WorldWideScience

Sample records for interactions neutrino astronomy

  1. Neutrino astronomy with supernova neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Lindner, Manfred; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2018-04-01

    Modern neutrino facilities will be able to detect a large number of neutrinos from the next Galactic supernova. We investigate the viability of the triangulation method to locate a core-collapse supernova by employing the neutrino arrival time differences at various detectors. We perform detailed numerical fits in order to determine the uncertainties of these time differences for the cases when the core collapses into a neutron star or a black hole. We provide a global picture by combining all the relevant current and future neutrino detectors. Our findings indicate that in the scenario of a neutron star formation, supernova can be located with precision of 1.5 and 3.5 degrees in declination and right ascension, respectively. For the black hole scenario, sub-degree precision can be reached.

  2. Neutrino masses and ordering via multimessenger astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langæble, Kasper; Meroni, Aurora; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We define the theoretical framework and deduce the conditions under which multi-messenger astronomy can provide useful information about neutrino masses and their ordering. The framework uses time differences between the arrival of neutrinos and the other light messenger, i.e. the graviton, emitted...

  3. Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamyshkov, Yuri [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States); Handler, Thomas [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The neutrino group of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville was involved from 05/01/2013 to 04/30/2015 in the neutrino physics research funded by DOE-HEP grant DE-SC0009861. Contributions were made to the Double Chooz nuclear reactor experiment in France where second detector was commissioned during this period and final series of measurements has been started. Although Double Chooz was smaller experimental effort than competitive Daya Bay and RENO experiments, its several advantages make it valuable for understanding of systematic errors in measurements of neutrino oscillations. Double Chooz was the first experiment among competing three that produced initial result for neutrino angle θ13 measurement, giving other experiments the chance to improve measured value statistically. Graduate student Ben Rybolt defended his PhD thesis on the results of Double Chooz experiment in 2015. UT group has fulfilled all the construction and analysis commitments to Double Chooz experiment, and has withdrawn from the collaboration by the end of the mentioned period to start another experiment. Larger effort of UT neutrino group during this period was devoted to the participation in another DOE-HEP project - NOvA experiment. The 14,000-ton "FAR" neutrino detector was commissioned in northern Minnesota in 2014 together with 300-ton "NEAR" detector located at Fermilab. Following that, the physics measurement program has started when Fermilab accelerator complex produced the high-intensity neutrino beam propagating through Earth to detector in MInnessota. UT group contributed to NOvA detector construction and developments in several aspects. Our Research Associate Athanasios Hatzikoutelis was managing (Level 3 manager) the construction of the Detector Control System. This work was successfully accomplished in time with the commissioning of the detectors. Group was involved in the development of the on-line software and study of the signatures of the cosmic ray backgrounds

  4. IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Halzen, F.; Klein, S.

    2010-06-04

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5,160 optical sensors are embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system, including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems and LEDs for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams.

  5. Neutrino astronomy: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of France. The full design calls for 12 strings, with 25 ... The NESTOR detector [19] is a proposed deep-sea neutrino telescope located off the coast of Greece. Planned deployment will be at a depth of 4000 meters. The full detector, with an effective area of 104 m2 for ...

  6. High energy neutrino astronomy and its telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.

    1995-01-01

    Doing astronomy with photons of energies in excess of a GeV has turned out to be extremely challenging. Efforts are underway to develop instruments that may push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than 10 -14 cm by mapping the sky using high energy neutrinos instead. Neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, will reach outside the galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology. The field is immersed in technology in the domains of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. To mind come the search for neutrino mass, cold dark matter (supersymmetric particles?) and the monopoles of the Standard Model. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building telescopes with effective area in excess of 0.01 km 2 , we show here that the natural scale of a high energy neutrino telescope is 1 km 2 . With several thousand optical modules and a price tag unlikely to exceed 100 million dollars, the scope of a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan

  7. Invited review article: IceCube: an instrument for neutrino astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halzen, Francis; Klein, Spencer R

    2010-08-01

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms 1 km(3) of deep and ultratransparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5160 optical sensors is embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems, and light-emitting diodes for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams. The outline of this review is as follows: neutrino astronomy and kilometer-scale detectors, high-energy neutrino telescopes: methodologies of neutrino detection, IceCube hardware, high-energy neutrino telescopes: beyond astronomy, and future projects.

  8. Interactive Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents guiding principles for developing interactive lessons for the World Wide Web. Describes "Amazing Space: Education Online from the Hubble Space Telescope", a program where students study spectacular Hubble Space Telescope images of stars and star-forming regions to learn about the life cycle of stars and the creation of atoms. (JRH)

  9. Neutrino astronomy: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Left: Schematic of νµ-induced muon track in detector. Right: Schematic of νe cascade. associated with the highest energy cosmic rays requires a detector with a cubic kilometer volume. Particles are detected via two interaction channels: tracks and cascades. Tracks come from muons produced in νµ charged-current ...

  10. Neutrino anomaly and -nucleus interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The neutrino anomaly generally refers to the solar neutrino problem where the observed number of electron type neutrinos from the sun was found to be considerably smaller than the number predicted in standard model of particle interactions [1–2]. Similar depletion of muon type neutrinos is found in the flux of atmospheric ...

  11. Neutrino interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    We examine tests of the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam (GWS) Standard Theory of Electroweak Interactions. The tests are model-independent in the sense that they are relations between experimental quantities that are direct consequences of the GWS theory, but they are independent of the detailed structure of the nucleus. Such relationships were anticipated by Weinberg. Neutrino reactions with nuclei are considered, focusing largely on charged-lepton production, and it is demonstrated that intermediate-energy neutrino reactions have a central and unique role to play in our understanding of semileptonic weak interactions. This point is illustrated by discussing a complete kinematic experiment on the nucleon. A discussion of what neutrino reactions could teach us about nuclear structure is also given

  12. IceCube and the Development of Neutrino Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: IceCube's discovery of a diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos started a new era of neutrino astronomy.I will review the multiple diffuse analyses in IceCube that observe the astrophysical flux, and what each can tell us. Then I will focus on spatial analyses that aim to identify the sources of such astrophysical neutrinos. This will be followed by an attempt to reconcile all results to draw a coherent picture that is the state of neutrino astronomy. Current plans for a streamlined real-time alert system to promote multi-messenger observations, and future plans of new detectors at the South Pole will be discussed to map out a path for discovering the first high-energy neutrino source in the sky.

  13. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY NEUTRINO ASTRONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. F. Grieder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We outline the current situation in ultrahigh energy (UHE cosmic ray physics, pointing out the remaining problems, in particular the puzzle concerning the origin of the primary radiation and the role of neutrino astronomy for locating the sources. Various methods for the detection of UHE neutrinos are briefly described and their merits compared. We give an account of the achievements of the existing optical Cherenkov neutrino telescopes, outline the possibility of using air fluorescence and particle properties of air showers to identify neutrino induced events, and discuss various pioneering experiments employing radio and acoustic detection of extremely energetic neutrinos. The next generation of space, ground and sea based neutrino telescopes now under construction or in the planning phase are listed.

  14. Neutrino anomaly and -nucleus interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutrino nucleus interactions in the domain of low and intermediate energy. The nuclear physics inputs mainly enter through two types of processes. These are: A. The nuclear processes responsible for neutrino production in the calculation of solar and atmospheric neutrino fluxes. B. The nuclear processes in which ...

  15. IceCube: Neutrinos and multimessenger astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Markus; Halzen, Francis

    2017-12-01

    We review the status of the IceCube observations of cosmic neutrinos. We investigate model-independent constraints on the properties of the sources where they originate. Specifically, we evaluate the multimessenger relations connecting neutrino, gamma ray, and cosmic ray observations and conclude that neutrinos are ubiquitous in the nonthermal universe, suggesting a more significant role than previously anticipated. Subsequently, we study the implications of IceCube's upper limits on the flux from individual point sources, as well as on the "guaranteed" flux of cosmogenic neutrinos.

  16. Neutrino astronomy current status, future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Karle, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    This review volume is motivated by the recent discovery of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube. The aim of the book is to bring together chapters on the status of current and future neutrino observatories with chapters on the implications and possible interpretations of the present observations and their upper limits. Each chapter is a mini-review of one aspect of the subject by leading experts. Taken together, the chapters constitute an up-to-date review of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and their potential sources.

  17. Interactions of neutrinos with matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, F.

    2017-07-01

    Neutrinos are elementary particles electrically neutral which belong to the family of leptons. As a consequence and in first approximation they only undergo weak processes. This gives them very special properties. They are ideal tools to study precisely the weak interactions, but there is a price to pay: neutrinos are characterized by extremely low probabilities of interactions, they easily penetrate large amount of matter without being stopped. Consequently, it is hard to perform neutrino physics measurements. In practice the difficulty is twofold: in order to accumulate enough statistics, experiments must rely on huge fluxes traversing huge detectors, the number of interactions being obviously proportional to these two factors. As a corollary, backgrounds are difficult to handle because they appear much more commonly than good events. Nevertheless, neutrino interactions have been detected from a variety of sources, both man-made and natural, from very low to very large energies. The aim of this review is to survey our current knowledge about interaction cross sections of neutrinos with matter across all pertinent energy scales. We will see that neutrino interactions cover a large range of processes: nuclear capture, inverse beta-decay, quasi-elastic scattering, resonant pion production, deep inelastic scattering and ultra-high energy interactions. All the gathered information will be used to study weak properties of matter but it will also allow to explore the properties of the neutrinos themselves. In particular, the known three different flavors of neutrinos have different behaviors inside matter and this will be relevant to give some precious understanding about their intrinsic parameters in particular their masses and mixings. As a second order process, neutrinos can undergo electromagnetic interactions. This will also be discussed. Although the corresponding phenomena are not yet experimentally proven by actual measurements, the theory is able to calculate

  18. High-Energy Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment studies neutrino interactions in iron at the highest available energies using the narrow-band neutrino beam N3 and the wide-band neutrino beam N1. The basis of the detector is a massive target-calorimeter in which the energy deposited by a neutrino (or antineutrino) is measured by electronic techniques and the momentum of outgoing muons is determined by magnetic deflection. The detector is constructed in the form of a 20 m long iron-cored toroidal magnet, composed of modules of length 70~cm and 90~cm, and of 3.75~m diameter. Drift chambers placed in between each module measure the trajectory of muons from the neutrino interactions. The modules are of three types. The first ten modules are constructed of 2.5~cm iron plates with 20~scintillator planes inserted between the plates. The next five modules are constructed of 5~cm plates with 15~planes of scintillator and the last six modules are constructed of 15~cm plates with 5~planes of scintillators. The total mass of the detector is @=~1400 tons...

  19. Coherent neutrino interactions in a dense medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiers, K.; Weiss, N.

    1997-01-01

    Motivated by the effect of matter on neutrino oscillations (the MSW effect) we study in more detail the propagation of neutrinos in a dense medium. The dispersion relation for massive neutrinos in a medium is known to have a minimum at nonzero momentum p∼G F ρ/√(2). We study in detail the origin and consequences of this dispersion relation for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos both in a toy model with only neutral currents and a single neutrino flavor and in a realistic open-quotes standard modelclose quotes with two neutrino flavors. We find that for a range of neutrino momenta near the minimum of the dispersion relation, Dirac neutrinos are trapped by their coherent interactions with the medium. This effect does not lead to the trapping of Majorana neutrinos. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Low energy neutrino astronomy with the large liquid-scintillation detector LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Feilitzsch, F von; Goeger-Neff, M; Hochmuth, K A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wurm, M

    2006-01-01

    The detection of low energy neutrinos in a large liquid scintillation detector may provide further important information on astrophysical processes as supernova physics, solar physics and elementary particle physics as well as geophysics. In this contribution, a new project for Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) consisting of a 50 kt scintillation detector is presented

  1. Neutrino Oscillations and Non-standard Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Farzan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Current neutrino experiments are measuring the neutrino mixing parameters with an unprecedented accuracy. The upcoming generation of neutrino experiments will be sensitive to subdominant neutrino oscillation effects that can in principle give information on the yet-unknown neutrino parameters: the Dirac CP-violating phase in the PMNS mixing matrix, the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of θ23. Determining the exact values of neutrino mass and mixing parameters is crucial to test various neutrino models and flavor symmetries that are designed to predict these neutrino parameters. In the first part of this review, we summarize the current status of the neutrino oscillation parameter determination. We consider the most recent data from all solar neutrino experiments and the atmospheric neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande, IceCube, and ANTARES. We also implement the data from the reactor neutrino experiments KamLAND, Daya Bay, RENO, and Double Chooz as well as the long baseline neutrino data from MINOS, T2K, and NOνA. If in addition to the standard interactions, neutrinos have subdominant yet-unknown Non-Standard Interactions (NSI with matter fields, extracting the values of these parameters will suffer from new degeneracies and ambiguities. We review such effects and formulate the conditions on the NSI parameters under which the precision measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters can be distorted. Like standard weak interactions, the non-standard interaction can be categorized into two groups: Charged Current (CC NSI and Neutral Current (NC NSI. Our focus will be mainly on neutral current NSI because it is possible to build a class of models that give rise to sizeable NC NSI with discernible effects on neutrino oscillation. These models are based on new U(1 gauge symmetry with a gauge boson of mass ≲ 10 MeV. The UV complete model should be of course electroweak invariant which in general implies that along with neutrinos, charged

  2. Charm and particle production in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazzoli, E.G.; Cnops, A.M.; Connolly, P.L.; Louttit, R.I.; Murtagh, M.J.; Palmer, R.B.; Samios, N.P.; Tso, T.T.; Williams, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    Ten strange particles were observed in a total of 1086 charged current neutrino interactions obtained in the analysis of 482,000 pictures taken in the Brookhaven Cryogenic 7' Bubble Chamber filled with hydrogen and deuterium. Details of these events are presented together with rates for associated strange particle and ΔS = +-ΔQ production in neutrino interactions

  3. Fuzzy dark matter and nonstandard neutrino interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Prass, Pascal; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2018-01-01

    We discuss novel ways in which neutrino oscillation experiments can probe dark matter. In particular, we focus on interactions between neutrinos and ultralight (“fuzzy”) dark matter particles with masses of order 10−22 eV. It has been shown previously that such dark matter candidates are phenomenologically successful and might help ameliorate the tension between predicted and observed small scale structures in the Universe. We argue that coherent forward scattering of neutrinos on fuzzy dark...

  4. Interaction between neutrinos and nonstationary plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, J.T. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal). Centro de Electrodinamica; Bingham, R. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Shukla, P.K. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Dawson, J.M. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Tsytovich, V.N. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Obshchej Fiziki

    1995-12-11

    The collective interaction of electron neutrinos with a dense non-stationary plasma is described here. This effect can eventually lead to a significant loss of energy of the neutrinos emitted by a collapsing supernova. The present effect is an exact analogue of the photon acceleration in an ionization front. We present here a classical estimate of the neutrino energy losses and also give the corresponding quantum description. (orig.).

  5. Quickly Creating Interactive Astronomy Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary…

  6. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ13 can be determined from abundance ratio of 7Li/11B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on 40Ar and 208Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-40Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-208Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  7. Fuzzy dark matter and nonstandard neutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Prass, Pascal; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2018-02-01

    We discuss novel ways in which neutrino oscillation experiments can probe dark matter. In particular, we focus on interactions between neutrinos and ultralight ("fuzzy") dark matter particles with masses of order 10-22 eV . It has been shown previously that such dark matter candidates are phenomenologically successful and might help ameliorate the tension between predicted and observed small scale structures in the Universe. We argue that coherent forward scattering of neutrinos on fuzzy dark matter particles can significantly alter neutrino oscillation probabilities. These effects could be observable in current and future experiments. We set new limits on fuzzy dark matter interacting with neutrinos using T2K and solar neutrino data, and we estimate the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments and of future long-baseline accelerator experiments. These results are based on detailed simulations in GLoBES. We allow the dark matter particle to be either a scalar or a vector boson. In the latter case, we find potentially interesting connections to models addressing various B physics anomalies.

  8. Interaction of electron neutrino with LSD detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Semenov, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of electron neutrino flux, originating in the rotational collapse mechanism on the first stage of Supernova burst, with the LSD detector components, such as 56Fe (a large amount of this metal is included in as shielding material) and liquid scintillator barNnH2n+2, is being investigated. Both charged and neutral channels of neutrino reaction with 12barN and 56Fe are considered. Experimental data, giving the possibility to extract information for nuclear matrix elements calculation are used. The number of signals, produced in LSD by the neutrino pulse of Supernova 1987A is determined. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. High-energy neutrino astronomy with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Botner, O

    2007-01-01

    The prospect of extending our knowledge of the astrophysical processes in the deepest recesses of the Universe by using neutrinos as astronomical messengers has been a dream of scientists since the 1960s. The vision is finally becoming a reality: the first-generation AMANDA neutrino telescope at the South Pole designed to search for high-energy neutrinos is being upgraded to a kilometre-scale array, IceCube, with a much improved sensitivity. A summary of the results from AMANDA, and the perspectives for IceCube are presented.

  10. Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy in the future large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, Michael; Feilitzsch, F V; Goeger-Neff, M; Lewke, T; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Todor, S; Winter, J

    2008-01-01

    The recent successes in neutrino physics prove that liquid-scintillator detectors allow to combine high energy resolution, efficient means of background reduction, and a large detection volume. In the planned LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) experiment, a target mass of 50 kt will enable the investigation of a variety of terrestrial and astrophysical neutrino sources. The high-statistics spectroscopy of geoneutrinos, solar neutrinos and supernova neutrinos will provide new insights in the heat production processes of Earth and Sun, and the workings of a gravitational collapse. The same measurements will as well investigate neutrino properties as oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy. A first spectroscopic measurement of the low flux of diffuse supernova neutrino background is within the sensitivity of the LENA detector. Finally, a life-time limit of several 1034 years can be set to the proton decay into proton and anti-neutrino, testing the predictions of SUSY theory. The present contribution includes a review of the scientific studies that were performed in the last years as well as a report on currently on-going R and D activities.

  11. Interactive Materials In The Teaching Of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Science. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, research locus of its Campus Januária; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. The results indicated that in the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; the rates of students prior knowledge in relation to astronomy was low; an evidence of meaningful learning of the concepts related to astronomy, and of viability of resource use involving digital technologies in the Teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options of future teachers and meet their training needs.

  12. Neutrino astronomy at Mont Blanc: from LSD to LSD-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, O.; Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we present the upgrading of the LSD experiment, presently running in the Mont Blanc Laboratory. The data recorded during the period when supernova 1987A exploded are analysed in detail. The research program of LSD-2, the same experiment as LSD but with an higher sensitivity to search for neutrino burst from collapsing stars, is also discussed

  13. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  14. RADIOACTIVE UHECR ASTRONOMY: CORRELATING GAMMA ANISOTROPY AND NEUTRINO PEV EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fargion

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available UHECR (Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays were expected to be protons, to fly straight and to suffer of a GZK (opacity on CMB radiation cut off. AUGER did suggest on 2007 that such early UHECR anisotropy was compatible with the foreseen Super-Galactic plane while both HIRES and AUGER confirmed such apparent GZK cut-off in the spectra. However the same AUGER composition since 2007 was favoring nuclei (and not nucleon. The recent absence of narrow angle clustering in UHECR maps, as it should be expected by protons, the missing of events along nearest Cluster Virgo, the wide spread (16° angle of UHECR along CenA are in disagreement with first proton–UHECR AUGER understanding. We claimed since 2008 a light nuclei role for CenA crowded area. On the other side the ICECUBE absence of TeVs neutrino clustering or anisotropy, its spectra steepening is favoring mostly a ruling atmospheric neutrino noise up to tens TeV. However recent two PeV neutrino event cannot easily coexist or being extrapolate with such atmospheric ruling scenario, nor with GZK (either nucleon or nuclei secondaries expected spectra. Finally tens TeV gamma anisotropy in ARGO–MILAGRO–ICECUBE maps may hardly be associated with known hadronic sources. Weimagine such anisotropy ruled by diffused gamma secondaries, being shine along UHECR bending and flight: radioactive light and heavy UHECR nuclei, while decaying in flight, may paint in the sky (by gamma, electrons and neutrinos their trajectories and bending, connecting UHECR spread events with TeV anisotropy, as well offering a very realistic source of first, otherwise puzzling, observed PeV neutrinos.

  15. Neutrino neutral current interactions in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, C.J.; Wehrberger, K.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of neutrino transport properties in matter is crucial for an understanding of the evolution of supernovae and of neutron star cooling. We investigate screening of neutrino scattering from a dense degenerate gas of electrons, protons and neutrons. We take into account correlations induced by the Coulomb interactions of the electrons and protons, and the strong interactions of the protons and neutrons. Nuclear matter is described by the σω model of quantum hadrodynamics. Results are presented for typical astrophysical scenarios. The differential cross section is strongly reduced at large energy transfer, where electrons dominate, and slightly reduced for small energy transfer, where nucleons dominate. At large densities, the nucleon effective mass is considerably lower than the free mass, and the region dominated by nucleons extends to larger energy transfer than for free nucleons. (orig.)

  16. How self-interactions can reconcile sterile neutrinos with cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas

    2014-01-24

    Short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have shown hints of the existence of additional sterile neutrinos in the eV mass range. However, such neutrinos seem incompatible with cosmology because they have too large of an impact on cosmic structure formation. Here we show that new interactions in the sterile neutrino sector can prevent their production in the early Universe and reconcile short baseline oscillation experiments with cosmology.

  17. SFP effect on Majorana type solar neutrinos in the presence of nonstandard neutrino interactionsSFP effect on Majorana type solar neutrinos in the presence of nonstandard neutrino interactions

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, DENİZ

    2015-01-01

    Assuming neutrinos are Majorana particles, neutrino oscillation is examined in the case of spin flavor precession (SFP) and nonstandard neutrino interaction (NSI). It is seen that the combined effect of them (SFP and NSI) is not ignorable for the neutrino oscillation.

  18. EFFECTS OF NEUTRINO ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS ON NEUTRINO INTERACTION WITH FINITE TEMPERATURE ELECTRON MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Sulaksono

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross-section of neutrino interaction with dense and warm electron gasses has been calculated by takinginto account the neutrino electromagnetic form factors. The significant effect of electromagnetic properties of neutrinocan be found if the neutrino dipole moment, μ ν , is ≥ 5.10-9 μB and neutrino charge radius, Rv, is ≥ 5.10-6 MeV-1. Theimportance of the retarded correction, detailed balance and Pauli blocking factors is shown and analyzed. Many-bodyeffects on the target matter which are included via random phase approximation (RPA correlation as well as photoneffective mass are also investigated.

  19. Non-Unitarity, sterile neutrinos, and Non-Standard neutrino Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Hernandez-Garcia, Josu; Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2017-04-27

    The simplest Standard Model extension to explain neutrino masses involves the addition of right-handed neutrinos. At some level, this extension will impact neutrino oscillation searches. In this work we explore the differences and similarities between the case in which these neutrinos are kinematically accessible (sterile neutrinos) or not (mixing matrix non-unitarity). We clarify apparent inconsistencies in the present literature when using different parametrizations to describe these effects and recast both limits in the popular neutrino non-standard interaction (NSI) formal- ism. We find that, in the limit in which sterile oscillations are averaged out at the near detector, their effects at the far detector coincide with non-unitarity at leading order, even in presence of a matter potential. We also summarize the present bounds existing in both limits and compare them with the expected sensitivities of near-future facilities taking the DUNE proposal as a bench- mark. We conclude that non-unitarity effects ...

  20. A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I.D.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction is made in the framework of Einstein-Dirac coupled equations. Two classes of solutions are obtained, corresponding to two specific physical situations. One cosmological model with expansion is obtained, having neutrinos as the only curvature source; their properties and the parameters which can to characterize the solution as a cosmological model are studied. The second class of solutions corresponds to a naive complete model of a spherically symmetric star emitting neutrinos: the inner region is suposed to be built up of a spherically symmetric distribution of a perfect fluid, bounded in space and which emitts neutrinos; the star matter is considered transparent for neutrinos; the outer region contains only neutrinos and gravitational field. The problem of neutrino compatibility with spherically symmetric gravitational fields is examined. The local conservation laws and the function conditions of the inner and outer solutions in the fluid surface are studied and permit to characterize two kinds of solutions. In one case, the solution describes the neutrino emission phase, with consequent configuration contraction, immediately before the fluid to be completely contained in the interior of the schwarzchild radius, when the neutrino emission and the star contraction stop. The other possibility can correspond to a quasi-stationary configuration, with neutrino emission, where the relativistic equation of radiative equilibrium permits to define the equivalent of 'Radiation pressure' for neutrinos, which acts in the same sense of the gravitational pressure. (L.C.) [pt

  1. Neutrino telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, J

    2002-01-01

    This review presents the scientific objectives and status of Neutrino Telescope Projects. The science program of these projects covers: neutrino astronomy, dark matter searches and measurements of neutrino oscillations. The two neutrino telescopes in operation: AMANDA and BAIKAL will be described together with the ANTARES neutrino telescope being built in the Mediterranean. (18 refs).

  2. The physics of collective neutrino-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Silva, L.O.; Dawson, J.M.; Bethe, H.; Bingham, R.; Stenflo, L.; Mendonca, J.T.; Dalhed, S.

    1999-01-01

    A review of recent work on collective neutrino-plasma interactions is presented. The basic physical concepts of this new field as well as some possible astrophysical problems where the physics of collective neutrino-plasma interactions can have a radical impact, are discussed. (author)

  3. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to ~3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the

  4. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  5. Neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.; Prakash, M.; Lattimer, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We study the charged and neutral current weak interaction rates relevant for the determination of neutrino opacities in dense matter found in supernovae and neutron stars. We establish an efficient formalism for calculating differential cross sections and mean free paths for interacting, asymmetric nuclear matter at arbitrary degeneracy. The formalism is valid for both charged and neutral current reactions. Strong interaction corrections are incorporated through the in-medium single particle energies at the relevant density and temperature. The effects of strong interactions on the weak interaction rates are investigated using both potential and effective field-theoretical models of matter. We investigate the relative importance of charged and neutral currents for different astrophysical situations, and also examine the influence of strangeness-bearing hyperons. Our findings show that the mean free paths are significantly altered by the effects of strong interactions and the multi-component nature of dense matter. The opacities are then discussed in the context of the evolution of the core of a protoneutron star. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  6. Curtailing the dark side in non-standard neutrino interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Denton, Peter B. [Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, The Niels Bohr Institute,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C. [Departament de Fisíca Quàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA),Pg. Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); Maltoni, Michele [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,Calle de Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Schwetz, Thomas [Institut für Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-04-20

    In presence of non-standard neutrino interactions the neutrino flavor evolution equation is affected by a degeneracy which leads to the so-called LMA-Dark solution. It requires a solar mixing angle in the second octant and implies an ambiguity in the neutrino mass ordering. Non-oscillation experiments are required to break this degeneracy. We perform a combined analysis of data from oscillation experiments with the neutrino scattering experiments CHARM and NuTeV. We find that the degeneracy can be lifted if the non-standard neutrino interactions take place with down quarks, but it remains for up quarks. However, CHARM and NuTeV constraints apply only if the new interactions take place through mediators not much lighter than the electroweak scale. For light mediators we consider the possibility to resolve the degeneracy by using data from future coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments. We find that, for an experiment using a stopped-pion neutrino source, the LMA-Dark degeneracy will either be resolved, or the presence of new interactions in the neutrino sector will be established with high significance.

  7. Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions : Obviating Oscillation Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Kirtiman; Niyogi, Saurabh

    2018-01-01

    Searching for non-standard neutrino interactions, as a means for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model, has one of the key goals of dedicated neutrino experiments, current and future. We demonstrate here that much of the parameter space accessible to such experiments is already ruled out by the RUN II data of the Large Hadron Collider experiment.

  8. Interactive Software Modules For Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, V.; Schimpf, S.; Morris, Mark; Malkan, M.

    1993-12-01

    In an attempt to offer undergraduate students a means of visualizing some of the dynamical, geometric, evolutionary, and spectroscopic concepts encountered in introductory astronomy and astrophysics courses, we have developed a set of ten computer modules intended for the interactive investigation of these concepts in a learning center equipped with a cluster of Unix-based workstations. We present six of these software teaching tools: Galaxy (rotation curves), Redshift (line identifications, redshift determinations, and construction of a Hubble plot), Sky View (an on-screen planetarium), Stellar Evolution (dynamic trajectories in the HR diagram), Parallax (parallactic ellipses and proper motions), and Binaries (eclipsing binary light curves and projected appearances evolving with orbital phase). Developed for the X-windows interface on Unix-based workstations for maximum portability and speed, these programs, along with accompanying instruction sets, guide the student through multi-step exercises designed to demonstrate these basic ideas. The sophistication of the modules is advanced enough to permit their utilization in courses spanning a wide range of skill levels with suitable tailoring of the instruction sets. The use of these modules in lower division astronomy and astrophysics classes at UCLA has been met with positive student reviews. We anticipate increased usage as the package of modules grows. Upon request, it can be exported to other institutions. The development of the package has been supported by NSF.

  9. Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Gouvea, AD; Pitts, K; Scholberg, K; Zeller, GP; Alonso, J; Bernstein, A; Bishai, M; Elliott, S; Heeger, K; Hoffman, K; Huber, P; Kaufman, LJ; Kayser, B; Link, J; Lunardini, C

    2016-01-01

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos. Report of the Community Summer Study 2013 (Snowmass) Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group

  10. Study of Neutrino Interactions in MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Richa [Panjab Univ., Chandigarh (India)

    2014-01-01

    MINOS stands for Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search. It is a long baseline experiment located in the USA and is composed of two detectors. The Near Detector is at Fermilab, 1 km from the source of neutrinos. The Far Detector is in Minnesota at a distance of 735 km from the source. Both detectors are steel scintillator tracking calorimeters. MINOS searches for neutrino oscillations by comparing the neutrino energy spectrum at the Far Detector with that obtained from a prediction based on the spectrum at the Near Detector. The primary aim of MINOS is to measure the atmospheric oscillation parameters Δm2 32 and θ23. CPT symmetry requires that these parameters should be same for neutrinos and antineutrinos. Di erences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations would be an indication of new physics beyond the neutrino-Standard Model ( SM). Additionally, violation of Lorentz or CPT symmetry could also give rise to oscillations di erent from that expected from the SM predictions, such as neutrino to antineutrino transitions.

  11. A detector for high-energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, M.; Knobloch, J.; Lacourt, A.; Laverriere, G.; May, J.; Paar, H.; Palazzi, P.; Ranjard, F.; Schilly, P.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Suter, H.; Wahl, H.; Williams, E.G.H.; Eisele, F.; Geweniger, G.; Kleinknecht, K.; Pollmann, O.; Spahn, G.; Willutzki, H.J.; Navarria, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of a large mass detector used at CERN to study high-energy neutrino interactions in iron. This detector combines magnetic spectrometry and hadron calorimetry techniques. (Auth.)

  12. First Measurement of Neutrino Interactions in MicroBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Pip [Fermilab

    2016-11-02

    The MicroBooNE detector has recently completed its first year of neutrino beam data-taking in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, having collected approximately half of its intended data ($3.4\\times10^{20}$ of $6.6\\times10^{20}$ protons on target). We present kinematic distributions of neutrino interactions observed from a small subset of this data (equivalent to $5\\times10^{19}$ protons on target), both as a first step towards a charged-current muon neutrino cross-section on argon, and as an exploration of the capabilities and operational challenges of large liquid argon time projection chambers as neutrino detectors. These distributions have been assessed using fully automated event selection and reconstruction.

  13. Study of electron and neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers-in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  14. Exclusive neutrino interactions on heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusevic, R.; Rein, D.

    1992-11-01

    A recent measurement of the inclusive cross section in the region of very low energy transfers using an iron-scintillator calorimeter is discussed in the context of the current theoretical models for neutrino-induced nonscaling processes.

  15. Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P.; Alonso, J.; Bernstein, A.; Bishai, M.; Elliott, S.; Heeger, K.; Hoffman, K.; Huber, P.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kayser, B.; Link, J.; Lunardini, C.

    2013-01-01

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  16. Writing an Electronic Astronomy Book with Interactive Curricular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristen L.; Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of tablets, the past few years have seen an increase in the demand for quality electronic textbooks. Unfortunately, most of the current offerings do not exploit the accessibility and interactivity that electronic books can deliver. In this poster, we discuss how we are merging our curriculum development projects (Physlets, Easy Java/JavaScript Simulations, and Open Source Physics) with the EPUB electronic book format to develop an interactive textbook for use in a one-semester introductory astronomy course. The book, Astronomy: An Interactive Introduction, combines the narrative, equations, and images of a traditional astronomy text with new JavaScript simulations.

  17. The EOS and neutrino interactions in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, M.; Reddy, S. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The deleptonization and cooling times of a newly born neutron star depend on the equation of state (EOS) and neutrino opacities in dense matter. Through model calculations we show that effects of Pauli blocking and many-body correlations due to strong interactions reduce both the neutral and charged current neutrino cross sections by large factors compared to the case in which these effects are ignored. (orig.)

  18. Sterile neutrinos with secret interactions — lasting friendship with cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Xiaoyong [International Center for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, 34014 (Italy); Dasgupta, Basudeb [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai, 400005 (India); Kopp, Joachim [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence and Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University, Staudingerweg 7, Mainz, 55128 (Germany)

    2015-10-06

    Sterile neutrinos with mass ≃1 eV and order 10% mixing with active neutrinos have been proposed as a solution to anomalies in neutrino oscillation data, but are tightly constrained by cosmological limits. It was recently shown that these constraints are avoided if sterile neutrinos couple to a new MeV-scale gauge boson A{sup ′}. However, even this scenario is restricted by structure formation constraints when A{sup ′}-mediated collisional processes lead to efficient active-to-sterile neutrino conversion after neutrinos have decoupled. In view of this, we reevaluate in this paper the viability of sterile neutrinos with such “secret” interactions. We carefully dissect their evolution in the early Universe, including the various production channels and the expected modifications to large scale structure formation. We argue that there are two regions in parameter space — one at very small A{sup ′} coupling, one at relatively large A{sup ′} coupling — where all constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large scale structure (LSS) data are satisfied. Interestingly, the large A{sup ′} coupling region is precisely the region that was previously shown to have potentially important consequences for the small scale structure of dark matter halos if the A{sup ′} boson couples also to the dark matter in the Universe.

  19. Principles and applications of a neutral current detector for neutrino physics and astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukier, A.; Stodolsky, L.

    1982-01-01

    We study neutrino detection through the elastic scattering of neutrinos on nuclei and identification of the recoil energy. The very large value of the cross section compared to previous methods indicates a detector would be relatively light and suggests the possibility of a true 'neutrino observatory'. We examine a realization in terms of the superconducting grain idea, which appears in principle feasible through extension and extrapolation of presently known techniques. Such a detector would permit determination of the neutrino spectrum and should be intensive to neutrino oscillations. Various applications and tests are discussed, including spallation sources, reactors, supernovas, solar and terrestrial neutrinos. A supernova would permit a simple determination of the number of neutrinos and their masses, while for solar neutrinos rates of thousands of S.N.U. are theoretically attainable. A preliminary estimate of the most difficult backgrounds is attempted. (orig.)

  20. Searching for resonances in the helicity conversion of neutrinos interacting with rotating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellandi, Jose; Guzzo, Marcelo M.; Hollanda, Pedro C. de

    1997-01-01

    Assuming that neutrino magnetic moment is not null, we study the evolution of neutrinos submitted to rotating magnetic fields, and the way the evolution can convert 'left' helicity neutrinos (actives) into 'right' neutrinos (sterile). We use the fact that the 'right' neutrinos do not interact with the detectors to obtain information on the neutrino magnetic field magnitude. For solving the neutrino evolution equation, the expansion method was combined with steady phase approximation used for the expansion integrals solution. The possibility of 'left' conversion into 'right' neutrinos has been calculated as function of the evolution matrix parameters (neutrino magnetic moment, electron density of the medium, the magnetic field magnitude and phase, etc). We made an attempt to obtain fitting of the parameter conditions in order to occur resonances in the neutrino transition probability, and therefore to obtain information on the limits for neutrino magnetic moments from the controlled beam helicity

  1. Neutrinos

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The Standard Model predicts that the neutrinos are massless and do not mix. Generic extensions of the Standard Model predict that neutrinos are massive (but, very likely, much lighter than the charged fermions). Therefore, the search for neutrino masses and mixing tests the Standard Model and probes new phasics. Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric, solar and, more recently, reactor neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. These results have significant theoretical implications: new physics exists, and its scale can be estimated. There are interesting lessons for grand unified theories and for models of extra dimensions. The measured neutrino flavor parameters pose a challenge to flavor models.

  2. Production of neutrinos and neutrino-like particles in proton-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dishaw, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    An experimental search was performed to look for the direct production of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles, i.e., neutral particles which interact weakly with hadrons, in proton-nucleus interactions at 400 GeV incident proton energy. Possible sources of such particles include the semi-leptonic decay of new heavy particles such as charm, and the direct production of a light neutral Higgs particle such as the axion. The production of these particles has been inferred in this experiment by energy nonconservation in the collision of a proton with an iron nucleus. The total visible energy of the interaction was measured using a sampling ionization calorimeter. After correcting for beam intensity effects and cutting the data to eliminate systematic effects in the measurement, the final resolution of the calorimeter was 3.51% and increased with decreasing incident beam energy with a square root dependence on the beam energy. Energy nonconservation in the data is manifest as a non-Gaussian distribution on the low side of the calorimeter measured energy. Model calculations yield the fraction of events expected in this non-Gaussian behavior for the various sources of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles. A maximum likelihood fit to the data with the theoretical fraction of events expected yields the 95% confidence level production cross section upper limit values. The upper limits for general production of neutrino-like particles for various parameterizations of the production cross section are presented. The following specific upper limits have been established: charm particle production -3 times the π 0 production cross section. 144 references

  3. Measurement of charm production in neutrino charged-current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Oenenguet, G [Cukurova University, Adana (Turkey); Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Oldeman, R G C [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gueler, M; Koese, U; Tolun, P [METU, Ankara (Turkey); Catanesi, M G; Muciaccia, M T [Universita di Bari and INFN, Bari (Italy); Winter, K [Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Van de Vyver, B; Vilain, P; Wilquet, G [Inter-University Institute for High Energies (ULB-VUB) Brussels (Belgium); Saitta, B [Universita di Cagliari and INFN, Cagliari (Italy); Di Capua, E [Universita di Ferrara and INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T, E-mail: dicapua@na.infn.it [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    The nuclear emulsion target of the CHORUS detector was exposed to the wide-band neutrino beam of the CERN SPS of 27 GeV average neutrino energy from 1994 to 1997. In total, about 100 000 charged-current (CC) neutrino interactions with at least one identified muon were located in the emulsion target and fully reconstructed, using newly developed automated scanning systems. Charmed particles were searched for by a program recognizing particle decays. The observation of the decay in nuclear emulsion makes it possible to select a sample with very low background and minimal kinematical bias. In all, 2013 CC interactions with a charmed hadron candidate in the final state were selected and confirmed through visual inspection. The charm production rate induced by neutrinos relative to the CC cross-section is measured to be {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}}N{yields}{mu}{sup -}CX)/{sigma}(CC)=(5.75 {+-} 0.32(stat){+-}0.30(syst))%. The charm production cross-section as a function of neutrino energy is also obtained. The results are in good agreement with previous measurements. The charm-quark hadronization produces the following charmed hadrons with relative fractions (in %): f{sub D{sup 0}}=43.7{+-}4.5, f{sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}=19.2{+-}4.2, f{sub D{sup +}}=25.3{+-}4.2 and f{sub D{sub s}{sup +}}=11.8{+-}4.7.

  4. Cosmic microwave background constraints on secret interactions among sterile neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forastieri, Francesco; Natoli, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via Giuseppe Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Lattanzi, Massimiliano [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Via Giuseppe Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Mangano, Gianpiero [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. Monte S.Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Mirizzi, Alessandro [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin,' Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Saviano, Ninetta, E-mail: francesco.forastieri@unife.it, E-mail: lattanzi@fe.infn.it, E-mail: mangano@na.infn.it, E-mail: alessandro.mirizzi@ba.infn.it, E-mail: natoli@fe.infn.it, E-mail: nsaviano@uni-mainz.de [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence and Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics, JohannesGutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Secret contact interactions among eV sterile neutrinos, mediated by a massive gauge boson X (with M {sub X} || M {sub W} ), and characterized by a gauge coupling g {sub X} , have been proposed as a mean to reconcile cosmological observations and short-baseline laboratory anomalies. We constrain this scenario using the latest Planck data on Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies, and measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We consistently include the effect of secret interactions on cosmological perturbations, namely the increased density and pressure fluctuations in the neutrino fluid, and still find a severe tension between the secret interaction framework and cosmology. In fact, taking into account neutrino scattering via secret interactions, we derive our own mass bound on sterile neutrinos and find (at 95 % CL) m {sub s} < 0.82 eV or m {sub s} < 0.29 eV from Planck alone or in combination with BAO, respectively. These limits confirm the discrepancy with the laboratory anomalies. Moreover, we constrain, in the limit of contact interaction, the effective strength G {sub X} to be < 2.8 (2.0) × 10{sup 10} G {sub F} from Planck (Planck+BAO). This result, together with the mass bound, strongly disfavours the region with M {sub X} ∼ 0.1 MeV and relatively large coupling g {sub X} {sub ∼} 10{sup −1}, previously indicated as a possible solution to the small scale dark matter problem.

  5. Multiplicity distributions in high-energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.W.; Coffin, C.T.; Diamond, R.N.; French, H.; Louis, W.; Roe, B.P.; Seidl, A.A.; Vander Velde, J.C.; Berge, J.P.; Bogert, D.V.; DiBianca, F.A.; Cundy, D.C.; Dunaitsev, A.; Efremenko, V.; Ermolov, P.; Fowler, W.; Hanft, R.; Harigel, G.; Huson, F.R.; Kolganov, V.; Mukhin, A.; Nezrick, F.A.; Rjabov, Y.; Scott, W.G.; Smart, W.

    1976-01-01

    Results from the Fermilab 15-ft bubble chamber on the charged-particle multiplicity distributions produced in high-energy charged-current neutrino-proton interactions are presented. Comparisons are made to γp, ep, μp, and inclusive pp scattering. The mean hadronic multiplicity appears to depend only on the mass of the excited hadronic state, independent of the mode of excitation. A fit to the neutrino data gives = (1.09+-0.38) +(1.09+-0.03)lnW 2

  6. AMANDA and IceCube: neutrino astronomy at the south pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    AMANDA is a high energy neutrino telescope consisting of 677 optical modules at 1.5-2 km depth in glacial ice at the south pole. We summarize AMANDA results for observation of atmospheric neutrinos and searches of extraterrestrial neutrinos from point sources, gamma ray bursts and diffuse fluxes. Upper limits at 90%CL are presented. The status of IceCube, the 1 km 3 successor to AMANDA currently under construction is presented

  7. AMANDA and IceCube: neutrino astronomy at the south pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taboada, Ignacio [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 19720 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    AMANDA is a high energy neutrino telescope consisting of 677 optical modules at 1.5-2 km depth in glacial ice at the south pole. We summarize AMANDA results for observation of atmospheric neutrinos and searches of extraterrestrial neutrinos from point sources, gamma ray bursts and diffuse fluxes. Upper limits at 90%CL are presented. The status of IceCube, the 1 km{sup 3} successor to AMANDA currently under construction is presented.

  8. Muon: electron final states in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    In an experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, eight candidates for the reaction ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything were observed with a total background of 1.5 +- 0.6 events. The detector consisted of twenty-eight optical spark chambers interspersed with liquid and plastic scintillation counters. Events classified as muon--electron final states are required to have a long noninteracting straight track in conjunction with an electromagnetic shower characteristic of that produced by an electron. Background processes are discussed and the total muon--electron background calculated. The ratio of the number of muon--electron candidates to all charged current events, corrected for the percentage of the neutrino beam above threshold is R' = [sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything)]/[sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + anything)] greater than or approximately 10 -2 . 47 references

  9. Colloquium: Multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ando, S.; Baret, B.; Bartos, I.; Bouhou, B.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Corsi, A.; Di Palma, I.; Dietz, A.; Donzaud, C.; Eichler, D.; Finley, C.; Guetta, D.; Halzen, F.; Jones, G.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kotake, K.; Kouchner, A.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Moscoso, L.; Papa, M.A.; Piran, T.; Pradier, T.; Romero, G.E.; Sutton, P.; Thrane, E.; van Elewyck, V.; Waxman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the astrophysical sources and violent phenomena observed in our Universe are potential emitters of gravitational waves and high-energy cosmic radiation, including photons, hadrons, and presumably also neutrinos. Both gravitational waves (GW) and high-energy neutrinos (HEN) are cosmic

  10. A Search for Single Photon Events in Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kullenberg, C.T.; Dimmery, D.; Tian, X.C.; Autiero, D.; Gninenko, S.; Rubbia, A.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kim, J.J.; Kirsanov, M.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Scott, A.M.; Seaton, M.B.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F.F.; Winton, L.J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B.D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for neutrino-induced events containing a single, exclusive photon using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS where the average energy of the neutrino flux is $\\simeq 25$ GeV. The search is motivated by an excess of electron-like events in the 200--475 MeV energy region as reported by the MiniBOONE experiment. In NOMAD, photons are identified via their conversion to $e^+e^-$ in an active target embedded in a magnetic field. The background to the single photon signal is dominated by the asymmetric decay of neutral pions produced either in a coherent neutrino-nucleus interaction, or in a neutrino-nucleon neutral current deep inelastic scattering, or in an interaction occurring outside the fiducial volume. All three backgrounds are determined {\\it in situ} using control data samples prior to opening the `signal-box'. In the signal region, we observe {\\bf 155} events with a predicted background of {\\bf 129.2 $\\pm$ 8.5 $\\pm$ 3.3}. We interpret this as null evidence for excess of single...

  11. Dark matter and exotic neutrino interactions in direct detection searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil); Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Suchita [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Gonzalez, Yuber F. Perez; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the effect of new physics interacting with both Dark Matter (DM) and neutrinos at DM direct detection experiments. Working within a simplified model formalism, we consider vector and scalar mediators to determine the scattering of DM as well as the modified scattering of solar neutrinos off nuclei. Using existing data from LUX as well as the expected sensitivity of LUX-ZEPLIN and DARWIN, we set limits on the couplings of the mediators to quarks, neutrinos and DM. Given the current limits, we also assess the true DM discovery potential of direct detection experiments under the presence of exotic neutrino interactions. In the case of a vector mediator, we show that the DM discovery reach of future experiments is affected for DM masses m{sub χ}≲10 GeV or DM scattering cross sections σ{sub χ}≲10{sup −47} cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, a scalar mediator will not affect the discovery reach appreciably.

  12. Optimization of the Orbiting Wide-Angle Light Collectors (OWL) Mission for Charged-Particle and Neutrino Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John F.; Mitchell, John W.; Streitmatter, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    OWL [1] uses the Earth's atmosphere as a vast calorimeter to fully enable the emerging field of charged-particle astronomy with high-statistics measurements of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) and a search for sources of UHE neutrinos and photons. Confirmation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) suppression above approx. 4 x 10(exp 19) eV suggests that most UHECR originate in astrophysical objects. Higher energy particles must come from sources within about 100 Mpc and are deflected by approx. 1 degree by predicted intergalactic/galactic magnetic fields. The Pierre Auger Array, Telescope Array and the future JEM-EUSO ISS mission will open charged-particle astronomy, but much greater exposure will be required to fully identify and measure the spectra of individual sources. OWL uses two large telescopes with 3 m optical apertures and 45 degree FOV in near-equatorial orbits. Simulations of a five-year OWL mission indicate approx. 10(exp 6) sq km/ sr/ yr of exposure with full aperture at approx. 6 x 10(exp 19) eV. Observations at different altitudes and spacecraft separations optimize sensitivity to UHECRs and neutrinos. OWL's stereo event reconstruction is nearly independent of track inclination and very tolerant of atmospheric conditions. An optional monocular mode gives increased reliability and can increase the instantaneous aperture. OWL can fully reconstruct horizontal and upward-moving showers and so has high sensitivity to UHE neutrinos. New capabilities in inflatable structures optics and silicon photomultipliers can greatly increase photon sensitivity, reducing the energy threshold for n detection or increasing viewed area using a higher orbit. Design trades between the original and optimized OWL missions and the enhanced science capabilities are described.

  13. nuPRISM: An experimental method to remove neutrino interaction uncertainties from oscillation experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Future experiments propose to make precision measurements of parameters in the neutrino mixing matrix, including the possibly maximal mixing angle theta23, and an unknown CP violating phase, dCP, by comparing the event rate of neutrinos and antineutrinos observed close to, and far from the source. Such "near to far" extrapolation methods must achieve percent level understanding of neutrino and antineutrino interactions; the interaction determines the relationship between experimental observables and the oscillation probability which depends on the neutrino energy. However, recent developments over the last 5 years demonstrate that our understanding of neutrino interactions is insufficient. In particular, the interaction of neutrinos on correlated pairs of nucleons has only recently been added to neutrino interaction simulations. The identification of these processes as interactions on a single nucleon results in a significant bias to the measured mixing parameters, even when near detector i...

  14. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  15. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang [Center for General Education, Chang Gung University,Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Fei-Fan [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, Feng-Shiuh [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Guey-Lin [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Tsung-Che [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Yi [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-22

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(ν-bar)+p→ν(ν-bar)+p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), ν-bar{sub e}+p→n+e{sup +}, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of ν-bar{sub e} flux with the ν-bar{sub x} (x=μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  16. The neutrino interaction analysis chain in OPERA

    CERN Document Server

    Rescigno, Regina

    Th e aim of the OPERA experiment i s to provide a “smoking - gun” proof of neutrino oscillation s, through the detecti on of the appearance signal of ν τ ’s in an initially pure ν μ beam. The beam is produced at CERN, 732 Km fa r from the detector , which is located underground in t he Gran Sasso laboratory. The evidence of the appearance signal will be provided by the detection of the daughter particles produced in the decay of the τ lepton. A micro - metric spatial resolution is needed in order to measure a nd study the topology of the ν τ - induced events. With this goal, n uclear emulsions, the highest resolution tracking detector , were chosen to be the core of the OPERA apparatus. The analysis of the large amount of nuclear emulsions used in the OPERA experime n t has required the development of a new generation of fast automatic mi croscopes , featuring a scanning speed more than one order of magnitude hi g h er than in p...

  17. Constraints on the Nonstandard Interaction in Propagation from Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Fukasawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the atmospheric neutrino experiments to the nonstandard flavor-dependent interaction in neutrino propagation is studied under the assumption that only nonvanishing components of the nonstandard matter effect are the electron and tau neutrino components ϵee, and ϵeτ, ϵττ and that the tau-tau component satisfies the constraint ϵττ=|ϵeτ|2/(1+ϵee which is suggested from the high energy behavior for atmospheric neutrino data. It is shown that the Super-Kamiokande (SK data for 4438 days constrains |tanβ|≡|ϵeτ/(1+ϵee|≲0.8 at 2.5σ (98.8% CL whereas the future Hyper-Kamiokande experiment for the same period of time as SK will constrain as |tanβ|≲0.3 at 2.5σCL from the energy rate analysis and the energy spectrum analysis will give even tighter bounds on ϵee and |ϵeτ|.

  18. Leptogenesis and composite heavy neutrinos with gauge-mediated interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondini, S. [University of Bern, AEC, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Panella, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    Leptogenesis is an appealing framework to account for the baryon asymmetry in the universe. To this end physics beyond the standard model is demanded. In this paper we investigate the possibility to attain successful leptogenesis with composite Majorana neutrinos. We work in the framework of effective gauge-mediated and contact interactions without any reference to an underlying compositeness theory. This approach is the one adopted in all current experimental searches for composite fermions at colliders. In the case of gauge-mediated interactions, we calculate the CP asymmetry in heavy composite neutrino decays. Both the direct and the indirect CP asymmetry are derived and resonant leptogenesis is also discussed. We find that the Sakharov conditions can be met and, for some choice of the parameters, the correct order of magnitude of the baryon asymmetry is reproduced. (orig.)

  19. Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinando Casolaro; Alberto Trotta

    2014-01-01

    The article made a survey on neutrinos and the role they have for the understanding of nature, both on a microscopic and cosmic scale.   I neutrini Nell'articolo viene fatta una rassegna sui  neutrini e sul ruolo che essi hanno per la comprensione della natura, sia su scala microscopica, che su scala cosmica. Parole Chiave: neutrino, massa, onde gravitazionali

  20. Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Casolaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article made a survey on neutrinos and the role they have for the understanding of nature, both on a microscopic and cosmic scale.   I neutrini Nell'articolo viene fatta una rassegna sui  neutrini e sul ruolo che essi hanno per la comprensione della natura, sia su scala microscopica, che su scala cosmica. Parole Chiave: neutrino, massa, onde gravitazionali

  1. Net charge of quark jets in (anti)neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teper, M.

    1981-01-01

    We analyse recent measurements of the net charges of quark jets in neutrino and antineutrino interactions. The data indicates that (i) the two quarks in the nucleon fragmentation region prefer to behave as a diquark rather than as a pair of independent quarks, and (ii) the struck quark does not appear to suffer any soft charge exchange of the kind that occurs when a valence quark inside a nucleon is slowed to x approx. O. (orig.)

  2. Measurements of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions at SciBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: nakajima@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-08-15

    The SciBooNE experiment (FNAL-E954) is designed to measure neutrino-nucleous cross sections in the one GeV region. Additionally, SciBooNE serves as a near detector for MiniBooNE by measuring the neutrino flux. In this paper, we describe two analyses using neutrino charged current interactions at SciBooNE: a neutrino spectrum measurement and a search for charged current coherent pion production.

  3. Single pion production in neutrino-nucleon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabirnezhad, M.

    2018-01-01

    This work represents an extension of the single pion production model proposed by Rein [Z. Phys. C 35, 43 (1987)., 10.1007/BF01561054]. The model consists of resonant pion production and nonresonant background contributions coming from three Born diagrams in the helicity basis. The new work includes lepton mass effects, and nonresonance interaction is described by five diagrams based on a nonlinear σ model. This work provides a full kinematic description of single pion production in the neutrino-nucleon interactions, including resonant and nonresonant interactions in the helicity basis, in order to study the interference effect.

  4. Strange particle production in neutrino-neon charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plano, R.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    Neutral strange particle production in charged-current muon-neutrino interactions have been studied in the Fermilab 15-foot neon bubble chamber. Associated production is expected to be the major source of strange particles in charged-current neutrino interactions. σ-neutral and ξ-minus production by neutrinos was observed. The dependence on various leptonic and hadronic variables is investigated. A fit to single and associated production of s, s/anti-s, and c quarks is described based on the number of single and double strange particle production events. Inclusive neutral strange particle decays (V 0 ) production rates as a fraction of all charged-current events are measured and are tabulated. The λ/K ratio is found to be 0.39 +- 0.04 and the fraction of λ coming from σ-neutral is (16 +- 5)%. The single- and double V 0 production was used to determine the associated s anti-s production rate and single s-quark production rate. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Gamma-rays, Neutrinos and Particle Astronomy as Messengers of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Spurio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of charged cosmic-rays, γ-rays and neutrino are possible thanks to the availability of new detectors coming from technologies typical of experimental particle physics. In conjunction with more traditional techniques used by astronomers, these multimessenger correlations of experimental data are opening a new scenario in astrophysics. We review some of the more recent developments in the field.

  6. Search for flavor-changing nonstandard neutrino interactions using ν_e appearance in MINOS

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, P.; Mualem, L.; Newman, H. B.; Orchanian, M.; Patterson, R. B.

    2017-01-01

    We report new constraints on flavor-changing nonstandard neutrino interactions from the MINOS long-baseline experiment using ν_e and ν_e appearance candidate events from predominantly ν_μ and ν_μ beams. We used a statistical selection algorithm to separate ν_e candidates from background events, enabling an analysis of the combined MINOS neutrino and antineutrino data. We observe no deviations from standard neutrino mixing, and thus place constraints on the nonstandard interaction matter effec...

  7. Phenomenological bounds in inclusive neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubrecht, G.J. II; Takasugi, E.; Tanaka, K.

    1975-01-01

    Using expressions for the ν and anti ν charged and neutral current cross sections and the electroproduction structure function integral and positivity requirements of the sea contribution, bounds are obtained on sigma/sup anti nu N//sigma/sup anti nu N/, and sigma/sup anti nu N//sub nc//sigma/sup nu N//sub nc/ in the standard model. A bound on sigma/sup anti nu N//sigma/sup nu N/ obtained with a V + A term anti p'γ/sub mu/(1-γ 5 )n is used to rule out such a term in the current. A plot of sigma/sup nu N//sub nc/ + sigma/sup anti nu N//sub nc/ versus sigma/sup nu N//sub nc/ - sigma/sup anti nu N//sub nc/ is introduced to analyze the neutral current data. A new relation connecting moments of y and y distributions at a particular point y/sub n/ for ν and anti ν interactions is found. The results do not depend on the neutral current data

  8. Engaging the Public Through an Interactive Astronomy Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristen

    2018-01-01

    The growing technology sector of the U.S. economy in an increasingly complex world has made it more important than ever for students to gather information, think critically, and solve problems. These skills are often acquired through the study of STEM disciplines. In an effort to inspire students and the public in the Charlotte, NC area to take an interest in STEM related fields, the Physics Department at Davidson College has recently developed an interactive astronomy community engagement program. This program is comprised of off-campus events that bring STEM programming to K-12 children, on-campus public star parties, and a day-long astronomy fair called Davidson Space Day. This presentation will illustrate the implementation of each of these components of our outreach program, present an evaluation of their success, and describe future goals and lessons learned thus far. This outreach program was made possible through funding from the NC Space Grant Consortium.

  9. Search for Quarks in High-Energy Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a search for quarks produced in high energy neutrino interactions. Neutrino interactions take place in a 23-ton lead target and are recognized by one or more particles crossing the counter hodoscopes S1 and S2, together with the absence of an incident particle signal in the initial veto counter V^0.\\\\ \\\\ The lead is viewed by an avalanche chamber to measure the specific ionization of the charged secondaries produced in the @n-interaction with high accuracy even in jet-like events, and by a series of two pairs of scintillation counter hodoscopes (ST1, ST2). The latter provide time-of-flight measurements and dE/dx measurements for a fast analysis in low and medium multiplicity provide a trigger for the chamber. \\\\ \\\\ In order to reduce the background in the set-up, very low momentum particles (mainly due to cascading processes in the target) are separated out by a @= 1 T.m magnet placed behind the target. \\\\ \\\\ A system of wire chambers W1, W2, which register both the position and the time at...

  10. Sensitivities to charged-current nonstandard neutrino interactions at DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Pouya; Khan, Amir N.; Wang, W.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the effects of charged-current (CC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSIs) at the source and at the detector in the simulated data for the planned Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). We neglect the neutral-current NSIs at the propagation because several solutions have already been proposed for resolving the degeneracies posed by neutral-current NSIs but no solutions exist for the degeneracies due to the CC NSIs. We study the effects of CC NSIs on the simultaneous measurements of {θ }23 and {δ }{{CP}} in DUNE. The analysis reveals that 3σ C.L. measurement of the correct octant of {θ }23 in the standard mixing scenario is spoiled if the CC NSIs are taken into account. Likewise, the CC NSIs can deteriorate the uncertainty of the {δ }{{CP}} measurement by a factor of two relative to that in the standard oscillation scenario. We also show that the source and the detector CC NSIs can induce a significant amount of fake CP-violation and the CP-conserving case can be excluded by more than 80% C.L. in the presence of fake CP-violation. We further find DUNE’s potential for constraining the relevant CC NSI parameters from the single parameter fits for both neutrino and antineutrino appearance and disappearance channels at both the near and far detectors. The results show that there could be improvements in the current bounds by at least one order of magnitude at DUNE’s near and far detectors, except for a few parameters which remain weaker at the far detector.

  11. Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Seymour, Percy

    2014-01-01

    With a blend of exciting discoveries and important scientific theory,this innovative and readable introduction to astronomy is ideal for anyone who wants to understand what we know about the universe,and how we know it. Each chapter starts with details of a method of jow astronomers over time have observed the world,and then uses this as a springboard to discuss what they discovered,and why this was important for understanding the cosmos. The last chapter,on dark matter,also focuses on the many things we don''t yet know - reminding us that astronomy,like this book,is a fast-paced and fascinati

  12. Multilepton production in neutrino interactions and proton-antiproton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    In part I, we consider the class of events containing 2 or 3 leptons in (anti-neutrino deep inelastic scattering and in proton-antiproton collisions. Understanding the characteristics and rate of production of this type of event has often proven to be a theoretical challenge. We show that a cluster model involving associated-charm production not only accounts for certain dimuon events, but also affords better agreement with experiment regarding trimuons produced in neutrino interactions. We also investigate correlations between D-meson and dimuon production in p anti p collisions in the context of a cluster model which includes the possibility of finding b anti b pairs in jets. Part II consists of a study of radiation zeros in the reaction p anti p → l anti nuγX. It has been proposed that the radiation zero phenomenon could be observed in processes involving the radiative decay of the W-boson. These processes might allow the measurement of the W anomalous magnetic moment. We calculate the effect on this measurement of the decay width and the non-zero transverse momentum of the W. We find that although the radiation zero is filled in to some extent, it might still be possible to estimate the magnetic moment of the W in future experiments

  13. Single pi-zero production in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapin, T.J.

    1976-01-01

    Production of single π 0 particles in neutrino reactions was studied in an experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The neutral current reactions, νn → νnπ 0 and νp → νpπ 0 , and the charged current reaction, νn → μ - pπ 0 , were investigated. The neutrino detector was made up of optical spark chambers and liquid and solid scintillation counters. The π 0 is detected by observing showers from its decay into two gamma rays. Muons are distinguished from other particles by their long range without interaction. Time of flight measurement is used to discriminate against neutron background. The neutral and charged current events are discussed, and the ratio of neutral current events to charged current events is found to be 0.149 +- 0.048 after corrections. Nuclear charge exchange corrections to this result because the detector contains complex nuclei are also discussed. Kinematic distributions for the final state particles and the pπ 0 mass distribution are given

  14. Electroweak interactions between intense neutrino beams and dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tsintsadze, N L; Stenflo, L

    2003-01-01

    The electroweak coupling between intense neutrino beams and strongly degenerate relativistic dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas is considered. The intense neutrino bursts interact with the plasma due to the weak Fermi interaction force, and their dynamics is governed by a kinetic equation. Our objective here is to develop a kinetic equation for a degenerate neutrino gas and to use that equation to derive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations. The latter are useful for studying numerous collective processes when intense neutrino beams nonlinearly interact with degenerate, relativistic, dense electron-positron plasmas in strong magnetic fields. If the number densities of the plasma particles are of the order of 10 sup 3 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 , the pair plasma becomes ultra-relativistic, which strongly affects the potential energy of the weak Fermi interaction. The new system of equations allows several neutrino-driven streaming instabilities involving new types of relativistic Alfven-like waves, The re...

  15. Exploring Nucleon Spin Structure Through Neutrino Neutral-Current Interactions in MicroBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, Katherine [New Mexico State U.

    2017-02-02

    The net contribution of the strange quark spins to the proton spin, $\\Delta s$, can be determined from neutral current elastic neutrino-proton interactions at low momentum transfer combined with data from electron-proton scattering. The probability of neutrino-proton interactions depends in part on the axial form factor, which represents the spin structure of the proton and can be separated into its quark flavor contributions. Low momentum transfer neutrino neutral current interactions can be measured in MicroBooNE, a high-resolution liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) in its first year of running in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab. The signal for these interactions in MicroBooNE is a single short proton track. We present our work on the automated reconstruction and classification of proton tracks in LArTPCs, an important step in the determination of neutrino- nucleon cross sections and the measurement of $\\Delta s$.

  16. Non-standard interactions and neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, S. V.

    2018-02-01

    We perform an analysis of the influence of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) on neutrino signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun. Taking experimentally allowed benchmark values for the matter NSI parameters we show that the evolution of such neutrinos with energies at GeV scale can be considerably modified. We simulate propagation of neutrinos from the Sun to the Earth for realistic dark matter annihilation channels and find that the matter NSI can result in at most 30% correction to the signal rate of muon track events at neutrino telescopes. Still present experimental bounds on dark matter from these searches are robust in the presence of NSI within considerable part of their allowed parameter space. At the same time electron neutrino flux from dark matter annihilation in the Sun can be changed by a factor of few.

  17. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role

  18. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  19. Nuclear correlation effects in neutrino-oxygen interactions and the atmospheric neutrino anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Marteau, J; Ericson, M

    2000-01-01

    The apparent anomaly in the ratio of muon to electron atmospheric neutrinos has been confirmed by several collaborations using different detection techniques. Together with the asymmetry in the zenithal distributions of the nu submu events in Super-Kamiokande, it gives a strong support to the neutrino oscillation hypothesis and to the existence of a non vanishing mass for the neutrinos. In this work we are interested by the role of nuclear physics in the neutrino-oxygen reactions, which are relevant for the Cerenkov detectors. We point out that multi-nucleon excitations of np-nh type and nuclear correlations could modify an experimental analysis a la Super-Kamiokande because they lead to a substantial enhancement of the number of 1 Cerenkov ring retained events.

  20. Neutrino-Oxygen interactions role of nuclear physics in the atmospheric neutrino anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Marteau, J; Ericson, M

    2001-01-01

    The apparent anomaly in the ratio of muon to electron atmospheric neutrinos first observed by Kamiokande and IMB has been confirmed by Super-Kamiokande and Soudan-2. The experimental analysis, including the asymmetry in the zenithal distributions of the $ \\mu-\\mathrm{type} $ events in Super-Kamiokande gives a strong support to the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to solve the anomaly. In this work we are interested by the role of nuclear physics in the neutrino-oxygen reactions used to detect the atmospheric neutrinos. We point out that multi-nucleon excitations of np-nh type and that nuclear correlations could modify an experimental analysis à la Super-Kamiokande because they lead to a substantial enhancement of the number of 1 \\v{C}erenkov ring retained events.

  1. Study of atmospheric neutrino interactions with the Frejus detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    We present an analysis of the neutrino event sample recorded in the Frejus experiment. This sample which corresponds to the 1.56 kt.y final sensitivity of the experiment is compared to the predictions of a Monte Carlo neutrino simulation program. It is based on a recent calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux at the Frejus latitude which takes into account muon polarization effects. The comparison is performed on the distributions of the visible energy, the zenith angle and the neutrino flavor. Good agreement is obtained between the data and the simulation within statistics

  2. Production of neutrinos and neutrino-like particles in proton-nucleus interactions. [400 GeV, cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dishaw, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    An experimental search was performed to look for the direct production of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles, i.e., neutral particles which interact weakly with hadrons, in proton-nucleus interactions at 400 GeV incident proton energy. Possible sources of such particles include the semi-leptonic decay of new heavy particles such as charm, and the direct production of a light neutral Higgs particle such as the axion. The production of these particles has been inferred in this experiment by energy nonconservation in the collision of a proton with an iron nucleus. The total visible energy of the interaction was measured using a sampling ionization calorimeter. After correcting for beam intensity effects and cutting the data to eliminate systematic effects in the measurement, the final resolution of the calorimeter was 3.51% and increased with decreasing incident beam energy with a square root dependence on the beam energy. Energy nonconservation in the data is manifest as a non-Gaussian distribution on the low side of the calorimeter measured energy. Model calculations yield the fraction of events expected in this non-Gaussian behavior for the various sources of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles. A maximum likelihood fit to the data with the theoretical fraction of events expected yields the 95% confidence level production cross section upper limit values. The upper limits for general production of neutrino-like particles for various parameterizations of the production cross section are presented. The following specific upper limits have been established: charm particle production < 670 ..mu..barns, supersymmetric particle production carrying an additional quantum number R < 33 ..mu..barns (mass of 1 GeV), 8 ..mu..barns (mass of 3 GeV); axion production < 10/sup -3/ times the ..pi../sup 0/ production cross section. 144 references.

  3. A Measurement of the Charged-Current Interaction Cross Section of the Tau Neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, Emily O' Connor [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-02-01

    The Fermilab experiment E872 (DONUT) was designed to make the first observation of the tau neutrino charged-current interaction. Using a hybrid emulsion-spectrometer detector, the tau lepton was identified by its single-prong or trident decay. Six interactions were observed, of which five were in the deep inelastic scattering region. These five interaction were used to measure the charged-current cross section of the tau neutrino. To minimize uncertainties, the tau neutrino cross section was measured relative to the electron neutrino cross section. The result σντNconstνeNconst = 0.77 ± 0.39 is consistent with 1.0, which is predicted by lepton universality. The tau neutrino cross section was also measured for 115 GeV neutrinos, which was the average energy of the interacted tau neutrinos. The result σντNexp = 45 ± 21 x 10-38 cm2 is consistent with the standard model prediction calculated in this thesis, σντNSM = 48 ± 5 x 10-38 cm2.

  4. Elementary particle interactions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out.

  5. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

  6. Proceedings of the Magellan workshop 2016. Connecting neutrino physics and astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmke, Stefan K.G.

    2016-09-01

    The first Magellan Workshop took place on March 17th/18th 2016 in Hamburg. Several topics have been addressed during the workshop with the most time devoted to discussing stellar physics and supernova physics. These two key topics are especially interesting to two distinct fields, each with their own approach, method and extensive knowledge gained: astrophysics and neutrino physics. It is thus no surprise that the workshop specifically intended to bring these groups together was met with a certain enthusiasm. 46 scientists working in institutions across seven countries attended a total of 30 plenary talks during their two days in Hamburg. The workshop then concluded with a trip to the Hamburg Observatory, for a tour of the historic and current telescopes. While supernovae of course were a primary topic, the presentations included many different, exciting projects. From relatively nearby objects in studies on geoneutrinos originating from inside the Earth via stellar physics in the refinement of solar models to high energy sources across multiple galaxies to the Cosmic Microwave Background. One particular subject in the field of supernova physics for the past 29 years of course has been the supernova SN1987A, mostly owed to its fairly recent explosion enabling modern science to observe the event from Earth and space alike both in electromagnetic waves and particle fluxes. These measurements have greatly expanded our knowledge as many theories on both the internal mechanisms as well as the evolution of supernovae could consequently be tested. Not only does the Large Magellanic Cloud which hosts this famous supernova serve as a pictoral symbol for our workshop, it is also now commonly named after Ferdinand Magellan, who was not the first to discover this prominent feature in the southern night sky, but the one whose journey brought news of its marvellous sight to European astronomers back in the late 16th century. Furthermore this journey shall serve as a symbol of

  7. Proceedings of the Magellan workshop 2016. Connecting neutrino physics and astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmke, Stefan K.G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Hamburger Sternwarte; Meyer, Mikko [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Vanhoefer, Laura (ed.) [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The first Magellan Workshop took place on March 17th/18th 2016 in Hamburg. Several topics have been addressed during the workshop with the most time devoted to discussing stellar physics and supernova physics. These two key topics are especially interesting to two distinct fields, each with their own approach, method and extensive knowledge gained: astrophysics and neutrino physics. It is thus no surprise that the workshop specifically intended to bring these groups together was met with a certain enthusiasm. 46 scientists working in institutions across seven countries attended a total of 30 plenary talks during their two days in Hamburg. The workshop then concluded with a trip to the Hamburg Observatory, for a tour of the historic and current telescopes. While supernovae of course were a primary topic, the presentations included many different, exciting projects. From relatively nearby objects in studies on geoneutrinos originating from inside the Earth via stellar physics in the refinement of solar models to high energy sources across multiple galaxies to the Cosmic Microwave Background. One particular subject in the field of supernova physics for the past 29 years of course has been the supernova SN1987A, mostly owed to its fairly recent explosion enabling modern science to observe the event from Earth and space alike both in electromagnetic waves and particle fluxes. These measurements have greatly expanded our knowledge as many theories on both the internal mechanisms as well as the evolution of supernovae could consequently be tested. Not only does the Large Magellanic Cloud which hosts this famous supernova serve as a pictoral symbol for our workshop, it is also now commonly named after Ferdinand Magellan, who was not the first to discover this prominent feature in the southern night sky, but the one whose journey brought news of its marvellous sight to European astronomers back in the late 16th century. Furthermore this journey shall serve as a symbol of

  8. Sterile neutrinos with non-standard secret interactions imprints on Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forastieri, F.

    2017-05-01

    Short baseline laboratory (SBL) anomalies have shown preference for light sterile neutrinos with eV masses. These particles, if confirmed, would be produced in the early universe and would add their contribution to the relativistic energy density basically increasing the effective number of extra relativistic species (N eff). It has been shown that when the matter potential produced by the sterile interactions becomes smaller than the vacuum oscillation frequency, sterile neutrinos are plentifully produced by the scattering effects in the sterile neutrino sector. This behaviour, however, leads to a ΔN eff ≃ 1 which is in tension at 3 - 5σ with the actual constraints given by the latest Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) observations. In order to avoid the thermalization of eV sterile neutrinos in the early universe, secret interactions between the sterile and active sectors mediated by a massive vector boson (MX 0.1 eV and seem to save the cosmological constraints coming from big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and mass bounds. In this framework, cosmological observations represent a powerful tool to constrain neutrino physics complementary to laboratory experiments. In particular, observations of the CMB have the potential to constrain the properties of relic neutrinos, as well as of additional light relic particles in the universe. In this work we present the effects of the strength of the interaction on the neutrino fluid perturbations and on the CMB anisotropies power spectrum.

  9. Atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos above 1 TeV interacting in IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Larsen, D. T.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Rees, I.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory was designed primarily to search for high-energy (TeV-PeV) neutrinos produced in distant astrophysical objects. A search for ≳100 TeV neutrinos interacting inside the instrumented volume has recently provided evidence for an isotropic flux of such neutrinos. At lower energies, IceCube collects large numbers of neutrinos from the weak decays of mesons in cosmic-ray air showers. Here we present the results of a search for neutrino interactions inside IceCube's instrumented volume between 1 TeV and 1 PeV in 641 days of data taken from 2010-2012, lowering the energy threshold for neutrinos from the southern sky below 10 TeV for the first time, far below the threshold of the previous high-energy analysis. Astrophysical neutrinos remain the dominant component in the southern sky down to a deposited energy of 10 TeV. From these data we derive new constraints on the diffuse astrophysical neutrino spectrum, Φν=2.0 6-0.3+0.4×1 0-18(Eν/1 05 GeV ) -2.46 ±0.12GeV-1 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 for 25 TeV neutrinos from charmed-meson decay in the atmosphere, 1.52 times the benchmark theoretical prediction used in previous IceCube results at 90% confidence.

  10. Development of the radio astronomical method of cosmic particle detection for extremely high-energy cosmic ray physics and neutrino astronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheleznykh Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposal to use ground based radio telescopes for detection of Askaryan radio pulses from particle cascades arising when extremely high-energy (EHE > 1020 eV cosmic rays (including neutrinos interact with the lunar regolith of multi gigaton mass was made at the end of 1980s in the framework of the Russian (Soviet DUMAND Program. During more than a quarter of century a number of lunar experiments were carried out mainly in the 1–3 GHz frequency range using the large radio telescopes of Australia, USA, Russia and other countries but these experiments only put upper limits to the EHE cosmic rays fluxes. For this reason, it would be of great interest to search for nanosecond radio pulses from the Moon in a wider interval of frequencies (including lower ones of 100–350 MHz with larger radio detectors – for example the giant radio telescope SKA (Square Kilometer Array which is constructed in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. In this paper possibilities are discussed to use one of the most sensitive meter-wavelength (∼ 110 MHz Large Phased Array (LPA of 187 × 384 m2 and the wide field of view meter-wavelength array of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory as prototypes of low frequency radio detectors for lunar experiments. The new scheme for fast simulation of ultrahigh and extremely high-energy cascades in dense media is also suggested. This scheme will be used later for calculations of radio emission of cascades in the lunar regolith with energies up to 1020 eV and higher in the wide frequency band of 0.1− a few GHz.

  11. Charged Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelrieß, M.

    2013-04-15

    High-energy neutrino astronomy has grown up, with IceCube as one of its main experiments having sufficient sensitivity to test “vanilla” models of astrophysical neutrinos. I review predictions of neutrino fluxes as well as the status of cosmic ray physics. I comment also briefly on an improvement of the Fermi-LAT limit for cosmogenic neutrinos and on the two neutrino events presented by IceCube first at “Neutrino 2012”.

  12. Scientific Visualization of Radio Astronomy Data using Gesture Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulumba, P.; Gain, J.; Marais, P.; Woudt, P.

    2015-09-01

    MeerKAT in South Africa (Meer = More Karoo Array Telescope) will require software to help visualize, interpret and interact with multidimensional data. While visualization of multi-dimensional data is a well explored topic, little work has been published on the design of intuitive interfaces to such systems. More specifically, the use of non-traditional interfaces (such as motion tracking and multi-touch) has not been widely investigated within the context of visualizing astronomy data. We hypothesize that a natural user interface would allow for easier data exploration which would in turn lead to certain kinds of visualizations (volumetric, multidimensional). To this end, we have developed a multi-platform scientific visualization system for FITS spectral data cubes using VTK (Visualization Toolkit) and a natural user interface to explore the interaction between a gesture input device and multidimensional data space. Our system supports visual transformations (translation, rotation and scaling) as well as sub-volume extraction and arbitrary slicing of 3D volumetric data. These tasks were implemented across three prototypes aimed at exploring different interaction strategies: standard (mouse/keyboard) interaction, volumetric gesture tracking (Leap Motion controller) and multi-touch interaction (multi-touch monitor). A Heuristic Evaluation revealed that the volumetric gesture tracking prototype shows great promise for interfacing with the depth component (z-axis) of 3D volumetric space across multiple transformations. However, this is limited by users needing to remember the required gestures. In comparison, the touch-based gesture navigation is typically more familiar to users as these gestures were engineered from standard multi-touch actions. Future work will address a complete usability test to evaluate and compare the different interaction modalities against the different visualization tasks.

  13. Development and utilization of ``Plate Changer'' system for neutrino interaction locations in OPERA emulsion target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, J.; Ariga, A.; Ban, T.; Hoshino, K.; Ishiguro, K.; Kazuyama, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Koshiba, S.; Matsuo, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Morishima, K.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Natsume, M.; Narita, K.; Omura, T.; Oya, M.; Sato, O.; Shiraishi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kose, U.; Yoon, C. S.; Zama, Y.

    2013-02-01

    In the OPERA experiment, so-called Scan Back method is used to locate neutrino interaction vertices in the emulsion target named ECC (Emulsion Cloud Chamber). In Scan Back method, tracks detected in the most downstream emulsion plate in ECCs are followed to upstream plate by plate until it reaches to the interaction points. In order to treat a number of neutrino interactions recorded in OPERA, dedicated systems called Plate Changer has been developed and utilized to neutrino event location in Japan. The details of the system have been described in this report. Until the end of November 2012, 6223 Scan Back trials have been performed using this system, and strongly contributed to the detection of tau neutrino appearance.

  14. Development and utilization of ''Plate Changer'' system for neutrino interaction locations in OPERA emulsion target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, J; Ariga, A; Ban, T; Hoshino, K; Ishiguro, K; Kazuyama, M; Kitagawa, N; Komatsu, M; Koshiba, S; Miyanishi, K; Morishima, K; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakano, T; Nakatsuka, Y; Natsume, M; Narita, K; Kim, S H; Kodama, K; Matsuo, T

    2013-01-01

    In the OPERA experiment, so-called Scan Back method is used to locate neutrino interaction vertices in the emulsion target named ECC (Emulsion Cloud Chamber). In Scan Back method, tracks detected in the most downstream emulsion plate in ECCs are followed to upstream plate by plate until it reaches to the interaction points. In order to treat a number of neutrino interactions recorded in OPERA, dedicated systems called Plate Changer has been developed and utilized to neutrino event location in Japan. The details of the system have been described in this report. Until the end of November 2012, 6223 Scan Back trials have been performed using this system, and strongly contributed to the detection of tau neutrino appearance.

  15. Study of electron and neutrino interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  16. Measurement of Reconstructed Charged Particle Multiplicities of Neutrino Interactions in MicroBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Aleena [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Here, we compare the observed charged particle multiplicity distributions in the MicroBooNE liquid argon time projection chamber from neutrino interactions in a restricted final state phase space to predictions of this distribution from several GENIE models. The measurement uses a data sample consisting of neutrino interactions with a final state muon candidate fully contained within the MicroBooNE detector. These data were collected in 2015-2016 with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), which has an average neutrino energy of 800 MeV, using an exposure corresponding to 5e19 protons-on-target. The analysis employs fully automatic event selection and charged particle track reconstruction and uses a data-driven technique to determine the contribution to each multiplicity bin from neutrino interactions and cosmic-induced backgrounds. The restricted phase space employed makes the measurement most sensitive to the higher-energy charged particles expected from primary neutrino-argon collisions and less sensitive to lower energy protons expected to be produced in final state interactions of collision products with the target argon nucleus.

  17. Impact of Nonstandard Interactions on Sterile-Neutrino Searches at IceCube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, Danny

    2016-08-12

    We analyze the energy and zenith angle distributions of the latest two-year IceCube data set of upward-going atmospheric neutrinos to constrain sterile neutrinos at the eV scale in the 3+1 scenario. We find that the parameters favored by a combination of LSND and MiniBooNE data are excluded at more than the 99% C.L. We explore the impact of nonstandard matter interactions on this exclusion and find that the exclusion holds for nonstandard interactions (NSIs) that are within the stringent model-dependent bounds set by collider and neutrino scattering experiments. However, for large NSI parameters subject only to model-independent bounds from neutrino oscillation experiments, the LSND and MiniBooNE data are consistent with IceCube.

  18. Non-standard neutrino interactions in the mu–tau sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mocioiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss neutrino mass hierarchy implications arising from the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions on muon rates in high statistics atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments like IceCube DeepCore. We concentrate on the mu–tau sector, which is presently the least constrained. It is shown that the magnitude of the effects depends strongly on the sign of the ϵμτ parameter describing this non-standard interaction. A simple analytic model is used to understand the parameter space where differences between the two signs are maximized. We discuss how this effect is partially degenerate with changing the neutrino mass hierarchy, as well as how this degeneracy could be lifted.

  19. A $B_4C$-silicon target for the detection of neutrino interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Barichello, G; Daniels, D C; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumps, Ludwig; Ellis, M; Ferrère, D; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Hernando, J A; Huta, W; Jiménez, J M; Kokkonen, J; Kuznetsov, V E; Linssen, Lucie; Long, J; Lisowski, B; Lupi, A; Runólfsson, O; Schmidt, B; Soler, F J P; Steele, D; Stipcevic, M; Veltri, M; Voillat, D

    1998-01-01

    This note describes the construction of a target for neutrino interactions composed of passive boron carbide plates interleaved with silicon microstrip detectors. The target contains four layers of passive material with a total mass of 45 kg and 600 single--sided silicon microstrip detectors with a total surface of 1.14 m$^2$ distributed over five layers. It is installed in the NOMAD spectrometer at the CERN SPS neutrino beam. During the 1997 run about 8000 \

  20. Improving LMA predictions with non-standard interactions: neutrino decay in solar matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Das, C R

    2010-01-01

    It has been known for some time that the well established LMA solution to the observed solar neutrino deficit fails to predict a flat energy spectrum for SuperKamiokande as opposed to what the data indicates. It also leads to a Chlorine rate which appears to be too high as compared to the data. We investigate the possible solution to these inconsistencies with non standard neutrino interactions, assuming that they come as extra contributions to the $\

  1. Observation of neutrino-like interactions without muon or electron in the Gargamelle neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hasert, F J; Krenz, W; Conta, C; Von Krogh, J; Lanske, D; Morfín, J G; Schultze, K; Weerts, H; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Sacton, J; Van Doninck, W K; Vilain, P; Camerini, U; Cundy, Donald C; Baldi, R; Danilchenko, I A; Fry, W F; Haidt, Dieter; Natali, S; Musset, P; Osculati, B; Palmer, R; Pattison, John Bryan M; Perkins, Donald Hill; Pullia, Antonio; Rousset, A; Venus, W A; Wachsmuth, H W; Brisson, V; Degrange, B; Haguenauer, Maurice; Kluberg, L; Nguyen-Khac, U; Petiau, P; Belotti, E; Bonetti, S; Cavalli, D; Fiorini, Ettore; Rollier, M; Aubert, Bernard; Blum, D; Chounet, L M; Heusse, P; Lagarrigue, A; Lutz, A M; Orkin-Lecourtois, A; Vialle, J P; Bullock, F W; Esten, M J; Jones, T W; McKenzie, J; Michette, A G; Myatt, Gerald; Scott, W G

    1974-01-01

    Events induced by neutral particles and producing only hadrons, but no muon or electron, have been observed in the heavy liquid bubble chamber Gargamelle exposed to neutrino ( nu ) and antineutrino ( nu ) beams at CERN. A study of the various sources which could give rise to such events reveals that less than 20% could be attributed to neutrons or K/sub L/ degrees . The events behave as expected if they arise from neutral current processes induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos. The ratio of the number of these events to the number of corresponding events with charged lepton is 0.22+or-0.04 for nu and 0.43+or-0.12 for nu . (8 refs).

  2. Detection of ultra-high energy neutrino interactions in ice: comparing radio detector array designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtol, Keith; Vieregg, Abigail

    2014-08-01

    Ultra-high energy (UHE, >10^18 eV) cosmic neutrinos are anticipated to reveal the most distant, most obscured, and highest energy particle accelerators in the Universe. An almost guaranteed flux of UHE neutrinos is predicted from the interactions of UHE cosmic rays with the cosmic microwave background, and additional contributions may arise from prompt emission at individual sources. The spectrum of UHE neutrinos is a sensitive discriminator of the cosmological evolution of UHE sources, as well as the composition of UHE cosmic rays. At the same time, UHE neutrinos will enable several tests of fundamental physics, including constraints on the neutrino-nucleon interaction cross section at center-of-momentum energies ~100 TeV, and searches for Lorentz invariance violation.Theoretical predictions and subsequent laboratory measurements of coherent radio emission from showers initiated by neutrino interactions in dielectric media (e.g., ice, sand, salt, lunar regolith) have motivated diverse experimental approaches involving "detectors" comprised of up to millions of cubic kilometers of natural materials. I will discuss simulation results comparing the expected performance of several proposed radio detector array designs with subterranean, ice shelf, and above ice configurations.

  3. Non-standard interactions with high-energy atmospheric neutrinos at IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvado, Jordi; Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Rius, Nuria [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València,Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2017-01-31

    Non-standard interactions in the propagation of neutrinos in matter can lead to significant deviations from expectations within the standard neutrino oscillation framework and atmospheric neutrino detectors have been considered to set constraints. However, most previous works have focused on relatively low-energy atmospheric neutrino data. Here, we consider the one-year high-energy through-going muon data in IceCube, which has been already used to search for light sterile neutrinos, to constrain new interactions in the μτ-sector. In our analysis we include several systematic uncertainties on both, the atmospheric neutrino flux and on the detector properties, which are accounted for via nuisance parameters. After considering different primary cosmic-ray spectra and hadronic interaction models, we improve over previous analysis by using the latest data and showing that systematics currently affect very little the bound on the off-diagonal ε{sub μτ}, with the 90% credible interval given by −6.0×10{sup −3}<ε{sub μτ}<5.4×10{sup −3}, comparable to previous results. In addition, we also estimate the expected sensitivity after 10 years of collected data in IceCube and study the precision at which non-standard parameters could be determined for the case of ε{sub μτ} near its current bound.

  4. Reevaluation of the prospect of observing neutrinos from Galactic sources in the light of recent results in gamma ray and neutrino astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Halzen, F.; Niro, V.

    2014-05-01

    In light of the recent IceCube evidence for a flux of extraterrestrial neutrinos, we revisit the prospect of observing the sources of the Galactic cosmic rays. In particular, we update the predictions for the neutrino flux expected from sources in the nearby star-forming region in Cygnus taking into account recent TeV gamma ray measurements of their spectra. We consider the three Milagro sources: MGRO J2019+37, MGRO J1908+06 and MGRO J2031+41 and calculate the attainable confidence level limits and statistical significance as a function of the exposure time. We also evaluate the prospects for a kilometer-scale detector in the Mediterranean to observe and elucidate the origin of the cosmic neutrino flux measured by IceCube.

  5. Testing Lorentz Invariance with Neutrinos from Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Sean T.; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that a very small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (UV), which suppresses photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with cosmic background radiation (CBR) photons, can produce a spectrum of cosmic rays that is consistent with that currently observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and HiRes experiments. Here, we calculate the corresponding flux of high energy neutrinos generated by the propagation of UHECR protons through the CBR in the presence of UV. We find that UV produces a reduction in the flux of the highest energy neutrinos and a reduction in the energy of the peak of the neutrino energy flux spectrum, both depending on the strength of the UV. Thus, observations of the UHE neutrino spectrum provide a clear test for the existence and amount of UV at the highest energies. We further discuss the ability of current and future proposed detectors make such observations.

  6. Gif 2011 school: neutrinos. Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.; Pascoli, S.; Piquemal, F.; Lasserre, T.; Kouchner, A.; Patzak, T.; Lavignac, S.; Volpe, C.; Katsanevas, S.; Rubbia, A.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the lectures given at the GIF 2011 school. These lectures were pedagogical reviews of both theoretical and experimental physics around neutrino issues. There were 9 lectures: 1) the origin of the neutrino mass, 2) theory of neutrino oscillations, 3) measuring the neutrino mass, 4) measuring the neutrino oscillation parameters, 5) astronomy with neutrinos, 6) the story of the neutrino, 7) neutrinos beyond the standard model, 8) neutrinos in cosmology, and 9) future experiments. (A.C.)

  7. Unveiling secret interactions among sterile neutrinos with big-bang nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviano, Ninetta; Pisanti, Ofelia; Mangano, Gianpiero; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Short-baseline neutrino anomalies suggest the existence of low-mass [m ˜O (1 ) eV ] sterile neutrinos νs. These would be efficiently produced in the early universe by oscillations with active neutrino species, leading to a thermal population of the sterile states seemingly incompatible with cosmological observations. In order to relieve this tension it has been recently speculated that new "secret" interactions among sterile neutrinos, mediated by a massive gauge boson X (with MX≪MW), can inhibit or suppress the sterile neutrino thermalization, due to the production of a large matter potential term. We note however, that they also generate strong collisional terms in the sterile neutrino sector that induce an efficient sterile neutrino production after a resonance in matter is encountered, increasing their contribution to the number of relativistic particle species Neff. Moreover, for values of the parameters of the νs-νs interaction for which the resonance takes place at temperature T ≲few MeV , significant distortions are produced in the electron (anti)neutrino spectra, altering the abundance of light element in big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Using the present determination of 4He and deuterium primordial abundances we determine the BBN constraints on the model parameters. We find that 2H/H density ratio exclude much of the parameter space if one assumes a baryon density at the best fit value of Planck experiment, ΩBh2=0.02207 , while bounds become weaker for a higher ΩBh2=0.02261 , the 95% C.L. upper bound of Planck. Due to the large error on its experimental determination, the helium mass fraction Yp gives no significant bounds.

  8. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltoni, Michele [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Smirnov, Alexei Yu. [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. The theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters θ{sub 12} and Δm{sup 2}{sub 21} have been measured; θ{sub 13} extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3ν paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos. (orig.)

  9. PeV neutrinos from intergalactic interactions of cosmic rays emitted by active galactic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashev, Oleg E; Kusenko, Alexander; Essey, Warren

    2013-07-26

    The observed very high energy spectra of distant blazars are well described by secondary gamma rays produced in line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays with background photons. In the absence of the cosmic-ray contribution, one would not expect to observe very hard spectra from distant sources, but the cosmic ray interactions generate very high energy gamma rays relatively close to the observer, and they are not attenuated significantly. The same interactions of cosmic rays are expected to produce a flux of neutrinos with energies peaked around 1 PeV. We show that the diffuse isotropic neutrino background from many distant sources can be consistent with the neutrino events recently detected by the IceCube experiment. We also find that the flux from any individual nearby source is insufficient to account for these events. The narrow spectrum around 1 PeV implies that some active galactic nuclei can accelerate protons to EeV energies.

  10. A study of the interactions of high energy electron-neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieuwenhuis, C.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes an analysis of electron-neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions with nuclei. The data were collected with the calorimeter of the Amsterdam-CERN-Hamburg-Moscow-Rome (CHARM) group in a beam dump exposure to 400 GeV/c protons from the CERN SPS in 1982. The predictions of the Standard Model for the quantities measured in this experiment are given. The results of the analysis of events without a primary muon in the final state are given in the form of an experimental y-distribution. The measured quantities are compared with the predictions of the theory and the measurements of other experiments. Presented are the cross-section ratio of neutral current and charged current electron-neutrino induced events, the prompt CC ν(anti ν) e interaction rate, the prompt (ν e +anti ν e )/(ν μ +anti ν μ ) flux ratio, the energy dependence of the prompt electron-neutrino flux and a measurement of the DantiD cross-section times semileptonic branching ratio based on prompt electron-neutrino interactions. (Auth.)

  11. Search for atmospheric muon-neutrinos and extraterrestric neutrino point sources in the 1997 AMANDA-B10 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biron von Curland, A.

    2002-07-01

    The young field of high energy neutrino astronomy can be motivated by the search for the origin of the charged cosmic rays. Large astrophysical objects like AGNs or supernova remnants are candidates to accelerate hadrons which then can interact to eventually produce high energy neutrinos. Neutrino-induced muons can be detected via their emission of Cherenkov light in large neutrino telescopes like AMANDA. More than 10 9 atmospheric muon events and approximately 5000 atmospheric neutrino events were registered by AMANDA-B10 in 1997. Out of these, 223 atmospheric neutrino candidate events have been extracted. This data set contains approximately 15 background events. It allows to confirm the expected sensitivity of the detector towards neutrino events. A second set containing 369 (approximately 270 atmospheric neutrino events and 100 atmospheric muon events) was used to search for extraterrestrial neutrino point sources. Neither a binned search, nor a cluster search, nor a search for preselected sources gave indications for the existence of a strong neutrino point source. Based on this result, flux limits were derived. Assuming E ν -2 spectra, typical flux limits for selected sources of the order of Φ μ limit ∝ 10 -14 cm -2 s -1 for muons and Φ ν limit ∝ 10 -7 cm -2 s -1 for neutrinos have been obtained. (orig.)

  12. An experimental estimation of diffraction dissociation phenomena after neutrino interactions with photoemulsion nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, O K

    2002-01-01

    Diffraction dissociation (DD) in muon neutrino interaction with nuclei is experimentally estimated for the first time. Using 207 events of neutrino-nucleus interactions on Ag and Br nuclei photoemulsion [the E-564 experiment (FNAL) database], 11 events were found which satisfy the DD criteria x sub B 2. The ratio of the DD cross section to the total deep inelastic cross section for charged currents was found to be equal to 0.29 +- 0.09. 4 events from the total 11 events turned out to be coherent DD candidates

  13. Muon/electron separation for atmospheric neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, W.W.M.; Barr, G.D.; Brooks, C.B.; Cobb, J.H.; Kirby-Gallagher, L.M.; Giles, R.H.; Giller, G.L.; Perkins, D.H.; Shield, P.D.; Thomson, M.A.; West, N.; Alner, G.J.; Cockerill, D.J.A.; Edwards, V.W.; Garcia-Garcia, C.; Litchfield, P.J.; Pearce, G.F.; Woods, C.A.; Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.S.; Balka, L.; Barrett, W.L.; Dawson, J.W.; Fields, T.; Goodman, M.C.; Hill, N.; Jankowski, D.J.; Lopez, F.; May, E.N.; Price, L.E.; Schlereth, J.; Thron, J.L.; Uretsky, J.L.; Courant, H.; Dahlin, B.; Demuth, D.; Gray, R.; Heppelmann, S.; Johns, K.; Joyce, T.; Kasahara, S.; Longley, N.; Lowe, M.; Marshak, M.L.; Miller, W.H.; Minor, C.; Peterson, E.A.; Roback, D.; Rosen, D.; Ruddick, K.; Schmid, D.; Shupe, M.; Villaume, G.; Weems, L.; Werkema, S.J.

    1991-08-01

    A study has been made of the ability of the Soudan 2 nucleon decay detector to distinguish between showering and non-showering particles, utilizing several different pattern recognition techniques. This work has direct application in the determination of the ν μ /ν e ratio for atmospheric neutrino induced events. The results of the application of these techniques to Monte Carlo data and to calibration data from the ISIS test beam are presented

  14. ANTARES: An Undersea Neutrino telescope

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ANTARES (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and ${Abyss}$ environmental RESearch) deep-sea neutrino telescope is designed to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origin. Neutrinos are unique probes of the high energy universe; being neutral they are not deflected by magnetic fields and interacting weakly they can readily escape from the densest regions of the universe. Potential sources of neutrino are galactic (e.g supernova remnants, micro-quasars) and extra-galactic (e.g active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursters). Annihilation of dark matter particles in the Sun or Galactic Centre is another well motivated potential source of extra terrestrial neutrinos. The ANTARES detector is located 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France) at a depth of 2475m in the Mediterranean Sea. Being located in the Northern hemisphere it studies the Southern sky and in particular has the Galactic Centre in its field of view. Since 2006, the detector has operated continuously in a partial configuration. The detector was compl...

  15. Calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux using the interaction model calibrated with atmospheric muon data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.; Sanuki, T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the 'modified DPMJET-III' model explained in the previous paper [T. Sanuki et al., preceding Article, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043005 (2007).], we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux. The calculation scheme is almost the same as HKKM04 [M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 70, 043008 (2004).], but the usage of the 'virtual detector' is improved to reduce the error due to it. Then we study the uncertainty of the calculated atmospheric neutrino flux summarizing the uncertainties of individual components of the simulation. The uncertainty of K-production in the interaction model is estimated using other interaction models: FLUKA'97 and FRITIOF 7.02, and modifying them so that they also reproduce the atmospheric muon flux data correctly. The uncertainties of the flux ratio and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrino flux are also studied

  16. Influence of hadronic interaction models on characteristics of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, A. D.; Kochanov, A. A.; Sinegovskaya, T. S.; Sinegovsky, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    The high-energy conventional atmospheric neutrino fluxes are calculated with the hadronic interaction models: Kimel & Mokhov, QGSJET II-03(04), SIBYL 2.1(2.3), EPOS LHC. The influence of hadron-nuclear interactions on the neutrino flux ratios, v/\\bar{v},({v}μ +{\\bar{v}}μ )/({v}e+{\\bar{v}}e), is studied. A comparison of calculations obtained with use of two different approaches, {\\mathscr{Z}}(E,h) -functions method and the Matrix Cascade Equations (MCEQ), demonstrates close agreement in whole but some of partial contrubutions. The comparison of calculated muon neutrino spectra with the latest experimental data justifies reliability of performed computation which describes correctly the atmospheric neutrino production. The calculation made with the model EPOS LHC, combined with Hillas & Gaisser parametrization of the cosmic ray spectrum, is in close agreement with the best fit of IceCube for energy spetrum of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the energy range 1–500 TeV.

  17. Estimate of the theoretical uncertainty of the cross sections for nucleon knockout in neutral-current neutrino-oxygen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Barbaro, M. B.; Benhar, Omar; Caballero Carretero, Juan Antonio; Giusti, Carlotta; González Jiménez, Raúl; Megías Vázquez, Guillermo Daniel; Meucci, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Free nucleons propagating in water are known to produce γ rays, which form a background to the searches for diffuse supernova neutrinos and sterile neutrinos carried out with Cherenkov detectors. As a consequence, the process of nucleon knockout induced by neutral-current quasielastic interactions of atmospheric (anti)neutrinos with oxygen needs to be under control at the quantitative level in the background simulations of ongoing and future experiments. In this paper, we provide a quantitati...

  18. Pages in the development of neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontekorvo, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    The review is quite sub ective in character, and is in no way complete. It is not a chapter of history of particle physics. It is a collection of a few short stories related to neutrino physics. Two of these, about Pauli and Fermi, touch on subjects already covered by a number of physicists, including the author, in connection with the recent neutrino's fiftieth ''birthday''. The story about Majorana's work on Majorana's fermions, which is following, has been covered much less extensively. There follow a few recollections, very personal indeed, related to the experimental and theoretical work of the author in proposing and developing radiochemical methods of detecting neutrinos, among which the Cl-Ar method, in suggesting the possible existence of neutrino oscillations with their implications for solar neutrino astronomy, in establishing the notion of weak processes and important properties of muons and in proposing a new type of weak interaction investigations - high energy neutrino experiments... In order to decrease somehow the extremely subjective character of the paper, the author has presented a list of important events in neutrino physics (until 1980) and also a list of large existing neutrino facilities

  19. Neutral currents and electromagnetic renormalization of the vector part of neutrino weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1976-01-01

    The nature and properties of neutral currents in neutrino processes at high energies are theoretically investigated. Electronagmetic renormalization of diagonal ((νsub(e)e(νsub(e)e) and (νsub(μ)μ)(νsub(μ)μ)) and nondiagonal ((νsub(e)μ)(νsub(e)μ)) interactions is discussed in terms of the universal fourfermion interaction model. It is shown that electromagnetic renormalization of neutrino vector interaction caused an effective appearance of vector neutral currents with photon isotopic structure. The value for the interaction constant is unambigously defined by the ratio of the total cross-section for electron-positron annihilation into muonic pairs. Interaction (renormalization) constants for neutral currents are pointed out to be always smaller than interaction constants for charge currents

  20. Multi-messenger aspects of cosmic neutrinos*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlers Markus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent observation of TeV-PeV neutrinos by IceCube has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. I will discuss this signal in the context of multi-messenger astronomy. For extragalactic source scenarios the corresponding gamma-rays are not directly observable due to interactions with the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma ray background observed by Fermi-LAT contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. Interestingly, the overall energy density of the observed neutrino flux is close to a theoretical limit for neutrino production in ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources and might indicate a common origin of these phenomena. I will highlight various multi-messenger relations and their implications for neutrino source scenarios.

  1. Characteristics of muon-electron events produced in high energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mapp, J.; Camerini, U.; Cline, D.; Fry, W.; Krogh, J. von; Loveless, R.J.; March, R.; Reeder, D.D.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Bosetti, P.; Lynch, G.; Marriner, J.; Solmitz, F.; Stevenson, M.K.; Cence, R.; Harris, F.; Parker, S.I.; Peters, M.; Peterson, V.; Stenger, V.

    The observation of neutrino interactions producing a muon, and an electron among the final state particles implies production of at least one new particle with a new quantum number. Evidence is presented for such events produced using the Fermilab 15' hydrogen-neon bubble chamber and the external muon identifier

  2. Atmospheric and astrophysical Neutrinos above 1 TeV Interacting in IceCube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Ackermann, M.; Adam, J.

    2015-01-01

    . At lower energies, IceCube collects large numbers of neutrinos from the weak decays of mesons in cosmic-ray air showers. Here we present the results of a search for neutrino interactions inside IceCube’s instrumented volume between 1 TeV and 1 PeV in 641 days of data taken from 2010–2012, lowering...... the energy threshold for neutrinos from the southern sky below 10 TeV for the first time, far below the threshold of the previous high-energy analysis. Astrophysical neutrinos remain the dominant component in the southern sky down to a deposited energy of 10 TeV. From these data we derive new constraints...... on the diffuse astrophysical neutrino spectrum, Φ_ν=2.06_{-0.3}^{+0.4}×10-18(E_ν/10^5  GeV)^{-2.46±0.12} GeV^-1 cm^−2 sr^−1 s^-1 for 25  TeVtimes the benchmark theoretical prediction...

  3. Prospect for Charge Current Neutrino Interactions Measurements at the CERN-PS

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, P; Bozza, C; Brugnera, R; Cecchetti, A; Cecchini, S; Collazuol, G; Corso, F Dal; De Mitri, I; De Serio, M; Di Ferdinando, D; Dore, U; Dusini, S; Fabbricatore, P; Fanin, C; Fini, R A; Garfagnini, A; Grella, G; Kose, U; Laveder, M; Loverre, P; Longhin, A; Marsella, G; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Mezzetto, M; Muciaccia, M T; Orecchini, D; Paoloni, A; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pozzato, M; Rescigno, R; Rosa, G; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Stanco, L; Stellacci, S; Surdo, A; Tenti, M; Togo, V

    2011-01-01

    Tensions in several phenomenological models grew with experimental results on neutrino/antineutrino oscillations at Short-Baseline (SBL) and with the recent, carefully recomputed, antineutrino fluxes from nuclear reactors. At a refurbished SBL CERN-PS facility an experiment aimed to address the open issues has been proposed [1], based on the technology of imaging in ultra-pure cryogenic Liquid Argon (LAr). Motivated by this scenario a detailed study of the physics case was performed. We tackled specific physics models and we optimized the neutrino beam through a full simulation. Experimental aspects not fully covered by the LAr detection, i.e. the measurements of the lepton charge on event-by-event basis and their energy over a wide range, were also investigated. Indeed the muon leptons from Charged Current (CC) (anti-)neutrino interactions play an important role in disentangling different phenomenological scenarios provided their charge state is determined. Also, the study of muon appearance/disappearance ca...

  4. Constraining secret gauge interactions of neutrinos by meson decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, P.; Farzan, Y.

    2017-05-01

    Secret coupling of neutrinos to a new light vector boson, Z', with a mass smaller than 100 MeV is motivated within a myriad of scenarios which are designed to explain various anomalies in particle physics and cosmology. Due to the longitudinal component of the massive vector boson, the rates of three-body decay of charged mesons (M ) such as the pion and the kaon to the light lepton plus neutrino and Z' (M →l ν Z') are enhanced by a factor of (mM/mZ')2. On the other hand, the standard two body decay M →l ν is suppressed by a factor of (ml/mM)2 due to chirality. We show that in the case of (M →e ν Z'), the enhancement of mM4/me2mZ'2˜1 0 8-1 010 relative to two-body decay (M →e ν ) enables us to probe very small values of gauge coupling for νe. The strongest bound comes from the RK≡Br (K →e +ν )/Br (K →μ +ν ) measurement in the NA62 experiment. The bound can be significantly improved by customized searches for signals of three-body charged meson decay into the positron plus missing energy in the NA62 and/or PIENU data.

  5. Measurement of the multi-TeV neutrino interaction cross-section with IceCube using Earth absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Hill, G. C.; Kyriacou, A.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B. J.; Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bradascio, F.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stasik, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; van Santen, J.; Adams, J.; Bagherpour, H.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O'Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C.; Ahlers, M.; Koskinen, D. J.; Larson, M. J.; Medici, M.; Rameez, M.; Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J. P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Zoll, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Bron, S.; Carver, T.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T.; Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M.; Andeen, K.; Plum, M.; Anderson, T.; Delaunay, J. J.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Pankova, D. V.; Teši´, G.; Turley, C. F.; Weiss, M. J.; Argüelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Moulai, M.; Auffenberg, J.; Brenzke, M.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Kalaczynski, P.; Koschinsky, J. P.; Leuermann, M.; Rädel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Sälzer, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Waza, A.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Bai, X.; Barron, J. P.; Giang, W.; Grant, D.; Kopper, C.; Moore, R. W.; Nowicki, S. C.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sarkar, S.; Wandler, F. D.; Weaver, C.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Yanez, J. P.; Barwick, S. W.; Yodh, G.; Baum, V.; Böser, S.; di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Köpke, L.; Krückl, G.; Momenté, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K.; Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P. B.; Woschnagg, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Schöneberg, S.; Tenholt, F.; Becker, K.-H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Soldin, D.; Benzvi, S.; Cross, R.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K. D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Klein, S. R.; Miarecki, S.; Palczewski, T.; Tatar, J.; Börner, M.; Fuchs, T.; Hünnefeld, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Pieloth, D.; Rhode, W.; Ruhe, T.; Sandrock, A.; Schlunder, P.; Soedingrekso, J.; Werthebach, J.; Bose, D.; Dujmovic, H.; in, S.; Jeong, M.; Kang, W.; Kim, J.; Rott, C.; Botner, O.; Burgman, A.; Hallgren, A.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Unger, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Braun, J.; Casey, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Fahey, S.; Ghorbani, K.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Liu, Q. R.; Luszczak, W.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Schneider, A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Ty, B.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Xu, D. L.; Yuan, T.; Brayeur, L.; Casier, M.; de Clercq, C.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; Kunnen, J.; Lünemann, J.; Maggi, G.; Toscano, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Kappes, A.; Coenders, S.; Huber, M.; Krings, K.; Rea, I. C.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Cowen, D. F.; de André, J. P. A. M.; Deyoung, T.; Hignight, J.; Lennarz, D.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Micallef, J.; Neer, G.; Rysewyk, D.; Dembinski, H.; Evenson, P. A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Koirala, R.; Pandya, H.; Seckel, D.; Stanev, T.; Tilav, S.; De Ridder, S.; Labare, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; van Driessche, W.; Vanheule, S.; Vraeghe, M.; de With, M.; Hebecker, D.; Kolanoski, H.; Fazely, A. R.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Xu, X. W.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Nygren, D. R.; Przybylski, G. T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Ishihara, A.; Kim, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Lu, L.; Mase, K.; Relich, M.; Stößl, A.; Yoshida, S.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Niederhausen, H.; Xu, Y.; Kohnen, G.; Kopper, S.; Nakarmi, P.; Pepper, J. A.; Toale, P. A.; Williams, D. R.; Kowalski, M.; Kurahashi, N.; Relethford, B.; Richman, M.; Wills, L.; Madsen, J.; Seunarine, S.; Spiczak, G. M.; Maruyama, R.; Rawlins, K.; Sarkar, S.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tung, C. F.; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Neutrinos interact only very weakly, so they are extremely penetrating. The theoretical neutrino-nucleon interaction cross-section, however, increases with increasing neutrino energy, and neutrinos with energies above 40 teraelectronvolts (TeV) are expected to be absorbed as they pass through the Earth. Experimentally, the cross-section has been determined only at the relatively low energies (below 0.4 TeV) that are available at neutrino beams from accelerators. Here we report a measurement of neutrino absorption by the Earth using a sample of 10,784 energetic upward-going neutrino-induced muons. The flux of high-energy neutrinos transiting long paths through the Earth is attenuated compared to a reference sample that follows shorter trajectories. Using a fit to the two-dimensional distribution of muon energy and zenith angle, we determine the neutrino-nucleon interaction cross-section for neutrino energies 6.3-980 TeV, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous measurements. The measured cross-section is about 1.3 times the prediction of the standard model, consistent with the expectations for charged- and neutral-current interactions. We do not observe a large increase in the cross-section with neutrino energy, in contrast with the predictions of some theoretical models, including those invoking more compact spatial dimensions or the production of leptoquarks. This cross-section measurement can be used to set limits on the existence of some hypothesized beyond-standard-model particles, including leptoquarks.

  6. Muon-electron final states in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    In an experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, eight candidates for the reaction ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything were observed with a total background of 1.5 +- 0.6 events. The detector consisted of twenty-eight optical spark chambers interspersed with liquid and plastic scintillation counters. Events classified as muon - electron final states are required to have a long noninteracting straight track in conjunction with an electromagnetic shower characteristic of that produced by an electron. Background processes are discussed and the total muon - electron background calculated. The ratio of the number of muon - electron candidates to all charged current events, corrected for the percentage of the neutrino beam above threshold, is R' = sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything)/sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + anything) approx. > 10 -2

  7. Neutrino propagation in binary neutron star mergers in presence of nonstandard interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Amélie; Volpe, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    We explore the impact of nonstandard interactions on neutrino propagation in accretion disks around binary neutron star merger remnants. We show flavor evolution can be significantly modified even for values of the nonstandard couplings well below current bounds. We demonstrate the occurrence of inner resonances as synchronized MSW phenomena and show that intricate conversion patterns might appear depending on the nonstandard interaction parameters. We discuss the possible implications for nucleosynthesis.

  8. Measurement of the single π0 production rate in neutral current neutrino interactions on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Amey, J.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ashida, Y.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Barry, C.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Bienstock, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Chappell, A.; Checchia, C.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cremonesi, L.; Cudd, A.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dunkman, M.; Dunne, P.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Gizzarelli, F.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, J. T.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hiramoto, A.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Koller, P. P.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Lamoureux, M.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Licciardi, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Lou, T.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Maret, L.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Morrison, J.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakanishi, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Paudyal, P.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Pritchard, A.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruggeri, A. C.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamura, R.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Vilela, C.; Vladisavljevic, T.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wret, C.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The single π0 production rate in neutral current neutrino interactions on water in a neutrino beam with a peak neutrino energy of 0.6 GeV has been measured using the PØD, one of the subdetectors of the T2K near detector. The production rate was measured for data taking periods when the PØD contained water (2.64 ×1020 protons-on-target) and also periods without water (3.49 ×1020 protons-on-target). A measurement of the neutral current single π0 production rate on water is made using appropriate subtraction of the production rate with water in from the rate with water out of the target region. The subtraction analysis yields 106 ±41 ±69 signal events where the uncertainties are statistical (stat.) and systematic (sys.) respectively. This is consistent with the prediction of 157 events from the nominal simulation. The measured to expected ratio is 0.68 ±0.26 (stat ) ±0.44 (sys ) ±0.12 (flux ) . The nominal simulation uses a flux integrated cross section of 7.63 ×10-39 cm2 per nucleon with an average neutrino interaction energy of 1.3 GeV.

  9. Study of charmed particle production in interactions with neutrinos detected in the experiment NOMAD at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechain, X.A.

    1999-01-01

    NOMAD (Neutrino Oscillation Magnetic Detector), devoted to the observation of tau neutrino interactions in case of neutrino flavour oscillations, was optimised in order to get an excellent identification of electrons coming from tau decays. Amongst the real events, identified as muon neutrino interactions, we select events including one muon and one positron candidate. We then reduce the number of events for which a hadron simulates the positron, and a method based on a likelihood rate allows us to select events for which the positron, lost in the hadronic jet, comes from the decay of a quark charm, and eliminates those for which the positron comes from photon conversions or Dalitz decays. From the extracted signal, we are able to estimate the mass of the charm quark and the strange sea content of the nucleon, by comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation based on the latest CCFR results. We also carried out a technical study on a possible identification of electrons using the specific behaviour of their tracks left in the drift chambers. We showed that we can get some discrimination power using variables given by the Kalman filter used for track fitting. (author)

  10. Neutrino sunshine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: On 10 June 1992, at the Neutrino 92 meeting in Grenada, Spain, Till Kirsten of Heidelberg's Max Planck Institute reported that neutrinos from sunshine had been seen. Most of the energy pumped out by the Sun comes from the fusion of protons into alpha particles, a process which also liberates neutrinos. While it takes about a million years for radiant energy formed in the deep interior of the Sun to fight its way to the surface, the highly penetrating neutrinos emerge almost immediately. It was in 1970 that Ray Davis and his team began taking data with a tank containing 615 tons of perchloroethylene (dry cleaning fluid) 1500 metres underground in the Homestake gold mine, South Dakota. The observed signal is consistently smaller than what is expected. This 'solar neutrino problem' was confirmed by the Kamioka mine experiment in Japan, looking at the Cherenkov light released by neutrino interactions in some 700 tons of water. However these experiments are only sensitive to a tiny high energy tail of the solar neutrino spectrum, and to understand what is going on needs measurements of the primary neutrinos from proton fusion. To get at these neutrinos, two large new detectors, using gallium and sensitive to these lower energy particles, have been built and commissioned in the past few years. The detectors are SAGE ('Soviet' American Gallium Experiment) in the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the Caucasus, and Gallex, a team from France, Germany, Israel, Italy and the US in the Italian Gran Sasso underground Laboratory. At Grenada, Kirsten reported unmistakable signs of solar neutrinos of proton origin recorded in Gallex. SAGE and Gallex do not yet have enough data to unambiguously fix the level of primary solar neutrinos reaching the Earth, and the interpretation of the interim results tends to be subjective. However after 23 years of conditioning through watching the solar neutrinos' high energy tail, the prospect of a neutrino

  11. Neutrino mass, the right-handed interaction and the double beta decay, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Masaru; Kotani, Tsuneyuki; Nishiura, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Kazuko; Takasugi, Eiichi.

    1981-01-01

    In order to shed light on the important question whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles, the double β decay is investigated within a general form of weak interaction Hamiltonian. The systematic study is made on the 0 + → J + nuclear transitions for the two-neutrino and neutrinoless modes both in the two-nucleon- and N*-mechanism. It is shown that for the neutrinoless mode, only the 0 + → 0 + transition in the two-nucleon mechanism is allowed if there is no right-handed interaction. When the right-handed interaction gives a sizable contribution, the role of the 0 + → 2 + transition becomes as important as the 0 + → 0 + transition. The comparison of our results with the previous ones is also presented. (author)

  12. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piteira, Rodolphe [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2005-09-29

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin2 (2θ23). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  13. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  14. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  15. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  16. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martineau-Huynh Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-energy neutrino astronomy will probe the working of the most violent phenomena in the Universe. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND project consists of an array of ∼ 105 radio antennas deployed over ∼ 200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the measurement of air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of τ leptons produced by the interaction of cosmic neutrinos under the Earth surface. Our objective with GRAND is to reach a neutrino sensitivity of 5 × 10−11E−2 GeV−1 cm−2 s−1 sr−1 above 3 × 1016 eV. This sensitivity ensures the detection of cosmogenic neutrinos in the most pessimistic source models, and up to 100 events per year are expected for the standard models. GRAND would also probe the neutrino signals produced at the potential sources of UHECRs.

  17. Search for high-energy neutrinos from dust obscured Blazars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggi, G.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; Vries, K. D.; Gentile, G.; Scholten, O.; van Eijndhoven, N.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of high-energy cosmic neutrinos by the IceCube neutrino observatory opens up a new field in physics, the field of neutrino astronomy. Using the IceCube neutrino detector we plan to search for high-energy neutrinos emitted from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), since AGN are believed

  18. Probing velocity dependent self-interacting dark matter with neutrino telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Denis S.; Albuquerque, Ivone F. M.

    2018-02-01

    Self-interacting dark matter models constitute an attractive solution to problems in structure formation on small scales. A simple realization of these models considers the dark force mediated by a light particle which can couple to the Standard Model through mixings with the photon or the Z boson. Within this scenario we investigate the sensitivity of the IceCube-DeepCore and PINGU neutrino telescopes to the associated muon neutrino flux produced by dark matter annihilations in the Sun. Despite the model's simplicity, several effects naturally appear: momentum suppressed capture by nuclei, velocity dependent dark matter self-capture, Sommerfeld enhanced annihilation, as well as the enhancement on the neutrino flux due to mediator late decays. Taking all these effects into account, we find that most of the model relevant parameter space can be tested by the three years of data already collected by the IceCube-DeepCore. We show that indirect detection through neutrinos can compete with the strong existing limits from direct detection experiments, specially in the case of isospin violation.

  19. Describing the observed cosmic neutrinos by interactions of nuclei with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Walter

    2014-07-01

    IceCube have observed neutrinos which are presumably of extra-galactic origin. Since specific sources have not yet been identified, we discuss what could be learned from the conceptual point of view. We use a simple model for neutrino production from the interactions between nuclei and matter, and we focus on the description of the spectral shape and flavor composition observed by IceCube. Our main parameters are spectral index, maximal energy, magnetic field, and composition of the accelerated nuclei. We show that a cutoff at PeV energies can be achieved by soft enough spectra, a cutoff of the primary energy, or strong enough magnetic fields. These options, however, are difficult to reconcile with the hypothesis that these neutrinos originate from the same sources as the ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We demonstrate that heavier nuclei accelerated in the sources may be a possible way out if the maximal energy scales appropriately with the mass number of the nuclei. In this scenario, neutrino observations can actually be used to test the UHECR acceleration mechanism. We also emphasize the need for a volume upgrade of the IceCube detector for future precision physics, for which the flavor information becomes a statistical meaningful model discriminator as qualitatively new ingredient.

  20. Study of neutrino interactions with the electronic detectors of the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N.; Altinok, O.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bagulya, A.; Bendhabi, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugiere, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunet, F.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chukanov, A.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Dal Corso, F.; De Lellis, G.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Declais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Egorov, O.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Favier, J.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Gollnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Goncharova, L.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guler, A.M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamada, K.; Hara, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Ishida, H.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kazuyama, K.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Kubota, H.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Lippi, I.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P.; Lutter, G.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Mannai, K.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, P.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nikitina, V.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olchevski, A.; Paniccia, M.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pretzl, K.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tran, T.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C.S.; Yoshioka, T.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2011-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is based on a hybrid technology combining electronic detectors and nuclear emulsions. OPERA collected muon-neutrino interactions during the 2008 and 2009 physics runs of the CNGS neutrino beam, produced at CERN with an energy range of about 5-35 GeV. A total of $5.3 \\times 10^{19}$ protons on target equivalent luminosity has been analysed with the OPERA electronic detectors: scintillator strips target trackers and magnetic muon spectrometers equipped with resistive plate gas chambers and drift tubes, allowing a detailed reconstruction of muon-neutrino interactions. Charged Current (CC) and Neutral Current (NC) interactions are identified, using the measurements in the electronic detectors, and the NC/CC ratio is computed. The momentum distribution and the charge of the muon tracks produced in CC interactions are analysed. Calorimetric measurements of the visible energy are performed for both the CC and NC samples. For CC events the Bjorken-$y$ distribution and the hadronic shower profile ...

  1. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic interactions measurement in MiniBooNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevalov, Denis [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) was designed to search for vμ → ve neutrino oscillations at Δm2 ~ 1 eV2 using an intense neutrino flux with an average energy Ev ~ 700 MeV. From 2002 to 2009 MiniBooNE has accumulated more than 1.0 x 1021 protons on target (POT) in both neutrino and antineutrino modes. MiniBooNE provides a perfect platform for detailed measurements of exclusive and semiinclusive neutrino cross-sections, for which MiniBooNE has the largest samples of events up to date, such as neutral current elastic (NCE), neutral current π0, charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE), charged current π+, and other channels. These measured cross-sections, in turn, allow to improve the knowledge of nucleon structure. This thesis is devoted to the study of NCE interactions. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic scattering (vN → vN) accounts for about 18% of all neutrino interactions in MiniBooNE. Using a high-statistics, high purity sample of NCE interactions in MiniBooNE, the flux-averaged NCE differential cross-section has been measured and is being reported here. Further study of the NCE cross-section allowed for probing the structure of nuclei. The main interest in the NCE cross-section is that it may be sensitive to the strange quark contribution to the nucleon spin, Δs, this however requires a separation of NCE proton (vp → vp) from NCE neutron (vn → vn) events, which in general is a challenging task. MiniBooNE uses a Cherenkov detector, which imposes restrictions on the measured nucleon kinematic variables, mainly due to the impossibility to reconstruct the nucleon direction below the Cherenkov threshold. However, at kinetic energies above this threshold MiniBooNE is able to identify NCE proton events that do not experience final state interactions (FSI). These events were used for the Δs measurement. In this thesis

  2. Neutrino interaction vertex location with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornushkin, Yu.A.; Dmitrievskij, S.G.; Chukanov, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of ν τ appearance from ν μ →ν τ oscillation in a ν μ beam. Description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by the electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  3. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, Bob [bmck@jlab.org

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  4. Neutrino mass, the right-handed interaction and the double beta decay, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Masaru; Kotani, Tsuneyuki; Nishiura, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Kazuko; Takasugi, Eiichi.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the formulae for the double β decay obtained in the previous paper, the general properties of 0 + → J + transitions are discussed and the analysis of the experimental data is presented. It is found that, for the two neutrino mode, the 0 + → 0 + transition in the two nucleon (2n)-mechanism dominates over the 0 + → 2 + transition as well as the contribution from the N*-mechanism. For the neutrinoless mode, only the 0 + → 0 + transition in the 2n-mechanism is allowed if there is no right-handed interaction. When the right-handed interaction gives a sizable contribution, the role of the 0 + → 2 + transition becomes as important as the 0 + → 0 + transition in this mode. It is concluded that the experimental data on the ratio of the 128 Te to 130 Te half-lives by Hennecke et al. suggest that neutrinos are Majorana particles, if we take the Vergados estimation of the nuclear matrix elements. Moreover, we find that the weighted average of neutrino masses is around 34 eV if there is no right-handed interaction. (author)

  5. The solar neutrinos epopee

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 year has been fruitful for the neutrino physics. First, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment has shown that the electron neutrinos nu sub e emitted by the sun are converted into muon neutrinos (nu submu) and tau neutrinos (nu subtau), thus closing the 30 years old problem of solar neutrinos deficit. This discovery validates the model of nuclear energy production inside the sun but it shakes the theory describing the weak interactions between the fundamental constituents of matter. This theory considers the neutrinos (and the photons) as massless particles, while the taste conversion phenomenon necessarily implies that neutrinos have a mass. In October 2000, the Universe exploration by the cosmic neutrinos is jointly recognized by R. Davis (USA) and M. Koshiba (Japan) who received the Nobel price of physics. Finally, in December 2000, the KamLAND experiment quantitatively demonstrated the neutrinos metamorphosis by detecting a deficit in the flux of electron antineutrinos coming from the ...

  6. study of neutrino interactions using the electronic detectors and emulsion-lead targets of the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolin, Alessandro; Kose, Umut

    2011-01-01

    OPERA collected muon-neutrino interaction during the 2008, 2009 and 2010 physics run of the CNGS neutrino beam, produced at CERN with an energy range of about 5-35 GeV. A total of 5.3 x 10 19 protons on target equivalent luminosity from the 2008-2009 sample has been analysed using the measurements in the electronic detectors. We report on the OPERA electronic detectors performances and comparison of momentum measurements of soft muon tracks performed by the electronic detectors to the measurement performed in the OPERA neutrino target brick.

  7. Characterization of Final State Interaction Strength in Plastic Scintillator by Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberly, Brandon M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Precise knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions is increasingly important as neutrino oscillation measurements transition into the systematics-limited era. In addition to modifying the initial interaction, the nuclear medium can scatter and absorb the interaction by-products through final state interactions, changing the types and kinematic distributions of particles seen by the detector. Recent neutrino pion production data from MiniBooNE is inconsistent with the final state interaction strength predicted by models and theoretical calculations, and some models fit best to the MiniBooNE data only after removing final state interactions entirely. This thesis presents a measurement of dσ/dTπ and dσ/dθπ for muon-neutrino charged current charged pion production in the MINER A scintillator tracker. MINER A is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The analysis is limited to neutrino energies between 1.5-10 GeV. Dependence on invariant hadronic mass W is studied through two versions of the analysis that impose the limits W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV. The lower limit on W increases compatibility with the MiniBooNE pion data. The shapes of the differential cross sections, which depend strongly on the nature of final state interactions, are compared to Monte Carlo and theoretical predictions. It is shown that the measurements presented in this thesis favor models that contain final state interactions. Additionally, a variety of neutrino-nucleus interaction models are shown to successfully reproduce the thesis measurements, while simultaneously failing to describe the shape of the MiniBooNE data.

  8. Measurement of $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$ production in neutrino charged- current interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Guler, A M; Köse, U; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Zeyrek, M T; Armenise, N; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Leva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; El-Aidi, R; Van de Vyver, B; Vilain, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, A V; Chizhov, M; Doucet, M; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Lavina, L S; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2003-01-01

    A measurement of Lambda /sub c//sup +/ production in neutrino nucleon charged-current interactions is presented. in a subsample of about 50 000 interactions located in the emulsion target of the CHORUS detector, exposed to the wide band neutrino beam of the CERN SPS, candidates for decays of short-lived particles were identified using new automatic scanning systems and later confirmed through visual inspection. Criteria based on the flight length allowed a statistical separation among the different charm species thus enabling a sample particularly rich in Lambda /sub c//sup +/ to be defined. At an average neutrino energy of 27 GeV, the product sigma ( Lambda /sup + /)/ sigma (CC) * BR( Lambda /sub c//sup +/ to 3p) was measured to be (0.37 +or- 0.10(stat) 0.02(syst)) * 10/sup -2/, while the values of (1.54 +or- 0.5(stat) +or- 0.18(syst)) * 10/sup -2/ and of 0.24 +or- 0.07(stat) 0.04(syst) were obtained for sigma ( Lambda /sub c//sup + /)/ sigma (CC) and BR( Lambda /sub c//sup +/ to 3p), respectively. (28 refs)...

  9. Prospect for Charge Current Neutrino Interactions Measurements at the CERN-PS

    CERN Document Server

    Stanco, Luca (INFN-Padova)

    2011-01-01

    Tensions in several phenomenological models grew with experimental results on neu- trino/antineutrino oscillations at Short-Baseline (SBL) and with the recent, carefully recomputed, antineutrino fluxes from nuclear reactors. At a refurbished SBL CERN- PS facility an experiment aimed to address the open issues has been proposed [1], based on the technology of imaging in ultra-pure cryogenic Liquid Argon (LAr). Motivated by this scenario a detailed study of the physics case was performed. We tackled specific physics models and we optimized the neutrino beam through a full simulation. Experimental aspects not fully covered by the LAr detection, i.e. the measurements of the lepton charge on event-by-event basis and their energy over a wide range, were also investigated. Indeed the muon leptons from Charged Current (CC) (anti-)neutrino interactions play an important role in disentangling different phenomenological scenarios provided their charge state is determined. Also, the study of muon appearance/disappearance...

  10. On the effect of nuclear interactions in neutrino reactions with oxygen targets and its role in atmospheric neutrino anomaly; De l`effet des interactions nucleaires dans les reactions de neutrinos sur des cibles d`oxygene et de son role dans l`anomalie des neutrinos atmospheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau Jacques [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1998-12-10

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced by interactions of the cosmic rays with the atmosphere`s nuclei. The observed ratio of muonic to electronic neutrinos is smaller than the theoretical one (up to a factor 2), this is the so-called atmospheric anomaly. This anomaly could be linked to that observed in the solar neutrino experiments. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of nuclear correlations upon the interaction of the atmospheric neutrinos with the oxygen nuclei of the water Cherenkov detectors. The products of these interactions are detected and identified thanks to the light ring the produce. The events are classified according to the number of produced rings which is computed from the neutrino-oxygen event rates in each exclusive reaction channel. The interpretation of the experimental results has been up to now limited to the quasi-elastic nucleon and {Delta} channels but other reaction channels exist which can lead to identification problems. A special role is played by the non-pionic decay channels of the {Delta} resonance which induce single ring events that have not been considered so far. To calculate them we adopted the nuclear response formalism and started with a semi-classical approximation. This allowed us to take into account the nuclear correlations by solving exactly the RPA equations in the ring approximation. It was found that these correlations strongly modify the inclusive and exclusive neutrino-oxygen cross sections and absolute interaction rates while the ratio of the interaction rates {mu}/e is not very much affected. The analysis in the exclusive channels leads to the result that the number of pions predicted in the simulations is overestimated. In conclusion, this work has shown the importance of the nuclear correlations in the neutrino-oxygen interaction and its impact on the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. It goes beyond the usual quasi-elastic approximations and can be moreover extended to other target nuclei, such as iron

  11. Associated charm production in neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Oenenguet, G. [Cukurova University, Adana (Turkey); van Dantzig, R.; de Jong, M. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oldeman, R.G.C. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[Universita di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Gueler, M.; Koese, U.; Tolun, P. [Physics Department of Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Catanesi, M.G.; Muciaccia, M.T. [Universita di Bari and INFN, Bari (Italy); Winter, K. [Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Van de Vyver, B. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies (ULB-VUB) Brussels, Brussels (Belgium)]|[SpinX Technologies, Geneva (Switzerland); Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies (ULB-VUB) Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Saitta, B. [Universita di Cagliari and INFN, Cagliari (Italy); Di Capua, E. [Universita di Ferrara and INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H. [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Hristova, I.R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kawamura, T.; Kolev, D.; Meinhard, H.; Panman, J.; Tsenov, R.; Uiterwijk, J.W.E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Rozanov, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[CPPM CNRS-IN2P3, Marseille (France); Zucchelli, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[SpinX Technologies, Geneva (Switzerland); Goldberg, J. [Technion, Haifa (Israel); Chikawa, M. [Kinki University, Higashiosaka (Japan); Song, J.S.; Yoon, C.S. [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea); Kodama, K.; Ushida, N. [Aichi University of Education, Kariya (Japan); Aoki, S.; Hara, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Delbar, T.; Favart, D.; Gregoire, G.; Kalinin, S.; Makhlioueva, I. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Artamonov, A.; Khovansky, V.; Shamanov, V.; Tsukerman, I. [Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorbunov, P. [Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[SpinX Technologies, Geneva (Switzerland); Bruski, N.; Frekers, D. [and others

    2007-11-15

    In this paper a search for associated charm production both in neutral and charged current {nu}-nucleus interactions is presented. The improvement of automatic scanning systems in the CHORUS experiment allows an efficient search to be performed in emulsion for short-lived particles. Hence a search for rare processes, like the associated charm production, becomes possible through the observation of the double charm-decay topology with a very low background. About 130000 {nu} interactions located in the emulsion target have been analysed. Three events with two charm decays have been observed in the neutral-current sample with an estimated background of 0.18{+-}0.05. The relative rate of the associated charm cross-section in deep inelastic {nu} interactions, {sigma}(c anti c{nu})/{sigma}{sub NC}{sup DIS}=(3.62{sup +2.95}{sub -2.42}(stat){+-}0.54(syst)) x 10{sup -3} has been measured. One event with two charm decays has been observed in charged-current {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions with an estimated background of 0.18{+-}0.06 and the upper limit on associated charm production in charged-current interactions at 90% C.L. has been found to be {sigma}(c anti c{mu}{sup -})/{sigma}{sub CC}<9.69 x 10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  12. Cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino neutral current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosetti, P.C.; Deden, H.; Deutschmann, M.; Fritze, P.; Graessler, H.; Hasert, F.J.; Morfin, J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Seyfert, H.; Banerjee, S.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Beuselinck, R.; Butterworth, I.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Powell, K.J.; Davis, C.L.; Grossman, P.; McGow, R.; Mulvey, J.H.; Myatt, G.; Perkins, D.H.; Pons, R.; Radojicic, O.; Renton, P.; Saitta, B.; Stenger, V.

    1978-01-01

    The cross sections for γ and anti γ neutral current interactions for which the hadron energy is > 15 GeV have been measured. These results, and the ratios of neutral current to charged current sections, are in agreement with the Weinberg-Salam model. Values of sin 2 thetasub(w) have been obtained both with and without the use of a parametrisation for the hadronic part of the interaction; the values are in good agreement with each other and the preferred result, that obtained by the method independent of hadronic models, is sin 2 thetasub(w) = 0.22 +- 0.05. (Auth.)

  13. Nonstandard neutrino self-interactions in a supernova and fast flavor conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighe, Amol; Sen, Manibrata

    2018-02-01

    We study the effects of nonstandard self-interactions (NSSI) of neutrinos streaming out of a core-collapse supernova. We show that with NSSI, the standard linear stability analysis gives rise to linearly as well as exponentially growing solutions. For a two-box spectrum, we demonstrate analytically that flavor-preserving NSSI lead to a suppression of bipolar collective oscillations. In the intersecting four-beam model, we show that flavor-violating NSSI can lead to fast oscillations even when the angle between the neutrino and antineutrino beams is obtuse, which is forbidden in the standard model. This leads to the new possibility of fast oscillations in a two-beam system with opposing neutrino-antineutrino fluxes, even in the absence of any spatial inhomogeneities. Finally, we solve the full nonlinear equations of motion in the four-beam model numerically, and explore the interplay of fast and slow flavor conversions in the long-time behavior, in the presence of NSSI.

  14. Measurement of fragmentation properties of charmed particle production in charged-current neutrino interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onengüt, G; De Jong, M; Konijn, J; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Van der Poel, C A F J; Visschers, J L; Güler, M; Köse, U; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Kama, S; Sever, R; Tolun,, P; Zeyrek, M T; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Ieva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; Van de Vyver, B; Vilain, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, A V; Brunner, J; Chizhov, M; Cussans, D G; Doucet, M; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Litmaath, M; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Saltzberg, D; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Rondeshagen, D; Wolff, T; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Santorelli, R; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; FLoverre, P; Ludovici, L; Maslennikov, A L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Spada, F R; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2004-01-01

    During the years 1994-97, the emulsion target of the CHORUS detector was exposed to the wideband neutrino beam of the CERN SPS. In total about 100 000 charged-current neutrino interactions were located in the nuclear emulsion target and fully reconstructed. From this sample of events which was based on the data acquired by new automatic scanning systems, 1048 D0 events were selected by a pattern recognition program. They were confirmed as neutral-particle decays through visual inspection. Fragmentation properties of deep-inelastic charm production were measured using these events. Distributions of the D0 momentum, Feynman x(x_F), z and tan thetaôut, the transverse angle out of the leptonic plane defined by the muon and the neutrino, are presented. The mean value of z was measured to be (z) = 0.63 +- 0.03(stat) +- 0.01(syst). From fits to the z distribution, values for the Peterson parameter epsilon_p = 0.108 +- 0.017(stat) +- 0.013(syst) and the Collins-Spiller parameter epsilon_CS = 0.21^+0.05_-0.04(stat) +...

  15. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Antonelli, V.; Miramonti, L.; Peña Garay, Carlos; Serenelli, A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of solar neutrinos has given since ever a fundamental contribution both to astroparticle and to elementary particle physics, offering an ideal test of solar models and offering at the same time relevant indications on the fundamental interactions among particles. After reviewing the striking results of the last two decades, which were determinant to solve the long standing solar neutrino puzzle and refine the Standard Solar Model, we focus our attention on the more recent results in...

  16. Again on neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenky, S.M.; Pontecorvo, B.

    1976-01-01

    The general case is treated of a weak interaction theory in which a term violating lepton charges is present. In such a scheme the particles with definite masses are Majorana neutrinos (2N if in the weak interaction participate N four-component neutrinos). Neutrino oscillations are discussed and it is shown that the minimum average intensity at the earth of solar neutrinos is 1/2N of the intensity expected when oscillations are absent

  17. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  18. Supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In the first part of his in-depth article on the 1987 supernova, David Schramm of the University of Chicago and the NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Centre reviewed the background to supernovae, the composition of massive stars and the optical history of SN 1987A, and speculated on what the 1987 remnant might be. In such a Type II supernova, gravitational pressure crushes the atoms of the star's interior producing neutron matter, or even a black hole, and releasing an intense burst of neutrinos. 1987 was the first time that physicists were equipped (but not entirely ready!) to intercept these particles, and in the second part of his article, David Schramm covers the remarkable new insights from the science of supernova neutrino astronomy, born on 23 February 1987

  19. Novel Photosensor "ReFerence" for Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy and Water Cherenkov Neutrino Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Daniel; Laille, Alvin; Bratton, Clayton

    2002-04-01

    A novel photosensor concept "ReFerence" was invented in order to provide multiple increase in the detection efficiency of Cherenkov photons in ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACT). The particular goal was to lower the gamma-ray detection threshold of the MAGIC telescope down to about 10 GeV. The "ReFerence" photosensor concept is unique in providing: more than twofold increase in quantum efficiency compared to photomultiplier tubes (PMT), excellent single-photon resolution (just as in HPDs), diminished thermionic noise, unprecedented magnetic shielding, negligible dead area, flat angular acceptance with sharp cutoff, hexagonal packing into large-area flat-panel cameras, manifest conceptual and constructional simplicity, extreme robustness and implosion safety, and low price. An extension of the "ReFerence" concept, the so called "TransReFerence", provides two very important additional (even originally unexpected) features - single-photon color sensitivity without destructive filtering, and multiple extension of the spectral sensitivity range. First "ReFerence" photosensor prototype was recently constructed and tested at UC Davis, and the results have verified the "ReFerence" concept. Development of a new fully functional prototype, based on super-sensitive GaAs-type photocathodes, has recently started in collaboration with the ITT Night Vision Industries. In this talk we will summarise the "ReFerence" concept, discuss its benefits for gamma-ray astronomy, and present the latest results of prototype tests.

  20. New experiment WAGASCI to measure cross sections of neutrino interactions in water and hydrocarbon using J-PARC beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsiannikova, T.; Antonova, M.; Izmaylov, A.; Kudenko, Y.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Mefodiev, A.; Mineev, O.; Suvorov, S.; Yershov, N.

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of the long base T2K,Tokai-to-Kamioka, Japan, experiment is the investigation of neutrino oscillations with a high-intensity beam of muon neutrinos and antineutrinos. Neutrino interaction measurements in the near detector complex (ND280) of the T2K experiment are used for adjustment of the parameters defining event simulation in the far detector (Super-Kamiokande), which is the key idea of the experiment; this allows one to considerably increase the oscillation analysis accuracy. The difference in the target material of the far (water) and near (scintillator, hydrocarbon) detectors results in a substantial systematic error in oscillation analysis. Systematic error can be reduced by direct measurements, a new water grid and scintillator detector WAGASCI was proposed for this purpose. The detector will operate at the J-PARC neutrino beam and measure the ratio of charged-current neutrino cross sections between water and hydrocarbon with a few percent precision. Further physical programs may include precise measurements of various charged channels of neutrino interaction. This paper presents the detector concept and the current plan for its installation.

  1. Cosmic neutrinos as a probe of TeV-scale physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, M.

    2007-02-15

    Ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos are versatile probes of astrophysics, astronomy, and particle physics. They represent the messengers of hadronic processes in cosmic accelerators and survive the propagation through the interstellar medium practically unscathed. We investigate the neutrino fluxes associated with optically thin proton sources which provide a diagnostic of the transition between galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. The center of mass energies in collisions of these cosmic neutrinos with atomic nuclei in the atmosphere or the Earth's interior easily exceed those so far reached in man-made accelerators. We discuss the prospects of observing supersymmetric neutrino interactions with Cherenkov telescopes and speculate about a neutrino component in extremely high energy cosmic rays from exotic interactions in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  2. Cosmic neutrinos as a probe of TeV-scale physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, M.

    2007-02-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos are versatile probes of astrophysics, astronomy, and particle physics. They represent the messengers of hadronic processes in cosmic accelerators and survive the propagation through the interstellar medium practically unscathed. We investigate the neutrino fluxes associated with optically thin proton sources which provide a diagnostic of the transition between galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. The center of mass energies in collisions of these cosmic neutrinos with atomic nuclei in the atmosphere or the Earth's interior easily exceed those so far reached in man-made accelerators. We discuss the prospects of observing supersymmetric neutrino interactions with Cherenkov telescopes and speculate about a neutrino component in extremely high energy cosmic rays from exotic interactions in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  3. Neutrinos from Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborra, Irene; Murase, Kohta

    2018-02-01

    Neutrinos are fundamental particles in the collapse of massive stars. Because of their weakly interacting nature, neutrinos can travel undisturbed through the stellar core and be direct probes of the still uncertain and fascinating supernova mechanism. Intriguing recent developments on the role of neutrinos during the stellar collapse are reviewed, as well as our current understanding of the flavor conversions in the stellar envelope. The detection perspectives of the next burst and of the diffuse supernova background will be also outlined. High-energy neutrinos in the GeV-PeV range can follow the MeV neutrino emission. Various scenarios concerning the production of high-energy neutrinos are discussed.

  4. The neutrino mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannucci, F.

    2003-09-01

    The neutrino is not an elementary particle like others, it is the most stunning of all: the neutrino is undetectable by itself, we have only indirect evidences of its existence, but the neutrino is essential to explain the weak interaction, to understand why matter triumphed over anti-matter just after the Big-bang, or to solve the riddle of the hidden mass of the universe. This book is a popular work dedicated to the neutrino from its discovery in beta decays to the most recent theories such as neutrino oscillations, and via the worldwide experiments dedicated to the study of the neutrinos. (A.C.)

  5. One meson π0 final state study in neutral current neutrino and antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comtet, Alain.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral pion production by weak neutral currents was observed in the CERN-GARGAMELLE neutrino experiment. The aim of the analysis was the measurement of the ratios R(ν) and R(antiν) of neutral-current to charged-current cross sections. The background due to neutron interactions was computed. A lower and an upper limit of the background was obtained. Bounds on the ratios R(ν) and R(antiν) are given using these limits: 0.11 [fr

  6. Expanded calculation of weak-interaction-mediated neutrino cooling rates due to 56Ni in stellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2010-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the neutrino cooling rates is required in order to study the various stages of stellar evolution of massive stars. Neutrino losses from proto-neutron stars play a crucial role in deciding whether these stars would be crushed into black holes or explode as supernovae. Both pure leptonic and weak-interaction processes contribute to the neutrino energy losses in stellar matter. At low temperatures and densities, the characteristics of the early phase of presupernova evolution, cooling through neutrinos produced via the weak interaction, are important. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently been used with success for the calculation of stellar weak-interaction rates of fp-shell nuclide. The lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y e ) during early phases of stellar evolution of massive stars changes substantially, mainly due to electron captures on 56 Ni. The stellar matter is transparent to the neutrinos produced during the presupernova evolution of massive stars. These neutrinos escape the site and assist the stellar core in maintaining a lower entropy. Here, an expanded calculation of weak-interaction-mediated neutrino and antineutrino cooling rates due to 56 Ni in stellar matter using the pn-QRPA theory is presented. This detailed scale is appropriate for interpolation purposes and is of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculated rates are compared with earlier calculations. During the relevant temperature and density regions of stellar matter the reported rates show few differences compared with the shell model rates and might contribute in fine-tuning of the lepton-to-baryon ratio during the presupernova phases of stellar evolution of massive stars.

  7. ANTARES : The first undersea neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. -J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Becherini, Y.; Beltramelli, J.; Bersani, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bogazzi, C.; de Botton, N.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Boudahef, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Cassano, B.; Castorina, E.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Chaleil, Th; Charvis, Ph; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Compere, C.; Coniglione, R.; Coppolani, X.; Cosquer, A.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Curtil, C.; D'Amato, C.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; De Bonis, G.; Decock, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Desages-Ardellier, F.; Deschamps, A.; Destelle, J. -J.; Di Maria, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Distefano, C.; Dominique, J. -L.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drogou, J. -F.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Durand, R.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Engelen, J. J.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. -L.; Galata, S.; Galeotti, S.; Gay, P.; Gensolen, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Gojak, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A. J.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Henry, S.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, M.; Jourde, D.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karkar, S.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kestener, P.; Kok, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lahonde-Hamdoun, C.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Languillat, J-C; Larosa, G.; Lavalle, J.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; LeVanSuu, A.; Lefevre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Leveque, C.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Mangano, S.; Marcel, A.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Masullo, R.; Mazeas, F.; Mazure, A.; Meli, A.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, C.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Neff, M.; Niess, V.; Nooren, G. J. L.; Oberski, J. E. J.; Olivetto, C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Patioselitis, D.; Papaleo, R.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Piret, Y.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Prono, G.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Rethore, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Ricol, J. S.; Rigaud, V.; Roca, V.; Roensch, K.; Rolin, J. -F.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rottura, A.; Roux, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J. -P.; Schuessler, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Shanidze, R.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sottoriva, A.; Spies, A.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th; Streeb, K.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Tasca, L.; Terreni, G.; Tezier, D.; Toscano, S.; Urbano, F.; Valdy, P.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; Virique, E.; de Vries, G.; Wijnker, G.; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yakovenko, Y.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; van Wijk, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope was completed in May 2008 and is the first operational Neutrino Telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The main purpose of the detector is to perform neutrino astronomy and the apparatus also offers facilities for marine and Earth sciences. This paper describes the

  8. Charged-current weak interaction processes in hot and dense matter and its impact on the spectra of neutrinos emitted from protoneutron star cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pinedo, G; Fischer, T; Lohs, A; Huther, L

    2012-12-21

    We perform three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport radiation hydrodynamics simulations covering a period of 3 s after the formation of a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova explosion. Our results show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter as suggested by Reddy et al. [Phys. Rev. D 58, 013009 (1998)] has a strong impact on the luminosities and spectra of the emitted neutrinos. When compared with simulations that neglect mean-field effects on the neutrino opacities, we find that the luminosities of all neutrino flavors are reduced while the spectral differences between electron neutrinos and antineutrinos are increased. Their magnitude depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at subnuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r process. Contrary to previous findings, our results show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth.

  9. Detection and reconstruction of short-lived particles produced by neutrino interactions in emulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Uiterwijk, J W E

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation, several different topics related to the chorus experiment are pre- sented. The chorus experiment has been used to study neutrino oscillations using the neutrino beam at cern. The neutrino oscillation hypothesis provided an explanation for the lower than expected fluxes of solar and atmospheric neutrinos. There are three neutrino species in nature corresponding to different weak eigenstates, namely, the elec- tron neutrino (νe ), the muon neutrino (νμ ), and the tau neutrino (ντ ). The lower fluxes could be interpreted as spontaneous oscillations between electron and muon neutrinos and between muon and tau neutrinos. The chorus experiment was designed to detect oscillation of muon neutrinos into tau neutrinos with small mixing probability down to 2 · 10−4 and a mass difference square between νμ and ντ larger than 0.5 eV2 . In the last decade, several disappearance experiments have confirmed the neutrino oscillation hypothesis and showed that oscillations occur between mass eig...

  10. Direct Measurement of Nuclear Dependence of Charged Current Quasielasticlike Neutrino Interactions Using MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt, M.; Ghosh, A.; Walton, T.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Cai, T.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Carneiro, M. F.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman,; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.

    2017-08-01

    Charged-current νμ interactions on carbon, iron, and lead with a final state hadronic system of one or more protons with zero mesons are used to investigate the influence of the nuclear environment on quasielasticlike interactions. The transferred four-momentum squared to the target nucleus, Q2, is reconstructed based on the kinematics of the leading proton, and differential cross sections versus Q2 and the cross-section ratios of iron, lead, and carbon to scintillator are measured for the first time in a single experiment. The measurements show a dependence on the atomic number. While the quasielasticlike scattering on carbon is compatible with predictions, the trends exhibited by scattering on iron and lead favor a prediction with intranuclear rescattering of hadrons accounted for by a conventional particle cascade treatment. These measurements help discriminate between different models of both initial state nucleons and final state interactions used in the neutrino oscillation experiments.

  11. Studying neutrino properties in the future LENA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a next-generation neutrino detector based on 50 kt of liquid scintillator. The low detection threshold, the good energy resolution and the potent background discrimination inherent to liquid scintillator make LENA a versatile observatory for astrophysical and terrestrial neutrinos. The present contribution highlights LENA's capabilities for studying neutrino properties based on both natural and artificial sources

  12. A 185kg NaI[Tl] Detector for Observing the Charged-Current Neutrino Interaction on 127I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Samuel; Coherent Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A 185kg NaI[Tl] detector has been deployed to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to measure the charged-current neutrino interaction cross-section on 127I. Results from an initial run will be shown, and details of an upgrade to the 185kg detector will be discussed. Recent developments towards a 2-ton NaI[Tl] detector capable of simultaneously observing the charged-current interaction on 127I and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering (CEvNS) will be presented.

  13. Extremely high energy cosmic neutrinos and relic neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2006-03-01

    I review the essentials of ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions, show how neutral-current detection and flavor tagging can enhance the scientific potential of neutrino telescopes, and sketch new studies on neutrino encounters with dark matter relics and on gravitational lensing of neutrinos.

  14. The role of self-interacting right-handed neutrinos in galactic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argüelles, C.R.; Rueda, J.A.; Ruffini, R. [International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Mavromatos, N.E., E-mail: carlos.arguelles@icranet.org, E-mail: Nikolaos.Mavromatos@cern.ch, E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown previously that the DM in galactic halos can be explained by a self-gravitating system of massive keV fermions ('inos') in thermodynamic equilibrium, and predicted the existence of a denser quantum core of inos towards the center of galaxies. In this article we show that the inclusion of self-interactions among the inos, modeled within a relativistic mean-field-theory approach, allows the quantum core to become massive and compact enough to explain the dynamics of the S-cluster stars closest to the Milky Way's galactic center. The application of this model to other galaxies such as large elliptical harboring massive central dark objects of ∼ 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙} is also investigated. We identify these interacting inos with sterile right-handed neutrinos pertaining to minimal extensions of the Standard Model, and calculate the corresponding total cross-section σ within an electroweak-like formalism to be compared with other observationally inferred cross-section estimates. The coincidence of an ino mass range of few tens of keV derived here only from the galactic structure, with the range obtained independently from other astrophysical and cosmological constraints, points towards an important role of the right-handed neutrinos in the cosmic structure.

  15. Using Nucleon Multiplicities to Analyze Anti-Neutrino Interactions with Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Miranda J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The most commonly used, simple interaction models have not accurately described the nuclear effects on either neutrino-nucleus or anti-neutrino-nucleus interactions. Comparison of data collected by the MINERvA experiment and these models shows a discrepancy in the reconstructed hadronic energy distribution at momentum transfers below 0.8 GeV. Two nuclear model effects that were previously not modeled are possible culprits of this discrepancy. The first is known as random-phase-approximation and the second is the addition of a meson exchange current process, also known as two-particle two-hole due to its result in two particles leaving the nucleus with two holes left in their place. For the first time a neutron counting software algorithm has been created and used to compare the multiplicity and spatial distributions of neutrons between the simulation and data. There is localized sensitivity to the RPA and 2p2h effects and both help the simulation better describe the data. Ad ditional systematic or model effects are present which cause the simulation to overproduce neutrons, and potential causes are discussed.

  16. Atmospheric neutrino results from IceCube-DeepCore and plans for PINGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, D. Jason; IceCube-Gen2 Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole is the largest operating neutrino detector in the world and spans a wide range of science topics, from astronomy at the PeV-scale to particle physics at the GeV-scale. We present results from the search for a light, O(1) eV2, sterile neutrino using the large IceCube array and, separately, using the lower energy extension DeepCore sub-array. Additionally, we review the atmospheric neutrino results and expected sensitivities related to oscillation physics (νµ disappearance and ντ appearance) as well as new limits on non-standard interactions. Continuing the success of the IceCube-DeepCore physics program, a proposed next generation in-fill detector with increased sensitivity to neutrinos of O(1) GeV will be covered.

  17. Neutrino Physics at Drexel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolinski, Michelle [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, Russell [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Our primary goal is to improve the understanding of the properties and interactions of neutrinos. We are pursuing this by means of the DUNE long-baseline and PROSPECT short-baseline neutrino experiments. For DUNE, a neutrino beam from Fermilab will be detected at the SURF facility in South Dakota, with the aim of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy (the mass ordering of neutrino flavors), and a measurement or limit on CP-violation via neutrinos. Our near-term experimental goal is to improve the characterization of the neutrino beam by measurements of muons produced as a byproduct of neutrino beam generation, to quantify the beam composition and flux. The short-range neutrino program has the aim of using the HFIR reactor at Oak Ridge as a neutrino source, with a detector placed nearby to find if there are short-distance oscillations to sterile neutrino flavors, and to resolve the 'reactor neutrino spectral anomaly' which has shown up as an unexplained 'bump' in the neutrino energy spectrum in recent experiments.

  18. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotera, K.; GRAND Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) project aims at detecting ultrahigh-energy neutrinos and cosmic rays with a ˜10^5 radio antenna array over 200'000 km^2 in mountainous regions in China, in order to solve the mystery of the origin of these two linked particles. Its strategy is to detect extensive air showers of the highest energies, above 10^{17} eV, that are triggered by the interaction of high-energy particles in the atmosphere or underground. In its first stages, GRAND will be competitive to detect the first cosmogenic neutrinos for favorable source scenarios. Ultimately, GRAND aims at reaching a sensitivity and angular resolution that should launch neutrino astronomy, and that will ensure the detection of these neutrinos, even in the most pessimistic cases. We present preliminary results of our simulations, plans for the ongoing, staged approach to the construction of GRAND, and the rich research program made possible by the design of GRAND.

  19. Right-handed neutrino dark matter under the B−L gauge interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneta, Kunio [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science,Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Zhaofeng [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye-Sung [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science,Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-07

    We study the right-handed neutrino (RHN) dark matter candidate in the minimal U(1){sub B−L} gauge extension of the standard model. The U(1){sub B−L} gauge symmetry offers three RHNs which can address the origin of the neutrino mass, the relic dark matter, and the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. The lightest among the three is taken as the dark matter candidate, which is under the B−L gauge interaction. We investigate various scenarios for this dark matter candidate with the correct relic density by means of the freeze-out or freeze-in mechanism. A viable RHN dark matter mass lies in a wide range including keV to TeV scale. We emphasize the sub-electroweak scale light B−L gauge boson case, and identify the parameter region motivated from the dark matter physics, which can be tested with the planned experiments including the CERN SHiP experiment.

  20. Interactions and Interventions: Current Research on Improving Informal Astronomy Education via the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, James G.; Gurton, S.; Hurst, A.; Berendsen, M.; Storksdieck, M.; Haley-Goldman, K.; Stein, J.; Pompea, S.; Garmany, C.; Sparks, R.; Pollock, W.

    2007-12-01

    In building national capacity for better informal astronomy education and public outreach (EPO), what sorts of professional development interactions are most effective in what situations--and what interventions for improvement can be effectively applied? Building on previous experience, the ASP, in conjunction with its partners, is conducting two National Science Foundation (NSF) funded projects investigating astronomy teaching and learning in informal contexts to explore these questions in both museum-based and amateur astronomy club settings. "Astronomy from the Ground Up" (AfGU) develops capacity for hands-on astronomy education in small and medium-sized science centers and nature centers through on-site and online professional development workshops and the establishment of a "community of practice" network. The ASP, in collaboration with the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) and the Association of Science and Technology Centers (ASTC), is investigating which model--face-to-face or online professional development--works best and will be sustainable for that target group. "Sharing the Universe" (STU) builds on the Night Sky Network in which amateur astronomy clubs, through the ASP with financial and logistical support from NASA and its missions, are provided tools and training to conduct EPO activities with their public audiences. The ASP, in collaboration with the Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI), launched a national survey in late 2007 to investigate the factors that either support or discourage sustained amateur astronomer EPO efforts, followed by an in-depth study of a subset of both successful and struggling clubs, and leading to the development of interventions that support amateur astronomy outreach within the context of a nurturing club environment. The presentation will offer some early and initial results of the AfGU project--which reveal some interesting and unforeseen advantages of the online model over the on-site model--and some

  1. A Search for Light Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles with SuperCDMS and Applications to Neutrino Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Adam J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological and astrophysical evidence indicates that 85% of the matter content of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic dark matter. A large number of experiments are currently undertaking searches for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the leading class of particle candidates for dark matter. This thesis describes the results of such a search with the SuperCDMS experiment, which uses Ge detectors cooled to 50 mK to detect ionization and phonons produced by particle interactions. We perform a blind analysis of 577 kg d of exposure on 7 detectors targeting WIMPs with masses < 30GeV/$c^{2}$, where anomalous results have been reported by previous experiments. No significant excess is observed and we set an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1.2 x 10$^{-42}$ cm2 at 8 GeV/$c^{2}$ We also set constraints on dark matter interactions independent of the dark matter halo physics, as well as on annual modulation of a dark matter signal. Cryogenic detectors similar to SuperCDMS also have potential applications in neutrino physics. We study several configurations in which dark matter detectors could be used with an intense neutrino source to detect an unmeasured Standard Model process called coherent neutrino scattering. This process may be useful, for example, as a calibration for next-generation dark matter detectors, and for constraining eV-scale sterile neutrinos. In addition, small cryogenic X-ray detectors on sounding rockets with large fields-of-view have the unique ability to constrain sterile neutrino dark matter. We set limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using an observation by the XQC instrument, and discuss prospects for a future observation of the galactic center using the Micro-X instrument.

  2. Neutrinos and our Sun - Part 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pep. 0.3. 3. 10. Neutrino Energy (MeV). The neutrino energy spectrum as predicted by the stan- dard solar model is shown in Figure 2, (see also [1]). 2. Detection of Neutrinos. Since neutrinos have very weak interaction with matter, they are very difficult particles to detect. This property of neutrinos is actually a boon to us ...

  3. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boger, J.; Hahn, R.L.; Rowley, J.K.; Carter, A.L.; Hollebone, B.; Kessler, D.; Blevis, I.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; DeKok, A.; Farine, J.; Grant, D.R.; Hargrove, C.K.; Laberge, G.; Levine, I.; McFarlane, K.; Mes, H.; Noble, A.T.; Novikov, V.M.; O' Neill, M.; Shatkay, M.; Shewchuk, C.; Sinclair, D.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Deal, R.; Earle, E.D.; Gaudette, E.; Milton, G.; Sur, B.; Bigu, J.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cluff, D.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Haq, R.U.; Hewett, J.; Hykawy, J.G.; Jonkmans, G.; Michaud, R.; Roberge, A.; Roberts, J.; Saettler, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Seifert, H.; Sweezey, D.; Tafirout, R.; Virtue, C.J.; Beck, D.N.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, X.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Dycus, F.W.; Gonzalez, J.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Kajiyama, Y.; Koehler, G.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Moebus, M.C.; Norman, E.B.; Okada, C.E.; Poon, A.W.P.; Purgalis, P.; Schuelke, A.; Smith, A.R.; Stokstad, R.G.; Turner, S.; Zlimen, I.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Fowler, M.M.; Goldschmidt, Azriel; Hime, A.; McGirt, A.F.; Miller, G.G.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wouters, J.M.; Anglin, J.D.; Bercovitch, M.; Davidson, W.F.; Storey, R.S.; Biller, S.; Black, R.A.; Boardman, R.J.; Bowler, M.G.; Cameron, J.; Cleveland, B.; Ferraris, A.P.; Doucas, G.; Heron, H.; Howard, C.; Jelley, N.A. E-mail: N.Jelley1@physics.ox.ac.uk; Knox, A.B.; Lay, M.; Locke, W.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Moorhead, M.; Omori, M.; Tanner, N.W.; Taplin, R.K.; Thorman, M.; Wark, D.L.; West, N.; Barton, J.C.; Trent, P.T.; Kouzes, R.; Lowry, M.M.; Bell, A.L.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.; Dayon, M.; Duncan, F.; Erhardt, L.S.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Ford, R.; Hallin, A.; Hamer, A.; Hart, P.M.; Harvey, P.J.; Haslip, D.; Hearns, C.A.W.; Heaton, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Jillings, C.J.; Korpach, E.P.; Lee, H.W.; Leslie, J.R.; Liu, M.-Q.; Mak, H.B.; McDonald, A.B.; MacArthur, J.D.; McLatchie, W.; Moffat, B.A.; Noel, S.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Robertson, B.C.; Skensved, P.; Stevenson, R.L.; Zhu, X.; Gil, S.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Komar, R.J.; Nally, C.W. [and others

    2000-07-11

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is a second-generation water Cherenkov detector designed to determine whether the currently observed solar neutrino deficit is a result of neutrino oscillations. The detector is unique in its use of D{sub 2}O as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by comparison of the charged- and neutral-current interaction rates. In this paper the physical properties, construction, and preliminary operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are described. Data and predicted operating parameters are provided whenever possible.

  4. The European Scanning System for the measurement and analysis of OPERA neutrino interactions with nuclear emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieva, Michela

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion films record tracks of charged particles with sub-micron accuracy. The development of fully automatized and DataBase-driven scanning system has made possible the use of nuclear emulsions in large mass detectors. The OPERA experiment, indeed, consists of a hybrid apparatus composed by electronic detectors and lead-emulsion structures (ECC) that make OPERA a large massive (1.25 kt) and high granularity detector. The European Scanning System (ESS), one of the two systems specifically developed for the needs of OPERA, is able to scan emulsions with a speed of 20cm 2 /h and with position and angular resolution of 0.1μm and 2 mrad. Thanks to these features we are able to follow back charged particles along their trajectories until the location, reconstruction and analysis of neutrino interaction vertices in a quasi-online way.

  5. The European Scanning System for the measurement and analysis of OPERA neutrino interactions with nuclear emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieva, Michela

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear emulsion films record tracks of charged particles with sub-micron accuracy. The development of fully automatized and DataBase-driven scanning system has made possible the use of nuclear emulsions in large mass detectors. The OPERA experiment, indeed, consists of a hybrid apparatus composed by electronic detectors and lead-emulsion structures (ECC) that make OPERA a large massive (1.25 kt) and high granularity detector. The European Scanning System (ESS), one of the two systems specifically developed for the needs of OPERA, is able to scan emulsions with a speed of 20 cm2/h and with position and angular resolution of 0.1 μm and 2 mrad. Thanks to these features we are able to follow back charged particles along their trajectories until the location, reconstruction and analysis of neutrino interaction vertices in a quasi-online way.

  6. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  7. Study of charmed particle production in interactions with neutrinos detected in the experiment NOMAD at CERN; Etude de la production de particules charmees via les interactions de neutrinos dans l'experience nomad au CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechain, X.A

    1999-06-25

    NOMAD (Neutrino Oscillation Magnetic Detector), devoted to the observation of tau neutrino interactions in case of neutrino flavour oscillations, was optimised in order to get an excellent identification of electrons coming from tau decays. Amongst the real events, identified as muon neutrino interactions, we select events including one muon and one positron candidate. We then reduce the number of events for which a hadron simulates the positron, and a method based on a likelihood rate allows us to select events for which the positron, lost in the hadronic jet, comes from the decay of a quark charm, and eliminates those for which the positron comes from photon conversions or Dalitz decays. From the extracted signal, we are able to estimate the mass of the charm quark and the strange sea content of the nucleon, by comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation based on the latest CCFR results. We also carried out a technical study on a possible identification of electrons using the specific behaviour of their tracks left in the drift chambers. We showed that we can get some discrimination power using variables given by the Kalman filter used for track fitting. (author)

  8. Supporting Interactive Teaching Methods at the New Faculty Workshop with Astronomy Lecture-Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Brissenden, G.; Duestua, S.; Prather, E. E.

    2004-05-01

    Ongoing research by the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona Steward Observatory suggests that, although faculty realize that lecture-based instruction is ineffective for many students, they are not aware of what interactive teaching strategies are available, particularly for large enrollment courses. A major emphasis of the AAPT/AAS New Faculty Workshop was to introduce faculty to effective active-learning strategies based on an understanding of how people learn. Faculty were introduced to think-pair-share methods where students work together to explain difficult concepts to each other. Faculty were also introduced to authentic assessment strategies that go beyond using traditional multiple-choice tests. In particular, faculty were introduced to Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy. The Lecture-Tutorials are instructional materials intended for use with collaborative student learning groups and are designed specifically to be easily integrated into existing courses centered on conventional lectures and do not require any outside equipment or a drastic course revision for implementation. The materials are based on research into student beliefs and reasoning difficulties and use effective instructional strategies that center on student learning. Each workshop presentation was complimented by a follow-up small group discussion session.

  9. Neutrinos (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The neutrino, the lightest and most weakly interacting particle of the Standard Model has revealed itself as the messenger of very exciting news in particle physics: there is Physics Beyond the Standard Model. All this thanks to the quantum-mechanical phenomenon of flavour oscillations which is intrinsically connected to the question of neutrino mass and which has been observed in neutrinos produced in natural sources, like the Sun and the Earth's atmosphere, as well as with human made neutrino beams at accelerator and reactors. The purpose of these lectures is to overview some aspects of the phenomenology of massive neutrinos. I will present the simplest extensions for adding neutrino masses to the SM, and then I will describe the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter and its present signatures.

  10. A Nine-Year Hunt for Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    How do we hunt for elusive neutrinos emitted by distant astrophysical sources? Submerge a huge observatory under ice or water and then wait patiently.Sneaky MessengersNeutrinos tiny, nearly massless particles that only weakly interact with other matter are thought to be produced as a constant background originating from throughout our universe. In contrast to known point sources of neutrinos (for instance, nearby supernovae), the diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos could be emitted from unresolved astrophysical sources too faint to be individually detected, or from the interactions of high-energy cosmic rays propagating across the universe.Observations of this diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos would be a huge step toward understanding cosmic-ray production, acceleration, and interaction properties. Unfortunately, these observations arent easy to make!Diagram showing the path of a neutrino from a distant astrophysical source (accelerator) through the Earth. It is eventually converted into an upward-traveling muon that registers in the ANTARES detector under the sea. [ANTARES]Looking for What Doesnt Want to Be FoundBecause neutrinos so rarely interact with matter, most pass right through us, eluding detection. The most common means of spotting the rare interacting neutrino is to look for Cherenkov radiation in a medium like ice or water, produced when a neutrino has interacted with matterto produce a charged particle (for instance, a muon) moving faster than the speed of light in the medium.Muons produced in our atmosphere can also register in such detectors, however, so we need a way of filtering out these non-cosmic background events. The solution is a clever trick: search for particles traveling upward, not downward. Atmospheric muons will come only from above, whereas muons produced by neutrinos should travel through the detectors in all directions, since cosmic neutrinos arrive from all directions including from below, after passing through the Earth

  11. Reducing the H0 and σ8 tensions with dark matter-neutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; BÅ`hm, Céline; Hivon, Eric; Bouchet, François R.

    2018-02-01

    The introduction of dark matter-neutrino interactions modifies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular power spectrum at all scales, thus affecting the reconstruction of the cosmological parameters. Such interactions can lead to a slight increase of the value of H0 and a slight decrease of S8≡σ8√{Ωm/0.3 } , which can help reduce somewhat the tension between the CMB and weak lensing or Cepheids data sets. Here we show that it is impossible to solve both tensions simultaneously. While the 2015 Planck temperature and low multipole polarization data combined with the Cepheids data sets prefer large values of the Hubble rate (up to H0=72.1-1.7+1.5 km /s /Mpc , when Neff is free to vary), the σ8 parameter remains too large to reduce the σ8 tension. Adding high multipole Planck polarization data does not help since this data shows a strong preference for low values of H0, thus worsening current tensions, even though they also prefer smaller value of σ8.

  12. Hans Bethe, the Sun and the Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the stars remained a major puzzle in science, which led to many ..... per sec at Davis's huge tank of the detecting fluid, only about one neutrino per three days interacted. That is the meaning of. 'weak interaction'. See S N Ganguli, Neutrinos and our .... To understand neutrino oscillation, one must think of neutrino as a ...

  13. Neutrino studies in nuclei and intense neutrino sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclei are used as micro laboratories for studying fundamental properties of neutrinos and weak interactions. Nuclear responses for neutrinos are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. The responses, which are mainly nuclear spin isospin responses, are studied indirectly by charge exchange hadronic reactions for charged current responses, and photo nuclear reactions for neutral current responses. Intense neutrino sources provided by stopped pions from intense proton beams are very promising probes for studying directly nuclear weak responses. SNS/ORLaND and JHP combined with large neutrino detectors such as MOON are of potential interest for nuclear response studies with intense neutrino beams

  14. The Detection Of Neutrino Interactions In The OPERA Experiment: An Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrizii, Laura

    2009-01-01

    OPERA is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment built to provide the final and unambiguous proof of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis in the atmospheric sector by observing ν τ emerging from the CNGS ν μ beam. The detector is a hybrid apparatus installed in the Hall C of the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. Runs with CNGS neutrinos were successfully carried out in 2007 and 2008. In this paper the detector and the analysis strategy are briefly described and the status of the analysis of the 2008 run events is discussed.

  15. Active galactic nuclei, neutrinos, and interacting cosmic rays in NGC 253 and NGC 1068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Gallagher III, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Everett, John E., E-mail: yoasthull@wisc.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    The galaxies M82, NGC 253, NGC 1068, and NGC 4945 have been detected in γ-rays by Fermi. Previously, we developed and tested a model for cosmic-ray interactions in the starburst galaxy M82. Now, we aim to explore the differences between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) environments by applying our self-consistent model to the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. Assuming a constant cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency by supernova remnants with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations, predict the radio and γ-ray spectra, and compare with published measurements. We find that our models easily fit the observed γ-ray spectrum for NGC 253 while constraining the cosmic-ray source spectral index and acceleration efficiency. However, we encountered difficultly modeling the observed radio data and constraining the speed of the galactic wind and the magnetic field strength, unless the gas mass is less than currently preferred values. Additionally, our starburst model consistently underestimates the observed γ-ray flux and overestimates the radio flux for NGC 1068; these issues would be resolved if the AGN is the primary source of γ-rays. We discuss the implications of these results and make predictions for the neutrino fluxes for both galaxies.

  16. Experimental Study of Trimuon Events in Neutrino Charged-Current Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Konijn, J; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Van der Poel, C A F J; Visschers, J L; Güler, M; Köse, U; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Kama, S; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Zeyrek, M T; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Ieva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; Van de Vyver, B; Vilain, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, A V; Brunner, J; Chizhov, M; Cussans, D G; Doucet, M; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Litmaath, M; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Saltzberg, D; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Rondeshagen, D; Wolff, T; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Santorelli, R; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Maslennikov, A L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Spada, F R; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of trimuon events induced by neutrino interactions in the CHORUS calorimeter exposed to the CERN SPS wide-band nu_mu beam. Among the multimuon events produced in the calorimeter, 42 mu- mu- mu+ events were selected and their kinematical properties investigated. In the past, several groups collected a sample of about one hundred events of this type but their source was largely unknown. Taking advantage of experimental data presently available on the production and muonic branching ratios of light neutral mesons and resonances, we make absolute predictions for the expected rates in our experiment. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations described in this article show that more than half of the trimuon events can be attributed to this source. Muons from pi- and K- decays in charm dimuon events are responsible for an additional ~25% contribution to the total mu- mu- m+ rate. The remaining 25% of events are likely to come from the internal bremsstrahlung of virtual photons into muon pair. As...

  17. Right-handed neutrinos and T-violating, P-conserving interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basem Kamal El-Menoufi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that experimental probes of the P-conserving, T-violating triple correlation in polarized neutron or nuclear β-decay provide a unique probe of possible T-violation at the TeV scale in the presence of right-handed neutrinos. In contrast to other possible sources of semileptonic T-violation involving only left-handed neutrinos, those involving right-handed neutrinos are relatively unconstrained by present limits on the permanent electric dipole moments of the electron, neutral atoms, and the neutron. On the other hand, LHC results for pp→e+ missing transverse energy imply that an order of magnitude of improvement in D-coefficient sensitivity would be needed for discovery. Finally, we discuss the interplay with the scale of neutrino mass and naturalness considerations.

  18. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, David Jason [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  19. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    . Detection of neutrinos from all past core-collapse supernova explosions in the visible universe with JUNO would further provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapse neutrino energy spectrum. Antineutrinos originating from the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in the Earth can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ˜400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino event samples. Atmospheric neutrino events collected in JUNO can provide independent inputs for determining the MH and the octant of the {θ }23 mixing angle. Detection of the 7Be and 8B solar neutrino events at JUNO would shed new light on the solar metallicity problem and examine the transition region between the vacuum and matter dominated neutrino oscillations. Regarding light sterile neutrino topics, sterile neutrinos with {10}-5 {{{eV}}}2\\lt {{Δ }}{m}412\\lt {10}-2 {{{eV}}}2 and a sufficiently large mixing angle {θ }14 could be identified through a precise measurement of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum. Meanwhile, JUNO can also provide us excellent opportunities to test the eV-scale sterile neutrino hypothesis, using either the radioactive neutrino sources or a cyclotron-produced neutrino beam. The JUNO detector is also sensitive to several other beyondthe-standard-model physics. Examples include the search for proton decay via the p\\to {K}++\\bar{ν } decay channel, search for neutrinos resulting from dark-matter annihilation in the Sun, search for violation of Lorentz invariance via the sidereal modulation of the reactor neutrino event rate, and search for the effects of non-standard interactions. The proposed construction of the JUNO detector will provide a unique facility to address many outstanding crucial questions in particle and astrophysics in a timely and cost-effective fashion. It holds the great potential for further advancing our quest to understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, one

  20. Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and the Short-Range Structure of Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanna, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Palamara, O. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schiavilla, R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wiringa, R. B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Improvements in theoretical modeling of Short Range structures and phenomena, and comparisons with data, will require sustained collaboration between nuclear theorists and neutrino experimentalists. The extensive history of studying this area of nuclear physics in electron- and hadron-scattering experiments, coupled with the transformative capabilities of LArTPCs to identify neutrinos, will provide a ripe opportunity for new discoveries that will further our understanding of the nucleus.

  1. The role of self-interacting right-handed neutrinos in galactic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Argüelles, C.R.; Rueda, J.A.; Ruffini, R.

    2016-01-01

    We show that warm dark matter keV fermions (`inos') can be responsible for both core and halo galactic structure, in agreement with current astrophysical/cosmological constraints. We identify the inos with sterile right-handed neutrinos. The possible mass range of up to a few tens of keV, obtained independently from the galactic structure and dark matter astroparticle physics, points towards an important role of the right-handed neutrinos in the cosmic structure.

  2. Neutrino properties from cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannestad, S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years precision cosmology has become an increasingly powerful probe of particle physics. Perhaps the prime example of this is the very stringent cosmological upper bound on the neutrino mass. However, other aspects of neutrino physics, such as their decoupling history and possible non......-standard interactions, can also be probed using observations of cosmic structure. Here, I review the current status of cosmological bounds on neutrino properties and discuss the potential of future observations, for example by the recently approved EUCLID mission, to precisely measure neutrino properties....

  3. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Q. R. Ahmad, R. C. Allen, T. C. Andersen, J. D. Anglin, G. Bühler, J. C. Barton, E. W. Beier, M. Bercovitch, J. Bigu, S. Biller, R. A. Black, I. Blevis, R. J. Boardman, J. Boger, E. Bonvin, M. G. Boulay, M. G. Bowler, T. J. Bowles, S. J. Brice, M. C. Browne, T. V. Bullard, T. H. Burritt, K. Cameron, J. Cameron, Y. D. Chan, M. Chen, H. H. Chen, X. Chen, M. C. Chon, B. T. Cleveland, E. T. H. Clifford, J. H. M. Cowan, D. F. Cowen, G. A. Cox, Y. Dai, X. Dai, F. Dalnoki-Veress, W. F. Davidson, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, M. R. Dragowsky, C. A. Duba, F. A. Duncan, J. Dunmore, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, A. P. Ferraris, R. J. Ford, M. M. Fowler, K. Frame, E. D. Frank, W. Frati, J. V. Germani, S. Gil, A. Goldschmidt, D. R. Grant, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, A. Hamer, A. A. Hamian, R. U. Haq, C. K. Hargrove, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, R. Heaton, K. M. Heeger, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, J. D. Hepburn, H. Heron, J. Hewett, A. Hime, M. Howe, J. G. Hykawy, M. C. P. Isaac, P. Jagam, N. A. Jelley, C. Jillings, G. Jonkmans, J. Karn, P. T. Keener, K. Kirch, J. R. Klein, A. B. Knox, R. J. Komar, R. Kouzes, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, M. Lay, H. W. Lee, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, W. Locke, M. M. Lowry, S. Luoma, J. Lyon, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, A. D. Marino, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, D. S. McDonald, K. McFarlane, G. McGregor, W. McLatchie, R. Meijer Drees, H. Mes, C. Mifflin, G. G. Miller, G. Milton, B. A. Moffat, M. Moorhead, C. W. Nally, M. S. Neubauer, F. M. Newcomer, H. S. Ng, A. J. Noble, E. B. Norman, V. M. Novikov, M. O'Neill, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, M. Omori, J. L. Orrell, S. M. Oser, A. W. P. Poon, T. J. Radcliffe, A. Roberge, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, J. K. Rowley, V. L. Rusu, E. Saettler, K. K. Schaffer, A. Schuelke, M. H. Schwendener, H. Seifert, M. Shatkay, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. Steiger, R. G. Stokstad, R. S. Storey, B. Sur, R. Tafirout, N. Tagg, N. W. Tanner, R. K. Taplin, M. Thorman, P. Thornewell, P. T. Trent, Y. I. Tserkovnyak, R. Van Berg, R. G. Van de Water, C. J. Virtue, C. E. Waltham, J.-X. Wang, D. L. Wark, N. West, J. B. Wilhelmy, J. F. Wilkerson, J. Wilson, P. Wittich, J. M. Wouters, and M. Yeh

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  4. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen, T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Buhler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar, R.J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A.D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, D.S.; McDonald, A.B.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer, R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G.G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B.A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; Newcomer, F.M.; Ng, H.S.; Noble, A.J.; Norman, E.B.; Novikov, V.M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C.E.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J.L.; Oser, S.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rosendahl, S.S.E.; Rowley, J.K.; Rusu, V.L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K.K.; Schwendener, M.H.; Schulke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J.J.; Sims, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D 2 O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar ν e flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of 8 B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to ν e , the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to ν μ and ν τ . In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from 8 B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The ν e flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3σ. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to ν e , in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active 8 B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions

  5. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen, T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Barton,J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler,M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Buhler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky,M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac,M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar, R.J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter,T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A.D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,D.S.; McDonald, A.B.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer, R.; Mifflin,C.; Miller, G.G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B.A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; Newcomer, F.M.; Ng, H.S.; Noble, A.J.; Norman, E.B.; Novikov, V.M.; O' Neill, M.; Okada, C.E.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J.L.; Oser, S.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rosendahl, S.S.E.; Rowley, J.K.; Rusu, V.L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K.K.; Schwendener,M.H.; Schulke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J.J.; Sims, C.J.; et al.

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  6. A model for large non-standard interactions of neutrinos leading to the LMA-Dark solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Farzan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that in addition to the standard LMA solution to solar anomaly, there is another solution called LMA-Dark which requires Non-Standard Interactions (NSI with effective couplings as large as the Fermi coupling. Although this solution satisfies all the bounds from various neutrino oscillation observations and even provides a better fit to low energy solar neutrino spectrum, it is not as popular as the LMA solution mainly because no model compatible with the existing bounds has been so far constructed to give rise to this solution. We introduce a model that provides a foundation for such large NSI with strength and flavor structure required for the LMA-Dark solution. This model is based on a new U(1′ gauge interaction with a gauge boson of mass ∼10 MeV under which quarks as well as the second and third generations of leptons are charged. We show that observable effects can appear in the spectrum of supernova and high energy cosmic neutrinos. Our model predicts a new contribution to the muon magnetic dipole moment and new rare meson decay modes.

  7. ANTARES: The first undersea neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Becherini, Y.; Beltramelli, J.; Bersani, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bogazzi, C.; de Botton, N.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Boudahef, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Cassano, B.; Castorina, E.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Chaleil, Th.; Charvis, Ph.; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Compère, C.; Coniglione, R.; Coppolani, X.; Cosquer, A.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Curtil, C.; D'Amato, C.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; de Bonis, G.; Decock, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Desages-Ardellier, F.; Deschamps, A.; Destelle, J.-J.; di Maria, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Distefano, C.; Dominique, J.-L.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drogou, J.-F.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Durand, R.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Engelen, J. J.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatá, S.; Galeotti, S.; Gay, P.; Gensolen, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Gojak, C.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A. J.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, M.; Jourde, D.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karkar, S.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kestener, P.; Kok, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lahonde-Hamdoun, C.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Languillat, J.-C.; Larosa, G.; Lavalle, J.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Levansuu, A.; Lefèvre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Lévéque, C.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Mangano, S.; Marcel, A.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Masullo, R.; Mazéas, F.; Mazure, A.; Meli, A.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, C.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Neff, M.; Niess, V.; Nooren, G. J. L.; Oberski, J. E. J.; Olivetto, C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Palioselitis, D.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Piret, Y.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Prono, G.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Réthoré, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Ricol, J. S.; Rigaud, V.; Roca, V.; Roensch, K.; Rolin, J.-F.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rottura, A.; Roux, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Shanidze, R.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sottoriva, A.; Spies, A.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Streeb, K.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Tasca, L.; Terreni, G.; Tezier, D.; Toscano, S.; Urbano, F.; Valdy, P.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; Virique, E.; de Vries, G.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnker, G.; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yakovenko, Y.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-11-01

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope was completed in May 2008 and is the first operational Neutrino Telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The main purpose of the detector is to perform neutrino astronomy and the apparatus also offers facilities for marine and Earth sciences. This paper describes the design, the construction and the installation of the telescope in the deep sea, offshore from Toulon in France. An illustration of the detector performance is given.

  8. Experimental study of the nucleon structure functions and of the gluon distribution from charged-current neutrino and antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsma, F.; Dorenbosch, J.; Jonker, M.; Nieuwenhuis, C.; Udo, F.; Allaby, J.V.; Amaldi, U.; Barbiellini, G.; Barone, L.; Capone, A.; Flegel, W.; Metcalf, M.; Panman, J.; Winter, K.; Abt, I.; Aspiazu, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Daumann, H.; Gall, P.D.; Metz, E.; Niebergall, F.; Ranitzsch, K.H.; Staehelin, P.

    1983-01-01

    Inclusive neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions were studied in the CHARM detector exposed to neutrino and antineutrino Wide Band Beams of the CERN 400 GeV SPS. The x and Q 2 dependence of the structure functions F 2 and xF 3 and of the antiquark momentum distribution q were determined. The data have been interpreted in terms of QCD theory using the Furmanski-Petronzio method. In this way we have determined #betta#sub(LO)=[190 + 70 sub(-40)(stat)+-70 (syst.)] MeV and the structure functions of quarks and gluons without specific assumptions on their analytic dependence. The results agree with previous experiments which relied on model assumptions in the analysis. We conclude that the model independent simultaneous analysis of the xF 3 , F 2 , anti q structure functions gives a more reliable determination of the gluon distribution in the nucleon. (orig.)

  9. Systems of neutrinos with mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, S.R. de

    1984-01-01

    From the formalism of relativistic kinetic theory and the weak interaction Lagrangian the volume viscosity of a massive neutrino system is derived. Its value is calculated as a function of the neutrino mass and the temperature. Its role in the way of expanding or contraction of neutrino clouds in the universe is discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. Neutrinos from the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Erwin Lourens

    2015-01-01

    A guaranteed source of neutrinos is the production in cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar matter in our Galaxy. The signal has never been detected however and only an upper limit on this flux of neutrinos has been published by the AMANDA-II detector. The ANTARES neutrino telescope, located

  11. Astronomy and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John M.

    The relationship between astronomy and politics is a complex but important part of understanding the practice of astronomy throughout history. This chapter explores some of the ways that astronomy, astrology, and politics have interacted, placing particular focus on the way that astronomy and astrology have been used for political purposes by both people in power and people who wish to influence a ruler's policy. Also discussed are the effects that politics has had on the development of astronomy and, in particular, upon the recording and preservation of astronomical knowledge.

  12. Neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil-Botella, I.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac), of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end. (author)

  13. Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Botella, I.

    2013-06-27

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

  14. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic. Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dis- persion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming ...

  15. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability.

  16. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hime, A.

    1996-09-01

    A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

  17. Neutrino cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berstein, J.

    1984-01-01

    These lectures offer a self-contained review of the role of neutrinos in cosmology. The first part deals with the question 'What is a neutrino.' and describes in a historical context the theoretical ideas and experimental discoveries related to the different types of neutrinos and their properties. The basic differences between the Dirac neutrino and the Majorana neutrino are pointed out and the evidence for different neutrino 'flavours', neutrino mass, and neutrino oscillations is discussed. The second part summarizes current views on cosmology, particularly as they are affected by recent theoretical and experimental advances in high-energy particle physics. Finally, the close relationship between neutrino physics and cosmology is brought out in more detail, to show how cosmological constraints can limit the various theoretical possibilities for neutrinos and, more particularly, how increasing knowledge of neutrino properties can contribute to our understanding of the origin, history, and future of the Universe. The level is that of the beginning graduate student. (orig.)

  18. Neutrino interaction event reconstruction and analysis in the Opera emulsion targets and charmed background rejection in the τ → 3h channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnier, M.

    2008-07-01

    OPERA (Gran-Sasso, Italy) is a long-baseline neutrino experiment dedicated to the tau neutrino detection in a pure muon neutrino beam, produced at CERN (730 km away). The main goal is to observe the ν μ → ν τ oscillation. The experiment uses a hybrid technology with electronic detectors and target blocks made of lead plates interleaved with nuclear emulsion sheets, in order to sign efficiently the ν τ interactions. The fundamental features of OPERA are its particle reconstruction performances achieved in spatial and angular resolutions. The first studies done in this thesis concern the development of several analysis tools like the particle momentum determination using the multiple coulomb scattering in target, and a method of neutrino interaction reconstruction for multi-vertex events. Then it has been possible to develop a multivariable analysis in order to separate τ and charmed events in the τ decay channel into three charged hadrons. These tools have been tested with neutrino interactions observed first with the OPERA test-beam called PEANUT, then with the OPERA events accumulated during the first CNGS (CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso) run in 2007. The combined analysis of these events has shown that both the analysis method and the OPERA detector behaviour are well understood. (author)

  19. New chiral fermions, a new gauge interaction, Dirac neutrinos, and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvêa, André de; Hernández, Daniel [Northwestern University, Department of Physics & Astronomy,2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    We propose that all light fermionic degrees of freedom, including the Standard Model (SM) fermions and all possible light beyond-the-standard-model fields, are chiral with respect to some spontaneously broken abelian gauge symmetry. Hypercharge, for example, plays this role for the SM fermions. We introduce a new symmetry, U(1){sub ν}, for all new light fermionic states. Anomaly cancellations mandate the existence of several new fermion fields with nontrivial U(1){sub ν} charges. We develop a concrete model of this type, for which we show that (i) some fermions remain massless after U(1){sub ν} breaking — similar to SM neutrinos — and (ii) accidental global symmetries translate into stable massive particles — similar to SM protons. These ingredients provide a solution to the dark matter and neutrino mass puzzles assuming one also postulates the existence of heavy degrees of freedom that act as “mediators' between the two sectors. The neutrino mass mechanism described here leads to parametrically small Dirac neutrino masses, and the model also requires the existence of at least four Dirac sterile neutrinos. Finally, we describe a general technique to write down chiral-fermions-only models that are at least anomaly-free under a U(1) gauge symmetry.

  20. Study of atmospheric neutrino interactions and search for nucleon decay in Soudan 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeson, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Contained event samples, including 30 single-track muon-like events, 35 single-shower electron-like events, and 34 multiprong events, have been obtained from a 1.0 kiloton-year exposure of the Soudan 2 detector. A sample of 15 multiprong events which are partially contained has also been isolated. Properties of these events are used to examine the verity of the atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio anomaly as reported by the Kamiokande and IMB-3 water Cherenkov experiments. The compatibility of the Soudan data with each of two 'new physics' explanations for the anomaly, namely proton decay and neutrino oscillations, is investigated. We examine background processes which have not been explicitly treated by the water Cherenkov detectors. Chapters discuss underground non-accelerator particle physics, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and its interpretation, the Soudan 2 detector and event selection, reconstruction of neutrino events, rock event contamination in Soudan 'quasi-elastic' samples, contained multiprong events in Soudan 2, neutrino flavor composition of the multiprong sample, partially contained events in Soudan 2, nucleon decay in Soudan 2, and a summary and discussion. 12 refs., 124 figs., 28 tabs., 7 appendices

  1. Study of atmospheric neutrino interactions and search for nucleon decay in Soudan 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeson, William R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1995-12-14

    Contained event samples, including 30 single-track muon-like events, 35 single-shower electron-like events, and 34 multiprong events, have been obtained from a 1.0 kiloton-year exposure of the Soudan 2 detector. A sample of 15 multiprong events which are partially contained has also been isolated. Properties of these events are used to examine the verity of the atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio anomaly as reported by the Kamiokande and IMB-3 water Cherenkov experiments. The compatibility of the Soudan data with each of two `new physics` explanations for the anomaly, namely proton decay and neutrino oscillations, is investigated. We examine background processes which have not been explicitly treated by the water Cherenkov detectors. Chapters discuss underground non-accelerator particle physics, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and its interpretation, the Soudan 2 detector and event selection, reconstruction of neutrino events, rock event contamination in Soudan `quasi-elastic` samples, contained multiprong events in Soudan 2, neutrino flavor composition of the multiprong sample, partially contained events in Soudan 2, nucleon decay in Soudan 2, and a summary and discussion.

  2. Neutrinos and dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrempp, L.

    2008-02-15

    From the observed late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion arises the quest for the nature of Dark Energy. As has been widely discussed, the cosmic neutrino background naturally qualifies for a connection with the Dark Energy sector and as a result could play a key role for the origin of cosmic acceleration. In this thesis we explore various theoretical aspects and phenomenological consequences arising from non-standard neutrino interactions, which dynamically link the cosmic neutrino background and a slowly-evolving scalar field of the dark sector. In the considered scenario, known as Neutrino Dark Energy, the complex interplay between the neutrinos and the scalar field not only allows to explain cosmic acceleration, but intriguingly, as a distinct signature, also gives rise to dynamical, time-dependent neutrino masses. In a first analysis, we thoroughly investigate an astrophysical high energy neutrino process which is sensitive to neutrino masses. We work out, both semi-analytically and numerically, the generic clear-cut signatures arising from a possible time variation of neutrino masses which we compare to the corresponding results for constant neutrino masses. Finally, we demonstrate that even for the lowest possible neutrino mass scale, it is feasible for the radio telescope LOFAR to reveal a variation of neutrino masses and therefore to probe the nature of Dark Energy within the next decade. A second independent analysis deals with the recently challenged stability of Neutrino Dark Energy against the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations, driven by the new scalar force felt between neutrinos. Within the framework of linear cosmological perturbation theory, we derive the equation of motion of the neutrino perturbations in a model-independent way. This equation allows to deduce an analytical stability condition which translates into a comfortable upper bound on the scalar-neutrino coupling which is determined by the ratio of the densities in cold dark

  3. Study of opposite-sign dimuon production in high-energy neutrino-nucleon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strongin, B.; Bofill, J.; Friedman, J. I.; Fuess, S.; Goodman, M. C.; Kendall, H. W.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Lyons, T.; Osborne, L. S.; Pitt, R.; Schneekloth, U.; Taylor, F. E.; Bogert, D.; Koizumi, G.; Stutte, L.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; Cobau, W.; Hatcher, R.; Owen, D.; Perkins, G.; Tartaglia, M.; Weerts, H.; Belusevic, R.; Walker, J. K.; White, A.; Womersley, J.

    1991-05-01

    Results are presented of a study of opposite-sign dimuon events observed in a fine-grained neutrino detector exposed to the Fermilab Tevatron wide-band neutrino beam. A total of 300 background-corrected μ+μ- events induced by incident neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to 500 GeV were accumulated. The data were analyzed in terms of a model based on charm-quark production followed by semileptonic decay of the charmed meson. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix terms were found to be ||Ucd||2=0.0378+/-0.0127 (stat)+0.0099-0.0082 (syst), and κ||Ucs||2=0.391+/-0.076 (stat)+0.097-0.066 (syst). The ratio of the strange to nonstrange sea in the nucleon, κ=2S/(U¯+D¯), was measured to be 0.407+/-0.075 (stat)+0.103-0.069 (syst).

  4. A letter of intent for a neutrino scattering experiment on the booster neutrino meanline: FINeSSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, B.T.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Yale U.

    2005-03-01

    identified as a priority of the neutrino community, as determined through the APS Multidisciplinary Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics. From the APS report, the Neutrino Matrix makes its recommendations in context of several assumptions regarding the neutrino program, including: ''Determination of the neutrino reaction and production cross sections required for a precise understanding of neutrino oscillation physics and the neutrino astronomy of astrophysical and cosmological sources. Our broad and exacting program of neutrino physics is built upon precise knowledge of how neutrinos interact with matter''. The experiment described here will provide unique information on cross sections of {approx}1 GeV neutrinos, in precisely the range explored by present and future long baseline oscillation programs. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is the natural place to perform this experiment. The physics goals proposed here grow the existing program and are necessary ingredients for the next generation oscillation physics measurements in this same energy range. This is a small, cost-effective, and timely experiment which fits well with the growing neutrino program at Fermilab.

  5. New neutrino oscillation results from NOVA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Neutrinos oscillate among flavors as they travel because a neutrino of a particular flavor is also a superposition of multiple neutrinos with slightly different masses.  The interferometric nature of oscillations allows these tiny mass differences to be measured, along with the parameters of the PMNS matrix which governs the mixing. However, since neutrinos only interact weakly, a powerful neutrino source and massive detectors are required to measure them. In this talk I will show recently updated results from NOvA, a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab with two functionally identical scintillator detectors. I will present measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance, and what constraints those measurements put on the remaining open questions in neutrino oscillations: Is the neutrino mass hierarchy "normal" or "inverted?" Do neutrino oscillations violate CP symmetry? Is the mixing in the atmospheric sector maximal? The recent update includes 50%...

  6. Experimental study of the nucleon longitudinal structure function in charged-current neutrino and antineutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsma, F.; Dorenbosch, J.; Jonker, M.; Nieuwenhuis, C.; Allaby, J.V.; Amaldi, U.; Barbiellini, G.; Barone, L.; Capone, A.; Flegel, W.; Metcalf, M.; Panman, J.; Winter, K.; Abt, I.; Aspiazu, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Daumann, H.; Gall, P.D.; Metz, E.; Niebergall, F.; Ranitzsch, K.H.; Staehelin, P.; Baroncelli, A.; Bosio, C.; Tortora, L.; Borgia, B.; Diemoz, M.; Dore, U.; Ferroni, F.; Longo, E.; Luminari, L.; Monacelli, P.; De Notaristefani, F.; Pistilli, P.; Santoni, C.; Valente, V.

    1984-01-01

    The x dependence of the longitudinal structure function Fsub(L) was determined with the CHARM neutrino detector exposed to neutrino and antineutrino wide-band beams of the CERN 400 GeV SPS. The results show a clear deviation from the Callan-Gross relation. The amount and the x dependence of this deviation are in agreement with the contribution coming from a finite transverse momentum of the partons in the nucleon if both the intrinsic and perturbative QCD terms are taken into account. (orig.)

  7. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devan, Alena V. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm2. An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, ms2 ~ 1 eV2. The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  8. We Detected Phenomena, Like Africa's Dogon, that Speak of Stellar Gravitational Neutrino Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, David Matthew; McLeod, Roger David

    2009-05-01

    Stick figure equivalents of Kokopelli/Pele/Pamola/Thor/Orion/Osiris, Canis Major/Anubis/Wolf/Fox, Leo/Bird Tailed Jaguar/Beaver Tailed Mountain Lion, were detected by us. They figure heavily in the spiritual/scientific world view of many traditional societies, and their cultural respect for the information such figures convey. Scientific instruments from the past were our laboratories, and theirs. All string/stick figure equivalents may represent types of longitudinally aligned neutrino flux between certain stellar pairs. Neutrino beams from distant pulsars, quasars, or other neutrino sources, cannot penetrate these graviton-like strings. They do pass through sectors of Earth, projecting stick figures within instruments like the Watch House at America's Stonehenge, and perhaps the chamber beneath the Great Pyramid. Sirius B, as the heaviest object in ``our'' universe for the Dogon, means it shares a profound graviton-like neutrino highway to our sun, as Sirius B/A do within Canis Major. It is possibly projected by a source within the Canis Major dwarf galaxy at about 3,000 times as distant as Sirius B/A at 8.7 ly.

  9. Self-interacting dark matter and Higgs bosons in the SU(3)C x SU(3)L x U(1)N model with right-handed neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Ngoc Long; Nguyen Quynh Lan

    2003-05-01

    We show that the SU(3) C x SU(3) L x U(1) N (3-3-1) model with right-handed neutrinos can provide candidates for self-interacting dark matter, namely they are the CP-even and odd Higgs bosons. These dark matters are stable without imposing of new symmetry and should be weak-interacting. (author)

  10. A Measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic interaction and a test of Lorentz violation with the MiniBooNE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katori, Teppei [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The Mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is designed to search for vμ → ve appearance neutrino oscillations. Muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interactions (vμ + n → μ + p) make up roughly 40% of our data sample, and it is used to constrain the background and cross sections for the oscillation analysis. Using high-statistics MiniBooNE CCQE data, the muon-neutrino CCQE cross section is measured. The nuclear model is tuned precisely using the MiniBooNE data. The measured total cross section is σ = (1.058 ± 0.003 (stat) ± 0.111 (syst)) x 10-38 cm2 at the MiniBooNE muon neutrino beam energy (700-800 MeV). ve appearance candidate data is also used to search for Lorentz violation. Lorentz symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in modern physics. Neutrino oscillations offer a new method to test it. We found that the MiniBooNE result is not well-described using Lorentz violation, however further investigation is required for a more conclusive result.

  11. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  12. Neutrino astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roulet, E.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos. The major role that neutrinos play in astrophysics and cosmology is illustrated. (author)

  13. Neutrino physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the writeup of the lectures on neutrino physics delivered at various schools: TASI and Trieste in 2013 and the CERN-Latin American School in 2015. The topics discussed in this lecture include: general properties of neutrinos in the SM, the theory of neutrino masses and mixings (Dirac and Majorana), neutrino oscillations both in vacuum and in matter, as well as an overview of the experimental evidence for neutrino masses and of the prospects in neutrino oscillation physics. We also briefly review the relevance of neutri- nos in leptogenesis and in beyond-the-Standard-Model physics.

  14. An Experiment in BEBC to Compare Neutral and Charged Current Neutrino Interactions Induced by $\

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The CERN narrow-band neutrino beam provides a unique possibility to study whether there is a difference between neutrinos resulting from @p-decays and those from K-decays. Since any difference might most strongly appear in strange particle production, BEBC is particularly suited for this study thanks to the efficient strange particle detection it provides.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment consists of two exposures of about 100 K pictures each in BEBC filled with 75\\% Ne-H^2 mixture without TST. The parent energies are most conveniently chosen to be respectively 275 GeV and 75 GeV yielding E(@nK) = E(@n@p) @= 65 GeV as the common energy. This would make the higher energy run parasitic on NB operation of the approved WA1 counter experiment. The lower, approximately coincides with an energy proposed for the Gargamelle experiment WA23.

  15. New scotogenic model of neutrino mass with U(1){sub D} gauge interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Picek, Ivica; Radovčić, Branimir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, P.O.B. 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2013-11-04

    We propose a new realization of the one-loop radiative model of neutrino mass generated by dark matter (scotogenic), where the particles in the loop have an additional U(1){sub D} gauge symmetry, which may be exact or broken to Z{sub 2}. This model is relevant to a number of astrophysical observations, including AMS-02 and the dark-matter distribution in dwarf galactic halos.

  16. Search for active-sterile neutrino mixing using neutral-current interactions in NOvA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamson, P.; Aliaga, L.; Ambrose, D.; Lokajíček, Miloš; Zálešák, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 7 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 072006. ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015068; GA MŠk(CZ) LG15047 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : NOvA * Fermilab * mass difference * near detector * far detector * mixing angle * neutrino * oscillation * experimental results Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016

  17. Study of opposite-sign dimuon production in high-energy neutrino-nucleon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strongin, B.; Bofill, J.; Friedman, J.I.; Fuess, S.; Goodman, M.C.; Kendall, H.W.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Lyons, T.; Osborne, L.S.; Pitt, R.; Schneekloth, U.; Taylor, F.E. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (USA)); Bogert, D.; Koizumi, G.; Stutte, L. (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (USA)); Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; Cobau, W.; Hatcher, R.; Owen, D.; Perkins, G.; Tartaglia, M.; Weerts, H. (Michigan State University, E. Lansing, Michigan 48824 (USA)); Belusevic, R.; Walker, J.K.; White, A.; Womersley, J. (University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Results are presented of a study of opposite-sign dimuon events observed in a fine-grained neutrino detector exposed to the Fermilab Tevatron wide-band neutrino beam. A total of 300 background-corrected {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} events induced by incident neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to 500 GeV were accumulated. The data were analyzed in terms of a model based on charm-quark production followed by semileptonic decay of the charmed meson. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix terms were found to be {vert bar}{ital U}{sub {ital c}{ital d}}{vert bar}{sup 2}=0.0378{plus minus}0.0127 (stat){sub {minus}0.0082}{sup +0.0099} (syst), and {kappa}{vert bar}{ital U}{sub {ital c}{ital s}}{vert bar}{sup 2}=0.391{plus minus}0.076 (stat){sub {minus}0.066}{sup +0.097} (syst). The ratio of the strange to nonstrange sea in the nucleon, {kappa}=2{ital S}/({ital {bar U}}+{ital {bar D}}), was measured to be 0.407{plus minus}0.075 (stat){sub {minus}0.069}{sup +0.103} (syst).

  18. Diffuse fluxes of cosmic neutrinos in KM3NeT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; KM3NeT Consortium1

    2011-01-01

    The search for diffuse fluxes of cosmic neutrinos is among the main objectives of high-energy neutrino astronomy. The future Mediterranean deep-sea neutrino telescope KM3NeT, due to its multi-km3 instrumented volume will have unprecedented sensitivity for the observation of these fluxes. Detection of diffuse neutrino fluxes of different origins (extragalactic, from inner Galaxy and cosmogenic) in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope is discussed in this paper.

  19. Diffuse fluxes of cosmic neutrinos in KM3NeT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, T., E-mail: thomas.seitz@physik.uni-erlangen.d [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Shanidze, R., E-mail: shanidze@physik.uni-erlangen.d [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-01-21

    The search for diffuse fluxes of cosmic neutrinos is among the main objectives of high-energy neutrino astronomy. The future Mediterranean deep-sea neutrino telescope KM3NeT, due to its multi-km{sup 3} instrumented volume will have unprecedented sensitivity for the observation of these fluxes. Detection of diffuse neutrino fluxes of different origins (extragalactic, from inner Galaxy and cosmogenic) in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope is discussed in this paper.

  20. Multiplicity distributions of charged hadrons produced in (anti)neutrino-deuterium charged- and neutral-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongejans, B.; Tenner, A.G.; Apeldoorn, G.W. van

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the multiplicity distributions of charged hadrons produced in νn, νp, antiνn and antiνp charged-current interactions for the hadronic energy range 2GeV ≤ W ≤ 14GeV (corresponding approximately to the neutrino energy range 5GeV ≤ E ≤ 150GeV). The experimental distributions are analysed in terms of binomial distributions. With increasing hadronic energy it is found a smooth transition from an ordinary binomial via Poissonian to the negative binomial function. KNO scaling holds approximately for the multiplicity distribution for the whole phase space. Data on the multiplicity distributions for neutral-current interactions are also presented

  1. Submarine neutrino communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the possibility to use a high energy neutrino beam from a muon storage ring to provide one way communication with a submerged submarine. Neutrino interactions produce muons which can be detected either, directly when they pass through the submarine or by their emission of Cerenkov light in sea water, which, in turn, can be exploited with sensitive photo detectors. Due to the very high neutrino flux from a muon storage ring, it is sufficient to mount either detection system directly onto the hull of the submersible. The achievable data transfer rates compare favorable with existing technologies and do allow for a communication at the usual speed and depth of submarines.

  2. Supernova neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Cardall, Christian Y.

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collap...

  3. Neutrino Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutrino Oscillations: New Windows to the Particle World. General Article Volume 21 Issue 10 ... Neutrino oscillation is a quantum mechanicalphenomenon whereby a neutrino created witha specific lepton flavour (electron, muon, or tau) can later bemeasured to have a different flavour. Historical developmentof the field in ...

  4. Solar Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar Neutrinos. Revathi Ananthakrishnan. 1. Introduction. The neutrino, which means the little neutral one in Ital- ian, is a very special elementary particle. It is a spin half, chargeless and almost . massless particle and therefore eluded detection for a long time. However, the sun is a rich source of neutrinos and physicists ...

  5. Development of an automatic scanning system for nuclear emulsion analysis in the OPERA experiment and study of neutrino interactions location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrabito, L.

    2007-10-01

    Following Super Kamiokande and K2K experiments, Opera (Oscillation Project with Emulsion tracking Apparatus), aims to confirm neutrino oscillation in the atmospheric sector. Taking advantage of a technique already employed in Chorus and in Donut, the Emulsion Cloud Chamber (ECC), Opera will be able to observe the ν μ → ν τ oscillation, through the ν τ appearance in a pure ν μ beam. The Opera experiment, with its ∼ 100000 m 2 of nuclear emulsions, needs a very fast automatic scanning system. Optical and mechanics components have been customized in order to achieve a speed of about 20 cm 2 /hour per emulsion layer (44 μm thick), while keeping a sub-micro-metric resolution. The first part of this thesis was dedicated to the optimization of 4 scanning systems at the French scanning station, based in Lyon. An experimental study on a dry objective scanning system has also been realized. The obtained results show that the performances of dry scanning are similar with respect to the traditional oil scanning, so that it can be successfully used for Opera. The second part of this work was devoted to the study of the neutrino interaction location and reconstruction strategy actually used in Opera. A dedicated test beam was performed at CERN in order to simulate Opera conditions. The obtained results definitely confirm that the proposed strategy is well adapted for tau search. (author)

  6. Los Neutrinos Los Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Félix

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available From all the proposals to understand the structure of matter, and the way the natural world is conformed, the one about neutrinos is the most enigmatic, abstract, and foreign to immediate experience; however, this is the one that has delved more deeply over the nearly eighty years since it was formulated by Wolfgang Pauli –in 1930- as a radical proposition to understand nucleon decay, and the decay of other particles, without the violation of the principle of conservation of energy and momentum at subatomic level. This proposition has evolved through the years, and from Pauli’s original idea only the basic elements remain.This article contains the tale of the hypothesis of neutrinos, its early history, its evolution up to present day, and the efforts done nowadays to study them. In summary, this is the physics of neutrinos. De todas las propuestas para entender la estructura de la materia, y la conformación del mundo natural, los neutrinos es la más enigmática, abstracta, y ajena a la experiencia inmediata; sin embargo, es la que más hondo ha ido calando a lo largo de los ya casi ochenta años de haber sido formulada por Wolfgang Pauli –en el año 1930- como una medida radical para entender el decaimiento de los nucleones, y otras partículas, sin que se violara el principio de la conservación de la energía y del momento a nivel subatómico. La propuesta ha evolucionado a lo largo de los años, y de la idea original de Pauli ya sólo lo básico permanece. En este artículo está el relato de la hipótesis de los neutrinos, su historia primera, su evolución hasta el presente, los esfuerzos que en la actualidad se realizan para estudiarlos. En breve, ésta es la física de los neutrinos.

  7. Hands-on-Universe, Europe Bringing frontline interactive astronomy to the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, R.

    Hands-on-Universe, Europe (EU-HOU) aims at re-awakening the interest for science in the young generations through astronomy and new technologies. It relies on real observations acquired through a worldwide internet-based network of automatic telescopes or with didactical tools (webcam, radiotelescope). Pupils manipulate images in the classroom environment, using specific software within pedagogical resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. EU-HOU is freely available on the web, and trains european teachers.

  8. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  9. New phenomena in neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss two new concepts in neutrino physics: The neutrino Moessbauer effect and non-standard neutrino interactions. We show that neutrinos emitted and absorbed in recoil-free processes (Moessbauer neutrinos) can oscillate in spite of their near monochromaticity. We support this statement by quantum mechanical wave packet arguments and by a quantum field theoretical (QFT) calculation of the combined rate of Moessbauer neutrino emission, propagation and absorption. The QFT approach does not require any a priori assumptions on the neutrino wave function, and it allows us to include a realistic treatment of the different mechanisms leading to broadening of the emission and absorption lines. In the second part of this work, we study the phenomenology of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). We classifying the allowed NSI operators according to their impact on future oscillation experiments and present numerical results for the NSI sensitivities of reactor, superbeam and neutrino factory experiments. We point out that NSI could mimic standard oscillation effects, and might therefore lead to incorrect fit values for the oscillation parameters. For the case of the neutrino factory, we perform a detailed optimisation study to determine the optimum muon energy and detector configuration. (orig.)

  10. New phenomena in neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis, we discuss two new concepts in neutrino physics: The neutrino Moessbauer effect and non-standard neutrino interactions. We show that neutrinos emitted and absorbed in recoil-free processes (Moessbauer neutrinos) can oscillate in spite of their near monochromaticity. We support this statement by quantum mechanical wave packet arguments and by a quantum field theoretical (QFT) calculation of the combined rate of Moessbauer neutrino emission, propagation and absorption. The QFT approach does not require any a priori assumptions on the neutrino wave function, and it allows us to include a realistic treatment of the different mechanisms leading to broadening of the emission and absorption lines. In the second part of this work, we study the phenomenology of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). We classifying the allowed NSI operators according to their impact on future oscillation experiments and present numerical results for the NSI sensitivities of reactor, superbeam and neutrino factory experiments. We point out that NSI could mimic standard oscillation effects, and might therefore lead to incorrect fit values for the oscillation parameters. For the case of the neutrino factory, we perform a detailed optimisation study to determine the optimum muon energy and detector configuration. (orig.)

  11. A measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic-like cross section on a hydrocarbon target and final state interaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Tammy [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Presented is the analysis of the μ charged-current quasielastic-like interaction with a polystyrene (CH or hydrocarbon) target in the MINER A experiment, which was exposed to a neutrino beam that peaked at 3.5 GeV.

  12. Neutrinos at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    CERN's long and distinguished neutrino tradition began in 1958 at the then new 500 MeV synchrocyclotron (SC) with the first observation of the decay of a charged pion into an electron and a neutrino. At that time, the first ideas on the special (vector/axial vector) structure of the weak interactions had been put forward by Feynman and Gell-Mann and by Marshak and Sudarshan, but the continual non-observation of that charged pion decay was holding up progress. This decay is only one part in ten thousand, and is masked by the dominant muon-neutrino channel. A special telescope was built to pick up the high energy electrons from the pion decay. In 1962 came another SC neutrino success, with the first measurement of the decay of a charged pion into a neutral one, with emission of an electron and a neutrino. Meanwhile the main thrust of CERN's neutrino effort was taking shape at the PS. By the close of 1960, CERN had decided to attack neutrino physics using several detectors - a 1m heavy liquid bubble chamber from Andre Lagarrigue's team in Paris, a CERN 1 m heavy liquid bubble chamber, and a hybrid chamber/counter from a group led by Helmut Faissner

  13. Accelerator neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, D.; Declais, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the last years neutrino physics was shaken by many important experimental results bringing solid proofs in favor of neutrino oscillations. The goal of the present and future generation of experiments at accelerators is to complete the comprehension of neutrino mixing and of the pattern of neutrino masses, perform precise measurements of all these parameters and investigate CP violation in the neutrino sector. Most of these goals will be achieved with the study of ν μ → ν e oscillations, which are mainly ruled by the still unknown mixing angle Θ 13 . A multi-step experimental strategy has to be attempted, depending on the magnitude of Θ 13 . (authors)

  14. Supernova neutrino detection in LZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitan, D.

    2018-02-01

    In the first 10 seconds of a core-collapse supernova, almost all of its progenitor's gravitational potential, O(1053 ergs), is carried away in the form of neutrinos. These neutrinos, with O(10 MeV) kinetic energy, can interact via coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS) depositing O(1 keV) in detectors. In this work we describe the performances of low-background dark matter detectors, such as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ), optimized for detecting low-energy depositions, in detecting these neutrino interactions. For instance, a 27 Msolar supernova at 10 kpc is expected to produce ~350 neutrino interactions in the 7-tonne liquid xenon active volume of LZ. Based on the LS220 EoS neutrino flux model for a SN, the Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST), and predicted CEνNS cross-sections for xenon, to study energy deposition and detection of SN neutrinos in LZ. We simulate the response of the LZ data acquisition system (DAQ) and demonstrate its capability and limitations in handling this interaction rate. We present an overview of the LZ detector, focusing on the benefits of liquid xenon for supernova neutrino detection. We discuss energy deposition and detector response simulations and their results. We present an analysis technique to reconstruct the total number of neutrinos and the time of the supernova core bounce.

  15. Neutrino cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Cosmological data are reviewed, questioning whether the universe may be open and dominated by neutrinos and gravitons rather than by baryons. The thermal history of the Lepton Era is investigated incorporating the effects of neutral currents, additional neutrinos, and a small neutrino mass. In the canonical version of Big Bang cosmology (equal numbers of neutrinos and antineutrinos), and neutrino number and energy density is, like that of photons, gravitationally insignificant unless the neutrino has a small mass (approximately 10 eV). The neutrino sea can be cosmologically significant if it is degenerate (so that the net leptonic or muonic charge is nonzero) with approximately 7 x 10 5 neutrinos (or antineutrinos) per cm 3 . This density homogeneously spread out is still so low that even the most energetic cosmic ray protons will not be stopped, even if neutral currents exist with the usual weak strength. It these degenerate neutrinos have a small mass (approximately 0.5 eV), they will condense into degenerate neutrino superstars of the size and mass of galactic clusters. If neutral currents make the (eν) (eν) coupling five times greater than what it is in V - A theory, nucleosynthesis commences a little earlier than conventionally assumed. This increases the cosmological He 4 abundance predicted only slightly from Y = 0.27 to Y = 0.29. An appendix reviews the effect of neutral currents on neutrino processes in stars. (author)

  16. Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M; Tsenov, R; Dracos, M; Bonesini, M; Palladino, V; Tortora, L; Mori, Y; Planche, T; Lagrange, J  B; Kuno, Y; Benedetto, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoini, S; Martini, M; Wildner, E; Prior, G; Blondel, A; Karadzhow, Y; Ellis, M; Kyberd, P; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F  J  P; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Jenner, L  J; Kurup, A; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Zarrebini, A; Poslimski, J; Blackmore, V; Cobb, J; Tunnell, C; Andreopoulos, C; Bennett, J  R  J; Brooks, S; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Edgecock, T  R; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; McFarland, A; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Booth, C; Skoro, G; Back, J  J; Harrison, P; Berg, J  S; Fernow, R; Gallardo, J  C; Gupta, R; Kirk, H; Simos, N; Stratakis, D; Souchlas, N; Witte, H; Bross, A; Geer, S; Johnstone, C; Mokhov, N; Neuffer, D; Popovic, M; Strait, J; Striganov, S; Morfín, J  G; Wands, R; Snopok, P; Bogacz, S  A; Morozov, V; Roblin, Y; Cline, D; Ding, X; Bromberg, C; Hart, T; Abrams, R  J; Ankenbrandt, C  M; Beard, K  B; Cummings, M  A  C; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R  P; Roberts, T  J; Yoshikawa, C  Y; Graves, V  B; McDonald, K  T; Coney, L; Hanson, G

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that $\\theta_{13} > 0$. The measured value of $\\theta_{13}$ is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO$\

  17. Search for coherent production of vector mesons in muon neutrino interactions with Gargamelle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchakour, A.

    1980-11-01

    This work is dedicated to the search for axial mesons (A 1 + , A 1 0 ) and vector mesons (ρ + , ρ - ) produced in elastic coherent reactions between muon neutrinos and C 12 , F 19 and Br 80 nuclei. 4 reactions have been taken into account: ν μ + N → μ - + A 1 + + N; ν μ + N → ν μ + A 1 0 + N; ν μ + N → μ - + ρ + + N; and ν μ + N → ν μ + ρ 0 + N. The experimental setting involved the cloud chamber Gargamelle and a muon neutrino beam coming from SPS (CERN) facility. A large part of this work has been the analysis of data provided by the cloud chamber in terms of event selection and kinematic event reconstruction. We got the following limiting values for the production cross-section on C 12 (the carbon content of the gaseous mix was 88%): σ(coh.,A 1 + ) -39 ; σ(coh.,ρ + ) -39 cm 2 ; σ(coh.,ρ 0 ) -39 cm 2 ; and σ(coh.,A 1 0 -39 cm 2 . Our results are consistent with other published data through the formula σ(coh.) = A*σ(nucleon) where A is the mass number. (A.C.)

  18. Reconstruction of GeV Neutrino Events in LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellenberg, R.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hellgartner, D.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.; Peltoniemi, J.

    2011-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a proposed next generation liquid-scintillator detector with about 50 kt target mass. Besides the detection of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, supernova neutrinos and the search for the proton decay, LENA could also be used as the far detector of a next generation neutrino beam. The present contribution outlines the status of the Monte Carlo studies towards the reconstruction of GeV neutrinos in LENA. Both the tracking capabilities at a few hundred MeV, most interesting for a beta beam, and above 1 GeV for a superbeam experiment are presented.

  19. Neutrino optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1994-10-01

    Neutrinos are produced by the in-flight decay of π and k mesons. Neutrinos are uncharged and cannot be focused directly. However, the transverse momentum of the neutrino due to the decay is typically much smaller than the transverse momentum spread of the parent meson. The focusing of the meson beam will then significantly enhance the neutrino flux at a distant detector. Neutrino beams can effectively be focused in the same manner as other charged particle beams, by means of quadrupoles and bending magnets. The bending magnets also can serve to define the momentum of the neutrino beams. Alternatively, neutrino beams can be focused by the use of magnetic horns. Both systems are described here. Proposed experiments with neutrinos to detect neutrino oscillations place the detector hundreds of kilometers away from the source. The flux of neutrinos through the detector then becomes very small. The calculation of the flux by conventional Monte Carlo or numerical integration techniques becomes prohibitively difficult. An alternate mathematical technique can be used to give results which are reliable to about 10%

  20. Neutrino clustering and the Z-burst model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKellar, B.H.J.; Garbutt, M.; Stephenson, G.J.; Goldman, T.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility that the observed Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays are generated by high energy neutrinos creating 'Z-bursts' in resonant interactions with the background neutrinos has been proposed, but there are difficulties in generating enough events with reasonable incident neutrino fluxes. We point out that this difficulty is overcome if the background neutrinos have coalesced into 'neutrino clouds' - a possibility previously suggested by some of us in another context. The limitations that this mechanism for the generation of UHECRs places on the high energy neutrino flux, on the masses of the background neutrinos and the characteristics of the neutrino clouds are discussed

  1. Theoretical introduction to the 37Cl solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahcall, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical introduction is given to the chlorine 37 solar neutrino experiment. From the definition of an SNU as 10 -36 captures per target atom per second the discussion proceeds to stellar evolution, the neutrino absorption cross sections, nuclear reactions, and lastly the implications for astronomy and for physics of the 37 Cl experiment

  2. Los Neutrinos Los Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Félix

    2012-01-01

    From all the proposals to understand the structure of matter, and the way the natural world is conformed, the one about neutrinos is the most enigmatic, abstract, and foreign to immediate experience; however, this is the one that has delved more deeply over the nearly eighty years since it was formulated by Wolfgang Pauli –in 1930- as a radical proposition to understand nucleon decay, and the decay of other particles, without the violation of the principle of conservation of energy and moment...

  3. The Neutrino: A Better Understanding Through Astrophysics: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneller, James P. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-10-12

    The final report for the award "The Neutrino: A Better Understanding Through Astrophysics" is given. The goals of the work were the following: to construct new theoretical approaches to the problem of neutrino propagation in media including where neutrino-neutrino interactions are important; to pioneer the use of new approaches, including super-scattering operators, for the evolution of neutrino thermal and statistical ensembles; to implement these new approaches in computer codes to study neutrino evolution in supernovae and other hot, dense environments; to increase the realism of simulated signals of a Galactic supernovae neutrino burst in current and future neutrino detectors; to study the simulated signals to determine the ability to extract information on the missing neutrino mixing parameters and the dynamics of the supernova explosion; and to study sterile neutrinos and non-standard interactions of neutrinos in supernovae and their effect upon the signal. Accomplishments made in these areas are described.

  4. The Neutrino: A Better Understanding Through Astrophysics: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneller, James P.

    2016-01-01

    The final report for the award 'The Neutrino: A Better Understanding Through Astrophysics' is given. The goals of the work were the following: to construct new theoretical approaches to the problem of neutrino propagation in media including where neutrino-neutrino interactions are important; to pioneer the use of new approaches, including super-scattering operators, for the evolution of neutrino thermal and statistical ensembles; to implement these new approaches in computer codes to study neutrino evolution in supernovae and other hot, dense environments; to increase the realism of simulated signals of a Galactic supernovae neutrino burst in current and future neutrino detectors; to study the simulated signals to determine the ability to extract information on the missing neutrino mixing parameters and the dynamics of the supernova explosion; and to study sterile neutrinos and non-standard interactions of neutrinos in supernovae and their effect upon the signal. Accomplishments made in these areas are described.

  5. Reactor Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Bong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very recently the most precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. This paper provides an overview of the upcoming experiments and of the projects under development, including the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible use of neutrinos for society, for nonproliferation of nuclear materials, and geophysics.

  6. Supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardall, C.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism and supernova nucleosynthesis, and as a potential probe of the supernova environment and of some of the neutrino mixing parameters that remain unknown; hence a variety of approximate transport schemes have been used to obtain results with reduced dimensionality. However, none of these approximate schemes have addressed a recent challenge to the conventional wisdom that neutrino flavor mixing cannot impact the explosion mechanism or r-process nucleosynthesis

  7. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howcroft, Caius Leo Frederick [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  8. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  9. Neutrino Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzetto, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Conference Series 'Un Altro Modo di guardare il Cielo', held in Venice, started in 1988. It included 13.editions of 'Neutrino Telescopes' and four editions of 'Neutrino Oscillations in Venice'. The conference Series ideated , created and conducted by Prof. Milla Baldo Ceolin, after her guidance 'Un Altro Modo di guardare il Cielo' became one of the most important fixed appointments of thr neutrino physics and astrophysics community.

  10. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soo-Bong; Lasserre, Thierry; Wang, Yifang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  11. Neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Postulated in the early days of quantum mechanics by Wolfgang Pauli to make energy-momentum conservation in nuclear beta decay come out right, the neutrino has never strayed far from physicists' attention. The Moriond Workshop on Massive Neutrinos in Particle Physics and Astrophysics held recently in the French Alps showed that more than half a century after Pauli's prediction, the neutrino stubbornly refuses to yield up all its secrets

  12. Neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bogomilov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ_{13}>0. The measured value of θ_{13} is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (antineutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EUROν Design Study consortium. EUROν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF collaboration. The EUROν baseline accelerator facility will provide 10^{21} muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  13. Particle Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    Cosmic microwave background photons: 400 / cm3. Cosmic background neutrinos: 330 / cm3. The lightest massive particles. A million times lighter than the electron. No direct mass measurement yet. The most weakly interacting particles. Do not interact with light ⇒ Dark matter. Stopping radiation with lead shielding:.

  14. Long baseline neutrino experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atmospheric neutrino experiments (IMB, Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande (SK)) show that νµ created in cosmic ray interactions with atmospheric nuclei are being converted into ντ but νe created in such interactions are unaffected. SK measure- ment of νµ and νe event rates as functions of zenith angle is the key ...

  15. Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-090 São Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

  16. A measurement of differential cross-sections and nucleon structure functions in charged-current neutrino interactions on iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Burkhardt, H.; Dydak, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Krasny, M.W.; Meyer, H.J.; Palazzi, P.; Ranjard, F.; Rothberg, J.; Steinberger, J.; Taureg, H.; Wahl, H.; Williams, R.W.; Wotschack, J. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Bluemer, H.; Brummel, H.D.; Buchholz, P.; Duda, J.; Eisele, F.; Kampschulte, B.; Kleinknecht, K.; Knobloch, J.; Mueller, E.; Pszola, B.; Renk, B. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik); Alvarez, T.; Belusevic, R.; Falkenburg, B.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Keilwerth, H.; Tittel, K. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik); Debu, P.; Guyot, C.; Merlo, J.P.; Para, A.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Peyaud, B.; Schuller, J.P.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires); Abramowicz, H.; Krolikowski, J.; Lipniacka, A. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej)

    1991-02-01

    A high-statistics measurement of the differential cross-sections for neutrino-iron scattering in the wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS is presented. Nucleon structure functions are extracted and their Q{sup 2} evolution is compared with the predictions of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.).

  17. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. K. Duorah. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 36 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 375-383. A Comparative Study on SN II Progenitors for the Synthesis of Li and B with the help of Neutrinos · N. Lahkar S. Kalita H. L. Duorah K. Duorah.

  18. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. S. Kalita. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 36 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 375-383. A Comparative Study on SN II Progenitors for the Synthesis of Li and B with the help of Neutrinos · N. Lahkar S. Kalita H. L. Duorah ...

  19. Precision measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters at INO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A magnetized Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based neutrino observa- tory (INO) is used to study neutrino oscillation sensitivity using atmospheric muon neutrino source. The ICAL detector will be able to detect muon tracks and hadron showers produced by neutrino interactions with the iron target.

  20. Solar neutrinos; Les neutrinos solaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cribier, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Laboratoire astroparticule et cosmologie (APC), 75 - Paris (France); Bowles, Th. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2005-09-15

    Several decades of studies of solar neutrinos lead now to clear indications that the oscillation between {nu}{sub e} produced in the core of the Sun and other flavours ({nu}{sub {mu}} or {nu}{sub {tau}} ) is the correct explanation of the deficit observed by all experiments. This implies that neutrinos are massive, in contradiction with the minimal standard model of particle physics. Moreover, thanks to the SNO (Sudbury neutrino observatory) experiment, we know that solar models built by astrophysicists predict correctly the flux of neutrinos. (authors)

  1. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  2. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, G.; Ianni, A.; Ranucci, G.

    2010-01-01

    Solar neutrino investigation has represented one of the most active field of particle physics over the past decade, accumulating important and sometimes unexpected achievements. After reviewing some of the most recent impressive successes, the future perspectives of this exciting area of neutrino research will be discussed.

  3. KARMEN: neutrino spectroscopy at ISIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drexlin, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    1996-11-01

    The Karlsruhe-Rutherford Neutrino Experiment KARMEN at the spallation neutron facility ISIS investigates fundamental properties of neutrinos as well as their interactions with matter. Low energy neutrinos with energies up to 50 MeV emitted by the pulsed {nu}-source ISIS are detected by a 56 tonne high resolution liquid scintillation calorimeter. Clear {nu}-signatures allow a reliable search for neutrino oscillations of the type {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} as well as a detailed investigation of neutrino-nucleus interactions in an energy range important for astrophysics. We present the results of the KARMEN experiment from data taking in the period from June 1990 - December 1995. (author) 9 figs., 10 refs.

  4. Astronomy at the frontiers of science

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature an interdisciplinary activity: it involves mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. Astronomers use (and often develop) the latest technology, the fastest computers and the most refined software.  In this book twenty-two leading scientists from nine countries talk about how astronomy interacts with these other sciences. They describe modern instruments used in astronomy and the relations between astronomy and technology, industry, politics and philosophy. They also discuss what it means to be an astronomer, the history of astronomy, and the place of astronomy in society today.   The book contains twenty chapters grouped in four parts: ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS discusses the place of astronomy among various branches of (mostly high-energy) physics. ASTRONOMY IN SOCIETY describes not only the historical context of astronomy, but issues facing astronomers today, including funding, planning, worldwide collaboration and links with industry. THE TOOLS OF OBSERVATION AND THE PROFESSION OF AS...

  5. ANIS: High energy neutrino generator for neutrino telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazizov, A.; Kowalski, M.

    2005-11-01

    We present the high-energy neutrino Monte Carlo event generator ANIS (All Neutrino Interaction Simulation). The program provides a detailed and flexible neutrino event simulation for high-energy neutrino detectors, such as AMANDA, ANTARES or ICECUBE. It generates neutrinos of any flavor according to a specified flux and propagates them through the Earth. In a final step neutrino interactions are simulated within a specified volume. All relevant standard model processes are implemented. We discuss strengths and limitations of the program. Catalogue identifier:ADWF Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWF Program is obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer on which the program has been thoroughly tested: Intel-Pentium based Personal Computers Operating system:Linux Programming language used:C++ Memory required to execute:13 megabyte Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:912 424 Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 876 631 Distribution format:tar.gz Libraries used by ANIS:HepMC [M. Dobbs, J.B. Hansen, Comput. Phys. Comm. 134 (2001) 41], CLHEP vector package [http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/asd/lhc++/clhep] Nature of physical problem:Monte Carlo neutrino event generator for high-energy neutrino telescopes. Method of solution:Neutrino events are first sampled according a specified flux, then propagated through the Earth and finally are allowed to interact inside a detection volume. Restrictions of the program:Neutrino energies range from 10 to 1012 GeV. Typical running time:104 events require typically a 1-GHz CPU time of about 300 s.

  6. Into the abyss underwater neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The bottom of the Mediterranean is the unlikely venue for a new kind of telescope poised to turn astronomy on its head. The Antares Cerenkov detector hopes to spot high-energy neutrinos. A brief design overview is given. The AMANDA-II detector at the South Pole is also discussed.

  7. Experimental and phenomenological status of neutrino anomalies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The current status of neutrino anomalies is summarized; the KamLAND experiment is described and the recent results of KamLAND presented. Author Affiliations. Sandip Pakvasa1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. Pramana – Journal of Physics. Current Issue : Vol.

  8. Bose-Einstein correlations in charged current muon-neutrino interactions in the NOMAD experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.C.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Goessling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F.F.; Winton, L.J.; Yabsley, B.D.; Zaccone, H.; Zei, R.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2004-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations in one and two dimensions have been studied, with high statistics, in charged current muon-neutrino interaction events collected with the NOMAD detector at CERN. In one dimension the Bose-Einstein effect has been analyzed with the Goldhaber and the Kopylov-Podgoretskii phenomenological parametrizations. The Goldhaber parametrization gives the radius of the pion emission region R G =1.01±0.05(stat) +0.09 -0.06 (sys) fm and for the chaoticity parameter the value λ=0.40±0.03(stat) +0.01 -0.06 (sys). Using the Kopylov-Podgoretskii parametrization yields R KP =2.07±0.04(stat) +0.01 -0.14 (sys) fm and λ KP =0.29±0.06(stat) +0.01 -0.04 (sys). Different parametrizations of the long-range correlations have been also studied. The two-dimensional shape of the source has been investigated in the longitudinal comoving frame. A significant difference between the transverse and the longitudinal dimensions is observed. The high statistics of the collected sample allowed the study of the Bose-Einstein correlations as a function of rapidity, charged particle multiplicity and hadronic energy. A weak dependence of both radius and chaoticity on multiplicity and hadronic energy is found

  9. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Alysia Diane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ~2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±$0.065\\atop{0.068}$(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±$0.12\\atop{0.11}$(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±$0.31\\atop{0.37}$(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  10. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Alysia Diane

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ∼2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)± 0.068 0.065 (sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 10 6 cm -2 s -1 , via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)± 0.12 0.11 (sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 10 6 cm -2 s -1 , and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)± 0.37 0.31 (sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 10 6 cm -2 s -1 . The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation

  11. Solar neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1983-01-01

    The solar energy is produced by a series of nuclear reactions taking place in the deep interior of the sun. Some of these reactions produce neutrinos which may be detected, the proper detection system being available. The results of the Davis experiment (with 37 Cl) are given, showing a deficiency in the solar neutrino flux. The relevant explanation is either a property of the neutrino or an important change in the physics of the solar models. The prospect of a new experiment (with 71 Ga) is important as it will decide which of the two explanations is correct [fr

  12. Thermalizing Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rasmus S. L.; Vogl, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Sterile neutrinos produced through oscillations are a well motivated dark matter candidate, but recent constraints from observations have ruled out most of the parameter space. We analyze the impact of new interactions on the evolution of keV sterile neutrino dark matter in the early Universe. Based on general considerations we find a mechanism which thermalizes the sterile neutrinos after an initial production by oscillations. The thermalization of sterile neutrinos is accompanied by dark entropy production which increases the yield of dark matter and leads to a lower characteristic momentum. This resolves the growing tensions with structure formation and x-ray observations and even revives simple nonresonant production as a viable way to produce sterile neutrino dark matter. We investigate the parameters required for the realization of the thermalization mechanism in a representative model and find that a simple estimate based on energy and entropy conservation describes the mechanism well.

  13. Thermalizing Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rasmus S L; Vogl, Stefan

    2017-12-22

    Sterile neutrinos produced through oscillations are a well motivated dark matter candidate, but recent constraints from observations have ruled out most of the parameter space. We analyze the impact of new interactions on the evolution of keV sterile neutrino dark matter in the early Universe. Based on general considerations we find a mechanism which thermalizes the sterile neutrinos after an initial production by oscillations. The thermalization of sterile neutrinos is accompanied by dark entropy production which increases the yield of dark matter and leads to a lower characteristic momentum. This resolves the growing tensions with structure formation and x-ray observations and even revives simple nonresonant production as a viable way to produce sterile neutrino dark matter. We investigate the parameters required for the realization of the thermalization mechanism in a representative model and find that a simple estimate based on energy and entropy conservation describes the mechanism well.

  14. New physics with ultra-high-energy neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Marfatia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Now that PeV neutrinos have been discovered by IceCube, we optimistically entertain the possibility that neutrinos with energy above 100 PeV exist. We evaluate the dependence of event rates of such neutrinos on the neutrino-nucleon cross section at observatories that detect particles, atmospheric fluorescence, or Cherenkov radiation, initiated by neutrino interactions. We consider how (i a simple scaling of the total standard model neutrino-nucleon cross section, (ii a new elastic neutral current interaction, and (iii a new completely inelastic interaction, individually impact event rates.

  15. Gravitationally confined relativistic neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayenas, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Grigoriou, D.

    2017-09-01

    Combining special relativity, the equivalence principle, and Newton’s universal gravitational law with gravitational rather than rest masses, one finds that gravitational interactions between relativistic neutrinos with kinetic energies above 50 MeV are very strong and can lead to the formation of gravitationally confined composite structures with the mass and other properties of hadrons. One may model such structures by considering three neutrinos moving symmetrically on a circular orbit under the influence of their gravitational attraction, and by assuming quantization of their angular momentum, as in the Bohr model of the H atom. The model contains no adjustable parameters and its solution, using a neutrino rest mass of 0.05 eV/c2, leads to composite state radii close to 1 fm and composite state masses close to 1 GeV/c2. Similar models of relativistic rotating electron - neutrino pairs give a mass of 81 GeV/c2, close to that of W bosons. This novel mechanism of generating mass suggests that the Higgs mass generation mechanism can be modeled as a latent gravitational field which gets activated by relativistic neutrinos.

  16. High energy neutrinos from GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    De Paolis, F; Orlando, D; Perrone, L

    2001-01-01

    It is by now recognized that GRBs can accelerate protons to relativistic energies and that high density media may be present nearby the source. We compute the high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from the decay of pions produced through the interaction of accelerated protons with nucleons in the surrounding medium. Then, we estimate the flux of high-energy muons induced on a detector by upward-going neutrinos interacting through charge current processes with the surrounding matter.

  17. Neutrino cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Miele, Gennaro; Pastor, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The role that neutrinos have played in the evolution of the Universe is the focus of one of the most fascinating research areas that has stemmed from the interplay between cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics. In this self-contained book, the authors bring together all aspects of the role of neutrinos in cosmology, spanning from leptogenesis to primordial nucleosynthesis, their role in CMB and structure formation, to the problem of their direct detection. The book starts by guiding the reader through aspects of fundamental neutrino physics, such as the standard cosmological model and the statistical mechanics in the expanding Universe, before discussing the history of neutrinos in chronological order from the very early stages until today. This timely book will interest graduate students and researchers in astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics, who work with either a theoretical or experimental focus.

  18. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavicini, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The status of solar neutrino experiments and their implications for both nonstandard astrophysics ({\\it e.g.,} cool sun models) and nonstandard neutrino properties ({\\it e.g.,} MSW conversions) are discussed. Assuming that all of the experiments are correct, the relative rates observed by Kamiokande and Homestake are hard to account for by a purely astrophysical solution, while MSW conversions can describe all of the data. Assuming the standard solar model, there are two allowed regions for M...

  19. Sterile neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, J. [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Machado, P. A. N., E-mail: pedro.machado@uam.es [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Maltoni, M. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Schwetz, T. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-21

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  20. Astronomy in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    Antarctica provides a unique environment for astronomers to practice their trade. The cold, dry and stable air found above the high Antarctic plateau, as well as the pure ice below, offers new opportunities for the conduct of observational astronomy across both the photon and the particle spectrum. The summits of the Antarctic plateau provide the best seeing conditions, the darkest skies and the most transparent atmosphere of any earth-based observing site. Astronomical activities are now underway at four plateau sites: the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Concordia Station at Dome C, Kunlun Station at Dome A and Fuji Station at Dome F, in addition to long duration ballooning from the coastal station of McMurdo, at stations run by the USA, France/Italy, China, Japan and the USA, respectively. The astronomy conducted from Antarctica includes optical, infrared, terahertz and sub-millimetre astronomy, measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropies, solar astronomy, as well as high energy astrophysics involving the measurement of cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos. Antarctica is also the richest source of meteorites on our planet. An extensive range of site testing measurements have been made over the high plateau sites. In this article, we summarise the facets of Antarctica that are driving developments in astronomy there, and review the results of the site testing experiments undertaken to quantify those characteristics of the Antarctic plateau relevant for astronomical observation. We also outline the historical development of the astronomy on the continent, and then review the principal scientific results to have emerged over the past three decades of activity in the discipline. These range from determination of the dominant frequencies of the 5 min solar oscillation in 1979 to the highest angular scale measurements yet made of the power spectrum of the CMBR anisotropies in 2010. They span through infrared views of the galactic ecology in star

  1. Determination of the neutral to charged current cross section ratio for neutrino interactions on protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M.T.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ruggieri, F. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy)); Belusevic, R.; Colley, D.C.

    1983-03-17

    About 2000 neutral induced interactions observed inside the hydrogen filled TST in BEBC have been analysed. The data were obtained from an exposure to the vsub(..mu..) wide band beam at the CERN SPS. A separation of these events into charged current, neutral current and neutral hadron induced interactions have been achieved using a multidimensional kinematic analysis. The neutral to charged current cross section ratio for vsub(..mu..) interactions on free protons has been determined avoiding the drastic cuts on the data inherent in previous experiments. The result Rsub(P)sup(v)=0.47 +- 0.04 is compatible with those measurements and the prediction of the standard SU(2) x U(1) model for sinsub(THETA)/sup 2/sub(W)=0.18 +- 0.04.

  2. Determination of the neutral to charged current cross section ratio for neutrino interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ruggieri, F.; Belusevic, R.; Colley, D. C.; Jones, G. T.; O'Neale, S.; Sewell, S.; Votruba, M. F.; Bertrand, D.; Moreels, J.; Sacton, J.; Vander Velde-Wilquet, C.; Van Doninck, W.; Brisson, V.; Francois, T.; Petiau, P.; Cooper, A. M.; Guy, J. G.; Michette, A. G.; Tyndel, M.; Venus, W.; Baton, J. P.; Gerbier, G.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Alamatsaz, H.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J. H.; Parker, M. A.; BEBC TST Neutrino Collaboration

    1983-03-01

    About 2000 neutral induced interactions observed inside the hydrogen filled TST in BEBC have been analysed. The data were obtained from an exposure to the vμ wide band beam at the CERN SPS. A separation of these events into charged current, neutral current and neutral hadron induced interactions have been achieved using a multidimensional kinematic analysis. The neutral to charged current cross section ratio for vμ interactions on free protons has been determined avoiding the drastic cuts on the data inherent in previous experiments. The result RPv = 0.47 ± 0.04 is compatible with those measurements and the prediction of the standard SU (2) × U (1) model for sin 2θW = 0.18 ± 0.04.

  3. Study of particle production in hadron-nucleus interactions for neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Palczewski, Tomasz Jan

    The dissertation presents a study of hadron product ion in the NA61/SHINE large acceptance spectrometer at CERN SPS. The differential cross se ctions were obtained for the production of negatively charged pions, neutral Kaons, and Lam bdas from the proton-Carbon interactions at 31 GeV/c. Methods of particle yields extraction from proton Carbon interactions were developed. An analysis chain of global correction m ethod (h- method) was established for the thin carbon target and as well for T2K replica targ et and compared to the results obtained with full particle identification. The h- method permits to cover larger phase space region not otherwise accessible. In addition, a full chain of V 0 analysis was prepared to obtain neutral Kaon and Lambda results in polar angle and momentum variables (p, θ ). Results on the differential production cross sections and mean mul tiplicities in production processes for negatively charge...

  4. Greek astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, Sir Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy as a science began with the Ionian philosophers, with whom Greek philosophy and mathematics also began. While the Egyptians and Babylonians had accomplished much of astronomical worth, it remained for the unrivalled speculative genius of the Greeks, in particular, their mathematical genius, to lay the foundations of the true science of astronomy. In this classic study, a noted scholar discusses in lucid detail the specific advances made by the Greeks, many of whose ideas anticipated the discoveries of modern astronomy.Pythagoras, born at Samos about 572 B.C., was probably the first

  5. The appearance of the tau-neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettini, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Opera experiment, installed in the Gran Sasso laboratory, aims at detecting the oscillations of muon-neutrinos into tau-neutrinos on their way from the CERN accelerator 730 km away. The neutrino beam produced by the CERN is mainly composed of muon-neutrinos with no tau-neutrinos. Experimentally, the 2 types of neutrinos can be distinguished when they produced a charged lepton: a muon-neutrino produces a muon while a tau-neutrino produces a tau. Opera is a tracking detector and to observe a tau track a micrometer scale spatial resolution is necessary, something that only nuclear emulsions provide. Because of the relatively short distance, only a fraction of neutrinos (1 to 2%) are expected to oscillate, considering in addition the very small cross-section of the neutrino, the conclusion is that the detector mass needs to be larger than 1000 tons. This is why the technique of the emulsion cloud chamber (ECC) was chosen. It is based on sandwiches of thin (50 μm) emulsion sheets, providing the 1 μm resolution tracking, interleaved with 1 mm thick lead sheets, providing the mass. Electronic trackers are used to identify the brick containing the interaction, which is then removed and processed. In august 2009 the first tau-neutrino was detected by Opera. (A.C.)

  6. Faraday effect and solar neutrino problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, S.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the Faraday effect and solar neutrino problem. Our main emphasis was on the Faraday rotation of neutrino de Broglie wave of electron-neutrino producing in the nuclear reactions in the sun and converting into any other flavor of neutrino while passing through matter and/or magnetic field of the sun. We have shown that specific Faraday angle can minimize the number of free parameters occurring in the neutrino oscillation. We have also shown that the resonant Faraday angle corresponding to the resonance of MSW effect can be obtained the knowledge of the oscillation parameter delta m/sup 2/ and the neutrino energy. Using neutrino-Faraday angle approach, we have shown that the matter enhanced neutrino oscillations is dominating over the resonant spin flavor precession (RSFP) even in the favorable region of the spin flavor procession. Using the latest solar neutrino data, we have shown that Faraday angle is almost 10/sup -3/ times smaller. This can be interpreted as the interaction of magnetic moment of neutrino with the solar magnetic field is negligibly small as compare to the effect of matter field on the neutrino oscillation. (author)

  7. Fundamental Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, Hannu; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl Johan

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental Astronomy gives a well-balanced and comprehensive introduction to the topics of classical and modern astronomy. While emphasizing both the astronomical concepts and the underlying physical principles, the text provides a sound basis for more profound studies in the astronomical sciences. The fifth edition of this successful undergraduate textbook has been extensively modernized and extended in the parts dealing with the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy and cosmology as well as with extrasolar planets and the solar system (as a consequence of recent results from satellite missions and the new definition by the International Astronomical Union of planets, dwarf planets and small solar-system bodies). Furthermore a new chapter on astrobiology has been added. Long considered a standard text for physical science majors, Fundamental Astronomy is also an excellent reference and entrée for dedicated amateur astronomers.

  8. Production of Excited Neutrinos at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, A; Mehdiyev, R

    2005-01-01

    We study the potential of the CERN LHC in the search for the single production of excited neutrino through gauge interactions. Subsequent decays of excited neutrino via gauge interactions are examined. The mass range accessible with the ATLAS detector is obtained.

  9. Interactive Lab to Learn Radio Astronomy, Microwave & Antenna Engineering at the Technical University of Cartagena (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Daniel Quesada-Pereira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An initiative carried out at the Technical University of Cartagena (UPCT, Spain to encourage students and promote the interest for Scientific and Engineering Culture between society is presented in this contribution. For this purpose, a long-term project based on the set-up of an interactive laboratory surrounding a small Radio Telescope (SRT system has been carried out. The main novelty is that this project is entirely being developed by students of last courses of our Telecommunication Engineering Faculty, under the supervision of four lecturers. This lab offers the possibility to remotely control the SRT, and it provides a set of multimedia web-based applications to produce a novel, practical, multidisciplinary virtual laboratory to improve the learning and teaching processes in related sciences and technologies.

  10. Neutral currents, supernovae neutrinos, and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The inelastic interactions of neutrinos during stellar collapse and neutron star cooling are discussed. The primary mechanism for dissipative neutrino reactions is nuclear excitation by neutral current scattering, a process not included in standard descriptions of supernovae. Charge-current and neutral current ''preheating'' of iron lying outside the shock front appears to be significant in the few milliseconds near shock breakout. This could help produce a more energetic shock. During the cooling phase, the neutral current interactions of muon and taon neutrinos appear to be responsible for some interesting nucleosynthesis. I discuss two examples the production of fluorine and neutrino-induced r-process nucleosynthesis. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. Radio astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parijskij, Y.N.; Gossachinskij, I.V.; Zuckerman, B.; Khersonsky, V.K.; Pustilnik, S.; Robinson, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    A critical review of major developments and discoveries in the field of radioastronomy during the period 1973-1975 is presented. The report is presented under the following headings:(1) Continuum radiation from the Galaxy; (2) Neutral hydrogen, 21 cm (galactic and extragalactic) and recombination lines; (3) Radioastronomy investigations of interstellar molecules; (4) Extragalactic radio astronomy and (6) Development in radio astronomy instruments. (B.R.H.)

  12. Discovering astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of basic astronomical knowledge is presented with attention to the structure and dynamics of the stars and planets. Also dealt with are techniques of astronomical measurement, e.g., stellar spectrometry, radio astronomy, star catalogs, etc. Basic physical principles as they pertain to astronomy are reviewed, including the nature of light, gravitation, and electromagnetism. Finally, stellar evolution and cosmology are discussed with reference to the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe.

  13. Astronomy Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.; Madsen, C.

    2003-07-01

    Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has penetrated the general public remarkably well with an extensive network of associations and organizations of aficionados all over the world. Also, as a result of the huge amount of data accumulated and by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have pioneered the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies, often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This book is filling up a gap in the astronomy-related literature by providing a set of chapters not only of direct interest to astronomy communication, but also well beyond it. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy nor in communication techniques while providing specific detailed information, as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographic elements. This book will be very useful for researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as for students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1345-0

  14. Determination of the semi-leptonic branching fraction of charm hadrons produced in neutrino charged-current interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; De Jong, M; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Spada, F R; Van Dantzig, R; Visschers, J L; Güler, M; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Zeyrek, M T; Armenise, N; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Ieva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; El-Aidi, R; Van de Vyver, B; Vilain, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, S A; Chizhov, M; Doucet, M; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Hoshino, K; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; Di Capua, F; De Rosa, G; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2002-01-01

    During the years 1994--1997, the emulsion target of the CHORUS detector was exposed to the CERN-SPS Wide Band Neutrino Beam. The improvements of the past few years in the automatic emulsion scanning systems allowed a sample of events located in emulsion to be used for studies of charm production. Based on a sample of 56,172~$\

  15. Neutrino Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelin Baldo, Milla

    2009-01-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the 13. International Workshop on 'Neutrino Telescope', 17. of the series 'Un altro modo di guardare il cielo', held in Venice at the 'Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti' from March 10 to March 13, 2009. This series started in Venice 21 years ago, in 1988, motivated by the growing interest in the exciting field of the neutrino physics and astrophysics, with the aim to bring together experimentalists and theorists and encourage discussion on the most recent results and to chart the direction of future researchers.

  16. Neutrino clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson Jr, G.J.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the possibility that neutrinos are coupled very weakly to an extremely light scalar boson. We first analyze the simple problem of one generation of neutrino and show that, for ranges of parameters that are allowed by existing data, such a system can have serious consequences for the evolution of stars and could impact precision laboratory measurements. We discuss the extension to more generations and show that the general conclusion remains viable. Finally, we note that, should such a scalar field be present, experiments give information about effective masses, not the masses that arise in unified field theories. (authors). 23 refs., 9 figs

  17. Solar neutrino detectors as sterile neutrino hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Marco; Borexino-SOX Collaboration; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cloué, O.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Gschwender, M.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Jonquères, N.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Ortica, F.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Reinert, Y.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssière, C.; Vishneva, A.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The large size and the very low radioactive background of solar neutrino detectors such as Borexino at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy offer a unique opportunity to probe the existence of neutrino oscillations into new sterile components by means of carefully designed and well calibrated anti-neutrino and neutrino artificial sources. In this paper we briefly summarise the key elements of the SOX experiment, a program for the search of sterile neutrinos (and other short distance effects) by means of a 144Ce-144Pr anti-neutrino source and, possibly in the medium term future, with a 51Cr neutrino source.

  18. Neutrino physics in a tagged-neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    A new high-energy neutrino program is described. The experiment would tag and reconstruct semileptonic decays in an intense K/sub L/ beam. The species and energy of outgoing neutrinos would be identified event-by-event and the neutrino interactions recorded in a massive iron detector. Such a system could search new regions in (Δm 2 , sin 2 2θ) space for neutrino oscillations with small mixing angles and measure ν/sub μ/ and ν/sub e/ cross-sections to ∼1%. The system could determine sin 2 θ/sub W/ in deep-inelastic scattering off quarks to +-.002--.004, a significant improvement over existing measurements. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Particle Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    Energy spectra of neutrino sources. ASPERA ... Neutrinos that displayed oscillations. 2. Neutrinos from a core collapse supernova. 3. Neutrinos with extremely large / small energies. 4. Exploring the universe in ... Produced due to natural radioactivity in the Earth's crust. Recently confirmed, after separating reactor neutrinos.

  20. No collective neutrino flavor conversions during the supernova accretion phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sovan; Fischer, Tobias; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Saviano, Ninetta; Tomàs, Ricard

    2011-10-07

    We perform a dedicated study of the supernova (SN) neutrino flavor evolution during the accretion phase, using results from recent neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations. In contrast to what was expected in the presence of only neutrino-neutrino interactions, we find that the multiangle effects associated with the dense ordinary matter suppress collective oscillations. The matter suppression implies that neutrino oscillations will start outside the neutrino decoupling region and therefore will have a negligible impact on the neutrino heating and the explosion dynamics. Furthermore, the possible detection of the next galactic SN neutrino signal from the accretion phase, based on the usual Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect in the SN mantle and Earth matter effects, can reveal the neutrino mass hierarchy in the case that the mixing angle θ(13) is not very small.

  1. Future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facilities and Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diwan, Milind [Brookhaven; Edgecock, Rob [Huddersfield U.; Hasegawa, Takuya [KEK, Tsukuba; Patzak, Thomas [APC, Paris; Shiozawa, Masato [Kamioka Observ.; Strait, Jim [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    We review the ongoing effort in the US, Japan, and Europe of the scientific community to study the location and the detector performance of the next-generation long-baseline neutrino facility. For many decades, research on the properties of neutrinos and the use of neutrinos to study the fundamental building blocks of matter has unveiled new, unexpected laws of nature. Results of neutrino experiments have triggered a tremendous amount of development in theory: theories beyond the standard model or at least extensions of it and development of the standard solar model and modeling of supernova explosions as well as the development of theories to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrino physics is one of the most dynamic and exciting fields of research in fundamental particle physics and astrophysics. The next-generation neutrino detector will address two aspects: fundamental properties of the neutrino like mass hierarchy, mixing angles, and the CP phase, and low-energy neutrino astronomy with solar, atmospheric, and supernova neutrinos. Such a new detector naturally allows for major improvements in the search for nucleon decay. A next-generation neutrino observatory needs a huge, megaton scale detector which in turn has to be installed in a new, international underground laboratory, capable of hosting such a huge detector.

  2. Future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facilities and Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Diwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the ongoing effort in the US, Japan, and Europe of the scientific community to study the location and the detector performance of the next-generation long-baseline neutrino facility. For many decades, research on the properties of neutrinos and the use of neutrinos to study the fundamental building blocks of matter has unveiled new, unexpected laws of nature. Results of neutrino experiments have triggered a tremendous amount of development in theory: theories beyond the standard model or at least extensions of it and development of the standard solar model and modeling of supernova explosions as well as the development of theories to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrino physics is one of the most dynamic and exciting fields of research in fundamental particle physics and astrophysics. The next-generation neutrino detector will address two aspects: fundamental properties of the neutrino like mass hierarchy, mixing angles, and the CP phase, and low-energy neutrino astronomy with solar, atmospheric, and supernova neutrinos. Such a new detector naturally allows for major improvements in the search for nucleon decay. A next-generation neutrino observatory needs a huge, megaton scale detector which in turn has to be installed in a new, international underground laboratory, capable of hosting such a huge detector.

  3. Neutrino cave

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Here the end of the underground decay tunnel, its window and beam stopper. On the left one sees the end of the last quadrupole of the neutrino narrow-band beam, and the detectors measuring the beam profile. Further downstream one sees two Beam Current Transformers (BCT, see photo 7801005) measuring the beam intensity, and a Cerenkov counter.

  4. Neutrino horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    View of the new neutrino horn installed in its blockhouse from the target end. Protons pass through the 2mm hole in the centre of the small fluorescent screen, hitting the target immediately behind it. The circular tubes carry pressurized cooling water.

  5. Solar Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ance of S Umasankar. I thank my guide and S H Patil for their guidance and encouragement throughout the project. I would also like to thank STELAB, Nagoya University, Japan for giving me permission to use their computer facilities to prepare the final manuscript. Suggested Reading. [1] J N Bahcall,Neutrino Astrophysics, ...

  6. Neutrino Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to two physicists-Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B McDonald, whose teams discoveredthat neutrinos, which come in three flavours, changefrom one flavour to another. This discovery is a major milestonein particle physics as it gives a clear evidence of physicsbeyond the Standard ...

  7. Neutrino Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    could sensibly bear that name [4], E Fermi proposed the term neutrino instead of neutron for Pauli's mysterious particle, also concluding. E Fermi proposed the ... In June 1956, just two years prior to Pauli's death, Reines and Cowan could send a telegram informing Pauli about their dis- covery. The discovery quoting the ...

  8. Some neutrino decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Massive neutrinos mixing with weak interaction eigenstates are expected to decay into various channels depending on their masses and their mixing pattern. The author reviews some of these decay modes in the simpliest possible frame (νsub(H) → e - e + νsub(e), νsub(n) → γνsub(e), νsub(n) → γγνsub(e) and considers only the addition of right handed neutrino fields to the spectrum of the standard Glashow-Salam-Weinberg theory of weak interactions, thereby allowing for the existence of Dirac masses generated through the coupling of these fields and their left handed mates with the usual Higgs doublet and its charge conjugate, as is the case for quarks

  9. J-PARC Press Release: Electron neutrino oscillation detected at T2K

    CERN Multimedia

    T2K Press Office

    2011-01-01

    Tsukuba, Japan, June 15, 2011. The T2K experiment, whose primary purpose is to study neutrino interactions at a large distance from their source, has detected 6 electron neutrino candidate events based on the data collected before March 11, 2011. For the first time, it was possible to observe an indication that muon neutrinos are able to transform into electron neutrinos over a distance of 295 km through the quantum mechanical phenomena of neutrino flavor oscillations.   The Super-Kamiokande detector, in Japan. © 2011, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK. The T2K experiment is searching for the neutrino oscillation phenomena, where particular types of neutrinos transform into other types of neutrinos. These observations help determine neutrino masses, as well elucidating the uncharted nature of neutrinos, such as the relationship among three neutrino generations (types). T2K aims at the world’s best sensitivity by detecting neutrinos with the Super-Kamiokande d...

  10. Recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Elewyck, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope is currently the largest operating water Cherenkov detector and the largest neutrino detector in the Northern Hemisphere. Its main scientific target is the detection of high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the diffuse neutrino flux. Its location allows for surveying a large part of the Galactic Plane, including the Galactic Centre. In addition to the standalone searches for point-like and diffuse high-energy neutrino signals, ANTARES has developed a range of multi-messenger strategies to exploit the close connection between neutrinos and other cosmic messengers such as gamma-rays, charged cosmic rays and gravitational waves. This contribution provides an overview of the recently conducted analyses, including a search for neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles region, searches for optical counterparts with the TAToO program, and searches for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts, blazars, and microquasars. Further topics of investigation, covering e.g. the search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation, searches for exotic particles and the measurement of neutrino oscillations, are also reviewed

  11. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos: three new phenomena in neutrino spin oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studenikin Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In studies of neutrino electromagnetic properties we discuss three very inter-esting aspects related to neutrino spin oscillations. First we consider neutrino mixing and oscillations in the mass and flavour bases under the influence of a constant magnetic field with nonzero transversal and longitudinal components. Then we discuss the effect of neutrino spin oscillations induced by electroweak interactions of neutrino with moving matter in case there is matter transversal current or polarization. In the final part of the paper we discuss recently developed approach to description of neutrino spin and spin-flavour oscillations in a constant magnetic field that is based on the use of the exact neutrino stationary states in the magnetic field.

  12. Global Status of Neutrino Oscillation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    monojit

    2014-11-08

    Outline of talk. Neutrino Oscillations: the context. Solar and geo neutrino physics. Reactor neutrino physics. Atmospheric and long-baseline neutrino physics. Atmospheric neutrinos and INO. Nov 8, 2014, IASc Annual Meeting, IIT-Madras, Chennai – p. 2 ...

  13. Astronomy Explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Gerald

    Every year large numbers of people take up the study of astronomy, mostly at amateur level. There are plenty of elementary books on the market, full of colourful photographs, but lacking in proper explanations of how and why things are as they are. Many people eventually wish to go beyond the 'coffee-table book' stage and study this fascinating subject in greater depth. This book is written for them. In addition, many people sit for public examinations in this subject each year and this book is also intended to be of use to them. All the topics from the GCSE syllabus are covered here, with sample questions at the end of each chapter. Astronomy Explained provides a comprehensive treatment of the subject in more depth than is usually found in elementary works, and will be of interest to both amateur astronomers and students of astronomy.

  14. Measuring neutrino mass without neutrinos!

    CERN Multimedia

    Peach, Kenneth J

    2004-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay offers the most precise (if challenging) way of measuring the absolute mass of the neutrino. Particle Physics met at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory last autumn to discuss wether the UK should take a lead in setting up such an experiment

  15. Measuring anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Tully, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are antialigned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, C ν B observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the C ν B is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neutrinos.

  16. Astronomy essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Brass, Charles O

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Astronomy includes the historical perspective of astronomy, sky basics and the celestial coordinate systems, a model and the origin of the solar system, the sun, the planets, Kepler'

  17. A measurement of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and NuMI beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospanov, Rustem [Texas U.

    2008-08-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. The neutrino beam is produced by the NuMI facility at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, and is observed at near and far detectors placed 734 km apart. The neutrino interactions in the near detector are used to measure the initial muon neutrino fl The vast majority of neutrinos travel through the near detector and Earth matter without interactions. A fraction of muon neutrinos oscillate into other fl vors resulting in the disappearance of muon neutrinos at the far detector. This thesis presents a measurement of the muon neutrino oscillation parameters in the framework of the two-neutrino oscillation hypothesis.

  18. Study of the atmospheric neutrino oscillations in the Frejus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdereau, O.

    1989-05-01

    The behavior of atmospheric neutrinos is investigated. It is a zero mass, zero charge and weak interacting particle. The aim of the investigation is to search for non standard phenomena, such as neutrino oscillations. The neutrino theoretical properties are discussed and the physical parameters experimental limits are recalled. The analysis of the approximately 200 events from atmospheric neutrinos observed in Frejus detector is carried out. The results and simulation of neutrino interactions are presented. The data analysis induces to the exclusion of neutrino oscillation hypothesis from some models. Three cases of oscillations involving two neutrino flavors are analyzed. The effect of a third flavor is also taken into account. The present data and those from IMB and Kamiokande experiments are compared. Topics involving investigations on the superposition of a signal and the atmospheric neutrinos are included [fr

  19. The physics-astronomy frontier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, F.; Narlikar, K.

    1980-01-01

    Spacetime diagrams and the structure of matter are considered, and aspects of electrical interaction are investigated. Attention is given to radiation, quantum mechanics, spectrum lines, black bodies, stellar spectra, the H-R diagram, radio astronomy, millimeter-wave astronomy, interstellar grains and infrared astronomy, and X-ray astronomy. The strong and weak interactions are examined, taking into account atoms, nuclei, the evolution of stars, and the measurement of astronomical distances. A description of gravitational interaction is also presented. The laws of motion and gravitation are considered along with black holes, the significance of cosmology, Hubble's law, the expanding universe, the symmetries of the universe, Olbers' paradox, the big-bang universe, Mach's principle, the meaning of the expansion of the system of galaxies, the redshift-magnitude relation of Hubble and Humason, the early universe, and the geometry of special relativity

  20. Low Energy Neutrino Physics with sub-keV Ge-Detectors at Kuo-Sheng Neutrino Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, H. T.; TEXONO Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities offer a unique opportunity to study neutrino interactions and properties, as well as search for light WIMP Dark Matter. The TEXONO Collaboration has been pursuing research program on low energy neutrino interactions and light WIMP Dark Matter at the Kuo-Sheng Neutrino Laboratory (KSNL) in Taiwan and in the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China. We present highlights the physics program on the studies of neutrino electromagnetic interactions as well as neutrino-nucleus coherent elastic scattering.

  1. Energy Reconstruction Methods in the IceCube Neutrino Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.

    2014-01-01

    of light emitted is proportional to the deposited energy, which is approximately equal to the neutrino energy for νe and νμ charged-current interactions and can be used to set a lower bound on neutrino energies and to measure neutrino spectra statistically in other channels. Here we describe methods...

  2. SNO results and neutrino magnetic moment solution to the solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the solar neutrino deficit is due to the interaction of neutrino transition magnetic moment with the solar magnetic ... Another new feature in the analysis is that for the global analysis, we have replaced the spectrum by its centroid. ... rise to mean potentials Va for neutrinos which are proportional to the number density of.

  3. Very high energy photons and neutrinos: Implications for UHECR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the environment of the acceleration processes for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, photons and neutrinos may be produced by interactions in the sources. If so, observations of gamma-rays or neutrinos could pinpoint the sources. This paper reviews some aspects of the search for photons and neutrinos from possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  4. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  5. Time calibration of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J.A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A.C.A.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brown, A.M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M.P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Herold, B.; Hossl, J.; Hsu, C.C.; De Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G.E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G.V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienzap, P.; Schock, F.; Schuller, J.P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope comprises a three-dimensional array of photomultipliers to detect the Cherenkov light induced by upgoing relativistic charged particles originating from neutrino interactions in the vicinity of the detector. The large scattering length of light in the deep sea

  6. Time calibration of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienzap, P.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J. P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    The ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope comprises a three-dimensional array of photomultipliers to detect the Cherenkov light induced by upgoing relativistic charged particles originating from neutrino interactions in the vicinity of the detector. The large scattering length of light in the deep sea

  7. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino τ v l M using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a v l D , which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2) L x U(1) Y .

  8. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  9. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  10. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios in neutrino and antineutrino nucleon interactions and determination of the Weinberg angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Groot, J.G.H. de; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Knobloch, J.; May, J.; Navarria, F.L.; Palazzi, P.; Para, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rothberg, J.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Taureg, H.; Rueden, W. von; Wahl, H.; Wotschak, J.; Duda, J.; Eisele, F.; Klasen, H.P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Lierl, H.; Pollmann, D.; Pszola, B.; Renk, B.; Willutzki, H.J.; Dydak, F.; Flottmann, T.; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Krolikowski, J.; Tittel, K.; Bloch, P.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Guyot, C.; Loucatos, S.; Maillard, J.; Merlo, J.P.; Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Turlay, R.; He, J.T.; Ruan, T.Z.; Wu, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The cross section ratios of neutral and charged current interactions induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos in iron have been measured in the 200 GeV narrow-band beam at the CERN SPS. We find Rsub(ν)=0.301+-0.007 and Rsub(anti ν)=0.363+-0.015 for a hadron energy cut of 10 GeV. The results are in agreement with the standard model of electroweak interactions. In the MS renormalization scheme at the scale of the W boson mass sin 2 Osub(w)(msub(w))=0.226+-0.012 is obtained, where the error represents the experimental uncertainty. The theoretical uncertainty is estimated to be Δ sind 2 Osub(w)=+-0.006. (orig.)

  11. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  12. Neutrino problems proliferate (Neutrino 94 conference report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Fraser

    1994-01-01

    The enigma of the neutrino continues. More than sixty years after its hesitant prediction by Pauli and forty years after its discovery by Reines and Cowan, the neutrino still refuses to give up all its secrets. The longer we travel down the neutrino road and the more we find out about these particles, the more problems we uncover en route. The present state of the neutrino mystery was highlighted at the Neutrino 94 meeting in Eilat, Israel, from 29 May to 3 June. It was a distinguished meeting, with the first morning including one session chaired by neutrino co-discoverer Fred Reines, and an introductory talk by muon-neutrino co-discoverer Leon Lederman. One figurehead neutrino personality conspicuously absent this time was Bruno Pontecorvo, who died last year and had attended the previous conference in the series, in Grenada, Spain, in 1992

  13. Ratio of neutral-current to charged-current cross sections for inclusive neutrino interactions in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, F.A.; Berge, J.P.; Bogert, D.V.; Cence, R.J.; Coffin, T.C.; Cundy, D.C.; Diamond, R.N.; DiBianca, F.A.; French, H.T.; Hanft, R.; Kochowski, C.; Louis, W.C.; Lynch, G.R.; Malko, J.; Marriner, J.P.; Nezrick, F.A.; Parker, S.I.; Peters, M.W.; Peterson, V.Z.; Roe, B.P.; Ross, R.T.; Scott, W.G.; Seidl, A.A.; Smart, W.; Stenger, V.J.; Stevenson, M.L.; Vander Velde, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The ratio of neutral-current to charged-current cross sections is determined from a sample of events obtained in an exposure of the Fermilab 15-ft hydrogen bubble chamber to a high-energy, horn-focused neutrino beam. For evens with three or more prongs and with visible hadron momentum above 10 GeV/c, the ratio is 0.40 +- 0.14. A Monte Carlo calculation assuming the Weinberg-Salam model is used to correct for excluded events, yielding R/sub NC/CC/ = 0.48 +- 0.17

  14. v-bare and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orrell, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation results from KamLAND, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), and Super-Kamiokande provide evidence for neutrino mass. Determination of the Dirac or Majorana nature of neutrinos is an important next step in neutrino physics. An electron antineutrino, v-bare, component of the solar neutrino flux would provide a telltale sign neutrinos are Majorana particles. The SNO Collaboration is currently searching for an v-bare signal, intending to measure or limit the flux of v-bare in the solar neutrino energy range. A method for increasing the fiducial volume and lowering the analysis energy threshold using the time coincidence signature of the product particles of the charged current weak interaction of a v-bare with a deuterium nucleus, v-bare + d → e+ + n + n, is presented

  15. High-energy neutrinos from AGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toschke, Marius [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); TU Dortmund (Germany); Becker Tjus, Julia [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Rhode, Wolfgang [TU Dortmund (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the outer space there are galactic and extragalactic sources like gamma-ray bursts (GRB), active galactic nuclei (AGN), supernovae or other phenomena which produce high-energy neutrinos. In contrast to supernovae, GRBs and AGN are supposed to generate neutrinos at the highest energies. Neutrinos have a tiny cross section as they mainly suffer from the weak interaction. Therefore, they are useful messenger particles providing information about the direction of the source. With observations of the gamma flux from galactic and extragalactic sources, it is possible to make predictions for the neutrino flux. We suppose that neutrinos are predominantly generated by inelastic proton-proton interactions and derive the possible galactic and extragalactic sources. In this talk, first results are presented.

  16. Neutrino 2004: Collection of Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The scientific program covers the latest developments in neutrino physics, astrophysics and related topics through a set of invited talks and 2 poster sessions. The following issues are addressed: - solar neutrinos, - atmospheric neutrinos, - short and long baseline experiments, - neutrino oscillations, - double beta decay, - direct neutrino mass limits, - theory for neutrino masses, neutrino telescopes and ultra-high energy neutrinos, - dark matter searches, - neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology, and - future projects beams and experiments.

  17. Neutrino 2004: Collection of Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The scientific program covers the latest developments in neutrino physics, astrophysics and related topics through a set of invited talks and 2 poster sessions. The following issues are addressed: - solar neutrinos, - atmospheric neutrinos, - short and long baseline experiments, - neutrino oscillations, - double beta decay, - direct neutrino mass limits, - theory for neutrino masses, neutrino telescopes and ultra-high energy neutrinos, - dark matter searches, - neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology, and - future projects beams and experiments

  18. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  19. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  20. The World of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutrinos from the big bang. Cosmic microwave background: 400 photons/ cm3. Temperature: ∼ 3 K. Cosmic neutrino background: 300 neutrinos / cm3. Temperature: ∼ 2 K. The “relic” neutrinos. The second-most abundant particles in the universe. Detection still far in future. (unless someone has a brilliant idea) ...

  1. Chaco astronomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín López, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    This presentation discusses the result of 18 years of ethnographic and ethnohistorical studies on Chaco astronomies. The main features of the systems of astronomical knowledge of the Chaco Aboriginal groups will be discussed. In particular we will discuss the relevance of the Milky Way, the role of the visibility of the Pleiades, the ways in which the celestial space is represented, the constitution of astronomical orientations in geographic space, etc. We also address a key feature of their vision of the cosmos: the universe is seen by these groups as a socio-cosmos, where humans and non-humans are related. These are therefore actually socio-cosmologies. We will link this to the theories of Chaco Aboriginal groups about power and political relations.We will discuss how the study of Aboriginal astronomies must be performed along with the studies about astronomies of Creole people and European migrants, as well as anthropological studies about the science teaching in the formal education system and by the mass media. In this form we will discuss the relevance of a very complex system of interethnic relations for the conformation of these astronomical representations and practices.We will also discuss the general methodological implications of this case for the ethnoastronomy studies. In particular we will talk about the advantages of a study of regional scope and about the key importance of put in contact the ethnoastronomy with contemporary issues in social sciences.We also analyze the importance of ethnoastronomy studies in relation to studies of sociology of science, especially astronomy. We also study the potential impact on improving formal and informal science curricula and in shaping effective policies to protect the tangible and intangible astronomical heritage in a context of respect for the rights of Aboriginal groups.

  2. The Prospect of Neutrinos with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    With the first detection of gravitational waves in 2015, scientists celebrated the opening of a new window to the universe. But multi-messenger astronomy astronomy based on detections of not just photons, but other signals as well was not a new idea at the time: we had already detected tiny, lightweight neutrinos emitted from astrophysical sources. Will we be able to combine observations of neutrinos and gravitational waves in the future to provide a deeper picture of astrophysical events?Signs of a MergerArtists impression of the first stage of a binary neutron star merger. [NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)]If the answer is yes, the key will probably be short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Theory predicts that when a neutron star merges with another compact object (either another neutron star or a black hole), a number of signals may be observable. These include:gravitational waves as the binary spirals inward,a brief burst of gamma rays at merger (this is the SGRB),high-energy neutrino emission during the SGRB,optical and infrared emission after the merger in the form of a kilonova, andradio afterglows of the merger remnants.While weve observed the various electromagnetic components of this picture, the multi-messenger part is lacking: gravitational-wave detections havent been made in conjunction with electromagnetic counterparts thus far, and the only confirmed astrophysical sources of neutrinos are the Sun and Supernova 1987A.Pedicted neutrino fluxes during different stages of emission in an SGRB. [Kimura et al. 2017]Can we expect this to change in the future? A team of authors led by Shigeo Kimura (Pennsylvania State University) has now explored the likelihood that well be able to detect high-energy neutrinos in association with future gravitational-wave events.Detecting the SGRB NeutrinosKimura and collaborators first estimate the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected during various emission phases of an SGRB. They show that a period of late-time emission, known

  3. Introduction to massive neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the theoretical ideas which make it natural to expect that neutrinos do indeed have mass. Then we focus on the physical consequences of neutrino mass, including neutrino oscillation and other phenomena whose observation would be very interesting, and would serve to demonstrate that neutrinos are indeed massive. We comment on the legitimacy of comparing results from different types of experiments. Finally, we consider the question of whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles. We explain what this question means, discuss the nature of a neutrino which is its own antiparticles, and consider how one might determine experimentally whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles or not

  4. Prospects for relic neutrino detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.F.

    1991-03-01

    The standard big bang model predicts a universal background of relic neutrinos, comparable in number density to the background microwave photons. This neutrino background is undetectable at the present time firstly because the neutrino energy is very low (10 -4 -10 -5 eV) resulting in a very low energy transfer to any conceivable detector, and secondly the low energy gives a lower interaction cross section and hence a very low event rate per unit mass. These obstacles have so far precluded any realistic proposal for relic neutrino detection. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the difficulties in detecting these neutrinos by summarizing six detection ideas which have been previously considered, indicating in each case the problems which have prevented the idea being developed into an experimental proposal. The most promising direction for further study would appear to be that of coherent interactions. So far, no investigations of this idea have resulted in a practical detection scheme, but in this paper one new variation is suggested which could in principle give an observable effect, if the necessary stringent experimental conditions could be created. It is suggested that this may become possible with the aid of foreseeable 21st century developments in nanotechnology. (author)

  5. Fundamental astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kröger, Pekka; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Now in its sixth edition this successful undergraduate textbook gives a well-balanced and comprehensive introduction to the topics of classical and modern astronomy. While emphasizing both the astronomical concepts and the underlying physical principles, the text provides a sound basis for more profound studies in the astronomical sciences. The chapters on galactic and extragalactic astronomy as well as cosmology were extensively modernized in the previous edition. In this new edition they have been further revised to include more recent results. The long chapter on the solar system has been split into two parts: the first one deals with the general properties, and the other one describes individual objects. A new chapter on exoplanets has been added to the end of the book next to the chapter on astrobiology. In response to the fact that astronomy has evolved enormously over the last few years, only a few chapters of this book have been left unmodified. Long considered a standard text for physical science maj...

  6. Humanising Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, S.

    2008-06-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that aims to expose underprivileged children (in the age group 4-10) to the inspirational aspects of astronomy. We are currently at the stage of developing materials that will be utilised in a diverse range of environments. This paper explores UNAWE's particular approach to developing tools which includes not only indigenous and folkloric astronomical knowledge, but also the culture of transmission of such knowledge. A specific understanding and explanation of the Universe, the Sun, Moon and stars is present in every culture and can be found contained in its history, legends and belief systems. By consciously embracing different ways of knowing the Universe and not uniquely the rational model, UNAWE places the humanising potential of astronomy at the centre of its purpose. Whilst inspiring curiosity, pride and a sense of ownership in one's own cultural identity, such an approach also exposes children to the diversity of other peoples and their cultures as well as the unifying aspects of our common scientific heritage. The means of creating and delivering the astronomy programme are as relevant to the desired educational outcomes as the content. The challenge in the design of materials is to communicate this stimulating message to the very young. Respect for alternative values systems, the need for dialogue and community participation, and where possible the production of materials using local resources is emphasised. This paper touches recent experiences liaising with communities in India, South Africa, Tunisia, Venezuela and Colombia.

  7. 50 years of neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhaber, M

    1980-01-01

    On December 4 1930, Wolfgang Pauli addressed an "open letter" to Lise Meitner and others attending a physics meeting, suggesting the neutrino as a way out of the difficulties confronted in beta rays research, especially by the existence of a continuous beta spectrum. He proposed a new particle later called the neutrino. The prehistory leading up to Pauli's letter will be reviewed, as well as the later discovery of the electron-neutrino followed by the muon-neutrino. There are now believed to be three different types of neutrino and their anti-particles. Neutrinos have a spin 1/2; but only one spin component has been found in nature: neutrinos go forward as "left-handed" screws and anti-neutrinos as "right-handed" ones. A question still not convincingly resolved today is wether neutrinos have a mass different from zero and, if they do, what consequences this would have for the behaviour of neutrinos and for cosmology.

  8. Developments in Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric and solar neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. We review the phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter. We present the existing evidence from solar and atmospheric neutrinos as well as the results from laboratory searches, including the final status of the LSND experiment. We describe the theoretical inputs that are used to interpret the experimental results in terms of neutrino oscillations. We derive the allowed ranges for the mass and mixing parameters in three frameworks: First, each set of observations is analyzed separately in a two-neutrino framework; Second, the data from solar and atmospheric neutrinos are analyzed in a three active neutrino framework; Third, the LSND results are added, and the status of accommodating all three signals in the framework of three active and one sterile light neutrinos is presented. We review the theoretical implications ...

  9. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ould-Saada, F. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1996-11-01

    Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos and their implications are discussed, and the experimental situation summarised. Spin precession in solar magnetic fields presents a solution of the solar neutrino problem. A magnetic moment, {mu}{sub {nu}}, of the order of 10{sup -11} {mu}{sub B} would be needed. In the simplest extension of the standard model, with no-vanishing neutrino masses, dipole moment interactions are allowed through higher order processes. A neutrino mass of {approx_equal}10 eV would give {mu}{sub {nu}}{approx_equal}10{sup -18} {mu}{sub B}, much smaller than the present experimental upper limit of 2x10{sup -10} {mu}{sub B}. Although model-dependent, upper bounds on dipole moments from astrophysics and cosmology are 10 to 100 times more stringent. Any values of {mu}{sub {nu}}, larger than the SM predictions, would then signal the onset of new physics. Among the processes sensitive to the magnetic moment, {nu}e{sup -} scattering presents two advantages: it is a pure weak, theoretically well understood process, and the recoil electron can be easily measured. A hypothetical electromagnetic contribution to the cross-section would dominate at low energies. A low background detector, MUNU, being built at the Bugey nuclear reactor is presented.It is based on a gas TPC, surrounded by a scintillator. The threshold on the electron recoil energy can be set very low, around 500 keV, giving the experiment a good sensitivity to the magnetic moment of the {nu}{sub e}, extending down to 2x10{sup -11} {mu}{sub B}. (author) 15 figs., 5 tabs., 96 refs.

  10. Parity violation and the masslessness of the neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannheim, P.D.

    1978-09-01

    It is proposed that the weak interaction be obtained by gauging the strong interaction chiral flavor group. The neutrinos are then four-component spinors. Pairs of right-handed neutrinos are allowed to condense into the vacuum. This produces maximal parity violation in both the quark and lepton sectors of the weak interaction, keeps the neutrinos massless, and also leads to the conventional Weinberg mixing pattern. The approach also in principle provides a way of calculating the Cabibbo angle. 11 references.

  11. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Current interest in gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 100 GeV comes from the identification of Cygnus X-3 and other X-ray binaries as sources. In addition there are reports of emission from radio pulsars and a variety of other objects. The statistical significance of many of the observations is not high and many reported effects await confirmation, but there are a sufficient number of independent reports that very high energy gamma-ray astronomy must now be considered to have an observational basis. The observations are summarized with particular emphasis on those reported since 1980. The techniques used - the detection of small air showers using the secondary photons and particles at ground level - are unusual and are described. Future prospects for the field are discussed in relation to new ground-based experiments, satellite gamma-ray studies and proposed neutrino astronomy experiments. (orig.) With 296 refs

  12. Neutrino Oscillation Parameters: Present Status and Future Roadmap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-04

    Nov 4, 2016 ... Gravitational Wave at Advanced LIGO. A New Era of. Gravitational Wave Astronomy. Intensity Frontier: Neutrino properties: A window to our Universe and New Physics. Discovery of moderately large value of θ. 13 has crucial consequences for future theoretical and experimental efforts. Non-zero θ. 13.

  13. Towards the detection of cosmological relic neutrino with neutrino capture on a beta decaying nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Messina, M; Mangano, G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on recent results in the Þeld of the phenomenology of very low energy neutrino interactions. We brießy describe the cross section calculation for Neutrino Capture on Beta decay nuclei (NCB). We show that the resulting cross section open the possibility to detect the cosmological relic neutrinos. With this achievement, the relic neutrino detection has been downscaled from a principle problem to a technological challenge. We also summarise the state of the art about possible detection techniques.

  14. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  15. Nuclear responses for neutrinos and neutrino studies by double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    laboratories for studying low energy neutrinos (ν) and fundamental weak interactions. Here nuclei are used to select and enhance particular processes relevant toν properties beyond the standard theory of SU(2)Д¢U(1). Actually Majorana ν masses, ...

  16. T2K neutrino flux prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K.

    2013-01-02

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment studies neutrino oscillations using an off-axis muon neutrino beam with a peak energy of about 0.6 GeV that originates at the J-PARC accelerator facility. Interactions of the neutrinos are observed at near detectors placed at 280 m from the production target and at the far detector -- Super-Kamiokande (SK) -- located 295 km away. The flux prediction is an essential part of the successful prediction of neutrino interaction rates at the T2K detectors and is an important input to T2K neutrino oscillation and cross section measurements. A FLUKA and GEANT3 based simulation models the physical processes involved in the neutrino production, from the interaction of primary beam protons in the T2K target, to the decay of hadrons and muons that produce neutrinos. The simulation uses proton beam monitor measurements as inputs. The modeling of hadronic interactions is re-weighted using thin target hadron production data, including recent charged pion and kaon measurements from the NA...

  17. Solar atmospheric neutrinos: A new neutrino floor for dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Beacom, John F.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Rott, Carsten

    2017-11-01

    As is well known, dark matter direct detection experiments will ultimately be limited by a "neutrino floor," due to the scattering of nuclei by MeV neutrinos from, e.g., nuclear fusion in the Sun. Here we point out the existence of a new neutrino floor that will similarly limit indirect detection with the Sun, due to high-energy neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions with the solar atmosphere. We have two key findings. First, solar atmospheric neutrinos ≲1 TeV cause a sensitivity floor for standard weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) scenarios, for which higher-energy neutrinos are absorbed in the Sun. This floor will be reached once the present sensitivity is improved by just 1 order of magnitude. Second, for neutrinos ≳1 TeV , which can be isolated by muon energy loss rate, solar atmospheric neutrinos should soon be detectable in IceCube. Discovery will help probe the complicated effects of solar magnetic fields on cosmic rays. These events will be backgrounds to WIMP scenarios with long-lived mediators, for which higher-energy neutrinos can escape from the Sun.

  18. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS neutrino beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autiero, Dario

    2012-03-01

    The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory measured the velocity of neutrinos from the CERN CNGS beam over a baseline of about 730 km with much higher accuracy than previous studies conducted with accelerator neutrinos. The measurement was based on high statistics data taken by OPERA in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Dedicated upgrades of the CNGS timing system and of the OPERA detector, as well as a high precision geodesy campaign for the measurement of the neutrino baseline, allowed reaching comparable systematic and statistical accuracies and limiting the overall uncertainty on the neutrinos time of flight measurement to 10 ns. The time of flight was measured by comparing the time distributions of neutrino interactions in OPERA and of protons hitting the CNGS target in 10.5 μs long extractions. The above result, indicating an early arrival time of about 60 ns of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum, was confirmed by a test performed using a beam with a short-bunch time-structure allowing to measure the neutrino time of flight at the single interaction level. The OPERA neutrino velocity measurement will be review as well as the latest developments and perspectives.

  19. Astrophysical neutrinos flavored with beyond the Standard Model physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus W.; Ackermann, Markus; Winter, Walter; Lechner, Lukas; Kowalski, Marek; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin

    2017-07-01

    We systematically study the allowed parameter space for the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos measured at Earth, including beyond the Standard Model theories at production, during propagation, and at detection. One motivation is to illustrate the discrimination power of the next-generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube-Gen2. We identify several examples that lead to potential deviations from the standard neutrino mixing expectation such as significant sterile neutrino production at the source, effective operators modifying the neutrino propagation at high energies, dark matter interactions in neutrino propagation, or non-standard interactions in Earth matter. IceCube-Gen2 can exclude about 90% of the allowed parameter space in these cases, and hence will allow to efficiently test and discriminate models. More detailed information can be obtained from additional observables such as the energy-dependence of the effect, fraction of electron antineutrinos at the Glashow resonance, or number of tau neutrino events.

  20. Astrophysical neutrinos flavored with beyond the Standard Model physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus W.; Lechner, Lukas; Ackermann, Markus; Kowalski, Marek; Winter, Walter

    2017-10-01

    We systematically study the allowed parameter space for the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos measured at Earth, including beyond the Standard Model theories at production, during propagation, and at detection. One motivation is to illustrate the discrimination power of the next-generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube-Gen2. We identify several examples that lead to potential deviations from the standard neutrino mixing expectation such as significant sterile neutrino production at the source, effective operators modifying the neutrino propagation at high energies, dark matter interactions in neutrino propagation, or nonstandard interactions in Earth matter. IceCube-Gen2 can exclude about 90% of the allowed parameter space in these cases, and hence will allow us to efficiently test and discriminate between models. More detailed information can be obtained from additional observables such as the energy dependence of the effect, fraction of electron antineutrinos at the Glashow resonance, or number of tau neutrino events.

  1. Scattering processes could distinguish Majorana from Dirac neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Barranco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that Majorana neutrinos have a pure axial neutral current interaction while Dirac neutrinos have the standard vector-axial interaction. In spite of this crucial difference, usually Dirac neutrino processes differ from Majorana processes by a term proportional to the neutrino mass, resulting in almost unmeasurable observations of this difference. In the present work we show that once the neutrino polarization evolution is considered, there are clear differences between Dirac and Majorana scattering on electrons. The change of polarization can be achieved in astrophysical environments with strong magnetic fields. Furthermore, we show that in the case of unpolarized neutrino scattering onto polarized electrons, this difference can be relevant even for large values of the neutrino energy.

  2. TeV gravity at neutrino telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Illana, J I; Meloni, D

    2005-01-01

    Cosmogenic neutrinos reach the Earth with energies around 10^9 GeV, and their interactions with matter will be measured in upcoming experiments (Auger, IceCube). Models with extra dimensions and the fundamental scale at the TeV could imply signals in these experiments. In particular, the production of microscopic black holes by cosmogenic neutrinos has been extensively studied in the literature. Here we make a complete analysis of gravity-mediated interactions at larger distances, where they can be calculated in the eikonal approximation. In these processes a neutrino of energy E_\

  3. Search for Sterile Neutrinos Using the MiniBooNE Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorel, Michel [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of light sterile neutrinos in Nature is motivated, and the prospects to extend sterile neutrino searches beyond current limits is substantiated, using the MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab. We report on the neutrino flux predictions for the MiniBooNE experiment, on the characterization of the charged-current, quasi-elastic interactions of muon neutrinos ({nu}{sub {mu}}n {yields} {mu}{sup -}p) observed, and on the experiment's sensitivity to sterile neutrinos via muon neutrino disappearance.

  4. On the High-Energy Neutrino Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Kun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We review observational aspects of the active galactic nuclei and their jets in connection with the detection of high-energy neutrinos by the Antarctic IceCube Neutrino Observatory. We propose that a reoriented jet generated by the spin-flipping supermassive black hole in a binary merger is likely the source of such high-energy neutrinos. Hence they encode important information on the afterlife of coalescing supermassive black hole binaries. As the gravitational radiation emanating from them will be monitored by the future LISA space mission, high-energy neutrino detections could be considered a contributor to multi-messenger astronomy.

  5. A search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osiecki, Thomas Henry [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-01-01

    MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can attain a very high precision for parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. In addition to precisely determining Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and θ23 through the disappearance of vμ, MINOS is able to measure vμ → vsterile by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far detector. In this thesis, we present the results of a search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS.

  6. The Era of Kilometer-Scale Neutrino Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Halzen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. KM3NeT, an instrument that aims to exploit several cubic kilometers of the deep Mediterranean sea as its detector medium, is in its final design stages. The scientific missions of these instruments include searching for sources of cosmic rays and for dark matter, observing Galactic supernova explosions, and studying the neutrinos themselves. Identifying the accelerators that produce Galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays has been a priority mission of several generations of high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino telescopes; success has been elusive so far. Detecting the gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes associated with cosmic rays reaches a new watershed with the completion of IceCube, the first neutrino detector with sensitivity to the anticipated fluxes. In this paper, we will first revisit the rationale for constructing kilometer-scale neutrino detectors. We will subsequently recall the methods for determining the arrival direction, energy and flavor of neutrinos, and will subsequently describe the architecture of the IceCube and KM3NeT detectors.

  7. CrossRef Neutrino factory proton driver and target design

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, Roland; Thomason, John; Davenne, Tristan; Caretta, Ottone; Back, John J

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos are very elusive particles belonging to the lepton family. They exist in different types corresponding to the different charged leptons, namely electrons, muons and taus. Contrary to electrons, neutrinos hardly interact with matter which makes them very difficult to detect and study. To the best of today’s knowledge, neutrinos have hardly any mass and they can change from one type to another (so-called “neutrino oscillation”). Most physicists think that this oscillation occurs because neutrinos have mass. A Neutrino Factory [1] is a special facility producing a large amount of neutrinos every year (typically 10$^{21}$ neutrinos/year). Its main purpose is to study the change of type of neutrinos between the place where they are generated and a remote location. In a Neutrino Factory, neutrinos result from the decay of muons, unstable particles with a mean lifetime of 2.2 $\\mu$s in their rest frame. Sharp beams of high energy neutrinos are obtained at the end of the long straight sections of a mu...

  8. Neutrinos and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Steigman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the standard models of particle physics and cosmology, there should be a background of cosmic neutrinos in the present Universe, similar to the cosmic microwave photon background. The weakness of the weak interactions renders this neutrino background undetectable with current technology. The cosmic neutrino background can, however, be probed indirectly through its cosmological effects on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN and the cosmic microwave background (CMB radiation. In this BBN review, focused on neutrinos and more generally on dark radiation, the BBN constraints on the number of “equivalent neutrinos” (dark radiation, on the baryon asymmetry (baryon density, and on a possible lepton asymmetry (neutrino degeneracy are reviewed and updated. The BBN constraints on dark radiation and on the baryon density following from considerations of the primordial abundances of deuterium and helium-4 are in excellent agreement with the complementary results from the CMB, providing a suggestive, but currently inconclusive, hint of the presence of dark radiation, and they constrain any lepton asymmetry. For all the cases considered here there is a “lithium problem”: the BBN-predicted lithium abundance exceeds the observationally inferred primordial value by a factor of ~3.

  9. Neutrino Pair Cerenkov Radiation for Tachyonic Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich D. Jentschura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission of a charged light lepton pair by a superluminal neutrino has been identified as a major factor in the energy loss of highly energetic neutrinos. The observation of PeV neutrinos by IceCube implies their stability against lepton pair Cerenkov radiation. Under the assumption of a Lorentz-violating dispersion relation for highly energetic superluminal neutrinos, one may thus constrain the Lorentz-violating parameters. A kinematically different situation arises when one assumes a Lorentz-covariant, space-like dispersion relation for hypothetical tachyonic neutrinos, as an alternative to Lorentz-violating theories. We here discuss a hitherto neglected decay process, where a highly energetic tachyonic neutrino may emit other (space-like, tachyonic neutrino pairs. We find that the space-like dispersion relation implies the absence of a q2 threshold for the production of a tachyonic neutrino-antineutrino pair, thus leading to the dominant additional energy loss mechanism for an oncoming tachyonic neutrino in the medium-energy domain. Surprisingly, the small absolute values of the decay rate and energy loss rate in the tachyonic model imply that these models, in contrast to the Lorentz-violating theories, are not pressured by the cosmic PeV neutrinos registered by the IceCube collaboration.

  10. Radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Alder, Berni

    1975-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 14: Radio Astronomy is devoted to the role of the digital computer both as a control device and as a calculator in addressing problems related to galactic radio noise. This volume contains four chapters and begins with a technical description of the hardware and the special data-handling problems of using radioheliography, with an emphasis on a selection of observational results obtained with the Culgoora radioheliograph and their significance to solar physics and to astrophysics in general. The subsequent chapter examines interstellar dispersion, i

  11. Molybdenum solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, K.; Cowan, G.A.; Bryant, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of the molybdenum solar neutrino experiment is to deduce the 8 B solar neutrino flux, averaged over the past several million years, from the concentration of 98 Tc in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. The experiment is important to an understanding of stellar processes because it will shed light on the reason for the discrepancy between theory and observation of the chlorine solar neutrino experiment. Possible reasons for the discrepancy may lie in the properties of neutrinos (neutrino oscillations or massive neutrinos) or in deficiencies of the standard solar model. The chlorine experiment only measures the 8 B neutrino flux in current times and does not address possible temporal variations in the interior of the sun, which are also not considered in the standard model. In the molybdenum experiment, we plan to measure 98 Tc (4.2 Myr), also produced by 8 B neutrinos, and possibly 97 Tc (2.6 Myr), produced by lower energy neutrinos

  12. The physics of neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, Vernon D; Whisnant, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    The physics of neutrinos- uncharged elementary particles that are key to helping us better understand the nature of our universe - is one of the most exciting frontiers of modern science. This book provides a comprehensive overview of neutrino physics today and explores promising new avenues of inquiry that could lead to future breakthroughs. The Physics of Neutrinos begins with a concise history of the field and a tutorial on the fundamental properties of neutrinos, and goes on to discuss how the three neutrino types interchange identities as they propagate from their sources to detectors. The book shows how studies of neutrinos produced by such phenomena as cosmic rays in the atmosphere and nuclear reactions in the solar interior provide striking evidence that neutrinos have mass, and it traces our astounding progress in deciphering the baffling experimental findings involving neutrinos. The discovery of neutrino mass offers the first indication of a new kind of physics that goes beyond the Standard Model ...

  13. Sterile neutrinos in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.

    2017-11-01

    Sterile neutrinos are natural extensions to the standard model of particle physics in neutrino mass generation mechanisms. If they are relatively light, less than approximately 10 keV, they can alter cosmology significantly, from the early Universe to the matter and radiation energy density today. Here, we review the cosmological role such light sterile neutrinos can play from the early Universe, including production of keV-scale sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates, and dynamics of light eV-scale sterile neutrinos during the weakly-coupled active neutrino era. We review proposed signatures of light sterile neutrinos in cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data. We also discuss keV-scale sterile neutrino dark matter decay signatures in X-ray observations, including recent candidate ∼3.5 keV X-ray line detections consistent with the decay of a ∼7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter particle.

  14. Neutrinos in a Sterile Throat

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben Matthew

    2007-01-01

    We consider field-theoretic models of a warped extra dimension with multiple throats, in which fermions that are singlets of the Standard Model gauge group propagate in a separate throat from the Standard Model fields, which we call the sterile throat. The singlets mix with Standard Model fields via interactions localized on the UV brane that connects the two throats. This leads to three, light, mostly-active, Majorana neutrinos via a higher-dimensional see-saw mechanism, together with Kaluza-Klein towers of mostly-sterile neutrinos, whose scale is set by the warp factor in the sterile throat and can be very low if the throat is deep. We suggest that a model of this kind may explain all the neutrino data, reconciling the LSND result with astrophysical constraints.

  15. Astronomy Education in Morocco - New Project for Implementing Astronomy in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darhmaoui, H.; Loudiyi, K.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy education in Morocco, like in many developing countries, is not well developed and lacks the very basics in terms of resources, facilities and research. In 2004, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) signed an agreement of collaboration with Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane to support the continued, long-term development of astronomy and astrophysics in Morocco. This is within the IAU program "Teaching for Astronomy Development" (TAD). The initial focus of the program concentrated exclusively on the University's Bachelor of Science degree program. Within this program, and during two years, we were successful in providing adequate astronomy training to our physics faculty and few of our engineering students. We also offered our students and community general astronomy background through courses, invited talks and extra curricular activities. The project is now evolving towards a wider scope and seeks promoting astronomy education at the high school level. It is based on modules from the Hands on Universe (HOU) interactive astronomy program. Moroccan students will engage in doing observational astronomy from their PCs. They will have access to a world wide network of telescopes and will interact with their peers abroad. Through implementing astronomy education at this lower age, we foresee an increasing interest among our youth not only in astronomy but also in physics, mathematics, and technology. The limited astronomy resources, the lack of teachers experience in the field and the language barrier are amongst the difficulties that we'll be facing in achieving the objectives of this new program.

  16. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    NAKAHATA, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the “solar neutrino problem”. Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consis...

  17. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Arloganu, C. C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Loehner, H.

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the

  18. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; et al., [Unknown; Decowski, M.P.; Kooijman, P.; Lim, G.; Palioselitis, D.; Presani, E.; de Wolf, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the

  19. A silicon detector for neutrino physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkonen, J

    2002-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting future muon neutrino - tau neutrino oscillation searches using a high-resolution, large-area silicon microstrip detector, the Silicon TARget (STAR) detector was built. STAR was installed in the NOMAD short baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the CERN SPS neutrino beam, where it recorded approximately 10000 neutrino interactions during the operation of the detector in the period 1997-98. It consists of five layers of silicon detectors interleaved with four layers of passive boron carbide as the target. The target mass is 45 kg, while the total silicon surface area is 1.14 square-meters and contains 32000 readout channels. The individual modules have a length of 72 cm, the longest built to date. The detection of tau particles, produced in tau neutrino charged-current interactions, would require a tracking detector with a precision of a few tens of microns in order to measure the position of the neutrino interaction vertex as well as the impact parame...

  20. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  1. Neutrino mass, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental approaches to neutrino mass include kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at rectors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indications that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing

  2. XUV astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, K.P.; Technische Univ. Berlin

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of the young field of extreme-ultraviolet astronomy at wavelengths from 50 Angstroem to 912 Angstroem. In recent years, it was realized that observations in this wavelength band could be performed due to the lucky circumstance that the sun is located in an extended region of extremely low interstellar gas density. Hence, the horizon for observations at 100 Angstroem due to the photoelectric opacity of the interstellar medium is typically at a distance of about 200 pc. Since 1975 a series of rocket and satellite observations have yielded the first positive results. Sources which radiate primarily in the extreme ultraviolet have been detected and even the small list of currently observed objects has had immediate impact on the studies of both stellar evolution and the interstellar medium. Diffuse emission from the interstellar medium results from a hot 10 5 to 10 6 K component of the interstellar gas. Prime stellar candidates for extreme-ultraviolet observations are (1) hot low-luminosity stars at the blue end of the HR diagram as, e.g., white dwarfs at the beginning of the cooling sequence, (2) atmospheric emission from stars surrounded by a hot corona or with flaring activity, (3) mass-exchanging binary systems as, e.g., main-sequence close binaries or catalysmic variables. The article discusses the prospects of extreme-ultraviolet astronomy and reviews the existing observations of extreme-ultraviolet emission from the interstellar medium and from stellar sources of the different categories. (orig.)

  3. Elementary astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, J.

    2006-08-01

    In developing nations such as Mexico, basic science education has scarcely improved. There are multiple reasons for this problem; they include poor teacher training and curricula that are not challenging for students. I shall suggest ways in which astronomy can be used to improve basic education, it is so attractive that it can be employed to teach how to read and write, learn a second language, mathematics, physics, as well as geography. If third world nations do not teach science in an adequate way, they will be in serious problems when they will try to achieve a better standard of living for their population. I shall also address informal education, it is by this means that most adults learn and keep up to date with subjects that are not their specialty. If we provide good outreach programs in developing nations we can aid adult training; astronomy is ideal since it is particularly multidisciplinary. In particular radio and television programs are useful for popularization since they reach such wide audiences.

  4. Search for sterile neutrinos with IceCube DeepCore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terliuk, Andrii [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The DeepCore detector is a sub-array of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory that lowers the energy threshold for neutrino detection down to approximately 10 GeV. DeepCore is used for a variety of studies including atmospheric neutrino oscillations. The standard three-neutrino oscillation paradigm is tested using the DeepCore detector by searching for an additional light, sterile neutrino with a mass on the order of 1 eV. Sterile neutrinos do not interact with the ordinary matter, however they can be mixed with the three active neutrino states. Such mixture changes the picture of standard neutrino oscillations for atmospheric neutrinos with energies below 100 GeV. The capabilities of DeepCore detector to measure such sterile neutrino mixing will be presented in this talk.

  5. Neutrino emission spectra of collapsing degenerate stellar cores - Calculations by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitan, Iu.L.; Sobol, I.M.; Khlopov, M.Iu.; Chechetkin, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    The variation of the hard part of the neutrino emission spectra of collapsing degenerate stellar cores with matter having a small optical depth to neutrinos is analyzed. The interaction of neutrinos with the degenerate matter is determined by processes of neutrino scattering on nuclei (without a change in neutrino energy) and neutrino scattering on degenerate electrons, in which the neutrino energy can only decrease. The neutrino emission spectrum of a collapsing stellar core in the initial stage of the onset of opacity is calculated by the Monte Carlo method: using a central density of 10 trillion g/cu cm and, in the stage of deep collapse, for a central density of 60 trillion g/cu cm. In the latter case the calculation of the spectrum without allowance for effects of neutrino degeneration in the central part of the collapsing stellar core corresponds to the maximum possible suppression of the hard part of the neutrino emission spectrum

  6. On flavor violation for massive and mixed neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasone, M.; Capolupo, A.; Ji, C.R.; Vitiello, G.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss flavor charges and states for interacting mixed neutrinos in QFT. We show that the Pontecorvo states are not eigenstates of the flavor charges. This implies that their use in describing the flavor neutrinos produces a violation of lepton charge conservation in the production/detection vertices. The flavor states defined as eigenstates of the flavor charges give the correct representation of mixed neutrinos in charged current weak interaction processes.

  7. Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilking, Michael Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Neutrinos are among the least understood particles in the standard model of particle physics. At neutrino energies in the 1 GeV range, neutrino properties are typically determined by observing the outgoing charged lepton produced in a charged current quasi-elastic interactions. The largest charged current background to these measurements comes from charged current pion production interactions, for which there is very little available data.

  8. Neutrino Oscillations within the Induced Gravitational Collapse Paradigm of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, L.; Guzzo, M. M.; Rossi-Torres, F.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.; Uribe, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The induced gravitational collapse paradigm of long gamma-ray bursts associated with supernovae (SNe) predicts a copious neutrino–antineutrino (ν \\bar{ν }) emission owing to the hypercritical accretion process of SN ejecta onto a neutron star (NS) binary companion. The neutrino emission can reach luminosities of up to 1057 MeV s‑1, mean neutrino energies of 20 MeV, and neutrino densities of 1031 cm‑3. Along their path from the vicinity of the NS surface outward, such neutrinos experience flavor transformations dictated by the neutrino-to-electron-density ratio. We determine the neutrino and electron on the accretion zone and use them to compute the neutrino flavor evolution. For normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies and within the two-flavor formalism ({ν }e{ν }x), we estimate the final electronic and nonelectronic neutrino content after two oscillation processes: (1) neutrino collective effects due to neutrino self-interactions where the neutrino density dominates, and (2) the Mikheyev–Smirnov–Wolfenstein effect, where the electron density dominates. We find that the final neutrino content is composed by ∼55% (∼62%) of electronic neutrinos, i.e., {ν }e+{\\bar{ν }}e, for the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The results of this work are the first step toward the characterization of a novel source of astrophysical MeV neutrinos in addition to core-collapse SNe and, as such, deserve further attention.

  9. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiacono, Laura Jean [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  10. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, A J

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are presented from preliminary analyses. Based on energy, direction and location, the data in the region of interest appear to be dominated by sup 8 B solar neutrinos, detected by the charged current reaction on deuterium and elastic scattering from electrons, with very little background. Measurements of radioactive backgrounds indicate that the measurement of all active neutrino types via the neutral current reaction on deuterium will be possible with small systematic uncertainties. Results for the fluxes observed with these reactions will be provided when further calibrations have been completed.

  11. Hadroproduction experiments to constrain accelerator-based neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Laura

    2017-09-01

    The precise knowledge of (anti-)neutrino fluxes is one of the largest limitation in accelerator-based neutrino experiments. The main limitations arise from the poorly known production properties of neutrino parents in hadron-nucleus interactions. Strategies used by neutrino experiment to constrain their fluxes using external hadroproduction data will be described and illustrated with an example of a tight collaboration between T2K and NA61/SHINE experiments. This enabled a reduction of the T2K neutrino flux uncertainty from ∼25% (without external constraints) down to ∼10%. On-going developments to further constrain the T2K (anti-)neutrino flux are discussed and recent results from NA61/SHINE are reviewed. As the next-generation long baseline experiments aim for a neutrino flux uncertainty at a level of a few percent, the future data-taking plans of NA61/SHINE are discussed.

  12. Some unsettled questions in the problem of neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    2003-01-01

    It is noted that the theory of neutrino oscillations can be constructed only in the framework of the particle physics theory where a mass shell conception is presented and then transitions (oscillations) between neutrinos with equal masses are real and between neutrinos with different masses are virtual. There can be three types of neutrino transitions. In the experiments it is necessary to decide the question: which type of neutrino transitions is realized in nature? At present it is supposed that Dirac and Majorana neutrino oscillations can be realized. It is shown that we cannot put Majorana neutrinos in the standard weak interaction theory without violation of the gauge invariance. If we use the Majorana neutrinos then we come to contradiction with the existing experimental data. Then it is obvious that there can be only realized transitions between Dirac neutrinos with different flavors. It is also shown that the mechanism of resonance enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter cannot be realized without violation of the law of energy-momentum conservation. Though it is supposed that in experiments we see neutrino oscillations, indeed only transitions between neutrinos are registered.To register neutrino oscillations, it is necessary to see second or even higher neutrino oscillation modes in experiments. For this purpose we can use the elliptic character of the Earth orbit at registrations of sun neutrinos. The analysis shows that the SNO experimental results do not confirm smallness of ν e → ν τ transition angle mixing, which was obtained in the CHOOZ experiment. It is also noted that there is contradiction between the SNO, Super-Kamiokande, Homestake and SAGE, and GNO (GALLEX) data. (author)

  13. Electromagnetic Properties of Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Broggini

    2012-01-01

    theoretical predictions. We discuss also the phenomenology of a neutrino charge radius and radiative decay. Finally, we describe the theory of neutrino spin and spin-flavor precession in a transverse magnetic field and we summarize its phenomenological applications.

  14. Ghost basis for neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.

    1976-07-01

    A class of solutions of DIRAC'S equation in gravitational fields for ghost neutrinos is given. Comments are restricted to the neutrino cosmological model recently found by M. Novello e I.D. Soares [pt

  15. The Neutrinos Saga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Souchere, Marie-Christine de; Moran, John

    2009-04-01

    The author proposes a history of the discovery and study of neutrinos. This history starts shortly after the discovery of radioactivity in 1896 with the observation of an inhomogeneous deceleration of electrons in the radioactive source which raised an issue of shortage of energy. Pauli then introduced the idea of a ghost particle which could preserve the principle of energy conservation and also the issue of statistics related to the laws of quantum mechanics. Works by the Joliot-Curies and Chadwick resulted in the identification of a neutral particle, first called a neutron, and then neutrino. The author then reports experiments performed to highlight neutrinos, and to identify different forms of neutrinos: muon, tau, lepton. She also addresses questions raised by solar neutrinos, experiments proving the metamorphosis of electron neutrinos into muon neutrinos. She discusses the interest of neutrino as cosmic messengers as they are emitted by various cosmic events, and also as a way to study dark matter

  16. Opera neutrino oscillation experiment: On the way to ντ observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreslo, Igor E

    2009-01-01

    The hypothesis of neutrino flavour changing in weak interaction representation via oscillations is confirmed by several experiments, all based on the observation of the disappearance of a given neutrino flavour. The direct appearance of a flavour different from the initial one, was never observed so far. OPERA is the first long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment employing nuclear emulsions for the direct observation of tau neutrinos in the CERN to Gran Sasso muon neutrino beam. At present the experiment is in the data taking phase. The number of detected neutrino interactions have exceeded one thousand. Experiment status and a summary of results from 2007 and 2008 runs is presented in this paper.

  17. Development of an automatic scanning system for nuclear emulsion analysis in the OPERA experiment and study of neutrino interactions location; Developpement d'un systeme ultra rapide pour le scan des emulsions nucleaires d'OPERA et etude sur la localistion des vertex de l'interaction des neutrinos a l'aide de ce systeme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabito, L

    2007-10-15

    Following Super Kamiokande and K2K experiments, Opera (Oscillation Project with Emulsion tracking Apparatus), aims to confirm neutrino oscillation in the atmospheric sector. Taking advantage of a technique already employed in Chorus and in Donut, the Emulsion Cloud Chamber (ECC), Opera will be able to observe the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation, through the {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance in a pure {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. The Opera experiment, with its {approx} 100000 m{sup 2} of nuclear emulsions, needs a very fast automatic scanning system. Optical and mechanics components have been customized in order to achieve a speed of about 20 cm{sup 2}/hour per emulsion layer (44 {mu}m thick), while keeping a sub-micro-metric resolution. The first part of this thesis was dedicated to the optimization of 4 scanning systems at the French scanning station, based in Lyon. An experimental study on a dry objective scanning system has also been realized. The obtained results show that the performances of dry scanning are similar with respect to the traditional oil scanning, so that it can be successfully used for Opera. The second part of this work was devoted to the study of the neutrino interaction location and reconstruction strategy actually used in Opera. A dedicated test beam was performed at CERN in order to simulate Opera conditions. The obtained results definitely confirm that the proposed strategy is well adapted for tau search. (author)

  18. Pulsar astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyne, A.G.; Graham-Smith, F.

    1990-01-01

    This account of the properties of pulsars tells an exciting story of discovery in modern astronomy. Pulsars, discovered in 1967, now take their place in a very wide range of astrophysics. They are one of the endpoints of stellar evolution, in which the core of a star collapses to a rapidly spinning neutron star a few kilometres in size. This book is an introductory account for those entering the field. It introduces the circumstances of the discovery and gives an overview of pulsar astrophysics. There are chapters on search techniques, distances, pulse timing, the galactic population of pulsars, binary and millisecond pulsars, geometry and physics of the emission regions, and applications to the interstellar medium. An important feature of this book is the inclusion of an up-to-date catalogue of all known pulsars. (author)

  19. Time calibration of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienzap, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J. P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2011-02-01

    The ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope comprises a three-dimensional array of photomultipliers to detect the Cherenkov light induced by upgoing relativistic charged particles originating from neutrino interactions in the vicinity of the detector. The large scattering length of light in the deep sea facilitates an angular resolution of a few tenths of a degree for neutrino energies exceeding 10 TeV. In order to achieve this optimal performance, the time calibration procedures should ensure a relative time calibration between the photomultipliers at the level of ˜1 ns. The methods developed to attain this level of precision are described.

  20. Neutrino Physics and JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, V.A.; Naumov, D.V.; Smirnov, O.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of neutrino physics is briefly reviewed, the basic properties of the neutrino are discussed, and the currently most challenging problems in this rapidly developing field are described. Written to mark the anniversary of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, this paper highlights JINR's contributions to the development of the neutrino physics and places special emphasis on the prospects of the JINR neutrino program. [ru

  1. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understa...

  2. Golden Jubilee photos: Elusive Neutrinos

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Catching neutrinos isn't easy. They interact only rarely with matter, so they have a good chance of passing straight through the Earth without stopping. However, when they do interact it is possible to see what effect they have on other particles. CERN had been doing this type of research for more than a decade by the time the detector in the picture was finished in 1977. The picture shows Klaus Winter, who worked on the 100 tonne CHARM experiment. CHARM is seen here in the West Area where it was set up with the 1250 tonne CDHS experiment. Researchers used these machines to help develop the Standard Model of particle physics and further our understanding of the structure of the atomic nucleus. The research also helped expand physics into a new field aimed at understanding the peculiar behaviour of neutrinos. There are three 'flavours' of neutrino - the electron, muon, and the tau neutrino. Over a long enough distance, they oscillate from one flavour to another. In 2006, CERN will try to make more progress on...

  3. Gravitational waves and multimessenger astronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricci Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely expected that in the coming quinquennium the first gravitational wave signal will be directly detected. The ground-based advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors are being upgraded to a sensitivity level such that we expect to be measure a significant binary merger rate. Gravitational waves events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic counterparts and neutrino emission carrying complementary information to those associated to the gravitational signals. If it becomes possible to measure all these forms of radiation in concert, we will end up an impressive increase in the comprehension of the whole phenomenon. In the following we summarize the scientific outcome of the interferometric detectors in the past configuration. Then we focus on some of the potentialities of the advanced detectors once used in the new context of the multimessenger astronomy.

  4. Is the neutrino as changeable as a weather vane?

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    We conclude the first part of our feature on the CNGS project with a sneak preview of next week's articles. The neutrino is something of a headache for physicists, who have come to wonder whether the muon neutrino is capable of changing into a tau neutrino. This hypothesis would explain the deficit of muon neutrinos in the atmosphere. When cosmic rays interact with the nuclei of atoms from the upper atmosphere, two kinds of neutrino are produced: muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos. Measurements have shown that there are fewer muon neutrinos than would normally have been expected. In 1998, the Super Kamiokande experiment in Japan revealed that the oscillation (or transformation) of muon neutrinos into tau neutrinos could be responsible for this shortfall, an idea which was supported, shortly afterwards, by the K2K (KEK to Kamioka) experiment. The main purpose of the experiments at the CNGS (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) project is to demonstrate this oscillation, which is thought to occur over long distan...

  5. NEUTRINOS AS COSMIC MESSENGERS IN THE ERA OF ICECUBE, ANTARES AND KM3NET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli F. Katz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Using neutrinos as cosmic messengers for observation of non-thermal processes in the Universe is a highly attractive and promising vision, which has been pursued in various neutrino telescope projects for more than two decades. Recent results from ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories and refinements of model calculations of the expected neutrino fluxes indicate that Gigaton target volumes will be necessary to establish neutrino astronomy. A first neutrino telescope of that size, IceCube, is operational at the South Pole. Based on experience with the smaller first-generation ANTARES telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, the multi-Gigaton KM3NeT device is in preparation. These neutrino telescopes are presented, and some selected results and the expected KM3NeT performance are discussed.

  6. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new ...

  7. The Tau neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugge, Lars; Ould-Saada, Faris

    2001-01-01

    In the summer 2000 the first direct demonstration of the Tau neutrino was announced. After describing some Physical history lines emphasizing the development of the Neutrino Physics, the article describes the experiment which lead to the direct discovery of the Tau neutrino

  8. Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutrino factories and these promise to take neutrino physics to a new era. Hopefully these as well as the long baseline experiments will lead to a determination of the neutrino parameters. Of course, entirely new phenomena could also be discovered. References. [1] R Davis, D S Harmer and K C Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett.

  9. Solar neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    The special properties of solar neutrinos that render this flux so uniquely important in searches for neutrino masses and flavor mixing are reviewed. The effects of matter, including density fluctuations and turbulence, on solar neutrino oscillations are explained through analogies with more familiar atomic physics phenomena

  10. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new indications ...

  11. Radio Cerenkov Emission from UHE neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekers, Ron; Jones, David; Protheroe, Ray; Bhat, Ramesh; McFadden, Rebecca; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    Some cosmic ray nuclei have energies equivalent to that of a fast-moving tennis ball. Our Galaxy is too small to produce them, and as they travel through the Universe they loose energy in collisions with microwave background radiation. So where do they come from? The neutrinos hold the key. They are produced in these collisions but interact so weakly that huge detectors are needed. We propose to use the moon as our detector by looking for the coherent Cerenkov radio emission from neutrino induced cascades in lunar regolith (sandy surface layer). The neutrino interaction produces a nanosec pulse peaking between 1-3GHz. This proposal is for time to test two of the parallel techniques we are developing to detect these neutrinos.

  12. CERN: something new in neutrinos; bubble chamber spectators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    An unexplained effect in neutrino interactions has been observed by the 'CHARM' collaboration in a beam dump experiment. Large numbers of unaccounted for hadron showers have been detected and some possible explanations are suggested. Also, the use of the deuterium filled BEBC bubble chamber for the study of high energy neutrino and antineutrino interactions is described. (W.D.L.).

  13. Frontiers in neutrino physics - Transparencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.; Balantekin, B.; Conrad, J.; Engel, J.; Fogli, G.; Giunti, C.; Espinoza, C.; Lasserre, T.; Lazauskas, R.; Lhuiller, D.; Lindner, M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Martini, M.; McLaughlin, G.; Mirizzi, A.; Pehlivan, Y.; Petcov, S.; Qian, Y.; Serenelli, A.; Stancu, I.; Surman, R.; Vaananen, D.; Vissani, F.; Vogel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the presentations. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the last advances in neutrino physics. The presentations dealt with: -) the measurement of the neutrino velocity, -) neutrino oscillations, -) anomaly in solar models and neutrinos, -) double beta decay, -) self refraction of neutrinos, -) cosmic neutrinos, -) antineutrino spectra from reactors, and -) some aspects of neutrino physics with radioactive ion beams. (A.C.)

  14. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  15. Supernova Neutrinos: Production, Oscillations and Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Tamborra, Irene; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Saviano, Ninetta; Scholberg, Kate; Bollig, Robert; Hudepohl, Lorenz; Chakraborty, Sovan

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in the collapse and explosion of massive stars, governing the infall dynamics of the stellar core, triggering and fueling the explosion and driving the cooling and deleptonization of the newly formed neutron star. Due to their role neutrinos carry information from the heart of the explosion and, due to their weakly interacting nature, offer the only direct probe of the dynamics and thermodynamics at the center of a supernova. In this paper, we review the present ...

  16. Supernova Neutrinos: Production, Oscillations and Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro MirizziBari Univ. & INFN, Bari; Irene Tamborra(GRAPPA Inst., Amsterdam); Hans-Thomas Janka(Max Planck Inst. for Astrophysics, Garching); Ninetta Saviano(IPPP, Durham); Kate Scholberg(Department of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham); Robert Bollig(TUM, Munich); Lorenz Hudepohl(MPCDF, Garching); Sovan Chakraborty(MPI, Munich)

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in the collapse and explosion of massive stars, governing the infall dynamics of the stellar core, triggering and fueling the explosion and driving the cooling and deleptonization of the newly formed neutron star. Due to their role neutrinos carry information from the heart of the explosion and, due to their weakly interacting nature, offer the only direct probe of the dynamics and thermodynamics at the center of a supernova. In this paper, we r...

  17. Technology Development for a Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory

  18. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martineau-Huynh, Olivier; Bustamante, Mauricio; Carvalho, Washington

    2017-01-01

    The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is a planned array of ~200 000 radio antennas deployed over ~200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims primarly at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the observation of extensive air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of taus prod...... per year are expected for the standard models. The instrument will also detect UHECRs and possibly FRBs. Here we show how our preliminary design should enable us to reach our sensitivity goals, and discuss the steps to be taken to achieve GRAND.......The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is a planned array of ~200 000 radio antennas deployed over ~200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims primarly at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the observation of extensive air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of taus...... produced by the interaction of cosmic neutrinos under the Earth surface. GRAND aims at reaching a neutrino sensitivity of 5.10$^{11}$ E$^{-2}$ GeV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$sr$^{-1}$ above 3.10$^{16}$ eV. This ensures the detection of cosmogenic neutrinos in the most pessimistic source models, and ~50 events...

  19. The Neutrino Mass Window for Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmüller, Wilfried; Plümacher, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Interactions of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the thermal phase of the early universe may be the origin of the cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry. This mechanism of baryogenesis implies stringent constraints on light and heavy Majorana neutrino masses. We derive an improved upper bound on the CP asymmetry in heavy neutrino decays which, together with the kinetic equations, yields an upper bound on all light neutrino masses of 0.1 eV. Lepton number changing processes at temperatures above the temperature T_B of baryogenesis can erase other, pre-existing contributions to the baryon asymmetry. We find that these washout processes become very efficient if the effective neutrino mass \\tilde{m}_1 is larger than m_* \\simeq 10^{-3} eV. All memory of the initial conditions is then erased. Hence, for neutrino masses in the range from (\\Delta m^2_sol)^{1/2} \\simeq 8*10^{-3} eV to (\\Delta m^2_atm)^{1/2} \\simeq 5*10^{-2} eV, which is suggested by neutrino oscillations, leptogenesis emerges as the unique source of the ...

  20. High energy neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Masip, M.

    2018-01-01

    We describe several components in the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos reaching the Earth and discuss whether they could explain IceCube's observations. Then we focus on TeV neutrinos from the Sun. We show that this solar neutrino flux is correlated with the cosmic-ray shadow of the Sun measured by HAWC, and we find that it is much larger than the flux of atmospheric neutrinos. Stars like our Sun provide neutrinos with a very steep spectrum and no associated gammas. We argue that this is...

  1. Geo-neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    L. Ludhova

    2012-01-01

    Geo-neutrinos, electron anti-neutrinos produced in β-decays of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes in the Earth, are a unique direct probe of our planet's interior. After a brief introduction about the Earth (mostly for physicists) and the very basics about the neutrinos and anti-neutrinos (mostly for geologists), I describe the geo-neutrinos' properties and the main aims of their study. An overview of the latest experimental results obtained by KamLand and Borexino experiments is provid...

  2. Energy reconstruction methods in the IceCube neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Arguelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grandmont, D. T.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jackson, S.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Macías, O.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Te{š}ić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurement of neutrino energies is essential to many of the scientific goals of large-volume neutrino telescopes. The fundamental observable in such detectors is the Cherenkov light produced by the transit through a medium of charged particles created in neutrino interactions. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the deposited energy, which is approximately equal to the neutrino energy for νe and νμ charged-current interactions and can be used to set a lower bound on neutrino energies and to measure neutrino spectra statistically in other channels. Here we describe methods and performance of reconstructing charged-particle energies and topologies from the observed Cherenkov light yield, including techniques to measure the energies of uncontained muon tracks, achieving average uncertainties in electromagnetic-equivalent deposited energy of ~ 15% above 10 TeV.

  3. Constraining dynamical neutrino mass generation with cosmological data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koksbang, S.M.; Hannestad, S., E-mail: koksbang@phys.au.dk, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2017-09-01

    We study models in which neutrino masses are generated dynamically at cosmologically late times. Our study is purely phenomenological and parameterized in terms of three effective parameters characterizing the redshift of mass generation, the width of the transition region, and the present day neutrino mass. We also study the possibility that neutrinos become strongly self-interacting at the time where the mass is generated. We find that in a number of cases, models with large present day neutrino masses are allowed by current CMB, BAO and supernova data. The increase in the allowed mass range makes it possible that a non-zero neutrino mass could be measured in direct detection experiments such as KATRIN. Intriguingly we also find that there are allowed models in which neutrinos become strongly self-interacting around the epoch of recombination.

  4. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel

  5. Sudbury neutrino observatory proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewan, G.T.; Evans, H.C.; Lee, H.W.

    1987-10-01

    This report is a proposal by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) collaboration to develop a world class laboratory for neutrino astrophysics. This observatory would contain a large volume heavy water detector which would have the potential to measure both the electron-neutrino flux from the sun and the total solar neutrino flux independent of neutrino type. It will therefore be possible to test models of solar energy generation and, independently, to search for neutrino oscillations with a sensitivity many orders of magnitude greater than that of terrestrial experiments. It will also be possible to search for spectral distortion produced by neutrino oscillations in the dense matter of the sun. Finally the proposed detector would be sensitive to neutrinos from a stellar collapse and would detect neutrinos of all types thus providing detailed information on the masses of muon- and tau-neutrinos. The neutrino detector would contain 1000 tons of D20 and would be located more than 2000 m below ground in the Creighton mine near Sudbury. The operation and performance of the proposed detector are described and the laboratory design is presented. Construction schedules and responsibilities and the planned program of technical studies by the SNO collaboration are outlined. Finally, the total capital cost is estimated to be $35M Canadian and the annual operating cost, after construction, would be $1.8 M Canadian, including the insurance costs of the heavy water

  6. Binocular astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Binoculars have, for many, long been regarded as an “entry level” observational tool, and relatively few have used them as a serious observing instrument. This is changing! Many people appreciate the relative comfort of two-eyed observing, but those who use binoculars come to realize that they offer more than comfort. The view of the stars is more aesthetically pleasing and therefore binocular observers tend to observe more frequently and for longer periods. Binocular Astronomy, 2nd Edition, extends its coverage of small and medium binoculars to large and giant (i.e., up to 300mm aperture) binoculars and also binoviewers, which brings the work into the realm of serious observing instruments. Additionally, it goes far deeper into the varying optical characteristics of binoculars, giving newcomers and advanced astronomers the information needed to make informed choices on purchasing a pair. It also covers relevant aspects of the physiology of binocular (as in “both eyes”) observation. The first edition ...

  7. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment: The precision era of neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, E. [Gleb Wataghin Institute of Physics, Universidade de Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas Brazil

    2017-12-01

    The last decade was remarkable for neutrino physics. In particular, the phenomenon of neutrino flavor oscillations has been firmly established by a series of independent measurements. All parameters of the neutrino mixing are now known, and we have the elements to plan a judicious exploration of new scenarios that are opened by these recent advances. With precise measurements, we can test the three-neutrino paradigm, neutrino mass hierarchy, and charge conjugation parity (CP) asymmetry in the lepton sector. The future long-baseline experiments are considered to be a fundamental tool to deepen our knowledge of electroweak interactions. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will detect a broadband neutrino beam from Fermilab in an underground massive liquid argon time-projection chamber at an L/E of about 103 km GeV-1 to reach good sensitivity for CP-phase measurements and the determination of the mass hierarchy. The dimensions and the depth of the far detector also create an excellent opportunity to look for rare signals like proton decay to study violation of the baryonic number, as well as supernova neutrino bursts, broadening the scope of the experiment to astrophysics and associated impacts in cosmology. In this paper, we discuss the physics motivations and the main experimental features of the DUNE project required to reach its scientific goals.

  8. Neutrino-induced nuclear excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belusevic, R. [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305 (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    We present an improved, compared to that of Belusevic and Rein, theoretical value of the cross section for the neutrino-induced nuclear excitation of iron. This result is based on a measurement of the photoabsorption cross section on the same nucleus, which can be related to the transverse part of the neutrino cross section via the conserved vector current hypothesis. The longitudinal part is related to the pion absorption cross section through the partial conservation of the axial-vector current, and thus reflects the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. A general formula for the excitation cross section is derived, which is valid for both low and high incident neutrino energies. When caused by a weak neutral current, this process may play an important role in core-collapse supernovae. It can also be detected using low-temperature techniques with the purpose of cosmological and weak-interaction studies. A new estimate of the cross sections for neutrino-induced nonscaling processes described by Belusevic and Rein is discussed in the context of two experiments using iron targets, but at very different beam energies.

  9. Worldwide Neutrino Web Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    The idea of an invisible particle that carries off energy was intro-duced by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930. The term "neutrino" ("little neutral one") was suggested by Enrico Fermi in his 1934 theory of beta-radioactivity which explained how a weak nuclear force could make atomic nuclei unstable. The neutrino, Fermi said, had no mass at all. But the neutrino does interact, slightly, and its importance has grown under the watchful eyes of experimenters and theorists.

  10. γ ray astronomy with muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halzen, F.; Stanev, T.; Yodh, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    Although γ ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard γ ray spectra there is a relative open-quotes enhancementclose quotes of muons from γ ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower γ rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons N μ , which is thus proportional to the primary γ ray energy. With γ ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the γ close-quote s of about 1%, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by 10 4 . The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal, and by γ ray detectors such as MILAGRO. TeV muons from γ ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy γ rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal, and MILAGRO detectors. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. Search for a diffuse flux of extragalactic neutrinos with the IceCube neutrino observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukraft, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of cosmic rays it has been one of the major research goals to identify the sources and acceleration mechanisms behind these high-energy particles observed from space, with energies up to several EeV. The study of high-energy charged particles and photons has advantages and disadvantages: the detection techniques for charged cosmic rays are very advanced though high-energy charged nuclei are not able to reveal their sources due to magnetic deflection. In the last years, there have been discoveries of many gamma-ray sources, where photon fluxes up to energies of 100 TeV have been observed. However, the universe is opaque to photons with energies larger than 100 TeV since gamma rays interact with the cosmic microwave background. Neutrinos suffer from neither of these limitations. They are ideal messenger particles in order to investigate the sources of cosmic rays since they propagate unaffected, but their detection is difficult and no extraterrestrial neutrino sources at high energies have yet been found. The IceCube experiment, located at the geographic South Pole, was built in order to detect high-energy neutrinos from the universe. It was completed in December 2010 and is the largest neutrino observatory on Earth. It detects neutrinos via their interaction with the Antarctic ice inside and around the detection volume. In these interactions, high-energy leptons are produced, which follow the direction of the initial neutrino and produce a cone of Cherenkov light along their path. This light is detected by optical sensors deployed in the instrumented volume. The search for a diffuse neutrino flux is a very promising approach to look for an extragalactic flux of astrophysical neutrinos. Its sensitivity is mainly based on neutrino energies since astrophysical neutrinos are expected to be more energetic than atmospheric neutrinos. It searches for an astrophysical flux from the sum of all sources in the universe. These sources can be individually

  12. Properties of neutrinos: Recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in experimental determinations of the properties of neutrinos is summarized. In particular, the extensive work on direct kinematic measurements of neutrino mass, on neutrino counting and on neutrino oscillations is highlighted. It is concluded that there may already be sufficient information to fix the masses of the neutrinos, but the evidence is still far from convincing. 63 refs., 13 figs

  13. Innovation in Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Ros, Rosa M.; Pasachoff, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. General Strategies for Effective Teaching: Introduction; 1. Main objectives of SpS2; 2. Learning astronomy by doing astronomy; 3. Hands-on Universe-Europe; 4. Life on Earth in the atmosphere of the Sun; 5. A model of teaching astronomy to pre-service teachers; 6. How to teach, learn about, and enjoy astronomy; 7. Clickers: a new teaching tool of exceptional promise; 8. Educational opportunities in pro-am collaboration; 9. Teaching history of astronomy to second-year engineering students; 10. Teaching the evolution of stellar and Milky Way concepts through the ages; 11. Educational efforts of the International Astronomical Union; 12. Astronomy in culture; 13. Light pollution: a tool for astronomy education; 14. Astronomy by distance learning; 15. Edible astronomy demonstrations; 16. Amateur astronomers as public outreach partners; 17. Does the Sun rotate around Earth or Earth rotate around the Sun?; 18. Using sounds and sonifications for astronomy outreach; 19. Teaching astronomy and the crisis in science education; 20. Astronomy for all as part of a general education; Poster abstracts; Part II. Connecting Astronomy with the Public: Introduction; 21. A status report from the Division XII working group; 22. Outreach using media; 23. Astronomy podcasting; 24. IAU's communication strategy, hands-on science communication, and the communication of the planet definition discussion; 25. Getting a word in edgeways: the survival of discourse in audiovisual astronomy; 26. Critical evaluation of the new Hall of Astronomy; 27. Revitalizing astronomy teaching through research on student understanding; Poster abstracts; Part III. Effective Use of Instruction and Information Technology: Introduction; 28. ESO's astronomy education program; 29. U.S. student astronomy research and remote observing projects; 30. Global network of autonomous observatories dedicated to student research; 31. Remote telescopes in education: report of an Australian study; 32. Visualizing

  14. Do high-energy neutrinos travel faster than photons in a discrete space-time?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Shesheng, E-mail: xue@icra.it [ICRANeT, Piazzale della Repubblica, 10-65122, Pescara, Physics Department, University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-06

    The recent OPERA measurement of high-energy neutrino velocity, once independently verified, implies new physics in the neutrino sector. We revisit the theoretical inconsistency of the fundamental high-energy cutoff attributing to quantum gravity with the parity-violating gauge symmetry of local quantum field theory describing neutrinos. This inconsistency suggests high-dimension operators of neutrino interactions. Based on these studies, we try to view the OPERA result, high-energy neutrino oscillations and indicate to observe the restoration of parity conservation by measuring the asymmetry of high-energy neutrinos colliding with left- and right-handed polarized electrons.

  15. Performance of a liquid argon time projection chamber exposed to the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneodo, F.; Cavanna, F.; Mitri, I. De; Mortari, G. Piano; Benetti, P.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Calligarich, E.; Cesana, E.; Dolfini, R.; Mauri, F.; Montanari, C.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rubbia, C.; Terrani, M.; Vignoli, C.; Bonesini, M.; Boschetti, B.; Cavalli, D.; Curioni, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of the first exposure of a Liquid Argon TPC to a multi-GeV neutrino beam. The data have been collected with a 50 liters ICARUS-like chamber located between the CHORUS and NOMAD experiments at the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF). We discuss both the instrumental performance of the detector and its capability to identify and reconstruct low-multiplicity neutrino interactions

  16. Theoretical Interpretation of Current Neutrino Oscillation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Gianluigi; Lisi, Eligio

    We discuss the theoretical interpretation of neutrino oscillation data in terms of 3v and 4v mixing. Two-neutrino oscillations, often used to describe experimental results in a first approximation, are briefly recalled (Sect. 5.1). The main focus of our review is 3v mixing (Sect. 5.2), which accommodates both the negative results of oscillation searches at reactors (Sect. 5.3) and the evidence for flavor transitions obtained from atmospheric and solar neutrino data (Sects. 5.4 and 5.5). The status and problems of 4v scenarios embedding the additional LSND signal are also discussed (Sect. 5.7). Finally, we outline the impact of the very latest data (Sect. 5.8). Standard electroweak neutrino interactions are assumed in all cases; scenarios with nonstandard dynamics are beyond the scope of this review.

  17. IMPLICATION OF THE NON-DETECTION OF GZK NEUTRINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacobi, Lee; Guetta, Dafne; Behar, Ehud [Department of Physics, Technion (Israel)

    2016-06-01

    The IceCube telescope has detected diffuse neutrino emission up to a deposited energy of 2.6 PeV. Neutrinos with higher energies are expected from the Greisen Ztsepin Kuzmin (GZK) effect, namely the interaction of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the extragalactic background light (EBL), but have not yet been detected. Models for GZK neutrinos vary greatly due to different assumptions on the UHECR elemental composition, as well as on the cosmological evolution of their sources and of the EBL. We show that the high ratio of EeV to PeV neutrinos in essentially all GZK models excludes the currently detected PeV neutrinos from being due to the GZK effect, because many additional higher-energy neutrinos should have been detected but were not. The non-detection of GZK neutrinos, despite more than essentially 1800 observing days, already rules out at 95% confidence all of the models that predict rates of 0.6 neutrinos yr{sup −1} or more. The non-detection is further used here to quantify the confidence at which classes of GZK models can be ruled out, and to compute the additional IceCube observing time required in order to rule them out with 95% confidence, if no detection is made. Finally, the number of GZK neutrinos expected from various classes of models in the future neutrino telescopes ARA and KM3NeT is estimated.

  18. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical 37 Cl and 71 Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun

  19. Effects of a neutrino-dark energy coupling on oscillations of high-energy neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Niki; Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2018-03-01

    If dark energy (DE) is a dynamical field rather than a cosmological constant, an interaction between DE and the neutrino sector could exist, modifying the neutrino oscillation phenomenology and causing C P and apparent Lorentz violating effects. The terms in the Hamiltonian for flavor propagation induced by the DE-neutrino coupling do not depend on the neutrino energy, while the ordinary components decrease as Δ m2/Eν. Therefore, the DE-induced effects are absent at lower neutrino energies, but become significant at higher energies, allowing to be searched for by neutrino observatories. We explore the impact of the DE-neutrino coupling on the oscillation probability and the flavor transition in the three-flavor framework, and investigate the C P -violating and apparent Lorentz violating effects. We find that DE-induced effects become observable for Eνmeff˜10-20 GeV2, where meff is the effective mass parameter in the DE-induced oscillation probability, and C P is violated over a wide energy range. We also show that current and future experiments have the sensitivity to detect anomalous effects induced by a DE-neutrino coupling and probe the new mixing parameters. The DE-induced effects on neutrino oscillation can be distinguished from other new physics possibilities with similar effects, through the detection of the directional dependence of the interaction, which is specific to this interaction with DE. However, current experiments will not yet be able to measure the small changes of ˜0.03 % in the flavor composition due to this directional effect.

  20. Status and Aims of the DUMAND Neutrino Project: the Ocean as a Neutrino Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A.; Blood, H.; Learned, J.; Reines, F.

    1976-07-01

    The possibility of using the ocean as a neutrino detector is considered. Neutrino-produced interactions result in charged particles that generate Cherenkov radiation in the water, which can be detected by light-gathering equipment and photomultipliers. The properties of the ocean as seen from this standpoint are critically examined, and the advantages and disadvantages pointed out. Possible uses for such a neutrino detector include (1) the detection of neutrinos emitted in gravitational collapse of stars (supernova production), not only in our own galaxy, but in other galaxies up to perhaps twenty-million light-years away, (2) the extension of high-energy neutrino physics, as currently practiced up to 200 GeV at high-energy accelerators, to energies up to 50 times higher, using neutrinos generated in the atmosphere by cosmic rays, and (3) the possible detection of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions outside the earth`s atmosphere. The technology for such an undertaking seems to be within reach.

  1. The State of the Art of Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-08

    The study of neutrino interactions has recently experienced a renaissance, motivated by the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments depend critically on an accurate models of neutrino interactions. These models have to predict not only the signal and background populations that oscillation experiments see at near and far detectors, but they must also predict how the neutrino's energy which enters a nucleus gets transferred to energies of the particles that leave the nucleus after the neutrino interacts. Over the past year there have been a number of new results on many different neutrino (and antineutrino) interaction channels using several different target nuclei. These results are often not in agreement with predictions extraolated from charged lepton scattering measurements, or even from predictions anchored to neutrino measurements on deuterium. These new measurements are starting to give the community the handles needed to improve the theoretical description of neutrino interactions, which ultimately pave the way for precision oscillation measurements. This report briefly summarizes recent results and points out where those results differ from the predictions based on current models.

  2. Transmission of neutrinos through matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Neutrinos travel through matter with negligible absorption except in very extreme situations. However, the index of refraction of neutrinos can play an important role in the oscillation of one type of neutrino to another when passing through matter.

  3. Progress on a spherical TPC for low energy neutrino detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, S; Colas, P; Deschamps, H; Dolbeau, J; Fanourakis, G; Ribas, E Ferrer; Enqvist, T; Geralis, T; Giomataris, Y; Gorodetzky, P; Gounaris, G J; Gros, M; Irastorza, I G; Kousouris, K; Lepeltier, V; Morales, J; Patzak, T; Paschos, E A; Salin, P; Savvidis, I; Vergados, J D

    2006-01-01

    The new concept of the spherical TPC aims at relatively large target masses with low threshold and background, keeping an extremely simple and robust operation. Such a device would open the way to detect the neutrino-nucleus interaction, which, although a standard process, remains undetected due to the low energy of the neutrino-induced nuclear recoils. The progress in the development of the first 1 m 3 prototype at Saclay is presented. Other physics goals of such a device could include supernova detection, low energy neutrino oscillations and study of non-standard properties of the neutrino, among others

  4. Neutrino Oscillations as a Probe of Light Scalar Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Asher

    2016-12-02

    We consider a class of models involving interactions between ultralight scalar dark matter and standard model neutrinos. Such couplings modify the neutrino mass splittings and mixing angles to include additional components that vary in time periodically with a frequency and amplitude set by the mass and energy density of the dark matter. Null results from recent searches for anomalous periodicities in the solar neutrino flux strongly constrain the dark matter-neutrino coupling to be orders of magnitude below current and projected limits derived from observations of the cosmic microwave background.

  5. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarcevic, Ina [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-06-14

    The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. We present final technical report on projects completed under the grant.

  6. Regions for maximum probabilities in the neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Giurgiu, A

    2001-01-01

    When neutrinos were first suggested by Pauli in 1930, he gave them properties that made them almost impossible to find: neutral, barely interacting and of zero mass particles. Since then, many surprising properties of neutrinos have been found and even more have been predicted, especially concerning their masses. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations was not clearly put into evidence in spite of the scientific effort. In this paper consequences of the hypothesis of the maximal lepton mixing for the neutrino oscillations are investigated. The properties of the oscillation probabilities are discussed, and some general predictions for the future long baseline oscillation experiments are done. (authors)

  7. COHERENT constraints to conventional and exotic neutrino physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulias, D. K.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2018-02-01

    The process of neutral-current coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, consistent with the Standard Model (SM) expectation, has been recently measured by the COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source. On the basis of the observed signal and our nuclear calculations for the relevant Cs and I isotopes, the extracted constraints on both conventional and exotic neutrino physics are updated. The present study concentrates on various SM extensions involving vector and tensor nonstandard interactions as well as neutrino electromagnetic properties, with an emphasis on the neutrino magnetic moment and the neutrino charge radius. Furthermore, models addressing a light sterile neutrino state and scenarios with new propagator fields—such as vector Z' and scalar bosons—are examined, and the corresponding regions excluded by the COHERENT experiment are presented.

  8. A large fiber sensor network for an acoustic neutrino telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buis Ernst-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific prospects of detecting neutrinos with an energy close or even higher than the GKZ cut-off energy has been discussed extensively in literature. It is clear that due to their expected low flux, the detection of these ultra-high energy neutrinos (Ev > 1018 eV requires a telescope larger than 100 km3. Acoustic detection may provide a way to observe these ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos, as sound that they induce in the deep sea when neutrinos lose their energy travels undisturbed for many kilometers. To realize a large scale acoustic neutrino telescope, dedicated technology must be developed that allows for a deep sea sensor network. Fiber optic hydrophone technology provides a promising means to establish a large scale sensor network [1] with the proper sensitivity to detect the small signals from the neutrino interactions.

  9. Neutrino induced vorticity, Alfven waves and the normal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R. [Theory Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); George, Manu [Theory Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Ahmedabad (India)

    2017-08-15

    We consider a plasma consisting of electrons and ions in the presence of a background neutrino gas and develop the magnetohydrodynamic equations for the system. We show that the electron neutrino interaction can induce vorticity in the plasma even in the absence of any electromagnetic perturbations if the background neutrino density is left-right asymmetric. This induced vorticity supports a new kind of Alfven wave whose velocity depends on both the external magnetic field and on the neutrino asymmetry. The normal mode analysis show that in the presence of neutrino background the Alfven waves can have different velocities. We also discuss our results in the context of dense astrophysical plasma such as magnetars and show that the difference in the Alfven velocities can be used to explain the observed pulsar kick. We discuss also the relativistic generalisation of the electron fluid in presence of an asymmetric neutrino background. (orig.)

  10. Physics potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-26

    Apr 26, 2017 ... few GeV) from accelerators, and that too with only muon neutrino beams. Nothing was known about the electron neutrino or antineutrino interactions. Thus began the neutrino experiments in KGF in the early sixties, conducted by a collaboration consisting of groups from Durham University (UK), Osaka City.

  11. First observation of low energy electron neutrinos in a liquid argon time projection chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; Farooq, S.; Fitzpatrick, R. S.; Fleming, B.; Hackenburg, A.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; Lang, K.; Luo, X.; Mehdiyev, R.; Page, B.; Palamara, O.; Rebel, B.; Schukraft, A.; Scanavini, G.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Szelc, A. M.; Weber, M.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G. P.

    2017-04-06

    Liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) produce remarkable fidelity in the observation of neutrino interactions. The superior capabilities of such detectors to reconstruct the spatial and calorimetric information of neutrino events have made them the detectors of choice in a number of experiments, specifically those looking to observe electron neutrino ($\

  12. Sterile Neutrino Search in the NOvA Far Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edayath, Sijith [Cochin U.; Aurisano, Adam [Cincinnati U.; Sousa, Alexandre [Cincinnati U.; Davies, Gavin [Indiana U.; Suter, Louise [Fermilab; Yang, Shaokai [Cincinnati U.

    2017-10-03

    The majority of neutrino oscillation experiments have obtained evidence for neutrino oscillations that are compatible with the three-flavor model. Explaining anomalous results from short-baseline experiments, such as LSND and MiniBooNE, in terms of neutrino oscillations requires the existence of sterile neutrinos. The search for sterile neutrino mixing conducted in NOvA uses a long baseline of 810 km between Near Detector (ND) at Fermilab and Far Detector (FD) in Minnesota. The signal for sterile neutrino oscillations is a deficit of neutral-current neutrino interactions at the FD with respect to the ND prediction. In this document, We will present the analysis improvements that we are implementing for future NC sterile neutrino searches with NOvA. These include: improved modelling of our detector response; the inclusion of NC 2p2h interaction modelling; implementing a better energy reconstruction techniques; and including possible oscillation due to sterile neutrinos in the ND . This improvements enable us to do a simultaneous ND-FD shape fit of the NC energy spectrum covering a wider sterile mass range than previous analyses.

  13. CERN: Neutrino facelift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    With the termination this summer of the CHARM II neutrino experiment at the SPS proton synchrotron, CERN's 30- year tradition of neutrino physics came to a temporary halt. However with these enigmatic particles playing a vital role in today's Standard Model but continually reluctant to give up all their secrets, neutrino physics will continue to be in the forefront of this research

  14. Neutrino mass anarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall; Murayama; Weiner

    2000-03-20

    What is the form of the neutrino mass matrix which governs the oscillations of the atmospheric and solar neutrinos? Features of the data have led to a dominant viewpoint where the mass matrix has an ordered, regulated pattern, perhaps dictated by a flavor symmetry. We challenge this viewpoint and demonstrate that the data are well accounted for by a neutrino mass matrix which appears to have random entries.

  15. Neutrino Mass Anarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lawrence; Murayama, Hitoshi; Weiner, Neal

    2000-03-01

    What is the form of the neutrino mass matrix which governs the oscillations of the atmospheric and solar neutrinos? Features of the data have led to a dominant viewpoint where the mass matrix has an ordered, regulated pattern, perhaps dictated by a flavor symmetry. We challenge this viewpoint and demonstrate that the data are well accounted for by a neutrino mass matrix which appears to have random entries.

  16. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Bergstroem, L.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Cowen, D.; Costa, C.; Dalberg, E.; Deyoung, T.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstroem, P.; Goobar, A.; Gray, L.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; He, Y.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kandhadai, V.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; LOwder, D.; Marciniewski, P.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Sorin, V.; Spiering, C.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    1999-03-01

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detector at the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B with an expected effective area for TeV neutrinos of {approx} 10{sup 4} m{sup 2}, has been taking data since 1997. Progress with calibration, investigation of ice properties, as well as muon and neutrino data analysis are described. The next stage 20-string detector AMANDA-II with {approx}800 PMTs will be completed in spring 2000.

  17. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Bergstrom, L.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Cowen, D.; Costa, C.; Dalberg,E.; Deyoung, T.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Goobar, A.; Gray, L.; Hallgren,A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; He, Y.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark,S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kandhadai, V.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold,M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.; Marciniewski, P.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; de, los, Heros, CP.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Sorin, V.; Spiering,C.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    1999-08-23

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detectorat the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B with an expected effectivearea for TeV neutrinos of similar to 10(4) m(2), has been taking datasince 1997. Progress with calibration, investigation of ice properties,as well as muon and neutrino data analysis are described. The next stage20-string detector AMANDA-II with similar to 800 PMTs will be completedin spring 2000.

  18. Oscillations with laboratory neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitta, Biagio

    2001-05-01

    The status of searches for oscillations using neutrinos produced in the laboratory is reviewed. The most recent results from experiments approaching completion are reported and the potential capabilities of long baseline projects being developed in USA and Europe are considered and compared. The steps that should naturally follow this new generation of experiments are outlined and the impact of future facilities - such as neutrino factories or conventional superbeams - in precision measurements of elements of the neutrino mixing matrix is discussed.

  19. Astrophysical and atmospheric neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.

    1986-01-01

    The low energy ( 1 TeV) astrophysical neutrino flux by a nearly model-independent analytic method for estimate the ultra-high energy neutrino flux from active astrophysical compact objects by comparison with the observed gamma ray flux at comparable energies. Applied to several known gamma ray sources, the calculation shows the neutrino flux from them to be only marginally detectable by DUMAND-size underwater detectors

  20. Polarized electron-muon neutrino scattering to electron and neutrino in noncommutative space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Ettefaghi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available For neutrino scattering from polarized electron, the weak interaction term in the cross section is significantly suppressed by the polarized term. The magnetic moment term does not receive any correction from the electron polarization. Hence, the study of the magnetic moment of neutrinos through scattering from the polarized electron leads to a stronger bound on the neutrino magnetic moment compared with the unpolarized case. On the other hand, neutrinos which are electrically neutral can couple directly with photons in Noncommutative (NC QED. In this paper, we calculate the NC QED corrections on this scattering are calculated. The phase difference between the NC term and the polarized weak interaction term is π/2. Therefore, the NC term does not destroy the above suppression.