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Sample records for interactions iv copper

  1. Thermal interaction of molten copper with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyszkowski, W.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental work was performed to study the thermal interaction between molten copper particles (in the range of temperature from the copper melting point to about 1800 0 C) and water from about 15-80 0 C. The transient temperatures of the copper particles and water before and during their thermal interaction were measured. The history of the phenomena was filmed by means of a high speed FASTAX camera (to 8000 f/s). Classification of the observed phenomena and description of the heat-transfer modes were derived. One among the phenomena was the thermal explosion. The necessary conditions for the thermal explosion are discussed and their physical interpretation is given. According to the hypothesis proposed, the thermal explosion occurs when the molten metal has the temperature of its solidification and the heat transfer on its surface is sufficiently intensive. The 'sharp-change' of the crystalline structure during the solidification of the molten metal is the cause of the explosion fragmentation. (author)

  2. Synthesis and characterization of αzirconium (IV) hydrogenphosphate containing metallic copper clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Alexilda Oliveira de; Rangel, Maria do Carmo; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2005-01-01

    The α-zirconium (IV) hydrogenphosphate (α-ZrP) has received great attention in the last years due to its properties like ion exchange, intercalation, ionic conductivity and catalytic activity. This work reports a method to produce metallic copper clusters on α-ZrP to be used as catalysts in petrochemical processes. It was found that the solids were non-crystalline regardless of the uptake of copper and the reduction. The specific surface area increased as a consequence of the increase of the interlayer distance to accept the copper ions between the layers. During the reduction, big clusters of copper (0,5-11μ) with different sizes and shapes were produced. (author)

  3. Evaluation of copper for divider subassembly in MCO Mark IA and Mark IV scrap fuel baskets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) subprojection eludes the design and fabrication of a canister that will be used to confine, contain, and maintain fuel in a critically safe array to enable its removal from the K Basins, vacuum drying, transport, staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage (Goldinann 1997). Each MCO consists of a shell, shield plug, fuel baskets (Mark IA or Mark IV), and other incidental equipment. The Mark IA intact and scrap fuel baskets are a safety class item for criticality control and components necessary for criticality control will be constructed from 304L stainless steel. It is proposed that a copper divider subassembly be used in both Mark IA and Mark IV scrap baskets to increase the safety basis margin during cold vacuum drying. The use of copper would increase the heat conducted away from hot areas in the baskets out to the wall of the MCO by both radiative and conductive heat transfer means. Thus copper subassembly will likely be a safety significant component of the scrap fuel baskets. This report examines the structural, cost and corrosion consequences associated with using a copper subassembly in the stainless steel MCO scrap fuel baskets

  4. Copper(I) in fogwater: Determination and interactions with sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanbin Xue; Reutlinger, M.; Sigg, L.; Stumm, W. (Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Duebendorf (Switzerland)); Lurdes S. Goncalves, M. de (Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal))

    1991-10-01

    The copper(I)/(II) redox system was examined in fogwater with respect to the occurrence of Cu(I), the role of sulfite as a reductant of Cu(II) and as a complexing ligand, and the speciation of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Copper(I) was measured in fogwater by the bathocuproine method, which was evaluated for the conditions typically encountered in atmospheric water droplets. Concentrations of Cu(I) in the range 0.1-1 {mu}M were found, which represented between 4 and > 90% of the total copper in these samples. In experiments using concentration ranges of copper and S(IV) close to that of fogwater, the reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) by sulfite was shown to be pH-dependent and to occur rapidly at pH > 6. Calculations of the equilibrium complexation of Cu(I) and Cu(II) under fogwater conditions show that complexes of Cu(I) with sulfite predominate, while for Cu(II) oxalato complexes are important. Sulfite plays an important role as a ligand for Cu(I) in fogwater; Cu(I) may be produced by various reduction reactions, e.g., by organic compounds, and appears to be oxidized only slowly in the presence of S(IV).

  5. COPPER RESISTANT STRAIN CANDIDA TROPICALIS RomCu5 INTERACTION WITH SOLUBLE AND INSOLUBLE COPPER COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ie. P. Prekrasna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the study was interaction of Candida tropicalis RomCu5 isolated from highland Ecuador ecosystem with soluble and insoluble copper compounds. Strain C. tropicalis RomCu5 was cultured in a liquid medium of Hiss in the presence of soluble (copper citrate and CuCl2 and insoluble (CuO and CuCO3 copper compounds. The biomass growth was determined by change in optical density of culture liquid, composition of the gas phase was measured on gas chromatograph, redox potential and pH of the culture fluid was defined potentiometrically. The concentration of soluble copper compounds was determined colorimetrically. Maximal permissible concentration of Cu2+ for C. tropicalis RomCu5 was 30 000 ppm of Cu2+ in form of copper citrate and 500 ppm of Cu2+ in form of CuCl2. C. tropicalis was metabolically active at super high concentrations of Cu2+, despite the inhibitory effect of Cu2+. C. tropicalis immobilized Cu2+ in the form of copper citrate and CuCl2 by it accumulation in the biomass. Due to medium acidification C. tropicalis dissolved CuO and CuCO3. High resistance of C. tropicalis to Cu2+ and ability to interact with soluble and insoluble copper compounds makes it biotechnologically perspective.

  6. Thallium(I copper(I thorium(IV triselenide, TlCuThSe3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ibers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Thallium(I copper(I thorium(IV triselenide, TlCuThSe3, crystallizes with four formula units in the space group Cmcm in the KCuZrS3 structure type. There is one crystallographically independent Th, Tl, and Cu atom at a site of symmetry 2/m.., m2m, and m2m, respectively. There are two crystallographically independent Se atoms at sites of symmetry m.. and m2m. The structure consists of sheets of edge-sharing ThSe6 octahedra and CuSe4 tetrahedra stacked parallel to the (010 face, separated by layers filled with chains of Tl running parallel to [100]. Each Tl is coordinated by a trigonal prism of Se atoms.

  7. Analytical solutions of hypersonic type IV shock - shock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Michael John

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the effects of a type IV shock interaction at high Mach numbers. This interaction occurs when an impinging oblique shock wave intersects the most normal portion of a detached bow shock. The flowfield which develops is complicated and contains an embedded jet of supersonic flow, which may be unsteady. The jet impinges on the blunt body surface causing very high pressure and heating loads. Understanding this type of interaction is vital to the designers of cowl lips and leading edges on air- breathing hypersonic vehicles. This analytical model represents the first known attempt at predicting the geometry of the interaction explicitly, without knowing beforehand the jet dimensions, including the length of the transmitted shock where the jet originates. The model uses a hyperbolic equation for the bow shock and by matching mass continuity, flow directions and pressure throughout the flowfield, a prediction of the interaction geometry can be derived. The model has been shown to agree well with the flowfield patterns and properties of experiments and CFD, but the prediction for where the peak pressure is located, and its value, can be significantly in error due to a lack of sophistication in the model of the jet fluid stagnation region. Therefore it is recommended that this region of the flowfield be modeled in more detail and more accurate experimental and CFD measurements be used for validation. However, the analytical model has been shown to be a fast and economic prediction tool, suitable for preliminary design, or for understanding the interactions effects, including the basic physics of the interaction, such as the jet unsteadiness. The model has been used to examine a wide parametric space of possible interactions, including different Mach number, impinging shock strength and location, and cylinder radius. It has also been used to examine the interaction on power-law shaped blunt bodies, a possible candidate for

  8. Interaction between copper and radiocesium in Indian mustard and sunflower grown in the hydroponic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirong Tang; Xiaochang Wang

    2002-01-01

    Both Indian mustard and sunflower were grown in a hydroponic solution treated with different concentration activities of 134 Cs or with different amounts of copper or with both in order to investigate the interaction between copper and radiocesium. It was found that 134 Cs activity concentration applied in the nutrient solution exerted more influence on the uptake and translocation of copper by Indian mustard than by sunflower. Indian mustard grown in hydroponic solution containing certain levels of copper and being treated with higher 134 Cs activity concentration showed higher uptake of copper than sunflower. However, in the case of root copper concentrations, sunflower showed significantly higher copper immobilization by roots than Indian mustard. It was also found that the presence of copper the the hydroponic solution did modify radiocesium uptake by both species. The application of 1 mg/l in the growth medium could greatly increase the uptake of 134 Cs by both species. With 3 mg/l concentration of copper amended to the solution, the accumulation of 134 Cs by both species was decreased compared to the 1 mg/l copper treatment. These lines of evidence show that there is stronger interaction between copper and radiocesium in Indian mustard than in sunflower during the root uptake through nutrient solution. (author)

  9. Hexacoordinated mixed-ligand complexes of vanadium(IV) and copper(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.S.; Motahera Begum; Roy, H.N.; Haroon, S.A.Q.M.

    1996-01-01

    The literature reports simple complexes of metal ions with Schiff bases derived from amino acids. But their mixed-ligand complexes are very rare. Keeping this fact in mind, some new mixed ligand complexes of V IV and Cu II with tridentate Schiff bases derived from glycine, salicylaldehyde and amino bases, e.g. quinoline (Q), isoquinoline (IQ), 2-picoline (2-pic), 4-picoline (4-pic) and pyridine (Py) were prepared and studied. 6 refs., 1 tab

  10. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M; Hanson, Andrew J; Foster, Patricia L

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings provide in vivo evidence

  11. Copper metabolism and its interactions with dietary iron, zinc, tin and selenium in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, S.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies on copper metabolism and its interactions with selected dietary trace elements in rats. The rats were fed purified diets throughout. High intakes of iron or tin reduced copper concentrations in plasma, liver and kidneys. The dietary treatments also

  12. Interaction of dimethylamine with clean and partially oxidized copper surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, J. A.; Rogers, J. W.; Banse, B. A.; Koel, B. E.

    1990-05-01

    The interaction of dimethylamine (DMA) with partially oxidized polycrystalline copper [Cu(poly)] and clean and partially oxidized Cu(110) between 110 and 500 K has been examined using electron stimulated desorption (ESD), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). ESD mass spectra of the DMA adsorbed on O/Cu(poly) between 112 and 230 K consistently display peaks at 44 amu [(CH 3) 2N] + and 46 amu [(CH 3) 2NH-H] +, but no significant parent peak at 45 amu [(CH 3) 2NH] +, even though this last feature is prominent in the gas-phase mass spectrum. OH - is not observed at temperatures below 184 K and the yield at higher temperatures is much less than that of O +. HREELS of DMA on clean and oxygen covered Cu(110) obtained at temperatures between 100 and 320 K show characteristic vibrational spectra for molecular DMA and no OH(a) vibrational modes. TPD results show that the desorption profiles of all the major peaks in the DMA mass spectrum follow that of the parent peak with no evidence for production of H 2O. The ESD, HREELS and TPD results all indicate that DMA is molecularly and reversibly adsorbed, with no significant formation of surface hydroxyl species. The results indicate that preferential adsorption of amines from amine/epoxy mixtures onto metal oxide surfaces could passivate the surface and prevent subsequent bonding to the epoxy resin.

  13. Interactions between iron oxides and copper oxides under hydrothermal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarvey, G B; Owen, D G

    1995-08-01

    Under hydrothermal conditions, magnetite and hematite have been shown to undergo interconversion reactions, the extent of which is controlled in part by the presence of copper oxides. In oxygenated water, the degree to which magnetite was oxidized to hematite was found to be dependent on the presence of CuO or Cu{sub 2}O. When these materials were absent, the oxidation of magnetite was limited by the dissolved oxygen in the aqueous system. Participation of the copper oxides in the oxidation process was confirmed by more complete conversion of magnetite was also influenced by the presence of the copper oxides. In addition to driving the reduction to completion, the presence of the copper oxides also exerted a strong influence over the morphology of the magnetite that formed. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  14. Effects of copper on invertebrate–sediment interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunting, E.R.; Mulder, C.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicants potentially decouple links between biodiversity and ecosystem processes. This study aimed to evaluate how toxicants affect invertebrate bioturbation and decomposition. Effects of copper on functionally distinct macrofaunal species (Asellus aquaticus and Tubifex spp.), decomposition (release of dissolved organic carbon, DOC) and Average Metabolic Response (AMR) and Community Metabolic Diversity (CMD) of bacteria were determined in 5-day microcosm experiments. Bioturbation was assessed as sediment redox potential (Eh) profiles. Concentration–response curves of the functional parameters DOC, and the faunal mediated AMR and CMD in the presence of Tubifex spp. depended on Tubifex spp. survival, i.e. similar EC 50 values for both endpoints. In contrast, functional parameters in the presence of A. aquaticus were more sensitive than survival. Sediment Eh-profiles showed that reduced decomposition was caused by reduced sediment reworking by A. aquaticus at sub-lethal copper concentrations. These observations hint at a decoupling of invertebrate community structure and ecosystem functioning upon stress. -- Highlights: •We compared invertebrate survival and functional responses to copper amendment. •Differential functional responses depending on invertebrate species. •Reduced functional responses with A. aquaticus at sub-lethal copper concentrations. •Sub-lethal copper concentrations reduced the bioturbating activities of A. aquaticus. •Stress decouples invertebrate community structure and ecosystem functioning. -- Sub-lethal copper concentrations reduced the bioturbating activities of A. aquaticus and invertebrate effects on decomposition, bacterial activity and community metabolic diversity

  15. XPS studies of short pulse laser interaction with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, P.; Minkovski, N.; Balchev, I.; Avramova, I.; Sabotinov, N.; Marinova, Ts.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of laser ablation on copper foil irradiated by a short 30 ns laser pulse was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The laser fluence was varied from 8 to 16.5 J/cm 2 and the velocity of the laser beam from 10 to 100 mm/s. This range of laser fluence is characterized by a different intensity of laser ablation. The experiments were done in two kinds of ambient atmosphere: air and argon jet gas. The chemical state and composition of the irradiated copper surface were determined using the modified Auger parameter (α') and O/Cu intensity ratio. The ablation atmosphere was found to influence the size and chemical state of the copper particles deposited from the vapor plume. During irradiation in air atmosphere the copper nanoparticles react with oxygen and water vapor from the air and are deposited in the form of a CuO and Cu(OH) 2 thin film. In argon atmosphere the processed copper surface is oxidized after exposure to air

  16. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules by configuration interaction. IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S.

    1972-01-01

    The theory of basis set dependence in configuration interaction calculations is discussed, taking into account a perturbation model which is valid for small changes in the self-consistent field orbitals. It is found that basis set corrections are essentially additive through first order. It is shown that an error found in a previously published dipole moment calculation by Green (1972) for the metastable first excited state of CO was indeed due to an inadequate basis set as claimed.

  17. Monitoring Interactions Inside Cells by Advanced Spectroscopies: Overview of Copper Transporters and Cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasorsa, Alessia; Natile, Giovanni; Rosato, Antonio; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Arnesano, Fabio

    2018-02-12

    Resistance, either at the onset of the treatment or developed after an initial positive response, is a major limitation of antitumor therapy. In the case of platinum- based drugs, copper transporters have been found to interfere with drug trafficking by facilitating the import or favoring the platinum export and inactivation. The use of powerful spectroscopic, spectrometric and computational methods has allowed a deep structural insight into the mode of interaction of platinum drugs with the metal-binding domains of the transporter proteins. This review article focuses on the mode in which platinum drugs can compete with copper ion for binding to transport proteins and consequent structural and biological effects. Three types of transporters are discussed in detail: copper transporter 1 (Ctr1), the major responsible for Cu+ uptake; antioxidant-1 copper chaperone (Atox1), responsible for copper transfer within the cytoplasm; and copper ATPases (ATP7A/B), responsible for copper export into specific subcellular compartments and outside the cell. The body of knowledge summarized in this review can help in shaping current chemotherapy to optimize the efficacy of platinum drugs (particularly in relation to resistance) and to mitigate adverse effects on copper metabolism. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Interactive effects of copper pollution, competition and drought on plant growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Bruus; Kjær, C.

    Previous studies have indicated that the toxicity of copper to plants in the field is enhanced compared to single-species laboratory tests with the same soil, i.e. under similar bioavailability conditions. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether this difference in toxicity between...... laboratory and field conditions may be explained by interactions between copper toxicity and climate (drought) or competition....

  19. Apolipoprotein A-IV interacts synergistically with melanocortins to reduce food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Koro; Liu, Min; Benoit, Stephen C; Clegg, Deborah J; Davidson, W Sean; D'Alessio, David; Seeley, Randy J; Tso, Patrick; Woods, Stephen C

    2006-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV is an anorexigenic gastrointestinal peptide that is also synthesized in the hypothalamus. The goal of these experiments was to determine whether apo A-IV interacts with the central melanocortin (MC) system in the control of feeding. The third ventricular (i3vt) administration of a subthreshold dose of apo A-IV (0.5 microg) potentiated i3vt MC-induced (metallothionein-II, 0.03 nmol) suppression of 30-min feeding in Long-Evans rats. A subthreshold dose of the MC antagonist (SHU9119, 0.1 nmol, i3vt) completely attenuated the anorectic effect of i3vt apo A-IV (1.5 microg). The i3vt apo A-IV significantly elevated the expression of c-Fos in neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, but not in the arcuate nucleus or median eminence. In addition, c-Fos expression was not colocalized with proopiomelanocortin-positive neurons. These data support a synergistic interaction between apo A-IV and melanocortins that reduces food intake by acting downstream of the arcuate.

  20. Interaction of halogens with copper(2) bis-diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larik, G.M.; Zvereva, G.A.; Minin, V.V.; Rakitin, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    The EPR method is used to study iodine, bromine and chlorine reactions with copper (2) bisdiethyldithiocarbamate, Cu(dtc) 2 , in the anhydrous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). It is shown that unlike reactions in toluene, capper (2) oxidation by iodine does not take place under the above conditions. The new complex that forms due to the reaction has the following composition (Cu(dtc)(DMSO) 2 ) + , i.e. unlike Cl - under Br - ions iodide-ions do not enter the coordination metal sphere

  1. Copper plasmonics and catalysis: role of electron-phonon interactions in dephasing localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen; Goodman, Samuel M.; H. Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-10-01

    Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain boundary scattering on the decay of localized surface plasmon waves. Using our quantitative analysis and different temperature dependent measurements, we show that electron-phonon interactions dominate over other scattering mechanisms in dephasing plasmon waves. While interband transitions in copper metal contributes substantially to plasmon losses, tuning surface plasmon modes to infrared frequencies leads to a five-fold enhancement in the quality factor. These findings demonstrate that conformal ALD coatings can improve the chemical stability for copper nanoparticles, even at high temperatures (>300 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and nanoscaled copper is a good alternative material for many potential applications in nanophotonics, plasmonics, catalysis and nanoscale electronics.Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain

  2. Different assembly of type IV collagen on hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrata alters endothelial cells interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Coelho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the structural role of type IV collagen (Col IV in the assembly of the basement membrane (BM and the perspective of mimicking its organization for vascular tissue engineering purposes, we studied the adsorption pattern of this protein on model hydrophilic (clean glass and hydrophobic trichloro(octadecylsilane (ODS surfaces known to strongly affect the behavior of other matrix proteins. The amount of fluorescently labeled Col IV was quantified showing saturation of the surface for concentration of the adsorbing solution of about 50μg/ml, but with approximately twice more adsorbed protein on ODS. AFM studies revealed a fine – nearly single molecular size – network arrangement of Col IV on hydrophilic glass, which turns into a prominent and growing polygonal network consisting of molecular aggregates on hydrophobic ODS. The protein layer forms within minutes in a concentration-dependent manner. We further found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC attach less efficiently to the aggregated Col IV (on ODS, as judged by the significantly altered cell spreading, focal adhesions formation and the development of actin cytoskeleton. Conversely, the immunofluorescence studies for integrins revealed that the fine Col IV network formed on hydrophilic substrata is better recognized by the cells via both α1 and α2 heterodimers which support cellular interaction, apart from these on hydrophobic ODS where almost no clustering of integrins was observed.

  3. Magnetic-superexchange interactions of uranium(IV) chloride-addition complexes with amides, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Chie; Hinatsu, Yukio; Imoto, Shosuke

    1983-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibilities of five cyclic amide (lactam)-addition complexes of uranium(IV) chloride were measured between room temperature and 2 K. Magnetic-exchange interaction was found only for N-methyl-substituted amide complexes, and a dimer structure was assumed for them on the basis of their chemical properties. Treating interdimer interaction with a molecular-field approximation, the magnetic susceptibilities were calculated to be in good agreement with the experimental results in the temperature region of the maxima in chi sub(A). The transmission of antiparallel spin coupling via the π orbitals of the bridging amide ligands is proposed to explain the strong intradimer superexchange interaction for the uranium(IV) chloride-amide complexes with the magnetic-susceptibility maximum. (author)

  4. Copper-silver ionization at a US hospital: interaction of treated ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tap water sampling and surface analysis of copper pipe/bathroom porcelain were performed to explore the fate of copper and silver during the first nine months of copper-silver ionization (CSI) applied to cold and hot water at a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. Ions dosed by CSI into the water at its point of entry to the hospital were inadvertently removed from hot water by a cation-exchange softener in one building (average removal of 72% copper and 51% silver). Copper at the tap was replenished from corrosion of the building’s copper pipes but was typically unable to reach 200 µg/L in first-draw and flushed hot and cold water samples. Unlike copper, silver solubility was not restricted by the incoming water’s high pH of 8.5. Cold water lines had >20 µg/L silver at most of the taps that were sampled, which further increased after flushing. However, silver plating onto copper pipe surfaces (particularly in the hot water line) prevented reaching 20 µg/L silver in hot water of many taps. Aesthetically displeasing purple/grey stains in bathroom porcelain were attributed to chlorargyrite [AgCl(s)], an insoluble precipitate that formed when CSI-dosed Ag+ ions combined with Cl- ions that were present in the incoming water. Overall, CSI aims to control Legionella bacteria in drinking water, but plumbing material interactions, aesthetics and other implications also deserve consideration to holistically evaluate in-building drinking water disinfection. To inform the

  5. Electrochemical methods to study hydrogen production during interaction of copper with deoxygenated aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilja, Christina; Betova, Iva; Bojinov, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In some countries, spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in canisters with a copper shell for corrosion protection, for further disposal in geologic repositories. The possibilities for corrosion after oxygen depletion must be evaluated, even if copper is considered to be immune in oxygen-free water. To follow the interaction of copper with deoxygenated aqueous solution, open-circuit potentiometric and electrochemical impedance measurements have been coupled to in-situ detection of cupric ion, dissolved molecular hydrogen and oxygen concentrations using electrochemical sensors. A kinetic model that considers the production of hydrogen as a catalytic process, the rate of which is proportional to the surface coverage of an intermediate species formed during interaction between copper and the solution is used to interpret the results. Kinetic parameters are estimated by a simultaneous fit of the experimental impedance spectra, the open circuit potential and cupric ion concentration as depending on temperature (22–70 °C) and exposure time (up to 720 h) to the model equations. Using the obtained values and a balance equation of hydrogen production on copper and its diffusion out of the cell through its walls, the kinetic parameters of this process are estimated by fitting dissolved molecular hydrogen concentration vs. time data at the three temperatures.

  6. Copper interacts with nonylphenol to cancel the effect of nonylphenol on fish chemosensory behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ashley J W; Thistle, Maria; Ghandi, Khashayar; Currie, Suzanne

    2013-10-15

    The majority of ecotoxicological studies have been concerned with responses of organisms to a single contaminant. While this approach remains valid, the challenge now is to understand the way in which multiple contaminants and stressors interact to produce effects in study organisms. Here we take an integrated biological and physico-chemical approach to understand the effects of 4-nonylphenol and copper on fish (white perch, Morone americana) chemosensory behaviour. We show that a one hour exposure to 2 μg L(-1) nonylphenol removes chemosensory attraction to conspecific chemical cues, while exposure to 5 μg L(-1) copper for one hour had no significant effect on the fish's attraction to these cues. Further, we show that simultaneous exposure to both contaminants at the stated dosage and for the same duration has no significant effect on the chemosensory attraction of white perch to conspecific chemical cues suggesting that copper mediates the effect of nonylphenol on fish in this respect. Physico-chemical data show that copper ions bind to nonylphenol in water, providing a mechanistic explanation for this change in the effect of nonylphenol. Furthermore, the finding that the copper ions bind to the lone pair of O on the nonylphenol molecule offers the tantalising possibility that it is this region of the nonylphenol molecule that plays the key role in disrupting fish chemical communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactions between copper(II) and DOM in the urban stormwater runoff: modeling and characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Wang, Chong-Chen; Li, Jun-Qi; Wang, Peng; Ou, Jia-Qi; Cui, Jing-Rui

    2018-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can strongly interact with both organic and inorganic contaminants to influence their transportation, transformation, bioavailability, toxicity and even their ultimate fate. Within this work, DOM was extracted from urban stormwater runoff samples collected from a regular sampling site of a typical residential area in Beijing, China. Copper(II) ions were selected as model to investigate the interactions between DOM and typical heavy metals. Both ultraviolet (UV) absorbance and fluorescence titration methods were introduced to determine the complex capacities (C L ) and conditional stability constants (log K M ) of bonding between DOM and copper (II) ions, which revealed that the values of C L were 85.62 and 87.23 μmol mg -1 and the log K M values were 5.37 and 5.48, respectively. The results suggested the successful complexation between DOM and copper(II) ions. Furthermore, morphology of the DOM binding to copper(II) ions was confirmed by both energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which can facilitate to clarify the corresponding mechanism. The Cu 2p 3/2 peak at 933.7 eV and the characteristic shake-up peaks of Cu-O were found in the XPS spectra, implying that copper(II) ions might coordinate with hydroxyl (aliphatic or phenolic) or carboxyl groups. With these profitable results, it can be concluded that DOM in urban stormwater runoff has a strong binding affinity with copper(II) ions, which may further lead to potentially significant influence on their migration and transformation.

  8. Comparison of interaction mechanisms of copper phthalocyanine and nickel phthalocyanine thin films with chemical vapours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridhi, R.; Singh, Sukhdeep; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    The present study deals with comparing interaction mechanisms of copper phthalocyanine and nickel phthalocyanine with versatile chemical vapours: reducing, stable aromatic and oxidizing vapours namely; diethylamine, benzene and bromine. The variation in electrical current of phthalocyanines with exposure of chemical vapours is used as the detection parameter for studying interaction behaviour. Nickel phthalocyanine is found to exhibit anomalous behaviour after exposure of reducing vapour diethylamine due to alteration in its spectroscopic transitions and magnetic states. The observed sensitivities of copper phthalocyanine and nickel phthalcyanine films are different in spite of their similar bond numbers, indicating significant role of central metal atom in interaction mechanism. The variations in electronic transition levels after vapours exposure, studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy confirmed our electrical sensing results. Bromine exposure leads to significant changes in vibrational bands of metal phthalocyanines as compared to other vapours.

  9. IV and IP administration of rhodamine in visualization of WBC-BBB interactions in cerebral vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Zachary Wilmer; Li, Hongbo; Gaughan, John P; Elliott, Melanie; Tuma, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Epi-illuminescence intravital fluorescence microscopy has been employed to study leukocyte-endothelial interactions in a number of brain pathologies. Historically, dyes such as Rhodamine 6G have been injected intravenously. However, intravenous injections can predispose experimental animals to a multitude of complications and requires a high degree of technical skill. Here, we study the efficacy of injecting Rhodamine 6G into the peritoneum (IP) for the purpose of analyzing leukocyte-endothelial interactions through a cranial window during real time intravital microscopy. After examining the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes through a cranial window, we found no advantage to the intravenous injection (IV). Additionally, we tested blood from both routes of injection by flow cytometry to gain a very precise picture of the two methods. The two routes of administration failed to show any difference in the ability to detect cells. The study supports the notion that IP Rhodamine 6G works as efficaciously as IV and should be considered a viable alternative in experimental design for investigations employing intravital microscopy. Facilitated intravital studies will allow for more exploration into cerebral pathologies and allow for more rapid translation from the laboratory to the patient with less chance of experimental error from failed IV access. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Interaction at interface between superconducting yttrium ceramics and copper or niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, M.I.; Korzhov, V.P.; Medved', N.V.; Myshlyaeva, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Light metallography, scanning electron microscopy and local energy dispersion analysis have been used to study the interaction of Y-ceramics with copper and niobium. Samples in the form of wire of two types were employed, that is, consisting of ceramic core YBaCuO and Cu shell or a ceramic core YBaCuO and bimetallic Cu/Nb shell. The interaction of the ceramics with the shell metal began already at 500 deg with the formation at the interafaces Cu-YBaCuO of oxide layers containing ceramic elements, and in the ceramic core - nonsuperconducting phases. A thin Al-layer placed between the ceramics and the shell appreciably decreased the reactability of the ceramics with respect to copper and niobium

  11. Interaction of copper, magnesium, zinc, cadmium and lead formiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyunner, Eh.A.; Mel'nichenko, L.M.; Yakhkind, N.D.; Vel'mozhnyj, I.S.; Katseva, G.N.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the residual concentrations of the interacting ions and refraction index of liquid phases were useful in determining the precipitate composition in the system MA 2 -NaOH-H 2 O(A - -HCOO - ; M 2+ -Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ ). It is shown that in the system CdA 2 -NaOH-H 2 O containing as high as 40 mole% of NaOH the precipitate composition is approximately constant and corresponds to hydroxoformiate Cd(OH)A which is formed by the equation Cd 2+ +OH - +A - =Cd(OH)A. Further increase in the NaOH content leads to the formation of varying-composition precipitates and, at a NaOH content >=66.6 mole%, - to cadmium hydroxide

  12. Mechanisms of redox interactions of bilirubin with copper and the effects of penicillamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božić, Bojana; Korać, Jelena; Stanković, Dalibor M; Stanić, Marina; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Bogdanović Pristov, Jelena; Spasojević, Ivan; Bajčetić, Milica

    2017-12-25

    Toxic effects of unconjugated bilirubin (BR) in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia have been related to redox and/or coordinate interactions with Cu 2+ . However, the development and mechanisms of such interactions at physiological pH have not been resolved. This study shows that BR reduces Cu 2+ to Cu 1+ in 1:1 stoichiometry. Apparently, BR undergoes degradation, i.e. BR and Cu 2+ do not form stable complexes. The binding of Cu 2+ to inorganic phosphates, liposomal phosphate groups, or to chelating drug penicillamine, impedes redox interactions with BR. Cu 1+ undergoes spontaneous oxidation by O 2 resulting in hydrogen peroxide accumulation and hydroxyl radical production. In relation to this, copper and BR induced synergistic oxidative/damaging effects on erythrocytes membrane, which were alleviated by penicillamine. The production of reactive oxygen species by BR and copper represents a plausible cause of BR toxic effects and cell damage in hyperbilirubinemia. Further examination of therapeutic potentials of copper chelators in the treatment of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactive Effects of Corrosion, Copper, and Chloramines on Legionella and Mycobacteria in Hot Water Plumbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, William J; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2017-06-20

    Complexities associated with drinking water plumbing systems can result in undesirable interactions among plumbing components that undermine engineering controls for opportunistic pathogens (OPs). In this study, we examine the effects of plumbing system materials and two commonly applied disinfectants, copper and chloramines, on water chemistry and the growth of Legionella and mycobacteria across a transect of bench- and pilot-scale hot water experiments carried out with the same municipal water supply. We discovered that copper released from corrosion of plumbing materials can initiate evolution of >1100 times more hydrogen (H 2 ) from water heater sacrificial anode rods than does presence of copper dosed as soluble cupric ions. H 2 is a favorable electron donor for autotrophs and causes fixation of organic carbon that could serve as a nutrient for OPs. Dosed cupric ions acted as a disinfectant in stratified stagnant pipes, inhibiting culturable Legionella and biofilm formation, but promoted Legionella growth in pipes subject to convective mixing. This difference was presumably due to continuous delivery of nutrients to biofilm on the pipes under convective mixing conditions. Chloramines eliminated culturable Legionella and prevented L. pneumophila from recolonizing biofilms, but M. avium gene numbers increased by 0.14-0.76 logs in the bulk water and were unaffected in the biofilm. This study provides practical confirmation of past discrepancies in the literature regarding the variable effects of copper on Legionella growth, and confirms prior reports of trade-offs between Legionella and mycobacteria if chloramines are applied as secondary disinfectant residual.

  14. Interactions of copper and lead with Nostoc muscorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schecher, W.D.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of cell concentration, time of exposure, cellular activity and solution chemistry, on Pb (10/sup -6/ M) and Cu (10/sup -5/ M) uptake by the alga Nostoc muscorum. Surface equilibrium, with respect to aqueous metal levels, was established within an equilibration period of 8 h and maximum metal removal was observed in the pH range of 7.5 to 8.0. The observed removal of Cu and Pb from solution was similar to adsorption observed for inorganic surfaces at pH values less than 8.0. Removal of metallic ions decreased at pH values greater than 8.0 which was thought to be due to aqueous complexation with organic extracellular material. The extent to which the cells were able to remove trace metals from solution in the presence of citrate, sulfate, and Ca ion (10/sup -3/ M) was also evaluated. Additions of citrate and Ca ion mitigated metal uptake by algal suspensions. The presence of sulfate resulted in a reduction of Cu removal below pH values of 5.6 but enhanced the removal of Pb over the entire pH range. The chemical equilibrium model MINEQL was utilized to compare theoretical and observed phenomena so that possible mechanisms for metal-cell interactions could be assessed.

  15. Effect and interactions of commercial additives and chloride ion in copper electrowinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenyuan

    This thesis is to understand and compare the effects and interactions of modified polysaccharide (HydroStar), polyacrylamide (Cyquest N-900) and chloride ion on copper electrowinning. A study of the nucleation and growth was conducted in a synthetic electrolyte (40 g/L Cu, 160 g/L H2SO 4, 20 mg/L Cl-) with the addition of HydroStar or Cyquest N-900 using potential step measurements. The current responses generated were compared to theoretical models of nucleation and growth mechanisms. The nucleation and growth mechanism changed as function of potential and the presence of organic additives. The nucleation and growth mechanisms were confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At low overpotentials, electrodeposition from the electrolyte without additives proceeded by progressive nucleation with three-dimensional (3-D) growth. The addition of HydroStar produced smaller nuclei and changed the mechanism to progressive nucleation and 2-D growth. Cyquest N-900 used there appeared to be progressive nucleation with 2-D growth and polarize the cathodes. In addition, instantaneous nucleation under diffusion control occurred at high overpotentials. Chloride ion and its interaction with HydroStar and Cyquest N-900 were further characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The trends observed from Nyquist plots and equivalent circuit models were consistent with the CV results. Chloride, on its own, depolarized copper electrodeposition, while chloride ion associated with Cyquest N-900 inhibited the reaction. It is proposed that Cl- acted as a bridging ligand between copper and Cyquest N-900. The addition of HydroStar depolarized copper deposition, but it did not interact with.

  16. Surface-rain interactions: differences in copper runoff for copper sheet of different inclination, orientation, and atmospheric exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Goidanich, Sara; Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of the diffuse dispersion of metals from outdoor constructions such as roofs and facades are necessary for environmental risk assessment and management. An existing predictive model has been compared with measured data of copper runoff from copper sheets exposed at four different inclinations facing four orientations at two different urban sites (Stockholm, Sweden, and Milan, Italy) during a 4-year period. Its applicability has also been investigated for copper sheet exposed at two marine sites(Cadiz, Spain, for 5 years, and Brest, France, for 9 years). Generally the model can be used for all given conditions. However, vertical surfaces should be considered as surfaces inclined 60-80 due to wind driven effects. The most important parameters that influence copper runoff, and not already included in the model, are the wind and rain characteristics that influence the actual rainfall volume impinging the surface of interest.

  17. Interaction of a copper (II) complex containing an artificial sweetener (aspartame) with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    A copper (II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied at physiological pH. The interaction was studied using different methods: spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment, circular dichroism (CD) and viscosimetric techniques. Hyperchromicity was observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O was observed and the binding constants (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be+89.3 kJ mol(-1) and+379.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Experimental results from spectroscopic methods were comparable and further supported by viscosity measurements. We suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 8×10+4 M(-1). Binding of this copper complex to DNA was found to be stronger compared to aspartame which was studied recently. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DFT study of ethyl xanthate interaction with sphalerite (1 1 0) surface in the absence and presence of copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization , Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization , Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Deng, Jiushuai [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization , Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Chen, Xiumin [National Engineering Laboratory of Vacuum Metallurgy, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Feng, Qicheng [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization , Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Interaction among sphalerite surface, copper and ethyl xanthate (EX) was simulated. • Results show that four stable interaction models exist among them. • The four models can result in the activation flotation of sphalerite. - Abstract: The interaction among sphalerite (1 1 0) surface, copper and ethyl xanthate (EX) was simulated using the density functional theory (DFT). The results of DFT indicate that four types of stable interaction models exist among sphalerite surface, copper and EX, i.e., EX interacts with the Cu substituted for Zn, Cu adsorbed on the top site of S, Cu adsorbed on the bridge site of S and Cu(OH){sub 2} adsorbed on the sphalerite surface. The four interaction models can result in the activation flotation of sphalerite. Density of states (DOS) analysis shows that the energy level discrepancy of the Zn 3d orbital in ZnS and the bonding S 3p orbital in EX results in the weak adsorption of EX on un-activated sphalerite surface. However, after copper activation, the Cu 3d orbital peak and bonding S 3p orbital peak are just maximally overlapped nearby the Fermi level. This study provides an insight into the nature that sphalerite responds not well to EX and also a comprehensive understanding on the possible interaction cases existing among sphalerite surface, copper and EX.

  19. DFT study of ethyl xanthate interaction with sphalerite (1 1 0) surface in the absence and presence of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Chen, Xiumin; Feng, Qicheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Interaction among sphalerite surface, copper and ethyl xanthate (EX) was simulated. • Results show that four stable interaction models exist among them. • The four models can result in the activation flotation of sphalerite. - Abstract: The interaction among sphalerite (1 1 0) surface, copper and ethyl xanthate (EX) was simulated using the density functional theory (DFT). The results of DFT indicate that four types of stable interaction models exist among sphalerite surface, copper and EX, i.e., EX interacts with the Cu substituted for Zn, Cu adsorbed on the top site of S, Cu adsorbed on the bridge site of S and Cu(OH) 2 adsorbed on the sphalerite surface. The four interaction models can result in the activation flotation of sphalerite. Density of states (DOS) analysis shows that the energy level discrepancy of the Zn 3d orbital in ZnS and the bonding S 3p orbital in EX results in the weak adsorption of EX on un-activated sphalerite surface. However, after copper activation, the Cu 3d orbital peak and bonding S 3p orbital peak are just maximally overlapped nearby the Fermi level. This study provides an insight into the nature that sphalerite responds not well to EX and also a comprehensive understanding on the possible interaction cases existing among sphalerite surface, copper and EX

  20. Autoionizing energy levels and extended spectral analysis of copper-like gallium and germanium (Ga III, Ge IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabtsev, A.N.; Wyart, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The spark spectra of doubly ionized gallium and triply ionized germanium have been observed. Lines broadened by autoionization have been attributed to 3d 9 4p 2 - 3d 10 4p transitions on the basis of parametric studies of the configurations 3d 9 4p 2 + 3d 9 4s4d. Line strengths and autoionization widths support the identifications. The analysis of the 3d 10 nl system has been corrected and extended. The ionization energy of Ge IV is 368 720 cm -1 ± 10 cm -1 . (orig.)

  1. Structural influence in the interaction of cysteine with five coordinated copper complexes: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Aguilar, Carlos Alberto; Thangarasu, Pandiyan; Mora, Jesús Gracia

    2018-04-01

    Copper complexes of N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane (L1) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (L2) prepared were characterized completely by different analytical methods. The X-structure of the complexes shows that Cu(II) presents in trigonal bi-pyramidal (TBP) geometry, consisting with the electronic spectra where two visible bands corresponding to five coordinated structure were observed. Thus TD-DFT was used to analyze the orbital contribution to the electronic transitions for the visible bands. Furthermore, the interaction of cysteine with the complexes was spectrally studied, and the results were explained through DFT analysis, observing that the geometrical parameters and oxidation state of metal ions play a vital role in the binding of cysteine with copper ion. It appears that the TBP structure is being changed into octahedral geometry during the addition of cysteine to the complexes as two bands (from complex) is turned to a broad band in visible region, signifying the occupation of cysteine molecule at sixth position of octahedral geometry. In the molecular orbital analysis, the existence of a strong overlapping of HOMOs (from cysteine) with LUMOs of Cu ion was observed. The total energy of the systems calculated by DFT shows that cysteine binds favorably with copper (I) than that with Cu(II).

  2. Influence of the Interaction between Sphalerite and Pyrite on the Copper Activation of Sphalerite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of pyrite on the activation of sphalerite was investigated by micro-flotation, copper adsorption experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical measurement. The micro-flotation test results showed that the recovery and flotation rate of sphalerite with copper sulphate as activator and butyl xanthate as collector were significantly decreased with the increasing content of pyrite in pulp. Cu2+ adsorption results indicated that the adsorption of Cu2+ on the sphalerite surface were decreased when pyrite was present in the pulp. XPS surface analysis demonstrated that the proportion of Cu+ species increased in the activation products on the sphalerite surface, but the total atomic concentration of Cu atom was decreased. Linear voltammetry measurement suggested that the current density of Cu+ species oxidizing to Cu2+ species was increased when sphalerite was electrically contacted with pyrite, which confirmed the increased proportion of Cu+ species on Cu-activation sphalerite surface when contacting with pyrite. These results indicated that there is not only a competitive adsorption for cupric ions (Cu2+, but the galvanic interaction between sphalerite and pyrite also has a significant influence on the copper activation of sphalerite.

  3. Anderson Hamiltonian description of the experimental electronic structure and magnetic interactions of copper oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z.; Allen, J.W.; Yeh, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    We describe valence-band and core-level photoemission data for copper oxide superconductors using the Anderson Hamiltonian applied to an impurity-cluster configuration-interaction model. We obtain experimental values of the parameters of the model the copper X oxygen charge transfer energy Δ∼0.4 eV, the d-d Coulomb interaction U∼6 eV, and the ligand-d hybridization T∼2.4 eV. Using these parameters, we evaluate the linear Cu-O-Cu superexchange interaction J and find it is dominated by the charge-transfer fluctuations. The magnitude obtained for J is much larger than typical Neel temperatures of these materials, and is somewhat larger than that estimated from applying the resonating-valence-bond picture to La 2 CuO 4 . We point out that for Δ >Δ, the charge-transfer degrees of freedom, and the lattice aspects of the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian, should not be neglected in constructing models for the high-T/sub c/ superconductivity. We also emphasize our resonant-photoemission result that the very small density of states at or near the Fermi level in all these materials has a substantial contribution from Cu 3d states, suggesting their importance for the superconductivity. We report other details of the resonant-photoemission data involving La and Ba states in the materials containing these elements

  4. Graphene-enhanced intermolecular interaction at interface between copper- and cobalt-phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Wei-Dong [Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Huang, Shu-Ping [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Lee, Chun-Sing, E-mail: apcslee@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-10-07

    Interfacial electronic structures of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc), cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc), and graphene were investigated experimentally by using photoelectron spectroscopy. While the CuPc/graphene interface shows flat band structure and negligible interfacial dipole indicating quite weak molecule-substrate interaction, the CuPc/CoPc/graphene interface shows a large interfacial dipole and obvious energy level bending. Controlled experiments ruled out possible influences from the change in film structure of CuPc and pure π–π interaction between CoPc and CuPc. Analysis based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory reveals that the decrease in the work function for the CuPc/CoPc/graphene system is induced by the intermolecular interaction between CuPc and CoPc which is enhanced owning to the peculiar electronic properties at the CoPc-graphene interface.

  5. Structural and magnetic characterization of a tetranuclear copper(II) cubane stabilized by intramolecular metal cation-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Rivière, Eric; Giorgi, Michel; Jamet, Hélène; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Tron, Thierry

    2013-05-20

    A novel tetranuclear copper(II) complex (1) was synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the ligand N-benzyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(1)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that complex 1 consists of a Cu4(OH)4 cubane core, where the four copper(II) centers are linked by μ3-hydroxo bridges. Each copper(II) ion is in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. X-ray analysis also evidenced an unusual metal cation-π interaction between the copper ions and phenyl substituents of the ligand. Calculations based on the density functional theory method were used to quantify the strength of this metal-π interaction, which appears as an important stabilizing parameter of the cubane core, possibly acting as a driving parameter in the self-aggregation process. In contrast, using the ligand N-phenethyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(2)), which only differs from L(1) by one methylene group, the same synthetic procedure led to a binuclear bis(μ-hydroxo)copper(II) complex (2) displaying intermolecular π-π interactions or, by a slight variation of the experimental conditions, to a mononuclear complex (3). These complexes were studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. The magnetic properties of complexes 1 and 2 are reported and discussed.

  6. Origin of the Strong Interaction between Polar Molecules and Copper(II) Paddle-Wheels in Metal Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongari, Daniele; Tiana, Davide; Stoneburner, Samuel J; Gagliardi, Laura; Smit, Berend

    2017-07-20

    The copper paddle-wheel is the building unit of many metal organic frameworks. Because of the ability of the copper cations to attract polar molecules, copper paddle-wheels are promising for carbon dioxide adsorption and separation. They have therefore been studied extensively, both experimentally and computationally. In this work we investigate the copper-CO 2 interaction in HKUST-1 and in two different cluster models of HKUST-1: monocopper Cu(formate) 2 and dicopper Cu 2 (formate) 4 . We show that density functional theory methods severely underestimate the interaction energy between copper paddle-wheels and CO 2 , even including corrections for the dispersion forces. In contrast, a multireference wave function followed by perturbation theory to second order using the CASPT2 method correctly describes this interaction. The restricted open-shell Møller-Plesset 2 method (ROS-MP2, equivalent to (2,2) CASPT2) was also found to be adequate in describing the system and used to develop a novel force field. Our parametrization is able to predict the experimental CO 2 adsorption isotherms in HKUST-1, and it is shown to be transferable to other copper paddle-wheel systems.

  7. Review of supercontainer copper shell-bentonite interactions and possible effects on buffer performance for the KBS-3H design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Wersin, P.

    2014-03-01

    A review is presented of the possible impact of the corrosion of a copper supercontainer shell on the performance of the bentonite buffer. The review is presented in two parts; first an assessment of the likely corrosion behaviour of the copper shell, including an assessment of the amount and speciation of copper corrosion products, and, second an assessment of the possible interactions of these copper corrosion products with the bentonite and the consequences for the buffer performance. The corrosion behaviour of oxygen-free copper in compacted bentonite is reviewed, including the effects of a possible lower-density region at the buffer-rock interface initially. Corrosion occurs under both aerobic conditions, due to the initial O 2 trapped in the bentonite and O 2 in the air or water-filled gap at the buffer/rock interface, and anaerobic conditions, due to sulphide present in the groundwater and that possibly produced by microbial activity in the bentonite. The reaction mechanism, the nature of the dissolved and precipitated corrosion products, and the evolution of the corrosion behaviour with time are discussed with reference to groundwater conditions at both Olkiluoto and Forsmark. Various interactions between the copper corrosion products (Cu(II) and Cu(I) species) and bentonite are considered, including diffusion and sorption and the incorporation of Cu into the bentonite. The available literature information on these processes is first reviewed and then this knowledge is used to predict the likely behaviour in a KBS-3H-style repository. Based on the information currently available, it is concluded that the corrosion of a copper supercontainer shell will only affect the bentonite within a distance of a few cm of the original location of the shell. Eventually, the copper shell will corrode to form an insoluble precipitate layer of Cu 2 S approximately 2-3 times the volume of the original shell. Bentonite within a few cm of this layer of precipitate may also

  8. Fluorescent copper(II complexes: The electron transfer mechanism, interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA and antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Hazra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dinuclear copper(II complexes with formula [Cu2(L2(N32] (1 and [Cu2(L2(NCS2] (2 HL = (1-[(3-methyl-pyridine-2-ylimino-methyl]-naphthalen-2-ol were synthesized by controlling the molar ratio of Cu(OAC2·6H2O, HL, sodium azide (1 and ammonium thiocyanate (2. The end on bridges appear exclusively in azide and thiocyanate to copper complexes. The electron transfer mechanism of copper(II complexes is examined by cyclic voltammetry indicating copper(II complexes are Cu(II/Cu(I couple. The interactions of copper(II complexes towards bovine serum albumin (BSA were examined with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic tools. We report a superficial solution-based route for the synthesis of micro crystals of copper complexes with BSA. The antibacterial activity of the Schiff base and its copper complexes were investigated by the agar disc diffusion method against some species of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Streptococcus pneumonia and Bacillus cereus. It has been observed that the antibacterial activity of all complexes is higher than the ligand.

  9. Prompt neutrino production in 400 GeV proton copper interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässler, H.; Dröge, W.; Idschok, U.; Kreutzmann, H.; Nellen, B.; Wünsch, B.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cundy, D. C.; Foeth, H.; Grant, A.; Harigel, G. G.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Nikolić, M.; Pape, L.; Parker, M. A.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Dris, M.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Talebzadeh, M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Bostock, P.; Krstić, J.; Myatt, G.; Radojicić, D.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Bolognese, T.; Faccini-Turluer, M. L.; Vignaud, D.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, Ch.; BEBC WA66 Collaboration

    1986-08-01

    The prompt electron neutrino and muon neutrino fluxes from proton copper interactions at 400 GeV/ c proton momentum have been measured. The asymmetry between the prompt electron (anti) neutrino and the prompt muon (anti) neutrino event rates above 20 GeV is A eμ = {(N e - N μ}/{(N c + N μ) } = 0.07 ± 0.08 corresponding to an Ne/ Nμ ratio of 1.14 -0.16-0.19. The cross section weighted charge asymmetry for electrons and muons combined is A ν overlineν = 0.15 ± 0.08 . The number of overlineD decays into overlineνeandoverlineνμis (4.1 ± 0.9) × 10 -4 per incident proton. No evidence for ντ interactions was found.

  10. Prompt neutrino production in 400 GeV proton copper interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graessler, H.; Dris, M.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Talebzadeh, M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Bolognese, T.; Faccini-Turluer, M.L.; Vignaud, D.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Bostock, P.; Krstic, J.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.

    1986-01-01

    The prompt electron neutrino and muon neutrino fluxes from proton copper interactions at 400 GeV/c proton momentum have been measured. The asymmetry between the prompt electron (anti)neutrino and the prompt muon (anti)neutrino event rates above 20 GeV is Asub(cμ)=(Nsub(e)-Nsub(μ))/Nsub(e)+Nsub(μ))=0.07+-0.08. The cross section weighted charge asymmetry for electrons and muons combined is Asub(ν)sub(anti ν)=0.15+-0.08. The number of anti D decays into anti νsub(e) and anti νsub(μ) is (4.1+-0.9) . 10 -4 per incident proton. No evidence for νsub(tau) interactions was found. (orig.)

  11. Interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the Calcite-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.A.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the calcite-solution interface at controlled pCO 2 (g) have been investigated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive (EDS) analyses of reacted calcite. Uranium precipitation at the calcite-solution interface was observed only for those experiments in which the initial [U(VI)] was greater than the solubility of rutherfordine, UO 2 CO 3 (s). At pH 8.0, flat radial uranium and calcium zoned precipitates form at the mineral-solution interface. At pH 4.3, uranium forms an anastomosing precipitate throughout the calcite surface. RBS analyses confirmed the SEM analyses showing that uranium forms a solid phase within the calcite surface, but formation of an uranium-calcium solid solution at depth is limited. In sharp contrast to U(VI), Nd is concentrated in the solid phase as individual neodymium-calcium carbonate crystals. Calcite and pure orthorhombic neodymium carbonate crystals dissolve at the expense of the formation of a more stable neodymium-calcium solid solution. In the presence of calcite, a thorium-calcium solid solution forms by exchanging Th for Ca in the calcite structure. Thorium precipitates in two linear trends which intersect each other at approximately 105deg C and 75deg C, parallel to calcite rhombohedral cleavage faces. (orig.)

  12. Spectroscopic Study of the Interaction between Horse Heart Myoglobin and Zirconium(IV)-Substituted Polyoxometalates as Artificial Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Hong Giang T; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2017-09-20

    A recent study [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 7391-7394] has shown that horse heart myoglobin (HHM) is selectively hydrolyzed by a range of zirconium(IV)-substituted polyoxometalates (POMs) under mild conditions. In this study, the molecular interactions between the Zr-POM catalysts and HHM are investigated by using a range of complementary techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), UV/Vis spectroscopy, tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy, and 1 H and 31 P NMR spectroscopy. A tryptophan fluorescence quenching study reveals that, among all examined Zr-POMs, the most reactive POM, 2:2 Zr IV -Keggin, exhibits the strongest interaction with HHM. 31 P NMR spectroscopy studies show that this POM dissociates in solution, resulting in the formation of a monomeric 1:1 Zr IV -Keggin structure, which is likely to be a catalytically active species. In the presence of Zr IV -POMs, HHM does not undergo complete denaturation, as evidenced by CD, UV/Vis, tryptophan fluorescence, and 1 H NMR spectroscopy. CD spectroscopy shows a gradual decrease in the α-helical content of HHM upon addition of Zr IV -POMs. The largest effect is observed in the presence of a large Zr IV -Wells-Dawson structure, whereas small Zr IV -Lindqvist POM has the least influence on the decrease in the α-helical content of HHM. In all cases, the Soret band at λ=409 nm is maintained in the presence of all examined Zr-POMs, which indicates that no conformational changes in the protein occur near the heme group. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. DFT study of ethyl xanthate interaction with sphalerite (1 1 0) surface in the absence and presence of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Chen, Xiumin; Feng, Qicheng

    2014-08-01

    The interaction among sphalerite (1 1 0) surface, copper and ethyl xanthate (EX) was simulated using the density functional theory (DFT). The results of DFT indicate that four types of stable interaction models exist among sphalerite surface, copper and EX, i.e., EX interacts with the Cu substituted for Zn, Cu adsorbed on the top site of S, Cu adsorbed on the bridge site of S and Cu(OH)2 adsorbed on the sphalerite surface. The four interaction models can result in the activation flotation of sphalerite. Density of states (DOS) analysis shows that the energy level discrepancy of the Zn 3d orbital in ZnS and the bonding S 3p orbital in EX results in the weak adsorption of EX on un-activated sphalerite surface. However, after copper activation, the Cu 3d orbital peak and bonding S 3p orbital peak are just maximally overlapped nearby the Fermi level. This study provides an insight into the nature that sphalerite responds not well to EX and also a comprehensive understanding on the possible interaction cases existing among sphalerite surface, copper and EX.

  14. EPR of Cu(II) in sarcosine cadmium chloride: probe into dopant site - symmetry and copper-sarcosine interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pathinettam-Padiyan, D; Murugesan, R

    2000-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) doped sarcosine cadmium chloride single crystals have been investigated at room temperature. Experimental results reveal that the Cu(II) ion enters the lattice interstitially. The observed superhyperfine lines indicate the superposition of two sets of quintet structure with interaction of nitrogen atoms and the two isotopes of copper. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are evaluated by Schonland method and the electric field symmetry around the copper ion is rhombic. An admixture of d sub z sup 2 orbital with the d sub x sub sup 2 sub - sub y sub sup 2 ground state is observed. Evaluation of MO coefficients reveals that the in-plane interaction between copper and nitrogen is strong in this lattice.

  15. Study of the interaction mechanism in the biosorption of copper(II) ions onto posidonia oceanica and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, Marta; Marzal, Paula; Gabaldon, Carmen [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali e Agrarie e Biotecnologie Agro-Alimentari, Sez. Chimica Agraria ed Ambientale, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    A systematic approach was used to characterize the biosorption of copper(II) onto two biosorbents, Posidonia oceanica and peat, focusing on the interaction mechanisms, the copper(II) sorption-desorption process and the thermal behavior of the biosorbents. Sorption isotherms at pH 4-6 were obtained and the experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir model with a maximum uptake (q{sub max}) at pH 6 of 85.78 and 49.69 mg g{sup -1}, for P. oceanica and peat, respectively. A sequential desorption (SD) with water, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and EDTA was applied to copper-saturated biosorbents. Around 65-70% copper(II) were desorbed with EDTA, indicating that this heavy metal was strongly bound. The reversibility of copper(II) sorption was obtained by desorption with HCl and SD. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis detected the presence of peaks associated with OH groups in aromatic and aliphatic structures, CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} in aliphatic structures, COO{sup -} and COOH groups and unsaturated aromatic structures on the surface of both biosorbents, as well as peaks corresponding to Si-O groups on the surface of peat. The results of SEM-EDX and FTIR analysis of copper-saturated samples demonstrated that ion exchange was one of the mechanisms involved in copper(II) retention. Thermal analysis of biosorbent samples showed that copper(II) sorption-desorption processes affected the thermal stability of the biosorbents. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Role of the Water–Metal Ion Bridge in Mediating Interactions between Quinolones and Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although quinolones have been in clinical use for decades, the mechanism underlying drug activity and resistance has remained elusive. However, recent studies indicate that clinically relevant quinolones interact with Bacillus anthracis (Gram-positive) topoisomerase IV through a critical water–metal ion bridge and that the most common quinolone resistance mutations decrease drug activity by disrupting this bridge. As a first step toward determining whether the water–metal ion bridge is a general mechanism of quinolone–topoisomerase interaction, we characterized drug interactions with wild-type Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) topoisomerase IV and a series of ParC enzymes with mutations (S80L, S80I, S80F, and E84K) in the predicted bridge-anchoring residues. Results strongly suggest that the water–metal ion bridge is essential for quinolone activity against E. coli topoisomerase IV. Although the bridge represents a common and critical mechanism that underlies broad-spectrum quinolone function, it appears to play different roles in B. anthracis and E. coli topoisomerase IV. The water–metal ion bridge is the most important binding contact of clinically relevant quinolones with the Gram-positive enzyme. However, it primarily acts to properly align clinically relevant quinolones with E. coli topoisomerase IV. Finally, even though ciprofloxacin is unable to increase levels of DNA cleavage mediated by several of the Ser80 and Glu84 mutant E. coli enzymes, the drug still retains the ability to inhibit the overall catalytic activity of these topoisomerase IV proteins. Inhibition parallels drug binding, suggesting that the presence of the drug in the active site is sufficient to diminish DNA relaxation rates. PMID:25115926

  17. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1–CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1. PMID:25694549

  18. Interaction of MYC with host cell factor-1 is mediated by the evolutionarily conserved Myc box IV motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L R; Foshage, A M; Weissmiller, A M; Popay, T M; Grieb, B C; Qualls, S J; Ng, V; Carboneau, B; Lorey, S; Eischen, C M; Tansey, W P

    2016-07-07

    The MYC family of oncogenes encodes a set of three related transcription factors that are overexpressed in many human tumors and contribute to the cancer-related deaths of more than 70,000 Americans every year. MYC proteins drive tumorigenesis by interacting with co-factors that enable them to regulate the expression of thousands of genes linked to cell growth, proliferation, metabolism and genome stability. One effective way to identify critical co-factors required for MYC function has been to focus on sequence motifs within MYC that are conserved throughout evolution, on the assumption that their conservation is driven by protein-protein interactions that are vital for MYC activity. In addition to their DNA-binding domains, MYC proteins carry five regions of high sequence conservation known as Myc boxes (Mb). To date, four of the Mb motifs (MbI, MbII, MbIIIa and MbIIIb) have had a molecular function assigned to them, but the precise role of the remaining Mb, MbIV, and the reason for its preservation in vertebrate Myc proteins, is unknown. Here, we show that MbIV is required for the association of MYC with the abundant transcriptional coregulator host cell factor-1 (HCF-1). We show that the invariant core of MbIV resembles the tetrapeptide HCF-binding motif (HBM) found in many HCF-interaction partners, and demonstrate that MYC interacts with HCF-1 in a manner indistinguishable from the prototypical HBM-containing protein VP16. Finally, we show that rationalized point mutations in MYC that disrupt interaction with HCF-1 attenuate the ability of MYC to drive tumorigenesis in mice. Together, these data expose a molecular function for MbIV and indicate that HCF-1 is an important co-factor for MYC.

  19. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of human serum albumin with copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Bhargab; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Das, Suman; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Naskar, Jnan Prakash

    2017-02-01

    Two osazone based ligands, butane-2,3-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (BDBPH) and hexane-3,4-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (HDBPH), were synthesized out of the 2:1 M Schiff base condensation of 2-hydrazino pyridine respectively with 2,3-butanedione and 3,4-hexanedione. The X-ray crystal structures of both the ligands have been determined. The copper(II) complex of HDBPH has also been synthesized and structurally characterized. HDBPH and its copper(II) complex have thoroughly been characterized through various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The X-ray crystal structure of the copper complex of HDBPH shows that it is a monomeric Cu(II) complex having 'N4O2' co-ordination chromophore. Interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with these ligands and their monomeric copper(II) complexes have been studied by various spectroscopic means. The experimental findings show that the ligands as well as their copper complexes are good HSA binders. Molecular docking investigations have also been done to unravel the mode of binding of the species with HSA.

  20. Occurrences of flares with type II and IV radio events in interacting sunspot groups in the course of revolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, J.; Krivsky, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using data from 11-year solar cycle No. 20, it was found that flares with type II radio bursts are more than twice as frequent and flares with type IV bursts nearly twice as frequent in sunspot groups which developed close to each other or which merged in the course of revolutions than in isolated sunspot groups. With both types the occurrence of these flares is concentrated in the revolution of the so-called sunspot group interaction (their approximation, merging). (author)

  1. Interactions of copper and thermal stress on mitochondrial bioenergetics in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappal, Ravinder; MacDonald, Nicole; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Interacting effects of Cu and temperature were investigated in rainbow trout liver mitochondria. • Mitochondrial functional indices are highly sensitive to temperature change. • High and low temperatures sensitize mitochondria to adverse effects of Cu. • Cu induces a highly temperature-sensitive mitochondrial permeability transition pore. • Cu-imposed mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation is mediated by reactive oxygen species. - Abstract: Thermal stress may influence how organisms respond to concurrent or subsequent chemical, physical and biotic stressors. To unveil the potential mechanisms via which thermal stress modulates metals-induced bioenergetic disturbances, the interacting effects of temperature and copper (Cu) were investigated in vitro. Mitochondria isolated from rainbow trout livers were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations at three temperatures (5, 15 and 25 °C) with measurement of mitochondrial complex I (mtCI)-driven respiratory flux indices and uncoupler-stimulated respiration. Additional studies assessed effects of temperature and Cu on mtCI enzyme activity, induction of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), swelling kinetics and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Maximal and basal respiration rates, as well as the proton leak, increased with temperature with the Q 10 effects being higher at lower temperatures. The effect of Cu depended on the mitochondrial functional state in that the maximal respiration was monotonically inhibited by Cu exposure while low and high Cu concentrations stimulated and inhibited the basal respiration/proton leak, respectively. Importantly, temperature exacerbated the effects of Cu by lowering the concentration of the metal required for toxicity and causing loss of thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondrial complex I activity was inhibited by Cu but was not affected by incubation temperature. Compared with the calcium (Ca) positive control, Cu

  2. Interactions of copper and thermal stress on mitochondrial bioenergetics in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDonald, Nicole [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Interacting effects of Cu and temperature were investigated in rainbow trout liver mitochondria. • Mitochondrial functional indices are highly sensitive to temperature change. • High and low temperatures sensitize mitochondria to adverse effects of Cu. • Cu induces a highly temperature-sensitive mitochondrial permeability transition pore. • Cu-imposed mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation is mediated by reactive oxygen species. - Abstract: Thermal stress may influence how organisms respond to concurrent or subsequent chemical, physical and biotic stressors. To unveil the potential mechanisms via which thermal stress modulates metals-induced bioenergetic disturbances, the interacting effects of temperature and copper (Cu) were investigated in vitro. Mitochondria isolated from rainbow trout livers were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations at three temperatures (5, 15 and 25 °C) with measurement of mitochondrial complex I (mtCI)-driven respiratory flux indices and uncoupler-stimulated respiration. Additional studies assessed effects of temperature and Cu on mtCI enzyme activity, induction of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), swelling kinetics and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Maximal and basal respiration rates, as well as the proton leak, increased with temperature with the Q{sub 10} effects being higher at lower temperatures. The effect of Cu depended on the mitochondrial functional state in that the maximal respiration was monotonically inhibited by Cu exposure while low and high Cu concentrations stimulated and inhibited the basal respiration/proton leak, respectively. Importantly, temperature exacerbated the effects of Cu by lowering the concentration of the metal required for toxicity and causing loss of thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondrial complex I activity was inhibited by Cu but was not affected by incubation temperature. Compared with the calcium (Ca) positive control

  3. Further evidences for enhanced nuclear cross-sections observed in 44 GeV carbon ion interactions with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.; Abdullaev, I.G.; Adloff, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The work of enhanced nuclear cross-sections of secondary fragments produced in the interaction of 44 GeV 12 C with copper has been deepened and extended. The earlier experiment on the emission of secondary fragments into large angles producing enhanced amounts of 24 Na in copper (Phys. Rev. C, 45, 1194(1992)) was confirmed and refined both experimentally and theoretically. In this context, one looked for another signature of such enhanced production, namely for enhanced neutron production. In order to search for this, a 20 cm thick massive copper target was irradiated with 18 and 44 GeV 12 C-ions. Secondary fragments already described could interact again with copper. Outside the metallic target, secondary neutrons got moderated and low energy nuclear reactions were studied in La and U radiochemically via (n,γ)-reactions and also with various solid state nuclear track detectors. One observed an indication, however not yet significant, of enhanced production rates for low energy nuclear reactions only with 44 GeV 12 C, when compared to 18 GeV 12 C-ions. Besides some proton irradiations at SATURNE, Saclay (France) at 2.6 GeV and at PSI, Villigen (Switzerland) at 0.6 GeV all other irradiations were carried out at the Synchrophasotron, LHE, JINR, Dubna (Russia). 46 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  4. A copper-methionine interaction controls the pH-dependent activation of peptidylglycine monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Andrew T; Broers, Brenda A; Kline, Chelsey D; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2011-12-20

    The pH dependence of native peptidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM) and its M314H variant has been studied in detail. For wild-type (WT) PHM, the intensity of the Cu-S interaction visible in the Cu(I) extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data is inversely proportional to catalytic activity over the pH range of 3-8. A previous model based on more limited data was interpreted in terms of two protein conformations involving an inactive Met-on form and an active flexible Met-off form [Bauman, A. T., et al. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 11140-11150] that derived its catalytic activity from the ability to couple into vibrational modes critical for proton tunneling. The new studies comparing the WT and M314H variant have led to the evolution of this model, in which the Met-on form has been found to be derived from coordination of an additional Met residue, rather than a more rigid conformer of M314 as previously proposed. The catalytic activity of the mutant decreased by 96% because of effects on both k(cat) and K(M), but it displayed the same activity-pH profile with a maximum around pH 6. At pH 8, the reduced Cu(I) form gave spectra that could be simulated by replacement of the Cu(M) Cu-S(Met) interaction with a Cu-N/O interaction, but the data did not unambiguously assign the ligand to the imidazole side chain of H314. At pH 3.5, the EXAFS still showed the presence of a strong Cu-S interaction, establishing that the Met-on form observed at low pH in WT cannot be due to a strengthening of the Cu(M)-methionine interaction but must arise from a different Cu-S interaction. Therefore, lowering the pH causes a conformational change at one of the Cu centers that brings a new S donor residue into a favorable orientation for coordination to copper and generates an inactive form. Cys coordination is unlikely because all Cys residues in PHM are engaged in disulfide cross-links. Sequence comparison with the PHM homologues tyramine β-monooxygenase and dopamine

  5. Investigation of the interaction of copper(II) oxide and electron beam irradiation crosslinkable polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen; Sin, Lee Tin; Ratnam, C.T.; Haraveen, K.J.S.; Tee, Tiam-Ting; Rahmat, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of copper(II) oxide when added to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends were investigated. It was found that the addition of low loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩽2 phr) to LDPE results in significantly poorer gel content and hot set results. However, the incorporation of higher loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩾3 phr) could slightly increase the degree of crosslinking in all irradiated LDPE composites. This is due to the fact that higher amounts of copper(II) oxide could slightly induce the formation of free radicals in LDPE matrix. Besides, increasing irradiation doses was also found to gradually increase the gel content of LDPE composites by generating higher amounts of free radicals. As a consequence, these higher amounts of free radicals released in the LDPE matrix could significantly increase the degree of crosslinking. The addition of copper(II) oxide could reduce the tensile strength and fracture strain (elongation at break) of LDPE composites because of poorer interfacial adhesion effect between copper(II) oxide particles and LDPE matrix. Meanwhile, increasing irradiation doses on all copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites could marginally increase the tensile strength. In addition, increasing irradiation dose could enhance the thermal stability of LDPE composites by increasing the decomposition temperature. The oxidation induction time (OIT) analysis showed that, because of the crosslinking network in the copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites, oxidation reaction is much delayed.

  6. Investigation of the interaction of copper(II) oxide and electron beam irradiation crosslinkable polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen, E-mail: direct.beest@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sin, Lee Tin, E-mail: direct.tinsin@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ratnam, C.T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Haraveen, K.J.S.; Tee, Tiam-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahmat, A.R. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of copper(II) oxide when added to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends were investigated. It was found that the addition of low loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩽2 phr) to LDPE results in significantly poorer gel content and hot set results. However, the incorporation of higher loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩾3 phr) could slightly increase the degree of crosslinking in all irradiated LDPE composites. This is due to the fact that higher amounts of copper(II) oxide could slightly induce the formation of free radicals in LDPE matrix. Besides, increasing irradiation doses was also found to gradually increase the gel content of LDPE composites by generating higher amounts of free radicals. As a consequence, these higher amounts of free radicals released in the LDPE matrix could significantly increase the degree of crosslinking. The addition of copper(II) oxide could reduce the tensile strength and fracture strain (elongation at break) of LDPE composites because of poorer interfacial adhesion effect between copper(II) oxide particles and LDPE matrix. Meanwhile, increasing irradiation doses on all copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites could marginally increase the tensile strength. In addition, increasing irradiation dose could enhance the thermal stability of LDPE composites by increasing the decomposition temperature. The oxidation induction time (OIT) analysis showed that, because of the crosslinking network in the copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites, oxidation reaction is much delayed.

  7. Interaction of complexes I, III, and IV within the bovine respirasome by single particle cryoelectron tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Stahlberg, Henning; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2011-01-01

    The respirasome is a multisubunit supercomplex of the respiratory chain in mitochondria. Here we report the 3D reconstruction of the bovine heart respirasome, composed of dimeric complex III and single copies of complex I and IV, at about 2.2-nm resolution, determined by cryoelectron tomography and

  8. Distribution and mobility of exogenous copper as influenced by aging and components interactions in three Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hanzhi; Li, Qi; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Copper contamination of soils is a global environmental problem. Soil components (organic matter, clay minerals, and microorganisms) and retention time can govern the adsorption, fixation, and distribution of copper. This study evaluated the interaction effects of soil components and aging on the distribution of exogenous copper. Three typical Chinese soils (Ultisol, Alfisol, and Histosol) were collected from Hunan, Henan, and Heilongjiang Provinces. Soils were incubated with rice straw (RS) and engineered bacteria (Pseudomonas putida X4/pIME) in the presence of exogenous copper for 12 months. Sequential extraction was employed to obtain the distribution of Cu species in soils, and the mobility factors of Cu were calculated. The relationships between soil properties and Cu fractions were analyzed with stepwise multiple linear regression. The results show that organic carbon plays a more important role in shaping the distribution of relatively mobile Cu, and iron oxides can be more critical in stabilizing Cu species in soils. Our results suggest that organic matter is the most important factor influencing copper partitioning in Ultisols, while iron oxides are more significant in Alfisols. The mobility of exogenous Cu in soils depends largely on organic carbon, amorphous Fe, and aging. The introduction of both rice straw and rice straw + engineered bacteria enhanced the stabilization of Cu in all the three soils during aging process. The introduction of bacteria could reduce copper mobility, which was indicated by the lowest mobility factors of Cu for the treatment with bacteria in Black, Red, and Cinnamon soils at the first 4, 8, and 8 months, respectively. Different measures should be taken into account regarding the content of organic matter and iron oxides depending on soil types for the risk assessment and remediation of Cu-contaminated soils.

  9. Subacute toxicity of copper and glyphosate and their interaction to earthworm (Eisenia fetida)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chui-Fan; Wang, Yu-Jun; Li, Cheng-Cheng; Sun, Rui-Juan; Yu, Yuan-Chun; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate (GPS) and copper (Cu) are common pollutants in soils, and commonly co-exist. Due to the chemical structure of GPS, it can form complexes of heavy metals and interface their bioavailability in soil environment. In order to explore the interactions between GPS and Cu, subacute toxicity tests of Cu and GPS on soil invertebrate earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were conducted. The relative weight loss and whole-worm metal burdens increased significantly with the increasing exposure concentration of Cu, while the toxicity of GPS was insignificant. The joint toxicity data showed that the relative weight loss and the uptake of Cu, as well as the superoxide dismutase, catalase and malondialdehyde activities, were significantly alleviated in the present of GPS, which indicated that GPS could reduce the toxicity and bioavailability of Cu in the soil because of its strong chelating effects. Highlights: •Cu markedly increased the weight loss ratio of earthworm. •Cu decreased the cocoon production of earthworm. •The toxicity of GPS on earthworm was insignificant. •The presence of GPS could reduce the toxicity of Cu on earthworm. -- The presence of glyphosate could reduce the toxicity and bioavailability of Cu in the soil because of its strong chelating effects

  10. Research of leaching of disseminated copper-nickel ores in their interaction with mine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlov A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A great amount of mine waste creates serious problems for economy and ecology in mining regions. Keeping of dumps and tailings storages requires huge capital costs and material inputs. Removal of overburden volumes cause ecological disequilibrium, ingress of chemical agents and heavy metals in ground and surface water have an adverse influence on eco-systems and human health. These hazards are particularly high under extreme climatic conditions, when mines create vast desert lands around themselves. Foreign researchers use the terms "acid mine drainage" (AМD and "acid rock drainage" (ARD when speaking on mine water oxidation and contamination of the environment with heavy metals. AMD is induced by underground mine drainage, natural sulfide-bearing rock exposures, etc. The processes occurring in the interaction the mine water with fine dust particles, as well as water filtering through the thick sulfide rocks have been studied. It has been shown that the reduction in potential environmental hazard of mine water of JSC "Kola MMC" is achieved through precipitation of heavy metals by iron hydroxide and magnesium hydrosilicate. Preliminary assessment of the feasibility of hydrometallurgical processing of disseminated copper-nickel ores has been made

  11. Metal-macrofauna interactions determine microbial community structure and function in copper contaminated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Daniel J; Gray, Nia B; Elver-Evans, Joanna; Midwood, Andrew J; Thornton, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Copper is essential for healthy cellular functioning, but this heavy metal quickly becomes toxic when supply exceeds demand. Marine sediments receive widespread and increasing levels of copper contamination from antifouling paints owing to the 2008 global ban of organotin-based products. The toxicity of copper will increase in the coming years as seawater pH decreases and temperature increases. We used a factorial mesocosm experiment to investigate how increasing sediment copper concentrations and the presence of a cosmopolitan bioturbating amphipod, Corophium volutator, affected a range of ecosystem functions in a soft sediment microbial community. The effects of copper on benthic nutrient release, bacterial biomass, microbial community structure and the isotopic composition of individual microbial membrane [phospholipid] fatty acids (PLFAs) all differed in the presence of C. volutator. Our data consistently demonstrate that copper contamination of global waterways will have pervasive effects on the metabolic functioning of benthic communities that cannot be predicted from copper concentrations alone; impacts will depend upon the resident macrofauna and their capacity for bioturbation. This finding poses a major challenge for those attempting to manage the impacts of copper contamination on ecosystem services, e.g. carbon and nutrient cycling, across different habitats. Our work also highlights the paucity of information on the processes that result in isotopic fractionation in natural marine microbial communities. We conclude that the assimilative capacity of benthic microbes will become progressively impaired as copper concentrations increase. These effects will, to an extent, be mitigated by the presence of bioturbating animals and possibly other processes that increase the influx of oxygenated seawater into the sediments. Our findings support the move towards an ecosystem approach for environmental management.

  12. Metal-macrofauna interactions determine microbial community structure and function in copper contaminated sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Mayor

    Full Text Available Copper is essential for healthy cellular functioning, but this heavy metal quickly becomes toxic when supply exceeds demand. Marine sediments receive widespread and increasing levels of copper contamination from antifouling paints owing to the 2008 global ban of organotin-based products. The toxicity of copper will increase in the coming years as seawater pH decreases and temperature increases. We used a factorial mesocosm experiment to investigate how increasing sediment copper concentrations and the presence of a cosmopolitan bioturbating amphipod, Corophium volutator, affected a range of ecosystem functions in a soft sediment microbial community. The effects of copper on benthic nutrient release, bacterial biomass, microbial community structure and the isotopic composition of individual microbial membrane [phospholipid] fatty acids (PLFAs all differed in the presence of C. volutator. Our data consistently demonstrate that copper contamination of global waterways will have pervasive effects on the metabolic functioning of benthic communities that cannot be predicted from copper concentrations alone; impacts will depend upon the resident macrofauna and their capacity for bioturbation. This finding poses a major challenge for those attempting to manage the impacts of copper contamination on ecosystem services, e.g. carbon and nutrient cycling, across different habitats. Our work also highlights the paucity of information on the processes that result in isotopic fractionation in natural marine microbial communities. We conclude that the assimilative capacity of benthic microbes will become progressively impaired as copper concentrations increase. These effects will, to an extent, be mitigated by the presence of bioturbating animals and possibly other processes that increase the influx of oxygenated seawater into the sediments. Our findings support the move towards an ecosystem approach for environmental management.

  13. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  14. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality

  15. Characterization of aqueous interactions of copper-doped phosphate-based glasses by vapour sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Christoph; Shah Mohammadi, Maziar; Waters, Kristian E; Nazhat, Showan N

    2014-07-01

    Owing to their adjustable dissolution properties, phosphate-based glasses (PGs) are promising materials for the controlled release of bioinorganics, such as copper ions. This study describes a vapour sorption method that allowed for the investigation of the kinetics and mechanisms of aqueous interactions of PGs of the formulation 50P2O5-30CaO-(20-x)Na2O-xCuO (x=0, 1, 5 and 10mol.%). Initial characterization was performed using (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Increasing CuO content resulted in chemical shifts of the predominant Q(2) NMR peak and of the (POP)as and (PO(-)) Fourier transform infrared absorptions, owing to the higher strength of the POCu bond compared to PONa. Vapour sorption and desorption were gravimetrically measured in PG powders exposed to variable relative humidity (RH). Sorption was negligible below 70% RH and increased exponentially with RH from 70 to 90%, where it exhibited a negative correlation with CuO content. Vapour sorption in 0% and 1% CuO glasses resulted in phosphate chain hydration and hydrolysis, as evidenced by protonated Q(0)(1H) and Q(1)(1H) species. Dissolution rates in deionized water showed a linear correlation (R(2)>0.99) with vapour sorption. Furthermore, cation release rates could be predicted based on dissolution rates and PG composition. The release of orthophosphate and short polyphosphate species corroborates the action of hydrolysis and was correlated with pH changes. In conclusion, the agreement between vapour sorption and routine characterization techniques in water demonstrates the potential of this method for the study of PG aqueous reactions. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Interaction among the trace elements zinc, copper and iron after depletion and repletion of dairy cows with zinc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, M; Schwarz, F J; Roth, H P; Schwarz, W A

    1978-12-01

    Imbalances in the supply with trace elements may be caused by the excessive administration of one or several elements or the insufficient administration in relation to other trace elements. This article deals with the interactions between the trace elements zinc and copper resp. zinc and iron under the conditions of the insufficient supply with Zn (6 mg per kg dry matter of the fodder) and the supply according to the demand with other trace elements (14 mg copper resp. 83 mg iron per dry matter of the fodder). For this purpose we investigated the copper, iron and zinc content of the milk and the serum of cows that were first depleted of zinc through a semi-synthetic zinc deficiency diet and then repleted with extra allowances of zinc. The closest connections exist between the copper and zinc content of the milk. Thus extreme Zn-deficiency feeding conditions the decreased Zn-content on the one hand and increased Cu-content on the other. In contrast to this, the cows' Zn-excretion in the milk increases after Zn-repletion whereas the Cu-content decreases. This shows a distinctly negative correlation. A loose connection could only be detected for the Cu- and Zn-content of the serum. Though the Zn-content changed considerably in dependence on the Zn-supply, the Cu-content remained largely uninfluenced. The Fe-content of both milk and serum shows no interaction with the nutritive Zn-supply. Only after 19 test weeks of extreme Zn-deficiency could a slight increase of the Fe-concentration be indicated.

  17. First-principles surface interaction studies of aluminum-copper and aluminum-copper-magnesium secondary phases in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Thiago H.; Nelson, Eric B.; Williamson, Izaak; Efaw, Corey M.; Sapper, Erik; Hurley, Michael F.; Li, Lan

    2018-05-01

    First-principles density functional theory-based calculations were performed to study θ-phase Al2Cu, S-phase Al2CuMg surface stability, as well as their interactions with water molecules and chloride (Cl-) ions. These secondary phases are commonly found in aluminum-based alloys and are initiation points for localized corrosion. Density functional theory (DFT)-based simulations provide insight into the origins of localized (pitting) corrosion processes of aluminum-based alloys. For both phases studied, Cl- ions cause atomic distortions on the surface layers. The nature of the distortions could be a factor to weaken the interlayer bonds in the Al2Cu and Al2CuMg secondary phases, facilitating the corrosion process. Electronic structure calculations revealed not only electron charge transfer from Cl- ions to alloy surface but also electron sharing, suggesting ionic and covalent bonding features, respectively. The S-phase Al2CuMg structure has a more active surface than the θ-phase Al2Cu. We also found a higher tendency of formation of new species, such as Al3+, Al(OH)2+, HCl, AlCl2+, Al(OH)Cl+, and Cl2 on the S-phase Al2CuMg surface. Surface chemical reactions and resultant species present contribute to establishment of local surface chemistry that influences the corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys.

  18. Interaction of copper metallization with rare-earth metals and silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, G. L.; Peto, G.; Zsoldos, E.; Horvath, Z. E.

    2001-01-01

    Solid-phase reactions of copper films with underlying gadolinium, erbium, and erbium - silicide layers on Si(100) substrates were investigated. For the phase analysis, x-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy were used. In the case of Cu/Gd/Si(100), an orthorhombic GdSi 2 formed, and, at higher temperatures, copper aggregated into islands. Annealed Cu/Er/Si(100) samples resulted in a hexagonal Er 5 Si 3 phase. In the Cu/ErSi 2-x /Si system, the copper catalyzes the transformation of the highly oriented hexagonal ErSi 2-x phase into hexagonal Er 5 Si 3 . Diverse phase developments of the samples with Gd and Er are based on reactivity differences of the two rare-earth metals. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  19. Characterization of chemical interactions during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Mahn

    2003-10-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) has received much attention as an unique technique to provide a wafer level planarization in semiconductor manufacturing. However, despite the extensive use of CMP, it still remains one of the least understood areas in semiconductor processing. The lack of the fundamental understanding is a significant barrier to further advancements in CMP technology. One critical aspect of metal CMP is the formation of a thin surface layer on the metal surface. The formation and removal of this layer controls all the aspects of the CMP process, including removal rate, surface finish, etc. In this dissertation, we focus on the characterization of the formation and removal of the thin surface layer on the copper surface. The formation dynamics was investigated using static and dynamic electrochemical techniques, including potentiodynamic scans and chronoamperometry. The results were validated using XPS measurements. The mechanical properties of the surface layer were investigated using nanoindentation measurements. The electrochemical investigation showed that the thickness of the surface layer is controlled by the chemicals such as an oxidizer (hydrogen peroxide), a corrosion inhibitor (benzotriazole), a complexing agent (citric acid), and their concentrations. The dynamic electrochemical measurements indicated that the initial layer formation kinetics is unaffected by the corrosion inhibitors. The passivation due to the corrosion inhibitor becomes important only on large time scales (>200 millisecond). The porosity and the density of the chemically modified surface layer can be affected by additives of other chemicals such as citric acid. An optimum density of the surface layer is required for high polishing rate while at the same time maintaining a high degree of surface finish. Nanoindentation measurements indicated that the mechanical properties of the surface layer are strongly dependent on the chemical additives in the slurry. The CMP

  20. IVS Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  1. On the interaction of granite with Tc(IV) and Tc(VII) in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Cui, Daquing

    1991-10-01

    The behaviour of technetium in granite-groundwater systems under reducing conditions was investigated. The anion TcO 4 - was reduced to Tc(IV) and simultaneously precipitated as TcO 2 xnH 2 O on the granite surfaces. The electron sources are assumed to be iron oxides and/or iron containing minerals in the granite. The technetium concentration in ground water under repository conditions may be predicted assuming TcO 2 xnH 2 O as the solid phase and TcO(OH) 2 0 and TcO 4 - as the predominant aqueous complexes using a formation constant for TcO(OH) 2 0 of log K = -8.16 and a standard reduction potential E 0 for the reaction TcO 4 - + 3e - + 4H + = TcO 2 xnH 2 O of 0.738 V. The surface related distribution ratio K a for TcO(OH) 2 0 between Stripa granite and ground water is approximately 1 cm based on geometrical surface area. (au)

  2. Synthesis and characterization of nickel(II), cobalt(II), copper(II), manganese(II), zinc(II), zirconium(IV), dioxouranium(VI) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes of a new Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and 5-methylpyrazole-3-carbohydrazide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamal, A.; Maurya, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Synthesis of a new Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and 5-methylpyrazole-3-carbohydrazide, and its coordination compounds with nickel(II), cobalt(II), copper(II), manganese(II), zinc(II), zirconium(IV), dioxouranium(VI) and dioxomolybdenum(VI) are described. The ligand and the complexes have been characterized on the basis of analytical, conductance, molecular weight, i.r., electronic and n.m.r. spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The stoichiometries of the complexes are represented as NiL . 3H 2 O, CoL . 2H 2 O, CuL, MnL . 2H 2 O, ZnL . H 2 O, Zr(OH) 2 (LH) 2 , Zr(OH) 2 L . 2MeOH, UO 2 L . MeOH and MoO 2 L . MeOH (where LH 2 =Schiff base). The copper(II) complex shows a subnormal magnetic moment due to antiferromagnetic exchange interaction while the nickel(II), cobalt(II) and manganese(II) complexes show normal magnetic moments at room temperature. The i.r. and n.m.r. spectral studies show that the Schiff base behaves as a dibasic and tridentate ligand coordinating through the deprotonated phenolic oxygen, enolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. (orig.)

  3. Geometry and Framework Interactions of Zeolite-Encapsulated Copper(II)-Histidine Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Grommen, R.; Manikandan, P.; Gao, Y.; Shane, T.; Shane, J.J.; Schoonheydt, R.A.; Goldfarb, D.

    2000-01-01

    The coordination geometry of zeolite-encapsulated copper(II)-histidine (CuHis) complexes, prepared by ion exchange of the complexes from aqueous solutions into zeolite NaY, was determined by a combination of UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-band EPR, electron-spin-echo envelope

  4. Probing the Intramolecular Metal-Selenoether Interaction in a Bis(iminosemiquinone) copper(II) Compound

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubrin, M.; Paretzki, A.; Hübner, R.; Beyer, K.; Schwederski, B.; Neugebauer, P.; Záliš, Stanislav; Kaim, W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 643, č. 21 (2017), s. 1621-1627 ISSN 0044-2313 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LTC17052 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : EPR spectroscopy * Molecular structure * Selenium ligand * Spectroelectrochemistry * Copper Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.144, year: 2016

  5. Kinetic investigation of myeloperoxidase upon interaction with copper, cadmium, and lead ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabani, M.; Ani, M.; Movahedian, A.; Samsam Shariat, Z. A.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase, which is abundantly expressed in neutrophils, catalyzes the formation of a number of reactive oxidant species. However, evidence has emerged that Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage and initiation and propagation of inflammatory diseases, particularly, cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, studying the regulatory mechanisms of the enzyme activity is of great importance. For clarifying some possible mechanism of the enzyme activity, kinetic investigations of Myeloperoxidase in the presence of Copper, Cadmium, and Lead ions were carried out in vitro. Methods: Myeloperoxidase was partially purified from human white blood cells using ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography techniques. Its activity was measured spectrophotometrically by using tetramethyl benzidine as substrate. Results: Purified enzyme had a specific activity of 21.7 U/mg protein with a purity index of about 0.71. Copper inhibited Myeloperoxidase activity progressively up to a concentration of 60 m M at which about 80% of inhibition achieved. The inhibition was non-competitive with respect to tetramethyl benzidine. An inhibitory constant (Ki) of about 19 m M was calculated from the slope of repot. Cadmium and Lead did not show any significant inhibitory effect on the enzyme activity. Conclusion: The results of the present study may indicate that there are some places on the enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex for Copper ions. Binding of Copper ions to these places result in conformational changes of the enzyme and thus, enzyme inhibition. This inhibitory effect of Copper on the enzyme activity might be considered as a regulatory mechanism on Myeloperoxidase activity.

  6. Layered vanadyl (IV) nitroprusside: Magnetic interaction through a network of hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.M. [Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Osiry, H. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Pomiro, F.; Varetti, E.L. [CEQUINOR (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 and 115, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC – CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre esq, Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Alejandro, R.R. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Ben Altabef, A. [INQUINOA-UNT-CONICET, Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); and others

    2016-07-15

    The hydrogen bond and π-π stacking are two non-covalent interactions able to support cooperative magnetic ordering between paramagnetic centers. This contribution reports the crystal structure and related magnetic properties for VO[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, which has a layered structure. This solid crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell, in the Pna2{sub 1} space group, with cell parameters a=14.1804(2), b=10.4935(1), c=7.1722(8) Å and four molecules per unit cell (Z=4). Its crystal structure was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Neighboring layers remain linked through a network of hydrogen bonds involving a water molecule coordinated to the axial position for the V atom and the unbridged axial NO and CN ligands. An uncoordinated water molecule is found forming a triple bridge between these last two ligands and the coordinated water molecule. The magnetic measurements, recorded down to 2 K, shows a ferromagnetic interaction between V atoms located at neighboring layers, with a Curie-Weiss constant of 3.14 K. Such ferromagnetic behavior was interpreted as resulting from a superexchange interaction through the network of strong OH····O{sub H2O}, OH····N{sub CN}, and OH····O{sub NO} hydrogen bonds that connects neighboring layers. The interaction within the layer must be of antiferromagnetic nature and it was detected close to 2 K. - Graphical abstract: Coordination environment for the metals in vanadyl (II) nitroprusside dihydrate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystal structure of vanadyl nitroprusside dehydrate. • Network of hydrogen bonds. • Magnetic interactions through a network of hydrogen bonds. • Layered transition metal nitroprussides.

  7. Investigations of the interactions of silicon dioxide with copper-aluminum alloy used as an adhesion promoter and diffusion barrier for copper metallization on silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-I.

    This study explores the concept of alloying copper with Al in order to impart properties that will make Cu useful for interconnect applications in ICs. The advantages of using Al as the alloying element lies in the thermodynamically favored interaction of Al with the underlying dielectric and with the O 2 at the surface of pure Cu thus achieving both the adhesion and passivation. This approach has been shown to generate an ultra thin interfacial layer, which acts as an adhesion promoter and diffusion barrier against Cu migration in the dielectric, without significantly affecting the resistivity of Cu. An emphasis has been placed to examine (a) the interaction of Al (from the Cu-Al alloy) with SiO2 at the alloy-SiO2 interface, (b) the Al migration to surface of the alloy or pure Cu if used, and (c) the impact of such migration on the bulk Cu film and passivation on the surface. In this work, sputtered Cu-Al (1--5 at%), with a resistivity in the range of 5--6 muO-cm, were studied as diffusion barriers/adhesion promoters between SiO2 and pure Cu. The films were examined in as-deposited state and after anneal at different temperatures for varying times and in different ambients by the use of surface and interface characterization techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and resistance measurements together with metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor studies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were also used to elucidate the structure. The results elucidate the mechanisms of Al movement and interaction with the interface SiO2 and O2 on surface and indicate that films of Cu doped with Al do act as a suitable diffusion barrier and adhesion promoter between SiO2 and Cu.

  8. Interactions of cadmium with copper, zinc, and iron in different organs and tissues of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julshamn, K.; Utne, F.; Brackkan, O.R.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of cadmium on tissue concentrations of iron, zinc and copper was studied in male rats. Two littermate groups were fed a stock diet with or without a supplement of 100 ..mu..g cadmium per g. Every three weeks ten animals from each group were sampled and the liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen, testes, muscle, fur, feces and urine were individually analyzed. Except for the fur, all the other organs showed highly significantly increased levels of cadmium when compared with the control group. The iron levels were significantly depressed in all organs. As the content in the feces remained unchanged and the urinary excretion showed an increase, it could be concluded that the cadmium supplementation resulted in a depletion of the body stores of iron. The zinc levels showed a significant increase in the liver and testes and a correspondingly significant decrease in the spleen. The levels of copper generally showed no significant changes.

  9. Applicability of soil-structure interaction analysis methods for earthquake loadings (IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S. P.; Ko, H. M.; Kim, J. K.; Yoon, J. Y.; Chin, B. M.; Yang, T. S.; Park, D. H.; Chung, W.; Park, J. Y.

    1996-07-01

    The ultimate goals of this research are to cultivate the capability of accurate SSI analysis and to develop the effective soil-structure interaction analysis method and computer program by comparing analysis results obtained in Lotung/Hualien LSST project. In this research, computer analysis program using hyper element was developed to analyze the forced vibration test and seismic test of the on-going Hualien LSST project. Prediction analysis and post-prediction analysis for Hualien LSST forced vibration and seismic response were executed by developed program. Thus this report is mainly composed of two parts. One is the summary of theoretical background of hyper element and the other is prediction analysis and post-prediction analysis results for Hualien LSST forced vibration and seismic response tests executed by developed program. Also, a coupling method of hyper element and generalized three-dimensional finite element or general axisymmetric finite element was presented for the further development of computer analysis program related to three dimensional hybrid soil-structure interaction and for the verification, the dynamic stiffness' of rigid circular /rectangular foundation are calculated. It is confirmed that program using hyper element is efficient and practical because it can consider non-homogeneity easily and execute the analysis in short time by using analytic solution m horizontal direction

  10. Interaction between graphene and copper substrate: The role of lattice orientation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Vejpravová, Jana; Holý, V.; Kavan, Ladislav; Kalbáč, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, MAR 2014 (2014), s. 440-451 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1677; GA MŠk LL1301; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11012 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Copper single crystals * Direct examinations * Fermi-level shifts Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 6.196, year: 2014

  11. (NH4)[V1-xIIIVxIV(AsO4)F1-xOx]: A new mixed valence vanadium(III,IV) fluoro-arsenate with ferromagnetic interactions and electronic conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrocal, Teresa; Mesa, Jose L.; Pizarro, Jose L.; Bazan, Begona; Ruiz de Larramendi, Idoia; Arriortua, Maria I.; Rojo, Teofilo

    2009-01-01

    A new mixed valence vanadium(III,IV) fluoro-arsenate compound, with formula (NH 4 )[V 1-x III V x IV (AsO 4 )F 1-x O x ] and KTP structure-type, has been synthesized by mild hydrothermal techniques. The crystal structure has been solved from single crystal X-ray diffraction data in the Pna2 1 orthorhombic space group. The unit-cell parameters are a=13.196(2) A, b=6.628(1) A and c=10.7379(7) A with Z=8. The final R factors were R1=0.0438 and wR2=0.0943 [all data]. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional framework formed by (V III,IV O 4 F 2 ) octahedra and (AsO 4 ) 3- tetrahedra arsenate oxoanions. The vanadium(III,IV) cations, from the (V III,IV O 4 F 2 ) octahedra, are linked through the fluorine atoms giving rise to zigzag chains. The ammonium cations are located in the cavities of the structure compensating the anionic charge of the [V 1-x III V x IV (AsO 4 )F 1-x O x ] - inorganic skeleton. The thermal stability limit of the phase is 345 deg. C, around to this temperature the ammonium cation and fluoride anion are lost. The IR spectrum shows the characteristic bands of the (NH 4 ) + and (AsO 4 ) 3- ions. Magnetic measurements indicate the existence of weak ferromagnetic interactions. Electronic conductivity, via a hopping mechanism, occurs with an activation energy of 0.66 eV. - Graphical abstract: Polyhedral view of the crystal structure of (NH 4 )[V III 1-x V IV x (AsO 4 )F 1-x O x

  12. Type IV pilins regulate their own expression via direct intramembrane interactions with the sensor kinase PilS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmury, Sara L N; Burrows, Lori L

    2016-05-24

    Type IV pili are important virulence factors for many pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcription of the major pilin gene-pilA-is controlled by the PilS-PilR two-component system in response to unknown signals. The absence of a periplasmic sensing domain suggested that PilS may sense an intramembrane signal, possibly PilA. We suggest that direct interactions between PilA and PilS in the inner membrane reduce pilA transcription when PilA levels are high. Overexpression in trans of PilA proteins with diverse and/or truncated C termini decreased native pilA transcription, suggesting that the highly conserved N terminus of PilA was the regulatory signal. Point mutations in PilA or PilS that disrupted their interaction prevented autoregulation of pilA transcription. A subset of PilA point mutants retained the ability to interact with PilS but could no longer decrease pilA transcription, suggesting that interaction between the pilin and sensor kinase is necessary but not sufficient for pilA autoregulation. Furthermore, PilS's phosphatase motif was required for the autoregulation of pilA transcription, suggesting that under conditions where PilA is abundant, the PilA-PilS interaction promotes PilR dephosphorylation and thus down-regulation of further pilA transcription. These data reveal a clever bacterial inventory control strategy in which the major subunit of an important P. aeruginosa virulence factor controls its own expression.

  13. Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and hafnium(IV) complexes of N'-(furan-3-ylmethylene)-2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)acetohydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Sanaa M; El-Saied, Fathy A; Abou El-Enein, Saeyda A; El-Shater, Heba A

    2009-03-01

    Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and hafnium(IV) complexes of furan-2-carbaldehyde 4-methoxy-N-anilinoacetohydrazone were synthesized and characterized by elemental and thermal (TG and DTA) analyses, IR, UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectra as well as magnetic moment and molar conductivity. Mononuclear complexes are obtained with 1:1 molar ratio except complexes 3 and 9 which are obtained with 1:2 molar ratios. The IR spectra of ligand and metal complexes reveal various modes of chelation. The ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate one and coordination occurs via the carbonyl oxygen atom and azomethine nitrogen atom. The ligand behaves also as a monobasic tridentate one and coordination occurs through the enolic oxygen atom, azomethine nitrogen atom and the oxygen atom of furan ring. Moreover, the ligand behaves as a neutral tridentate and coordination occurs via the carbonyl oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and furan oxygen atoms as well as a monobasic bidentate and coordination occurs via the enolic oxygen atom and azomethine nitrogen atom. The electronic spectra and magnetic moment measurements reveal that all complexes possess octahedral geometry except the copper complex 10 possesses a square planar geometry. The thermal studies showed the type of water molecules involved in metal complexes as well as the thermal decomposition of some metal complexes.

  14. Trace elements studies on Karachi population part IV: blood copper, zinc, magnesium and lead levels in psychiatric patients with depression, mental retardation and seizure disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manser, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    Blood copper, zinc, magnesium and lead levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy for 15 males and 16 female suffering from depression, 6 males and 1 female with mental retardation and 3 males and 4 females with seizure disorders. They were all under no medication and belong to low income groups. No difference in copper levels was found between the sexes in any of the groups. The levels in all the groups were significantly higher than in the normals. In depressives, males had significantly higher zinc levels than females and only female depressives had lower levels from normals. In both depressives and normals, males had higher magnesium levels than females but no group of patients had significantly different levels from normals. Lead levels were significantly higher in female depressives and for those with seizure disorders than for controls. At least one metal abnormality was found in 21 (67.7%) depressive, 5 (71.4%) of those with mental retardation and 6 (85.7%) with seizure disorders. (author)

  15. Evaluation of toxic and interactive toxic effects of three agrochemicals and copper using a battery of microbiotests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungolos, A; Emmanouil, C; Tsiridis, V; Tsiropoulos, N

    2009-08-01

    Three commonly used test organisms of different trophic levels (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) were exposed to selected agrochemicals (fosthiazate, metalaxyl-M, imidacloprid) and copper, in single doses or in binary mixtures. The toxicity of each single compound varied up to two orders of magnitude, depending on the test species examined. V. fischeri was the most sensitive test organism regarding fosthiazate and metalaxyl-M, indicating an IC(50) value of 0.20 mg/L (0.17-0.25 mg/L) and 0.88 mg/L (0.35-1.57 mg/L), respectively. Imidacloprid was the least toxic compound, indicating an EC(50) value on D. magna of 64.6 mg/L (43.3-122.5 mg/L) and an IC(50) value on V. fischeri of 226 mg/L (159-322 mg/L), while for imidacloprid at a concentration of 1000 mg/L the effect on P. subcapitata was lower than 50%. Copper was the most toxic compound towards all test organisms exhibiting the highest toxic effect on P. subcapitata, with an IC(50) value of 0.05 mg/L (0.003-0.008 mg/L). The toxic effects of the binary mixtures have been compared to the theoretically expected effect, resulting from a simple mathematical model based on the theory of probabilities. The independent action model was used in order to predict the theoretically expected effect. The interactive effects were mostly antagonistic or additive, while in few cases (interactive effects of metalaxyl-M and copper on V. fischeri) a synergistic mode of action was observed for some concentration combinations. Experiments showed that interactive effects of chemicals may vary depending on the test species used as well as on the chemicals and their respective concentrations. Although most of the concentrations of chemicals tested in this study are higher than the ones usually found in natural environment, the evaluation of their interactive toxic effects using a battery of bioassays may comprise a useful tool for the estimation of the environmental hazard of chemicals.

  16. Interaction of copper with dinitrogen tetroxide in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I V; Deeva, E B; Glazunova, T Yu; Troyanov, S I; Guseinov, F I; Kustov, L M

    2017-03-27

    Ionic liquids that are stable toward oxidation and nitration and are based on the 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation (BMIm + ) can be used as solvents and reaction media for copper dissolution in liquid dinitrogen tetraoxide N 2 O 4 . The ionic liquid not only favors the dissociation of N 2 O 4 into NO + and NO 3 - , but also takes part in the formation of different crystalline products. Thus, NO[BF 4 ], NO[Cu(NO 3 ) 3 ] and (BMIm) 2 [Cu 2 (CF 3 COO) 6 ] were prepared using (BMIm)A, A - = [BF 4 ] - , (CF 3 SO 2 ) 2 N - , CF 3 COO - , respectively. The formation of a certain product is determined by the nature of the anion A - and the relative solubility of the reaction products in the ionic liquid. Crystals of NO[BF 4 ] were also prepared directly from a mixture of N 2 O 4 and BMImBF 4 . According to XRD single-crystal structure analysis, the structure of NO[BF 4 ] consists of tetrahedral [BF 4 ] - anions and nitrosonium NO + cations; the formation of these ions prove the heterolytic dissociation of N 2 O 4 dissolved in the ionic liquid. The crystal structure of the earlier unknown binuclear copper trifluoroacetate (BMIm) 2 [Cu 2 (CF 3 COO) 6 ] were determined by X-ray diffraction. The peculiarity of this dimer compared to the majority of known dimeric copper(ii) carboxylates is the unusually long CuCu distance (3.15 Å), with Cu(ii) ions demonstrating an atypical coordination of a distorted trigonal bipyramid formed by five O atoms of five trifluoroacetate groups.

  17. Symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster studies of electronically excited states of copper tetrachloride and copper tetrabromide dianions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Piecuch, Piotr; Lutz, Jesse J.; Gour, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electronically excited states of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- are determined using the scalar relativistic symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster calculations. The results are compared with experimental spectra. Highlights: ► Electronic spectra of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- are examined by SAC-CI and EOMCC methods. ► Relativistic SAC-CI and EOMCC results are compared with experimental spectra. ► An assignment of bands in the CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- absorption spectra is obtained. ► Relativistic effects affect excitation energies and ground-state geometries. ► The effect of relativity on the oscillator strengths is generally small. - Abstract: The valence excitation spectra of the copper tetrachloride and copper tetrabromide open-shell dianions, CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- , respectively, are investigated by a variety of symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction (SAC-CI) and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods. The valence excited states of the CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- species that correspond to transitions from doubly occupied molecular orbitals (MOs) to a singly occupied MO (SOMO), for which experimental spectra are available, are examined with the ionized (IP) variants of the SAC-CI and EOMCC methods. The higher-energy excited states of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- that correspond to transitions from SOMO to unoccupied MOs, which have not been characterized experimentally, are determined using the electron-attached (EA) SAC-CI and EOMCC approaches. An emphasis is placed on the scalar relativistic SAC-CI and EOMCC calculations based on the spin-free part of the second-order Douglass–Kroll–Hess Hamiltonian (DKH2) and on a comparison of the results of the IP and EA SAC-CI and EOMCC calculations with up to 2-hole-1-particle (2h-1p) and 2-particle-1-hole (2p-1h) excitations, referred to as the IP-SAC-CI SD-R and IP-EOMCCSD(2h-1p) methods in the IP case and EA-SAC-CI SD-R and EA

  18. Interaction of a laser-produced copper plasma jet with ambient plastic plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Gus’kov, S.Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 9 (2011), 095003-095003 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser produced-plasma jets * PALS laser * laser ablation * copper plasma * plastic plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/9/095003/pdf/0741-3335_53_9_095003.pdf

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of the Adducts of Morpholinedithioccarbamate Complexes of Oxovanadium (IV, Nickel(II, and Copper(II with Piperidine and Morpholine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousami Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1:1 adducts of bis(morpholinedithiocarbamato complex of VO(IV, 1:1 and 1:2 adducts of bis(morpholinedithiocarbamato complexes of Ni(II and Cu(II with piperidine and morpholine have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis, and TGA/DTA techniques. Analytical data reveals that VO(IV complex forms only 1:1 adducts with the formula [VO(morphdtc2L].H2O while Ni(II and Cu(II complexes form both 1:1 and 1:2 adducts with 1:1 adducts having general formula Ni(morphdtc2.L and Cu(morphdtc2.L and 1:2 adducts having general formula Ni(morphdtc2.L2 and Cu(morphdtc2.L2 (morphdtc = morpholinedithiocarbamate, L = morpholine and piperidine. Antifungal activity of some complexes has been carried out against the fungal strain Fusarium oxysporium. Thermal studies indicate a continuous weight loss. A square pyramidal geometry has been proposed for the 1:1 adducts of Ni(II and Cu(II complexes while an octahedral geometry has been proposed for the 1:1 adducts of VO(IV and for the 1:2 adducts of Ni(II and Cu(II complexes.

  20. The tarantula toxins ProTx-II and huwentoxin-IV differentially interact with human Nav1.7 voltage sensors to inhibit channel activation and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yucheng; Blumenthal, Kenneth; Jackson, James O; Liang, Songping; Cummins, Theodore R

    2010-12-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7 plays a crucial role in pain, and drugs that inhibit hNa(v)1.7 may have tremendous therapeutic potential. ProTx-II and huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), cystine knot peptides from tarantula venoms, preferentially block hNa(v)1.7. Understanding the interactions of these toxins with sodium channels could aid the development of novel pain therapeutics. Whereas both ProTx-II and HWTX-IV have been proposed to preferentially block hNa(v)1.7 activation by trapping the domain II voltage-sensor in the resting configuration, we show that specific residues in the voltage-sensor paddle of domain II play substantially different roles in determining the affinities of these toxins to hNa(v)1.7. The mutation E818C increases ProTx-II's and HWTX-IV's IC(50) for block of hNa(v)1.7 currents by 4- and 400-fold, respectively. In contrast, the mutation F813G decreases ProTx-II affinity by 9-fold but has no effect on HWTX-IV affinity. It is noteworthy that we also show that ProTx-II, but not HWTX-IV, preferentially interacts with hNa(v)1.7 to impede fast inactivation by trapping the domain IV voltage-sensor in the resting configuration. Mutations E1589Q and T1590K in domain IV each decreased ProTx-II's IC(50) for impairment of fast inactivation by ~6-fold. In contrast mutations D1586A and F1592A in domain-IV increased ProTx-II's IC(50) for impairment of fast inactivation by ~4-fold. Our results show that whereas ProTx-II and HWTX-IV binding determinants on domain-II may overlap, domain II plays a much more crucial role for HWTX-IV, and contrary to what has been proposed to be a guiding principle of sodium channel pharmacology, molecules do not have to exclusively target the domain IV voltage-sensor to influence sodium channel inactivation.

  1. Study of interaction of bismuth, strontium, calcium copper, lead nitrates solutions with sodium oxalate solution with the aim of HTSC synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, V.P.; Krasnobaeva, O.N.; Nosova, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    With the aim of developing a new technique for HTSC oxides synthesis on the base of combined sedimentation of hydroxy salts and their heat treatment is studied interaction of bismuth, strontium, calcium, copper and lead nitrates with alkali solution of sodium oxalate. Conditions for total sedimentation of all five metals from the solution are found. The phase composition of interaction products is determined. It is established that they are high-dispersed homogeneous mixture of three phases of variable composition: twin hydroxalate of copper-bismuth, lead hydroxalate and twin oxalate of strontium-calcium. After heat treatment of the phases are obtained the HTSC oxides

  2. Quantitative assessment of intermolecular interactions by atomic force microscopy imaging using copper oxide tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, Harry; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Timmer, Alexander; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Lacheng; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Cnudde, Marvin; Strassert, Cristian Alejandro; Ji, Wei; Rohlfing, Michael; Fuchs, Harald

    2018-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is an impressive tool with which to directly resolve the bonding structure of organic compounds1-5. The methodology usually involves chemical passivation of the probe-tip termination by attaching single molecules or atoms such as CO or Xe (refs 1,6-9). However, these probe particles are only weakly connected to the metallic apex, which results in considerable dynamic deflection. This probe particle deflection leads to pronounced image distortions, systematic overestimation of bond lengths, and in some cases even spurious bond-like contrast features, thus inhibiting reliable data interpretation8-12. Recently, an alternative approach to tip passivation has been used in which slightly indenting a tip into oxidized copper substrates and subsequent contrast analysis allows for the verification of an oxygen-terminated Cu tip13-15. Here we show that, due to the covalently bound configuration of the terminal oxygen atom, this copper oxide tip (CuOx tip) has a high structural stability, allowing not only a quantitative determination of individual bond lengths and access to bond order effects, but also reliable intermolecular bond characterization. In particular, by removing the previous limitations of flexible probe particles, we are able to provide conclusive experimental evidence for an unusual intermolecular N-Au-N three-centre bond. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CuOx tips allow the characterization of the strength and configuration of individual hydrogen bonds within a molecular assembly.

  3. The Legionella pneumophila IcmSW complex interacts with multiple Dot/Icm effectors to facilitate type IV translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Cambronne

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Many gram-negative pathogens use a type IV secretion system (T4SS to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The fidelity of protein translocation depends on the efficient recognition of effector proteins by the T4SS. Legionella pneumophila delivers a large number of effector proteins into eukaryotic cells using the Dot/Icm T4SS. How the Dot/Icm system is able to recognize and control the delivery of effectors is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that the IcmS and IcmW proteins interact to form a stable complex that facilitates translocation of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm system by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that the IcmSW complex is necessary for the productive translocation of multiple Dot/Icm effector proteins. Effector proteins that were able to bind IcmSW in vitro required icmS and icmW for efficient translocation into eukaryotic cells during L. pneumophila infection. We identified regions in the effector protein SidG involved in icmSW-dependent translocation. Although the full-length SidG protein was translocated by an icmSW-dependent mechanism, deletion of amino terminal regions in the SidG protein resulted in icmSW-independent translocation, indicating that the IcmSW complex is not contributing directly to recognition of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm system. Biochemical and genetic studies showed that the IcmSW complex interacts with a central region of the SidG protein. The IcmSW interaction resulted in a conformational change in the SidG protein as determined by differences in protease sensitivity in vitro. These data suggest that IcmSW binding to effectors could enhance effector protein delivery by mediating a conformational change that facilitates T4SS recognition of a translocation domain located in the carboxyl region of the effector protein.

  4. Synthesis, Structure and Investigation of Germanium(IV and Copper(II Complexes with Malic Acid and 1,10ʹ-phenanthroline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Seifullina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two crystalline compounds of germanium(IV with malic acid (HMal and 1,10ʹ-phenanthroline (phen - [Ge(HMal2(phen]•pheh•2H2O (I and [CuCl(phen2][Ge(OH(HMal2] (II were synthesized for the first time and characterized by elemental analysis, IR-spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. There was elucidated from single-crystal X-ray diffraction that two different forms of Germanium are implemented: Ge4+ (I and hydrolyzed GeOH3+ (II to form distorted octahedron and pyramid respectively.

  5. Study on the interaction of a copper(II) complex containing the artificial sweetener aspartame with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh; Filli, Soraya Moradi

    2014-05-01

    A copper(II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied at physiological pH. Binding studies of this complex with HSA are useful for understanding the Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O-HSA interaction mechanism and providing guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient artificial sweeteners drive. The interaction was investigated by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment and circular dichroism. Hyperchromicity observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of HSA to Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O was observed and the binding constant (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) were calculated to be -458.67 kJ mol(-1) and -1,339 J mol(-1 )K(-1) respectively. According to the van't Hoff equation, the reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. In conformity with experimental results, we suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O interacts with HSA. In comparison with previous study, it is found that the Cu(II) complex binds stronger than aspartame.

  6. Copper-silver ionization at a US hospital: interaction of treated drinking water with plumbing materials, aesthetics and other considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tap water sampling and surface analysis of copper pipe/bathroom porcelain were performed to explore the fate of copper and silver during the first nine months of copper-silver ionization (CSI) applied to cold and hot water at a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. Ions dosed by CSI into...

  7. A review of the literature related to modelling the interaction of copper and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, W.H.; Crocker, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Swedish program for disposal of spent fuels will be faced with the problem of approving an ultrasonic testing scheme for large copper vessels to be used for the disposal. The microstructure of the vessels is uncertain. Manufacturing technology for such vessels is not yet established, but those under consideration could lead to a number of defects which may be critical to the performance of the canister. One method for detection of such defects is ultrasonic inspection. The reliability of this method is limited by the signal to noise ratio that may be achieved. The present literature review shows that there is excellent potential to make progress in the ultrasonic inspection by using one model as a theoretical predictor, the Rose model, and a further model model as an experimental validation, the ISMBB. Recommendations are made for the next stage of this project. 32 refs

  8. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jugal V.; Gajera, Sanjay B.; Patel, Mohan N.

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities.

  9. Copper interactions in TlCu7S4 and TlCu7Se4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noren, L.; Delaplane, R.G.; Berger, R.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The copper chalcogenides ACu 7 S 4 (A=NH 4 + , Tl + , Rb + ) are quasi-one-dimensional metals at ambient and higher temperatures which is due to the high mobility of copper in these structures. TlCu 7 S 4 and TlCu 7 Se 4 are isostructural compounds, space group I4/m, which can be described on the basis of a TlX 8 cube with two different Cu sites, Cu(1) and Cu(2). Cu(2)-Cu(2) zigzag chains run along the c axis with only 3/4 occupation of the Cu(2) sites. However, these two compounds differ in behaviour on cooling. The sulphide shows a polymorphic first-order transition to the CsAg 7 S 4 type (P4/n) owing to ordering of the vacancies in the Cu(2)-Cu(2) chains. In order to study the nature of the Cu(2) order/disorder in the two title compounds, a series of neutron diffraction measurements (both Bragg and diffuse scattering) were made at several temperatures from 40 to 713 K on the instrument SLAD at Studsvik. The structure at each temperature was modelled using RMC techniques. The resulting configuration show that as the temperature increases, there is a marked increase in the mobility of the Cu atoms in the Cu(2)-Cu(2) chains for TlCu 7 S 4 but not for TlCu 7 Se 4 . This is due to the initial difference in the Cu(2)-Cu(2) distances, only 2.2A for the thiocuprate, but 2.7A in the selenocuprate which explains the relative ease for Cu(2) ordering in the latter case. (author)

  10. Noncovalent interaction of polyethylene glycol with copper complex of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and its application in constructing inorganic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu Zhen; Song, Le Xin; Chen, Jie; Du, Fang Yun; Yang, Jing; Xia, Juan

    2011-10-21

    In this study, we try to answer a fundamental question: what is the consequence of the noncovalent interaction between a polymer and a coordination compound? Here, polyethylene glycol (PEG-4000, PEG-b) and copper complex of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (H(2)CuY) were employed to solve this problem. A novel adduct (CEP) between H(2)CuY and PEG-b was prepared. Our results indicated several interesting findings. First, the introduction of H(2)CuY had no effect on the stacking structure of PEG-b but led to a large change in surface structure of the polymer. Second, there was a significant difference (117 K) in the maximum degradation temperature between the PEG and the CEP, suggesting that the noncovalent interaction can drastically improve the thermal stability of the PEG. Third, sintering experiments showed that H(2)CuY and CEP produced completely different decomposition products. The former formed Cu crystals in nitrogen and CuO in air, but the latter generated Cu and CuCl crystals with good crystallinity, respectively. Finally, three independent measurements: viscosity, conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance in solution, provided useful information and insights from both sides of the noncovalent interaction. Probable interaction mechanisms and interaction sites were proposed. We consider that the current research could create the foundation for a new understanding of how the noncovalent adduct interaction between a metallic complex and a polymer relates to the change in physical and chemical properties of the adducted components. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  11. Computational prediction of secretion systems and secretomes of Brucella: identification of novel type IV effectors and their interaction with the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause brucellosis in various mammals including humans. Brucella survive inside the host cells by forming vacuoles and subverting host defence systems. This study was aimed to predict the secretion systems and the secretomes of Brucella spp. from 39 complete genome sequences available in the databases. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify the type IV secretion effectors and their interactions with host proteins. We predicted the secretion systems of Brucella by the KEGG pathway and SecReT4. Brucella secretomes and type IV effectors (T4SEs) were predicted through genome-wide screening using JVirGel and S4TE, respectively. Protein-protein interactions of Brucella T4SEs with their hosts were analyzed by HPIDB 2.0. Genes coding for Sec and Tat pathways of secretion and type I (T1SS), type IV (T4SS) and type V (T5SS) secretion systems were identified and they are conserved in all the species of Brucella. In addition to the well-known VirB operon coding for the type IV secretion system (T4SS), we have identified the presence of additional genes showing homology with T4SS of other organisms. On the whole, 10.26 to 14.94% of total proteomes were found to be either secreted (secretome) or membrane associated (membrane proteome). Approximately, 1.7 to 3.0% of total proteomes were identified as type IV secretion effectors (T4SEs). Prediction of protein-protein interactions showed 29 and 36 host-pathogen specific interactions between Bos taurus (cattle)-B. abortus and Ovis aries (sheep)-B. melitensis, respectively. Functional characterization of the predicted T4SEs and their interactions with their respective hosts may reveal the secrets of host specificity of Brucella.

  12. Interaction of cysteine and copper ions on the surface of iron: EIS, polarization and XPS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The current study demonstrates a comprehensive study for Cysteine + Cu(II) ions as an efficient inhibitor as demonstrated by EIS, XPS and potentiodynamic polarization measurements, in addition to traditional weight loss measurements. → The novelty of the current work originates from the combined use of an eco-friendly compound (i.e., cysteine) with a minute amount of copper ions (in the micro molar range) as a corrosion inhibitor for low carbon steel in acidic medium. To this end, cysteine shows only moderate inhibition ca. 60% for iron which jumps up to more than 95% in the presence of micro molar range of Cu(II) ions. → Cysteine-Cu(II) blends are found superior to benzotriazole (BTAH)-Cu(II) blends in terms of their long-term stability in addition to the avoidance of the use of the well-reported highly toxic BTAH. - Abstract: This study addresses the enhancing effect of copper ions on the inhibition efficiency (IE) of cysteine (an eco-friendly compound) against the corrosion of iron in 0.5 M sulphuric acid. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data revealed a significant increase in the polarization resistance (R p ) of the iron/solution interface in the presence of cysteine and Cu(II) ions instead of cysteine alone. That is, IE of 95% is obtained in the presence of 5 mM cysteine and 25 μM Cu(II) ions, compared to 66% in absence of Cu(II) ions. Moreover, electrochemical polarization measurements indicate that cysteine and Cu(II) ions blends act as mixed-type inhibitors for the corrosion of iron. The formation of Cu(I)-cysteinate complex and/or cysteine SAM at Cu atop the iron surface (as evident from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) blocks the underlying iron surface and imparts a pronounced protection against its corrosion. IE of cysteine-Cu(II) blend remains effectively unchanged with immersion time indicating its high stability in the used acidic medium.

  13. Calculation of the Ruderman-Kittel interaction and magnetic ordering in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Wang, X.-W.; Harmon, B. N.

    1986-01-01

    Using first principles energy bands and wave functions the authors find the Rudermann-Kittel interaction having a more predominant nearest neighbour coupling than expected for free electrons. Using the correlation theory and including dipolar interactions they find the most probable structure to ...

  14. Interaction between copper oxide wire particles and Duddingtonia flagrans in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J M; Miller, J E; Larsen, M; Terrill, T H

    2005-11-25

    An experiment was completed to determine if copper oxide wire particles (COWP) had any effect on the activity of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans in growing lambs. COWP has been used recently as a dewormer in small ruminants because of nematode resistance to anthelmintics. D. flagrans has been used to control free-living stages of parasitic nematodes in livestock. Katahdin and Dorper lambs, 4 months of age, were administered no or 4 g COWP (n=24/dose) in early October 2003. Haemonchus contortus was the predominant gastrointestinal parasite during the trial, which was acquired naturally from pasture. Half the lambs from each COWP group were supplemented with corn/soybean meal with or without D. flagrans for 35 days. Fecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volume (PCV) were determined weekly between days 0 (day of COWP administration) and 35. Feces from lambs in each treatment group were pooled and three replicates per group were cultured for 14 days at room temperature. Larvae (L3) were identified and counted per gram of feces cultured. Treatment with COWP was effective in decreasing FEC, which remained low compared with FEC from lambs not treated with COWP. This led to an increase in PCV in these lambs (COWP x day, Pcopper on H. contortus, and the additional larval reducing effect exerted by the nematode destroying fungus D. flagrans, the expected result would be a much lower larval challenge on pasture when these two tools are used together in a sustainable control strategy.

  15. Toxicity of sulfadiazine and copper and their interaction to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yu, Wantai; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Hua; Jiang, Chunming

    2017-08-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to investigate the single and combined effect of different concentrations of sulfadiazine (SDZ) (1 and 10mgkg -1 ) and copper (Cu) (20 and 200mgkg -1 ) stresses on growth, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant enzyme activities of wheat seedlings and their accumulation. High SDZ or Cu level significantly inhibited the growth of wheat seedlings, but the emergence rate was only inhibited by high SDZ level. The presence of Cu reduced the accumulation of SDZ, whereas the effect of SDZ on the accumulation of Cu depended on their concentrations. Low Cu level significantly increased the chlorophyll content, while high Cu level or both SDZ concentrations resulted in a significant decrease in the chlorophyll content as compared to the control. Additionally, H 2 O 2 and MDA contents increased with the elevated SDZ or Cu level. The activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase were also stimulated by SDZ or Cu except for the aerial part treated by low Cu level and root treated by high SDZ level. The joint toxicity data showed that the toxicity of SDZ to wheat seedlings was generally alleviated by the presence of Cu, whereas the combined toxicity of SDZ and Cu was larger than equivalent Cu alone. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Neutron-Phonon Interaction Studies in Copper, Zinc and Magnesium Single Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliszewski, E.; Sosnowski, J.; Blinowski, K.; Kozubowski, J.; Padlo, L.; Sledziewska, D.

    1963-01-01

    The phonon dispersion relations in copper single crystals has been studied by means of a triple-axis crystal neutron spectrometer. In the [100] direction the transversal branch, not reported in the papers of Cabie and Jacrot, has been found. This branch fits well to the recent data of sound velocity; however, it differs partly from the X-ray results of Jacobsen. For the longitudinal branch in the [100] direction the dispersion curve obtained by Cribier and Jacrot is lying well above the Jacobsen's curve, and the experimental points reported in the present paper support the results of Cribier and Jacrot. The phonon dispersion relations in zinc and magnesium single crystals has been studied using the cold neutron method and by means of a triple-axis crystal neutron spectrometer as well. The scattering surfaces in the [1010] plane were traced, the AT and AL branches found and the phonon dispersion relations in the [001] and [010] directions obtained. The results have been compared with those obtained by Johnson with X-rays. In the [001] direction the present results fit well lo Johnson's foe the AL branch. In the [010] direction for the AT branch a large discrepancy has been found between Johnson's and the present results. Some explanation of this discrepancy is given. Similar measurements in the same directions in magnesium single crystals are under way and will be reported. (author) [fr

  17. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Al-Senaidi, Khalfan; Joshi, Niranjan P; Venselaar, Hanka; van den Brand, Mariël Am; Nijtmans, Leo Gj; Rodenburg, Richard Jt

    2017-06-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, failure to thrive, and isolated complex IV deficiency are presented. We show that the variant lies within the evolutionarily conserved COX5A/COX4 interface domain, suggesting that it alters the interaction between these two subunits during complex IV biogenesis. In patient skin fibroblasts, the enzymatic activity and protein levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. Lentiviral complementation rescues complex IV deficiency. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates demonstrating a function of COX5A in complex IV biogenesis. A potential therapeutic lead is demonstrated by showing that copper supplementation leads to partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Interactive effects of copper stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on photosynthetic characteristics and chlorphyl fluorescence parameters of elsholtzia splendens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Jin, Z.; Li, J.

    2017-01-01

    To determine interactive effects of added copper (Cu) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation on the photosynthesis of Elsholtzia splendens, a greenhouse pot experiment was conducted. Four treatments were used, including -Cu-AMF (no Cu addition and no AMF inoculation), +Cu-AMF (Cu addition but no AMF inoculation), -Cu+AMF (no Cu addition and AMF inoculation), and +Cu+AMF (Cu addition and AMF inoculation). Cu addition did not change diurnal variation curves of the net photosynthetic rate(PN), the intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration (Ci), the stomatal conductance (gs), or the transpiration rate (E); however, it significantly decreased the daily mean PN, gs, E, light-use efficiency (LUE), and carboxylation efficiency (CE). Furthermore, AMF inoculation significantly increased the daily mean PN, gs, LUE, and CE of E. splendens. In response to light, Cu addition significantly decreased the light-saturated net photosynthetic rate (PNmax), the light saturation point (LSP), the light compensation point (LCP), and the apparent quantum yield (AQY), while AMF inoculation significantly increased PNmax and AQY. In response to the CO/sub 2/ concentration, Cu addition significantly decreased PNmax and the CO/sub 2/ saturation point (CSP), while AMF inoculation significantly increased PNmax. Both Cu addition and AMF inoculation significantly decreased the relative chlorophyll content. Compared to the negative control treatment (-Cu-AMF), Cu addition significantly increased the minimal fluorescence, but significantly decreased maximal fluorescence, variable fluorescence,and maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII. These results suggest that AMF inoculations alleviate the inhibitory effect of copper stress on E. splendens plants by weakening its toxic effects on the photosynthetic apparatus and pigments. (author)

  19. Full-length cellular β-secretase has a trimeric subunit stoichiometry, and its sulfur-rich transmembrane interaction site modulates cytosolic copper compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Filip; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Bethge, Tobias; McGuire, Hugo; Scolari, Silvia; Herrmann, Andreas; Blunck, Rikard; Bowie, Derek; Multhaup, Gerd

    2017-08-11

    The β-secretase (BACE1) initiates processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) into Aβ peptides, which have been implicated as central players in the pathology of Alzheimer disease. BACE1 has been described as a copper-binding protein and its oligomeric state as being monomeric, dimeric, and/or multimeric, but the native cellular stoichiometry has remained elusive. Here, by using single-molecule fluorescence and in vitro cross-linking experiments with photo-activatable unnatural amino acids, we show that full-length BACE1, independently of its subcellular localization, exists as trimers in human cells. We found that trimerization requires the BACE1 transmembrane sequences (TMSs) and cytoplasmic domains, with residues Ala 463 and Cys 466 buried within the trimer interface of the sulfur-rich core of the TMSs. Our 3D model predicts that the sulfur-rich core of the trimeric BACE1 TMS is accessible to metal ions, but copper ions did not trigger trimerization. The results of functional assays of endogenous BACE1 suggest that it has a role in intracellular copper compartmentalization by transferring cytosolic copper to intracellular compartments, while leaving the overall cellular copper concentration unaltered. Adding to existing physiological models, our results provide novel insight into the atypical interactions between copper and BACE1 and into its non-enzymatic activities. In conclusion, therapeutic Alzheimer disease prevention strategies aimed at decreasing BACE1 protein levels should be regarded with caution, because adverse effects in copper homeostasis may occur. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Interstitial-impurity interactions in copper-silver and aluminum-magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    The configurations and dynamical properties of complexes formed between interstitials and oversized impurities in electron-irradiated aluminum and copper were determined. Measurements were taken of the ultrasonic attention and resonant frequency in single crystal samples of Cu-Ag and Al-Mg. A variety of peaks appeared in both materials in plots of the logarithmic decrement versus temperature. The simultaneous presence of multiple defects was established by the different annealing behavior shown by each peak. It was found that interstitial trapping in our oversized systems was generally weaker than in previously studied undersized systems. The principal features in Cu-Ag that must be accounted for by a model include the following: (1) Three low-temperature peaks were seen having trigonal symmetry. The main peak annealed away at 110 K uncorrelated with any resistivity recovery and it grew at 60 K, correlated with a resistivity decrease. For Al-MG, the principal features associated with the main peak include: seen at high temperature (>135 K) having trigonal symmetry; annealed away at 127 K and seemed to correlate with a resistivity decrease; remaining peaks grew while the main peak annealed away. The implications of an existing model were developed. No evidence was found for the deeply-trapped -orthorhombic defect predicted by the existing model. Therefore, two alternative models were developed. Model A uses a canted dumb-bell at the next-nearest neighbor position to explain the results. Model B uses a point interstitial at an octahedral position. A distinction between the two which is subject to experimental check is that model A predicts that interstitial migration between different impurity atoms occurs near 127 K in Cu-Ag while model B predicts a migration temperature near 60 K

  1. Photophysical studies of the interactions of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) with copper and zinc ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Cabaña, Z.E.; Valdés, O.; Vergara, C.E.; Camarada, M.B.; Nachtigall, F.M.; González-Nilo, F.D.; Santos, Leonardo S.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the photophysical behavior of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) in the presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in aqueous solutions using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Theoretical and experimental results confirmed the presence of a strong covalent metal–ligand interaction between PAMAM G0 and copper ion that favored the formation of a ligand–metal charge transfer band coordination complex. In the case of Zn(II), no complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered. Structure analysis identified the presence of aggregate like PAMAM G0–Zn moieties that generated an enhancement in the fluorescence emission of PAMAM G0. - Highlights: • Photophysical behavior of PAMAM G0 dendrimer with Cu and Zn ions was studied. • Strong covalent metal–ligand interaction was confirmed between PAMAM G0–Cu(II). • No complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered in the case of Zn(II). • Dendrimer aggregate generated an enhancement in fluorescence emission

  2. Photophysical studies of the interactions of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) with copper and zinc ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Cabaña, Z.E. [Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry Institute of Natural Resources, University of Talca (Chile); Valdés, O. [Nanobiotechnology Division at University of Talca, Fraunhofer Chile Research Foundation – Center for Systems Biotechnology, FCR-CSB, P.O. Box 747 Talca (Chile); Vergara, C.E. [Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry Institute of Natural Resources, University of Talca (Chile); Camarada, M.B. [Universidad Andrés Bello, Facultad de Biología, Center for Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology (CBIB), República 239, Santiago (Chile); Fundación Fraunhofer Chile Research, M. Sánchez Fontecilla 310 piso 14, Las Condes (Chile); Nachtigall, F.M. [Nanobiotechnology Division at University of Talca, Fraunhofer Chile Research Foundation – Center for Systems Biotechnology, FCR-CSB, P.O. Box 747 Talca (Chile); González-Nilo, F.D. [Universidad Andrés Bello, Facultad de Biología, Center for Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology (CBIB), República 239, Santiago (Chile); Fundación Fraunhofer Chile Research, M. Sánchez Fontecilla 310 piso 14, Las Condes (Chile); Santos, Leonardo S., E-mail: lssantos@utalca.cl [Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis, Chemistry Institute of Natural Resources, University of Talca (Chile); Nanobiotechnology Division at University of Talca, Fraunhofer Chile Research Foundation – Center for Systems Biotechnology, FCR-CSB, P.O. Box 747 Talca (Chile)

    2015-08-15

    This study reports the photophysical behavior of poly(amidoamine) generation zero (PAMAM G0) in the presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in aqueous solutions using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Theoretical and experimental results confirmed the presence of a strong covalent metal–ligand interaction between PAMAM G0 and copper ion that favored the formation of a ligand–metal charge transfer band coordination complex. In the case of Zn(II), no complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered. Structure analysis identified the presence of aggregate like PAMAM G0–Zn moieties that generated an enhancement in the fluorescence emission of PAMAM G0. - Highlights: • Photophysical behavior of PAMAM G0 dendrimer with Cu and Zn ions was studied. • Strong covalent metal–ligand interaction was confirmed between PAMAM G0–Cu(II). • No complex formation with PAMAM G0 was registered in the case of Zn(II). • Dendrimer aggregate generated an enhancement in fluorescence emission.

  3. Molecular self assembly and chiral recognition of copper octacyanophthalocyanine on Au(111): Interplay of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sk, Rejaul; Dhara, Barun; Miller, Joel; Deshpande, Aparna

    Submolecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of copper octacyanophthalocyanine, CuPc(CN)8, at 77 K demonstrates that these achiral molecules form a two dimensional (2D) tetramer-based self-assembly upon evaporation onto an atomically flat Au(111) substrate. They assemble in two different structurally chiral configurations upon adsorption on Au(111). Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS),acquired at 77 K, unveils the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of this self-assembly. Voltage dependent STM images show that each molecule in both the structurally chiral configurations individually becomes chiral by breaking the mirror symmetry due to the enhanced intermolecular dipolar coupling interaction at the LUMO energy while the individual molecules remain achiral at the HOMO energy and within the HOMO-LUMO gap. At the LUMO energy, the handedness of the each chiral molecule is decided by the direction of the dipolar coupling interaction in the tetramer unit cell. This preference for LUMO energy indicates that this chirality is purely electronic in nature and it manifests on top of the organizational chirality that is present in the self-assembly independent of the orbital energy. Supported by IISER Pune and DAE-BRNS, India (Project No. 2011/20/37C/17/BRNS).

  4. Effect of pH and uranium concentration on interaction of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.C.; Victor, D.M.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of pH and uranium concentration on the interactions of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands was studied by employing dialysis and ultrafiltration techniques. The interactions of U(VI) and U(IV) with organic ligands in nitrate or chloride aqueous solution have been found to be pH-dependent. The stability constants of uranium-organic complexes decrease in the order: fulvic acid>humic acid>tannic acid for U(VI) and humic acid>tannic acid>fulvic acid for U(IV). Scatchard plots for the uranium-organic acid systems indicate two types of binding sites with a difference in stability constants of about 10 2 . Ultrafiltration of uranium-humic acid complexes indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) ions are concentrated in larger molecular size fractions (>5.1 nm) at pH less than or equal to 3 and in smaller molecular size fractions (in the range 5.1 to 3.1 nm and 2.4 to 1.9 nm) at pH greater than or equal to 5. 7 figures, 4 tables

  5. Subcellular interactions of dietary cadmium, copper and zinc in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamunde, Collins; MacPhail, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in rainbow trout. Metals accumulated in the liver were predominantly metabolically active. Cd, Cu and Zn exhibited both competitive and cooperative interactions. The metal–metal interactions altered subcellular metals partitioning. - Abstract: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets containing (μg/g) 500 Cu, 1000 Zn and 500 Cd singly and as a ternary mixture for 28 days. Livers were harvested and submitted to differential centrifugation to isolate components of metabolically active metal pool (MAP: heat-denaturable proteins (HDP), organelles, nuclei) and metabolically detoxified metal pool (MDP: heat stable proteins (HSP), NaOH-resistant granules). Results indicated that Cd accumulation was enhanced in all the subcellular compartments, albeit at different time points, in fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Cd alone, whereas Cu alone exposure increased Cd partitioning. Exposure to the metals mixture reduced (HDP) and enhanced (HSP, nuclei and granules) Cu accumulation while exposure to Zn alone enhanced Cu concentration in all the fractions analyzed without altering proportional distribution in MAP and MDP. Although subcellular Zn accumulation was less pronounced than that of either Cu or Cd, concentrations of Zn were enhanced in HDP, nuclei and granules from fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Zn alone. Cadmium alone exposure mobilized Zn and Cu from the nuclei and increased Zn accumulation in organelles and Cu in granules, while Cu alone exposure stimulated Zn accumulation in HSP, HDP and organelles. Interestingly, Cd alone exposure increased the partitioning of the three metals in MDP indicative of enhanced detoxification. Generally the accumulated metals were predominantly metabolically active: Cd, 67–83%; Cu, 68–79% and Zn, 60–76

  6. Subcellular interactions of dietary cadmium, copper and zinc in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacPhail, Ruth [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in rainbow trout. Metals accumulated in the liver were predominantly metabolically active. Cd, Cu and Zn exhibited both competitive and cooperative interactions. The metal-metal interactions altered subcellular metals partitioning. - Abstract: Interactions of Cu, Cd and Zn were studied at the subcellular level in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets containing ({mu}g/g) 500 Cu, 1000 Zn and 500 Cd singly and as a ternary mixture for 28 days. Livers were harvested and submitted to differential centrifugation to isolate components of metabolically active metal pool (MAP: heat-denaturable proteins (HDP), organelles, nuclei) and metabolically detoxified metal pool (MDP: heat stable proteins (HSP), NaOH-resistant granules). Results indicated that Cd accumulation was enhanced in all the subcellular compartments, albeit at different time points, in fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Cd alone, whereas Cu alone exposure increased Cd partitioning. Exposure to the metals mixture reduced (HDP) and enhanced (HSP, nuclei and granules) Cu accumulation while exposure to Zn alone enhanced Cu concentration in all the fractions analyzed without altering proportional distribution in MAP and MDP. Although subcellular Zn accumulation was less pronounced than that of either Cu or Cd, concentrations of Zn were enhanced in HDP, nuclei and granules from fish exposed to the metals mixture relative to those exposed to Zn alone. Cadmium alone exposure mobilized Zn and Cu from the nuclei and increased Zn accumulation in organelles and Cu in granules, while Cu alone exposure stimulated Zn accumulation in HSP, HDP and organelles. Interestingly, Cd alone exposure increased the partitioning of the three metals in MDP indicative of enhanced detoxification. Generally the accumulated metals were predominantly metabolically active: Cd, 67-83%; Cu, 68-79% and Zn, 60-76%. Taken

  7. In Vitro Studies on the Absorption and Interactions of Zinc, Copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The exact details of the processes of trace metals absorption and interactions in the gastro intestinal tract remain uncertain. Absorption for the most part, takes places in the small intestine. The exact site of maximum absorption, as defined either by kinetic rate or quantity has not been clearly defined. Similarly ...

  8. Novel insights in the molecular pathogenesis of human copper homeostasis disorders through studies of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, P. de

    2007-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for living organisms, yet it is very toxic when present in amounts exceeding cellular needs. Delicate mechanisms have evolved to ensure proper copper homeostasis is maintained for the organism, as well as at a cellular level, and perturbations in these mechanisms give

  9. Observing Graphene Grow: Catalyst–Graphene Interactions during Scalable Graphene Growth on Polycrystalline Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffractometry, and environmental scanning electron microscopy are used to fingerprint the entire graphene chemical vapor deposition process on technologically important polycrystalline Cu catalysts to address the current lack of understanding of the underlying fundamental growth mechanisms and catalyst interactions. Graphene forms directly on metallic Cu during the high-temperature hydrocarbon exposure, whereby an upshift in the binding energies of the corresponding C1s XPS core level signatures is indicative of coupling between the Cu catalyst and the growing graphene. Minor carbon uptake into Cu can under certain conditions manifest itself as carbon precipitation upon cooling. Postgrowth, ambient air exposure even at room temperature decouples the graphene from Cu by (reversible) oxygen intercalation. The importance of these dynamic interactions is discussed for graphene growth, processing, and device integration. PMID:24041311

  10. Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile ions in copper selenides studied by EXAFS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asylgushina, G.N.; Bikkulova, N.N.; Titova, S.G.; Kochubey, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile Cu ions has been studied in Cu 2- x Se in superionic and in normal state using EXAFS-spectroscopy. It has been found that the transition from normal to superionic state and change of mobile Cu ion concentration practically do not have an influence on local state of Cu atoms, but change of both these parameters is accompanied by a change of Se-sublattice state

  11. 31P NMR study of the interaction of inorganic phosphate with bovine copper-zinc superoxide dismutase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Freitas, D.M.; Luchinat, C.; Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Valentine, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Paramagnetic effect of 31 P phosphate resonances caused by Cu(II) ions in native and phenylglyoxal-modified bovine Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase have been used to monitor the interaction of phosphate with these proteins. T 2 values are found to be 70 times smaller than T 1 , indicating that some mechanisms, as yet undefined, contribute to the line width. Using T 1 measurements, it was determined that the affinity constants for phosphate binding to the native protein are 20 +/- 4 and 34 +/- 3 M -1 at pH 8.0 and 7.0 respectively, and that the Cu(II)-phosphate distance 5.3 A. At pH 6.3, two binding sites are observed, one at a distance >7 A with an affinity constant >100 M -1 and another at approximately 5 A with an affinity constant of 10 M -1 . Modification of the protein with phenylglyoxal causes the affinity of phosphate for the same sites to decrease by a factor of 3 at pH 6.3. These results indicate that phosphate does not bind directly to Cu(II) but to a site close by. It was concluded that the site of phosphate binding is Arg-141, which in known from X-ray structural evidence to be located approximately 5 Angstrom form the copper center. 26 references, 4 figures

  12. Studies on the mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine. Interaction with copper and xanthine oxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kela, U; Vijayvargiya, R

    1981-01-01

    Interaction between 6-mercaptopurine, Cu2+ and the enzyme xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2.) was examined. Whereas Cu2+ was found to inhibit the enzyme, 6-mercaptopurine could protect as well as reverse the enzyme inhibition produced by the metal ion. The formation of a complex between 6-mercaptopurine and Cu2+ seems to be responsible for the observed effect. Job's [(1928) Ann. Chem. 9, 113] method has shown the composition of the complex to be 1:1. The apparent stability constant (log K value), ...

  13. Growth of Single- and Bilayer ZnO on Au(111) and Interaction with Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xingyi; Yao, Kun; Sun, Keju; Li, Wei-Xue; Lee, Junseok; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-05-02

    The stoichiometric single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) have been prepared by reactive deposition of Zn on Au(111) and studied in detail with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Both single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) adopt a planar, graphite-like structure similar to freestanding ZnO(0001) due to the weak van der Waals interactions dominating their adhesion with the Au(111) substrate. At higher temperature, the single-layer ZnO(0001) converts gradually to bi-layer ZnO(0001) due to the twice stronger interaction between two ZnO layers than the interfacial adhesion of ZnO with Au substrate. It is found that Cu atoms on the surface of bi-layer ZnO(0001) are mobile with a diffusion barrier of 0.31 eV, and likely to agglomerate and form nanosized particles at low coverages; while Cu atoms tend to penetrate a single layer of ZnO(0001) with a barrier of 0.10 eV, resulting in a Cu free surface.

  14. Impact of creep-fatigue interaction on the lifetime of a dispersion strengthened copper alloy in unirradiated and irradiated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Stubbins, J.F.

    2001-06-01

    Creep-fatigue interaction behaviour of a dispersion strengthened copper alloy was investigated at 22 and 250 deg. C. To determine the effect of irradiation a number of fatigue specimens were irradiated at 250 deg. C to a dose level of 0.3 dpa and were tested at 250 deg. C. The creep-fatigue interaction was simulated by applying a certain hold-time on both tension and compression sides of the cyclic loading with a frequency of 0.5 Hz. Hold-times of 0,2, 5, 10, 100 and 1000 seconds were used. For a given hold-time, the real lifetime and the number of cycles to failure were determined at different strain amplitudes. Post-deformation micro-structures and fracture surfaces were investigated using transmission and scanning electron microscopes, respectively. The main results of these investigations are presented and their implications are briefly discussed in the present report. The central conclusion emerging from the present work is that a hold-time of 10 seconds or less causes a drastic decrease in the real lifetime as well as in the number of cycles to failure, particularly at low levels of strain amplitudes. A combination of higher temperature, higher strain amplitude and longer hold-time, on the other hand, may lead to an improvement in the lifetime. The irradiation at 250 deg. C to a dose level of 0.3 dpa does not play any significant role in determining the lifetime under creep-fatigue testing conditions. (au)

  15. Studies on the mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine. Interaction with copper and xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kela, U; Vijayvargiya, R

    1981-03-01

    Interaction between 6-mercaptopurine, Cu2+ and the enzyme xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2.) was examined. Whereas Cu2+ was found to inhibit the enzyme, 6-mercaptopurine could protect as well as reverse the enzyme inhibition produced by the metal ion. The formation of a complex between 6-mercaptopurine and Cu2+ seems to be responsible for the observed effect. Job's [(1928) Ann. Chem. 9, 113] method has shown the composition of the complex to be 1:1. The apparent stability constant (log K value), as determined by Subhrama Rao & Raghav Rao's [(1955) J. Sci. Chem. Ind. Res. 143, 278], method is found to be 6.74. It is suggested that the formation of a stable complex between 6-mercaptopurine molecules and Cu2+ may be an additional mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine, particularly with reference to its anti-inflammatory properties.

  16. Studies on the mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine. Interaction with copper and xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kela, U; Vijayvargiya, R

    1981-01-01

    Interaction between 6-mercaptopurine, Cu2+ and the enzyme xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2.) was examined. Whereas Cu2+ was found to inhibit the enzyme, 6-mercaptopurine could protect as well as reverse the enzyme inhibition produced by the metal ion. The formation of a complex between 6-mercaptopurine and Cu2+ seems to be responsible for the observed effect. Job's [(1928) Ann. Chem. 9, 113] method has shown the composition of the complex to be 1:1. The apparent stability constant (log K value), as determined by Subhrama Rao & Raghav Rao's [(1955) J. Sci. Chem. Ind. Res. 143, 278], method is found to be 6.74. It is suggested that the formation of a stable complex between 6-mercaptopurine molecules and Cu2+ may be an additional mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine, particularly with reference to its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:6895465

  17. Copper(II) ions interactions in the systems with triamines and ATP. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Bregier-Jarzebowska, R; Gasowska, A; Zalewska, A; Lomozik, L

    2017-12-01

    The mode of interaction and thermodynamic stability of complexes formed in binary and ternary Cu(II)/ATP/triamines systems were studied using potentiometric and spectroscopic (NMR, EPR, UV-Vis) methods. It was found that in binary metal-free systems ATP/H x PA species are formed (PA: Spd=spermidine or 3,3-tri=1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane) where the phosphate groups from nucleotides are preferred negative centers and protonated amine groups of amines are positive centers of reaction. In the ternary systems Cu/ATP/H x (PA) as well as Cu/(ATP)(PA) species are formed. The type of the formed Cu(II) complexes depends on pH of the solution. For a low pH value the complexation appears between Cu(II) and ATP molecules via oxygen atoms of phosphate groups. For a very high pH value, where ATP is hydrolyzed, the Cu(II) ions are bound to the nitrogen atoms of polyamine molecules. We did not detect any direct coordination of the N7 nitrogen atom of adenosine to Cu(II) ions. It means that the CuN7 interaction is an indirect type and can be due to noncovalent interplay including water molecule. EPR studies were performed at glassy state (77K) after a fast freezing both for binary and ternary systems. The glassy state EPR spectra do not reflect species identified in titration studies indicating significant effect of rapid temperature decrease on equilibrium of Cu(II) complexes. We propose the molecular structure of all the studied complexes at the glassy state deduced from EPR and optical spectroscopy results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tyrosinase inhibition due to interaction of homocyst(e)ine with copper: the mechanism for reversible hypopigmentation in homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reish, O; Townsend, D; Berry, S A; Tsai, M Y; King, R A

    1995-01-01

    Deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) is a genetic disorder of transsulfuration resulting in elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine and methionine and decreased cysteine. Affected patients have multisystem involvement, which may include light skin and hair. Reversible hypopigmentation in treated homocystinuric patients has been infrequently reported, and the mechanism is undefined. Two CBS-deficient homocystinuric patients manifested darkening of their hypopigmented hair following treatment that decreased plasma homocyst(e)ine. We hypothesized that homocyst(e)ine inhibits tyrosinase, the major pigment enzyme. The activity of tyrosinase extracted from pigmented human melanoma cells (MNT-1) that were grown in the presence of homocysteine was reduced in comparison to that extracted from cells grown without homocysteine. Copper sulfate restored homocyst(e)ine-inhibited tyrosinase activity when added to the culture cell media at a proportion of 1.25 mol of copper sulfate per 1 mol of DL-homocysteine. Holo-tyrosinase activity was inhibited by adding DL-homocysteine to the assay reaction mixture, and the addition of copper sulfate to the reaction mixture prevented this inhibition. Other tested compounds, L-cystine and betaine did not affect tyrosinase activity. Our data suggest that reversible hypopigmentation in homocystinuria is the result of tyrosinase inhibition by homocyst(e)ine and that the probable mechanism of this inhibition is the interaction of homocyst(e)ine with copper at the active site of tyrosinase. Images Figure 1 PMID:7611281

  19. Interactive effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and light to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Marti, Elodie; Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@unige.ch

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Comparable stability of CuO-NP suspensions under different light conditions. • UVR* inhibits growth, bleaches chlorophyll fluorescence and damages membrane. • Below 1 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs do not attenuate light in algal suspension. • SNL enhances significantly the effect of 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs on microalgae. • Synergistic interactions between UVR* and CuO-NPs. - Abstract: The present study explores the effect of light with different spectral composition on the stability of CuO-nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dispersions and their effects to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results showed that simulated natural light (SNL) and light with enhanced UVB radiation (UVR*) do not affect the dissolution of CuO-NPs as compared to light irradiation conditions typically used in laboratory incubator (INC). Comparable values of ζ-potential and hydrodynamic size during 24 h were found under all studied conditions. Concentrations of CuO-NPs below 1 mg L{sup −1} do not attenuate the light penetration in the algal suspensions in comparison with NP-free system. Exposure to a combination of 8 μg L{sup −1} or 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs and INC or SNL has no significant effect on the algal growth inhibition, algal fluorescence and membrane integrity under short-term exposure. However, an enhancement of the percentage of cells experiencing oxidative stress was observed upon exposure to 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs and SNL for 4 and 8 h. Combination of UVR* and 0.8 mg L{sup −1} CuO-NPs resulted in synergistic effects for all biological endpoints. Despite the photocatalytic properties of CuO-NPs no significant increase in abiotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under simulated solar radiation was observed suggesting that the synergistic effect observed might be correlated to other factors than CuO-NP-mediated ROS photoproduction. Tests performed with CuSO{sub 4} confirmed the important role of dissolution as toxicity driving force for lower

  20. Raman spectroscopic studies of the interaction of oxalic acid and sodium oxalate used as corrosion inhibitors with copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeziorowski, H.; Moser, B.

    1985-09-01

    The Raman spectra of the liquid-solid interface recorded in situ show the formation of a salt complex of the inhibitor molecules and the copper ions. This suggests that this chemisorbed surface species produces the protective layer.

  1. Type IV pilins regulate their own expression via direct intramembrane interactions with the sensor kinase PilS

    OpenAIRE

    Kilmury, Sara L. N.; Burrows, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Although two-component systems are a ubiquitous means of rapid bacterial adaptation to changing environments, identification of the specific signals detected by sensor kinases can be challenging. Also, little is known about the diverse, poorly characterized family of sensor kinases that detect intramembrane signals. We show that the major type IV pilin, PilA, is an inhibitory intramembrane ligand for the PilS sensor kinase that controls pilA expression and we characterize the mechanism of sig...

  2. Charge Ordering, Competing Magnetic Interactions, and Magneto-Resistance Effects in Layered Iron(IV)-Based Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, P.; Ghosh, S.

    2002-01-01

    Iron(IV)-based Ruddlesden-Popper-type oxides Sr 3 Fe 2-x Co x O 7-y (0≤x≤1) have been synthesized and studied by various techniques. It is shown that iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopy is a powerful tool for elucidating the intimate correlations between chemical composition, electron-transport properties, electronic state, magnetism, and the large magneto-resistance effects in this system.

  3. Interaction Between Graphene-Coated SiC Single Crystal and Liquid Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, M.; Sobczak, N.; Sobczak, J. J.; Kudyba, A.; Bruzda, G.; Nowak, R.; Pietrzak, K.; Chmielewski, M.; Strupiński, W.

    2018-05-01

    investigations and Raman spectroscopy studies suggest that the presence of graphene layer on the SiC substrate suppresses but does not completely prevent chemical interaction between liquid Cu drop and SiC. Both chemical degradation (etching) and mechanical degradation of the graphene layer during drop rolling due to high adhesion of the Cu drop to the SiC substrate are responsible for mass transfer through the 2nd drop/substrate interface that in turn results in significant changes of structure and chemistry of the drop and the interface.

  4. Interaction Between Graphene-Coated SiC Single Crystal and Liquid Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, M.; Sobczak, N.; Sobczak, J. J.; Kudyba, A.; Bruzda, G.; Nowak, R.; Pietrzak, K.; Chmielewski, M.; Strupiński, W.

    2018-04-01

    investigations and Raman spectroscopy studies suggest that the presence of graphene layer on the SiC substrate suppresses but does not completely prevent chemical interaction between liquid Cu drop and SiC. Both chemical degradation (etching) and mechanical degradation of the graphene layer during drop rolling due to high adhesion of the Cu drop to the SiC substrate are responsible for mass transfer through the 2nd drop/substrate interface that in turn results in significant changes of structure and chemistry of the drop and the interface.

  5. Humic acids and their interactions with metallic elements: Cu II, Eu III, Th IV, U VI: contribution of size exclusion chromatography method and research of complexation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourd-Moulin, V.

    1986-04-01

    The interest given to natural organic matter (humic and fulvic acids) as complexing agents of metallic ions in soils and natural waters becomes more and more important in environmental area. Cation - humic matter interactions have a great importance, a better understanding of the contribution of these substances in natural media specially towards radioactive elements with long life time. Interactions are studied by a chromatographic technique of gel filtration: the dynamic equilibrium method is based on the separation of the formed complex humic macromolecule - metallic ion and the free metallic ion, which due to its size penetrates totally in the pores of the gel. Separation mechanisms of the chromatographic support and the contribution of each parameter, are studied as a function of the buffer nature, its concentration, the PH, the gel porosity and the valence of the metallic cation. This study led to the determination of the appropriate experimental conditions for each cation. A study of metallic binding with humic acid has been undertaken with Cu 2+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ , Uo 2 2+ . These elements, except copper, have been chosen for their properties similar to the transuranic elements. Different samples of humic acids (commercial, podzolic soil, rendzine soil) are also studied. A deeper research of europium - humic acid interactions by means of different treatment models (discrete or gaussian models) has been undertaken in order to determine the number, the binding site strength and the global interaction constants [fr

  6. Interaction of a common painkiller piroxicam and copper-piroxicam with chromatin causes structural alterations accompanied by modulation at the epigenomic/genomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sathi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Chakraborty, Payal; Das, Chandrima; Sarkar, Munna

    2017-08-01

    NSAIDs are the most common class of painkillers and anti-inflammatory agents. They also show other functions like chemoprevention and chemosuppression for which they act at the protein but not at the genome level since they are mostly anions at physiological pH, which prohibit their approach to the poly-anionic DNA. Complexing the drugs with bioactive metal obliterate their negative charge and allow them to bind to the DNA, thereby, opening the possibility of genome level interaction. To test this hypothesis, we present the interaction of a traditional NSAID, Piroxicam and its copper complex with core histone and chromatin. Spectroscopy, DLS, and SEM studies were applied to see the effect of the interaction on the structure of histone/chromatin. This was coupled with MTT assay, immunoblot analysis, confocal microscopy, micro array analysis and qRT-PCR. The interaction of Piroxicam and its copper complex with histone/chromatin results in structural alterations. Such structural alterations can have different biological manifestations, but to test our hypothesis, we have focused only on the accompanied modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. The complex, showed alteration of key epigenetic signatures implicated in transcription in the global context, although Piroxicam caused no significant changes. We have correlated such alterations caused by the complex with the changes in global gene expression and validated the candidate gene expression alterations. Our results provide the proof of concept that DNA binding ability of the copper complexes of a traditional NSAID, opens up the possibility of modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  8. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  9. Antiproliferative activity and interactions with cell-cycle related proteins of the organotin compound triethyltin(IV)lupinylsulfide hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, F; Sparatore, F; Cagnoli, M; Bruzzo, C; Novelli, F; Alama, A

    2001-03-14

    Organotin compounds, particularly tri-organotin, have demonstrated cytotoxic properties against a number of tumor cell lines. On this basis, triethyltin(IV)lupinylsulfide hydrochloride (IST-FS 29), a quinolizidine derivative, was synthesized and developed as a potential antitumor agent. This tin-derived compound exhibited potent antiproliferative effects on three different human cancer cell lines: teratocarcinoma of the ovary (PA-1), colon carcinoma (HCT-8) and glioblastoma (A-172). Cytotoxic activity was assessed by MTT and cell count assays during time course experiments with cell recovery after compound withdrawal. Significant cell growth inhibition (up to 95% in HCT-8 after 72 h of exposure), which also persisted after drug-free medium change, was reported in all the cell lines by both assays. In addition, the cytocidal effects exerted by IST-FS 29 appeared more consistent with necrosis or delayed cell death, rather than apoptosis, as shown by morphologic observations under light microscope, DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry. In the attempt to elucidate whether this compound might affect genes playing a role in G1/S phase transition, the expressions of p53, p21(WAF1), cyclin D1 and Rb, mainly involved in response to DNA-damaging stress, were analyzed by Western blot. Heterogeneous patterns of expression during exposure to IST-FS 29 were evidenced in the different cell lines suggesting that these cell-cycle-related genes are not likely the primary targets of this compound. Thus, the present data seem more indicative of a direct effect of IST-FS-29 on macromolecular synthesis and cellular homeostasis, as previously hypothesized for other organotin complexes.

  10. Electrochemical study of the interaction between dsDNA and copper(I) using carbon paste and hanging mercury drop electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Z; Girousi, S

    2008-06-30

    The interaction of copper(I) with double-stranded (ds) calf thymus DNA was studied in solution and at the electrode surface by means of transfer voltammetry using a carbon paste electrode (CPE) as working electrode in 0.2 M acetate buffer solution (pH 5.0). As a result of the interaction of Cu(I) between the base pairs of the dsDNA, the characteristic peaks of dsDNA, due to the oxidation of guanine and adenine, increased and after a certain concentration of Cu(I) a new peak at +1.37 V appeared, probably due to the formation of a purine-Cu(I) complex (dsDNA-Cu(I) complex). Accordingly, the interaction of copper(I) with calf thymus dsDNA was studied in solution as well as at the electrode surface using hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) by means of alternating current voltammetry (AC voltammetry) in 0.3 M NaCl and 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 8.5) as supporting electrolyte. Its interaction with DNA is shown to be time dependent. Significant changes in the characteristic peaks of dsDNA were observed after addition of higher concentration of Cu(I) to a solution containing dsDNA, as a result of the interaction between Cu(I) and dsDNA. All the experimental results indicate that Cu(I) can bind to DNA by electrostatic binding and form an association complex.

  11. Development and Application of Laser-Induced Energy Deposition for Flow Control of Edney Type IV Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Interactions Konstantinos Kontis University of Manchester Research Office Oxford Road Manchester M13 9PL UNITED KINGDOM EOARD Grant 12... GRANT NUMBER Grant 12-2007 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Konstantinos Kontis 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER...New York: Wiley, 1989. [70] G. Cardone , A. Ianiro, G. d. Ioio, and A. Passaro, “Temperature maps measurements on 3d surfaces with infrared thermography

  12. Ion-solvent interactions and the complex behaviour of U(IV) and U(VI) with chloro-ligands in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Duschner, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Born, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The complex chemical behaviour of U(IV) and U(VI) in amphiprotic solutions, especially in mixtures of solvents, was investigated using ion exchange and solvent extraction methods. The experimental data was used, on the one hand, in order to obtain complexing constants in dependence of ligands and their concentration as well as of the agent and to classify these in a universal scale of ion activities with water as reference point, and on the other hand, to explain the interactions between central atom, ligand and solvating molecule. One aim of these investigations is to understand the basic mechanisms in adjusting the equilibrium between two different phases in the separation chemistry of these elements. (orig./LH) [de

  13. Interactive computer graphics displays for hierarchical data structures. [Description of THESGRAF, in FORTRAN IV for CDC and IBM computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahn, D.F.; Murano, C.V.

    1980-05-01

    An interactive computer graphical display program was developed as an aid to user visualization and manipulation of hierarchically structured data systems such as thesauri. In the present configuration, a thesaurus term and its primary and secondary conceptual neighbors are presented to the user in tree graph form on a CRT; the user then designates, via light pen or keyboard, any of the neighbors as the next term of interest and receives a new display centered on this term. By successive specification of broader, narrower, and related terms, the user can course rapidly through the thesaurus space and refine his search file. At any stage, he deals with a term-centered, conceptually meaningful picture of a localized portion of the thesaurus, and is freed from the artificial difficulties of handling the traditional alphabetized thesaurus. Intentional limitation of the associative range of each display frame, and the use of color, case, and interconnecting vectors to encode relationships among terms, enhance interpretability of the display. Facile movement through the term space, provided by interactive computation, allows the display to remain simple, and is an essential element of the system. 3 figures.

  14. Global characteristics of atomic spectra and their use for the analysis of spectra. IV. Configuration interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucas, S.; Jonauskas, V.; Karazija, R.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.III see ibid., vol.52, p.639, 1995. Changes of the moments of atomic spectrum due to configuration interaction (CI), the CI strength, the average shift of the energy of a level due to its interaction with all levels of distant configuration and other global characteristics of CI effects in atoms are systematised and their expressions presented. The results of the calculation of those characteristics for the energy level spectra of the 3s3p 3 + 3s 2 3p3d configurations in Si isoelectronic series, 3p 5 3d N + 3p 6 3d N-2 4p + 3p 6 3d N-2 4f (N = 5, 6, 7, 8) in Cr, Mn, Fe and Co isoelectronic series, ns 2 np N + np N+2 at n = 2 - 5 and N = 2 - 4 in neutral atoms as well as for the characteristic emission spectra corresponding to the 3p 5 3d 9 + 3d 7 4p → 3d 8 transitions as well as for the Auger M 4.3 N 1 N 2.3 spectra in Kr and N 4.5 O 1 O 2.3 in Xe are given and compared with the same characteristics of the more complete experimental spectra. (orig.)

  15. Thermodynamic Data to Model the Interaction Between Coolant and Fuel in Gen IV Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsdale, Alan; Gisby, John; Davies, Hugh; Konings, Rudy; Benes, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of nuclear fuels in various environments is vital to the design and safe operation of nuclear reactors. While this is true if the reactor is operating within its design specification, it is even more so if accidents occur and the fuel is exposed to unexpected temperatures, pressures or chemical environments. It is clearly hazardous and costly to explore all such scenarios experimentally and therefore it is necessary to undertake modelling where possible using well-grounded theoretical approaches. This paper will show examples of where calculations of chemical and phase equilibria have been applied successfully to the long term storage of nuclear waste, phase formation during core meltdown and prediction of fission product release into the atmosphere. It will also highlight the development of thermodynamic data carried out during the European Metrology Research Project Metrofission required to model the potential interaction between the coolant, nuclear fuel, containment materials and atmosphere of a sodium cooled fast reactor. (authors)

  16. Ferromagnetic interaction in an asymmetric end-to-end azido double-bridged copper(II) dinuclear complex: a combined structure, magnetic, polarized neutron diffraction and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Christophe; Jeanneau, Erwann; El Moll, Hani; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Goujon, Antoine; Cousson, Alain; Carvajal, Maria Angels; Robert, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    A new end-to-end azido double-bridged copper(II) complex [Cu(2)L(2)(N(3))2] (1) was synthesized and characterized (L=1,1,1-trifluoro-7-(dimethylamino)-4-methyl-5-aza-3-hepten-2-onato). Despite the rather long Cu-Cu distance (5.105(1) A), the magnetic interaction is ferromagnetic with J= +16 cm(-1) (H=-JS(1)S(2)), a value that has been confirmed by DFT and high-level correlated ab initio calculations. The spin distribution was studied by using the results from polarized neutron diffraction. This is the first such study on an end-to-end system. The experimental spin density was found to be localized mainly on the copper(II) ions, with a small degree of delocalization on the ligand (L) and terminal azido nitrogens. There was zero delocalization on the central nitrogen, in agreement with DFT calculations. Such a picture corresponds to an important contribution of the d(x2-y2) orbital and a small population of the d(z2) orbital, in agreement with our calculations. Based on a correlated wavefunction analysis, the ferromagnetic behavior results from a dominant double spin polarization contribution and vanishingly small ionic forms.

  17. Molecular dynamic simulation of interaction of low-energy Ar and Xe ions with copper clusters at graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornich, G.V.; Lozovskaya, L.I.; Betts, G.; Zaporozhchenko, V.I.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    One conducted molecular and dynamic simulation of sputtering of isolated clusters consisting of 13, 27 and 195 Cu atoms from the (0001) graphite surface by 200 eV energy Ar and Xe ions. It is shown that the factors of reflection of Ar and Xe ions from copper clusters differ from one another insignificantly, though the energy of the reflected Xe ions is essentially lower than that of Ar ions. The values of the factor of cluster sputtering by Xe ions are higher in contrast to sputtering by Ar ions. One identified two mechanisms of cluster sputtering resulting in the maximum of sputtering intensity at the polar angles near the normal one, and in periodicity of maximums within the azimuth distributions of sputtering intensity with 60 deg period [ru

  18. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the arm and/or a 24-hour urine sample is collected. Sometimes a health practitioner performs a liver ... disease , a rare inherited disorder that can lead to excess storage of copper in the liver, brain, and other ...

  19. Inter- and intramolecular non-covalent interactions in 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde complexes of copper, silver, and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Laura; Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Three new imidazole compounds, [CuBr2(mimc)2] (1), [Ag(mimc)2][CF3SO3] (2), and [AuCl3(mimc)] (3) (mimc = 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde), have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and further analyzed using the QTAIM analysis. The compounds exhibit self-assembled 3D networks arising from intermolecular non-covalent interactions such as metallophilic interactions, metal-π contacts, halogens-halogen interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These weak interactions have a strong impact on the coordination sphere of the metal atoms and on the packing of compounds 1, 2, and 3.

  20. UV-Vis spectroscopy combined with chemometric study on the interactions of three dietary flavonoids with copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangliang; Liu, Yuchen; Wang, Yongmei; Xu, Man; Hu, Xinyu

    2018-10-15

    The complex formation between a copper ion and the dietary flavonoid quercetin (QU) and its two glycosides hyperin (HY) and rutin (RU) was studied by the combined use of spectroscopic measurement and the chemometric method. The spectral changes of pH titration revealed two successively formed deprotonated species of QU: the first formed species was proposed to be the 3-hydroxyl group deprotonated QU, and the second was the quinone form QU, which was formed by oxidation after the hydroxyl groups in the B-ring were deprotonated at high pH values. Similar results were obtained for HY and RU with two deprotonated species forming at high pH values. UV/visible spectroscopy showed successive formation of CuL 2 and CuL species of QU at pH 6.0, while only Cu 2 L was formed for HY and RU at this pH. Glycoside moieties in the C-ring of flavonoids decrease the conditional associated constants between flavonoids and Cu 2+ . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10 -7 and 4*10 -5 mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs

  2. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P; Spahiu, K; Bruno, J [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10{sup -7} and 4*10{sup -5} mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs.

  3. Synthetic heme/copper assemblies: toward an understanding of cytochrome c oxidase interactions with dioxygen and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematian, Shabnam; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-08-18

    Our long-time niche in synthetic biological inorganic chemistry has been to design ligands and generate coordination complexes of copper or iron ions or both, those reacting with dioxygen (O2) or nitrogen oxides (e.g., nitric oxide (NO(g)) and nitrite (NO2(-))) or both. As inspiration for this work, we turn to mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, which is responsible for dioxygen consumption and is also the predominant target for NO(g) and nitrite within mitochondria. In this Account, we highlight recent advances in studying synthetic heme/Cu complexes in two respects. First, there is the design, synthesis, and characterization of new O2 adducts whose further study will add insights into O2 reductive cleavage chemistry. Second, we describe how related heme/Cu constructs reduce nitrite ion to NO(g) or the reverse, oxidize NO(g) to nitrite. The reactions of nitrogen oxides occur as part of CcO's function, which is intimately tied to cellular O2 balance. We had first discovered that reduced heme/Cu compounds react with O2 giving μ-oxo heme-Fe(III)-O-Cu(II)(L) products; their properties are discussed. The O-atom is derived from dioxygen, and interrogations of these systems led to the construction and characterization of three distinctive classes of heme-peroxo complexes, two high-spin and one low-spin species. Recent investigations include a new approach to the synthesis of low-spin heme-peroxo-Cu complexes, employing a "naked" synthon, where the copper ligand denticity and geometric types can be varied. The result is a collection of such complexes; spectroscopic and structural features (by DFT calculations) are described. Some of these compounds are reactive toward reductants/protons effecting subsequent O-O cleavage. This points to how subtle improvements in ligand environment lead to a desired local structure and resulting optimized reactivity, as known to occur at enzyme active sites. The other sector of research is focused on heme/Cu assemblies mediating the redox

  4. Unexpected ferromagnetic interaction in a new tetranuclear copper(II) complex: synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic properties, and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondo, Matilde; García-Deibe, Ana M; Corbella, Monstserrat; Ruiz, Eliseo; Tercero, Javier; Sanmartín, Jesús; Bermejo, Manuel R

    2005-07-11

    The new tetranuclear carbonate complex [Cu2L)2(CO3)] x 8H2O (1 x 8H2O) (H3L = (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-bis[4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-azabut-3-enyl]-1,3-imidazolidine) has been obtained by two different synthetic routes and fully characterized. Recrystallization of 1 x 8H2O in methanol yields single crystals of {[(Cu2L)2(CO3)]}2 x 12H2O (1 x 6H2O), suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. The crystal structure of 1 x 6H2O shows two crystallographically different tetranuclear molecules in the asymmetric unit, 1a and 1b. Both molecules can be understood as self-assembled from two dinuclear [Cu2L]+ cations, joined by a mu4-eta(2):eta(1):eta(1) carbonate ligand. The copper atoms of each crystallographically different [(Cu2L)2(CO3)] molecule present miscellaneous coordination polyhedra: in both 1a and 1b, two metal centers are in square pyramidal environments, one displays a square planar chromophore and the other one has a geometry that can be considered as an intermediate between square pyramid and trigonal bipyramid. Magnetic studies reveal net intramolecular ferromagnetic coupling between the metal atoms. Density functional calculations allow the assignment of the different magnetic coupling constants and explain the unexpected ferromagnetic behavior, because of the presence of an unusual NCN bridging moiety and countercomplementarity of the phenoxo (or carbonate) and NCN bridges.

  5. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  6. A first-principles model of copper-boron interactions in Si: implications for the light-induced degradation of solar Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E.; Coutinho, J.; Öberg, S.; Torres, V. J. B.

    2017-02-01

    The recent discovery that Cu contamination of Si combined with light exposure has a significant detrimental impact on carrier life-time has drawn much concern within the solar-Si community. The effect, known as the copper-related light-induced degradation (Cu-LID) of Si solar cells, has been connected to the release of Cu interstitials within the bulk (2016 Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 147 115-26). In this paper, we describe a comprehensive analysis of the formation/dissociation process of the CuB pair in Si by means of first-principles modelling, as well as the interaction of CuB defects with photo-excited minority carriers. We confirm that the long-range interaction between the \\text{Cu}\\text{i}+ cation and the \\text{B}\\text{s}- anion has a Coulomb-like behaviour, in line with the trapping-limited diffusivity of Cu observed by transient ion drift measurements. On the other hand, the short-range interaction between the d-electrons of Cu and the excess of negative charge on \\text{B}\\text{s}- produces a repulsive effect, thereby decreasing the binding energy of the pair when compared to the ideal point-charge Coulomb model. We also find that metastable CuB pairs produce acceptor states just below the conduction band minimum, which arise from the Cu level emptied by the B acceptor. Based on these results, we argue that photo-generated minority carriers trapped by the metastable pairs can switch off the Coulomb interaction that holds the pairs together, enhancing the release of Cu interstitials, and acting as a catalyst for Cu-LID.

  7. Chaperones CCS, ATOX and COXIV responses to copper supplementation in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Magdalena; Andrews, Monica; Pizarro, Fernando; Arredondo, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of proteins in blood and other tissues has failed to identify markers of early copper effects on health. Studies in animal models show that chaperone of SOD (CCS) respond to changes of copper status. Evidence about other copper chaperones (COXIV, ATOX) is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess by means of an in vitro challenge the mRNA relative abundance of ccs, sod1, coxIV, mtIIa and atox in peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNCs) obtained from healthy individuals, acutely and chronically supplemented with small-to-moderate amounts of copper. Healthy participants received 8 mg Cu/d (supplemented group, SG) or placebo, (placebo group, PG) for 2 months. Biochemical indicators were assessed at basal (T0) and after 2 (T2) and 60 days (T60). At these times PMNCs were obtained, challenged with 1, 5 or 20 μM Cu-histidine for 20 h and the mRNA relative abundance of the selected genes assessed by real time PCR. The results showed that at T0, intracellular copper was not different between experimental and control groups. This increased at T2 and T60 when the copper in the media increased (two-way ANOVA, P CCS mRNA transcripts showed no significant changes (two-way ANOVA) at T2 and T60. In SG, CCS changed by treatment, time and interaction (two-way ANOVA, all P CCS but not SOD, ATOX or COXIV responded consistently to controlled changes of copper availability in an in vitro copper challenge.

  8. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel layered copper-lithium phosphonate with antiferromagnetic intrachain Cu(II)···Cu(II) interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S.M. [Departments of Physical and Analytical Chemistry and Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Amghouz, Zakariae [Scientific and Technical Services, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus Universitario, 33203 Gijón (Spain); Blanco, David Martínez [Scientific and Technical Services, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R. [Departments of Physical and Analytical Chemistry and Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo-CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    Novel metal phosphonate [CuLi(PPA)] [H{sub 3}PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid] was synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. It crystallizes in the space group C2/c, with cell parameters a=21.617(2) Å, b=4.9269(2) Å, c=14.342(1) Å, β=132.3(2)°, and Z=8. Its framework is built up from a main trimer, acting as a secondary building unit (SBU), which is formed by vertex-shared between two (LiO{sub 4}) and one (Cu(1)O{sub 4}) polyhedra. These units repeat along b-axis forming infinite inorganic chains, these chains are in turn cross-linked by corner sharing with (Cu(2)O{sub 4}) polyhedra to produce inorganic layers lying in the bc-plane. The neighboring layers are connected through the PPA ligand, leading to a 3D pillared-layered structure. The topological analysis reveals that the compound exhibits 3,4,10-c net. Finally, magnetic susceptibility measurement of this compound over the temperature range of 2–300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic intrachain interactions. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of a novel lithium-copper phosphonate, formulated as [CuLi(PPA)] (H{sub 3}PPA=3-phosphonopropionic acid), have been reported. This compound has a 3D pillared-layered structure with 3,4,10-c net topology. The magnetic susceptibility data over the temperature range of 2–300 K reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions. - Highlights: • Novel metal phosphonate, [CuLi(PPA)] (1), has been synthesized and characterized. • Compound 1 has a 3D pillared-layered structure with 3,4,10-c net topology. • Magnetic susceptibility data reveals the occurrence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions.

  9. Copper(II Complexes Based on Aminohydroxamic Acids: Synthesis, Structures, In Vitro Cytotoxicities and DNA/BSA Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Four complexes, [Cu2(glyha(bpy2(H2O]·2ClO4·H2O (1, [Cu2(glyha(phen2]·2ClO4 (2, [Cu2(alaha(bpy2Cl]·Cl·4H2O (3, and [{Cu2(alaha(phen2}{Cu2(alaha(phen2(NO3}]·3NO3 (4 (glyha2− = dianion glycinehydroxamic acid, alaha2− = dianion alaninehydroxamic acid, bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline have been successfully synthesized and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The interactions of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were studied through UV spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism. The results revealed that complexes 1–4 could interact with CT-DNA through intercalation. Interactions of all complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA were confirmed by the docking study to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxic effect of the complexes was also examined on four tumor cell lines, including human lung carcinoma cell line (A549, human colon carcinoma cell line (HCT-116, human promyelocytic leukemia cell (HL-60 and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa. All complexes exhibited different antitumor activities.

  10. Structural and magnetic studies on copper succinate dihydrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P BINITHA

    2017-08-21

    Aug 21, 2017 ... rials chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, gas storage, polymer magnets, etc. ... super exchange interactions among copper atoms through bridging .... Thus, these two water molecules in the structure of copper succinate are.

  11. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal–metal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konsolakis, Michalis, E-mail: mkonsol@science.tuc.gr [School of Production Engineering and Management, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Chania, Crete (Greece); Ioakeimidis, Zisis [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Western Macedonia, Bakola and Sialvera, GR-50100 Kozani (Greece)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • The surface chemistry of Cu-based catalysts is adjusted by metal-support or metal–metal interactions. • Three series of catalysts, i.e., Cu/REOs, Cu/Ce{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O{sub δ} and Cu–Co/CeO{sub 2} were prepared. • The local structure of Cu sites is remarkably affected by support or active phase modification. • Useful insights toward the fundamental understanding of Cu-catalyzed reactions are provided. - Abstract: Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal–metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O{sub δ}) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu–Co/CeO{sub 2}). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal–metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  12. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal-metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Ioakeimidis, Zisis

    2014-11-01

    Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal-metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO2, La2O3, Sm2O3), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce1-xSmxOδ) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu-Co/CeO2). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal-metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  13. Non-covalent interactions in 2-methylimidazolium copper(II) complex (MeImH)2[Cu(pfbz)4]: Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray structure and packing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Saini, Anju; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Jitendra; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan; Venugopalan, Paloth

    2017-01-01

    A new anionic copper(II) complex, (MeImH)2 [Cu(pfbz)4] (1) where, MeImH = 2-methylimidazolium and pfbz = pentafluorobenzoate has been isolated by reacting copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, pentafluorobenzoic acid and 2-methylimidazole in ethanol: water mixture in 1:2:2 molar ratio. This complex 1 has been characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, FT-IR) and conductance measurements. The complex salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c. Single crystal X-ray structure determination revealed the presence of discrete ions: [Cu(pfbz)4]2- anion and two 2-methylimidazolium cation (C4H7N2)+. The crystal lattice is stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and F⋯F interactions between cationic-anionic and the anionic-anionic moieties respectively, besides π-π interactions.

  14. Impacts of ambient salinity and copper on brown algae: 2. Interactive effects on phenolic pool and assessment of metal binding capacity of phlorotannin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connan, Solene, E-mail: solene.connan@gmail.com [Botany and Plant Science, School of Natural Sciences, Environmental Change Institute and Martin Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway (Ireland); Stengel, Dagmar B., E-mail: dagmar.stengel@nuigalway.ie [Botany and Plant Science, School of Natural Sciences, Environmental Change Institute and Martin Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway (Ireland)

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this study was to establish in laboratory experiments a quantitative link between phenolic pool (production, composition and exudation) in Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus and their potential to bind metals. Additionally, the copper binding capacity of purified phlorotannin was investigated. A reduction in salinity decreased total phenolic contents, altered phenolic composition by increasing proportion of cell-wall phenolics, and also increased phenolic exudation of the two seaweed species. After 15 days at a salinity of 5, the inhibition of photosynthesis observed previously for A. nodosum coincided with the high exudation of phenolic compounds into the surrounding water of the seaweed tips which resulted in a significant reduction of phenolic contents. Increased copper concentration also reduced total phenolic contents, changed phenolic composition (increase in proportion and level of cell-wall phenolics), and positively affected phenolic exudation of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus. A decrease in salinity enhanced the copper toxicity and caused the earlier impact on the physiology of seaweed tips. An involvement of phlorotannins in copper binding is also demonstrated; purified phlorotannins from A. nodosum collected from a site with little anthropogenic activity contained all four metals tested. When placed in copper-enriched water, as for the seaweed material, copper contents of the phenolics increased, zinc and cadmium contents decreased, but no change in chromium content was observed. The use of cell-wall phenolic content as biomarker of copper contamination seems promising but needs further investigation.

  15. A 48 kDa collagen-binding phosphoprotein isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cells interacts with the collagenous domain, but not the globular domain, of collagen type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Madri, J A

    1990-01-15

    We have identified collagen-binding proteins in detergent extracts of metabolically labelled bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) by collagen type IV-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The major collagen type IV-binding protein identified by SDS/PAGE had a molecular mass of 48 kDa, which we term the 'collagen-binding 48 kDa protein' (CB48). The pI of CB48 was 8.0-8.3 in a two-dimensional gel system, running non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis in the first dimension and SDS/PAGE in the second dimension. Under these conditions CB48 separated into two major (a and b) and one minor isoform (c); a was the most basic of the three isoforms. Two-dimensional chymotryptic peptide maps derived from each individual isoform were virtually identical. The charge differences between the isoforms were due in part to differential H3(32)PO4 incorporation by the protein. CB48 bound to intact collagen type IV and the collagenous region of collagen type IV, but not to the globular NC1 domain. Cell-surface labelling and indirect immunofluorescence experiments localized the bulk of CB48 intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum Golgi region, with a minor population of molecules on the cell surface. A specific rabbit polyclonal anti-CB48 serum did not inhibit the attachment or spreading of BAEC to collagen type IV in an 'in vitro' adhesion assay, suggesting that the cell-surface population of CB48 is not involved in BAEC adhesion. We conclude that CB48 is a collagen-binding phosphoprotein that interacts with the collagenous domain of collagen type IV and may be involved in intracellular transport of collagen molecules.

  16. The piroxicam complex of copper(II), trans-[Cu(Pir)2(THF)2], and its interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Salimi, Mona; Weil, Matthias; Jannesari, Zahra; Darabi, Farivash; Abdi, Khatereh; Khalaji, Aliakbar Dehno; Sardari, Soroush; Ahangari, Reza

    2012-08-01

    The mononuclear Cu(II) complex, trans-[Cu(Pir)2(THF)2], where Pir is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, and 1H NMR) and single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The molecular structure of the centrosymmetric complex is made up of two monoanionic bidentate Pir ligands coordinated to the Cu(II) atom through the pyridyl N atom and the carbonyl O atom of the amide group in equatorial positions. The elongated rhombic octahedral (ERO) coordination of the CuNONOO2″ chromophore is completed by the O atoms of two THF molecules in axial positions. A strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the amide N-H function and the enolate O atom confirms the ZZZ conformation of piroxicam. In addition, CD spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis assays have been used to investigate the interaction of the complex with DNA. The results revealed that the binding of the complex with DNA led to DNA backbone distortion.

  17. The interaction of copper ions with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli: an X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzen, Ulrike; Bovenkamp-Langlois, Lisa; Klysubun, Wantana; Hormes, Josef; Prange, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of copper ions have been known for a long time. However, the exact mechanism of action of the transition metal on microorganisms has long been unclear. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Cu K edge allows the determination of copper speciation in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that have been treated with Cu(II) and Cu(I) solutions. The death/inactivation of the bacteria was observed using plate counting and light microscopy. The Cu K-XANES spectra of the two Gram-negative bacteria are different than those of the Gram-positive strain. The results clearly show that the Cu + -S bond contributes to the antibacterial activity of copper, as in the case of silver. The detailed evaluation of the differentiated absorption spectra shows that Cu + (not Cu 2+ ) is the dominant ion that binds to the bacteria. Because Cu + is not the most common copper ion, copper is not as effective an antibacterial agent as silver, whose common valency is actually + 1. Any reaction of copper with phosphorus from the bacteria can be excluded after the evaluation of the absorption spectra.

  18. Mapping the interaction site for the tarantula toxin hainantoxin-IV (β-TRTX-Hn2a) in the voltage sensor module of domain II of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianfu; Luo, Ji; Meng, Er; Ding, Jiuping; Liang, Songping; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-06-01

    Peptide toxins often have pharmacological applications and are powerful tools for investigating the structure-function relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Although a group of potential VGSC inhibitors have been reported from tarantula venoms, little is known about the mechanism of their interaction with VGSCs. In this study, we showed that hainantoxin-IV (β-TRTX-Hn2a, HNTX-IV in brief), a 35-residue peptide from Ornithoctonus hainana venom, preferentially inhibited rNav1.2, rNav1.3 and hNav1.7 compared with rNav1.4 and hNav1.5. hNav1.7 was the most sensitive to HNTX-IV (IC50∼21nM). In contrast to many other tarantula toxins that affect VGSCs, HNTX-IV at subsaturating concentrations did not alter activation and inactivation kinetics in the physiological range of voltages, while very large depolarization above +70mV could partially activate toxin-bound hNav1.7 channel, indicating that HNTX-IV acts as a gating modifier rather than a pore blocker. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the toxin bound to site 4, which was located on the extracellular S3-S4 linker of hNav1.7 domain II. Mutants E753Q, D816N and E818Q of hNav1.7 decreased toxin affinity for hNav1.7 by 2.0-, 3.3- and 130-fold, respectively. In silico docking indicated that a three-toed claw substructure formed by residues with close contacts in the interface between HNTX-IV and hNav1.7 domain II stabilized the toxin-channel complex, impeding movement of the domain II voltage sensor and inhibiting hNav1.7 activation. Our data provide structural details for structure-based drug design and a useful template for the design of highly selective inhibitors of a specific subtype of VGSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. IV treatment at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other IV treatments you may receive after you leave the hospital include: Treatment for hormone deficiencies Medicines for severe nausea that cancer chemotherapy or pregnancy may cause Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain (this is IV ...

  20. Fundamental insights into conformational stability and orbital interactions of antioxidant (+)-catechin species and complexation of (+)-catechin with zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Sirichai, Somsak; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-09-01

    Conformational stability of (+)-catechin species in water has been examined with density functional theory, associated with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of solvation. Factors such as electron delocalization, lone-pair electron donation and intramolecular hydrogen bonding substantially contribute to the conformational stabilization. Upon deprotonation, the HOMO and LUMO energies for (+)-catechin are both elevated; the energy gaps for the deprotonated species are narrower than the energy gap for the neutral species. The preferential deprotonation occurs at the C3'-, C5-, C7- and C4'-OH groups successively. The pKa value at 9.3 predicted for the most acidic OH group agrees well with previous experimental data; however the values are overestimated for the less acidic OH groups due to limitations of the PCM for charged solutes and/or complex nature of true deprotonation pathways. Formation of hydrogen radicals should be promoted at high pH values following the bond dissociation enthalpies. Complexation of (+)-catechin with either zinc(II) or oxovanadium(IV) is favored at the 1:1 metal-to-ligand (M:L) mole ratio, with the oxovanadium(IV) complex showing higher reaction preference. At M:L = 1:2, formation of two isomeric complexes are plausible for each type of metal ion. Effects of stoichiometry and isomerism on the computational spectral features of the possibly formed metal complexes have been described.

  1. Antwerp Copper Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes.......In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes....

  2. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  3. Separation of copper-64 from copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglin, R.I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of copper-64 from irradiated copper phthalocyanine by Szilard-Chalmers effect is studied. Two methods of separation are used: one of them is based on the dissolution of the irradiated dry compound in concentrated sulfuric acid following its precipitation in water. In the other one the compound is irradiated with water in paste form following treatment with water and hydrochloric acid. The influence of the crystal form of the copper phthalocyanine on the separation yield of copper-64 is shown. Preliminary tests using the ionic exchange technique for purification and changing of copper-64 sulfate to chloride form are carried out. The specific activity using the spectrophotometric technique, after the determination of the copper concentration in solution of copper-64, is calculated. (Author) [pt

  4. A cerium(IV)-carbon multiple bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregson, Matthew; Lu, Erli; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Chemistry

    2013-12-02

    Straightforward access to a cerium(IV)-carbene complex was provided by one-electron oxidation of an anionic ''ate'' cerium(III)-carbene precursor, thereby avoiding decomposition reactions that plague oxidations of neutral cerium(III) compounds. The cerium(IV)-carbene complex is the first lanthanide(IV)-element multiple bond and involves a twofold bonding interaction of two electron pairs between cerium and carbon. [German] Auf direktem Wege zu einem Cer(IV)-Carbenkomplex gelangt man durch die Einelektronenoxidation einer anionischen Carben-Cerat(III)-Vorstufe. So werden Zersetzungsprozesse vermieden, die die Oxidation neutraler Cer(III)-Verbindungen erschweren. Der Cer(IV)-Carbenkomplex enthaelt die erste Lanthanoid(IV)-Element-Mehrfachbindung; dabei binden Cer und Kohlenstoff ueber zwei Elektronenpaare.

  5. Cation modulation of hemoglobin interaction with sodium n-dodecyl sulphate (SDS iv: magnesium modulation at pH 7.20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the interaction of Mg2+ (0–2.30 mM and sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS with hemoglobins (Hbs A and S at pH 7.20. SDS was used to model both membranes (0.60 mM SDS and proteases (5.0 mM SDS. Via UV-visible spectroscopy, second derivative and difference second derivative spectroscopy, we interrogated for difference(s in the interaction of these ligands with the proteins that can account for the HbS resistance to malaria parasite while been prone to sickling. Our results show that Mg2+ interaction with the proteins lowered the HbS oxygen affinity in comparison with the HbA. Additionally, [SDS]-protein interactions resulted in oxoferryl heme species formation that was prominent for the HbA and highly diminished for the HbS. [Mg2+] introduction to the [SDS]-protein mixture, however decreased the concentration of denatured protein species. The [Mg2+]-[SDS]-protein interactions suggest that while ionic or coulomb interactions for the HbA, in the presence of the surfactants, are [Mg2+] dependent, those of the HbS are not. Furthermore, hydrophobicity is a crucial force for the HbS interaction at neutral pH and is little-masked by ionic, electrostatic or coulombic interactions. In conclusion, at physiological pH, the Mg-SDS interaction decreased the HbS denaturation in comparison to the HbA.

  6. An enhanced cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G chemiluminescence system using guest-host interactions in a lab-on-a-chip platform for estimating the total phenolic content in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Haddabi, Buthaina; Al Lawati, Haider A J; Suliman, FakhrEldin O

    2016-04-01

    Two chemiluminescence-microfluidic (CL-MF) systems, e.g., Ce(IV)-rhodamine B (RB) and Ce(IV)-rhodamine 6G (R6G), for the determination of the total phenolic content in teas and some sweeteners were evaluated. The results indicated that the Ce(IV)-R6G system was more sensitive in comparison to the Ce(IV)-RB CL system. Therefore, a simple (CL-MF) method based on the CL of Ce(IV)-R6G was developed, and the sensitivity, selectivity and stability of this system were evaluated. Selected phenolic compounds (PCs), such as quercetin (QRC), catechin (CAT), rutin (RUT), gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CA) and syringic acid (SA), produced analytically useful chemiluminescence signals with low detection limits ranging from 0.35 nmol L(-1) for QRC to 11.31 nmol L(-1) for SA. The mixing sequence and the chip design were crucial, as the sensitivity and reproducibility could be substantially affected by these two factors. In addition, the anionic surfactant (i.e., sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) can significantly enhance the CL signal intensity by as much as 300% for the QRC solution. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the enhancement was due to a strong guest-host interaction between the cationic R6G molecules and the anionic amphiphilic environment. Other parameters that could affect the CL intensities of the PCs were carefully optimized. Finally, the method was successfully applied to tea and sweetener samples. Six different tea samples exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 7.32 to 13.5 g per 100g of sample with respect to GA. Four different sweetener samples were also analyzed and exhibited total phenolic/antioxidant levels from 500.9 to 3422.9 mg kg(-1) with respect to GA. The method was selective, rapid and sensitive when used to estimate the total phenolic/antioxidant level, and the results were in good agreement with those reported for honey and tea samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cation modulation of hemoglobin interaction with sodium n-dodecyl sulphate (SDS) iv: magnesium modulation at pH 7.20

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi; Ferdinand C. Chilaka; Charles O. Nwamba

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of Mg2+ (0–2.30 mM) and sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with hemoglobins (Hbs) A and S at pH 7.20. SDS was used to model both membranes (0.60 mM SDS) and proteases (5.0 mM SDS). Via UV-visible spectroscopy, second derivative and difference second derivative spectroscopy, we interrogated for difference(s) in the interaction of these ligands with the proteins that can account for the HbS resistance to malaria parasite while been prone to sickling. Our results show ...

  8. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haleel, A.; Mahendiran, D. [Post-Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, The New College (Autonomous), Chennai 600 014 (India); Veena, V.; Sakthivel, N. [Department of Biotechnology, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); Rahiman, A. Kalilur, E-mail: akrahmanjkr@gmail.com [Post-Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, The New College (Autonomous), Chennai 600 014 (India)

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L{sup 1–3})(diimine)]ClO{sub 4} (1–6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 1}), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 2}) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 3}), and two diimine coligands, 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO–LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT–DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π–π, σ–π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate

  9. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  10. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Roa, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Waste Isolation Research Division, Tokai Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(IV) species was lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other tetravalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  11. Copper Bioleaching in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Gentina; Fernando Acevedo

    2016-01-01

    Chile has a great tradition of producing and exporting copper. Over the last several decades, it has become the first producer on an international level. Its copper reserves are also the most important on the planet. However, after years of mineral exploitation, the ease of extracting copper oxides and ore copper content has diminished. To keep the production level high, the introduction of new technologies has become necessary. One that has been successful is bioleaching. Chile had the first...

  12. Interaction between metals and nucleic acids. Part 3. Synthesis and structural studies of copper(II) complexes with Schiff base ligands derived from barbituric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, I.; Gaudemer, A.; Chiaroni, A.; Riche, C.

    1986-02-17

    Schiff bases have been prepared from 5-formylbarbituric acid and 5-formyl-1,3-dimethyl-barbituric acid and various di- or tri-amines. The structure of the corresponding copper(II) complexes have been established by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of one of the complexes, Cu(DiMeBardpt), was determined by X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical study shows that these complexes are reduced at slightly more negative potentials than the corresponding complexes obtained from uracil, which suggests that these new ligands are better electron-donors.

  13. Generation IV national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preville, M.; Sadhankar, R.; Brady, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the Generation IV National Program. This program involves evolutionary and innovative design with significantly higher efficiencies (∼50% compared to present ∼30%) - sustainable, economical, safe, reliable and proliferation resistant - for future energy security. The Generation IV Forum (GIF) effectively leverages the resources of the participants to meet these goals. Ten countries signed the GIF Charter in 2001

  14. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  15. Copper Induces Vasorelaxation and Antagonizes Noradrenaline -Induced Vasoconstriction in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Copper is an essential trace element for normal cellular function and contributes to critical physiological or pathological processes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of copper on vascular tone of rat mesenteric artery and compare the effects of copper on noradrenaline (NA and high K+ induced vasoconstriction. Methods: The rat mesenteric arteries were isolated and the vessel tone was measured by using multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood pressure of carotid artery in rabbits was measured by using physiological data acquisition and analysis system in vivo. Results: Copper dose-dependently blunted NA-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. Copper-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited when the vessels were pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Copper did not blunt high K+-induced vasoconstriction. Copper preincubation inhibited NA-evoked vasoconstriction and the inhibition was not affected by the presence of L-NAME. Copper preincubation showed no effect on high K+-evoked vasoconstriction. Copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (DTC antagonized the vasoactivity induced by copper in rat mesenteric artery. In vivo experiments showed that copper injection (iv significantly decreased blood pressure of rabbits and NA or DTC injection (iv did not rescue the copper-induced hypotension and animal death. Conclusion: Copper blunted NA but not high K+-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. The acute effect of copper on NA-induced vasoconstriction was depended on nitric oxide (NO, but the effect of copper pretreatment on NA-induced vasoconstriction was independed on NO, suggesting that copper affected NA-induced vasoconstriction by two distinct mechanisms.

  16. Correlation between DNA interactions and cytotoxic activity of four new ternary compounds of copper(II) with N-donor heterocyclic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Priscila P; Guerra, Wendell; Dos Santos, Geandson Coelho; Fernandes, Nelson G; Silveira, Josiane N; da Costa Ferreira, Ana M; Bortolotto, Tiago; Terenzi, Hernán; Bortoluzzi, Adailton João; Neves, Ademir; Pereira-Maia, Elene C

    2014-03-01

    Four new ternary complexes of copper(II) were synthesized and characterized: [Cu(hyd)(bpy)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (1), [Cu(hyd)(phen)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (2), [Cu(Shyd)(bpy)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (3) and [Cu(Shyd)(phen)(acn)(ClO4)](ClO4)] (4), in which acn=acetonitrile; hyd=2-furoic acid hydrazide, bpy=2,2-bipyridine; phen=1,10-phenanthroline and Shyd=2-thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes in a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line was investigated. All complexes are able to enter cells and inhibit cellular growth in a concentration-dependent manner, with an activity higher than that of the corresponding free ligands. The substitution of Shyd for hyd increases the activity, while the substitution of bpy for phen renders the complex less active. Therefore, the most potent complex is 4 with an IC50 value of 1.5±0.2μM. The intracellular copper concentration needed to inhibit 50% of cell growth is approximately 7×10(-15)mol/cell. It is worth notifying that a correlation between cytotoxic activity, DNA binding affinity and DNA cleavage was found: 1<3<2<4. © 2013.

  17. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  18. Role of copper oxides in contact killing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Michael; Erbe, Andreas; Mathews, Salima; Chen, Ying; Solioz, Marc; Mücklich, Frank

    2013-12-31

    The potential of metallic copper as an intrinsically antibacterial material is gaining increasing attention in the face of growing antibiotics resistance of bacteria. However, the mechanism of the so-called "contact killing" of bacteria by copper surfaces is poorly understood and requires further investigation. In particular, the influences of bacteria-metal interaction, media composition, and copper surface chemistry on contact killing are not fully understood. In this study, copper oxide formation on copper during standard antimicrobial testing was measured in situ by spectroscopic ellipsometry. In parallel, contact killing under these conditions was assessed with bacteria in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or Tris-Cl. For comparison, defined Cu2O and CuO layers were thermally generated and characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The antibacterial properties of these copper oxides were tested under the conditions used above. Finally, copper ion release was recorded for both buffer systems by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectroscopy, and exposed copper samples were analyzed for topographical surface alterations. It was found that there was a fairly even growth of CuO under wet plating conditions, reaching 4-10 nm in 300 min, but no measurable Cu2O was formed during this time. CuO was found to significantly inhibit contact killing, compared to pure copper. In contrast, thermally generated Cu2O was essentially as effective in contact killing as pure copper. Copper ion release from the different surfaces roughly correlated with their antibacterial efficacy and was highest for pure copper, followed by Cu2O and CuO. Tris-Cl induced a 10-50-fold faster copper ion release compared to PBS. Since the Cu2O that primarily forms on copper under ambient conditions is as active in contact killing as pure copper, antimicrobial objects will retain their antimicrobial properties even after oxide formation.

  19. The Type IV Pilus Assembly ATPase PilB of Myxococcus xanthus Interacts with the Inner Membrane Platform Protein PilC and the Nucleotide-binding Protein PilM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Lisa Franziska; Friedrich, Carmen; Harms, Andrea; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; van der Does, Chris

    2016-03-25

    Type IV pili (T4P) are ubiquitous bacterial cell surface structures, involved in processes such as twitching motility, biofilm formation, bacteriophage infection, surface attachment, virulence, and natural transformation. T4P are assembled by machinery that can be divided into the outer membrane pore complex, the alignment complex that connects components in the inner and outer membrane, and the motor complex in the inner membrane and cytoplasm. Here, we characterize the inner membrane platform protein PilC, the cytosolic assembly ATPase PilB of the motor complex, and the cytosolic nucleotide-binding protein PilM of the alignment complex of the T4P machinery ofMyxococcus xanthus PilC was purified as a dimer and reconstituted into liposomes. PilB was isolated as a monomer and bound ATP in a non-cooperative manner, but PilB fused to Hcp1 ofPseudomonas aeruginosaformed a hexamer and bound ATP in a cooperative manner. Hexameric but not monomeric PilB bound to PilC reconstituted in liposomes, and this binding stimulated PilB ATPase activity. PilM could only be purified when it was stabilized by a fusion with a peptide corresponding to the first 16 amino acids of PilN, supporting an interaction between PilM and PilN(1-16). PilM-N(1-16) was isolated as a monomer that bound but did not hydrolyze ATP. PilM interacted directly with PilB, but only with PilC in the presence of PilB, suggesting an indirect interaction. We propose that PilB interacts with PilC and with PilM, thus establishing the connection between the alignment and the motor complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  1. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  2. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  3. SAGE IV Pathfinder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing a unique, new occultation technique involving imaging, the SAGE IV concept will meet or exceed the quality of previous SAGE measurements at a small...

  4. Gene transcript profiles of the TIA biosynthetic pathway in response to ethylene and copper reveal their interactive role in modulating TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Jia; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Research on transcriptional regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis of the medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, has largely been focused on gene function and not clustering analysis of multiple genes at the transcript level. Here, more than ten key genes encoding key enzyme of alkaloid synthesis in TIA biosynthetic pathways were chosen to investigate the integrative responses to exogenous elicitor ethylene and copper (Cu) at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. The ethylene-induced gene transcripts in leaves and roots, respectively, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the results showed the overall expression of TIA pathway genes indicated as the Q value followed a standard normal distribution after ethylene treatments. Peak gene expression was at 15-30 μM of ethephon, and the pre-mature leaf had a higher Q value than the immature or mature leaf and root. Treatment with elicitor Cu found that Cu up-regulated overall TIA gene expression more in roots than in leaves. The combined effects of Cu and ethephon on TIA gene expression were stronger than their separate effects. It has been documented that TIA gene expression is tightly regulated by the transcriptional factor (TF) ethylene responsive factor (ERF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis for the genes of C. roseus showed that expression of the MPK gene correlated with strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine b-D-glucosidase(SGD). In addition, ERF expression correlated with expression of secologanin synthase (SLS) and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), specifically in roots, whereas MPK and myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) correlated with STR and SGD genes. In conclusion, the ERF regulates the upstream pathway genes in response to heavy metal Cu mainly in C. roseus roots, while the MPK mainly participates in regulating the STR gene in response to ethylene in pre-mature leaf. Interestingly, the

  5. A Study on the Copper Effect on gold leaching in copper-ethanediamine-thiosulphate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiong; Xiang, Pengzhi; Huang, Yao

    2018-01-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive square-wave voltammetry (SWV), cyclic voltammetry(CV) and tafel method for the determination of various factors of gold in thiosulphate solution in this paper. We present our study on the effect of copper(II) on the leaching of gold in thiosulphate solutions. The current study aims to establish the interaction of copper in the leaching process by electrochemical method.

  6. Atomistic simulation of femtosecond laser pulse interactions with a copper film: Effect of dependency of penetration depth and reflectivity on electron temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouye Foumani, A.; Niknam, A. R.

    2018-01-01

    The response of copper films to irradiation with laser pulses of fluences in the range of 100-6000 J/m2 is simulated by using a modified combination of a two-temperature model (TTM) and molecular dynamics (MD). In this model, the dependency of the pulse penetration depth and the reflectivity of the target on electron temperature are taken into account. Also, the temperature-dependent electron-phonon coupling factor, electron thermal conductivity, and electron heat capacity are used in the simulations. Based on this model, the dependence of the integral reflectivity on pulse fluence, the changes in the film thickness, and the evolution of density and electron and lattice temperatures are obtained. Moreover, snapshots that show the melting and disintegration processes are presented. The disintegration starts at a fluence of 4200 J/m2, which corresponds with an absorbed fluence of 616 J/m2. The calculated values of integral reflectivity are in good agreement with the experimental data. The inclusion of such temperature-dependent absorption models in the TTM-MD method would facilitate the comparison of experimental data with simulation results.

  7. Study of the interaction between the indentation size effect and Hall-Petch effect with spherical indenters on annealed polycrystalline copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X D; Bushby, A J; Jennett, N M

    2008-01-01

    Methods to obtain tensile stress-strain properties of materials from a practically non-destructive indentation test are of great industrial interest. Nanoindentation is a good candidate. However, to do this successfully, indentation size effects must be accounted for. An indentation size effect with spherical indenters has been shown for a range of fcc metals with relatively large grain size (Spary et al 2006 Phil. Mag. 86 5581-93); the increase in yield stress being proportional to the inverse cube root of indenter radius. Here, we investigate these differences further and present results for the indentation size effect with spherical indenters on Cu samples with a range of different grain sizes from 1 μm to single crystal. The important experimental control parameter, of the relative size of the indentation compared with the grain size, is also explored by using indenters of different radii on the different grain sized samples. When the grain size, d, is less than 6 times the radius of the projected contact area, a, a Hall-Petch-like behaviour is observed superimposed on the indentation size effect. For d > 6a the indentation size effect dominates. The two effects may be combined by addition in quadrature. This new parametric function is able to predict the indentation pressure in annealed copper given input values of indenter radius and grain size

  8. Physiological and nutritional status of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb.) grown in soil with interaction of high doses of copper and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiecher, Tadeu L; Tiecher, Tales; Ceretta, Carlos A; Ferreira, Paulo A A; Nicoloso, Fernando T; Soriani, Hilda H; Tassinari, Adriele; Paranhos, Juçara Terezinha; De Conti, Lessandro; Brunetto, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    Vineyard sandy acid soils from South Brazil have experienced heavy metal contamination due to replacement of copper (Cu)-based by zinc (Zn)-based products to control foliar diseases. Thus, we evaluate physiological and nutritional status of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb.), a common interrow crop in vineyards from this region. Soil was collected in a natural field from Santana do Livramento, in Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state of Brazil. Black oat was cultivated for 30 days in a greenhouse with application of 0, 30, and 60 mg Cu kg(-1) combined with 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 mg Zn kg(-1). After the trial period, dry matter accumulation of roots and shoots, Cu and Zn contents in roots and shoots, chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic pigments and catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) activity were determined. Cu and Zn toxicity was evidenced by the decrease in plant growth of black oat as well as by the decrease of photochemical efficiency associated with the decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, especially with the highest doses of Cu and Zn. Furthermore, the activity of antioxidant enzymes (CAT and POD) was increased in intermediate doses of Zn, indicating the activation of the antioxidant system, but the stress condition in treatments with high levels of Cu and Zn was not reversed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel nanostructured composite formed by interaction of copper octa(3-aminopropyl)octasilsesquioxane with azide ligands: Preparation, characterization and a voltammetric application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro do Carmo, Devaney; Paim, Leonardo Lataro; Metzker, Gustavo; Dias Filho, Newton Luiz; Stradiotto, Nelson Ramos

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the preparation, characterization and application of copper octa(3-aminopropyl)octasilsesquioxane following its subsequent reaction with azide ions (ASCA). The precursor (AC) and the novel compound (ASCA) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetric analyses and voltammetric technique. The cyclic voltammogram of the modified graphite paste electrode with ASCA (GPE-ASCA), showed one redox couple with formal potential (E 1/2 ox ) = 0.30 V and an irreversible process at 1.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl; NaCl 1.0 M; v=20mVs -1 ). The material is very sensitive to nitrite concentrations. The modified graphite paste electrode (GPE-ASCA) gives a linear range from 1.0 x 10 -4 to 4.0 x 10 -3 mol L -1 for the determination of nitrite, with a detection limit of 2.1 x 10 -4 mol L -1 and the amperometric sensitivity of 8.04 mA/mol L -1 .

  10. Copper and selenium supplementation in the diet of Brangus steers on the nutritional characteristics of meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlindo Saran Netto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight Brangus cattle were used to determine the effect of copper and selenium supplementation on the carcass characteristics, fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle and on the copper and selenium concentrations in the liver. The treatments were: no supplementation of copper or selenium; 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite; 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate; and 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite and 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate. The fat thickness, rib eye area and fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle were not affected by treatments. There was no effect on carcass yield and cooling loss with the supplementation of copper, selenium or selenium × copper in the levels studied. For the ether extract concentration in the longissimus dorsi muscle, no differences were found according to the treatments with selenium, copper or selenium × copper. The treatments with selenium and selenium × copper showed higher selenium concentrations in the liver than the control and copper treatments. For the copper concentration in the liver, the copper and selenium × copper treatments showed higher values than the control and selenium treatments. Despite the little effect on the meat composition, the results of this experiment demonstrate no interaction between selenium and copper in the levels studied.

  11. Formation of copper silicides by high dose metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Chun; Zhang Jizhong; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Si(1 1 1) was implanted by copper ions with different doses and copper distribution in silicon matrix was obtained. The as-implanted samples were annealed at 300 and 540 deg. C, respectively. Formation of copper silicides in as-implanted and annealed samples were studied. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the reaction were found to be different from reaction at copper-silicon interface that was applied in conventional studies of copper-silicon interaction. The defects in silicon induced by implantation and formation of copper silicides were recognized by Si(2 2 2) X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  12. PRP: a FORTRAN IV interactive plotting program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, A. S.; Linde, J.

    A computer program, PRP, has been designed to plot any arithmetic combination selected from a set of major and trace element data on a y- x graph. y and x are defined and entered as a program string (y, x) which is interpreted sequentially. Operators ( +, -, ∗, /, ( unary) , square root, log 10, In c, antilog 10, exponential, integer, absolute value, (,),,) and integer or real numbers may be included. Axis lengths and scales are determined by the user. Five different plotting symbols are available.

  13. Interactions between oxovanadium (IV), glycylvaline and imidazoles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The aqueous chemistry of vanadium has been attracting interest for many years. Solution ... other simple molecules containing this type of donor groups. .... This work was carried out under financial assistance from the University Grant.

  14. Electrical characterization of copper related defect reactions in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, T. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 67 - Strasbourg (France). Lab. PHASE; Istratov, A.A.; Flink, C.; Weber, E.R. [Department of Material Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, 577 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Defect reactions involving interstitial copper impurities (Cu{sub i}) in silicon are reviewed. The influence of the Coulomb interaction between positively charged copper and negatively charged defects, such as acceptor states of transition metals and lattice defects, on the complex formation rate is discussed in detail. The diffusivity of interstitial copper and the dissociation kinetics of copper-acceptor pairs are studied using the recently introduced transient ion drift (TID) method. TID results reveal that most interstitial copper impurities remain dissolved immediately after the quench and form pairs with shallow acceptors. It is shown that in moderately and heavily doped silicon the diffusivity of copper is trap limited, while in low B-doped silicon the interstitial copper-acceptor pairing is weak enough to allow the assessment of the copper intrinsic diffusion coefficient. The intrinsic diffusion barrier is estimated to be 0.18{+-}0.01 eV. It is concluded that the Coulomb potential used in previous publications underestimated considerably the acceptor-copper interaction. In light of these results, a general discussion on Cu related defect reactions is given. (orig.) 44 refs.

  15. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvashnina, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    Rare earths and copper systems were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). The use of monochromased synchotron radiation and improved energy resolution for RIXS made possible to obtain valuable information on the electronic structure in 4f, 5f and 3d systems. Experimental results for rare-earths (Ho, Gd, Cm, U, Np, Pu) were analyzed by atomic multiplet theory based on the Hartree-Fock calculations. The inelastic scattering structures in RIXS spectra at 5d edge of actinides found to be sensitive to actinide oxidation states in different systems. Comparison of experimental and calculated Cm 5d RIXS spectra gave direct information about valency of the 248-curium isotope in oxide. Scientific understanding of processes that control chemical changes of radioactive species from spent fuel is improved by studying interactions of actinide ions (U, Np, Pu) with corroded iron surfaces. RIXS measurements at the actinide 5d edge found to be sensitive to actinide oxidation states in different systems. Comparison of experimental and calculated Cm 5d RIXS spectra gave direct information about valency of the 248 curium isotope in oxide. Scientific understanding of processes that control chemical changes of radioactive species from spent fuel is improved by studying interactions of actinide ions (U, Np, Pu) with corroded iron surfaces. RIXS measurements at the actinide 5d edge indicate the reduction of U(VI), NP(V) and Pu(VI) to U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) by presence of iron ions. This thesis is also addressed to the study of changes in the electronic structure of copper films during interaction with synthetic groundwater solutions. The surface modifications induced by chemical reactions of oxidized 100 Angstrom Cu films with CL - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - ions in aqueous solutions with various concentrations were studied in-situ using XAS. It was shown that the pH value, the concentration of Cl - ion and presence of HC 3 - ion in

  16. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and CopperSystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2007-07-11

    Rare earths and copper systems were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). The use of monochromased synchotron radiation and improved energy resolution for RIXS made possible to obtain valuable information on the electronic structure in 4f, 5f and 3d systems. Experimental results for rare-earths (Ho, Gd, Cm, U, Np, Pu) were analyzed by atomic multiplet theory based on the Hartree-Fock calculations. The inelastic scattering structures in RIXS spectra at 5d edge of actinides found to be sensitive to actinide oxidation states in different systems. Comparison of experimental and calculated Cm 5d RIXS spectra gave direct information about valency of the 248-curium isotope in oxide. Scientific understanding of processes that control chemical changes of radioactive species from spent fuel is improved by studying interactions of actinide ions (U, Np, Pu) with corroded iron surfaces. RIXS measurements at the actinide 5d edge found to be sensitive to actinide oxidation states in different systems. Comparison of experimental and calculated Cm 5d RIXS spectra gave direct information about valency of the 248 curium isotope in oxide. Scientific understanding of processes that control chemical changes of radioactive species from spent fuel is improved by studying interactions of actinide ions (U, Np, Pu) with corroded iron surfaces. RIXS measurements at the actinide 5d edge indicate the reduction of U(VI), NP(V) and Pu(VI) to U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) by presence of iron ions. This thesis is also addressed to the study of changes in the electronic structure of copper films during interaction with synthetic groundwater solutions. The surface modifications induced by chemical reactions of oxidized 100 Angstrom Cu films with CL-, SO42- and HCO3- ions in aqueous solutions with various concentrations were studied in-situ using XAS. It was shown that the pH value, the

  17. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  18. Gibbs energy calculation of electrolytic plasma channel with inclusions of copper and copper oxide with Al-base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posuvailo, V. M.; Klapkiv, M. D.; Student, M. M.; Sirak, Y. Y.; Pokhmurska, H. V.

    2017-03-01

    The oxide ceramic coating with copper inclusions was synthesized by the method of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). Calculations of the Gibbs energies of reactions between the plasma channel elements with inclusions of copper and copper oxide were carried out. Two methods of forming the oxide-ceramic coatings on aluminum base in electrolytic plasma with copper inclusions were established. The first method - consist in the introduction of copper into the aluminum matrix, the second - copper oxide. During the synthesis of oxide ceramic coatings plasma channel does not react with copper and copper oxide-ceramic included in the coating. In the second case is reduction of copper oxide in interaction with elements of the plasma channel. The content of oxide-ceramic layer was investigated by X-ray and X-ray microelement analysis. The inclusions of copper, CuAl2, Cu9Al4 in the oxide-ceramic coatings were found. It was established that in the spark plasma channels alongside with the oxidation reaction occurs also the reaction aluminothermic reduction of the metal that allows us to dope the oxide-ceramic coating by metal the isobaric-isothermal potential oxidation of which is less negative than the potential of the aluminum oxide.

  19. Copper and silver halates

    CERN Document Server

    Woolley, EM; Salomon, M

    2013-01-01

    Copper and Silver Halates is the third in a series of four volumes on inorganic metal halates. This volume presents critical evaluations and compilations for halate solubilities of the Group II metals. The solubility data included in this volume are those for the five compounds, copper chlorate and iodate, and silver chlorate, bromate and iodate.

  20. Internet Economics IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    edts.): Internet Economics IV Technical Report No. 2004-04, August 2004 Information Systems Laboratory IIS, Departement of Computer Science University of...level agreements (SLA), Information technology (IT), Internet address, Internet service provider 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18... technology and its economic impacts in the Internet world today. The second talk addresses the area of AAA protocol, summarizing authentication

  1. Uranium (IV) carboxylates - I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satpathy, K C; Patnaik, A K [Sambalpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1975-11-01

    A few uranium(IV) carboxylates with monochloro and trichloro acetic acid, glycine, malic, citric, adipic, o-toluic, anthranilic and salicylic acids have been prepared by photolytic methods. The I.R. spectra of these compounds are recorded and basing on the spectral data, structure of the compounds have been suggested.

  2. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  3. Application of factorial designs and Doehlert matrix in optimization of experimental variables associated with the preconcentration and determination of vanadium and copper in seawater by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Sergio L.C.; Queiroz, Adriana S.; Fernandes, Marcelo S.; Santos, Hilda C. dos

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper a procedure for preconcentration and determination of vanadium and copper in seawater using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) is proposed, which is based on solid-phase extraction of vanadium (IV), vanadium (V) and copper (II) ions as 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) complexes by active carbon. The optimization process was carried out using two-level full factorials and Doehlert matrix designs. Four variables (PAN mass, pH, active carbon mass and shaking time) were regarded as factors in the optimization. Results of the two-level full factorial design 2 4 with 16 runs for vanadium extraction, based on the variance analysis (ANOVA), demonstrated that the factors pH and active carbon mass, besides the interaction (pHxactive carbon mass), are statistically significant. For copper, the ANOVA revealed that the factors PAN mass, pH and active carbon mass and the interactions (PAN massxpH) and (pHxactive carbon mass) are statistically significant. Doehlert designs were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for extraction. The procedure proposed allowed the determination of vanadium and copper with detection limits (3σ/S) of 73 and 94 ng l -1 , respectively. The precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), was 1.22 and 1.37% for 12.50 μg l -1 of vanadium and copper, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 80. The recovery achieved for determination of vanadium and copper in the presence of several cations demonstrated that this procedure improved the selectivity required for seawater analysis. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium and copper in seawater samples collected in Salvador City, Brazil. Results showed good agreement with other data reported in the literature

  4. Structures of the two new compounds distrontium copper(II) triselenite(IV) and distrontium copper(II) bis[hydrogenselenite(IV)] bisselenite(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effenberger, H.

    1988-01-01

    Sr 2 Cu(SeO 3 ) 3 , M r =619.68, triclinic, Panti 1, a=7.229(3), b=7.710(3), c=8.656(3) A, α=102.68(3), β=105.31(3), γ=96.12(3) 0 , V=447.0 A 3 , Z=2, D x =4.60 Mg m -3 , λ(MoKα)=0.71073 A, μ=26.0 mm -1 , F(000)=558, room temperature, R=0.033 for 3330 reflections up to 2θ=70 0 . Sr 2 Cu(SeO 2 OH) 2 (SeO 3 ) 2 , M r =748.65, triclinic, Panti 1, a=5.260(1), b=6.961(1), c=9.052(2) A, α=67.86(1), β=75.40(1), γ=80.41(1) 0 , V=296.6A 3 , Z=1, D x =4.19 Mg m -3 , λ(MoKα)=0.71073 A, μ=22.6 mm -1 , F(000)=339, room temperature, R=0.036 for 2362 reflections up to 2θ=70 0 . In the two compounds the Sr atoms are [8] and [9] coordinated (Sr-O=2.52 to 2.93 A), the Cu atoms have a tetragonal-pyramidal [4+1] and a square-planar [4] coordination, respectively. The distance Se-O h (1.80 A) is significantly longer than the other Se-O bonds (1.66 to 1.73 A). In Sr 2 Cu(SeO 3 ) 3 , the SrO 8 polyhedra form a three-dimensional network; in Sr 2 Cu(SeO 2 OH) 2 (SeO 3 ) 2 , the SrO 9 polyhedra are edge-linked to form sheets which are connected by CuO 4 squares, SeO 3 groups and the hydrogen bond (O-H...O=2.88 A). (orig.)

  5. Copper complexes containing thiosemicarbazones derived from 6-nitropiperonal: Antimicrobial and biophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckford, Floyd A.; Webb, Kelsey R.

    2017-08-01

    A series of four thiosemicarbazones from 6-nitropiperonal along with the corresponding copper complexes were synthesized. The biophysical characteristics of the complexes were investigated by the binding to DNA and human serum albumin. The binding to DNA is moderate; the binding constants run from (0.49-7.50) × 104 M- 1. In relation to HSA, the complexes interact strongly with binding constants on the order of 105 M- 1. The complexes also display antioxidant behavior as determined by the ability to scavenge diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (dpph) and nitric oxide radicals. The antimicrobial profiles of the compounds, tested against a panel of microbes including five of the ESKAPE pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, MDR, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two yeasts (Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii), are also described. The compounds contain a core moiety that is similar to oxolinic acid, a quinolone antibiotic that targets DNA gyrase and topoisomerase (IV). The binding interaction between the complexes and these important antibacterial targets were studied by computational methods, chiefly docking studies. The calculated dissociation constants for the interaction with DNA gyrase B (from Staphylococcus aureus) range from 4.32 to 24.65 μM; the binding was much stronger to topoisomerase IV, with dissociation constants ranging from 0.37 to 1.27 μM.

  6. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations (CRWMS M and O 1999b) and (CRWMS M and O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as line load. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding their 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.6) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance. The EDA IV concept includes more defense-in-depth layers than the VA reference design because of its backfill, drip shield, waste package shielding, and integral filler features. These features contribute to the low dose-rate to the public achieved during the first 10,000 years of repository life as shown in Figure 3. Investigation of the EDA IV concept has led to the following general conclusions: (1) The total life cycle cost for EDA IV is about $21.7 billion which equates to a $11.3 billion net present value (both figures rounded up). (2) The incidence of design basis events for EDA IV is similar to the VA reference design. (3) The emplacement of the waste packages in drifts will be similar to the VA reference design. However, heavier equipment may be required because the shielded waste package will be heavier. (4) The heavier

  7. Redox mechanisms and superconductivity in layered copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveau, B.; Michel, C.; Hervieu, M.; Provost, J.

    1992-01-01

    Redox reactions in high T c superconductors cuprates are complex and play an important role in superconductivity: oxygen non-stoichiometry is influencing the critical temperature, and rock salt layers interact with copper layers. 25 refs., 7 figs

  8. Copper carrier protein in copper toxic sheep liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, A L; Dean, P D.G.

    1973-01-01

    The livers of copper-toxic sheep have been analyzed by gel electrophoresis followed by staining the gels for copper with diethyldithiocarbamate and for protein with amido schwartz. These gels were compared with similar gels obtained from the livers of normal and copper-deficient animals. The copper-toxic livers contained an extra protein band which possessed relatively weakly bound copper. Possible origins of this protein are discussed. 8 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D and D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D and D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D and D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness

  10. Canine Copper-Associated Hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, Karen; Fieten, Hille

    2017-01-01

    Copper-associated hepatitis is recognized with increasing frequency in dogs. The disease is characterized by centrolobular hepatic copper accumulation, leading to hepatitis and eventually cirrhosis. The only way to establish the diagnosis is by histologic assessment of copper distribution and copper

  11. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level.

  12. Multilevel Dual Damascene copper interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, S.

    C, 500oC and 600oC for Ti, TiN and Ta barriers respectively. Via resistivity on the order of 10-9/ /Omegacm2 was measured for Cu/Ta/Cu interfaces and no degradation in the via resistance was observed upto 600oC on the 2 μm and 3 μm wide contact windows. Characterization of diode leakage and subthreshold currents of CMOS transistors fabricated with Ta adhesion layers, showed the failure of the Ta barrier at 450oC. Despite the good barrier performance of the CVD TiN films, obtaining low contact resistivity may be a concern. The potential use of Cu-Mg alloy as the backend metallization has also been studied. Fully encapsulated wiring has been fabricated by causing the Mg to out- diffuse towards the Cu/SiO2 interfaces and the free copper surface. The inter-connects exhibited good stability and oxidation resistance, but via resistances were extremely high, probably due to the presence of insulating films like MgO or MgF2 at the interface between the two metal levels. It may be possible to decrease the via resistance to values comparable to Cu/Ta/Cu by altering the process flow and using a suitable via clean. When used at the contact level, undesirable interaction with the CoSi2 film was observed at temperatures as low as 350oC. Another problem was the high contact resistance at the Cu-Mg/CoSi2 interface. Hence the use of this alloy as a contact fill material is not feasible at this time. An additional barrier layer may be required between the Cu-Mg and CoSi2 films to protect the integrity of the silicide and provide low contact resistance.

  13. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  14. A sputnik IV saga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  15. DFT Study of Azole Corrosion Inhibitors on Cu2O Model of Oxidized Copper Surfaces: II. Lateral Interactions and Thermodynamic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Gustinčič

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of imidazole, triazole, and tetrazole—used as simple models of azole corrosion inhibitors—on various Cu 2 O(111- and Cu 2 O(110-type surfaces was characterized using density functional theory (DFT calculations with the focus on lateral intermolecular interactions and the thermodynamic stability of various adsorption structures. To this end, an ab initio thermodynamics approach was used to construct two-dimensional phase diagrams for all three molecules. The impact of van der Waals dispersion interactions on molecular adsorption bonding was also addressed. Lateral intermolecular interactions were found to be the most repulsive for imidazole and the least for tetrazole, for which they are usually even slightly attractive. Both non-dissociative and dissociative adsorption modes were considered and although dissociated molecules bind to surfaces more strongly, none of the considered structures that involve dissociated molecules appear on the phase diagrams. Our results show that the three azole molecules display a strong tendency to preferentially adsorb at reactive coordinatively unsaturated (CUS Cu surface sites and stabilize them. According to the calculated phase diagrams for Cu 2 O(111-type surfaces, the three azole molecules adsorb to specific CUS sites, designated as Cu CUS , under all conditions at which molecular adsorption is stable. This tentatively suggests that their corrosion inhibition capability may stem, at least in part, from their ability to passivate reactive surface sites. We further comment on a specific drawback due to neglect of configurational entropy that is usually utilized within the ab initio thermodynamics approach. We analyze the issue for Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption models and show that when configurational entropy is neglected, the ab initio thermodynamics approach is too hasty to predict phase-transition like behavior.

  16. Comparative effects of dissolved copper and copper oxide nanoparticle exposure to the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Samreen; Goddard, Russell H.; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K., E-mail: gkbielmyer@valdosta.edu

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Differences between CuO NP and CuCl{sub 2} exposure were characterized. • Copper accumulation in E. pallida was concentration-dependent. • E. pallida exposed to CuCl{sub 2} accumulated higher copper tissue burdens. • The oxidative stress response was greater in E. pallida exposed to CuO NP. • Both forms of copper inhibited CA activity in E. pallida. - Abstract: Increasing use of metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) by various industries has resulted in substantial output of these NP into aquatic systems. At elevated concentrations, NP may interact with and potentially affect aquatic organisms. Environmental implications of increased NP use are largely unknown, particularly in marine systems. This research investigated and compared the effects of copper oxide (CuO) NP and dissolved copper, as copper chloride (CuCl{sub 2}), on the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida. Sea anemones were collected over 21 days and tissue copper accumulation and activities of the enzymes: catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and carbonic anhydrase were quantified. The size and shape of CuO NP were observed using a ecanning electron microscope (SEM) and the presence of copper was confirmed by using Oxford energy dispersive spectroscopy systems (EDS/EDX). E. pallida accumulated copper in their tissues in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with the animals exposed to CuCl{sub 2} accumulating higher tissue copper burdens than those exposed to CuO NP. As a consequence of increased copper exposure, as CuO NP or CuCl{sub 2}, anemones increased activities of all of the antioxidant enzymes measured to some degree, and decreased the activity of carbonic anhydrase. Anemones exposed to CuO NP generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentrations of CuCl{sub 2}. This study is useful in discerning differences between CuO NP and dissolved copper exposure and the findings have implications for exposure of aquatic

  17. Micromachining with copper lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  18. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  19. copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptadionato)copper(II) ... Abstract. Equilibrium concentrations of various condensed and gaseous phases have been thermodyna- ... phere, over a wide range of substrate temperatures and total reactor pressures.

  20. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    OpenAIRE

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important fir...

  1. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  2. Copper intoxication in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazaryan, V.S.; Sogoyan, I.S.; Agabalov, G.A.; Mesropyan, V.V.

    1966-01-01

    Of 950 sheep fed hay from a vineyard sprayed regularly with copper sulfate, 143 developed clinical copper poisoning and 103 died. The Cu content of the hay was 10.23 mg%, of the liver of dead sheep 17-52 mg%, and of the blood serum of affected sheep 0.86 mg%. The symptoms and the histological findings in kidneys and liver are described.

  3. Copper in the sea: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1977-04-01

    Life in the sea is vulnerable to the influx of trace metals resulting from man's activities. Although many pollutants introduced to the sea eventually degrade to less harmful forms, trace metals accumulate in sediments and have a continued potential for effect on biota. Copper has a toxic potential exceeding all other metals due to the quantity discharged and its toxicological effect. Fortunately, copper in the oceans is rendered less bioavailable or less toxic by its ready interaction with the complex chemical components of seawater. This bibliography was prepared to illustrate the status of current knowledge of the biogeochemistry of copper and to aid the development of research programs to define the effects of copper discharged to the marine environment. The references are categorized to aid the reader to locate literature concerning specific aspects of the biogeochemistry of copper. A brief comment describing the important findings in each category is given. Although this bibliography is not exhaustive, the listed references are likely representative of current knowledge.

  4. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  5. Common molecular determinants of tarantula huwentoxin-IV inhibition of Na+ channel voltage sensors in domains II and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yucheng; Jackson, James O; Liang, Songping; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-08-05

    The voltage sensors of domains II and IV of sodium channels are important determinants of activation and inactivation, respectively. Animal toxins that alter electrophysiological excitability of muscles and neurons often modify sodium channel activation by selectively interacting with domain II and inactivation by selectively interacting with domain IV. This suggests that there may be substantial differences between the toxin-binding sites in these two important domains. Here we explore the ability of the tarantula huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV) to inhibit the activity of the domain II and IV voltage sensors. HWTX-IV is specific for domain II, and we identify five residues in the S1-S2 (Glu-753) and S3-S4 (Glu-811, Leu-814, Asp-816, and Glu-818) regions of domain II that are crucial for inhibition of activation by HWTX-IV. These data indicate that a single residue in the S3-S4 linker (Glu-818 in hNav1.7) is crucial for allowing HWTX-IV to interact with the other key residues and trap the voltage sensor in the closed configuration. Mutagenesis analysis indicates that the five corresponding residues in domain IV are all critical for endowing HWTX-IV with the ability to inhibit fast inactivation. Our data suggest that the toxin-binding motif in domain II is conserved in domain IV. Increasing our understanding of the molecular determinants of toxin interactions with voltage-gated sodium channels may permit development of enhanced isoform-specific voltage-gating modifiers.

  6. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappal, Ravinder; MacDougald, Michelle; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  7. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  8. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and electron transport chain defect induced by high dietary copper in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Cao, Huabin; Su, Rongsheng; Guo, Jianying; Li, Chengmei; Pan, Jiaqiang; Tang, Zhaoxin

    2017-09-01

    Copper is an important trace mineral in the diet of poultry due to its biological activity. However, limited information is available concerning the effects of high copper on mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, 72 broilers were used to investigate the effects of high dietary copper on liver mitochondrial dysfunction and electron transport chain defect. Birds were fed with different concentrations [11, 110, 220, and 330 mg of copper/kg dry matter (DM)] of copper from tribasic copper chloride (TBCC). The experiment lasted for 60 d. Liver tissues on d 60 were subjected to histopathological observation. Additionally, liver mitochondrial function was recorded on d 12, 36, and 60. Moreover, a site-specific defect in the electron transport chain in liver mitochondria was also identified by using various chemical inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration. The results showed different degrees of degeneration, mitochondrial swelling, and high-density electrons in hepatocytes. In addition, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and oxidative phosphorylation rate (OPR) in liver mitochondria increased at first and then decreased in high-dose groups. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation velocity in treated groups was higher than that in control group, which were magnified by inhibiting electron transport at Complex IV. The results indicated that high dietary copper could decline liver mitochondrial function in broilers. The presence of a site-specific defect at Complex IV in liver mitochondria may be responsible for liver mitochondrial dysfunction caused by high dietary copper. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  10. Mutual effects of copper and phosphate on their interaction with γ-Al2O3: combined batch macroscopic experiments with DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xuemei; Yang, Shitong; Tan, Xiaoli; Chen, Changlun; Sheng, Guodong; Wang, Xiangke

    2012-10-30

    The mutual effects of Cu(II) and phosphate on their interaction with γ-Al(2)O(3) are investigated by using batch experiments combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results of batch experiments show that coexisting phosphate promotes the retention of Cu(II) on γ-Al(2)O(3), whereas phosphate retention is not affected by coexisting Cu(II) at low initial phosphate concentrations (≤ 3.6 mg P/L). Cu-phosphate aqueous complexes control Cu(II) retention through the formation of type B ternary surface complexes (where phosphate bridges γ-Al(2)O(3) and Cu(II)) at pH 5.5. This deduction is further supported by the results of DFT calculations. More specifically, the DFT calculation results indicate that the type B ternary surface complexes prefer to form outer-sphere or monodentate inner-sphere binding mode under our experimental conditions. The enhancement of phosphate retention on γ-Al(2)O(3) in the presence of Cu(II) at high initial phosphate concentrations (>3.6 mg P/L) may be attributed to the formation of 1:2 Cu(II)-phosphate species and/or surface precipitates. Understanding the mutual effects of phosphate and Cu(II) on their mobility and transport in mineral/water environments is more realistic to design effective remediation strategies for reducing their negative impacts on aquatic/terrestrial environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating signals of oil spill impacts, climate, and species interactions in Pacific herring and Pacific salmon populations in Prince William Sound and Copper River, Alaska.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Ward

    interactions between nearshore species and freshwater inputs, particularly as they relate to climate change and increasing water temperatures.

  12. A 48 kDa collagen-binding phosphoprotein isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cells interacts with the collagenous domain, but not the globular domain, of collagen type IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Madri, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have identified collagen-binding proteins in detergent extracts of metabolically labelled bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) by collagen type IV-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The major collagen type IV-binding protein identified by SDS/PAGE had a molecular mass of 48 kDa, which we term the 'collagen-binding 48 kDa protein' (CB48). The pI of CB48 was 8.0-8.3 in a two-dimensional gel system, running non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis in the first dimension and SDS/PAGE in the se...

  13. Copper : recession and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick-Ching, T.

    2002-01-01

    In 2002, the world output for copper will fall for the first time in nearly a decade because of financial pressure and voluntary constraints. Cutbacks at copper mines amount to 760,000 tonnes per year. These cutbacks have occurred mostly in the United States which holds the largest share of high cost mines. This paper discussed recent developments in both copper supply and demand. The United States is unique as both a large consumer and producer of copper. At 1.35 million tonnes, US mine output in 2001 was at its lowest since 1987. The cutbacks in mining in general were described in this paper with particular reference to the huge loss of mining and metallurgical activity in the United States during a prolonged period of low prices in the mid 1980s. The author noted that this period was followed by an exceptional decade when much of the industry rebounded. Only 8 mines closed outright in the United States and a handful in Canada since the recession of the 1980s, but that is partly because mines got bigger and there are fewer small mines in North America. There are only 4 electrolytic refineries and 3 smelters still active in the entire United States, of which 2 are operating at a fraction of capacity. It was noted that only the buoyancy of China prevented a much bigger decline in copper demand on a global scale

  14. Hepatic imaging in stage IV-S neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, E.A. Jr.; Smith, W.L.; Iowa Univ., Iowa City; Cohen, M.D.; Kisker, C.T.; Platz, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Stage IV-S neuroblastoma describes a group of infants with tumor spread limited to liver, skin, or bone marrow. Such patients, who constitute about 25% of affected infants with neuroblastoma, may expect spontaneous tumor remission. We report 18 infants with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma, 83% of whom had liver involvement. Imaging investigations included Technetium 99m sulfur colloid scan, ultrasound, and CT. Two patterns of liver metastasis were noted: ill-defined nodules or diffuse tumor throughout the liver. Distinction of normal and abnormal liver with diffuse type metastasis could be quite difficult, particularly with liver scans. We conclude that patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma have ultrasound or CT examination as an initial workup, with nuclear medicine scans reserved for followup studies. (orig.)

  15. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  16. Cyclopentadienyluranium(IV) acetylacetonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, K.W.; Edwards, J.; Rickard, C.E.F.; Tempest, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Cyclopentadienyluranium(IV) acetylacetonate complexes, (eta 5 C 5 H 5 )UClsub(3-x)(acac)sub(x), where x = 1 or 2, and the corresponding bis triphenylphosphine oxide (tppo) complexes have been prepared. The bis cyclopentadienyl complexes, (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 U(acac) 2 and (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 UCl(acac)(tppo) 2 have also been prepared and are stable with respect to disproportionation, whereas (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 UCl(acac) is not. The IR and UV/visible spectra of the complexes are reported, together with some additional information on the UCl 2 (acac) 2 thf and -tppo systems. (author)

  17. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  18. Electrical conduction in composites containing copper core-copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of nanometre-sized copper core-copper oxide shell with diameters in the range 6.1 to 7.3 nm dispersed in a silica gel were synthesised by a technique comprising reduction followed by oxidation of a suitably chosen precursor gel. The hot pressed gel powders mixed with nanometre-sized copper particles ...

  19. Comparative Study of Electroless Copper Film on Different Self-Assembled Monolayers Modified ABS Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiushuai Xu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper films were grown on (3-Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS, (3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES and 6-(3-(triethoxysilylpropylamino-1,3,5- triazine-2,4-dithiol monosodium (TES self-assembled monolayers (SAMs modified acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS substrate via electroless copper plating. The copper films were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Their individual deposition rate and contact angle were also investigated to compare the properties of SAMs and electroless copper films. The results indicated that the formation of copper nuclei on the TES-SAMs modified ABS substrate was faster than those on the MPTMS-SAMs and APTES-SAMs modified ABS substrate. SEM images revealed that the copper film on TES-SAM modified ABS substrate was smooth and uniform, and the density of copper nuclei was much higher. Compared with that of TES-SAMs modified resin, the coverage of copper nuclei on MPTMS and APTES modified ABS substrate was very limited and the copper particle size was too big. The adhesion property test demonstrated that all the SAMs enhanced the interfacial interaction between copper plating and ABS substrate. XRD analysis showed that the copper film deposited on SAM-modified ABS substrate had a structure with Cu(111 preferred orientation, and the copper film deposited on TES-SAMs modified ABS substrate is better than that deposited on MPTMS-SAMs or APTES-SAMs modified ABS resins in electromigrtion resistance.

  20. Study of copper fluorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillardeau, J.

    1967-02-01

    This report deals with the action of fluorine on copper. Comprehensive descriptions are given of the particular technological methods and of the preparation of the reactants. This fluorination reaction has been studied at medium and low fluorine pressures. A nucleation and growth phenomenon is described. The influence of a pollution of the gas phase on the fluorination process is described. The solid-state reaction between cupric fluoride and cooper has also been studied. A special study has been made of the growth of copper deposits by thermal decomposition of gaseous fluorides. (author) [fr

  1. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryding, David G.; Allen, Douglas; Lee, Richard H.

    1996-11-01

    The advanced photon source is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail than has ben possible to date. The beam is produced by using third- generation insertion devices in a 7-GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1,104 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high-power devices is very high, and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm$_2). Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop, a dispersion-strengthened copper, is the desired design material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Congenital bilateral neuroblastoma (stage IV-S): case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Lee, Hee Jung; Woo, Seong Ku; Lee, Sang Rak; Kim, Heung Sik

    2002-01-01

    Congenital neonatal neuroblastoma is not uncommon but bilateral adrenal neuroblastoma is rare, accounting for about ten percent of neuroblastomas in children. We report the US the MR findings of a stage IV-S congenital bilateral neuroblastoma occurring in a one-day-old neonate

  3. Rate and Regulation of Copper Transport by Human Copper Transporter 1 (hCTR1)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryon, Edward B.; Molloy, Shannon A.; Ivy, Kristin; Yu, Huijun; Kaplan, Jack H.

    2013-01-01

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is a homotrimer of a 190-amino acid monomer having three transmembrane domains believed to form a pore for copper permeation through the plasma membrane. The hCTR1-mediated copper transport mechanism is not well understood, nor has any measurement been made of the rate at which copper ions are transported by hCTR1. In this study, we estimated the rate of copper transport by the hCTR1 trimer in cultured cells using 64Cu uptake assays and quantification of plasma membrane hCTR1. For endogenous hCTR1, we estimated a turnover number of about 10 ions/trimer/s. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, a second transmembrane domain mutant of hCTR1 (H139R) had a 3-fold higher Km value and a 4-fold higher turnover number than WT. Truncations of the intracellular C-terminal tail and an AAA substitution of the putative metal-binding HCH C-terminal tripeptide (thought to be required for transport) also exhibited elevated transport rates and Km values when compared with WT hCTR1. Unlike WT hCTR1, H139R and the C-terminal mutants did not undergo regulatory endocytosis in elevated copper. hCTR1 mutants combining methionine substitutions that block transport (M150L,M154L) on the extracellular side of the pore and the high transport H139R or AAA intracellular side mutations exhibited the blocked transport of M150L,M154L, confirming that Cu+ first interacts with the methionines during permeation. Our results show that hCTR1 elements on the intracellular side of the hCTR1 pore, including the carboxyl tail, are not essential for permeation, but serve to regulate the rate of copper entry. PMID:23658018

  4. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Montes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson’s disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson’s disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson’s disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson’s disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  5. Acute effect of copper exposure on serum biochemical characteristics of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melika Ghelichpour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ambient copper was investigated on serum stress markers, sodium and enzyme levels in Common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. over a 14-d exposure period. Fish were exposed to 0, 25 and 100 μg L-1 copper (as copper sulfate and blood was sampled at 0, 3, 7 and 14 d after exposure. Serum profile was significantly affected by copper concentration, sampling time and their interaction. Increase in serum levels of cortisol, glucose, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and decrease in serum sodium levels were observed in both copper-exposed groups, 3 d after copper exposure, which lasted until the end of the experiment. It is concluded that copper exposure causes stress response and sodium loss in common carp. Likewise alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase increase after exposure which might be as results of either tissue damage or stress.

  6. Creative Copper Crests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  7. and copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (II) and copper(II)–zinc(II) complexes. SUBODH KUMAR1, R N PATEL1*, P V KHADIKAR1 and. K B PANDEYA2. 1 Department of Chemistry, APS University, Rewa 486 003, India. 2 CSJM University, Kanpur 208 016, India e-mail: (R N Patel) ...

  8. Reagent conditions of the flotation of copper, copper - molybdenum and copper -zinc ores in foreing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevaeva, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Reagents-collectors and frothers, used abroad in reagent regimes of flotation of copper, copper-molybdenum and copper zinc ores, have been considered. Xanthogenates, aerofloats, xanthogenformiates, thionocarbamates are mainly used as reagents-collectors. Methylizobutylcarbinol and Daufros are used as reagents-frothers

  9. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearling, J.L.

    1998-11-01

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes ( 64 Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective 64 Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective 64 Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential, with hypoxia

  10. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  11. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Warm acclimation reduced the electron transport system (ETS) efficiency. • Warm acclimation altered the effects of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu on ETS. • Warm acclimation increased thermal sensitivity of state 3 and reduced that of state 4. • Cu stimulated while hypoxia inhibited ETS respiratory activity. • Interactions of Cu and hypoxia on the ETS and plasma metabolites were antagonistic. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24 h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I–IV (CI–IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma

  12. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, British Columbia V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Warm acclimation reduced the electron transport system (ETS) efficiency. • Warm acclimation altered the effects of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu on ETS. • Warm acclimation increased thermal sensitivity of state 3 and reduced that of state 4. • Cu stimulated while hypoxia inhibited ETS respiratory activity. • Interactions of Cu and hypoxia on the ETS and plasma metabolites were antagonistic. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24 h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I–IV (CI–IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma

  13. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made...

  14. About the structure and stability of complex carbonates of thorium (IV), cerium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervin, Jacqueline

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the study of complex carbonates of cations of metals belonging to the IV A column, i.e. thorium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV), and also cerium (IV) and uranium (VI), and more particularly focused on ionic compounds formed in solution, and also on the influence of concentration and nature of cations on stability and nature of the formed solid. The author first presents methods used in this study, discusses their precision and scope of validity. She reports the study of the formation of different complex ions which have been highlighted in solution, and the determination of their formation constants. She reports the preparation and study of the stability domain of solid complexes. The next part reports the use of thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectrometry, and crystallography for the structural study of these compounds

  15. Effects of auxin and copper on growth of saffron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Sharifi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Saffron is known as one of the most common spices and medicinal plant in the world. Little information is available on the effects of copper and growth regulators on morphological characteristics of saffron. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different concentrations of copper and auxin on morphological properties of root and leaf of saffron. This study was arranged as a factorial experiment in greenhouse condition and in hydroponic system. Copper was used in copper sulfate (CuSO4 form (0, 0.02, 0.1 and 0.2 mg/L and auxin in naphthalene acetic acid (NAA form (0, 1 and 2 g/L. Results showed that interaction of Naphthalene acetic acid 1 g/L and copper sulfate 0.1 mg/L increased root number, as well as root and leaf dry weight. Furthermore, naphthalene acetic acid 1 and 2 g/L in most treatments reduced the number of buds. Copper concentration of corm was increased in 0.2 mg/L copper sulfate.

  16. Effects of copper ions on the characteristics of egg white gel induced by strong alkali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yaoyao; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Mingsheng; Chen, Zhangyi; Wang, Shuzhen; Tu, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of copper ions on egg white (EW) gel induced by strong alkali. Changes in gel characteristics were examined through texture profile analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical methods. The value of gel strength reached its maximum when 0.1% copper ions was added. However, the lowest cohesiveness values were observed at 0.1%. The springiness of gel without copper ions was significantly greater than the gel with copper ions added. SEM results illustrated that the low concentration of copper ions contributes to a dense and uniform gel network, and an open matrix was formed at 0.4%. The free and total sulphhydryl group content in the egg white protein gel significantly decreased with the increased copper. The increase of copper ions left the contents of ionic and hydrogen bonds basically unchanged, hydrophobic interaction presented an increasing trend, and the disulfide bond exhibited a completely opposite change. The change of surface hydrophobicity proved that the main binding force of copper induced gel was hydrophobic interaction. However, copper ions had no effect on the protein component of the gels. Generally, a low level of copper ions facilitates protein-protein association, which is involved in the characteristics of gels. Instead, high ionic strength had a negative effect on gels induced by strong alkali. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Plated copper front side metallization on printed seed-layers for silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Achim

    2015-01-01

    A novel copper front side metallization architecture for silicon solar cells based on a fine printed silver seed-layer, plated with nickel, copper and silver, is investigated. The work focuses on the printing of fine seed-layers with low silver consumption, the corrosion of the printed seed-layers by the interaction with electrolyte solutions and the encapsulation material on module level and on the long term stability of the cells due to copper migration. The investigation of the correlation...

  18. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  19. Copper and hypoxia modulate transcriptional and mitochondrial functional-biochemical responses in warm acclimated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Purcell, Sara; MacDonald, Nicole; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2016-01-01

    To survive in changing environments fish utilize a wide range of biological responses that require energy. We examined the effect of warm acclimation on the electron transport system (ETS) enzymes and transcriptional responses to hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperatures for 3 weeks followed by exposure to Cu, hypoxia or both for 24 h. Activities of ETS enzyme complexes I-IV (CI–CIV) were measured in liver and gill mitochondria. Analyses of transcripts encoding for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration (cytochrome c oxidase subunits 4-1 and 2: COX4-1 and COX4-2), metal detoxification/stress response (metallothioneins A and B: MT-A and MT-B) and energy sensing (AMP-activated protein kinase α1: AMPKα1) were done in liver mitochondria, and in whole liver and gill tissues by RT-qPCR. Warm acclimation inhibited activities of ETS enzymes while effects of Cu and hypoxia depended on the enzyme and thermal acclimation status. The genes encoding for COX4-1, COX4-2, MT-A, MT-B and AMPKα1 were strongly and tissue-dependently altered by warm acclimation. While Cu and hypoxia clearly increased MT-A and MT-B transcript levels in all tissues, their effects on COX4-1, COX4-2 and AMPKα1 mRNA levels were less pronounced. Importantly, warm acclimation differentially altered COX4-2/COX4-1 ratio in liver mitochondria and gill tissue. The three stressors showed both independent and joint actions on activities of ETS enzymes and transcription of genes involved in energy metabolism, stress response and metals homeostasis. Overall, we unveiled novel interactive effects that should not be overlooked in real world situations wherein fish normally encounter multiple stress factors. - Highlights: • Joint and individual effects of copper, hypoxia and warm acclimation differ quantitatively. • Energy metabolism genes are differentially altered by multiple stressors.

  20. The Effect of Copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environment, where fishes are found, stuns them ... of earthen ponds are springing up near cocoa ... farm, which posses toxicological risk to farmed ... Veg. oil. 1.0. 1.0. 1.0. 1.0. 1.0. Copper sulphate 0. 1.0. 2.5. 5.0. 7.5. Total ..... Cellulase Production by Wild Strains of Aspergillus Niger, ... Mangrove Area of Lagos, Nigeria.

  1. Copper Pyrimidine based MOFs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesized hydrothermally in a 23-mL Teflon lined stainless steel bomb by heating copper(II) 2-pyrazinecarboxylate (31 mg, 0.1 mmol) and tin(II) iodide (75 mg, 0.2 mmol) in 4 mL water at 150±C for 24 h. The reaction vessel was subsequently cooled to 70±C at 1±C/min and held at that temperature for 6 h before returning ...

  2. Copper doped borate dosimeters revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alajerami, Y.S.M. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Department of Medical Radiography, Al-Azhar University, Gaza Strip, Palestine (Country Unknown); Hashim, S., E-mail: suhairul@utm.my [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Oncology Treatment Centre, Sultan Ismail Hospital, 81100 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ghoshal, S.K. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mhareb, M. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Saleh, M.A. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); National Atomic Energy Commission (NATEC), Sana' a (Yemen)

    2014-11-15

    We render a panoramic overview on copper (Cu) doped borate dosimeters. Preparing a dosimeter by mixing specific materials with precise weights and methods is a never-ending quest. The recommended composition is highly decisive for accurate estimation of the absorbed dose, prediction of the biological outcome, determination of the treatment dose for radiation therapy and facilitation of personal monitoring. Based on these principles, the proposed dosimeter must cover a series of dosimetric properties to realize the exact results and assessment. The doped borate dosimeters indeed demonstrate attractive thermoluminescence (TL) features. Several dedicated efforts are attempted to improve the luminescence properties by doping various transition metals or rare-earth elements. The Cu ion being one of the preferred activators shows excellent TL properties as revealed via detail comparison with other dosimeters. Two oxide states of Cu (Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup ++}) with reasonable atomic number allow easy interaction with boron network. Interestingly, the intrinsic luminescent centers of borate lattice are in cross linked with that of Cu{sup +} ions. Thus, the activation of borate dosimeter with Cu ions for the enhancement of the TL sensitivity is recognized. These dosimeters reveal similar glow curves as the standard TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) one irrespective of the use of modifiers and synthesis techniques. They display high sensitivity, low fading, dose response linearity over wide range and practical minimum detectable dose. Furthermore, the effective atomic number being the most beneficial aspect (equivalent to that of human tissue) of borate dosimeters do not show any change due to Cu ion activations. The past development, major challenges, excitement, applications, recent progress and the future promises of Cu doped borate TL dosimeters are highlighted. - Highlights: • The manuscript gives a panoramic overview on copper doped borate dosimeters. • Cu ions activated

  3. Copper doped borate dosimeters revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alajerami, Y.S.M.; Hashim, S.; Ghoshal, S.K.; Bradley, D.A.; Mhareb, M.; Saleh, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We render a panoramic overview on copper (Cu) doped borate dosimeters. Preparing a dosimeter by mixing specific materials with precise weights and methods is a never-ending quest. The recommended composition is highly decisive for accurate estimation of the absorbed dose, prediction of the biological outcome, determination of the treatment dose for radiation therapy and facilitation of personal monitoring. Based on these principles, the proposed dosimeter must cover a series of dosimetric properties to realize the exact results and assessment. The doped borate dosimeters indeed demonstrate attractive thermoluminescence (TL) features. Several dedicated efforts are attempted to improve the luminescence properties by doping various transition metals or rare-earth elements. The Cu ion being one of the preferred activators shows excellent TL properties as revealed via detail comparison with other dosimeters. Two oxide states of Cu (Cu + and Cu ++ ) with reasonable atomic number allow easy interaction with boron network. Interestingly, the intrinsic luminescent centers of borate lattice are in cross linked with that of Cu + ions. Thus, the activation of borate dosimeter with Cu ions for the enhancement of the TL sensitivity is recognized. These dosimeters reveal similar glow curves as the standard TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) one irrespective of the use of modifiers and synthesis techniques. They display high sensitivity, low fading, dose response linearity over wide range and practical minimum detectable dose. Furthermore, the effective atomic number being the most beneficial aspect (equivalent to that of human tissue) of borate dosimeters do not show any change due to Cu ion activations. The past development, major challenges, excitement, applications, recent progress and the future promises of Cu doped borate TL dosimeters are highlighted. - Highlights: • The manuscript gives a panoramic overview on copper doped borate dosimeters. • Cu ions activated technique in borate

  4. Supersonic copper clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.E.; Hansen, S.G.; Geusic, M.E.; Michalopoulos, D.L.; Smalley, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Copper clusters ranging in size from 1 to 29 atoms have been prepared in a supersonic beam by laser vaporization of a rotating copper target rod within the throat of a pulsed supersonic nozzle using helium for the carrier gas. The clusters were cooled extensively in the supersonic expansion [T(translational) 1 to 4 K, T(rotational) = 4 K, T(vibrational) = 20 to 70 K]. These clusters were detected in the supersonic beam by laser photoionization with time-of-flight mass analysis. Using a number of fixed frequency outputs of an exciplex laser, the threshold behavior of the photoionization cross section was monitored as a function of cluster size.nce two-photon ionization (R2PI) with mass selective detection allowed the detection of five new electronic band systems in the region between 2690 and 3200 A, for each of the three naturally occurring isotopic forms of Cu 2 . In the process of scanning the R2PI spectrum of these new electronic states, the ionization potential of the copper dimer was determined to be 7.894 +- 0.015 eV

  5. Native copper as a natural analogue for copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the occurrence of native copper as found in geological formations as a stability analogue of copper canisters that are planned to be used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the Finnish bedrock. A summary of several publications on native copper occurrences is presented. The present geochemical and geohydrological conditions in which copper is met with in its metallic state show that metallic copper is stable in a wide range of temperatures. At low temperatures native copper is found to be stable where groundwater has moderate pH (about 7), low Eh (< +100 mV), and low total dissolved solids, especially chloride. Microscopical and microanalytical studies were carried out on a dozen of rock samples containing native copper. The results reveal that the metal shows no significant alteration. Only the surface of copper grains is locally coated. In the oldest samples there exist small corrosion cracks; the age of the oldest samples is over 1,000 million years. A review of several Finnish groundwater studies suggests that there are places in Finland where the geohydrological conditions are favourable for native copper stability. (orig.)

  6. Topological characterisation and identification of critical domains within glucosyltransferase IV (GtrIV of Shigella flexneri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Anesh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three bacteriophage genes gtrA, gtrB and gtr(type are responsible for O-antigen glucosylation in Shigella flexneri. Both gtrA and gtrB have been demonstrated to be highly conserved and interchangeable among serotypes while gtr(type was found to be specific to each serotype, leading to the hypothesis that the Gtr(type proteins are responsible for attaching glucosyl groups to the O-antigen in a site- and serotype- specific manner. Based on the confirmed topologies of GtrI, GtrII and GtrV, such interaction and attachment of the glucosyl groups to the O-antigen has been postulated to occur in the periplasm. Results In this study, the topology of GtrIV was experimentally determined by creating different fusions between GtrIV and a dual-reporter protein, PhoA/LacZ. This study shows that GtrIV consists of 8 transmembrane helices, 2 large periplasmic loops, 2 small cytoplasmic N- and C- terminal ends and a re-entrant loop that occurs between transmembrane helices III and IV. Though this topology differs from that of GtrI, GtrII, GtrV and GtrX, it is very similar to that of GtrIc. Furthermore, both the N-terminal periplasmic and the C-terminal periplasmic loops are important for GtrIV function as shown via a series of loop deletion experiments and the creation of chimeric proteins between GtrIV and its closest structural homologue, GtrIc. Conclusion The current study provides the basis for elucidating the structure and mechanism of action of this important O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase.

  7. Direct Bandgap Group IV Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0049 Direct Bandgap group IV Materials Hung Hsiang Cheng NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY Final Report 01/21/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY 1 ROOSEVELT RD. SEC. 4 TAIPEI CITY, 10617 TW 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING...14. ABSTRACT Direct bandgap group IV materials have been long sought for in both academia and industry for the implementation of photonic devices

  8. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  9. Copper tolerance in Becium homblei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, C; Stone, J

    1971-04-09

    Analyses show that Becium homblei has apparently no mechanism for limiting copper uptake. As growth proceeds, the concentration of metal increases in leaves and stems. Much of the copper is bound to structural material of the cells. There is a significant difference between the amount of extractable material in root and leaf tissues. These differences, in conjunction with the extrinsic factor of regular bush fires, were important factors in the evolution of this copper-resistant species of Becium. 9 references.

  10. Copper toxicity in housed lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, A H; Valks, D A; Appleton, M A; Shaw, W B

    1969-09-27

    Copper toxicity among 170 lambs artificially reared indoors at High Mowthorpe NAAS Experimental Husbandry Farm is reported. Although only three lambs were lost it is not unreasonable to suggest that the liver copper levels of the lambs which were slaughtered would have been high and losses could have been much heavier had there been any further copper supplementation. Even a copper level of 20 ppm in lamb concentrates given to lambs reared artificially indoors is dangerous, and intakes of much less than 38 mg per lamb per day can be fatal if given of a prolonged period. 5 references, 1 table.

  11. Copper and copper-nickel-alloys - An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassert, Anton; Tikana, Ladji [Deutsches Kupferinstitut e.V. Am Bonneshof 5, 40474 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    With the increasing level of industrialization the demand for and the number of copper alloys rose in an uninterrupted way. Today, the copper alloys take an important position amongst metallic materials due to the large variety of their technological properties and applications. Nowadays there exist over 3.000 standardized alloys. Copper takes the third place of all metals with a worldwide consumption of over 15 millions tons per year, following only to steel and aluminum. In a modern industrial society we meet copper in all ranges of the life (electro-technology, building and construction industry, mechanical engineering, automotive, chemistry, offshore, marine engineering, medical applications and others.). Copper is the first metal customized by humanity. Its name is attributed to the island Cyprus, which supplied in the antiquity copper to Greece, Rome and the other Mediterranean countries. The Romans called it 'ore from Cyprus' (aes cyprium), later cuprum. Copper deposited occasionally also dapper and could be processed in the recent stone age simply by hammering. Already in early historical time copper alloys with 20 to 50 percent tin was used for the production of mirrors because of their high reflecting power. Although the elementary nickel is an element discovered only recently from a historical perspective, its application in alloys - without any knowledge of the alloy composition - occurred at least throughout the last 2.000 years. The oldest copper-nickel coin originates from the time around 235 B.C.. Only around 1800 AD nickel was isolated as a metallic element. In particular in the sea and offshore technology copper nickel alloys found a broad field of applications in piping systems and for valves and armatures. The excellent combination of characteristics like corrosion resistance, erosion stability and bio-fouling resistance with excellent mechanical strength are at the basis of this success. An experience of many decades supports the use

  12. The copper binding properties of metformin - QCM-D, XPS and nanobead agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Xueling; Uddin, Rokon; Heiskanen, Arto

    2015-01-01

    Study of the copper binding properties of metformin is important for revealing its mechanism of action as a first-line type-2 diabetes drug. A quantitative investigation of interactions between metformin and l-cysteine-copper complexes was performed. The results suggest that metformin could...

  13. Structural templating in a nonplanar phthalocyanine using single crystal copper iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Rochford, L. A. (Luke A.); Ramadan, Alexandra J.; Keeble, Dean S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Heutz, Sandrine; Jones, T. S. (Tim S.)

    2015-01-01

    Solution-grown copper iodide crystals are used as substrates for the templated growth of the nonplanar vanadyl phthalocyanine using organic molecular beam deposition. Structural characterization reveals a single molecular orientation produced by the (111) Miller plane of the copper iodide crystals. These fundamental measurements show the importance of morphology and structure in templating interactions for organic electronics applications.

  14. Copper Contamination Impairs Herbivore Initiation of Seaweed Inducible Defenses and Decreases Their Effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria M Warneke

    Full Text Available Seaweed-herbivore interactions are often mediated by environmental conditions, yet the roles of emerging anthropogenic stressors on these interactions are poorly understood. For example, chemical contaminants have unknown consequences on seaweed inducible resistance and herbivore response to these defenses despite known deleterious effects of contaminants on animal inducible defenses. Here, we investigated the effect of copper contamination on the interactions between a snail herbivore and a brown seaweed that displays inducible resistance to grazing. We examined seaweed inducible resistance and its effectiveness for organisms exposed to copper at two time points, either during induction or after herbivores had already induced seaweed defenses. Under ambient conditions, non-grazed tissues were more palatable than grazed tissues. However, copper additions negated the preference for non-grazed tissues regardless of the timing of copper exposure, suggesting that copper decreased both how herbivores initiated these inducible defenses and their subsequent effectiveness. Copper decreased stimulation of defenses, at least in part, by suppressing snail grazing pressure-the cue that turns inducible defenses on. Copper decreased effectiveness of defenses by preventing snails from preferentially consuming non-grazed seaweed. Thus, contaminants can potentially stress communities by changing seaweed-herbivore interactions mediated via inducible defenses. Given the ubiquity of seaweed inducible resistance and their potential influence on herbivores, we hypothesize that copper contamination may change the impact of these resistant traits on herbivores.

  15. Syntheses of polystyrene supported chelating resin containing the Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and triethylene tetramine and its copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), iron(III), zinc(II), cadmium(II), molybdenum(VI), zirconium(IV) and uranium(VI) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamal, A.; Singh, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A new polymer-anchored chelating ligand has been synthesized by the reaction of chloromethylated polystyrene (containing 0.94 mmol of Cl per gram of resin and 1% cross-linked with divinylbenzene) and the Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and triethylenetetramine. A new series of polystyrene supported, Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Zn(II), Cd(II), Zr(IV), dioxomolybdenum (VI) and dioxouranium (VI) complexes of the formulae PS-LCu, PS-LNi, PS-LCo, PS-LFeCl.DMF, PS-LZn, PS-LCd, PS-LZr(OH) 2 . DMF, PS L MoO 2 and PS-LUO 2 (where PS-LH 2 = polymer-anchored Schiff base and DMF dimethyl-formamide) have been synthesized and characterised by elemental analysis, infrared, electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The complexes PS-LCu, PS-LNi and PS-LCo have square planar structure, PS-LFeCl.DMF, PS-LMoO 2 and PS-LUO 2 have octahedral structure, PS L Zn and PS-LCd are tetrahedral and PS-LZr(OH) 2 .DMF is pentagonal bipyramidal. The polymer-anchored Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) complexes are paramagnetic while Ni(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Zr(IV), dioxomolybdenum(VI) and dioxouranium(VI) complexes are diamagnetic. The negative shift of the v (C=N) (azomethine) and the positive shift of v (C--O)(phenolic) are indicative of ONNO donor behaviour of the polymer-anchored Schiff base. (author)

  16. Interação entre Hb C [beta6(A3Glu>Lys] e IVS II-654 (C>T beta-talassemia no Brasil Hb C [beta6(A3Glu>Lys] and IVS II - 654 (C>T beta thalassemia interaction in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. Bonini-Domingos

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by a microcytic hypochromic anemia and an imbalance in the synthesis of the globin-chains. Hb C is the second most frequently variant of hemoglobin found in Brazil. The laboratory diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies, including thalassemias, is growing in importance, particularly because of an increasing requirement for neonatal diagnosis of abnormal hemoglobins. Screening tests were carried out using alkaline and acid electrophoresis, globin-chain analysis by cellulose acetate in alkaline pH, isoelectric focusing and HPLC. The molecular characterization was made by PCR-ASO for Hb C and beta thalassemia mutants. Large-scale screening and discriminative methodologies must provide information about the hemoglobin polymorphisms in Brazilian population. HPLC is a powerful tool in these cases. Molecular characterization is important to genetic counseling and clinical management, in particular for the Brazilian population that have an intense racial admixture, with great variability of hemoglobins. In this paper an association between Hb C and beta thalassemia (IVS-II-654 in a black family from Brazil was described.

  17. Is Copper Immune to Corrosion When in Contact With Water and Aqueous Solutions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Digby D.; Sharifi-Asl, Samin (Pennsylvania State Univ., PA (United States). Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    2011-03-15

    Forsmark, different sulphur species was found to be most deleterious causing copper to corrode in an anoxic environment under hydrogen gas evolution. In order to find out what species that can be present in a repository environment a Gibbs Energy Minimisation algorithm was employed. By this method it was concluded that (S2-, HS- and H{sub 2}S) are predicted to be present in the entire anoxic period at sufficient concentrations to cause corrosion of copper. It is finally concluded that the corrosion rate of copper canisters will be determined by the very complex interaction between copper, buffer material and bedrock in order to reduce corrosion of copper to an acceptable level

  18. Is Copper Immune to Corrosion When in Contact With Water and Aqueous Solutions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby D.; Sharifi-Asl, Samin

    2011-03-01

    depth in Forsmark, different sulphur species was found to be most deleterious causing copper to corrode in an anoxic environment under hydrogen gas evolution. In order to find out what species that can be present in a repository environment a Gibbs Energy Minimisation algorithm was employed. By this method it was concluded that (S 2 -, HS- and H 2 S) are predicted to be present in the entire anoxic period at sufficient concentrations to cause corrosion of copper. It is finally concluded that the corrosion rate of copper canisters will be determined by the very complex interaction between copper, buffer material and bedrock in order to reduce corrosion of copper to an acceptable level

  19. Spectrographic determination of impurities in copper and copper oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-11-01

    An emission spectrographic method for the determination of Al, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ge, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Si, Sn and Zn in copper and copper oxide is described. Two mixtures (Graphite and ZnO: graphite and GeO sub(2)) were used as buffers. The standard deviation lies around 10%. (author)

  20. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  1. Influence of branched quaternary ammonium surfactant molecules as levelers for copper electroplating from acidic sulfate bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, An-yin; Chen, Biao; Fang, Lei; Yu, Jian-jun; Wang, Li-min

    2013-01-01

    A family of branched quaternary ammonium surfactants (compounds 1a–1c) with different carbon chains were synthesized for levelers applied in copper electroplating. Their inhibitory actions on copper electroplating were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Compound 1b, as representative structure type, was tested by means of different electrochemical methods including CV, polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with different concentrations. The interaction between compound 1b and copper surface was investigated using atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The results indicated that our newly synthesized compounds, particular 1b, were effective levelers used for copper electroplating. Compound 1b could adsorb on copper surface to form an adsorption layer. The adsorption behavior of compound 1b on copper surface indicated that compound 1b could inhibit the copper electrodeposition, which provided favorable conditions used as a leveler. Moreover, the addition of compound 1b could increase the cathodic polarization, which was attributed to the adsorption of compound 1b during copper electroplating process. In addition, various surface morphologies and crystalline orientation of the plated copper films caused by different concentrations of compound 1b were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. Effects of compound 1b on refining the grain size and changing the preferential orientation of the plated copper films were exhibited

  2. Sulphonated metal phthalocyanine complexes as redox indicators in micro titrations with cerium(IV) sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, H S; Achar, B N [Mysore Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1980-01-01

    Tetrasodium salts of copper(II) 4,4', 4'', 4'''-tetrasulphophthalocyanine 2-hydrate, nickel(II) 4,4', 4'', 4'''-tetrasulphophthalocyanine, nickel(II) 3,3', 3'', 3'''-tetrasulphophthalocyanine and cobalt(II) 4,4', 4'', 4'''-tetrasulphophthalocyanine 2-hydrate, and copper phthalocyanine trisulphonic acid are prepared in pure state. The molar absorptivity and formal redox potentials of the complexes are determined. The complexes are proposed as sensitive redox indicators in the micro determination of iron(II), arsenic(III), molybdenum(V), uranium(IV) and hydroquinone with 0.001-0.0005N cerium(IV) sulphate in sulphuric, hydrochloric and acetic acid media. They give sharp colour change from light turquoise blue to pale purple colour at the equivalence point. They have advantages over a few existing redox indicators.

  3. Copper: From neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Opazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of AMPA receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (neuroproteostasis in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such Alzheimer’s disease (AD where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients.

  4. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  5. Advanced Copper Composites Against Copper-Tolerant Xanthomonas perforans and Tomato Bacterial Spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer-Scherer, A; Liao, Y Y; Young, M; Ritchie, L; Vallad, G E; Santra, S; Freeman, J H; Clark, D; Jones, J B; Paret, M L

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a widespread and damaging bacterial disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). For disease management, growers rely on copper bactericides, which are often ineffective due to the presence of copper-tolerant Xanthomonas strains. This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of the new copper composites core-shell copper (CS-Cu), multivalent copper (MV-Cu), and fixed quaternary ammonium copper (FQ-Cu) as potential alternatives to commercially available micron-sized copper bactericides for controlling copper-tolerant Xanthomonas perforans. In vitro, metallic copper from CS-Cu and FQ-Cu at 100 μg/ml killed the copper-tolerant X. perforans strain within 1 h of exposure. In contrast, none of the micron-sized copper rates (100 to 1,000 μg/ml) from Kocide 3000 significantly reduced copper-tolerant X. perforans populations after 48 h of exposure compared with the water control (P copper-based treatments killed the copper-sensitive X. perforans strain within 1 h. Greenhouse studies demonstrated that all copper composites significantly reduced bacterial spot disease severity when compared with copper-mancozeb and water controls (P copper composites significantly reduced disease severity when compared with water controls, using 80% less metallic copper in comparison with copper-mancozeb in field studies (P copper composites have the potential to manage copper-tolerant X. perforans and tomato bacterial spot.

  6. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the ... and sediment were collected and trace element concentrations were measured with an ICP-MS. ..... Clay minerals are known to have high sorption affinities ..... sediment/water quality interaction with particular reference to the.

  7. Copper and Lead levels in two popular leafy vegetables grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    forming an important source of vitamins and minerals ... and the interaction with other metals (Zurera et al., ... is an essential trace element in the functions of the ... The levels of Lead and Copper varied between the vegetable varieties and from ...

  8. Structural and magnetic studies on copper succinate dihydrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The four bis-bidendate succinate anions form syn–syn bridges among two copper atomsto form a polymeric two-dimensional chain. From room temperature vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) studies themagnetic moment of the material is calculated as 1.35 Bohr magneton (BM), indicating antiferromagnetic interaction ...

  9. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons in copper and copper alloys has shown that dislocation motion in copper, at low temperature, can be treated as an analog of an underdamped oscillator. We have also shown that the viscous drag on mobile dislocations in type II superconductors can be treated as an acoustic attenuation of an elastic wave

  10. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  11. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  12. Copper Powder and Chemicals: edited proceedings of a seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Various papers are presented covering the following topics: Status of Copper Chemical Industry in India, Copper Powder from Industrial Wastes, Manufacture of Copper Hydroxide and High Grade Cement Copper from Low Grade Copper Ore, Manufacture of Copper Sulphate as a By-Product, Hydrometallurgical Treatments of Copper Converter and Smelter Slage for Recovering Copper and other Non-Ferrous Metals, Recovery of Copper from Dilute Solutions, Use of Copper Compounds as Fungicides in India, Copper in Animal Husbandry, and Use of Copper Powder and Chemicals for Marine Applications. The keynote paper given at the Seminar was on Conservation of Copper for Better Use.

  13. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fengxiang; Ai Yu; Wang Jiafu; Wang Lisheng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts-data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  14. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Fengxiang; Ai Yu; Wang Jiafu; Wang Lisheng, E-mail: phonixchen79@yahoo.com.cn [Department of physics science and technology, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan city, Hubei Province, 430070 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts-data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  15. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper. It...

  16. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.M.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (<1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  17. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, G.J. van den; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendruiks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (< 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  18. Possible effects of external electrical fields on the corrosion of copper in bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, Claes (Swerea KIMAB (Sweden))

    2011-12-15

    External potentials that develop across a repository may interact with the copper canister. A study was undertaken to investigate the potential corrosion effects of voltage differences in a repository. A set of experiments was performed to study the tendency of copper in bentonite to corrode under influence of an externally applied electrical field. A model study was made to estimate possible corrosion effects of an external electrical field on a full-scale canister in the KBS-3 concept. The interaction between the repository represented by a copper canister in bentonite, and an external electrical field is illustrated with an example

  19. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  20. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium and copper radionuclides have a long history of use in nuclear medicine. Table 1 presents the nuclear properties of several gallium and copper isotopes that either are used in the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine or exhibit particular characteristics that might make them useful in diagnostic or therapeutic medicine. This paper will provide some historic perspective along with an overview of some current research directions in gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry. A more extensive review of gallium radiopharmaceutical chemistry has recently appeared and can be consulted for a more in-depth treatment of this topic

  1. Copper complexes as 'radiation recovery' agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, J.R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Copper and its compounds have been used for their remedial effects since the beginning of recorded history. As early as 3000 BC the Egyptians used copper as an antiseptic for healing wounds and to sterilise drinking water; and later, ca 1550 BC, the Ebers Papyrus reports the use of copper acetate, copper sulphate and pulverised metallic copper for the treatment of eye infections. These historical uses of copper and its compounds are particularly interesting in the light of modern evidence concerning the use of certain copper complexes for the treatment of radiation sickness and more recently as an adjunct to radiotherapy for cancer patients. (author)

  2. Pressure brazing of ceramics to metals with copper solder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlova, M.A.; Metelkin, I.I.

    1986-01-01

    The effect on the quality of joints brazed with copper of different non metallized aluminooxide dielectrics with metals and alloys of a series of technological parameters (temperature, pressure, holding, and medium) in the course of pressure brazing is investigated. It is shown that in case of brazing with kovar and nickel the character of dependences is identical, however in all cases the joints with nickel are more durable. For the ceramics - molybdenum system characterized by weak interaction with copper solder kinetic dependences have no maximum and only under holding of more than 20 min the constant strength of 150-190 MPa is attained

  3. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghel, C.; Penttilae, S.

    2010-03-01

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  4. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  5. The role of insufficient copper in lipid synthesis and fatty-liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Austin; Tallino, Savannah; Yu, Lei; Burkhead, Jason L

    2017-04-01

    The essential transition metal copper is important in lipid metabolism, redox balance, iron mobilization, and many other critical processes in eukaryotic organisms. Genetic diseases where copper homeostasis is disrupted, including Menkes disease and Wilson disease, indicate the importance of copper balance to human health. The severe consequences of insufficient copper supply are illustrated by Menkes disease, caused by mutation in the X-linked ATP7A gene encoding a protein that transports copper from intestinal epithelia into the bloodstream and across the blood-brain barrier. Inadequate copper supply to the body due to poor diet quality or malabsorption can disrupt several molecular level pathways and processes. Though much of the copper distribution machinery has been described and consequences of disrupted copper handling have been characterized in human disease as well as animal models, physiological consequences of sub-optimal copper due to poor nutrition or malabsorption have not been extensively studied. Recent work indicates that insufficient copper may be important in a number of common diseases including obesity, ischemic heart disease, and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, marginal copper deficiency (CuD) has been reported as a potential etiologic factor in diseases characterized by disrupted lipid metabolism such as non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD). In this review, we discuss the available data suggesting that a significant portion of the North American population may consume insufficient copper, the potential mechanisms by which CuD may promote lipid biosynthesis, and the interaction between CuD and dietary fructose in the etiology of NAFLD. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):263-270, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Copper influence on bank vole's (Myodes glareolus) sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miska-Schramm, Agata; Kapusta, Joanna; Kruczek, Małgorzata

    2018-04-01

    The impact of human activity on the environment has led to a steady increase of the amounts of copper in the ecosystems. This element accumulates in plants and water, potentially exposing rodents to its harmful effects. In industrial districts, a decrease in the density of small rodent populations has been observed. This decline may be caused by many factors, including mortality, decreased fertility, or impaired sexual behavior. The decline in the reproductive abilities of small rodents after copper exposure was demonstrated in our previous work (Miska-Schramm A, Kruczek M, Kapusta J, Ecotoxicology 23:1546-1554, 2014). The aim of the presented research was to determine how copper administered at concentrations similar to those recorded in industrial districts (Cu I-150 mg/kg, Cu II-600 mg/kg, C-control) affects the sexual behavior of small rodents. The model species was the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). The behavior and vocalizations of male-female pairs were recorded during open-field tests: ♂C vs. ♀C; ♂Cu I vs. ♀C; ♂Cu II vs. ♀C while in preference tests, female behavior was assessed in the following combinations: ♀C vs. ♂C & ♂Cu I; ♀C vs. ♂C & ♂Cu II. In the presented work, we show that copper decreased the males' sexual attractiveness. Females showed suppressed preference towards males treated with 600 mg/kg copper. The number of sniffs and a number of approaches towards Cu II males was significantly lower than towards control individuals. Also, in preference test with 150 mg/kg treated animals, total activity was lower towards copper treated animals. At the same time, copper did not influence intra-sexual interactions.

  7. Effect of different levels of copper on growth performance and cecal ecosystem of newly weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Wen Chen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different levels of copper sulfate on the growth performance and cecal ecosystem in newly weaned piglets. One hundred piglets weaned at 28±2 d were randomly allocated to 4 treatments with 5 replicates of 5 piglets each. Piglets received for 28 d the base diet with i no addition (control or with copper addition (from copper sulfate at ii 100, iii 175, and iv 250 mg/kg-1. On day 21, twenty piglets were randomly selected (one from each replicate to slaughter and investigate the population and diversity of cecal microorganisms. The results showed that the diets containing 175 and 250 mg/kg-1 copper improved the average daily gain (ADG by 51% and 60% and decreased the feed to gain ratio (F/G by 21% and 16%, respectively. Adding 175 or 250 mg/kg-1 copper improved crude protein, ether extract, calcium and phosphorus digestibility. Viable counts of Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacilli in cecum tended to be reduced, while the concentrations of cecal volatile fatty acids (VFA were increased in pigs fed diet supplemented as copper level increased. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR results showed that adding 175 or 250 mg/kg-1 copper reduced the lactobacilli in cecum. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE maps showed that band numbers and intensity of cecal bacterial 16S rDNA decreased as the copper levels increased. The results suggested that the effects of high dietary copper on microflora and their activities and metabolic products might contribute to the intestinal health and result in improved growth performance.

  8. Effect of different levels of copper on growth performance and cecal ecosystem of newly weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Feng Mei

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different levels of copper sulfate on the growth performance and cecal ecosystem in newly weaned piglets. One hundred piglets weaned at 28±2 d were randomly allocated to 4 treatments with 5 replicates of 5 piglets each. Piglets received for 28 d the base diet with i no addition (control or with copper addition (from copper sulfate at ii 100, iii 175, and iv 250 mg/kg–1. On day 21, twenty piglets were randomly selected (one from each replicate to slaughter and investigate the population and diversity of cecal microorganisms. The results showed that the diets containing 175 and 250 mg/kg–1 copper improved the average daily gain (ADG by 51% and 60% and decreased the feed to gain ratio (F/G by 21% and 16%, respectively. Adding 175 or 250 mg/kg–1 copper improved crude protein, ether extract, calcium and phosphorus digestibility. Viable counts of Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacilli in cecum tended to be reduced, while the concentrations of cecal volatile fatty acids (VFA were increased in pigs fed diet supplemented as copper level increased. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR results showed that adding 175 or 250 mg/kg–1 copper reduced the lactobacilli in cecum. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE maps showed that band numbers and intensity of cecal bacterial 16S rDNA decreased as the copper levels increased. The results suggested that the effects of high dietary copper on microflora and their activities and metabolic products might contribute to the intestinal health and result in improved growth performance.

  9. Copper tailings in stucco mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Pavez

    Full Text Available Abstract This investigation addressed the evaluation of the use of copper tailings in the construction industry in order to reduce the impact on the environment. The evaluation was performed by a technical comparison between stucco mortars prepared with crushed conventional sand and with copper tailings sand. The best results were achieved with the stucco mortars containing tailings. The tailings presented a fine particles size distribution curve different from that suggested by the standard. The values of compressive strength, retentivity, and adherence in the stucco mortars prepared with copper tailings were much higher than those obtained with crushed sand. According to the results from this study, it can be concluded that the preparation of stucco mortars using copper tailings replacing conventional sand is a technically feasible alternative for the construction industry, presenting the benefit of mitigating the impact of disposal to the environment.

  10. Crystal structure of ammonium divanadium(IV,V tellurium(IV heptaoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T. A. Harrison

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral building blocks of the layered inorganic network in the mixed-valence title compound, (NH4(VIVO2(VVO2(TeO3, are vertex-sharing VVO4 tetrahedra, distorted VIVO6 octahedra and TeO3 pyramids, which are linked by V—O—V and V—O—Te bonds, forming double layers lying parallel to (100. The presumed TeIV lone-pairs of electrons appear to be directed inwards into cavities in the double layers. The charge-balancing ammonium cations lie between the layers and probably interact with them via N—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  11. The effect of phosphorus on creep in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, Rolf; Andersson, Henrik C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pure copper with an addition of about 50 ppm phosphorus is the planned material for the outer part of the waste package for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. Phosphorus is added to improve the creep ductility but it also strongly increases the creep strength. In the present paper the influence of phosphorus on the strength properties of copper is analysed. Using the Labusch-Nabarro model it is demonstrated that 50 ppm has a negligible influence on the yield strength in accordance with observations. For slow moving dislocations, the interaction energy between the P-atoms and the dislocations gives rise to an agglomeration and a locking. The computed break away stresses are in agreement with the difference in creep stress of copper with and without P-additions

  12. The copper deposits of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B.S.; Burbank, W.S.

    1929-01-01

    The copper district of Keweenaw Point, in the northern peninsula of Michigan, is the second largest producer of copper in the world.  The output of the district since 1845 has been more than 7,500,000,000 pounds and showed a rather steady and consistent increase from the beginning of production to the end of the World War in 1918, since which there has been a marked decrease.

  13. Copper atomic-scale transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fangqing; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen; Schimmel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO 4 + H 2 SO 4 ) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and -170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes ( U bias ) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1 G 0 ( G 0 = 2e 2 /h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck's constant) or 2 G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  14. Atmospheric corrosion effects on copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franey, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Studies have been performed on the naturally formed patina on various copper samples. Samples have been obtained from structures at AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (40,2,1 and <1 yr) and the Statue of Liberty (100 yr). The samples show a distinct layering effect, that is, the copper base material shows separate oxide and basic sulfate layers on all samples, indicating that patina is not a homogeneous mixture of oxides and basic sulfates

  15. Chronic copper poisoning in lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D B

    1964-08-08

    This communication presented evidence of the elevation of plasma GOT (glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase or aspartate transaminase) concentration during the development of copper toxicity in some experimental lambs, and also demonstrated that plasma GOT concentration can be used to assess the course of the disease during treatment. A group of Kerry Hill lambs were fed 1 1/2 lb per day of a proprietary concentrate containing 40 parts of copper per million on a dry-matter basis in addition to hay and water ad lib. Data was included for the plasma GOT concentrations of the lambs, bled weekly after weaning from pasture to this diet. There was some variation between the individual lambs, and in one there was no increase in plasma GOT by the 20th week when all the surviving lambs were slaughtered. The concentrations of copper found in the caudate lobe of the liver and in the kidney cortex post mortem were given. The overall findings showed that the liver gave a reliable indication of the copper status of an animal whereas the kidney cortex copper concentration was a better criterion for the diagnosis of copper poisoning and was in agreement with the results of Eden, Todd, and Grocey and Thompson. Observations demonstrated the benefits resulting from the early diagnosis of chronic copper poisoning in lambs, when treatment of affected animals may be commenced before the haemolytic crisis develops. Treatment included reducing the copper intake and dosing with ammonium molybdate and sodium sulfate, and the plasma GOT concentration may be used to assess the rate of recovery. 4 references, 3 tables.

  16. Uruguay; 2011 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This 2011 Article IV Consultation highlights that the growth momentum in Uruguay has continued into 2011 but a slowdown is under way, led by weaker exports and slower public investment. Uruguay’s economic and financial vulnerabilities are modest, and the government has reduced debt vulnerabilities significantly and built important financial buffers. Executive Directors have commended authorities’ skillful macroeconomic management that has underpinned Uruguay’s excellent economic performance, ...

  17. Austria; 2013 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents details of Austria’s 2013 Article IV Consultation. Austria has been growing economically but is facing challenges in the financial sector. Full implementation of medium-term fiscal adjustment plans require specifying several measures and plans that need gradual strengthening to take expected further bank restructuring cost into account. It suggests that strong early bank intervention and resolution tools, a better designed deposit insurance system, and a bank-financed reso...

  18. Combined copper/zinc attachment to prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding of prion protein (PrP) is responsible for diseases such as ``mad-cow disease'' in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jacob in humans. Extensive experimental investigation has established that this protein strongly interacts with copper ions, and this ability has been linked to its still unknown function. Attachment of other metal ions (zinc, iron, manganese) have been demonstrated as well, but none of them could outcompete copper. Recent finding, however, indicates that at intermediate concentrations both copper and zinc ions can attach to the PrP at the octarepeat region, which contains high affinity metal binding sites. Based on this evidence, we have performed density functional theory simulations to investigate the combined Cu/Zn attachment. We consider all previously reported binding modes of copper at the octarepeat region and examine a possibility simultaneous Cu/Zn attachment. We find that this can indeed occur for only one of the known binding sites, when copper changes its coordination mode to allow for attachment of zinc ion. The implications of the simultaneous attachment on neural function remain to be explored.

  19. Adsorption of copper ions of natural montmorillonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimneva Ludmila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospects of montmorillonite clay using for the extraction of copper ions from natural and waste waters were determined. Specified chemical and phase composition of natural forms of the montmorillonite clay are shown in the article. Quantitative characteristics of adsorption process of copper ions, the statistical exchange capacity is 1,21 (298 К, 1,25 (313 К, 1,43 (333 К. The authors have studied the balance of copper ions by the method of constructing the isotherms. The description of the adsorption process was carried out by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models. The calculations showed that the best data for the sorption described by Langmuir model. The nature of the interaction of copper ions with montmorillonite clay in natural form is presented. The calculated thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process, the obtained values of the Gibbs energy have a negative sign -11,5 (298 К, -15,6 (313 К, -16,2 (333 К кJ/mol, that corresponds to a sustainable consolidation of copper ions on the surface of the montmorillonite clay.

  20. Copper sulphate poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, M

    1975-01-01

    In the archives of the Clinic for Internal Diseases of Domestic Animals at the Veterinary Faculty of Zagreb University some thirty cases of horse disease diagnosed as copper sulphate poisoning were noted. The data correspond in many respects to the clinical findings of copper sulphate poisoning in other domestic animals. A series of experimental horse poisonings were undertaken in order to determine the toxicity of copper sulphate. The research results are as follows: Horses are sensitive to copper sulphate. Even a single application of 0.125 g/kg body weight in 1% concentration by means of incubation into the stomach causes stomach and gut disturbances and other poisoning symptoms. Poisoning occurs in two types: acute and chronic. The former appears after one to three applications of copper sulphate solution and is characterized by gastroenteritis, haemolysis, jaundice and haemoglobinuria with signs of consecutive damage of kidney, liver and other organs. The disease, from the first application to death lasts for two weeks. Chronic poisoning is caused by ingestion of dry copper sulphate in food (1% solution dried on hay or clover) for two or more months. There are chronic disturbances of stomach and gut and loss of weight, and consecutive (three to four) haemolytic crises similar to those of acute poisoning. From the beginning of poisoning to death six or more months can elapse.

  1. Genome Sequences of Two Copper-Resistant Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Copper-Fed Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Freja L.; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two copper-resistant Escherichia coli strains were determined. These had been isolated from copper-fed pigs and contained additional putative operons conferring copper and other metal and metalloid resistances.......The draft genome sequences of two copper-resistant Escherichia coli strains were determined. These had been isolated from copper-fed pigs and contained additional putative operons conferring copper and other metal and metalloid resistances....

  2. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Calvin J [Lakewood, CO; Miedaner, Alexander [Boulder, CO; Van Hest, Maikel [Lakewood, CO; Ginley, David S [Evergreen, CO; Nekuda, Jennifer A [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  3. Use of copper radioisotopes in investigating disorders of copper metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M.; Smith, S.; Mercer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Copper is an essential trace element for life as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease in humans which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency. Using copper radioisotopes 64 Cu (t 1/2 = 12.8 hr) and 67 Cu (t 1/2 = 61 hr) we have studied the protein which is mutated in Menkes disease. This is a transmembrane copper pump which is responsible for absorption of copper into the body and also functions to pump out excess Cu from cells when Cu is elevated. It is therefore a vital component of normal Cu homeostasis. We have provided the first biochemical evidence that the Menkes protein functions as a P-type ATPase Cu pump (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press) and these data will be discussed. The assay involved pumping of radiocopper into purified membrane vesicles. Furthermore we have transfected normal and mutant Menkes genes into cells and are carrying out structure-function studies. We are also studying the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a Cu transport protein in order to determine how Cu regulates this protein and its cleavage products. These studies will provide vital information on the relationship between Cu and APP and processes which lead to Alzheimers disease

  4. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  5. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-01-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76 Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76 Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76 Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  6. Copper and ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transport protein COPT1 alter iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Andrés, Fernando; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Perea-García, Ana; Domingo, Concha; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2017-09-01

    Copper deficiency and excess differentially affect iron homeostasis in rice and overexpression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity copper transporter COPT1 slightly increases endogenous iron concentration in rice grains. Higher plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to efficiently acquire and use micronutrients such as copper and iron. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between both metals remain poorly understood. In the present work, we study the effects produced on iron homeostasis by a wide range of copper concentrations in the growth media and by altered copper transport in Oryza sativa plants. Gene expression profiles in rice seedlings grown under copper excess show an altered expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis compared to standard control conditions. Thus, ferritin OsFER2 and ferredoxin OsFd1 mRNAs are down-regulated whereas the transcriptional iron regulator OsIRO2 and the nicotianamine synthase OsNAS2 mRNAs rise under copper excess. As expected, the expression of OsCOPT1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transport protein, as well as other copper-deficiency markers are down-regulated by copper. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis COPT1 overexpression (C1 OE ) in rice causes root shortening in high copper conditions and under iron deficiency. C1 OE rice plants modify the expression of the putative iron-sensing factors OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and enhance the expression of OsIRO2 under copper excess, which suggests a role of copper transport in iron signaling. Importantly, the C1 OE rice plants grown on soil contain higher endogenous iron concentration than wild-type plants in both brown and white grains. Collectively, these results highlight the effects of rice copper status on iron homeostasis, which should be considered to obtain crops with optimized nutrient concentrations in edible parts.

  7. New data on the Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization: the behaviour of native copper in a natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, N.; Ahonen, L.

    1999-05-01

    The Hyrkkoelae Cu-U mineralisation (SW Finland) is studied as an analogue to the behaviour of copper canister in crystalline bedrock. Uranium-native copper and uranium-copper corrosion products interactions are also addressed in this study. The integration of uranium series disequilibrium (USD) studies gives an estimate of the time-scales of the corrosion processes. The mineral assemblages native copper-copper sulfide, copper sulfides - copper iron sulfides, and native copper-copper oxide (cuprite) occur in open fractures at several depth intervals within granite pegmatites (GP). The surfaces of these open fractures have accumulations of uranophane crystals and other unidentified uranyl compounds. The secondary uranium minerals are mainly distributed around copper sulfide grains. Microscopic intergrowths of copper sulfides and uranyl compounds also have been observed. The surface of the fracture where native copper and cuprite occur is covered with uranium-rich smectite. The very low 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio (0.29 - 0.39) in the main uranium fraction in smectite indicates chemical stable conditions (e.g., oxidising) during at least a time period comparable to the half-life of the 234 U isotope (T 1/2 = 2.44 x 10 5 a). Groundwater samples were collected from intervals where copper minerals occur within open fractures. The Eh and pH conditions were measured during long-term pumping (2-4 weeks per sample). Eh was measured both in situ and an the surface using three electrodes (Pt, Au, C). The actual groundwater conditions are oxidising and would not allow the sulfidization of native copper. Sulfidization may be considered as on old phenomenon, older than the precipitation of uranyl phases in the samples. The end of sulfidization may be earlier than the precipitation and/or remobilisation of U(VI) phases in a time span from about 2 x 10 5 years (precipitation of uranophane) to 2.44 x 10 5 (remobilisation of U from smectite). (orig.)

  8. Design of copper DNA intercalators with leishmanicidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maribel; Cisneros-Fajardo, Efrén José; Sierralta, Aníbal; Fernández-Mestre, Mercedes; Silva, Pedro; Arrieche, Dwight; Marchán, Edgar

    2003-04-01

    The complexes [Cu(dppz)(NO(3))]NO(3) (1), [Cu(dppz)(2)(NO(3))]NO(3) (2), [Cu(dpq)(NO(3))]NO(3) (3), and [Cu(dpq)(2)(NO(3))]NO(3) (4) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FAB-mass spectrometry, EPR, UV, and IR spectroscopies, and molar conductivity. DNA interaction studies showed that intercalation is an important way of interacting with DNA for these complexes. The biological activity of these copper complexes was evaluated on Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes, and the results showed leishmanicidal activity. Preliminary ultrastructural studies with the most active complex (2) at 1 h revealed parasite swelling and binucleated cells. This finding suggests that the leishmanicidal activity of the copper complexes could be associated with their interaction with the parasitic DNA.

  9. Improving Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag by Modifying the Molten Copper Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a new technology was developed to improve the beneficiation of copper and iron components from copper slag, by modifying the molten slag to promote the mineralization of valuable minerals and to induce the growth of mineral grains. Various parameters, including binary basicity, dosage of compound additive, modification temperature, cooling rate and the end point temperature of slow cooling were investigated. Meanwhile, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS was employed to determine the mineralogy of the modified and unmodified slag, as well as to reveal the mechanisms of enhancing beneficiation. The results show that under the proper conditions, the copper grade of rougher copper concentrate was increased from 6.43% to 11.04%, iron recovery of magnetic separation was increased significantly from 32.40% to 63.26%, and other evaluation indexes were changed slightly, in comparison with unmodified copper slag. Moreover, matte and magnetite grains in the modified slag aggregated together and grew obviously to the mean size of over 50 μm, resulting in an improvement of beneficiation of copper and iron.

  10. Active-Site Environment of Copper-Bound Human Amylin Relevant to Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Manas; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2018-01-02

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2Dm) is characterized by reduced β cell mass and amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) or amylin, a 37 amino acid containing peptide around pancreatic β cells. The interaction of copper (Cu) with amylin and its mutants has been studied in detail using absorption, circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Cu binds amylin in a 1:1 ratio, and the binding domain lies within the first 19 amino acid residues of the peptide. Depending on the pH of the medium, Cu-amylin shows the formation of five pH-dependent components (component IV at pH 4.0, component III at pH 5.0, component II at pH 6.0, component I at pH 8.0, and another higher pH component above pH 9.0). The terminal amine, His18, and amidates are established as key residues in the peptide that coordinate the Cu center. The physiologically relevant components I and II can generate H 2 O 2 , which can possibly account for the enhanced toxicity of amylin in the presence of Cu, causing damage of the β cells of the pancreas via oxidative stress.

  11. Purification, identification and molecular mechanism of two dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory peptides from Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Chaohua; Ji, Hongwu

    2017-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) played an important role in blood glucose regulation. Inhibition of DPP-IV may improve glycemic control in diabetics by preventing the rapid breakdown of incretin hormones and prolonging their physiological action. In this study, Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) protein was hydrolyzed using animal proteolytic enzymes. The hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). DPP-IV inhibitory activity of the fractions achieved from Antarctic krill protein was determined by DPP-IV screening reagent kit. Two purified peptides were identified by Xevo G2-XS QTof mass spectrometer (QTOF-MS). One peptide purified was Ala-Pro (AP) with IC 50 values of 0.0530mg/mL, the other Ile-Pro-Ala (IPA) with IC 50 values of 0.0370mg/mL. They both exhibited strong DPP-IV inhibitory activity. The molecular docking analysis revealed that DPP-IV inhibition by AP and IPA was mainly due to formation of a strong interaction surface force with the 91-96 and 101-105 amino acids of the DPP-IV. Our results suggested that the protein hydrolysate from Antarctic krill can be considered as a promising natural source of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides in the management of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Renal cortex copper concentration in acute copper poisoning in calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Fazzio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic value of renal cortex copper (Cu concentration in clinical cases of acute copper poisoning (ACP. A total of 97 calves that died due to subcutaneous copper administration were compiled in eleven farms. At least, one necropsy was conducted on each farm and samples for complementary analysis were taken. The degree of autolysis in each necropsy was evaluated. The cases appeared on extensive grazing calf breeding and intensive feedlot farms, in calves of 60 to 200 kg body weight. Mortality varied from 0.86 to 6.96 %, on the farms studied. The first succumbed calf was found on the farms between 6 and 72 hours after the susbcutaneous Cu administration. As discrepancies regarding the reference value arose, the local value (19.9 parts per million was used, confirming the diagnosis of acute copper poisoning in 93% of the analyzed kidney samples. These results confirm the value of analysis of the cortical kidney Cu concentration for the diagnosis of acute copper poisoning.

  13. Tracer techniques in electroplating. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stverak, B.; Rousar, I.

    1979-01-01

    In copper extraction from a solution containing trace amounts of silver the extraction of silver is controlled by diffusion. Mass transfer coefficients may be determined from the surface density of the extracted silver. The values are used in designing a system with suitable mixing for even mass distribution on the entire surface of the electrode. Silver was labelled with the sup(110m)Ag isotope with a specific activity of 0.74 GBq/g Ag. The surface density values were determined autoradiographically. The mass transfer coefficients were calculated from autoradiogram optical densities and the surface density of the silver to be determined. It was found that mixing by nitrogen through a cullet was considerably nonhomogeneous; when the gas was distributed along the bottom the mixing was more homogeneous. (H.S.)

  14. Copper metallurgy at the crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habashi F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper technology changed from the vertical to the horizontal furnace and from the roast reaction to converting towards the end of the last century. However, the horizontal furnace proved to be an inefficient and polluting reactor. As a result many attempts were made to replace it. In the past 50 years new successful melting processes were introduced on an industrial scale that were more energy efficient and less polluting. In addition, smelting and converting were conducted in a single reactor in which the concentrate was fed and the raw copper was produced. The standing problem in many countries, however, is marketing 3 tonnes of sulfuric acid per tonne of copper produced as well as emitting large amounts of excess SO2 in the atmosphere. Pressure hydrometallurgy offers the possibility of liberating the copper industry from SO2 problem. Heap leaching technology has become a gigantic operation. Combined with solvent extraction and electrowinning it contributes today to about 20% of copper production and is expected to grow. Pressure leaching offers the possibility of liberating the copper industry from SO2 problem. The technology is over hundred years old. It is applied for leaching a variety of ores and concentrates. Hydrothermal oxidation of sulfide concentrates has the enormous advantage of producing elemental sulfur, hence solving the SO2 and sulfuric acid problems found in smelters. Precipitation of metals such as nickel and cobalt under hydrothermal conditions has been used for over 50 years. It has the advantage of a compact plant but the disadvantage of producing ammonium sulfate as a co-product. In case of copper, however, precipitation takes place without the need of neutralizing the acid, which is a great advantage and could be an excellent substitute for electrowinning which is energy intensive and occupies extensive space. Recent advances in the engineering aspects of pressure equipment design open the door widely for increased

  15. Interactive Macroeconomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guilmi, Corrado; Gallegati, Mauro; Landini, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Preface; List of tables; List of figures, 1. Introduction; Part I. Methodological Notes and Tools: 2. The state space notion; 3. The master equation; Part II. Applications to HIA Based Models: 4. Financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics I: heterogeneity and interaction; 5. Financial fragility and macroeconomic Dynamics II: learning; Part III. Conclusions: 6. Conclusive remarks; Part IV. Appendices and Complements: Appendix A: Complements to Chapter 3; Appendix B: Solving the ME to solve the ABM; Appendix C: Specifying transition rates; Index.

  16. Special quasirandom structures for binary/ternary group IV random alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.; Jiang, Chao; Grimes, Robin W.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Simulation of defect interactions in binary/ternary group IV semiconductor alloys at the density functional theory level is difficult due to the random distribution of the constituent atoms. The special quasirandom structures approach is a

  17. Crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.G.; Clearfield, A.

    1976-01-01

    The ion exchange behaviour of seven crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates towards some of the alkali metal cations is described. Only two of the compounds (A and C) possess ion exchange properties in acidic solutions. Four others show some ion exchange characteristics in basic media with some of the alkali cations. Compound G does not behave as an ion exchanger in solutions of pH + , but show very little Na + uptake. Compound E undergoes ion exchange with Na + and Cs + , but not with Li+. Both Li + and Na + are sorbed by compounds A and C. The results are indicative of structures which show steric exclusion phenomena. (author)

  18. PREPARATION OF OXOPORPHINATOMANGANESE (IV) COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willner, I.; Otvos, J.; Calvin, M.

    1980-07-01

    Oxo-manganese-tetraphenylporphyrin (O=Mn{sup IV}-TPP) has been prepared by an oxygen-transfer reaction from iodosylbenzene to MnIITPP and characterized by its i.r. and field desorption mass spectra, which are identical to those of the product obtained by direct oxidation of Mn{sup III}(TPP) in an aqueous medium; it transfers oxygen to triphenylphosphine to produce triphenylphosphine oxide, and it is suggested that similar intermediates are important in oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450 as well as in the photosynthetic evolution of oxygen.

  19. Investigation of copper nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfini, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    An extensive study has been performed on copper isotopes in the mass region A=63-66. The results of a precise measurement are presented on the properties of levels of 64 Cu and 66 Cu. They were obtained by bombarding the 63 Cu and 65 Cu nuclei with neutrons. The gamma spectra collected after capture of thermal, 2-keV, 24-keV neutrons have been analysed and combined to give a rather extensive set of precise level energies and gamma transition strengths. From the angular distribution of the gamma rays it is possible to obtain information concerning the angular momentum J of several low-lying states. The level schemes derived from such measurements have been used as a test for calculations in the framework of the shell model. The spectral distributions of eigenstates in 64 Cu for different configuration spaces are presented and discussed. In this study the relative importance of configurations with n holes in the 1f7/2 shell with n up to 16, are investigated. It is found that the results strongly depend on the values of the single-particle energies. The results of the spectral-distribution method were utilized for shell-model calculations. From the information obtained from the spectral analysis it was decided to adopt a configuration space which includes up to one hole in the 1f7/2 shell and up to two particles in the 1g9/2 shell. Further, restrictions on seniority and on the coupling of the two particles in the 1g9/2 orbit have been applied and their effects have been studied. It is found that the calculated excitation energies reproduce the measured values in a satisfactory way, but that some of the electromagnetic properties are less well in agreement with experimental data. (Auth.)

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors derived from a mangrove flora Rhizophora mucronata: An in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Gurudeeban

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV is responsible for conversion of glucose tolerance (GLP-1, into inactive form. The inhibition of DPP IV would be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to isolate and evaluate cystine, phenyl acetic acid, acrylamide, caprylone and oleic acid from Rhizophora mucronata inhibitory action on DPP IV inhibitors using in silico approach. In silico analysis of cystine, phenyl acetic acid, acrylamide, caprylone and oleic acid on human apo DPP IV protein was done by using Autodoc 4.0. Among the five compounds cysteine acts as an inhibitor with binding energy -5.89 kcal/mol, seven hydrogen bond interactions at residues VAL459, VAL 459, GLU408, GLU206, ARG358, GLU205 and SER209 to suppresses the action of DPP IV protein.

  1. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchi Nenkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

  2. Current trends in copper theft prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrofrancesco, A. [Electrical Safety Authority, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Copper is used in electrical wiring, water and gas piping, currency, and in household items. An increase in the price and demand for copper has made copper theft a profitable venture for some thieves. Copper consumed in North America is typically supplied by recycling. Scrap dealers may pay near-market prices for pure copper wires. However, copper theft poses a serious threat to the safety of utility workers and the public. Power outages caused by copper theft are now affecting grid reliability. This paper examined technologies and techniques used to prevent copper theft as part of a security strategy for utilities. Attempts to steal copper can leave utility substations unsecured and accessible to children. The theft of neutral grounds will cause the local distribution company (LDC) to malfunction and may cause power surges in homes as well as appliance fires. Utilities are now looking at using a hybrid steel and copper alternative to prevent copper theft. Asset identification techniques are also being used to identify the original owners of the copper and more easily prosecute thieves. Automated monitoring techniques are also being used to increase substation security. Utilities are also partnering with law enforcement agencies and pressuring governments to require scrap dealers to record who they buy from. It was concluded that strategies to prevent copper theft should be considered as part of an overall security strategy for utilities. tabs., figs.

  3. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  4. Interface between Sn-Sb-Cu solder and copper substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebo, P., E-mail: Pavel.Sebo@savba.sk [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3 (Slovakia); Svec, P. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava 45 (Slovakia); Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, J. Bottu 25, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Janickovic, D.; Illekova, E. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava 45 (Slovakia); Plevachuk, Yu. [Ivan Franko National University, Department of Metal Physics, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} New lead-free solder materials based on Sn-Sb-Cu were designed and prepared. {yields} Melting and solidification temperatures of the solders have been determined. {yields} Cu-substrate/solder interaction has been analyzed and quantified. {yields} Phases formed at the solder-substrate interface have been identified. {yields} Composition and soldering atmospheres were correlated with joint strength. - Abstract: Influence of antimony and copper in Sn-Sb-Cu solder on the melting and solidification temperatures and on the microstructure of the interface between the solder and copper substrate after wetting the substrate at 623 K for 1800 s were studied. Microstructure of the interface between the solder and copper substrates in Cu-solder-Cu joints prepared at the same temperature for 1800 s was observed and shear strength of the joints was measured. Influence of the atmosphere - air with the flux and deoxidising N{sub 2} + 10H{sub 2} gas - was taken into account. Thermal stability and microstructure were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Melting and solidification temperatures of the solders were determined. An interfacial transition zone was formed by diffusion reaction between solid copper and liquid solder. At the interface Cu{sub 3}Sn and Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} phases arise. Cu{sub 3}Sn is adjacent to the Cu substrate and its thickness decreases with increasing the amount of copper in solder. Scallop Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} phase is formed also inside the solder drop. The solid solution Sn(Sb) and SbSn phase compose the interior of the solder drop. Shear strength of the joints measured by push-off method decreases with increasing Sb concentration. Copper in the solder shows even bigger negative effect on the strength.

  5. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  6. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, Michael; Saar, Amir; Ermak, Oleg; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits. (paper)

  7. Copper tolerance of Trichoderma species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić-Petrović Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some Trichoderma strains can persist in ecosystems with high concentrations of heavy metals. The aim of this research was to examine the variability of Trichoderma strains isolated from different ecosystems, based on their morphological properties and restriction analysis of ITS fragments. The fungal growth was tested on potato dextrose agar, amended with Cu(II concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 10 mmol/l, in order to identify copper-resistant strains. The results indicate that some isolated strains of Trichoderma sp. show tolerance to higher copper concentrations. Further research to examine the ability of copper bioaccumulation by tolerant Trichoderma strains is needed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31080 i br. III 43010

  8. Amplification of light emission of chiral pyridine Eu(III) complex by copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisfeld, Renata; Levchenko, Viktoria [Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Piccinelli, Fabio; Bettinelli, Marco [Laboratorio Materiali Luminescenti, DB, Universita di Verona and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We outline the applications of lanthanides luminescence in a number of modern fields. The intensity of the luminescence of the expensive lanthanides can be increased by their interaction with nanoparticles of inexpensive copper. As a typical example the chiral pyridine-based Eu{sup 3+} complex was incorporated into amorphous films of polyvinyl alcohol with hydroxyethyl cellulose. The luminescence intensity of the complex is increased by three hundred percent by its interaction with copper nanoparticles. The synthesis and steady state spectroscopy of the materials are presented. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of copper were for the first time synthesized at 80 °C. • Copper NPs were incorporated with a luminescent Eu{sup 3+} complex in a polymeric matrix. • The films produced were characterized by photoluminescence spectroscopy. • The luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} complex with Cu NPs is 3 times higher than the original one.

  9. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload

  10. Figurines in Pietrele: Copper Age ideology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svend Hansen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Major trends in figurine production of the copper age settlement of Pietrele (Romania are discussed. The bone figurines are seen as an ideological innovation of the Early Copper Age system in the Eastern Balkans.

  11. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  12. Human copper transporter 2 is localized in late endosomes and lysosomes and facilitates cellular copper uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghe, van den P.V.E; Folmer, D.E.; Malingré, H.E.M.; Beurden, van E.; Klomp, A.E.M.; Sluis, van de B.; Merkx, M.; Berger, R.J.; Klomp, L.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    High-affinity cellular copper uptake is mediated by the CTR (copper transporter) 1 family of proteins. The highly homologous hCTR (human CTR) 2 protein has been identified, but its function in copper uptake is currently unknown. To characterize the role of hCTR2 in copper homoeostasis,

  13. Copper nitrate redispersion to arrive at highly active silica-supported copper catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328228524; Wolters, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829560; Gabrielsson, A.; Pollington, S.D.; Headdock, G.; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain copper catalysts with high dispersions at high copper loadings, the gas flow rate and gas composition was varied during calcination of silica gel impregnated with copper nitrate to a loading of 18 wt % of copper. Analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2O chemisorption, and

  14. Copper and Anesthesia: Clinical Relevance and Management of Copper Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, Adrian; Dameron, Charles T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has implicated abnormal copper homeostasis in the underlying pathophysiology of several clinically important disorders, some of which may be encountered by the anesthetist in daily clinical practice. The purpose of this narrative review is to summarize the physiology and pharmacology of copper, the clinical implications of abnormal copper metabolism, and the subsequent influence of altered copper homeostasis on anesthetic management.

  15. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.1125 Section 73.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2125 - Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.2125 Section 73.2125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... § 73.2125 Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity and...

  17. Refining processes in the copper casting technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rzadkosz, S.; Kranc, M.; Garbacz-Klempka, A.; Kozana, J.; Piękoś, M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of technology of copper and alloyed copper destined for power engineering casts. The casts quality was assessed based on microstructure, chemical content analysis and strength properties tests. Characteristic deoxidising (Logas, Cup) and modifying (ODM2, Kupmod2) formulas were used for the copper where high electrical conductivity was required. Chosen examples of alloyed copper with varied Cr and Zr content were studied, and the optimal heat treatment parameter...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  19. The Bauschinger Effect in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L .M.; Stobbs, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the Bauschinger effect in pure copper shows that by comparison with dispersion hardened copper the effect is very small and independent of temperature. This suggests that the obstacles to flow are deformable. A simple composite model based on this principle accounts for the data semi......-quantitatively and also accounts for the stored energy of cold-work. An interesting feature of the model is that it shows very clearly that, although dislocation pile-ups may exist, the flow stress of the composite is entirely due to the resistance to dislocation motion in the tangles of forest dislocations....

  20. Cupriferous peat: embryonic copper ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, D C

    1961-07-01

    A Canadian peat was found to contain up to 10% (dry weight) Cu, and a mechanism for Cu accumulation in peat was discussed. Wet chemical techniques and x-ray diffraction were utilized to identify Cu compounds. Copper was organically bound in peat as a chelate complex and did not occur as an oxide, sulfide, or as elemental Cu. Because of the low S content of peat the Cu was assumed to be bound to nitrogen or oxygen-containing components. Copper, having a greater affinity for N, tended to form the more stable Cu-N chelate. The element was concentrated as circulating cupriferous ground waters filtered through the peat.

  1. Tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniukov, E; Yakimchuk, D; Kozlovsky, A; Shlimas, D; Zdorovets, M; Kadyrzhanov, K

    2016-01-01

    Simple method of tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes based on template synthesis was developed. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of the obtained nanostructures was carried out. Characterization of structural features was made by methods of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry analysis. Evaluation of wall thickness is made by methods of gas permeability. Electrical conductivity of nanotubes was define in the study of their current-voltage characteristics. The possibility to control of copper nanotubes physical properties by variation of the deposition parameters was shown. (paper)

  2. Determination of Cerium (IV) Using Rhodamine 6G Fluorescence Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zh.; Sheng, L.; Su, B.; Tao, C.; Jing, W.

    2017-11-01

    The interaction between rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and cerium sulfate was studied by the fluorescence quenching method. In a sulfuric acid medium, the interaction of Ce(IV) with Rh6G results in Rh6G fluorescence quenching. The maximum excitation wavelength (λex) and the maximum emission wavelength (λem) are 530 nm and 555 nm, respectively. A good linearity between the relative fl uorescence intensity (ΔF) and Ce(IV) was observed in the range 0.12-1.08 μg/mL. The detection limit was 1.4 × 10-3 μg/mL. The optimum reaction conditions, influencing factors, and effect of coexisting substances were investigated in the experiment. We found that the concentration of Rh6G was 3.2 × 10-6 mol/L, and the fl uorescence intensity was maximum.

  3. Electrical conduction in composites containing copper core–copper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of Mott's small polaron hopping conduction model. ... sample exhibited a metallic conduction confirming the formation of a percolative chain of ..... value of εp. Also the oxide layer formation on the initially unoxidized copper particles will increase the resistivity level of the nanocomposite. This is borne out by results shown in ...

  4. Thermodynamic evaluation of Cu-H-O-S-P system - Phase stabilities and solubilities for OFP-copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Hans; Frisk, Karin

    2013-04-01

    contents for OFP-copper are higher than the calculated solubility of hydrogen. Experiments and calculations indicate that hydrogen degassing should occur even in hydrogen gas. The strong interaction between oxygen and hydrogen could motivate why hydrogen is trapped in the material at low temperatures in an oxygen containing environment

  5. Thermodynamic evaluation of Cu-H-O-S-P system - Phase stabilities and solubilities for OFP-copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Hans; Frisk, Karin [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    containing phosphate Cu{sub 3}(P{sub 2}O{sub 6}OH){sub 2} can become stable. Measured hydrogen contents for OFP-copper are higher than the calculated solubility of hydrogen. Experiments and calculations indicate that hydrogen degassing should occur even in hydrogen gas. The strong interaction between oxygen and hydrogen could motivate why hydrogen is trapped in the material at low temperatures in an oxygen containing environment.

  6. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.2647 Section 73.2647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive copper powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73...

  7. Some oxozirconium(IV) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, R C; Gupta, S K; Parmar, S S; Vasisht, S K [Punjab Univ., Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1976-01-01

    Some new oxozirconium(IV) complexes, ZrO(An)/sub 2/, ZrO(Gly)/sub 2/, ZrO(HSal)/sub 2/, ZrO(HPth)/sub 2/, ZrO(Pic)/sub 2/(HPic)/sub 2/, and ZrO(Quin)/sub 2/(HQuin)/sub 2/ have been isolated from the reactions of ZrO(CH/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/CH/sub 3/COOH with anthranilic acid (HAn), glycine (HGly), salicylic acid (H/sub 2/Sal), phthalic acid (H/sub 2/Pth), picolinic acid (HPic), and 8-quinolinol (HQuin) respectively. Their important infrared bands and wherever possible molar conductance and molecular weight have been reported.

  8. Implementasi Corporate Social Responsibility Pada PT. Perkebunan Nusantara IV (PERSERO)

    OpenAIRE

    Matondang, Anggey Wira

    2015-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility is a management concept where by companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and interactions with their stakeholders. This study aims to determine how the implementation of CSR in PTPN IV and what are the effect of CSR implementation to the community’s economic empowerment and their constraints. This study is a qualitative study using descriptive methods, and data are collected through interviewing the informan...

  9. Tunneling spectra of graphene on copper unraveled

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xin; Stradi, Daniele; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms, etc. The interpretation of the spectra can be complicated, however. Specifically for graphene grown on copper, there have been conflicting reports of tunneling spectra. A clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the variability is desired. In this work, we have revealed that the root cause...... of the variability in tunneling spectra is the variation in graphene-substrate coupling under various experimental conditions, providing a salutary perspective on the important role of 2D material-substrate interactions. The conclusions are drawn from measured data and theoretical calculations for monolayer, AB......-stacked bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene coexisting on the same substrates in areas with and without intercalated oxygen, demonstrating a high degree of consistency. The Van Hove singularities of the twisted graphene unambiguously indicate the Dirac energy between them, lending strong evidence to our...

  10. Copper nanoparticles in zeolite Y

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, A.; Loos, J.; Boddenberg, B.

    1999-01-01

    CuCl has been dispersed in the supercages of a Y-type zeolite by heating a mechanical salt/host mixture in vacuo. The occluded salt was subsequently reduced to copper metal in a hydrogen atmosphere. Virtually complete reduction of the salt is achieved at 460°C. Under the same conditions,

  11. Effects of copper on mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostal, L

    1971-01-01

    The author deals with the effects of copper on mitosis. He found that a Cu concentration of 1 mg per liter is very toxic and strongly inhibits the course of mitosis in Vicia fabia. The effects of 0.5 mg and 0.25 mg Cu concentrations per liter were similar but a much weaker character.

  12. Copper complexes as chemical nucleases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    anticancer drug famotidine has been shown as a better catalyst than CuCl2 for sulfite ... Effect of addition of bis-chelate copper(II) complexes (dpq, •; phen, ; ..... Reproduction, Development & Genetics for their help in the DNA cleavage studies ...

  13. Copper, lead and zinc production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, J.; Ternan, S.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter provides information on the by-products and residues generated during the production of copper, lead and zinc. The purpose of this chapter is to describe by-products and residues which are generated, how these may be avoided or minimised, and available options for the utilization and management of residues. (author)

  14. on THICKNESS OF COPPER (|) OXIDE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-12-20

    Dec 20, 2006 ... known materials to be used as semiconductor devices. The oxide is. Observed to be an attractive starting material for the production of solar cells for low cost terrestrial conversion of solar energy to electricity. Copper (I) oxide is one Of the earliest known photovoltaic materials and the first in which the ...

  15. Lab Tracker and Copper Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have to do with factors of asymmetric neurologic development, such as being right or left-handed. The copper is often seen most prominently in the basal ganglia, the area deep within the brain that coordinates movements. The face of the giant ...

  16. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  17. COPPER CORROSION AND SOLUBILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster provides a very cursory summary of TTEB in-house copper research experimental systems, and extramural research projects. The field studies summarized are the Indian Hill (OH) study of the use of orthophosphate for reducing cuprosolvency in a high alkalinity water, an...

  18. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present

  19. Effect of acrylonitrile on the electrode processes ivolving copper cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor F. Vargalyuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of cyclic voltammetry and study of deposits morphology, it has been shown that acrylonitrile does not have significant effect on the mechanism of Cu2+ + 2ē → Cu0 reaction. This distinguishes acrylonitrile from the unsaturated polyfunctional organic substances (acrylic acid, acrylamide which forms stable complexes with Cu2+ ions. Acrylonitrile just inhibits cathodic process by adsorbing on the surface of electrode thus blocking its active sites. But the presence of acrylonitrile significantly changes the mechanism of the anodic process. It has been found that acrylonitrile interacts with surface copper atoms thus forming thermodynamically stable [Cu π-AN]0 π‑complexes. Ionization potential of these π‑complexes is more negative if compare to copper atoms. As the result acceleration of anodic process takes place in the low polarization area. However, since the chemisorption is a slow process the presence of acrylonitrile mainly affects dissolution of the first surface layers of copper atoms. Further ionization of copper atoms runs out directly and requires higher polarization.

  20. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznickova, A.; Orendac, M.; Kolska, Z.; Cizmar, E.; Dendisova, M.; Svorcik, V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  1. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, A., E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Orendac, M., E-mail: martin.orendac@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Kolska, Z., E-mail: zdenka.kolska@seznam.cz [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Cizmar, E., E-mail: erik.cizmar@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Dendisova, M., E-mail: vyskovsm@vscht.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V., E-mail: vaclav.svorcik@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  2. A Study of Protection of Copper Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. A.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile treatment of high capacity boiler water with hydrazine and ammonia is studied. Ammonia comes from the decomposition of excess hydrazine injected to treat dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is also injected for the control of pH. To find an effect of such ammonia on the copper alloy, the relations between pH and iron, and ammonia and copper are studied. Since the dependence of corrosion of iron on pH differs from that of copper, a range of pH was selected experimentally to minimize the corrosion rates of both copper and iron. Corrosion rates of various copper alloys are also compared

  3. Electrochemical remediation of copper contaminated clay soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, V.A.; Babakina, O.A.; Mitojan, R.A. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The study objective focused on electrochemical remediation copper polluted soils in the presence of adjuvant substances and conditions that are more effective for the treatment. Some of these substances were studied in different researches. Moreover, authors obtained a result of extraction copper rate higher than 90%. In this connection the following problems were set: - Influence organic and inorganic substances on copper mobility in soil under the DC current. - Moisture effect on copper migration in clay. - Electrochemical remediation soils different mineralogical composition. - A washing conditions contribution to electrochemical remediation of soil from copper. - Accuracy rating experimental dates. (orig.)

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type IV Glycogen storage disease type IV Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an ...

  5. iväkoti Riemula

    OpenAIRE

    Alanko, Reetta; Ihanamäki, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä kuvataan yleisesti päivähoidon kehitystä Suomessa sekä päivähoitoa yrittäjän näkökulmasta, tuoden esille sen tämän päivän haasteet ja mahdollisuudet. Työssä on pohdittu yhteistyön merkitystä kunnan kanssa ja sitä, miten kunta voi osaltaan joko rajoittaa tai edesauttaa yksityisen päivähoitoyrityksen toimintaa. Opinnäytetyössä kerrotaan teoriassa Päiväkoti Riemula nimisen, erityispäivähoitopalveluita tarjoavan yrityksen perustamiseen liittyvistä suunnitelmista. Suunnitelluss...

  6. Tribological properties of copper-based composites with copper coated NbSe2 and CNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Beibei; Yang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Huang, Hong; Li, Hongping; Tang, Hua; Li, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Morphology of copper coated NbSe 2 and CNT; friction coefficient and wear rate of copper-based composites. - Highlights: • NbSe 2 and CNT were coated with copper layers by the means of electroless plating. • The mechanical and tribological properties of copper composites were studied. • The enhancement mechanisms of copper coated NbSe 2 and CNT were proposed. • Copper–copper coated (12 wt.%NbSe 2 –3 wt.%CNT) composite had the best wear resistance. - Abstract: Copper-based composites with copper coated NbSe 2 and/or CNT were fabricated by the powder metallurgy technique. The morphology and phase composition of copper coated NbSe 2 and carbon nanotube (CNT) were observed using high solution transmission electronic microscope (HRTEM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM equipped with EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The density, hardness, and bending strength of as-prepared copper-based composites were measured, and their tribological properties were investigated using UMT-2 tester. Results indicated that all copper-based composites showed decreased density and bending strength, but increased hardness in comparison with copper matrix. Besides, the incorporation of copper coated NbSe 2 improved the friction-reducing and anti-wear properties of copper matrix. Addition of copper coated CNT greatly enhanced the mechanical and tribological properties. In particular, when the content of copper coated CNT was 3 wt.%, the corresponding composite exhibited the best tribological properties. This was because NbSe 2 was distributed chaotically in matrix, which greatly improved the friction-reducing property of copper, while CNT with superior mechanical strength enhanced the wear resistance by increasing the load-carrying capacity. More importantly, copper layers coated on NbSe 2 and CNT favored the good interfacial combination between fillers and copper matrix showing beneficial effect for the stresses transferring from matrix to fillers

  7. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 degrees C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper)

  8. Effect of Cerium(IV)-Surfactant Reaction in Foam Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Beom; Jung, Chong-Hun; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Chorong; Choi, Wang-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Using foams allows the decommissioning of complex shaped facilities. The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. The corrosion rate of radioactive nuclides contaminated stainless steel metal is very important factor for the foam decontamination process. The goal of this study is to develop the decontamination process for contaminated stainless steel in medium of nitric acid. Stainless steel needs a strong oxidizing agent such as Ce(IV) ion and the effects of cerium(IV). Surfactant interaction involved in foam decontamination and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. The formulation of foams loaded with strong oxidizing reagents such as Ce(IV) is an important factor. The enhanced decontamination properties of nitric acid with Ce(IV) additive on stainless steel is well known in liquid mediums. stainless steel metal is an important aspect in the foam decontamination process.

  9. Effect of Cerium(IV)-Surfactant Reaction in Foam Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Han Beom; Jung, Chong-Hun; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Chorong; Choi, Wang-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Using foams allows the decommissioning of complex shaped facilities. The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. The corrosion rate of radioactive nuclides contaminated stainless steel metal is very important factor for the foam decontamination process. The goal of this study is to develop the decontamination process for contaminated stainless steel in medium of nitric acid. Stainless steel needs a strong oxidizing agent such as Ce(IV) ion and the effects of cerium(IV). Surfactant interaction involved in foam decontamination and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. The formulation of foams loaded with strong oxidizing reagents such as Ce(IV) is an important factor. The enhanced decontamination properties of nitric acid with Ce(IV) additive on stainless steel is well known in liquid mediums. stainless steel metal is an important aspect in the foam decontamination process

  10. A statistical approach to the experimental design of the sulfuric acid leaching of gold-copper ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes F.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The high grade of copper in the Igarapé Bahia (Brazil gold-copper ore prevents the direct application of the classic cyanidation process. Copper oxides and sulfides react with cyanides in solution, causing a high consumption of leach reagent and thereby raising processing costs and decreasing recovery of gold. Studies have showm that a feasible route for this ore would be a pretreatment for copper minerals removal prior to the cyanidation stage. The goal of this experimental work was to study the experimental conditions required for copper removal from Igarapé Bahia gold-copper ore by sulfuric acid leaching by applying a statistical approach to the experimental design. By using the Plackett Burman method, it was possible to select the variables that had the largest influence on the percentage of copper extracted at the sulfuric acid leaching stage. These were temperature of leach solution, stirring speed, concentration of sulfuric acid in the leach solution and particle size of the ore. The influence of the individual effects of these variables and their interactions on the experimental response were analyzed by applying the replicated full factorial design method. Finally, the selected variables were optimized by the ascending path statistical method, which determined the best experimental conditions for leaching to achieve the highest percentage of copper extracted. Using the optimized conditions, the best leaching results showed a copper extraction of 75.5%.

  11. Mutated PET117 causes complex IV deficiency and is associated with neurodevelopmental regression and medulla oblongata lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, G H; Visser, G; Baertling, F; Wintjes, L T; Wolters, V M; van Montfrans, J; de Kort, G A P; Nikkels, P G J; van Hasselt, P M; van der Crabben, S N; Rodenburg, R J T

    2017-06-01

    The genetic basis of the many progressive, multi systemic, mitochondrial diseases that cause a lack of cellular ATP production is heterogeneous, with defects found both in the mitochondrial genome as well as in the nuclear genome. Many different mutations have been found in the genes encoding subunits of the enzyme complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. In addition, mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the assembly of these complexes are known to cause mitochondrial disorders. Here we describe two sisters with a mitochondrial disease characterized by lesions in the medulla oblongata, as demonstrated by brain magnetic resonance imaging, and an isolated complex IV deficiency and reduced levels of individual complex IV subunits. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the gene encoding Pet117, a small protein that has previously been predicted to be a complex IV assembly factor. PET117 has not been identified as a mitochondrial disease gene before. Lentiviral complementation of patient fibroblasts with wild-type PET117 restored the complex IV deficiency, proving that the gene defect is responsible for the complex IV deficiency in the patients, and indicating a pivotal role of this protein in the proper functioning of complex IV. Although previous studies had suggested a possible role of this protein in the insertion of copper into complex IV, studies in patient fibroblasts could not confirm this. This case presentation thus implicates mutations in PET117 as a novel cause of mitochondrial disease.

  12. Synthesis of carbon-supported copper catalyst and its catalytic performance in methanol dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelepova, Ekaterina V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Vedyagin, Aleksey A., E-mail: vedyagin@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ilina, Ludmila Yu.; Nizovskii, Alexander I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Tsyrulnikov, Pavel G. [Institute of Hydrocarbon Processing SB RAS, Neftezavodskaya st., 54, Omsk, 644040 (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Carbon-supported copper catalyst was studied in dehydrogenation of methanol. • Reduction temperature affected size of Cu particles and Cu{sup 0}/Cu{sup 2+} ratio. • Reduction at 400 °C was required to obtain high methyl formate yield. - Abstract: Carbon-supported copper catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of Sibunit with an aqueous solution of copper nitrate. Copper loading was 5 wt.%. Temperature of reductive pretreatment was varied within a range of 200–400 °C. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Catalytic activity of the samples was studied in a reaction of methanol dehydrogenation. Silica-based catalyst with similar copper loading was used as a reference. It was found that copper is distributed over the surface of support in the form of metallic and partially oxidized particles of about 12–17 nm in size. Diminished interaction of copper with support was supposed to be responsible for high catalytic activity.

  13. Copper deficiency induced emphysema is associated with focal adhesion kinase inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Mizuno

    Full Text Available Copper is an important regulator of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α dependent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and is also required for the activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX to effect matrix protein cross-linking. Cell detachment from the extracellular matrix can induce apoptosis (anoikis via inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK.To examine the molecular mechanisms whereby copper depletion causes the destruction of the normal alveolar architecture via anoikis, Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper deficient diet for 6 weeks while being treated with the copper chelator, tetrathiomolybdate. Other groups of rats were treated with the inhibitor of auto-phosphorylation of FAK, 1,2,4,5-benzenetetraamine tetrahydrochloride (1,2,4,5-BT or FAK small interfering RNA (siRNA.Copper depletion caused emphysematous changes, decreased HIF-1α activity, and downregulated VEGF expression in the rat lungs. Cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim expression was increased, and the phosphorylation of FAK was decreased in copper depleted rat lungs. Administration of 1,2,4,5-BT and FAK siRNA caused emphysematous lung destruction associated with increased expression of cleaved capase-3, caspase-8 and Bim.These data indicate that copper-dependent mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema, which may be associated with decreased HIF-1α and FAK activity in the lung.

  14. Manganese Coated Sand for Copper (II Removal from Water in Batch Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal Hilal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Removal of heavy metals, such as copper ions, from water is important to protect human health and the environment. In this study, manganese coated sand (MCS was used as an adsorbent to remove copper ions in a batch system. Equilibrium data were determined at a temperature of 25.6 °C and the Langmuir model was used to describe the experimental data. Mn-coating improved the removal of copper ions by 70% as compared to uncoated sand. Based on a kinetics study, the adsorption of copper ions on MCS was found to occur through a chemisorption process and the pseudo-second-order model was found to fit the kinetics experimental data well. Due to particle interactions, the equilibrium uptake was reduced as the ratio of sand to volume of solution increased. pH affected the removal of copper ions with lowest uptakes found at pH 3 and pHs >7, whilst at pHs in the range of 4 to 7, the uptake was highest and almost constant at the value of 0.0179 mg/g ± 4%. This study has also revealed that copper ions removal was dissolved oxygen (DO dependent with the highest removal occurring at ambient DO concentration, which suggests that DO should be carefully studied when dealing with copper ions adsorption.

  15. Copper economy in Chlamydomonas: Prioritized allocation and reallocation of copper to respiration vs. photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropat, Janette; Gallaher, Sean D.; Urzica, Eugen I.; Nakamoto, Stacie S.; Strenkert, Daniela; Tottey, Stephen; Mason, Andrew Z.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic elements, although required only in trace amounts, permit life and primary productivity because of their functions in catalysis. Every organism has a minimal requirement of each metal based on the intracellular abundance of proteins that use inorganic cofactors, but elemental sparing mechanisms can reduce this quota. A well-studied copper-sparing mechanism that operates in microalgae faced with copper deficiency is the replacement of the abundant copper protein plastocyanin with a heme-containing substitute, cytochrome (Cyt) c6. This switch, which is dependent on a copper-sensing transcription factor, copper response regulator 1 (CRR1), dramatically reduces the copper quota. We show here that in a situation of marginal copper availability, copper is preferentially allocated from plastocyanin, whose function is dispensable, to other more critical copper-dependent enzymes like Cyt oxidase and a ferroxidase. In the absence of an extracellular source, copper allocation to Cyt oxidase includes CRR1-dependent proteolysis of plastocyanin and quantitative recycling of the copper cofactor from plastocyanin to Cyt oxidase. Transcriptome profiling identifies a gene encoding a Zn-metalloprotease, as a candidate effecting copper recycling. One reason for the retention of genes encoding both plastocyanin and Cyt c6 in algal and cyanobacterial genomes might be because plastocyanin provides a competitive advantage in copper-depleted environments as a ready source of copper. PMID:25646490

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of apocupredoxins: insights into the formation and stabilization of copper sites under entatic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Vila, Alejandro J; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2014-06-01

    Cupredoxins perform copper-mediated long-range electron transfer (ET) in biological systems. Their copper-binding sites have evolved to force copper ions into ET-competent systems with decreased reorganization energy, increased reduction potential, and a distinct electronic structure compared with those of non-ET-competent copper complexes. The entatic or rack-induced state hypothesis explains these special properties in terms of the strain that the protein matrix exerts on the metal ions. This idea is supported by X-ray structures of apocupredoxins displaying "closed" arrangements of the copper ligands like those observed in the holoproteins; however, it implies completely buried copper-binding atoms, conflicting with the notion that they must be exposed for copper loading. On the other hand, a recent work based on NMR showed that the copper-binding regions of apocupredoxins are flexible in solution. We have explored five cupredoxins in their "closed" apo forms through molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that prearranged ligand conformations are not stable as the X-ray data suggest, although they do form part of the dynamic landscape of the apoproteins. This translates into variable flexibility of the copper-binding regions within a rigid fold, accompanied by fluctuations of the hydrogen bonds around the copper ligands. Major conformations with solvent-exposed copper-binding atoms could allow initial binding of the copper ions. An eventual subsequent incursion to the closed state would result in binding of the remaining ligands, trapping the closed conformation thanks to the additional binding energy and the fastening of noncovalent interactions that make up the rack.

  17. Hydrothermal chemistry of Th(IV) with aromatic dicarboxylates: New framework compounds and in situ ligand syntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Knope, Karah E.; Frisch, Mark; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel thorium (IV) coordination polymer, Th(C 5 H 2 N 2 O 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 (1), has been prepared under the hydrothermal reaction of thorium nitrate tetrahydrate and 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid (H 3 pdc). Compound 1 (orthorhombic, P2 1 2 1 2 1 , a=6.9362(5) A, b=10.7806(8) A, c=17.9915(14) A, Z=2, R 1 =0.0210, wR 2 =0.0470) consists of thorium metal centers connected via H 3 pdc linkages to form an overall three-dimensional structure containing π-π interactions between the pyrazole rings. 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (H 2 pzdc) was explored as well to (1) study the effect of the location of the carboxylic groups around the aromatic ring and (2) produce heterometallic compounds. Thorium (IV) and copper (II) were combined with H 2 pzdc, resulting in an interesting decomposition reaction characterized though the isolation of Th(C 2 O 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 .2H 2 O (2) (monoclinic, C2/c, a=13.8507(12) A, b=7.8719(7) A, c=10.7961(16) A, β=118.0310(10) o , Z=2, R 1 =0.0160, wR 2 =0.0349), Cu(C 6 H 2 N 2 O 4 ) (3) (monoclinic, C2/c, a=11.499(3) A, b=7.502(2) A, c=7.402(2) A, β=93.892(5) o , Z=4, R 1 =0.0472, wR 2 =0.0745) and Cu(C 5 H 3 N 2 O 2 )(NO 3 )(H 2 O) (4). The capture of these species provides mechanistic evidence for the formation of the oxalate anions observed in 2 via the decarboxylation of H 2 pzdc to yield the linker in 4: 2-pyrazinecarboxylate anions. - Graphical abstract: 3,5-Pyrazoledicarboxylic and 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid were utilized in synthesizing two novel thorium (IV) coordination polymers. Attempts to synthesize a Th-Cu bimetallic compound with 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid resulted in a triphasic mixture (2, 3 and 4, respectively). The oxalate anion observed in Th(C 2 O 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 .2H 2 O (2) is theorized to result from decarboxylation of 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as supported by the organic linker, 2-pyrazinecarboxylate, observed in Cu(C 5 H 3 N 2 O 2 )(NO 3 )(H 2 O) (4)

  18. What is the Potential for More Copper Fabrication in Zambia?

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    The copper fabrication industry lies between: (1) the industry that produces copper (as a commodity metal from mined ores as well as from recycling), and (2) the users of copper in finished products such as electronic goods. Copper fabrication involves the manufacture of products such as copper wire, wire rod, low-voltage cable, and other copper based semi-manufactures. Copper is clearly a...

  19. Extended analysis of Cu IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinders, E.; Uijlings, P.

    1980-01-01

    Wavelength data and classifications of 974 Cu IV lines in the region 750-1275 Angstroem are presented. Most of the lines have been classified as transitions from the previously unknown high even configurations 3d 7 5s and 3d 7 4d to 3d 7 4p. The configuration 3d 7 4d is seriously perturbed by 3d 6 4s 2 . The analysis resulted in the identification of 27 levels of 3d 7 5s and 113 levels of (3d 7 4d + 3d 6 4s 2 ) which are reported. The earlier published levels of 3d 7 4s and 3d 7 4p have to be shifted downward as a consequence of improved wavelength data. Radial paramter values, resulting from least-squares fits, are compared to Hartree-Fock values. The eigenvectors obtained in the parametric fitting are used to calculate transition probabilities in intermediate coupling. The relation between the observed intensities of the transitions 3d 7 4d-3d 7 4p and 3d 7 Ss-3d 7 4p is compared to the relation between theoretical values of the transition integrals obtained from Hartree-Fock calculations. A spectroscopic value for the ionization potentials is calculated from the 3d 7 ns configurations. (orig.)

  20. Studies of binary cerium(IV)-praseodymium(IV) and cerium(IV)-terbium(IV) oxides as pigments for ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, L.M.L.

    1991-01-01

    It was investigated a series of pigments of general composition Ce 1-x Pr x O 2 , and Ce x Tb y O 2 , exhibiting radish and brown colors, respectively, and high temperature stability. The pigments were obtained by dissolving appropriate amounts of the pure lanthanide oxides in acids and precipitating the rare earths as mixed oxalates, which were isolated and calcined under air, at 1000 0 C. X-Ray powder diffractograms were consistent with a cubic structure for the pigments. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, using Gouy method, indicated the presence of Pr(IV) ions in the Ce 1-x Pr x O 2 pigments and of Terbium predominantly as Tb(III) ions in the Ce-tb mixed oxides. A new method, based on suspension of solid samples in PVA-STB gels (STB = sodium tetradecaborate), was employed for the measurements of the electronic spectra of the pigments. The thermal behaviour the pigments was investigated by the calcination of the oxalates in the temperature range of 500 to 1200 O C, from 10 to 60 minutes. (author)

  1. Accumulation and hyperaccumulation of copper in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, V.; Trnkova, L.; Huska, D.; Babula, P.; Kizek, R.

    2009-04-01

    Copper is natural component of our environment. Flow of copper(II) ions in the environment depends on solubility of compounds containing this metal. Mobile ion coming from soil and rocks due to volcanic activity, rains and others are then distributed to water. Bio-availability of copper is substantially lower than its concentration in the aquatic environment. Copper present in the water reacts with other compounds and creates a complex, not available for organisms. The availability of copper varies depending on the environment, but moving around within the range from 5 to 25 % of total copper. Thus copper is stored in the sediments and the rest is transported to the seas and oceans. It is common knowledge that copper is essential element for most living organisms. For this reason this element is actively accumulated in the tissues. The total quantity of copper in soil ranges from 2 to 250 mg / kg, the average concentration is 30 mg / kg. Certain activities related to agriculture (the use of fungicides), possibly with the metallurgical industry and mining, tend to increase the total quantity of copper in the soil. This amount of copper in the soil is a problem particularly for agricultural production of food. The lack of copper causes a decrease in revenue and reduction in quality of production. In Europe, shows the low level of copper in total 18 million hectares of farmland. To remedy this adverse situation is the increasing use of copper fertilizers in agricultural soils. It is known that copper compounds are used in plant protection against various illnesses and pests. Mining of minerals is for the development of human society a key economic activity. An important site where the copper is mined in the Slovakia is nearby Smolníka. Due to long time mining in his area (more than 700 years) there are places with extremely high concentrations of various metals including copper. Besides copper, there are also detected iron, zinc and arsenic. Various plant species

  2. Uptake and internalisation of copper by three marine microalgae: comparison of copper-sensitive and copper-tolerant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jacqueline L; Angel, Brad M; Stauber, Jennifer L; Poon, Wing L; Simpson, Stuart L; Cheng, Shuk Han; Jolley, Dianne F

    2008-08-29

    Although it has been well established that different species of marine algae have different sensitivities to metals, our understanding of the physiological and biochemical basis for these differences is limited. This study investigated copper adsorption and internalisation in three algal species with differing sensitivities to copper. The diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was particularly sensitive to copper, with a 72-h IC50 (concentration of copper to inhibit growth rate by 50%) of 8.0 microg Cu L(-1), compared to the green algae Tetraselmis sp. (72-h IC50 47 microg Cu L(-1)) and Dunaliella tertiolecta (72-h IC50 530 microg Cu L(-1)). At these IC50 concentrations, Tetraselmis sp. had much higher intracellular copper (1.97+/-0.01 x 10(-13)g Cu cell(-1)) than P. tricornutum (0.23+/-0.19 x 10(-13)g Cu cell(-1)) and D. tertiolecta (0.59+/-0.05 x 10(-13)g Cu cell(-1)), suggesting that Tetraselmis sp. effectively detoxifies copper within the cell. By contrast, at the same external copper concentration (50 microg L(-1)), D. tertiolecta appears to better exclude copper than Tetraselmis sp. by having a slower copper internalisation rate and lower internal copper concentrations at equivalent extracellular concentrations. The results suggest that the use of internal copper concentrations and net uptake rates alone cannot explain differences in species-sensitivity for different algal species. Model prediction of copper toxicity to marine biota and understanding fundamental differences in species-sensitivity will require, not just an understanding of water quality parameters and copper-cell binding, but also further knowledge of cellular detoxification mechanisms.

  3. Rapid fluorescence assay for Sudan dyes using polyethyleneimine-coated copper nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Yu; Li, Jia Xing; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun; Qu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We report that the intensity of the blue fluorescence of copper nanoclusters coated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) is strongly reduced in the presence of the food dyestuffs Sudan I-IV. This finding was exploited in a label-free fluorescence assay for these Sudan dyes both in ethanol and aqueous solutions. The PEI-capped nanoclusters have an average diameter of 1.8 nm and are displaying, under 355 nm excitation, a blue emission at 480 nm that matches the absorption bands of the Sudan dyes. The clusters are stable in solution for at least 1 month. Under optimum conditions, this assay can be applied to the quantification of the dyes Sudan I, II, III, and IV, respectively, in the 0.1−30, 0.1–30, 0.1–25, and 0.1–25 μM concentration ranges, and the detection limits (3σ/slope) are 65, 70, 45, and 50 nM, respectively. The capability of reducing the fluorescence of the PEI-capped copper nanoclusters is directly related to the number of the functional groups in that Sudan III and IV give lower detection limits. This analytical scheme exhibits a remarkably high selectivity for the Sudan dyes over potentially interfering substances. The method was successfully applied to determine Sudan I, II, III, and IV in hot chilli powder. (author)

  4. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-12-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  5. Electrochemical in-situ impregnation of wood using a copper nail as source for copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Block, Thomas; Nymark, Morten

    2011-01-01

    A new method for copper impregnation of wood in structures was suggested and tested in laboratory scale with specimen of new pine sapwood. A copper nail and a steel screw were placed in the wood, and an electric direct current field was applied, so the copper nail was anode and the screw...... was cathode. At the anode, copper ions were generated. The copper ions were transported into the wood by electromigration (movement of ions in an applied electric field) towards the cathode, and a volume between the two electrodes was thereby impregnated. Copper also moved to a lesser degree in the opposite...

  6. Determinants of Infant Behaviour IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, B. M., Ed.

    This volume consists of reports of individual studies and surveys of research work on mother-infant interactions. It is divided into two parts. The first section presents a wide range of studies on mother-infant relations as exhibited in the behavior of animals. The second part, concerning human behavior, includes studies on the natural history of…

  7. Copper Leaching from Copper-ethanolamine Treated Wood: Comparison of Field Test Studies and Laboratory Standard Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Nejc Thaler; Miha Humar

    2014-01-01

    Copper-based compounds are some of the most important biocides for the protection of wood in heavy duty applications. In the past, copper was combined with chromium compounds to reduce copper leaching, but a recent generation of copper-based preservatives uses ethanolamine as a fixative. To elucidate the leaching of copper biocides from wood, Norway spruce (Picea abies) wood was treated with a commercial copper-ethanolamine solution with two different copper concentrations (cCu = 0.125% and 0...

  8. Template Syntheses, Crystal Structures and Supramolecular Assembly of Hexaaza Macrocyclic Copper(II) Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Ju Chang; Lough, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Two new hexaaza macrocyclic copper(II) complexes were prepared by a template method and structurally characterized. In the solid state, they were self-assembled by intermolecular interactions to form the corresponding supramolecules 1 and 2, respectively. In the structure of 1, the copper(II) macrocycles are bridged by a tp ligand to form a macrocyclic copper(II) dimer. The dimer extends its structure by intermolecular forces such as hydrogen bonds and C-H···π interactions, resulting in the formation of a double stranded 1D supramolecule. In 2, the basic structure is a monomeric copper(II) macrocycle with deprotonated imidazole pendants. An undulated 1D hydrogen bonded array is achieved through hydrogen bonds between imidazole pendants and secondary amines, where the imidazole pendants act as a hydrogen bond acceptor. The 1D hydrogen bonded supramolecular chain is supported by C-H···π interactions between the methyl groups of acetonitrile ligands and imidazole pendants of the copper(II) macrocycles. In both complexes, the introduction of imidazoles to the macrocycle as a pendant plays an important role for the formation of supramolecules, where they act as intermolecular hydrogen bond donors and/or acceptors, C-H···π and π-π interactions

  9. Surface modification of calcium–copper hydroxyapatites using polyaspartic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othmani, Masseoud; Aissa, Abdallah; Bachoua, Hassen; Debbabi, Mongi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The reaction of polyaspartic acid with calcium hydroxyapatite and mixed calcium–copper hydroxyapatite is tested. ► Chemical analysis shows that the presence of copper in the apatitic structure increases the reactivity of the apatite surface. ► X-ray powder analysis shows the conservation of unique crystalline phase of hydroxyapatite after copper incorporation and/or PASP acid reacting. ► IR spectra show the formation of the formation of organometallic bond M-O-C (M=Ca or Cu) on the apatitic surface. ► Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the texture surface was changed by the grafting. - Abstract: Mixed calcium–copper hydroxyapatite (Ca–CuHAp), with general formula Ca (10−x) Cu x (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 , where 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.75 was prepared in aqueous medium in the presence of different concentrations of poly-L-aspartic acid (PASP). XRD, IR, TG-DTA, TEM-EDX, AFM and chemical analyses were used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the products. All techniques show the formation of new hybrid compounds Ca–CuHAp–PASP. The presence of the grafting moiety on the apatitic material is more significant with increasing of copper amount and/or organic concentration in the starting solution. These increases lead to the affectation of apatite crystallinity. The IR spectroscopy shows the conservation of (P-OH) band of (HPO 4 ) 2− groups, suggesting that PASP acid was interacted only with metallic cations of hydroxyapatite.

  10. Surface modification of calcium-copper hydroxyapatites using polyaspartic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmani, Masseoud; Aissa, Abdallah; Bachoua, Hassen [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Debbabi, Mongi, E-mail: m.debbabi@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction of polyaspartic acid with calcium hydroxyapatite and mixed calcium-copper hydroxyapatite is tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical analysis shows that the presence of copper in the apatitic structure increases the reactivity of the apatite surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray powder analysis shows the conservation of unique crystalline phase of hydroxyapatite after copper incorporation and/or PASP acid reacting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR spectra show the formation of the formation of organometallic bond M-O-C (M=Ca or Cu) on the apatitic surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the texture surface was changed by the grafting. - Abstract: Mixed calcium-copper hydroxyapatite (Ca-CuHAp), with general formula Ca{sub (10-x)}Cu{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, where 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.75 was prepared in aqueous medium in the presence of different concentrations of poly-L-aspartic acid (PASP). XRD, IR, TG-DTA, TEM-EDX, AFM and chemical analyses were used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the products. All techniques show the formation of new hybrid compounds Ca-CuHAp-PASP. The presence of the grafting moiety on the apatitic material is more significant with increasing of copper amount and/or organic concentration in the starting solution. These increases lead to the affectation of apatite crystallinity. The IR spectroscopy shows the conservation of (P-OH) band of (HPO{sub 4}){sup 2-} groups, suggesting that PASP acid was interacted only with metallic cations of hydroxyapatite.

  11. Zirconium (IV) complexes with some polymethylenediimines | Na ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The syntheses of zirconium (IV) complexes have been carried out by the reaction of oxozirconium (IV) chloride with the appropriate diimines (Schiff bases). The complexes were isolated as yellow solids which are stable to heat. The complexes were found to be insoluble in most solvents. The infrared spectra, elemental ...

  12. Astragaloside IV liposomes ameliorates adriamycin-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The rats were given a single tail intravenous injection of adriamycin (6 mg/kg) within 1 week, and then divided into four groups including normal, model, benazepril and astragaloside IV liposomes group. They were all orally administered dosage of benazepril and astragaloside IV liposomes once daily for 8 weeks.

  13. Studies on the optical absorption of copper-dopped myoglobin: conformational changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, M.T.M.

    1976-03-01

    Optical absorption changes in the visible and near U.V. spectrum of myoglobin molecules are observed when copper ions are added to the macromolecule. The heme optical transitions are investigated through a theoretical simulation of the optical absorption spectrum. A study of the absorption band in the region of 700 nm associated with the copper - myoglobin complexes indicated the existence of two kinds of metal-protein complexes: one associated with the six or eitht first added copper ions and the other related with the higher concentrations. Conformational changes caused by thermal treatment are studied in myoglobin water solutions and solutions containing copper ions. The phenomenon named pre-denaturation is observed through the optical absorption at 245 nm. It is shown that interactions between myoglobin molecules occur in the pre-denaturation phenomenon. (Author) [pt

  14. Effects of vacuum processing erbium dideuteride/ditritide films deposited on chromium underlays on copper substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provo, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Thin films of erbium dideuteride/ditritide were experimentally produced on chromium underlays deposited on copper substrates. The chromium underlay is required to prevent erbium occluder/copper substrate alloying which inhibits hydriding. Data taken has shown that vacuum processing affects the erbium/chromium/copper interaction. With an in situ process in which underlay/occluder films are vacuum deposited onto copper substrates and hydrided with no air exposure between these steps, data indicates a minimum of 1500A of chromium is required for optimum hydriding. If films are vacuum deposited as above and air-exposed before hydriding, a minimum of 3000A of chromium was shown to be required for equivalent hydriding. Data suggests that the activation step (600 0 C for 1 hour) required for hydriding the film of the second type is responsible for the difference observed. Such underlay thickness parameters are important, with regard to heat transfer considerations in thin hydride targets used for neutron generation

  15. Adsorption studies of water on copper, nickel, and iron: assessment of the polarization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Staehle, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    In the atmospheric corrosion of copper, nickel, and iron, the adsorption of water affects the corrosion rates. Knowledge of water adsorption and metal oxyhydroxide formation is important in understanding the atmospheric corrosion process. The purposes of the present research were (i) to measure the adsorption of water on metal surfaces as a function of temperature and relative humidity (RH) and (ii) to assess Bradley's polarization model of adsorption. In the present research, the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique was used to measure the mass changes of copper, nickel, and iron at 0 to 100% relative humidity and 7 to 90 C under nitrogen and air environments. Less water was adsorbed on copper, nickel, and iron which form oxides than on gold. The amount of water adsorption was similar on copper, nickel, and iron under N 2 and air carrier gases. Functional relationship was first proposed as a way to include dipole/induced dipole interactions between the adsorbents and water layers. (orig.)

  16. Thermal conductivity of glass copper-composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Terai, Ryohei; Haidai, Haruki

    1980-01-01

    Glass-metal composites are to be one of the answers for promoting thermal conduction in the glassy solids containing high-level radioactive wastes. In order to investigate the effect of metal addition on thermal conductivity of glasses, glass-copper composites were selected, and the conductivities of the composites were measured and discussed in regards to copper content and microstructure. Fully densified composites were successfully prepared by pressure sintering of the powder mixtures of glass and copper at temperatures above the yield points of the constituent glasses if the copper content was not so much. The conductivity was measured by means of a comparative method, in which the thermal gradient of the specimen was compared with that of quartz glass as standard under thermally steady state. Measurements were carried out at around 50 0 C. The thermal conductivity increased with increasing content of copper depending on the kind of copper powder used. The conductivities of the composites of the same copper content differed considerably each another. Fine copper powder was effective on increasing conductivity, and the conductivity became about threefold of that of glass by mixing the fine copper powder about 10 vol%. For the composites containing the fine copper powder less than 5 vol%, the conductivity obeyed so-called logarithmic rule, one of the mixture rules of conductivity, whereas for composites containing more than 5 vol%, the conductivity remarkably increased apart from the rule. This fact suggests that copper becomes continuous in the composite when the copper content increased beyond 5 vol%. For the composites containing coarse copper powder, the conductivity was increased not significantly, and obeyed an equation derived from the model in which conductive material dispersed in less conductive one. (author)

  17. Generation IV reactors: international projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Hittner, D.

    2003-01-01

    Generation IV international forum (GIF) was initiated in 2000 by DOE (American department of energy) in order to promote nuclear energy in a long term view (2030). GIF has selected 6 concepts of reactors: 1) VHTR (very high temperature reactor system, 2) GHR (gas-cooled fast reactor system), 3) SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor system, 4) SCWR (super-critical water-cooled reactor system), 5) LFR (lead-cooled fast reactor system), and 6) MFR (molten-salt reactor system). All these 6 reactor systems have been selected on criteria based on: - a better contribution to sustainable development (through their aptitude to produce hydrogen or other clean fuels, or to have a high energy conversion ratio...) - economic profitability, - safety and reliability, and - proliferation resistance. The 6 concepts of reactors are examined in the first article, the second article presents an overview of the results of the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) within IAEA. The project finished its first phase, called phase-IA. It has produced an outlook into the future role of nuclear energy and defined the need for innovation. The third article is dedicated to 2 international cooperations: MICANET and HTR-TN. The purpose of MICANET is to propose to the European Commission a research and development strategy in order to develop the assets of nuclear energy for the future. Future reactors are expected to be more multiple-purposes, more adaptable, safer than today, all these developments require funded and coordinated research programs. The aim of HTR-TN cooperation is to promote high temperature reactor systems, to develop them in a long term perspective and to define their limits in terms of burn-up and operating temperature. (A.C.)

  18. Copper disinfection ban causes storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Since 1 February this year, under the EU's Biocidal Products Directive, it has been illegal to sell or use water treatment systems that use elemental copper, a practice employed historically by a significant number of UK healthcare facilities to combat Legionella. Alan Lester, managing director of specialist supplier of 'environmentally-friendly' water treatment systems, Advanced Hydro, says the ban has caused 'a storm of giant proportion,' with advocates of copper ion-based treatment systems arguing that this disinfection method dates back 3,000 years to Egyptian times, making it an 'undoubtedly proven' technology. Here he explains why the ban came into force, considers why the UK's Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is seeking a derogation, looks at the ban's likely impact, and gives a personal viewpoint on the 'pros and cons' of some of the alternative treatment technologies, including a titanium dioxide-based system marketed by Advanced Hydro itself in the UK.

  19. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  20. Combined toxicity of microcystin-LR and copper on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Steinman, Alan D; Wan, Xiang; Xie, Liqiang

    2018-05-10

    Microcystins and copper commonly co-exist in the natural environment, but their combined toxicity remains unclear, especially in terrestrial plants. The present study investigated the toxicity effects of microcystin-LR (0, 5, 50, 500, 1000 μg L -1 ) and copper (0, 50, 500, 1000, 2000 μg L -1 ), both individually and in mixture, on the germination, growth and oxidative response of lettuce. The bioaccumulation of microcystin-LR and copper was also evaluated. Results showed that the decrease in lettuce germination induced by copper alone was not significantly different from that induced by the mixture, and the combined toxicity assessment showed a simple additive effect. Lettuce growth was not significantly reduced by microcystin-LR alone, whereas it was significantly reduced by copper alone and the mixture when copper concentration was higher than 500 μg L -1 . High concentrations of microcystin-LR (1000 μg L -1 ) and copper (≥50 μg L -1 ),as well as their mixture (≥50 + 500 μg L -1 ), induced oxidative stress in lettuce. A synergistic effect on the growth and antioxidative system of lettuce was observed when exposed to low concentrations of the mixture (≤50 + 500 μg L -1 ), whereas an antagonistic effect was observed at high concentrations (≥1000 + 2000 μg L -1 ). Moreover, the interaction of microcystin-LR and copper can increase their accumulation in lettuce. Our results suggest that the toxicity effects of microcystin-LR and copper are exacerbated when they co-exist in the natural environment at low concentrations, which not only negatively affects plant growth but also poses a potential risk to human health via the food chain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. A cytosolic copper storage protein provides a second level of copper tolerance in Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straw, Megan L; Chaplin, Amanda K; Hough, Michael A; Paps, Jordi; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Wilson, Michael T; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2018-01-24

    Streptomyces lividans has a distinct dependence on the bioavailability of copper for its morphological development. A cytosolic copper resistance system is operative in S. lividans that serves to preclude deleterious copper levels. This system comprises of several CopZ-like copper chaperones and P 1 -type ATPases, predominantly under the transcriptional control of a metalloregulator from the copper sensitive operon repressor (CsoR) family. In the present study, we discover a new layer of cytosolic copper resistance in S. lividans that involves a protein belonging to the newly discovered family of copper storage proteins, which we have named Ccsp (cytosolic copper storage protein). From an evolutionary perspective, we find Ccsp homologues to be widespread in Bacteria and extend through into Archaea and Eukaryota. Under copper stress Ccsp is upregulated and consists of a homotetramer assembly capable of binding up to 80 cuprous ions (20 per protomer). X-ray crystallography reveals 18 cysteines, 3 histidines and 1 aspartate are involved in cuprous ion coordination. Loading of cuprous ions to Ccsp is a cooperative process with a Hill coefficient of 1.9 and a CopZ-like copper chaperone can transfer copper to Ccsp. A Δccsp mutant strain indicates that Ccsp is not required under initial copper stress in S. lividans, but as the CsoR/CopZ/ATPase efflux system becomes saturated, Ccsp facilitates a second level of copper tolerance.

  2. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  3. Copper as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics: copper-ionophore pharmacology and altering systemic copper distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Delphine; Pearson, Helen B.; Clatworthy, Sharnel A.S.; Smith, Zoe M.; Francis, Paul S.; Llanos, Roxana M.; Volitakis, Irene; Phillips, Wayne A.; Meggyesy, Peter M.; Masaldan, Shashank; Cater, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Copper-ionophores that elevate intracellular bioavailable copper display significant therapeutic utility against prostate cancer cells in vitro and in TRAMP (Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate) mice. However, the pharmacological basis for their anticancer activity remains unclear, despite impending clinical trails. Herein we show that intracellular copper levels in prostate cancer, evaluated in vitro and across disease progression in TRAMP mice, were not correlative with copper-ionophore activity and mirrored the normal levels observed in patient prostatectomy tissues (Gleason Score 7 & 9). TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells harbored markedly elevated oxidative stress and diminished glutathione (GSH)-mediated antioxidant capacity, which together conferred selective sensitivity to prooxidant ionophoric copper. Copper-ionophore treatments [CuII(gtsm), disulfiram & clioquinol] generated toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells, but not in normal mouse prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). Our results provide a basis for the pharmacological activity of copper-ionophores and suggest they are amendable for treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Additionally, recent in vitro and mouse xenograft studies have suggested an increased copper requirement by prostate cancer cells. We demonstrated that prostate adenocarcinoma development in TRAMP mice requires a functional supply of copper and is significantly impeded by altered systemic copper distribution. The presence of a mutant copper-transporting Atp7b protein (tx mutation: A4066G/Met1356Val) in TRAMP mice changed copper-integration into serum and caused a remarkable reduction in prostate cancer burden (64% reduction) and disease severity (grade), abrogating adenocarcinoma development. Implications for current clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27175597

  4. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; John, E.K.; Barnhart, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Several isotopes of gallium and copper exhibit nuclear properties that make them attractive for applications in nuclear medicine, most notably Ga-67, Ga-68, Cu-67 and Cu-62. Of these, gamma-emitting Ga-67 has historically found the greatest clinical use, based on the observation that tracer gallium(III) citrate rapidly produces Ga-67 transferrin upon intravenous injection and then slowly affords selective Ga-67 localization in sites of abscess and certain tumors. Copper-67 has received attention as a potential label for tissue-selective monoclonal antibodies, since its associated γ-photons can be used for external imaging and its β - -emissions could be used for radiation therapy. Positron-emitting gallium-68 and copper-62, being available from parent/daughter generator systems, have attracted interest as potential labels for radiopharmaceuticals used in positron emission tomography (PET) because they could reduce the dependence of this imaging technology on hospital-based cyclotrons. The 10 min. half-life of Cu-62 is particularly well-suited to the time frame of PET studies of tissue perfusion, an application for which Cu(II)-bis(thiosemicarbazone) derivatives appear promising. The 68 min. half-life of Ga-68 makes it appropriate for PET studies over longer imaging time spans

  5. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whiting, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grear, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Blake, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Massaua, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brown-Saracino, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Battey, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  6. Structural characterization of the Actinides (III) and (IV) - DOTA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audras, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    The polyamino-carboxylate anions have been identified as compounds of interest in the operations of actinide separation, in actinide migration in the environment and in human radio-toxicology. The structural characterization of complexes formed between actinides and polyamino-carboxylates ligands is essential for a better understanding of actinide-ligands interactions. Among the polyamino-carboxylate anions, the DOTA ligand (1,4,7,10-tetraaza-cyclododecane tetraacetic acid) is described as a very strong complexing agent of the lanthanides(III), but has been little studied with actinides. The objective of this thesis is to describe the complexes formed between the actinides (III) and (IV) and the DOTA ligand, and compare them with the lanthanide complexes. For this, an approach has been introduced to characterize the complexes by complementary analytical techniques (spectrophotometry, electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry, NMR, EXAFS, electrochemistry), but also by calculations of theoretical chemistry to help the interpretation of the experimental data. The formation of a 1:1 complex is observed with the actinides(III) (plutonium and americium) as for lanthanides(III): rapid formation of intermediate species which evolves slowly towards the formation of a limit complex. Within this complex, the cation is located inside the cavity formed by the ligand. Four nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from the carboxylate functions are involved in the coordination sphere of the cation. However, differences were observed in the bond lengths formed between the cation and the nitrogen atoms (the bonds are somewhat shorter in the case of actinide complexes) as well as the complexation kinetics, which is slightly faster for the actinides(III) than for lanthanide(III) ions of equivalent radius. The same behavior was observed in solution upon complexation of actinides(IV) (uranium, plutonium and neptunium): slow formation of a 1:1 complex (actinide(IV):ligand) in wherein the

  7. Silica-gel Particles Loaded with an Ionic Liquid for Separation of Zr(IV Prior to Its Determination by ICP-OES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi M. Marwani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new ionic liquid loaded silica gel amine (SG-APTMS-N,N-EPANTf2 was developed, as an adsorptive material, for selective adsorption and determination of zirconium, Zr(IV, without the need for a chelating intermediate. Based on a selectivity study, the SG-APTMS-N,N-EPANTf2 phase showed a perfect selectivity towards Zr(IV at pH 4 as compared to other metallic ions, including gold [Au(III], copper [Cu(II], cobalt [Co(II], chromium [Cr(III], lead [Pb(II], selenium [Se(IV] and mercury [Hg(II] ions. The influence of pH, Zr(IV concentration, contact time and interfering ions on SG-APTMS-N,N-EPANTf2 uptake for Zr(IV was evaluated. The presence of incorporated donor atoms in newly synthesized SG-APTMS-N,N-EPANTf2 phase played a significant role in enhancing its uptake capacity of Zr(IV by 78.64% in contrast to silica gel (activated. The equilibrium and kinetic information of Zr(IV adsorption onto SG-APTMS-N,N-EPANTf2 were best expressed by Langmuir and pseudo second-order kinetic models, respectively. General co-existing cations did not interfere with the extraction and detection of Zr(IV. Finally, the analytical efficiency of the newly developed method was also confirmed by implementing it for the determination of Zr(IV in several water samples.

  8. Large local lattice expansion in graphene adlayers grown on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Arezki, Hakim; Nguyen, Van Luan; Shen, Jiahong; Mucha-Kruczyński, Marcin; Yao, Fei; Boutchich, Mohamed; Chen, Yue; Lee, Young Hee; Asensio, Maria C.

    2018-05-01

    Variations of the lattice parameter can significantly change the properties of a material, and, in particular, its electronic behaviour. In the case of graphene, however, variations of the lattice constant with respect to graphite have been limited to less than 2.5% due to its well-established high in-plane stiffness. Here, through systematic electronic and lattice structure studies, we report regions where the lattice constant of graphene monolayers grown on copper by chemical vapour deposition increases up to 7.5% of its relaxed value. Density functional theory calculations confirm that this expanded phase is energetically metastable and driven by the enhanced interaction between the substrate and the graphene adlayer. We also prove that this phase possesses distinctive chemical and electronic properties. The inherent phase complexity of graphene grown on copper foils revealed in this study may inspire the investigation of possible metastable phases in other seemingly simple heterostructure systems.

  9. Linking strain anisotropy and plasticity in copper metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Conal E.; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son

    2015-01-01

    The elastic anisotropy of copper leads to significant variation in the x-ray elastic constants (XEC), which link diffraction-based strain measurements to stress. An accurate depiction of the mechanical response in copper thin films requires a determination of an appropriate grain interaction model that lies between Voigt and Reuss limits. It is shown that the associated XEC weighting fraction, x*, between these limits provides a metric by which strain anisotropy can be quantified. Experimental values of x*, as determined by a linear regression scheme of diffraction data collected from multiple reflections, reveal the degree of strain anisotropy and its dependence on plastic deformation induced during in-situ and ex-situ thermal treatments

  10. Surface modification of calcium-copper hydroxyapatites using polyaspartic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Masseoud; Aissa, Abdallah; Bachoua, Hassen; Debbabi, Mongi

    2013-01-01

    Mixed calcium-copper hydroxyapatite (Ca-CuHAp), with general formula Ca(10-x)Cux(PO4)6(OH)2, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.75 was prepared in aqueous medium in the presence of different concentrations of poly-L-aspartic acid (PASP). XRD, IR, TG-DTA, TEM-EDX, AFM and chemical analyses were used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the products. All techniques show the formation of new hybrid compounds Ca-CuHAp-PASP. The presence of the grafting moiety on the apatitic material is more significant with increasing of copper amount and/or organic concentration in the starting solution. These increases lead to the affectation of apatite crystallinity. The IR spectroscopy shows the conservation of (Psbnd OH) band of (HPO4)2- groups, suggesting that PASP acid was interacted only with metallic cations of hydroxyapatite.

  11. Microcomponents manufacturing for precise devices by copper vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, Sergey; Nikonchuk, Michail O.; Polyakov, Igor V.

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents investigation results of drilling of metal microcomponents by copper vapor laser. The laser consists of master oscillator - spatial filter - amplifier system, electronics switching with digital control of laser pulse repetition rate and quantity of pulses, x-y stage with computer control system. Mass of metal, removed by one laser pulse, is measured and defined by means of diameter and depth of holes. Interaction of next pulses on drilled material is discussed. The difference between light absorption and metal evaporation processes is considered for drilling and cutting. Efficiency of drilling is estimated by ratio of evaporation heat and used laser energy. Maximum efficiency of steel cutting is calculated with experimental data of drilling. Applications of copper vapor laser for manufacturing is illustrated by such microcomponents as pin guide plate for printers, stents for cardio surgery, encoded disks for security systems and multiple slit masks for spectrophotometers.

  12. Speciation and leachability of copper in mine tailings from porphyry copper mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Yianatos, Juan B; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2005-01-01

    Mine tailing from the El Teniente-Codelco copper mine situated in VI Region of Chile was analysed in order to evaluate the mobility and speciation of copper in the solid material. Mine tailing was sampled after the rougher flotation circuits, and the copper content was measured to 1150mgkg^-^1 dry...... matter. This tailing was segmented into fractions of different size intervals: 0-38, 38-45, 45-53, 53-75, 75-106, 106-150, 150-212, and >212@mm, respectively. Copper content determination, sequential chemical extraction, and desorption experiments were carried out for each size interval in order...... to evaluate the speciation of copper. It was found that the particles of smallest size contained 50-60% weak acid leachable copper, whereas only 32% of the copper found in largest particles could be leached in weak acid. Copper oxides and carbonates were the dominating species in the smaller particles...

  13. Preparation of copper and silicon/copper powders by a gas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    aCentre for Materials Research, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, ... Copper powder; Si/Cu composite particle; gas evaporation–condensation method; characteriza- tion. .... from the liquid metal surface, the mixed vapour of copper.

  14. Zircon Supported Copper Catalysts for the Steam Reforming of Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiastri, M.; Fendy, Marsih, I. N.

    2008-03-01

    Steam reforming of methanol (SRM) is known as one of the most favorable catalytic processes for producing hydrogen. Current research on zirconia, ZrO2 supported copper catalyst revealed that CuO/ZrO2 as an active catalyst for the SRM. Zircon, ZrSiO4 is available from the by-product of tin mining. In the work presented here, the catalytic properties of CuO/ZrSiO4 with various copper oxide compositions ranging from 2.70% (catalyst I), 4.12% (catalyst II), and 7.12%-mass (catalyst III), synthesized by an incipient wetness impregnation technique, were investigated to methanol conversion, selectivity towards CO formation, and effect of ZnO addition (7.83%CuO/8.01%ZnO/ZrSiO4 = catalyst V). The catalytic activity was obtained using a fixed bed reactor and the zircon supported catalyst activity was compared to those of CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst (catalyst IV) and commercial Kujang LTSC catalyst. An X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis was done to identify the abundant phases of the catalysts. The catalysts topography and particle diameter were measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and composition of the catalysts was measured by SEM-EDX, scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive using X-ray analysis. The results of this research provide information on the possibility of using zircon (ZrSiO4) as solid support for SRM catalysts.

  15. Copper Bioleaching in China: Review and Prospect

    OpenAIRE

    Shenghua Yin; Leiming Wang; Eugie Kabwe; Xun Chen; Rongfu Yan; Kai An; Lei Zhang; Aixiang Wu

    2018-01-01

    The commercial application of copper bioleaching, an environmentally-friendly approach for low-grade and secondary mineral resources recycling, has increased worldwide since the 2000s. As the world’s second-largest economic entity and the largest developing country, China has the largest demand for metal resources, significantly advancing the theory and industrial technology of copper bioleaching. This paper reviews the exploration and application of copper bioleaching in China. Two typical b...

  16. World Copper Market Outlook: 2003-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Florela Stoian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents synthetically the copper market outlook (demand, supply, and prices) during 2003-2014, highlighting the impact of economic crisis of 2008-2009 on the world copper market. During the crisis, the decline in demand caused increases in excess supply of metal, as the supply has followed an upward trend, contributing to the imbalances of the copper market and putting pressure on stock prices at LME London Metal Exchange.

  17. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, Karamjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits

  18. Functional understanding of the versatile protein copper metabolism MURR1 domain 1 (COMMD1) in copper homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedoseienko, Alina; Bartuzi, Paulina; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an important cofactor in numerous biological processes in all living organisms. However, excessive copper can be extremely toxic, so it is vital that the copper level within a cell is tightly regulated. The damaging effect of copper is seen in several hereditary forms of copper toxicity in

  19. Adduct formation in Ce(IV) thenolytrifluoroacetonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anufrieva, S.I.; Polyakova, G.V.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The literature contains no information on adduct formation in Ce(IV) β-diketonates with additional ligands. Since tetrakis-β-diketonates of Ce(IV) have four six-membered chelate rings, we can suppose that the introduction of an additional monodentate or bidentate ligand into the coordination sphere of Ce(IV) β-diketonates would lead to an increase in the coordination number (CN) of the Ce(IV) to nine or ten. The possibility of realization of such a high CN for Ce(IV) has not been proved; a study of adduct formation by Ce(IV) tetrakis-β-diketonates is thus of theoretical interest. Such an investigation might also be of practical interest, because the introduction of an additional ligand into the coordination sphere of a rare-earth β-diketonate usually increases the solubility of the β-diketonate in nonpolar solvents and increases the volatility of the compound; such a modification of the properties is important for various practical purposes. The aim of our work was to study the possibility of separating solid adducts of Ce(IV) tetrakis-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate with certain oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing donor monodentate and bidentate ligands, and also to investigate their properties. As the β-diketone we used thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTFA), since in a parallel investigation it was found that Ce(TTFA) 4 has a high oxidation-reduction stability

  20. Impairment of Interrelated Iron- and Copper Homeostatic Mechanisms in Brain Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin, all highly involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells that express various transporters. PMID:23055972

  1. Thermal conductivity of tungsten–copper composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Kwon, Su Yong; Ham, Hye Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present the temperature dependence of the thermophysical properties for tungsten–copper composite from room temperature to 400 °C. The powders of tungsten–copper were produced by the spray conversion method and the W–Cu alloys were fabricated by the metal injection molding. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of tungsten–copper composite was controllable by volume fraction copper. - Abstract: As the speed and degree of integration of semiconductor devices increases, more heat is generated, and the performance and lifetime of semiconductor devices depend on the dissipation of the generated heat. Tungsten–copper alloys have high electrical and thermal conductivities, low contact resistances, and low coefficients of thermal expansion, thus allowing them to be used as a shielding material for microwave packages, and heat sinks for high power integrated circuits (ICs). In this study, the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of several types of tungsten–copper (W–Cu) composites are investigated, using compositions of 5–30 wt.% copper balanced with tungsten. The tungsten–copper powders were produced using the spray conversion method, and the W–Cu alloys were fabricated via the metal injection molding. The tungsten–copper composite particles were nanosized, and the thermal conductivity of the W–Cu alloys gradually decreases with temperature increases. The thermal conductivity of the W–30 wt.% Cu composite was 238 W/(m K) at room temperature.

  2. Unraveling the Amycolatopsis tucumanensis copper-resistome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila Costa, José Sebastián; Kothe, Erika; Abate, Carlos Mauricio; Amoroso, María Julia

    2012-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution is widespread causing serious ecological problems in many parts of the world; especially in developing countries where a budget for remediation technology is not affordable. Therefore, screening for microbes with high accumulation capacities and studying their stable resistance characteristics is advisable to define cost-effective any remediation strategies. Herein, the copper-resistome of the novel copper-resistant strain Amycolatopsis tucumanensis was studied using several approaches. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that proteins of the central metabolism, energy production, transcriptional regulators, two-component system, antioxidants and protective metabolites increased their abundance upon copper-stress conditions. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in presence of copper, superoxide dismutase, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and mycothiol reductase genes were markedly induced in expression. The oxidative damage of protein and lipid from A. tucumanensis was negligible compared with that observed in the copper-sensitive strain Amycolatopsis eurytherma. Thus, we provide evidence that A. tucumamensis shows a high adaptation towards copper, the sum of which is proposed as the copper-resistome. This adaptation allows the strain to accumulate copper and survive this stress; besides, it constitutes the first report in which the copper-resistome of a strain of the genus Amycolatopsis with bioremediation potential has been evaluated.

  3. Electroforming copper targets for RTNS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, W.K.; Dini, J.W.; Logan, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    Copper targets used in RTNS II, which is the world's most intense 14-MeV neutron source, contain water cooling channels for temperature control. There are two methods for fabricating these targets: (1) diffusion bonding a copper panel containing photoetched channels to another copper panel, and (2) an electroforming technique which involves filling the photoetched channels with wax, plating thick copper to seal over the channels and then removing the wax. Development of this latter process and results obtained with it are described

  4. A horizontally gene transferred copper resistance locus confers hyper‐resistance to antibacterial copper toxicity and enables survival of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Joanne; Thomas, Jamie; Riboldi, Gustavo P.; Zapotoczna, Marta; Tarrant, Emma; Andrew, Peter W.; Londoño, Alejandra; Planet, Paul J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Waldron, Kevin J.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Excess copper is highly toxic and forms part of the host innate immune system's antibacterial arsenal, accumulating at sites of infection and acting within macrophages to kill engulfed pathogens. We show for the first time that a novel, horizontally gene transferred copper resistance locus (copXL), uniquely associated with the SCCmec elements of the highly virulent, epidemic, community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA‐MRSA) USA300, confers copper hyper‐resistance. These genes are additional to existing core genome copper resistance mechanisms, and are not found in typical S. aureus lineages, but are increasingly identified in emerging pathogenic isolates. Our data show that CopX, a putative P1B‐3‐ATPase efflux transporter, and CopL, a novel lipoprotein, confer copper hyper‐resistance compared to typical S. aureus strains. The copXL genes form an operon that is tightly repressed in low copper environments by the copper regulator CsoR. Significantly, CopX and CopL are important for S. aureus USA300 intracellular survival within macrophages. Therefore, the emergence of new S. aureus clones with the copXL locus has significant implications for public health because these genes confer increased resistance to antibacterial copper toxicity, enhancing bacterial fitness by altering S. aureus interaction with innate immunity. PMID:29521441

  5. Nearly 60% Copper Rod & Wire Companies Neutral about Future Copper Price

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>How about the trend of copper price recently? According to the survey result of Shanghai Metals Market, amongst 21 domestic copper rod & wire companies, 57% of the companies are neutral about the future copper price, while 14% and 19% of the companies consider that

  6. The copper-transporting ATPase pump and its potential role in copper-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Ohno; C.A. Clausen; Frederick Green; G. Stanosz

    2016-01-01

    Copper-tolerant brown-rot decay fungi exploit intricate mechanisms to neutralize the efficacy of copper-containing preservative formulations. The production and accumulation oxalate is the most widely recognized theory regarding the mechanism of copper-tolerance in these fungi. The role of oxalate, however, may be only one part of a series of necessary components...

  7. Galvanic corrosion of copper-cast iron couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel rods for geological disposal, SKB are considering using the Copper-Cast Iron Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and an inner cast iron container. The canister will be placed into boreholes in the bedrock of a geologic repository and surrounded by bentonite clay. In the unlikely event of the outer copper canister being breached, water would enter the annulus between the inner and outer canister and at points of contact between the two metals there would be the possibility of galvanic interactions. Although this subject has been considered previously from both a theoretical standpoint and by experimental investigations there was a need for further experimental studies in support of information provided by SKB to the Swedish regulators (SKI). In the work reported here copper-cast iron galvanic couples were set up in a number of different environments representing possible conditions in the SKB repository. The tests investigated two artificial porewaters at 30 deg C and 50 deg C, under aerated and deaerated conditions. Tests were also carried out in a 30 wt% bentonite slurry made up in artificial groundwater. The potential of the couples and the currents passing between the coupled electrodes were monitored for several months. The effect of growing an oxide film on the surface of the cast iron prior to coupling it with copper was investigated. In addition, some crevice specimens based on the multi-crevice assembly (MCA) design were used to simulate the situation where the copper canister will be in direct contact with the cast iron inner vessel. The electrochemical results are presented graphically in the form of electrode potentials and galvanic corrosion currents as a function of time. The galvanic currents in aerated conditions were much higher than in deaerated conditions. For example, at 30 deg C, galvanic corrosion rates as low as 0.02 μm/year for iron were observed after deaeration, but

  8. The role of the native oxide shell on the microwave sintering of copper metal powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Morsi M.; Link, Guido; Thumm, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin oxide native layer had a critical role on microwave sintering of copper. • Explain why microwaves interact with copper powder differently than its bulk. • Abnormal expansion in copper is due to the plastic deformation and crack formation. • In-situ setup gives important insight about the microwave sintering of metals. • Microwave sintering is a promising candidate technology in powder metallurgy. - Abstract: Successful microwave sintering of several metal powders had been reported by many researchers with remarkable improvements in the materials properties and/or in the overall process. However, the concept behind microwave heating of metal powders has not been fully understood till now, as it is well known that bulk metals reflect microwaves. The progress of microwave sintering of copper metal powder compacts was investigated via combining both in-situ electrical resistivity and dilatometry measurements that give important information about microstructural changes with respect to the inter-particle electrical contacts during sintering. The sintering behavior of copper metal powders was depending on the type of the gas used, particle size, the initial green density, the soaking sintering time and the thin oxide layer on the particles surfaces. The thin copper oxide native layer (ceramics) that thermodynamically formed on the particles surfaces under normal handling and ambient environmental conditions had a very critical and important role in the microwave absorption and interaction, the sintering behavior and the microstructural changes. This finding could help to have a fundamental understanding of why MW’s interact with copper metal powder in a different way than its bulk at room temperature, i.e. why a given metal powder could be heated using microwaves while its bulk reflects it

  9. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Volume 5 of the supplements on ''atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion'' to the journal ''Nuclear Fusion'' is devoted to a critical assessment of the physical and thermo-mechanical properties of presently considered candidate plasma-facing and structural materials for next-generation thermonuclear fusion devices. It contains 9 papers. The subjects are: (i) requirements and selection criteria for plasma-facing materials and components in the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activities) design; (ii) thermomechanical properties of Beryllium; (iii) material properties data for fusion reactor plasma-facing carbon-carbon composites; (iv) high-Z candidate plasma facing materials; (v) recommended property data for Molybdenum, Niobium and Vanadium alloys; (vi) copper alloys for high heat flux structure applications; (vii) erosion of plasma-facing materials during a tokamak disruption; (viii) runaway electron effects; and (ix) data bases for thermo-hydrodynamic coupling with coolants. Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Market opportunities: U.S. - PADD IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The current supply and demand balance, the short and long term expectations and marketing opportunities for Canadian crude oil in PADD IV, the Rocky Mountain region in the US, were reviewed. It was suggested that market opportunities in PADD IV are derived from the following four factors: (1) crude oil declines within that area, (2) federal regulations, (3) competitive presence with markets, and (4) population growth. The overall conclusion was that Canadian producers and PADD IV refiners will be looking at an ever-growing relationship based on freight equalized world crude prices. 8 tabs., 5 figs

  11. Fluid element in SAP IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, C.; Akkas, N.

    1979-01-01

    In previous studies a fluid element is incorporated in the widely used general purpose finite element program SAPIV. This type of problem is of interest in the design of nuclear components involving geometric complexities and nonlinearities. The elasticity matrix of a general-purpose finite element program is modified in such a way that it becomes possible to idealize fluid as a structural finite element with zero shear modulus and a given bulk modules. Using the modified version of SAPIV, several solid-fluid interactions problems are solved. The numerical solutions are compared with the available analytical solutions. They are shown to be in reasonable aggrement. It is also shown that by solving an exterior-fluid interaction problem, the pressure wave propagation in the acoustic medium can be solved with the same approach. In this study, two of the problem not studied in the previous work will be presented. These problems are namely the effects of the link elements used at solid-fluid interfaces and of the concentrated loads on the response of the fluid medium. Truss elements are used as the link elements. After these investigations, it is decided that general purpose finite element programs with slight modifications can be used in the safety analysis of nuclear reactor plants. By this procedure it is possible to handle two-dimensional plane strain and tridimensional axisymmetric problems of this type. (orig.)

  12. XAFS Study of the Ferro- and Antiferromagnetic Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes of Azomethine Based Tridentate Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenko, Valery G.; Vasilchenko, Igor S.; Shestakova, Tatiana E.; Uraev, Ali I.; Burlov, Anatolii S.; Garnovskii, Alexander D.; Pirog, Irina V.

    2007-01-01

    Binuclear copper complexes are known to be models for metalloenzymes containing copper active sites, and some of them are of considerable interest due to their magnetic and charge transfer properties. The reactions of the complex formation of bibasic tridentate heterocyclic imines with copper acetate leads to two types of chelates with mono deprotonated ligands and with totally deprotonated ligands. Cu K-edge EXAFS has been applied to determine the local structure around the metal center in copper(II) azomethine complexes with five tridentate ligands: 1-(salycilideneimino)- or 1-(2-tosylaminobenzilideneimino)-2-amino(oxo, thio)benzimidazoles. It has been found that some of the chelates studied are bridged binuclear copper complexes, and others are mononuclear complexes. The copper-copper interatomic distances in the bridged binuclear copper complexes were found to be 2.85-3.01 A. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility data indicate the presence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions within the dimer, the former is dominating at low temperatures and the latter at high temperatures

  13. Zinc and Copper Effects on Stability of Tubulin and Actin Networks in Dendrites and Spines of Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Laura; Roudeau, Stéphane; Carmona, Asuncion; Domart, Florelle; Petersen, Jennifer D; Bohic, Sylvain; Yang, Yang; Cloetens, Peter; Ortega, Richard

    2017-07-19

    Zinc and copper ions can modulate the activity of glutamate receptors. However, labile zinc and copper ions likely represent only the tip of the iceberg and other neuronal functions are suspected for these metals in their bound state. We performed synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging with 30 nm resolution to image total biometals in dendrites and spines from hippocampal neurons. We found that zinc is distributed all along the dendrites while copper is mainly pinpointed within the spines. In spines, zinc content is higher within the spine head while copper is higher within the spine neck. Such specific distributions suggested metal interactions with cytoskeleton proteins. Zinc supplementation induced the increase of β-tubulin content in dendrites. Copper supplementation impaired the β-tubulin and F-actin networks. Copper chelation resulted in the decrease of F-actin content in dendrites, drastically reducing the number of F-actin protrusions. These results indicate that zinc is involved in microtubule stability whereas copper is essential for actin-dependent stability of dendritic spines, although copper excess can impair the dendritic cytoskeleton.

  14. Diorganotin(IV) Complexes with Methionine Methyl Ester. Equilibria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) (DBT) and diphenyltin(IV) (DPT) was investigated at 25 °C and 0.1 mol dm–3 ionic strength in water for dimethyltin(IV) and in 50 % dioxane–water mixture for dibutyltin(IV) and diphenyltin(IV). Methionine methyl ester forms1:1 and 1:2 ...

  15. Periodontal Disease Part IV: Periodontal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In Part IV of this article, the author describes two periodontal infections, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (trench mouth) and periodontal abscess, both acute painful conditions for which patients may seek advice from their family physician rather than their dentist.

  16. Safety assessment for Generation IV nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leahy, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. ISAM is an integrated 'tool-kit' consisting of 5 analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development: 1) qualitative safety features review - QSR, 2) phenomena identification and ranking table - PIRT, 3) objective provision tree - OPT, 4) deterministic and phenomenological analyses - DPA, and 5) probabilistic safety analysis - PSA. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time

  17. Determination of uranium (IV) by flow voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Anqing

    1987-01-01

    According to the quantitative reaction of U(IV) and Fe(III) in H 2 SO 4 as well as the relation between current and concentration of substance detected, U(IV) has been determined indirectly by measurement of the electrolysis current of residual Fe(III). The columniform electrode used is made of glass carbon particles. At the range of U(IV) from a few micrograms to 40 μg, the linear relation is excellent. The relative standard deviation is within ±4%. The interference of Fe(II), Ti(IV) and U(VI) is negligible but of Ti(III) is serious. This method has been successfully applied in the determination of actual samples (both out line and on line). Main advantages of this procedure are rapid, simple, small amount of sample (only at microgram level) and easy to realize automation, able to use for on line or process analysis

  18. IV&V Project Assessment Process Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) will launch NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). This launch vehicle will provide American launch capability for human exploration and travelling beyond Earth orbit. SLS is designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions. The first test flight is scheduled for December 2017. The SLS SRR/SDR provided insight into the project development life cycle. NASA IV&V ran the standard Risk Based Assessment and Portfolio Based Risk Assessment to identify analysis tasking for the SLS program. This presentation examines the SLS System Requirements Review/System Definition Review (SRR/SDR), IV&V findings for IV&V process validation correlation to/from the selected IV&V tasking and capabilities. It also provides a reusable IEEE 1012 scorecard for programmatic completeness across the software development life cycle.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes, GAGs accumulate within cells, specifically inside the lysosomes . Lysosomes are compartments in the cell that break down ... that cause molecules to build up inside the lysosomes are called lysosomal storage disorders. In MPS IV, ...

  20. Copper oxide--copper sulfate water-splitting cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foh, S. E.; Schreiber, J. D.; Dafler, J. R.

    1978-08-01

    A hybrid copper oxide--copper sulfate thermochemical water-splitting cycle, IGT's H-5, has been demonstrated in the laboratory with recycled materials. The optimum configuration and operating conditions for the electrolytic hydrogen-producing step have not yet been defined. With cooperative funding (A.G.A./G.R.I./DOE) a conceptual flowsheet was developed for this cycle and a load-line efficiency of about 37% calculated. This figure is the result of a single iteration on the original base case flow sheet and compares well with the values calculated for other processes at this stage of development. An iterative optimization of process conditions would improve efficiency. The data required to perform an economic analysis are not yet available and the electrolysis step must be more fully defined. An attractive process efficiency, relatively few corrosive materials, and few gas-phase separations are attributes of Cycle H-5 that lead us to believe hydrogen costs (to be developed during future analyses) would be improved significantly over similar processes analyzed to date.

  1. The non-octarepeat copper binding site of the prion protein is a key regulator of prion conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachin, Gabriele; Mai, Phuong Thao; Tran, Thanh Hoa; Salzano, Giulia; Benetti, Federico; Migliorati, Valentina; Arcovito, Alessandro; Longa, Stefano Della; Mancini, Giordano; D'Angelo, Paola; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The conversion of the prion protein (PrPC) into prions plays a key role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the importance for pathogenesis, the mechanism of prion formation has escaped detailed characterization due to the insoluble nature of prions. PrPC interacts with copper through octarepeat and non-octarepeat binding sites. Copper coordination to the non-octarepeat region has garnered interest due to the possibility that this interaction may impact prion conversion. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study copper coordination at pH 5.5 and 7.0 in human PrPC constructs, either wild-type (WT) or carrying pathological mutations. We show that mutations and pH cause modifications of copper coordination in the non-octarepeat region. In the WT at pH 5.5, copper is anchored to His96 and His111, while at pH 7 it is coordinated by His111. Pathological point mutations alter the copper coordination at acidic conditions where the metal is anchored to His111. By using in vitro approaches, cell-based and computational techniques, we propose a model whereby PrPC coordinating copper with one His in the non-octarepeat region converts to prions at acidic condition. Thus, the non-octarepeat region may act as the long-sought-after prion switch, critical for disease onset and propagation.

  2. Effect of Nano-Al2O3 on the Toxicity and Oxidative Stress of Copper towards Scenedesmus obliquus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Zhou, Suyang; Fan, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Nano-Al2O3 has been widely used in various industries; unfortunately, it can be released into the aquatic environment. Although nano-Al2O3 is believed to be of low toxicity, it can interact with other pollutants in water, such as heavy metals. However, the interactions between nano-Al2O3 and heavy metals as well as the effect of nano-Al2O3 on the toxicity of the metals have been rarely investigated. The current study investigated copper toxicity in the presence of nano-Al2O3 towards Scenedesmus obliquus. Superoxide dismutase activity and concentration of glutathione and malondialdehyde in cells were determined in order to quantify oxidative stress in this study. Results showed that the presence of nano-Al2O3 reduced the toxicity of Cu towards S. obliquus. The existence of nano-Al2O3 decreased the growth inhibition of S. obliquus. The accumulation of copper and the level of oxidative stress in algae were reduced in the presence of nano-Al2O3. Furthermore, lower copper accumulation was the main factor that mitigated copper toxicity with the addition of nano-Al2O3. The decreased copper uptake could be attributed to the adsorption of copper onto nanoparticles and the subsequent decrease of available copper in water. PMID:27294942

  3. Effect of Nano-Al₂O₃ on the Toxicity and Oxidative Stress of Copper towards Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Zhou, Suyang; Fan, Wenhong

    2016-06-09

    Nano-Al₂O₃ has been widely used in various industries; unfortunately, it can be released into the aquatic environment. Although nano-Al₂O₃ is believed to be of low toxicity, it can interact with other pollutants in water, such as heavy metals. However, the interactions between nano-Al₂O₃ and heavy metals as well as the effect of nano-Al₂O₃ on the toxicity of the metals have been rarely investigated. The current study investigated copper toxicity in the presence of nano-Al₂O₃ towards Scenedesmus obliquus. Superoxide dismutase activity and concentration of glutathione and malondialdehyde in cells were determined in order to quantify oxidative stress in this study. Results showed that the presence of nano-Al₂O₃ reduced the toxicity of Cu towards S. obliquus. The existence of nano-Al₂O₃ decreased the growth inhibition of S. obliquus. The accumulation of copper and the level of oxidative stress in algae were reduced in the presence of nano-Al₂O₃. Furthermore, lower copper accumulation was the main factor that mitigated copper toxicity with the addition of nano-Al₂O₃. The decreased copper uptake could be attributed to the adsorption of copper onto nanoparticles and the subsequent decrease of available copper in water.

  4. Current status of NPP generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohanes Dwi Anggoro; Dharu Dewi; Nurlaila; Arief Tris Yuliyanto

    2013-01-01

    Today development of nuclear technology has reached the stage of research and development of Generation IV nuclear power plants (advanced reactor systems) which is an innovative development from the previous generation of nuclear power plants. There are six types of power generation IV reactors, namely: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR). The purpose of this study is to know the development of Generation IV nuclear power plants that have been done by the thirteen countries that are members of the Gen IV International Forum (GIF). The method used is review study and refers to various studies related to the current status of research and development of generation IV nuclear power. The result of this study showed that the systems and technology on Generation IV nuclear power plants offer significant advances in sustainability, safety and reliability, economics, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In addition, based on the research and development experience is estimated that: SFR can be used optimally in 2015, VHTR in 2020, while NPP types GFR, LFR, MSR, and SCWR in 2025. Utilization of NPP generation IV said to be optimal if fulfill the goal of NPP generation IV, such as: capable to generate energy sustainability and promote long-term availability of nuclear fuel, minimize nuclear waste and reduce the long term stewardship burden, has an advantage in the field of safety and reliability compared to the previous generation of NPP and VHTR technology have a good prospects in Indonesia. (author)

  5. Dsm-iv hypochondriasis in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar, JI; Gara, M; Waitzkin, H; Silver, RC; Holman, A; Compton, W

    1998-01-01

    The object of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of the DSM-IV diagnosis of hypochondriasis in a primary care setting. A large sample (N = 1456) of primary care users was given a structured interview to make diagnoses of mood, anxiety, and somatoform disorders and estimate levels of disability. The prevalence of hypochondriasis (DSM-IV) was about 3%. Patients with this disorder had higher levels of medically unexplained symptoms (abridged somatization) and were more impair...

  6. COBRA-IV wire wrap data comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, T.E.; George, T.L.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1979-02-01

    Thermal hydraulic analyses of hexagonally packed wire-wrapped fuel assemblies are complicated by the induced crossflow between adjacent subchannels. The COBRA-IV computer code simultaneously solves the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of fuel assemblies. The modifications and the results are presented which are predicted by the COBRA-IV calculation. Comparisons are made with data measured in five experimental models of a wire-wrapped fuel assembly

  7. Annual Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    This project supported the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, held from 2007 to 2015, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. The subject of the Copper Mountain Conference Series alternated between Multigrid Methods in odd-numbered years and Iterative Methods in even-numbered years. Begun in 1983, the Series represents an important forum for the exchange of ideas in these two closely related fields. This report describes the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, 2007-2015. Information on the conference series is available at http://grandmaster.colorado.edu/~copper/

  8. Annual Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Stephen F. [Front Range Scientific, Inc., Lake City, CO (United States)

    2016-03-25

    This project supported the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, held from 2007 to 2015, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. The subject of the Copper Mountain Conference Series alternated between Multigrid Methods in odd-numbered years and Iterative Methods in even-numbered years. Begun in 1983, the Series represents an important forum for the exchange of ideas in these two closely related fields. This report describes the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, 2007-2015. Information on the conference series is available at http://grandmaster.colorado.edu/~copper/.

  9. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about......, they may be inadequate in patients diagnosed so late that extensive body deposits of metal have been developed. The main research needs in this field are to further clarify molecular mechanisms of disease progression and to develop new chelators that are more effective and less toxic than those presently...

  10. Accumulation of copper by the aquatic macrophyte Salvinia biloba Raddi (Salviniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Freitas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aquatic macrophytes have properties and mechanisms which are useful for the removal of substances in solution, commonly used in phytoremediation processes in aquatic environments. This study evaluated the performance of copper (Cu accumulation by Salvinia biloba Raddi (Salviniaceae in different metal concentrations (1, 3 and 5 µg mL-1, as well as the control treatment, measured at intervals of 0, 7 and 14 days under laboratory conditions, with control as to pH and luminosity. After the experiment, the S. biloba biomass was washed, kiln dried, crushed and subjected to the process of digestion, and subsequently the accumulated copper content was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that S. biloba is apt at accumulating copper, varying significantly between different treatments and days of exposure to the contaminant, as well as its interaction (treatment × days. The highest accumulation values were observed in treatment with 5 µg mL-1, which at 14 days, with 11,861 µg g-1 of copper. We observed symptoms of toxicity and mortality in plants, probably indicating the effect of copper on the species when at high levels. Salvinia biloba is an efficient species in the removal of copper in solution, its recommendation as a remediating agent in aquatic ecosystems being possible.

  11. Direct and indirect effects of copper-contaminated sediments on the functions of model freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardham, Stephanie; Chariton, Anthony A; Hose, Grant C

    2015-01-01

    Copper is acutely toxic to, and directly affects, primary producers and decomposers, which are key players in essential processes such as the nutrient cycle in freshwater ecosystems. Even though the indirect effects of metals (for example effects due to changes in species interactions) may be more common than direct effects, little is known about the indirect effects of copper on primary producers and decomposers. The effects of copper on phytoplankton, macrophytes, periphyton and organic matter decomposition in an outdoor lentic mesocosm facility were assessed, and links between the responses examined. Copper directly decreased macrophyte growth, subsurface organic matter decomposition, and the potential for high phytoplankton Chlorophyll a concentrations. However, periphyton cover and organic matter decomposition on the surface of the sediment were stimulated by the presence of copper. These latter responses were attributed to indirect effects, due to a reduction in grazing pressure from snails, particularly Physa acuta, in the higher copper-contaminated mesocosms. This permitted the growth of periphyton and other heterotrophs, ultimately increasing decomposition at the sediment surface. The present study demonstrates the pronounced influence indirect effects may have on ecological function, findings that may not be observed in traditional laboratory studies (which utilize single species or simplistic communities).

  12. Utilizing NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the role of copper in prion diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-02-24

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the normal development of the brain and nervous system, although the hallmark of several neurological diseases is a change in copper concentrations in the brain and central nervous system. Prion protein (PrP) is a copper-binding, cell-surface glycoprotein that exists in two alternatively folded conformations: a normal isoform (PrPC) and a disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). Prion diseases are a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders that develop as a result of conformational conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. The pathogenic mechanism that triggers this conformational transformation with the subsequent development of prion diseases remains unclear. It has, however, been shown repeatedly that copper plays a significant functional role in the conformational conversion of prion proteins. In this review, we focus on current research that seeks to clarify the conformational changes associated with prion diseases and the role of copper in this mechanism, with emphasis on the latest applications of NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the interactions of copper with prion proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Utilizing NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the role of copper in prion diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Al-Talla, Zeyad; Guo, Xianrong; Al-Ghamdi, Suliman; Al-Masri, Harbi Tomah

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the normal development of the brain and nervous system, although the hallmark of several neurological diseases is a change in copper concentrations in the brain and central nervous system. Prion protein (PrP) is a copper-binding, cell-surface glycoprotein that exists in two alternatively folded conformations: a normal isoform (PrPC) and a disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). Prion diseases are a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders that develop as a result of conformational conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. The pathogenic mechanism that triggers this conformational transformation with the subsequent development of prion diseases remains unclear. It has, however, been shown repeatedly that copper plays a significant functional role in the conformational conversion of prion proteins. In this review, we focus on current research that seeks to clarify the conformational changes associated with prion diseases and the role of copper in this mechanism, with emphasis on the latest applications of NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the interactions of copper with prion proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Synthesis of Commercial Products from Copper Wire-Drawing Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, J.; Fernández, B.

    2014-06-01

    Copper powder and copper sulfate pentahydrate were obtained from copper wire-drawing scale. The hydrometallurgical recycling process proposed in this article yields a high-purity copper powder and analytical grade copper sulfate pentahydrate. In the first stage of this process, the copper is dissolved in sulfuric acid media via dismutation of the scale. In the second stage, copper sulfate pentahydrate is precipitated using ethanol. Effects such as pH, reaction times, stirring speed, initial copper concentration, and ethanol/solution volume ratio were studied during the precipitation from solution reaction. The proposed method is technically straightforward and provides efficient recovery of Cu from wire-drawing scale.

  15. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead...... involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells...

  16. COPPER AND COPPER-CONTAINING PESTICIDES: METABOLISM, TOXICITY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Husak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of the current knowledge regarding metabolism and toxicity of copper and copper-based pesticides in living organisms. Copper is an essential trace element in all living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, because it participates in different metabolic processes and maintain functions of organisms. The transport and metabolism of copper in living organisms is currently the subject of many studies. Copper is absorbed, transported, distributed, stored, and excreted in the body via the complex of homeostatic processes, which provide organisms with a needed constant level of this micronutrient and avoid excessive amounts. Many aspects of copper homeostasis were studied at the molecular level. Copper based-pesticides, in particularly fungicides, bacteriocides and herbicides, are widely used in agricultural practice throughout the world. Copper is an integral part of antioxidant enzymes, particularly copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD, and plays prominent roles in iron homeostasis. On the other hand, excess of copper in organism has deleterious effect, because it stimulates free radical production in the cell, induces lipid peroxidation, and disturbs the total antioxidant capacity of the body. The mechanisms of copper toxicity are discussed in this review also.

  17. Adsorption behavior of caffeine as a green corrosion inhibitor for copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Fernando Sílvio de; Giacomelli, Cristiano; Gonçalves, Reinaldo Simões; Spinelli, Almir

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical and impedance experiments were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of copper in aerated 0.1 mol L −1 H 2 SO 4 solutions in the presence of three xanthine derivatives with similar chemical structures. The corrosion rate of copper was found to increase in the presence of theophylline and theobromine and decrease in the presence of caffeine. The adsorption and inhibitory effect of caffeine on copper surfaces in aerated 0.1 mol L −1 H 2 SO 4 solutions were then investigated in detail by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and fluorescence experiments. The data obtained indicate that caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor adsorbing onto the copper surface according to the Temkin isotherm, with the negative ∆G° ads value of − 31.1 kJ mol −1 signifying a spontaneous adsorption process. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with caffeine concentration in the range of 1.0–10.0 mmol L −1 . Furthermore, the EIS results obtained at the open-circuit potential and surface analysis (SEM, EDS and fluorescence) clearly demonstrated the adsorption of the organic compound onto the copper electrode. The contact angle measurements revealed the formation of a hydrophobic protective film. This film covers up to 72% of the total active surface, acts as a protective barrier and prevents interaction between the metal, water and oxygen molecules. - Highlights: ► We have investigated the adsorption and corrosion inhibition of caffeine on copper surfaces. ► Caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor. ► Caffeine adsorbs onto copper surface according to Temkin isotherm. ► There exists the formation of a hydrophobic film that acts as a protective barrier. ► This corrosion inhibitor covers up to 72% of the total active surface of copper.

  18. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J. Castillo [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Hamdani, F. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Creus, J., E-mail: jcreus@univ-lr.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Touzain, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Correc, O. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Impact of disinfectant treatment on the durability of copper pipes. • Synergy between disinfectant concentration and temperature. • Pitting corrosion of copper associated to the corrosion products formation on copper. - Abstract: In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  19. Mesophilic leaching of copper sulphide sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR B. CVETKOVSKI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper was precipitated using a sodium sulphide solution as the precipitation agent from an acid solution containing 17 g/l copper and 350 g/l sulphuric acid. The particle size of nearly 1 µm in the sulphide sludge sample was detected by optical microscopy. Based on chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, covellite was detected as the major sulphide mineral. The batch bioleach amenability test was performed at 32 °C on the Tk31 mine mesophilic mixed culture using a residence time of 28 days. The dissolution of copper sulphide by direct catalytic leaching of the sulphides with bacteria attached to the particles was found to be worthy, although a small quantity of ferrous ions had to be added to raise the activity of the bacteria and the redox potential of the culture medium. Throughout the 22-day period of the bioleach test, copper recovery based on residue analysis indicated a copper extraction of 95 %, with copper concentration in the bioleach solution of 15 g/l. The slope of the straight line tangential to the exponential part of the extraction curve gave a copper solubilisation rate of 1.1 g/l per day. This suggests that a copper extraction of 95 % for the period of bioleach test of 13.6 days may be attained in a three-stage bioreactor system.

  20. Chemistry of the copper silicon interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.J.; Sashin, V.A.; Nixon, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Copper and silicon readily interdiffuse, even at room temperature, to form an interface which can be several nanometers thick. Over the years considerable effort has gone into investigating the diffusion process and chemical nature of the interface formed. Photoemission measurements give evidence for the formation of a stable suicide with a definite stoichiometry, Cu 3 Si. This is evidenced by splitting of the Si LVV Auger line and slight shifts and change in shape of the copper valence band density of states as measured by ultra-violet photoemission. In this paper we present calculations of the electronic structure of copper suicide, bulk copper and silicon, and preliminary measurements of the interface by electron momentum spectroscopy. Densities of states for copper and copper suicide are dominated by the copper 3d bands, and difference between the two compounds are relatively small. By contrast, the full band structures are quite distinct. Hence, experimental measurements of the full band structure of the copper on silicon interface, for example by EMS, have the potential to reveal the chemistry of the interface in a detailed way