WorldWideScience

Sample records for interaction probing exotic

  1. Probing exotic phases of interacting two-dimensional carriers using one-dimensional density modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueed, M. A.

    nature of the interacting bilayer system at nu=1 and 1/2. Finally, we focus on the half filling of a higher Landau level, namely nu=7/2, where B|| induces an anisotropic stripe phase. We show that a minute external density modulation is sufficient to cause a reorientation of the stripe phase if its wavelength is comparable to the external modulation period.

  2. Probing exotic physics with cosmic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, Dan; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, collider experiments have been the primary tool used in searching for particle physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss alternative approaches for exploring exotic physics scenarios using high energy and ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos. Such neutrinos can be used to study interactions at energies higher, and over baselines longer, than those accessible to colliders. In this way, neutrino astronomy can provide a window into fundamental physics which is highly complementary to collider techniques. I will discuss the role of neutrino astronomy in fundamental physics, considering the use of such techniques in studying several specific scenarios including low scale gravity models, Standard Model electroweak instanton induced interactions, decaying neutrinos and quantum decoherence

  3. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  4. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as “wormholes” and “warp drives”. However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg- Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions is investigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energy fluctuations, cosmological scalar (i. e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  5. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  6. Hadronic interaction and structure of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    I will overview recent studies on the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei, and will show its relevance to hadronic interaction, including nuclear forces. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The shell structure and existing limit of nuclei depend also on the three-body interaction in a specific way. I will sketch how the Δ-hole excitation induced three-body force (Fujita-Miyazawa force) modifies them. (author)

  7. High energy exotic interactions observed by Chacaltaya emulsion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinellato, J.A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandi Filho, J.

    1984-01-01

    Exotic events like Centauros, Chirons and Geminions which appears in cosmic ray interactions of the Brazil-Japan Collaboration at Chacaltaya are presented. Genetic hypothesis on how these kind of events are produced are discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Probing the partonic structure of exotic particles in hard electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We argue that the electroproduction of exotic particles is a useful tool for study of their partonic structure. In the case of hybrid mesons, the magnitude of their cross sections shows that they are accessible for measurements in existing electroproduction experiments

  9. Probing the Evolution of the Shell Structures in Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, Giacomo

    2008-01-01

    Magic numbers are a key feature in finite Fermion systems since they are strongly related to the underlying mean field. The size of the shell gaps and their evolution far from stability can be linked to the shape and symmetry of the nuclear mean field. Moreover the study of nuclei with large neutron/proton ratio allow to probe the density dependence of the effective interaction. Changes of the nuclear density and size in nuclei with increasing N/Z ratios are expected to lead to different nuclear symmetries and excitations. In this contribution I will discuss some selected examples which show the big potential of stable beams and of binary reactions for the study of the properties of the neutron-rich nuclear many body systems.

  10. Searches for exotic interactions in nuclear beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    This contribution presents current efforts in the search for exotic interactions in nuclear β decay using a calorimetric technique for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape. We describe the criteria for the choice of sensitive candidates in Gamow-Teller transitions and present the status of measurements performed in {sup 6}He and {sup 20}F decay.

  11. An exotic k-essence interpretation of interactive cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, Monica [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-15

    We define a generalization of scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic term which we call exotic k-essence or, briefly, exotik. These fields are generated by the global description of cosmological models with two interactive fluids in the dark sector and under certain conditions they correspond to usual k-essences. The formalism is applied to the cases of constant potential and of inverse square potential and also we develop the purely exotik version for the modified holographic Ricci type (MHR) of dark energy, where the equations of state are not constant. With the kinetic function F = 1 + mx and the inverse square potential we recover, through the interaction term, the identification between k-essences and quintessences of an exponential potential, already known for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I geometries. Worked examples are shown that include the self-interacting MHR and also models with crossing of the phantom divide line (PDL). (orig.)

  12. An exotic k-essence interpretation of interactive cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Monica

    2016-01-01

    We define a generalization of scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic term which we call exotic k-essence or, briefly, exotik. These fields are generated by the global description of cosmological models with two interactive fluids in the dark sector and under certain conditions they correspond to usual k-essences. The formalism is applied to the cases of constant potential and of inverse square potential and also we develop the purely exotik version for the modified holographic Ricci type (MHR) of dark energy, where the equations of state are not constant. With the kinetic function F = 1 + mx and the inverse square potential we recover, through the interaction term, the identification between k-essences and quintessences of an exponential potential, already known for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I geometries. Worked examples are shown that include the self-interacting MHR and also models with crossing of the phantom divide line (PDL). (orig.)

  13. Constraints on Exotic Spin-Dependent Interactions Between Matter and Antimatter from Antiprotonic Helium Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, Filip; Fadeev, Pavel; Flambaum, Victor V.; Jackson Kimball, Derek F.; Kozlov, Mikhail G.; Stadnik, Yevgeny V.; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-05-01

    Heretofore undiscovered spin-0 or spin-1 bosons can mediate exotic spin-dependent interactions between standard model particles. Here, we carry out the first search for semileptonic spin-dependent interactions between matter and antimatter. We compare theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium to constrain exotic spin- and velocity-dependent interactions between electrons and antiprotons.

  14. Dark matter and exotic neutrino interactions in direct detection searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil); Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Suchita [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Gonzalez, Yuber F. Perez; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the effect of new physics interacting with both Dark Matter (DM) and neutrinos at DM direct detection experiments. Working within a simplified model formalism, we consider vector and scalar mediators to determine the scattering of DM as well as the modified scattering of solar neutrinos off nuclei. Using existing data from LUX as well as the expected sensitivity of LUX-ZEPLIN and DARWIN, we set limits on the couplings of the mediators to quarks, neutrinos and DM. Given the current limits, we also assess the true DM discovery potential of direct detection experiments under the presence of exotic neutrino interactions. In the case of a vector mediator, we show that the DM discovery reach of future experiments is affected for DM masses m{sub χ}≲10 GeV or DM scattering cross sections σ{sub χ}≲10{sup −47} cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, a scalar mediator will not affect the discovery reach appreciably.

  15. Higgs exotic decays in general NMSSM with self-interacting dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyu; Zhang, Mengchao; Zhao, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Under current LHC and dark matter constraints, the general NMSSM can have self-interacting dark matter to explain the cosmological small structure. In this scenario, the dark matter is the light singlino-like neutralino (χ) which self-interacts through exchanging the light singlet-like scalars (h1,a1). These light scalars and neutralinos inevitably interact with the 125 GeV SM-like Higgs boson (hSM), which cause the Higgs exotic decays hSM → h1h1, a1a1, χχ. We first demonstrate the parameter space required by the explanation of the cosmological small structure and then display the Higgs exotic decays. We find that in such a parameter space the Higgs exotic decays can have branching ratios of a few percent, which should be accessible in the future e+e‑ colliders.

  16. Nematodes, exotic earthworms and nitrogen addition: interactions between global change factors lead to cancellation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, Jonathan R

    2017-07-01

    Photos from the experiment described in Shao et al. (): (a) the endogeic (i.e. earthworms that typically live in the soil, burrowing horizontally to acquire nutrients) earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus that was added to the plots; (b) P. corethrurus in a quiescence state in response to drought; (c) set-up of the control plots (i.e. no earthworms, ambient nitrogen) used in this experiment. [Colour figure can be viewed at wileyonlinelibrary.com] In Focus: Shao, Y., Zhang, W., Eisenhauer, N., Liu, T., Xiong, Y., Liang, C. & Fu, S. (2017) Nitrogen deposition cancels out exotic earthworm effects on plant-feeding nematode communities. Journal of Animal Ecology, 86, 708-717. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Shao et al. () explored how N addition and exotic earthworms interacted to impact on the plant-feeding nematode community. They demonstrate that exotic earthworm presence alone increased the abundance of less harmful plant-feeding nematodes and decreased the abundance of the more harmful plant-feeding nematodes. However, in plots receiving both exotic earthworms and N addition, such earthworm effects on the nematode community were negated. These findings pull focus on the need to simultaneously consider multiple global change factors (e.g. exotic species invasions and N deposition) when making predictions about how such factors might affect above- and below-ground interactions and thereby alter ecosystem function. © 2017 The Author. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  17. Competitive interactions between native and invasive exotic plant species are altered under elevated carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Anthony; Leishman, Michelle R

    2011-03-01

    We hypothesized that the greater competitive ability of invasive exotic plants relative to native plants would increase under elevated CO(2) because they typically have traits that confer the ability for fast growth when resources are not limiting and thus are likely to be more responsive to elevated CO(2). A series of competition experiments under ambient and elevated CO(2) glasshouse conditions were conducted to determine an index of relative competition intensity for 14 native-invasive exotic species-pairs. Traits including specific leaf area, leaf mass ratio, leaf area ratio, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and root weight ratio were measured. Competitive rankings within species-pairs were not affected by CO(2) concentration: invasive exotic species were more competitive in 9 of the 14 species-pairs and native species were more competitive in the remaining 5 species-pairs, regardless of CO(2) concentration. However, there was a significant interaction between plant type and CO(2) treatment due to reduced competitive response of native species under elevated compared with ambient CO(2) conditions. Native species had significantly lower specific leaf area and leaf area ratio under elevated compared with ambient CO(2). We also compared traits of more-competitive with less-competitive species, regardless of plant type, under both CO(2) treatments. More-competitive species had smaller leaf weight ratio and leaf area ratio, and larger relative growth rate and net assimilation rate under both ambient and elevated CO(2) conditions. These results suggest that growth and allocation traits can be useful predictors of the outcome of competitive interactions under both ambient and elevated CO(2) conditions. Under predicted future atmospheric CO(2) conditions, competitive rankings among species may not change substantially, but the relative success of invasive exotic species may be increased. Thus, under future atmospheric CO(2) conditions, the ecological and

  18. Probing kink interactions with fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlitz, R.; Chakrabarti, R.

    1985-01-01

    A dilute gas of kinks exhibits strong but short-ranged intrinsic interactions. When these intrinsic interactions are supplemented by other ''extrinsic'' interactions, a phase transition can occur in which kinks and antikinks bind to form a gas of bounces. The extrinsic interactions arise from the coupling of kinks to an additional degree of freedom, which we take to be a fermion field. The class of quantum-mechanical models which we study includes examples of supersymmetry. The way in which kinks and antikinks bind depends in detail on aspects of the intrinsic interactions. This structure is probably shared by field-theoretic models

  19. Exotic atoms and the kaon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-12-01

    Recent progress in the study of p-bar-p and p-bar-nucleus atoms is briefly reviewed before moving on to a discussion of the kaon-nucleon interaction at low energies. The need for new definitive X-ray measurements for K - p atoms is emphasised. Finally some comments are made about K-bar-nucleus and Σ - , Ξ - and Ω - atoms. (author)

  20. Designing, Probing, and Stabilizing Exotic Fabry-Perot Cavities for Studying Strongly Correlated Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryou, Albert

    Synthetic materials made of engineered quasiparticles are a powerful platform for studying manybody physics and strongly correlated systems due to their bottom-up approach to Hamiltonian modeling. Photonic quasiparticles called polaritons are particularly appealing since they inherit fast dynamics from light and strong interaction from matter. This thesis describes the experimental demonstration of cavity Rydberg polaritons, which are composite particles arising from the hybridization of an optical cavity with Rydberg EIT, as well as the tools for probing and stabilizing the cavity. We first describe the design, construction, and testing of a four-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity, whose small waist size on the order of 10 microns is comparable to the Rydberg blockade radius. By achieving strong coupling between the cavity photon and an atomic ensemble undergoing electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we observe the emergence of the dark-state polariton and characterize its single-body properties as well as the single-quantum nonlinearity. We then describe the implementation of a holographic spatial light modulator for exciting different transverse modes of the cavity, an essential tool for studying polariton-polariton scattering. For compensating optical aberrations, we employ a digital micromirror device (DMD), combining beam shaping with adaptive optics to produce diffraction-limited light. We quantitatively measure the purity of the DMD-produced Hermite-Gauss modes and confirm up to 99.2% efficiency. One application of the technique is to create Laguerre-Gauss modes, which have been used to probe synthetic Landau levels for photons in a twisted, nonplanar cavity. Finally, we describe the implementation of an FPGA-based FIR filter for stabilizing the cavity. We digitally cancel the acoustical resonances of the feedback-controlled mechanical system, thereby demonstrating an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the feedback bandwidth from 200 Hz to more than 2 k

  1. Time Crystal Platform: From Quasicrystal Structures in Time to Systems with Exotic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giergiel, Krzysztof; Miroszewski, Artur; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    Time crystals are quantum many-body systems that, due to interactions between particles, are able to spontaneously self-organize their motion in a periodic way in time by analogy with the formation of crystalline structures in space in condensed matter physics. In solid state physics properties of space crystals are often investigated with the help of external potentials that are spatially periodic and reflect various crystalline structures. A similar approach can be applied for time crystals, as periodically driven systems constitute counterparts of spatially periodic systems, but in the time domain. Here we show that condensed matter problems ranging from single particles in potentials of quasicrystal structure to many-body systems with exotic long-range interactions can be realized in the time domain with an appropriate periodic driving. Moreover, it is possible to create molecules where atoms are bound together due to destructive interference if the atomic scattering length is modulated in time.

  2. Novel multitrophic interactions among an exotic, generalist herbivore, its host plants and resident enemies in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Julie V; Mills, Nicholas J

    2016-12-01

    What happens when an exotic herbivore invades and encounters novel host plants and enemies? Here, we investigate the impacts of host plant quality and plant architecture on an exotic generalist herbivore, Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and its interactions with resident parasitoids in California. Using artificial diet and five plant species, we found significant effects of diet on the fitness of E. postvittana under laboratory conditions. In the field, based on a common garden experiment with host plants of nine species, we found that larval parasitism varied among plant species by a factor of 2.1 with a higher risk of parasitism on shorter than taller plants. Parasitism of egg masses varied by a factor of 4.7 among plant species with a higher risk of parasitism on taller than shorter plants. In the laboratory, the foraging time of a resident egg parasitoid on excised leaves varied among plant species, but did not correspond to observed egg parasitism rates on these same plants in the field. On leaves of Plantago lanceolata, the probability of egg parasitism decreased with trichome density. Overall, there was a significant effect of host plant on the intrinsic rate of increase of E. postvittana and on the extent of parasitism by resident parasitoids, but no correlation existed between these two effects. The recent decline of E. postvittana in California may be due to the low quality of some host plants and to the many resident enemies that readily attack it, perhaps due to its phylogenetic relatedness to resident tortricids.

  3. Contrasting effects of land use intensity and exotic host plants on the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Walter Santos; Vieira, Marcos Costa; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Almeida-Neto, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Human land use tends to decrease the diversity of native plant species and facilitate the invasion and establishment of exotic ones. Such changes in land use and plant community composition usually have negative impacts on the assemblages of native herbivorous insects. Highly specialized herbivores are expected to be especially sensitive to land use intensification and the presence of exotic plant species because they are neither capable of consuming alternative plant species of the native flora nor exotic plant species. Therefore, higher levels of land use intensity might reduce the proportion of highly specialized herbivores, which ultimately would lead to changes in the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks. This study investigates the community-wide effects of land use intensity on the degree of specialization of 72 plant-herbivore networks, including effects mediated by the increase in the proportion of exotic plant species. Contrary to our expectation, the net effect of land use intensity on network specialization was positive. However, this positive effect of land use intensity was partially canceled by an opposite effect of the proportion of exotic plant species on network specialization. When we analyzed networks composed exclusively of endophagous herbivores separately from those composed exclusively of exophagous herbivores, we found that only endophages showed a consistent change in network specialization at higher land use levels. Altogether, these results indicate that land use intensity is an important ecological driver of network specialization, by way of reducing the local host range of herbivore guilds with highly specialized feeding habits. However, because the effect of land use intensity is offset by an opposite effect owing to the proportion of exotic host species, the net effect of land use in a given herbivore assemblage will likely depend on the extent of the replacement of native host species with exotic ones.

  4. Interactions between a Top Order Predator and Exotic Mesopredators in the Australian Rangelands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Moseby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in mesopredators caused by the removal of top-order predators can have significant implications for threatened wildlife. Recent evidence suggests that Australia’s top-order predator, the dingo, may suppress the introduced cat and red fox. We tested this relationship by reintroducing 7 foxes and 6 feral cats into a 37 km2 fenced paddock in arid South Australia inhabited by a male and female dingo. GPS datalogger collars recorded locations of all experimental animals every 2 hours. Interactions between species, mortality rates, and postmortems were used to determine the mechanisms of any suppression. Dingoes killed all 7 foxes within 17 days of their introduction and no pre-death interactions were recorded. All 6 feral cats died between 20 and 103 days after release and dingoes were implicated in the deaths of at least 3 cats. Dingoes typically stayed with fox and cat carcasses for several hours after death and/or returned several times in ensuing days. There was no evidence of intraguild predation, interference competition was the dominant mechanism of suppression. Our results support anecdotal evidence that dingoes may suppress exotic mesopredators, particularly foxes. We outline further research required to determine if this suppression translates into a net benefit for threatened prey species.

  5. Depletion interaction measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijting, W.K.; Knoben, W.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the depletion interaction between stearylated silica surfaces in cyclohexane in the presence of dissolved polydimethylsiloxane by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. We found that the range of the depletion interaction decreases with increasing concentration.

  6. Exotic Quantum Phases and Phase Transitions of Strongly Interacting Electrons in Low-Dimensional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishmash, Ryan V.

    Experiments on strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional electronic materials---for example, the high-temperature cuprate superconductors and the putative quantum spin liquids kappa-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3 and EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2---routinely reveal highly mysterious quantum behavior which cannot be explained in terms of weakly interacting degrees of freedom. Theoretical progress thus requires the introduction of completely new concepts and machinery beyond the traditional framework of the band theory of solids and its interacting counterpart, Landau's Fermi liquid theory. In full two dimensions, controlled and reliable analytical approaches to such problems are severely lacking, as are numerical simulations of even the simplest of model Hamiltonians due to the infamous fermionic sign problem. Here, we attempt to circumvent some of these difficulties by studying analogous problems in quasi-one dimension. In this lower dimensional setting, theoretical and numerical tractability are on much stronger footing due to the methods of bosonization and the density matrix renormalization group, respectively. Using these techniques, we attack two problems: (1) the Mott transition between a Fermi liquid metal and a quantum spin liquid as potentially directly relevant to the organic compounds kappa-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu 2(CN)3 and EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2] 2 and (2) non-Fermi liquid metals as strongly motivated by the strange metal phase observed in the cuprates. In both cases, we are able to realize highly exotic quantum phases as ground states of reasonable microscopic models. This lends strong credence to respective underlying slave-particle descriptions of the low-energy physics, which are inherently strongly interacting and also unconventional in comparison to weakly interacting alternatives. Finally, working in two dimensions directly, we propose a new slave-particle theory which explains in a universal way many of the intriguing experimental results of the triangular lattice organic spin

  7. Muons as hyperfine interaction probes in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@triumf.ca; MacLean, Amy [Mount Allison University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Spin polarized positive muons injected in matter serve as magnetic probes for the investigation of physical and chemical properties of free radicals, mechanisms of free radical reactions and their formations, and radiation effects. All muon techniques rely on the evolution of spin polarization (of the muon) and in that respect are similar to conventional magnetic resonance techniques. The applications of the muon as a hyperfine probe in several fields in chemistry are described.

  8. Muons as hyperfine interaction probes in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, Khashayar; MacLean, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Spin polarized positive muons injected in matter serve as magnetic probes for the investigation of physical and chemical properties of free radicals, mechanisms of free radical reactions and their formations, and radiation effects. All muon techniques rely on the evolution of spin polarization (of the muon) and in that respect are similar to conventional magnetic resonance techniques. The applications of the muon as a hyperfine probe in several fields in chemistry are described

  9. Multiquark exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The question Are Anomalons Multiquark Exotics is discussed. It is concluded that so far there is no convincing experimental evidence for any multiquark exotic bound state nor for any exotic resonance. Except for the delta and S* there are no candidates for bound states and no firm theoretical predictions waiting to be tested. Exotic resonances may exist in the 1.5 to 2.0 GeV region and in the charmed sector, e.g., the charmed-strange exotics. The experimental search for multiquark resonances is still open and active

  10. Probing gas-surface interactions with a molecular beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruit, M.E.M.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of direct scattering, trapping and sticking in molecular beam scattering is probed. The O 2 /Ag interaction was chosen, using the close-packed (111) plane of Ag as target surface. 170 refs.; 22 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Solar neutrinos as a probe of dark matter-neutrino interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozzi, Francesco; Vecchi, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Shoemaker, Ian M., E-mail: capozzi.12@osu.edu, E-mail: ian.shoemaker@usd.edu, E-mail: vecchi@infn.pd.it [Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sterile neutrinos at the eV scale have long been studied in the context of anomalies in short baseline neutrino experiments. Their cosmology can be made compatible with our understanding of the early Universe provided the sterile neutrino sector enjoys a nontrivial dynamics with exotic interactions, possibly providing a link to the Dark Matter (DM) puzzle. Interactions between DM and neutrinos have also been proposed to address the long-standing 'missing satellites' problem in the field of large scale structure formation. Motivated by these considerations, in this paper we discuss realistic scenarios with light steriles coupled to DM . We point out that within this framework active neutrinos acquire an effective coupling to DM that manifests itself as a new matter potential in the propagation within a medium of asymmetric DM . Assuming that at least a small fraction of asymmetric DM has been captured by the Sun, we show that a sizable region of the parameter space of these scenarios can be probed by solar neutrino experiments, especially in the regime of small couplings and light mediators where all other probes become inefficient. In the latter regime these scenarios behave as familiar 3+1 models in all channels except for solar data, where a Solar Dark MSW effect takes place. Solar Dark MSW is characterized by modifications of the most energetic {sup 8}B and CNO neutrinos, whereas the other fluxes remain largely unaffected.

  12. Probing the exotic structure of {sup 8}B by its elastic scattering and breakup reaction on nuclear targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, V.K.; Zemlyanaya, E.V.; Lukyanov, K.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kadrev, D.N.; Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Spasova, K. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); University ' ' Ep. K. Preslavski' ' , Shumen (Bulgaria)

    2017-02-15

    The structure of the exotic {sup 8}B nucleus is studied by means of elastic scattering, as well as its breakup on nuclear targets. We present microscopic calculations of the optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of {sup 8}B on {sup 12}C, {sup 58}Ni, and {sup 208}Pb targets at energies 20 < E < 170 MeV. The density distributions of {sup 8}B obtained within the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) model and the three-cluster model (3CM) are used to construct the potentials. The real part of the hybrid OP is calculated using the folding model with the direct and exchange terms included, while the imaginary part is obtained on the base of the high-energy approximation (HEA) and also taken to be equal to the microscopic real part of the OP. In this model the only free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts of OP obtained by fitting the elastic scattering experimental data. A dependence of their values on the model density of {sup 8} B is found. In addition, the cluster model, in which {sup 8}B consists of a p-halo and the {sup 7} Be core, is applied to calculate the breakup cross sections of the {sup 8}B nucleus on {sup 9}Be, {sup 12}C, and {sup 197}Au targets, as well as momentum distributions of {sup 7}Be fragments, and a comparison with the existing experimental data is made. (orig.)

  13. Probing Pseudomonas syringae host interactions using metatranscriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptome analyses during the interaction of plants and pathogens can be used to provide insights into molecular mechanisms of plant resistance as well as the mechanisms used by bacteria to adapt to hosts and cause disease. We performed a dual in planta RNA-Seq experiment to profile RNA expressi...

  14. Electromagnetic probes of strongly interacting matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... Collisions between two nuclei at relativistic energies will create charged particles – either in .... The thermal cutting rules give a systematic procedure to express ...... mesons due to its interaction with the thermal partons [80] and employment of running .... [16] J Deng, Q Wang, N Xu and P Zhuang, Phys. Lett.

  15. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  16. Exotic hardrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    In this review, the present status of the physics of exotic hadrons (mesons and baryons) is considered. It is shown that, that during the last decade, several new meson states were observed, whose properties can hardly be explained in terms of the simple quark model. These particles have become serious candidates for exotic hadrons. The search for narrow, heavy baryons in different production and formation reactions is also discussed. 143 refs., 52 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  18. Trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions initiated by an exotic invasive plant autogenic ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson

    2010-01-01

    Indirect interactions are important for structuring ecological systems. However, research on indirect effects has been heavily biased toward top-down trophic interactions, and less is known about other indirect-interaction pathways. As autogenic ecosystem engineers, plants can serve as initiators of nontrophic indirect interactions that, like top-down pathways, can...

  19. Probing exotic magnetic phases and electrical transport in Cr-rich γ-NiFeCr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Pampa [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Majumdar, A.K., E-mail: akm@bose.res.in [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, PO Belur Math, Howrah 711202 (India); Nigam, A.K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2015-05-01

    We have identified ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and re-entrant spin-glass-like phases in Cr-rich γ-NiFeCr alloys and studied their critical magnetic behavior. Their electrical resistivity exhibits distinct minima between 10 and 24 K with ρ∞−√T due to electron–electron interaction effects. Electron–phonon and electron–magnon contributions to ρ are isolated. The magnetoresistance shows hysteresis effects, a signature of spin-glass-like phases and a sign reversal with change of magnetic states. We have also observed that the nature of magnetic states strongly depends on the concentration of Fe and Cr. In this system, even a small amount of Fe enhances ferromagnetism a lot while addition of a little bit of Cr suppresses ferromagnetism and takes the system to the antiferromagnetic regime. The correlation between the magnetic and the electrical properties are more meaningful here since both studies were done on the same set of samples which have rather high melting points. - Highlights: • Identified ferro, antiferro, and re-entrant spin-glass phases in Ni–Fe–Cr alloys. • Resistivity ρ~−√T shows minima from 10–24 K due to electron–electron interaction. • Electron–phonon and electron–magnon contributions to ρ are isolated. • Magneto-transport measurements strengthened the magnetic phases identified. • Correlation in magnetic/electrical properties more meaningful if same samples used.

  20. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  1. Interactions between exotic invasive plants and soil microbes in the rhizosphere suggest that 'everything is not everywhere'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Marnie E; Callaway, Ragan M

    2012-07-01

    The study of soil biota in the context of exotic plant invasions has led to an explosion in our understanding of the ecological roles of many different groups of microbes that function in roots or at the root-soil interface. Part of this progress has been the emergence of two biogeographic patterns involving invasive plants and soil microbes. First, in their non-native ranges invasive plants commonly interact differently with the same soil microbes than native plants. Second, in their native ranges, plants that are invasive elsewhere commonly interact functionally with soil microbes differently in their home ranges than they do in their non-native ranges. These studies pose a challenge to a long-held paradigm about microbial biogeography - the idea that microbes are not limited by dispersal and are thus free from the basic taxonomic, biogeographical and evolutionary framework that characterizes all other life on Earth. As an analogy, the global distribution of animals that function as carnivores does not negate the fascinating evolutionary biogeographic patterns of carnivores. Other challenges to this notion come from new measurements of genetic differences among microbes across geographic boundaries, which also suggest that meaningful biogeographic patterns exist for microorganisms. We expand this discussion of whether or not 'everything is everywhere' by using the inherently biogeographic context of plant invasions by reviewing the literature on interactions among invasive plants and the microorganisms in the rhizosphere. We find that these interactions can be delineated at multiple scales: from individual plants to continents. Thus the microbes that regulate major aspects of plant biology do not appear to be exempt from the fundamental evolutionary processes of geographical isolation and natural selection. At the important scales of taxonomy, ecotype and ecosystem functions, the fundamental ecology of invaders and soil microbes indicates that everything might

  2. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    tunneling microscope (STM). Especially at low temperatures the Kondo resonance is used to probe magnetic interaction with ferromagnetic islands and between two atoms. The latter showing a crossover between Kondo screened atoms and antiferromagnetically coupled atoms close to the quantum critical point....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...

  3. Probing Quark-Gluon Interactions with Transverse Polarized Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondon, Oscar A.

    2011-01-01

    Transverse polarized inelastic scattering extends the power of the electromagnetic interaction as a probe of nucleon dynamics beyond the leading order regime explored with longitudinally polarized DIS. In transverse polarized scattering, the twist-3 g 2 spin structure function contributes at the same order as the longitudinal, twist-2, g 1 , so interactions between quarks and gluons can be studied, opening a window on the mechanisms of confinement. This talk reports the results of Jefferson Lab's Resonances Spin Structure experiment measurement of g 2 and the d 2 twist-3 quark matrix element at a four-momentum transfer of 1.3 GeV 2 .

  4. Simulated galaxy interactions as probes of merger spectral energy distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Brassington, Nicola, E-mail: llanz@ipac.caltech.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-10

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to the simulated SEDs that are close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with the SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient for identifying the interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.

  5. A Spatially Explicit Dual-Isotope Approach to Map Regions of Plant-Plant Interaction after Exotic Plant Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hellmann

    Full Text Available Understanding interactions between native and invasive plant species in field settings and quantifying the impact of invaders in heterogeneous native ecosystems requires resolving the spatial scale on which these processes take place. Therefore, functional tracers are needed that enable resolving the alterations induced by exotic plant invasion in contrast to natural variation in a spatially explicit way. 15N isoscapes, i.e., spatially referenced representations of stable nitrogen isotopic signatures, have recently provided such a tracer. However, different processes, e.g. water, nitrogen or carbon cycles, may be affected at different spatial scales. Thus multi-isotope studies, by using different functional tracers, can potentially return a more integrated picture of invader impact. This is particularly true when isoscapes are submitted to statistical methods suitable to find homogeneous subgroups in multivariate data such as cluster analysis. Here, we used model-based clustering of spatially explicit foliar δ15N and δ13C isoscapes together with N concentration of a native indicator species, Corema album, to map regions of influence in a Portuguese dune ecosystem invaded by the N2-fixing Acacia longifolia. Cluster analysis identified regions with pronounced alterations in N budget and water use efficiency in the native species, with a more than twofold increase in foliar N, and δ13C and δ15N enrichment of up to 2‰ and 8‰ closer to the invader, respectively. Furthermore, clusters of multiple functional tracers indicated a spatial shift from facilitation through N addition in the proximity of the invader to competition for resources other than N in close contact. Finding homogeneous subgroups in multi-isotope data by means of model-based cluster analysis provided an effective tool for detecting spatial structure in processes affecting plant physiology and performance. The proposed method can give an objective measure of the spatial extent

  6. Probing SU(N)-symmetric orbital interactions with ytterbium Fermi gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scazza, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This thesis reports on the creation and investigation of interacting two-orbital quantum gases of ytterbium in optical lattices. Degenerate fermionic gases of ytterbium or other alkaline-earth-like atoms have been recently proposed as model systems for orbital phenomena in condensed matter, such as Kondo screening, heavy-Fermi behaviour and colossal magnetoresistance. Such gases are moreover expected to obey a high SU(N) symmetry, owing to their highly decoupled nuclear spin, for which the emergence of novel, exotic phases of matter has been predicted. With the two lowest (meta-) stable electronic states mimicking electrons in distinct orbitals of solid materials, the two-orbital SU(N) Hubbard model and its spin-exchange inter-orbital interactions are realised. The interactions in two-orbital degenerate mixtures of different nuclear spin states of 173 Yb are probed by addressing the transition to the metastable state in a state-independent optical lattice. The complete characterisation of the two-orbital scattering channels and the demonstration of the SU(N=6) symmetry within the experimental uncertainty are presented. Most importantly, a strong spin- exchange coupling between the two orbitals is identified and the associated exchange process is observed through the dynamic equilibration of spin imbalances between ensembles in different orbitals. These findings are enabled by the implementation of high precision spectroscopic techniques and of full coherent control of the metastable state population. The realisation of SU(N)-symmetric gases with spin-exchange interactions, the elementary building block of orbital quantum magnetism, represents an important step towards the simulation of paradigmatic many-body models, such as the Kondo lattice model.

  7. Exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, K.; Hattori, T.; Yasue, M.

    1991-01-01

    An exotic composite vector boson V is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W, and Z. One is based on four-Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ, and V

  8. Clusters and exotic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt is made to present some data which may be construed as indicating that perhaps clusters play a role in high energy and exotic pion or kaon interactions with complex (A much greater than 16) nuclei. Also an attempt is made to summarize some very recent experimental work on pion interactions with nuclei which may or may not in the end support a picture in which clusters play an important role. (U.S.)

  9. Exotic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Sigamani, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A selection of results for searches for exotic physics at the LHC are presented. These include a search for massive resonances, dark matter with a high energy jet in association with large missing transverse momentum, long-lived neutral particles, and narrow dijet resonances. The results are based on 20/fb of LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV taken with the CMS detector.

  10. Exotic charmonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhlova, Galina V; Pakhlov, Pavel N [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russian Federation State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Eidel' man, Semen I [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-07

    The most significant results on the spectroscopy, production, and decay of charmonium and charmonium-like states are reviewed. The surprise-filled physics of charmonium is currently attracting great experimental and theoretical attention. Unexpected properties exhibited by numerous discovered states fail to be explained by the theory, which instead suggests the existence in the spectra of charmonium-like particles of exotic systems different from usual bound states. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. Proton-ion collisions: behind the scenes of an exotic interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Protons to the right, ions to the left: the basic principle of proton-ion collisions at the LHC might seem straightforward. However, this is an almost unprecedented mode of collider operation, certainly unique at the energy provided by the LHC. In addition to being a remarkable technical achievement, this interaction between a proton and an ion can potentially contribute a lot to the understanding of the properties of matter in its primordial state.   Prior to last week, the LHC had only collided protons with protons and lead ions with lead ions. These were indeed the two operational schemes the LHC was designed for. However, since science can often evolve in directions that were not necessarily expected at the beginning of a project, over the years the scientific community has become more and more interested in the hybrid type of interaction – that between protons and ions. Last week’s collisions were only a test for the teams involved in the operation of the LHC, in prepara...

  12. Slotted rotatable target assembly and systematic error analysis for a search for long range spin dependent interactions from exotic vector boson exchange using neutron spin rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, C.; Crawford, B.; Fox, W.; Francis, I.; Holley, A.; Magers, S.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Vanderwerp, J.

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the design and construction of a novel target array of nonmagnetic test masses used in a neutron polarimetry measurement made in search for new possible exotic spin dependent neutron-atominteractions of Nature at sub-mm length scales. This target was designed to accept and efficiently transmit a transversely polarized slow neutron beam through a series of long open parallel slots bounded by flat rectangular plates. These openings possessed equal atom density gradients normal to the slots from the flat test masses with dimensions optimized to achieve maximum sensitivity to an exotic spin-dependent interaction from vector boson exchanges with ranges in the mm - μm regime. The parallel slots were oriented differently in four quadrants that can be rotated about the neutron beam axis in discrete 90°increments using a Geneva drive. The spin rotation signals from the 4 quadrants were measured using a segmented neutron ion chamber to suppress possible systematic errors from stray magnetic fields in the target region. We discuss the per-neutron sensitivity of the target to the exotic interaction, the design constraints, the potential sources of systematic errors which could be present in this design, and our estimate of the achievable sensitivity using this method.

  13. Retarded Local Dynamics of Single Fluorescent Probes in Polymeric Glass due to Interaction Strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Yang, Jingfa; Zhao, Jiang

    The effect of strengthening of interaction between single fluorescent probes and polymer matrix to the probes dynamics is investigated using single molecule fluorescence defocus microscopy. By introducing multiple hydroxyl groups to the fluorescent probes, which builds up hydrogen bonds between the probe and polymer matrix, the dynamics is discovered to be retarded. This is evidenced by the lowering of the frequency of the vibrational modes in the power spectra of the rotation trajectories of individual fluorescent probes, and also by the lowering of population of rotating probes. The results show that by strengthening the probe-matrix interaction, the local dynamics detected by the probes is equivalent to that detected by a bigger probe, due to the enhanced friction between the probe and the polymer matrix. the National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB821500).

  14. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    Scope and method of study. Hydrogen bonding is a fundamental element in protein structure and function. Breaking a single hydrogen bond may impair the stability of a protein. It is therefore important to probe dynamic changes in hydrogen bonding interactions during protein folding and function. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is highly sensitive to hydrogen bonding interactions. However, it lacks quantitative correlation between the vibrational frequencies and the number, type, and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of ionizable and polar residues. We employ quantum physics theory based ab initio calculations to study the effects of hydrogen bonding interactions on vibrational frequencies of Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues and to develop vibrational spectral markers for probing hydrogen bonding interactions using infrared spectroscopy. In addition, proton transfer process plays a crucial role in a wide range of energy transduction, signal transduction, and enzymatic reactions. We study the structural basis for proton transfer using photoactive yellow protein as an excellent model system. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to investigate the structures of early intermediate states. Quantum theory based ab initio calculations are used to study the impact of hydrogen bond interactions on proton affinity and proton transfer. Findings and conclusions. Our extensive density function theory based calculations provide rich structural, spectral, and energetic information on hydrogen bonding properties of protonated side chain groups of Asp/Glu and Tyr. We developed vibrational spectral markers and 2D FTIR spectroscopy for structural characterization on the number and the type of hydrogen bonding interactions of the COOH group of Asp/Glu and neutral phenolic group of Tyr. These developments greatly enhance the power of time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy as a major experimental tool for structural characterization of functionally important

  15. Molecular electrostatics for probing lone pair-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Neetha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H; Kumar, Anmol; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2013-11-14

    An electrostatics-based approach has been proposed for probing the weak interactions between lone pair containing molecules and π deficient molecular systems. For electron-rich molecules, the negative minima in molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography give the location of electron localization and the MESP value at the minimum (Vmin) quantifies the electron-rich character of that region. Interactive behavior of a lone pair bearing molecule with electron deficient π-systems, such as hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine and 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene explored within DFT brings out good correlation of the lone pair-π interaction energy (E(int)) with the Vmin value of the electron-rich system. Such interaction is found to be portrayed well with the Electrostatic Potential for Intermolecular Complexation (EPIC) model. On the basis of the precise location of MESP minimum, a prediction for the orientation of a lone pair bearing molecule with an electron deficient π-system is possible in the majority of the cases studied.

  16. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  17. Stocked exotic predators and their interaction with native galaxiids (Pisces: Galaxiidae) shape the food web structure in Tasmanian lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Nicolas; Amsinck, Susanne Lildal; Barmuta, Leon

    2015-01-01

    maximum body size, but not of cladocerans. The zooplankton community food web was wider in lakes with lower pelagic contribution to the fish diet. Our results suggest a negative effect by exotic predators on the niche width of galaxiids, but weak cascading effects on phytoplankton biomass, and a negative...

  18. Wide-Range Probing of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duck-Ho; Yoo, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Yun; Min, Byoung-Chul; Choe, Sug-Bong

    2017-03-01

    The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in magnetic objects is of enormous interest, because it generates built-in chirality of magnetic domain walls (DWs) and topologically protected skyrmions, leading to efficient motion driven by spin-orbit torques. Because of its importance for both potential applications and fundamental research, many experimental efforts have been devoted to DMI investigation. However, current experimental probing techniques cover only limited ranges of the DMI strength and have specific sample requirements. Thus, there are no versatile methods to quantify DMI over a wide range of values. Here, we present such an experimental scheme, which is based on the angular dependence of asymmetric DW motion. This method can be used to determine values of DMI much larger than the maximum strength of the external magnetic field strength, which demonstrates that various DMI strengths can be quantified with a single measurement setup. This scheme may thus prove essential to DMI-related emerging fields in nanotechnology.

  19. Capillary Interactions between a Probe Tip and a Nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Ning, Sun; Le-Feng, Wang; Wei-Bin, Rong

    2008-01-01

    To understand capillary interactions between probe tips and nanoparticles under ambient conditions, a theoretical model of capillary forces between them is developed based on the geometric relations. It is found that the contribution of surface tension force to the total capillary force attains to similar order of magnitude as the capillary pressure force in many cases. It is also shown that the tip shape and the radial distance of the meniscus have great influence on the capillary force. The capillary force decreases with the increasing separation distances, and the variance of the contact angles may change the magnitudes of capillary forces several times at large radial distances. The applicability of the symmetric meniscus approximation is discussed. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  20. Diffusing colloidal probes of protein-carbohydrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Shannon L; Meric, Gulsum; Swavola, Julia C; Bevan, Michael A

    2013-02-19

    We present diffusing colloidal probe measurements of weak, multivalent, specific protein-polysaccharide interactions mediated by a competing monosaccharide. Specifically, we used integrated evanescent wave and video microscopy methods to monitor the three-dimensional Brownian excursions of conconavilin A (ConA) decorated colloids interacting with dextran-functionalized surfaces in the presence of glucose. Particle trajectories were interpreted as binding lifetime histograms, binding isotherms, and potentials of mean force. Binding lifetimes and isotherms showed clear trends of decreasing ConA-dextran-specific binding with increasing glucose concentration, consistent with expectations. Net potentials were accurately captured by superposition of a short-range, glucose-independent ConA-dextran repulsion and a longer-range, glucose-dependent dextran bridging attraction modeled as a harmonic potential. For glucose concentrations greater than 100 mM, the net ConA-dextran potential was found to have only a nonspecific repulsion, similar to that of bovine serum albumin (BSA) decorated colloids over dextran determined in control experiments. Our results demonstrate the first use of optical microscopy methods to quantify the connections between potentials of mean force and the binding behavior of ConA-decorated colloids on dextran-functionalized surfaces.

  1. Interaction of a ballistic probe with gaseous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerovsky, Zden; Greason, William D

    2008-01-01

    Free-flying metal probes are used to determine charge densities in gaseous media containing free charge or low density plasma. The trajectory of the probe is ensured either by gravity or by propelling the probe to a certain velocity at the launch site. While travelling, the probe charge changes from its launch-site magnitude to that related to the space charge density existing along the trajectory. The degree to which the probe's arrival-site charge magnitude matches the space charge density in the area of interest depends on the probe shape and on the charge exchange processes between the probe body and the medium. The paper studies a probe acting as a free-flying charge carrier in air, and discusses the problems that may lead to an imbalance between the charge collected by the probe in the area of interest and the charge measured at the arrival site. The analysis and the described experiments are of the ballistic type: a small, triboelectrically pre-charged metal probe was propelled on a horizontal path, and the charge carried by the probe was measured at several points along the trajectory by means of contact-free induction rings; the initial and final charges were determined by static Faraday cups. A charge disparity was found under certain conditions, and its degree explained by the effects of the charge carrier potential. The studied probe charges ranged from 10 to 50 nF, and the fly-times needed to cross a one-meter path ranged from 20 to 40 ms. The probe to gas charge exchange experiments and their analysis yielded conditions under which the probe lost approximately 10 % of its charge. The results of our study may be of interest to those who intend to use the free-flying probe technique for the determination of space charge density.

  2. Effect of exotic long-lived sub-strongly interacting massive particles in big bang nucleosynthesis and a new solution to the Li problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawasaki Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The plateau of 7Li abundance as a function of the iron abundance by spectroscopic observations of metal-poor halo stars (MPHSs indicates its primordial origin. The observed abundance levels are about a factor of three smaller than the primordial 7Li abundance predicted in the standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN model. This discrepancy might originate from exotic particle and nuclear processes operating in BBN epoch. Some particle models include heavy (m >> 1 GeV long-lived colored particles which would be confined inside exotic heavy hadrons, i.e., strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs. We have found reactions which destroy 7Be and 7Li during BBN in the scenario of BBN catalyzed by a long-lived sub-strongly interacting massive particle (sub-SIMP, X. The reactions are non radiative X captures of 7 Be and 7Li which can be operative if the X particle interacts with nuclei strongly enough to drive 7 Be destruction but not strongly enough to form a bound state with 4 He of relative angular momentum L = 1. We suggest that 7Li problem can be solved as a result of a new process beyond the standard model through which the observable signature was left on the primordial Li abundance.

  3. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Bousson, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that delivered more than 2 fb^-1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  4. Organizational Probes:Exploring Playful Interactions in Work Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Eliens, A.P.W.; Eliëns, A.; van de Watering, M.R.; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Jorge, J

    2008-01-01

    Playfulness, with non-intrusive elements, can be considered a useful resource for enhancing social awareness and community building within work organizations. Taking inspirations from the cultural probes approach, we developed organizational probes as a set of investigation tools that could provide

  5. Probing the pairing interaction through two-neutron transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margueron J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the pairing interaction in mean-field-based models is addressed. In particular, the possibility to use pair transfers as A tool to better constrain this interaction is discussed. First, pairing inter-actions with various density dependencies (surface/volume mixing are used in the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov + quasiparticle random-phase approximation model to generate the form factors to be used in reaction calculations. Cross sections for (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions are calculated in the one-step zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation for some Tin isotopes and for incident proton energies from 15 to 35 MeV. Three different surface/volume mixings of A zero-range density-dependent pairing interaction are employed in the microscopic calculations and the sensitivity of the cross sections to the different mixings is analyzed. Differences among the three different theoretical predictions are found espacially for the nucleus 136Sn and they are more important at the incident proton energy of 15 MeV. We thus indicate (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions with very neutron-rich Sn isotopes and at proton energies around 15 MeV as good experimental cases where the surface/volume mixing of the pairing interaction may be probed. In the second part of the manuscript, ground-state to ground-state transitions are investigated. Approximations made to estimate two-nucleon transfer probabilities in ground-state to ground-state transitions and the physical interpretation of these probabilities are discussed. Probabilities are often calculated by approximating both ground states of the initial nucleus A and of the final nucleus A±2 by the same quasiparticle vacuum. We analyze two improvements of this approach. First, the effect of using two different ground states with average numbers of particles A and A±2 is quantified. Second, by using projection techniques, the role of particle number restoration is analyzed. Our analysis

  6. Fluorescence spectral studies on interaction of fluorescent probes with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Kaushik, E-mail: ghoshfcy@iitr.ac.in; Rathi, Sweety; Arora, Deepshikha

    2016-07-15

    Interaction of 2-(1-(naphthale-1-ylimino)ethyl)phenol (1), 2-methoxy-4-(((4-methoxyphenyl)imino)methyl)phenol (2) and 2-methoxy-4-((naphthalene-1-ylimino)methyl)phenol (3) with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was examined. Fluorescence spectral data were obtained from the probes by varying the concentration of BSA as well as from BSA by varying the concentration of probes. Synchronous fluorescence measurements were performed and binding constants of the probes were calculated. To understand mode of quenching, Stern–Volmer plot, absorption spectral studies and life time measurements were performed. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was also scrutinized. - Highlights: • Schiff bases with pendant phenolato function and interaction with BSA. • Synchronous fluorescence studies and a preferred interaction with tryptophan. • Probable interaction of probes with Trp-213 residue in the hydrophobic cavity. • 1:1 binding stoichiometry of probes and BSA in Benesi–Hildebrand graph.

  7. Sudden Oak Death: Interactions of the Exotic Oomycete Phytophthora ramorum with Naïve North American Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    Ten years after a threatening and previously unknown disease of oaks and tanoaks appeared in coastal California, a significant amount of progress has been made toward the understanding of its causal agent Phytophthora ramorum and of the novel pathosystems associated with this exotic organism. However, a complete understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of this species still eludes us. In part, our inability to fully understand this organism is due to its phylogenetic, phylogeographic, phenotypic, and epidemiological complexities, all reviewed in this paper. Most lines of evidence suggest that the high degree of disease severity reported in California is not simply due to a generalized lack of resistance or tolerance in naïve hosts but also to an innate ability of the pathogen to survive in unfavorable climatic conditions and to reproduce rapidly when conditions become once again favorable. PMID:23002108

  8. Trends in exotic-atom research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Horvath, D.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt was made to analyze the trends in the development of exotic-atom research on the basis of a recently compiled bibliography. The analysis of nearly 4000 publications demonstrated that: (1) exotic atoms are nuclear probes used in every field of physics, from the test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) to chemical physics, to materials sciences; (2) the role of nuclear and atomic physics in exotic atom research is decreasing (although it is still significant), while that of materials sciences and chemial physics is exponentially increasing; and (3) prior to 1980 most investigators were mainly interested in atoms with negative muons, while during the last few years the positive muon (μSR) studies have dominated exotic atom research

  9. An exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi; Hattori, Takashi; Yasue, Masaki.

    1990-08-01

    An exotic composite vector boson, V, is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W and Z. One is based on four Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ and V. (author)

  10. Computational procedures for probing interactions in OLS and logistic regression: SPSS and SAS implementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Andrew F; Matthes, Jörg

    2009-08-01

    Researchers often hypothesize moderated effects, in which the effect of an independent variable on an outcome variable depends on the value of a moderator variable. Such an effect reveals itself statistically as an interaction between the independent and moderator variables in a model of the outcome variable. When an interaction is found, it is important to probe the interaction, for theories and hypotheses often predict not just interaction but a specific pattern of effects of the focal independent variable as a function of the moderator. This article describes the familiar pick-a-point approach and the much less familiar Johnson-Neyman technique for probing interactions in linear models and introduces macros for SPSS and SAS to simplify the computations and facilitate the probing of interactions in ordinary least squares and logistic regression. A script version of the SPSS macro is also available for users who prefer a point-and-click user interface rather than command syntax.

  11. Study of protein-probe complexation equilibria and protein-surfactant interaction using charge transfer fluorescence probe methyl ester of N,N-dimethylamino naphthyl acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahanta, Subrata; Balia Singh, Rupashree; Bagchi, Arnab [Department of Chemistry University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Nath, Debnarayan [Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nguchhait@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the interaction between intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe-Methyl ester of N,N-dimethylamino naphthyl acrylic acid (MDMANA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The nature of probe protein binding interaction, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from protein to probe and time resolved fluorescence decay measurement predict that the probe molecule binds strongly to the hydrophobic cavity of the protein. Furthermore, the interaction of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) with water soluble protein BSA has been investigated using MDMANA as fluorescenece probe. The changes in the spectral characteristics of charge transfer fluorescence probe MDMANA in BSA-SDS environment reflects well the nature of the protein-surfactant binding interaction such as specific binding, non-cooperative binding, cooperative binding and saturation binding.

  12. Energy exotic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, V.; Gibner, S.; Pinnamaneni, K.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter with 88 references focuses on the use of exotic options to control exposure to energy prices. Exotic options are defined, and the conversion of a standard option into an exotic option and pricing models are examined. Pricing and hedging exotic options, path-dependent options, multi-commodity options, options on the minimum-or-maximum of two commodities, compound options, digital options, hybrid and complex structures, and natural gas daily options are described. Formulas for option pricing for vanilla, barrier, compound, options on minimum or maximum of two assets, and look back options are given in an appendix

  13. Solute-solvent interactions and dynamics probed by THz light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, Gerhard; Böhm, Fabian; Ma, Chun-Yu; Havenith, Martina

    The THz range (1-12 THz, 30-400 cm-1) is especially suited to probe changes in the solvent dynamics induced by solutes of different character (hydrophobic, hydrophilic, charged, neutral). In recent years we have investigated a large variety of such solutes and found characteristic spectral fingerprints for ions, but also for uncharged solutes, such as alcohols. We will present a status report on our current understanding of the observed spectral changes and how they relate to physico-chemical parameters like hydration shell size or the lifetime of an excited intermolecular oscillation. In addition, we will show, that in some cases the spectral changes are closely related to the partition function yielding access to a microscopic understanding of macroscopic thermodynamic functions. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (Ruhr-Universität, EXC1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  14. Probing non nucleonic degrees of freedom with strong and electromagnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1985-10-01

    In this talk, I would like to examine our present view on non-nucleonic degrees of freedom with a few typical experimental results obtained recently both with hadronic and electromagnetic probes at intermediate energies. It is the first generation of experimental data which has probed mesonic degrees of freedom with a spatial resolution of the order of 0.5 fm. This has made possible for example the measurement of the size of the pion-nucleon interaction region. This is very stimulating progress and we begin to have a coherent overview on the various reaction mechanisms which are induced by hadronic and electromagnetic probes

  15. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-01-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located ∼0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin have

  16. Nuclei with exotic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-08-01

    We discuss various interesting features in the behavior of exotic constituents of nuclei such as hyperons and mesons, in particular, with emphases on the aspect of exotic halos which are formed in general by short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. Specifically, Λ and Σ hypernuclei and pionic nuclei are discussed. (author)

  17. Long-range interactions between probes, particles and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.; Manson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review is given of some applications of a novel form of self-energy theory. These include the image force experienced by an electron near a metal, the van der Waals interaction between two molecules and the polarization potential of atomic scattering theory

  18. Phthalic Acid Chemical Probes Synthesized for Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Jen Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasticizers are additives that are used to increase the flexibility of plastic during manufacturing. However, in injection molding processes, plasticizers cannot be generated with monomers because they can peel off from the plastics into the surrounding environment, water, or food, or become attached to skin. Among the various plasticizers that are used, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (phthalic acid is a typical precursor to generate phthalates. In addition, phthalic acid is a metabolite of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP. According to Gene_Ontology gene/protein database, phthalates can cause genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, etc. In this study, a silanized linker (3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane, APTES was deposited on silicon dioxides (SiO2 particles and phthalate chemical probes were manufactured from phthalic acid and APTES–SiO2. These probes could be used for detecting proteins that targeted phthalic acid and for protein-protein interactions. The phthalic acid chemical probes we produced were incubated with epithelioid cell lysates of normal rat kidney (NRK-52E cells to detect the interactions between phthalic acid and NRK-52E extracted proteins. These chemical probes interacted with a number of chaperones such as protein disulfide-isomerase A6, heat shock proteins, and Serpin H1. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA software showed that these chemical probes were a practical technique for protein-protein interaction analysis.

  19. Ion-atom interactions probed by photofragment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.

    1984-01-01

    Photofragment spectroscopy studies energetic and dynamical properties of molecular states interacting with dissociation continuum. So far, data for eighteen diatomic molecular ions have been gathered by this technique. This paper is a review of these investigations, introduced by a discussion of the experimental methods used. The wealth of information accessible by ion photofragment spectroscopy challenges the experimentalist in the application of innovative techniques and the theoretician for less approximate accounts of the Hamiltonian. (Auth.)

  20. Probing Molecular Insights into Zika Virus–Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika virus (ZIKV outbreak in the Americas surprised all of us because of its rapid spread and association with neurologic disorders including fetal microcephaly, brain and ocular anomalies, and Guillain–Barré syndrome. In response to this global health crisis, unprecedented and world-wide efforts are taking place to study the ZIKV-related human diseases. Much has been learned about this virus in the areas of epidemiology, genetic diversity, protein structures, and clinical manifestations, such as consequences of ZIKV infection on fetal brain development. However, progress on understanding the molecular mechanism underlying ZIKV-associated neurologic disorders remains elusive. To date, we still lack a good understanding of; (1 what virologic factors are involved in the ZIKV-associated human diseases; (2 which ZIKV protein(s contributes to the enhanced viral pathogenicity; and (3 how do the newly adapted and pandemic ZIKV strains alter their interactions with the host cells leading to neurologic defects? The goal of this review is to explore the molecular insights into the ZIKV–host interactions with an emphasis on host cell receptor usage for viral entry, cell innate immunity to ZIKV, and the ability of ZIKV to subvert antiviral responses and to cause cytopathic effects. We hope this literature review will inspire additional molecular studies focusing on ZIKV–host Interactions.

  1. Probing Molecular Insights into Zika Virus–Host Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ina; Li, Ge; Wang, Shusheng; Desprès, Philippe; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2018-01-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas surprised all of us because of its rapid spread and association with neurologic disorders including fetal microcephaly, brain and ocular anomalies, and Guillain–Barré syndrome. In response to this global health crisis, unprecedented and world-wide efforts are taking place to study the ZIKV-related human diseases. Much has been learned about this virus in the areas of epidemiology, genetic diversity, protein structures, and clinical manifestations, such as consequences of ZIKV infection on fetal brain development. However, progress on understanding the molecular mechanism underlying ZIKV-associated neurologic disorders remains elusive. To date, we still lack a good understanding of; (1) what virologic factors are involved in the ZIKV-associated human diseases; (2) which ZIKV protein(s) contributes to the enhanced viral pathogenicity; and (3) how do the newly adapted and pandemic ZIKV strains alter their interactions with the host cells leading to neurologic defects? The goal of this review is to explore the molecular insights into the ZIKV–host interactions with an emphasis on host cell receptor usage for viral entry, cell innate immunity to ZIKV, and the ability of ZIKV to subvert antiviral responses and to cause cytopathic effects. We hope this literature review will inspire additional molecular studies focusing on ZIKV–host Interactions. PMID:29724036

  2. The interaction of fluorescent nanodiamond probes with cellular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, Simon R; Nagl, Andreas; Bigot, François; Rodríguez-García, Melissa M; de Vries, Marcel P; Chipaux, Mayeul; Schirhagl, Romana

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are promising tools to image cells, bioanalytes and physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, and electric or magnetic fields with nanometer resolution. To exploit their potential for intracellular applications, the FNDs have to be brought into contact with cell culture media. The interactions between the medium and the diamonds crucially influence sensitivity as well as the ability to enter cells. The authors demonstrate that certain proteins and salts spontaneously adhere to the FNDs and may cause aggregation. This is a first investigation on the fundamental questions on how (a) FNDs interact with the medium, and (b) which proteins and salts are being attracted. A differentiation between strongly binding and weakly binding proteins is made. Not all proteins participate in the formation of FND aggregates. Surprisingly, some main components in the medium seem to play no role in aggregation. Simple strategies to prevent aggregation are discussed. These include adding the proteins, which are naturally present in the cell culture to the diamonds first and then inserting them in the full medium. Graphical abstractSchematic of the interaction of nanodiamonds with cell culture medium. Certain proteins and salts adhere to the diamond surface and lead to aggregation or to formation of a protein corona.

  3. The interactions of the HELIOS probe with the solar wind plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.H.; Isensee, U.; Maassberg, H.

    1981-08-01

    HELIOS solar probe disturbs the solar wind plasma in the near vicinity. Around the probe, a space charge cloud is formed due to strong photoelectron emission and fade out of solar wind particles. The conducting and isolating parts of the surface are differently charged. These effects result in a very complex potential structure in the vicinity of the probe and on the surface. The interactions of the HELIOS probe with the solar wind plasma are described by models based on kinetic theory of plasma. The combination of these models yields an entire and consistent representation of the spacecraft charging and the potential structure. Electron spectra measured by plasma experiment E1 are analysed and compared with results of the theoretical models. (orig.) [de

  4. Probing cocaine-antibody interactions in buffer and human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Despite progress in cocaine immunotherapy, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of antibodies which bind to cocaine and its metabolites are not well understood. It is also not clear how the interactions between them differ in a complex matrix such as the serum present in the human body. In the present study, we have used microscale thermophoresis (MST, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR we have evaluated the affinity properties of a representative mouse monoclonal (mAb08 as well as those of polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mouse and human patient serum.MST analysis of fluorescently tagged mAb08 binding to cocaine reveals an approximately 15 fold decrease in its equilibrium dissociation constant in 20-50% human serum compared with that in saline buffer. A similar trend was also found using enriched polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mice and patient serum, for which we have used fluorescently tagged bovine serum albumin conjugated to succinyl norcocaine (BSA-SNC. This conjugate closely mimics both cocaine and the hapten used to raise these antibodies. The ITC data also revealed that cocaine has a moderate affinity of about 2 µM to 20% human serum and very little interaction with human serum albumin or nonspecific human IgG at that concentration range. In a SPR inhibition experiment, the binding of mAb08 to immobilized BSA-SNC was inhibited by cocaine and benzoylecgonine in a highly competitive manner, whereas the purified polyclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans and mice, revealed preferential selectivity to pharmacologically active cocaine but not to the inactive metabolite benzoylecgonine. We have also developed a simple binding model to simulate the challenges associated with cocaine immunotherapy using the variable quantitative and kinetic properties of the antibodies.High sensitivity calorimetric determination of antibody binding to cocaine and its metabolites provide

  5. Language, interactivity and solution probing: repetition without repetition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, Stephen; Nash, Luarina

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of autopoiesis to biological systems was crucial in building an alternative to the classic view of cognitive science. However, concepts like structural coupling and autonomy are not strong enough to throw light on language and human problem solving. The argument...... is presented though a case study where a person solves a problem and, in so doing relies on non-local aspects of the ecology as well as his observer's mental domain. Like Anthony Chemero we make links with ecological psychology to emphasize how embodiment draws on cultural resources as people concert thinking......, action and perception. We trace this to human interactivity or sense-saturated coordination that renders possible language and human forms of cognition: it links human sense-making to historical experience. People play roles with natural and cultural artifacts as they act, animate groups and live through...

  6. Probing protein-lipid interactions by FRET between membrane fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Gadjev, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful fluorescence technique that has found numerous applications in medicine and biology. One area where FRET proved to be especially informative involves the intermolecular interactions in biological membranes. The present study was focused on developing and verifying a Monte-Carlo approach to analyzing the results of FRET between the membrane-bound fluorophores. This approach was employed to quantify FRET from benzanthrone dye ABM to squaraine dye SQ-1 in the model protein-lipid system containing a polycationic globular protein lysozyme and negatively charged lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. It was found that acceptor redistribution between the lipid bilayer and protein binding sites resulted in the decrease of FRET efficiency. Quantification of this effect in terms of the proposed methodology yielded both structural and binding parameters of lysozyme-lipid complexes.

  7. On exotic fireballs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tati, T.

    1984-01-01

    Exotic fireballs found by Brazil-Japan Collaboration of Chacaltaya Emulsion Chamber Experiment are interpreted in terms of a model of hadronic matter (of which hadrons are made) based on the theory of finite degree of freedom. It is considered in our picture that exotic fireballs reveal the part left undefined in the renormalization theory of quantum field and nonappearance of exotic fireballs (of relatively small mass, i.e. Mini-Centauro and Geminion) in CERN SPS collider experiment is possibly due to the existence of universal time realized by the cutoff of momentum degree of freedom of the field of basic particles. (Author) [pt

  8. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  9. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H 2 O 2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo

  10. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, A.M., E-mail: arey@jilau1.colorado.edu [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gorshkov, A.V. [Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kraus, C.V. [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Martin, M.J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  11. Probing non-standard interactions at Daya Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Bagchi, Partha [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg,Sainik School Post, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Forero, David V. [AHEP Group, Institut de Física Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de València,Parc Cientific de Paterna, C/ Catedratico José Beltrán, 2 E-46980 Paterna (València) (Spain); Center for Neutrino Physics, Virginia Tech,Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tórtola, Mariam [AHEP Group, Institut de Física Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de València,Parc Cientific de Paterna, C/ Catedratico José Beltrán, 2 E-46980 Paterna (València) (Spain)

    2015-07-13

    In this article we consider the presence of neutrino non-standard interactions (NSI) in the production and detection processes of reactor antineutrinos at the Daya Bay experiment. We report for the first time, the new constraints on the flavor non-universal and flavor universal charged-current NSI parameters, estimated using the currently released 621 days of Daya Bay data. New limits are placed assuming that the new physics effects are just inverse of each other in the production and detection processes. With this special choice of the NSI parameters, we observe a shift in the oscillation amplitude without distorting the L/E pattern of the oscillation probability. This shift in the depth of the oscillation dip can be caused by the NSI parameters as well as by θ{sub 13}, making it quite difficult to disentangle the NSI effects from the standard oscillations. We explore the correlations between the NSI parameters and θ{sub 13} that may lead to significant deviations in the reported value of the reactor mixing angle with the help of iso-probability surface plots. Finally, we present the limits on electron, muon/tau, and flavor universal (FU) NSI couplings with and without considering the uncertainty in the normalization of the total event rates. Assuming a perfect knowledge of the event rates normalization, we find strong upper bounds ∼ 0.1% for the electron and FU cases improving the present limits by one order of magnitude. However, for a conservative error of 5% in the total normalization, these constraints are relaxed by almost one order of magnitude.

  12. Probing non-standard interactions at Daya Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Bagchi, Partha; Forero, David V.; Tórtola, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    In this article we consider the presence of neutrino non-standard interactions (NSI) in the production and detection processes of reactor antineutrinos at the Daya Bay experiment. We report for the first time, the new constraints on the flavor non-universal and flavor universal charged-current NSI parameters, estimated using the currently released 621 days of Daya Bay data. New limits are placed assuming that the new physics effects are just inverse of each other in the production and detection processes. With this special choice of the NSI parameters, we observe a shift in the oscillation amplitude without distorting the L/E pattern of the oscillation probability. This shift in the depth of the oscillation dip can be caused by the NSI parameters as well as by θ 13 , making it quite difficult to disentangle the NSI effects from the standard oscillations. We explore the correlations between the NSI parameters and θ 13 that may lead to significant deviations in the reported value of the reactor mixing angle with the help of iso-probability surface plots. Finally, we present the limits on electron, muon/tau, and flavor universal (FU) NSI couplings with and without considering the uncertainty in the normalization of the total event rates. Assuming a perfect knowledge of the event rates normalization, we find strong upper bounds ∼ 0.1% for the electron and FU cases improving the present limits by one order of magnitude. However, for a conservative error of 5% in the total normalization, these constraints are relaxed by almost one order of magnitude.

  13. Unnatural amino acids as probes of ligand-receptor interactions and their conformational consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Ahern, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    -edge synthetic and chemical biological approaches. Here we summarize recent advances in the use of site-directed incorporation of unnatural amino acids and chemical probes to study ligand-receptor interactions, determine the location of binding sites, and examine the downstream conformational consequences...

  14. Environmentally sensitive probes for monitoring protein-membrane interactions at nanomolar concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shvadchak, Volodymyr V.; Kucherak, Oleksandr; Afitska, Kseniia; Dziuba, D.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 5 (2017), s. 852-859 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : solvatochromic probes * fluorescence * protein-membrane interaction * affinity * binding stoichiometry * alpha-synuclein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  15. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  16. Probing of the interfacial Heisenberg and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction by magnon spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Khalil

    2017-01-11

    This Topical Review presents an overview of the recent experimental results on the quantitative determination of the magnetic exchange parameters in ultrathin magnetic films and multilayers grown on different substrates. The experimental approaches for probing both the symmetric Heisenberg and the antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction in ultrathin magnetic films and at interfaces are discussed in detail. It is explained how the experimental spectrum of magnetic excitations can be used to quantify the strength of these interactions.

  17. Probing in-medium spin–orbit interaction with intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating for the first time both the spin and isospin degrees of freedom explicitly in transport model simulations of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, we observe that a local spin polarization appears during collision process. Most interestingly, it is found that the nucleon spin up–down differential transverse flow is a sensitive probe of the spin–orbit interaction, providing a novel approach to probe both the density and isospin dependence of the in-medium spin–orbit coupling that is important for understanding the structure of rare isotopes and synthesis of superheavy elements

  18. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements

  19. X-ray spectroscopy from exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    Why do experimentalists study exotic atoms, in particular antiprotonic atoms? The answer is simple: the information about electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions that can be obtained by doing X-ray spectroscopy from exotic atoms is really worth the effort. It is possible to (1) enlarge the knowledge about the properties of exotic particles (such as mass and magnetic moment); (2) open a possibility to test quantum electrodynamics; (3) get detailed insight into the shape of nuclei (characterized by the nuclear radium and higher momenta) and even into the neutron distribution in the nucleus (neutron halo); and (4) use it as a powerful tool to learn about the strong interaction at very low relative hadron-nucleon velocities

  20. Final report: Mapping Interactions in Hybrid Systems with Active Scanning Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezovsky, Jesse [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This project aimed to study and map interactions between components of hybrid nanodevices using a novel scanning probe approach. To enable this work, we initially constructed a flexible experimental apparatus allowing for simultaneous scanning probe and confocal optical microscopy measurements. This setup was first used for all-optical measurements of nanostructures, with the focus then shifting to hybrid devices in which single coherent electron spins are coupled to micron-scale ferromagnetic elements, which may prove useful for addressing single spins, enhanced sensing, or spin-wave-mediated coupling of spins for quantum information applications. A significant breakthrough was the realization that it is not necessary to fabricate a magnetic structure on a scanning probe – instead a ferromagnetic vortex core can act as an integrated, solid state, scanning probe. The core of the vortex produces a very strong, localized fringe field which can be used analogously to an MFM tip. Unlike a traditional MFM tip, however, the vortex core is scanned within an integrated device (eliminating drift), and can be moved on vastly faster timescales. This approach allows the detailed investigation of interactions between single spins and complex driven ferromagnetic dynamics.

  1. Charge parity exotic mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Evidence for a meson with exotic quantum numbers J PC 1 -+ , the ρ(1405), has been observed at the AGS at Brookhaven and Crystal Barrel at CERN. This meson is exotic to the extent that its quantum numbers are not consistent with the generalised Pauli exclusion principle applied to the naive constituent quark model. In a fully relativistic field theoretic treatment, however, there is nothing in principle to preclude the existence of charge parity exotics. Using our earlier covariant Bethe-Salpeter model of light-quark mesons with no new parameter fitting we demonstrate the existence of a q - q-bar bound state with the quantum numbers of the ρ

  2. Probing interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Miao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we place observational constraints on the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model. We consider three kinds of phenomenological interactions between holographic dark energy and matter, i.e., the interaction term Q is proportional to the energy densities of dark energy (ρ Λ ), matter (ρ m ), and matter plus dark energy (ρ m +ρ Λ ). For probing the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model, we use the latest observational data including the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) Constitution data, the shift parameter of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) given by the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP5) observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our results show that the interaction and spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model are both rather small. Besides, it is interesting to find that there exists significant degeneracy between the phenomenological interaction and the spatial curvature in the holographic dark energy model

  3. Probing Enzyme-Surface Interactions via Protein Engineering and Single-Molecule Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The overall objective of this research was to exploit protein engineering and fluorescence single-molecule methods to...enhance our understanding of the interaction of proteins and surfaces. Given this objective, the specific aims of this research were to: 1) exploit the...incorporation of unnatural amino acids in proteins to introduce single-molecule probes (i.e., fluorophores for fluorescence resonance energy transfer

  4. Probing the interactions of mitoxantrone with biomimetic membranes with electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieciecka, Dorota; Królikowska, Agata; Krysinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Abstract: Mitoxantrone – an anticancer drug – was used to probe the interactions of this class of cytostatic molecules with biomimetic monolayers. The drug effect was monitored with electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), as well as spectroscopic techniques (surface enhanced Raman scattering), during its passive partitioning/penetration through the mixed Langmuir and Langmuir–Blodgett monolayers after their transfer on gold electrodes. This approach allowed us to discriminate between the drug interactions with hydrophilic head-group region and hydrophobic alkyl chains moiety of such monolayers

  5. Search for exotic barton resonances in the final states of K-p and K-d interactions at 2.9 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staab, R.W.

    1975-11-01

    The reactions K - p → Ψ 0 π - π + K 0 in hydrogen and K - n → Ψ - π - K + in deuterium were analyzed for isotopic spin-3/2 exotic cascade resonance production at a K - beam momentum of 2.9 GeV/c. In addition, the strangeness +1 baryons (Z*'s) were searched for in the reaction K - d → Ψ - Z* at the same beam momentum. The three particle states under consideration lie at the corners of an exotic decuplet. The data came from the Brandeis-Maryland-Syracuse-Tufts collaboration involving two experiments at the 31'' bubble chamber at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each involved 10 6 pictures with a 30 event/μbarn exposure in hydrogen and a 17 event/μbarn exposure in deuterium

  6. Investigation of ferromagnetic spinel semiconductors by hyperfine interactions of implanted nuclear probes

    CERN Document Server

    Samokhvalov, V; Dietrich, M; Schneider, F; Tiginyanu, I M; Tsurkan, V; Unterricker, S

    2003-01-01

    The semiconducting ferromagnetic spinel compounds CdCr//2Se //4, CdCr //2S//4, HgCr//2Se//4 and CuCr//2Se//4 (metallic) were investigated by the perturbed angular correlations (PAC) method with the radioactive probes **1**1**1In, **1**1**1**mCd, **1**1**1Ag, **1**1**7Cd, **1**9**9**mHg and **7**7Br. The probes were implanted at the ISOLDE on-line separator (CERN-Geneva) into single crystals. From the time dependence of the PAC spectra and the measured hyperfine interaction parameters: electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine field, the probe positions and the thermal behavior of the probes could be determined. Cd, Ag and Hg are substituted at the A-site, In at the A- and B-site in the semiconducting compounds and Br at the anion position. Electric and magnetic hyperfine fields were used as test quantities for theoretical charge and spin density distributions of LAPW calculations (WIEN97).

  7. Exotic invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  8. Exotic biological control agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajek, Ann E.; Hurley, Brett P.; Kenis, Marc; Garnas, Jeffrey R.; Bush, Samantha J.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Lenteren, van Joop C.; Cock, Matthew J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Biological control is a valuable and effective strategy for controlling arthropod pests and has been used extensively against invasive arthropods. As one approach for control of invasives, exotic natural enemies from the native range of a pest are introduced to areas where control is needed.

  9. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-09-01

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates.

  10. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-01-01

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates

  11. Exotic baryonium exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolescu, B.

    1978-05-01

    The prominent effects supposed to be associated with the exchange of exotic baryonium Regge trajectories are reviewed. The experimental presence of all expected effects leads to suggest that the baryonium exchange mechanism is a correct phenomenological picture and that mesons with isospin 2 or 3/2 or with strangeness 2, strongly coupled to the baryon-antibaryon channels, must be observed

  12. Exotic reptile bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, J; Ehrlich, M; Henderson, S O

    1997-09-01

    Reptiles are a growing part of the exotic pet trade, and reptile bites have been considered innocuous in the emergency medicine literature. Two cases are reported of reptile bites, one from a green iguana and the other from a reticulated python. The treatment concerns associated with reptile bites are discussed.

  13. AFM Colloidal Probe Measurements Implicate Capillary Condensation in Punch-Particle Surface Interactions during Tableting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal Tejedor, Maria; Nordgren, Niklas; Schuleit, Michael; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna; Rutland, Mark W

    2017-11-21

    Adhesion of the powders to the punches is a common issue during tableting. This phenomenon is known as sticking and affects the quality of the manufactured tablets. Defective tablets increase the cost of the manufacturing process. Thus, the ability to predict the tableting performance of the formulation blend before the process is scaled-up is important. The adhesive propensity of the powder to the tableting tools is mostly governed by the surface-surface adhesive interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is a surface characterization technique that allows the measurement of the adhesive interactions between two materials of interest. In this study, AFM steel colloidal probe measurements were performed on ibuprofen, MCC (microcrystalline cellulose), α-lactose monohydrate, and spray-dried lactose particles as an approach to modeling the punch-particle surface interactions during tableting. The excipients (lactose and MCC) showed constant, small, attractive, and adhesive forces toward the steel surface after a repeated number of contacts. In comparison, ibuprofen displayed a much larger attractive and adhesive interaction increasing over time both in magnitude and in jump-in/jump-out separation distance. The type of interaction acting on the excipient-steel interface can be related to a van der Waals force, which is relatively weak and short-ranged. By contrast, the ibuprofen-steel interaction is described by a capillary force profile. Even though ibuprofen is not highly hydrophilic, the relatively smooth surfaces of the crystals allow "contact flooding" upon contact with the steel probe. Capillary forces increase because of the "harvesting" of moisture-due to the fast condensation kinetics-leaving a residual condensate that contributes to increase the interaction force after each consecutive contact. Local asperity contacts on the more hydrophilic surface of the excipients prevent the flooding of the contact zone, and there is no such adhesive

  14. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  15. Atomic wavefunctions probed through strong-field light-matter interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mairesse, Y; Villeneuve, D M; Corkum, P B; Dudovich, N [Natl Res Council Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada); Shafir, D; Dudovich, N [Weizmann Inst Sci, Dept Phys Complex Syst, IL-76100 Rehovot, (Israel); Mairesse, Y [Univ Bordeaux 1, CELIA, CNRS, UMR 5107, CEA, F-33405 Talence (France)

    2009-07-01

    Strong-field light-matter interactions can encode the spatial properties of the electronic wavefunctions that contribute to the process. In particular, the broadband harmonic spectra, measured for a series of molecular alignments, can be used to create a tomographic reconstruction of molecular orbitals. Here, we present an extension of the tomography approach to systems that cannot be naturally aligned. We demonstrate this ability by probing the two-dimensional properties of atomic wavefunctions. By manipulating an electron-ion re-collision process, we are able to resolve the symmetry of the atomic wavefunction with high contrast. (authors)

  16. Exotic Black Holes?

    OpenAIRE

    Brans, Carl H.

    1993-01-01

    Exotic smooth manifolds, ${\\bf R^2\\times_\\Theta S^2}$, are constructed and discussed as possible space-time models supporting the usual Kruskal presentation of the vacuum Schwarzschild metric locally, but {\\em not globally}. While having the same topology as the standard Kruskal model, none of these manifolds is diffeomorphic to standard Kruskal, although under certain conditions some global smooth Lorentz-signature metric can be continued from the local Kruskal form. Consequently, it can be ...

  17. Characterisation of target plasma required for REB-plasma interaction studies using cylindrical Langmuir probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Paithankar, A.S.; Iyyengar, S.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    The target plasma required for relativistic electron beam (REB)-plasma interaction studies has been generated by coaxial plasma gun. The measurement of electron density and temperature has been carried out using cylindrical Langmuir probes. Probes both oriented parallel and transverse to the flow have been used. The spatial as well as temporal variation of electron density and temperature have been studied. The typical electron density and temperature measured by probe were in the range of 9.0-3.5 x 10 13 cm -3 and 5-7 eV respectively. The typical e-folding decay time of density was 6.2 μs, while no appreciable change in electron temperature was observed until 10 μs after the peak density. The density decays by about 50% at distance of 30 cm from the gun. The plasma flow velocity has been measured by the time of flight technique and was found to be 2.5 x 10 6 cm s -1 . The plasma radius measured by dosimeter film, at distance of 30 cm from the gun was 3 cm. (author)

  18. Probe manipulators for Wendelstein 7-X and their interaction with the magnetic topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, RACK; D, HÖSCHEN; D, REITER; B, UNTERBERG; J, W. COENEN; S, BREZINSEK; O, NEUBAUER; S, BOZHENKOV; G, CZYMEK; Y, LIANG; M, HUBENY; Ch, LINSMEIER; the Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2018-05-01

    Probe manipulators are a versatile addition to typical plasma edge diagnostics. Equipped with material samples they allow for detailed investigation of plasma–wall interaction processes, such as material erosion, deposition or impurity transport pathways. When combined with electrical probes, a study of scrape-off layer and plasma edge density, temperature and flow profiles as well as magnetic topologies is possible. A mid-plane manipulator is already in operation on Wendelstein 7-X. A system in the divertor region is currently under development. In the present paper we discuss the critical issue of heat and power loads, power redistribution and experimental access to the complex magnetic topology of Wendelstein 7-X. All the aforementioned aspects are of relevance for the design and operation of a probe manipulator in a device like Wendelstein 7-X. A focus is put on the topological region that is accessible for the different coil current configurations at Wendelstein 7-X and the power load on the manipulator with respect to the resulting different magnetic configurations. Qualitative analysis of power loads on plasma-facing components is performed using a numerical tracer particle diffusion tool provided via the Wendelstein 7-X Webservices.

  19. Study of plasma-material surface interaction using Langmuir probe technique during plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Akel, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we tried to understand the plasma-surface interactions by using Langmuir probes. Two different types of plasmas were studied, the first is the electropositive plasma in Argon and the second is the electronegative plasma in Sulfur Hexafluoride. In the first type, the effects of Argon gas pressure, the injection of Helium in the remote zone and the substrate bias on the measurements of the Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) and on the plasma parameters (electron density (n e ), effective electron temperature (T e ff), plasma potential (V p ) and floating potential (V f )) have been investigated. The obtained EEPFs and plasma parameters have been used to control two remote plasma processes. The first is the remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) of thin films, on silicon wafers, from Hexamethyldisoloxane (HMDSO) precursor diluted in the remote Ar-He plasma. The second is the pure Argon remote plasma treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer surface. In the second type, the plasma diagnostics were performed in the remote zone as a function of SF 6 flow rate, where relative concentrations of fluorine atoms were measured using actinometry optical emission spectroscopy; electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential were determined using single cylindrical Langmuir probe, positive ion flux and negative ion fraction were determined using an planar probe. The silicon etching process in SF 6 plasma was studied. (author)

  20. Pyrethroid Activity-Based Probes for Profiling Cytochrome P450 Activities Associated with Insecticide Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; O' Neill, Paul M.; Hong, David; Finn, Robert; Henderson, Colin; Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J.

    2014-01-18

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control a diverse spectrum of diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid metabolizing and non-metabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes to measure labeling specificity, plus CPR and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using a deltamethrin mimetic PyABP we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. The most reactive enzyme was a P450, CYP2C11, which is known to metabolize deltamethrin. Furthermore, several other pyrethroid metabolizers were identified (CYPs 2C6, 3A4, 2C13 and 2D1) along with related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-g’s 2B1 - 5, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, or ‘pyrethrome’. Considering the central role that P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of new tools for disease control.

  1. Study of plasma-material surface interaction using langmuir probe technique during plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Akel, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tried to understand the plasma-surface interactions by using Langmuir probes. Two different types of plasmas were studied, the first is the electropositive plasma in Argon and the second is the electronegative plasma in Sulfur Hexafluoride. In the first type, the effects of Argon gas pressure, the injection of Helium in the remote zone and the substrate bias on the measurements of the Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) and on the plasma parameters (electron density (n e ), effective electron temperature (T e ff), plasma potential (V p ) and floating potential (V f )) have been investigated. The obtained EEPFs and plasma parameters have been used to control two remote plasma processes. The first is the remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) of thin films, on silicon wafers, from Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) precursor diluted in the remote Ar-He plasma. The second is the pure Argon remote plasma treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer surface. In the second type, the plasma diagnostics were performed in the remote zone as a function of SF 6 flow rate, where relative concentrations of fluorine atoms were measured using actinometry optical emission spectroscopy; electron density, electron temperature and plasma potential were determined using single cylindrical Langmuir probe, positive ion flux and negative ion fraction were determined using an planar probe. The silicon etching process in SF 6 plasma was studied. (author)

  2. Pyrethroid activity-based probes for profiling cytochrome P450 activities associated with insecticide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Hanafy M; O'Neill, Paul M; Hong, David W; Finn, Robert D; Henderson, Colin J; Wright, Aaron T; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J I

    2013-12-03

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity-based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid-metabolizing and nonmetabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes, to measure labeling specificity, plus cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using PyABPs, we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid-metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. These included P450s as well as related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid-metabolizing enzymes, or "pyrethrome." Considering the central role P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid in the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of unique tools for disease control.

  3. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  4. Probing the Odderon in coherent hadron–hadron interactions at CERN LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, V.P., E-mail: barros@ufpel.edu.br [High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    One of the open questions of the strong interaction theory is the existence of the Odderon, which is an unambiguous prediction of Quantum Chromodynamics, but still not confirmed in the experiment. In this paper we propose the study of the diffractive η{sub c} photoproduction in coherent interactions as a new alternative to probe the Odderon in pp and PbPb collisions at CERN LHC. As the Pomeron exchange cannot contribute to this process, its observation would indicate the existence of the Odderon. We predict total cross sections of order of pb(μb) for pp (PbPb) collisions and large values for the event rates/year, which makes, in principle, the experimental analysis of this process feasible at LHC.

  5. Role of polarization in probing anomalous gauge interactions of the Higgs boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, Sudhansu S.; Godbole, Rohini M.; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Mamta

    2009-01-01

    We explore the use of polarized e + /e - beams and/or the information on final state decay lepton polarizations in probing the interaction of the Higgs boson with a pair of vector bosons. A model independent analysis of the process e + e - →ffH, where f is any light fermion, is carried out through the construction of observables having identical properties under the discrete symmetry transformations as different individual anomalous interactions. This allows us to probe an individual anomalous term independent of the others. We find that initial state beam polarization can significantly improve the sensitivity to CP-odd couplings of the Z boson with the Higgs boson (ZZH). Moreover, an ability to isolate events with a particular τ helicity, with even 40% efficiency, can improve sensitivities to certain ZZH couplings by as much as a factor of 3. In addition, the contamination from the ZZH vertex contributions present in the measurement of the trilinear Higgs-W (WWH) couplings can be reduced to a great extent by employing polarized beams. The effects of initial state radiation and beamstrahlung, which can be relevant for higher values of the beam energy are also included in the analysis.

  6. Indirect Probe of Electroweak-Interacting Particles at Future Lepton Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    Various types of electroweak-interacting particles, which have non-trivial charges under the SU(2) L x U(1) Y gauge symmetry, appear in various extensions of the Standard Model. These particles are good targets of future lepton colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the Future Circular Collider of electrons and positrons (FCC-ee). An advantage of the experiments is that, even if their beam energies are below the threshold of the production of the new particles, quantum effects of the particles can be detected through high precision measurements. We estimate the capability of future lepton colliders to probe electroweak-interacting particles through the quantum effects, with particular focus on the wino, the Higgsino and the so-called minimal dark matters, and found that a particle whose mass is greater than the beam energy by 100-1000 GeV is detectable by measuring di-fermion production cross sections with O(0.1)% accuracy. In addition, with the use of the same analysis, we also discuss the sensitivity of the future colliders to model independent higher dimensional operators, and found that the cutoff scales corresponding to the operators can be probed up to a few ten TeV.

  7. Indirect probe of electroweak-interacting particles at future lepton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ichikawa, Koji; Kundu, Anirban; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Shirai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Various types of electroweak-interacting particles, which have non-trivial charges under the SU(2)_L×U(1)_Y gauge symmetry, appear in various extensions of the Standard Model. These particles are good targets of future lepton colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the Future Circular Collider of electrons and positrons (FCC-ee). An advantage of the experiments is that, even if their beam energies are below the threshold of the production of the new particles, quantum effects of the particles can be detected through high precision measurements. We estimate the capability of future lepton colliders to probe electroweak-interacting particles through the quantum effects, with particular focus on the wino, the Higgsino and the so-called minimal dark matters, and found that a particle whose mass is greater than the beam energy by 100–1000 GeV is detectable by measuring di-fermion production cross sections with O(0.1)% accuracy. In addition, with the use of the same analysis, we also discuss the sensitivity of the future colliders to model independent higher dimensional operators, and found that the cutoff scales corresponding to the operators can be probed up to a few ten TeV.

  8. Exact dimension estimation of interacting qubit systems assisted by a single quantum probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Akira; Cappellaro, Paola

    2017-12-01

    Estimating the dimension of an Hilbert space is an important component of quantum system identification. In quantum technologies, the dimension of a quantum system (or its corresponding accessible Hilbert space) is an important resource, as larger dimensions determine, e.g., the performance of quantum computation protocols or the sensitivity of quantum sensors. Despite being a critical task in quantum system identification, estimating the Hilbert space dimension is experimentally challenging. While there have been proposals for various dimension witnesses capable of putting a lower bound on the dimension from measuring collective observables that encode correlations, in many practical scenarios, especially for multiqubit systems, the experimental control might not be able to engineer the required initialization, dynamics, and observables. Here we propose a more practical strategy that relies not on directly measuring an unknown multiqubit target system, but on the indirect interaction with a local quantum probe under the experimenter's control. Assuming only that the interaction model is given and the evolution correlates all the qubits with the probe, we combine a graph-theoretical approach and realization theory to demonstrate that the system dimension can be exactly estimated from the model order of the system. We further analyze the robustness in the presence of background noise of the proposed estimation method based on realization theory, finding that despite stringent constrains on the allowed noise level, exact dimension estimation can still be achieved.

  9. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jung, Sunghoon [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Salvioni, Ennio [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tsai, Yuhsin [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics,Department of Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ∼ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. Depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ∼ 2.5 TeV at the LHC and beyond 10 TeV at a future 100 TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.

  10. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong, E-mail: qianyong86@163.com; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing, E-mail: xueqingqiu66@163.com

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are quantitatively probed by atomic force microscopy, which is fundamental but beneficial for understanding and optimizing the absorption-dispersion and catalytic degradation processes of lignin. - Highlights: • The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are measured using AFM. • The adhesion forces between lignin and metal oxides are larger than that in nonmetal systems. • Hydrogen bond plays an important role in lignin-inorganic oxides system. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO{sub 2} due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO and SiO{sub 2} decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  11. Probing the interaction of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP with model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Dyszy

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP interacts with biological membranes and delivers polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs via a collisional mechanism. The binding of FAs in the protein and the interaction with membranes involve a motif called "portal region", formed by two small α-helices, A1 and A2, connected by a loop. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron spin resonance to probe the changes in the protein and in the membrane model induced by their interaction. Spin labeled B-FABP mutants and lipidic spin probes incorporated into a membrane model confirmed that B-FABP interacts with micelles through the portal region and led to structural changes in the protein as well in the micelles. These changes were greater in the presence of LPG when compared to the LPC models. ESR spectra of B-FABP labeled mutants showed the presence of two groups of residues that responded to the presence of micelles in opposite ways. In the presence of lysophospholipids, group I of residues, whose side chains point outwards from the contact region between the helices, had their mobility decreased in an environment of lower polarity when compared to the same residues in solution. The second group, composed by residues with side chains situated at the interface between the α-helices, experienced an increase in mobility in the presence of the model membranes. These modifications in the ESR spectra of B-FABP mutants are compatible with a less ordered structure of the portal region inner residues (group II that is likely to facilitate the delivery of FAs to target membranes. On the other hand, residues in group I and micelle components have their mobilities decreased probably as a result of the formation of a collisional complex. Our results bring new insights for the understanding of the gating and delivery mechanisms of FABPs.

  12. Exotic smoothness and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladkowski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Short introduction to exotic differential structures on manifolds is given. The possible physical context of this mathematical curiosity is discussed. The topic is very interesting although speculative. (author)

  13. Exotic searches at lep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seager, P.

    2001-01-01

    The search for exotic processes at LEP is presented. The Standard Model Higgs has as yet not been observed. This provides freedom to search for processes beyond the Standard Model and even beyond the minimal version of the supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model. This paper outlines the searches for charged Higgs bosons, fermiophobic Higgs bosons, invisibly decaying Higgs bosons, technicolor, leptoquarks, unstable heavy leptons and excited leptons. The results presented are those from the LEP collaborations using data taken up to a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 202 GeV. (author)

  14. Euroschool on Exotic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Pfützner, Marek

    2018-01-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of Lecture Notes based on the highly successful Euro Summer School on Exotic Beams. The aim of these notes is to provide a thorough introduction to radioactive ion-beam physics at the level of graduate students and young postdocs starting out in the field. Each volume covers a range of topics from nuclear theory to experiment and applications. Vol I has been published as LNP 651, Vol II as LNP 700, Vol. III as LNP 764 and Vol. IV as LNP 879.

  15. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Jaafar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  16. Exotic rotational correlations in quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2017-05-01

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  17. The interaction of a nanoscale coherent helium-ion probe with a crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A.J.; Forbes, B.D.; Allen, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thickness fringing was recently observed in helium ion microscopy (HIM) when imaging magnesium oxide cubes using a 40 keV convergent probe in scanning transmission mode. Thickness fringing is also observed in electron microscopy and is due to quantum mechanical, coherent, multiple elastic scattering attenuated by inelastic phonon excitation (thermal scattering). A quantum mechanical model for elastic scattering and phonon excitation correctly models the thickness fringes formed by the helium ions. However, unlike the electron case, the signal in the diffraction plane is due mainly to the channeling of ions which have first undergone inelastic thermal scattering in the first few atomic layers so that the origin of the thickness fringes is not due to coherent interference effects. This quantum mechanical model affords insight into the interaction of a nanoscale, focused coherent ion probe with the specimen and allows us to elucidate precisely what is needed to achieve atomic resolution HIM. - Highlights: • Thickness fringing has recently been observed imaging MgO cubes using helium ion microscopy. • A quantum mechanical model for elastic scattering and phonon excitation models the fringes. • The signal is due mainly to the coherent scattering of ions after inelastic thermal scattering. • We elucidate precisely what is needed to achieve atomic resolution HIM

  18. Electron-muon correlation as a new probe of strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2009-01-01

    As a new and clean probe to the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP), we propose an azimuthal correlation of an electron and a muon that originate from the semileptonic decay of charm and bottom quarks. By solving the Langevin equation for the heavy quarks under the hydrodynamic evolution of the hot plasma, we show that substantial quenching of the away-side peak in the electron-muon correlation can be seen if the sQGP drag force acting on heavy quarks is large enough as suggested from the gauge/gravity correspondence. The effect could be detected in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Measurement of the target current by inductive probe during laser interaction on terawatt laser system PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cikhardt, Jakub; Krása, Josef; De Marco, Massimo; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Velyhan, Andriy; Krouský, Eduard; Cikhardtová, B.; Klír, Daniel; Řezáč, Karel; Ullschmied, Jiří; Skála, Jiří; Kubeš, P.; Kravárik, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 10 (2014), s. 103507-103507 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser PALS * laser-target interaction * target current * inductive probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4898016

  20. Diagnostic imaging of exotic pets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonographic, and computed tomographic (CT) imaging are important diagnostic modalities in exotic pets. The use of appropriate radiographic equipment, film-screen combinations, and radiographic projections enhances the information obtained from radiographs. Both normal findings and common radiographic abnormalities are discussed. The use of ultrasonography and CT scanning for exotic small mammals and reptiles is described

  1. Current Status of Exotic Hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.A.; Ahmed, Maqsood; Fazal-e-Aleem

    2005-01-01

    Physics of exotic hadrons is in the limelight these days. The models for these baryons are discussed as well as their production and decay processes and methods of their identification. The results of recent experiments in this field are presented, in which some unusual states are observed. These states are candidates for exotic hadrons

  2. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  3. Discovering uncolored naturalness in exotic Higgs decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem usually require top partners. In standard SUSY or composite Higgs theories, the partners carry SM color and are becoming increasingly constrained by LHC searches. However, theories like Folded SUSY (FS), Twin Higgs (TH) and Quirky Little Higgs (QLH) introduce uncolored top partners, which can be SM singlets or carry electroweak charge. Their small production cross section left doubt as to whether the LHC can effectively probe such scenarios. Typically, these partners are charged under their own mirror color gauge group. In FS and QLH, the absence of light mirror matter allows glueballs to form at the bottom of the mirror spectrum. This is also the case in some TH realizations. The Higgs can decay to these mirror glueballs, with the glueballs decaying into SM particles with potentially observable lifetimes. We undertake the first detailed study of this glueball signature and quantitatively demonstrate the discovery potential of uncolored naturalness via exotic Higgs decays at the LHC and a potential future 100 TeV collider. Our findings indicate that mirror glueballs are the smoking gun signature of natural FS and QLH type theories, in analogy to tree-level Higgs coupling shifts for the TH. We show that glueball masses in the ∼10–60 GeV mass range are theoretically preferred. Careful treatment of lifetime, mirror-hadronization and nonperturbative uncertainties is required to perform meaningful collider studies. We outline several new search strategies for exotic Higgs decays of the form h→XX→4f at the LHC, with X having lifetimes in the 10μm to km range. We find that FS stops can be probed with masses up to 600 (1100) GeV at the LHC with 300 (3000) fb −1 of data, and TH top partners could be accessible with masses up to 900 (1500) GeV. This makes exotic Higgs decays the prime discovery channel for uncolored naturalness at the LHC.

  4. Probing Induced Structural Changes in Biomimetic Bacterial Cell Membrane Interactions with Divalent Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Allison M [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL; Jubb, Aaron M [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes, formed primarily by the self-assembly of complex mixtures of phospholipids, provide a structured scaffold for compartmentalization and structural processes in living cells. The specific physical properties of phospholipid species present in a given membrane play a key role in mediating these processes. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a zwitterionic lipid present in bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cell membranes, is exceptional. In addition to undergoing the standard lipid polymorphic transition between the gel and liquid-crystalline phase, it can also assume an unusual polymorphic state, the inverse hexagonal phase (HII). Divalent cations are among the factors that drive the formation of the HII phase, wherein the lipid molecules form stacked tubular structures by burying the hydrophilic head groups and exposing the hydrophobic tails to the bulk solvent. Most biological membranes contain a lipid species capable of forming the HII state suggesting that such lipid polymorphic structural states play an important role in structural biological processes such as membrane fusion. In this study, the interactions between Mg2+ and biomimetic bacterial cell membranes composed of PE and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) were probed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The lipid phase transitions were examined at varying ratios of PE to PG and upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of Mg2+. An understanding of these basic interactions enhances our understanding of membrane dynamics and how membrane-mediated structural changes may occur in vivo.

  5. Reduced mycorrhizal responsiveness leads to increased competitive tolerance in an invasive exotic plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren P. Waller; Ragan M. Callaway; John N. Klironomos; Yvette K. Ortega; John L. Maron

    2016-01-01

    1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can exert a powerful influence on the outcome of plant–plant competition. Since some exotic plants interact differently with soil biota such as AM fungi in their new range, range-based shifts in AM responsiveness could shift competitive interactions between exotic and resident plants, although this remains poorly studied. 2. We...

  6. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  7. Studies of the neutron single-particle structure of exotic nuclei at the HRIBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.S.; Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Cizewski, J.A.; Greife, U.; Gross, C.J.; Johnson, M.S.; Jones, K.L.; Kozub, R.L.; Liang, J.F.; Livesay, R.J.; Ma, Z.; Moazen, B.H.; Nesaraja, C.D.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The study of neutron single-particle strengths in neutron-rich nuclei is of interest for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The distribution of single-particle strengths constrains the effective Hamiltonian and pairing interactions and determines neutron interaction rates that are crucial for understanding the synthesis of heavy nuclei in supernovae via the rapid neutron capture process. Particularly important are the neutron single-particle levels in nuclei near closed neutron shells. Radioactive ion beams from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility have been used to study (d,p) reactions in inverse kinematics in order to probe neutron single-particle states in exotic nuclei. The results of a measurement with a 82 Ge beam will be presented

  8. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Summary Super star clusters are groups of hundreds of thousands of very young stars packed into an unbelievably small volume. They represent the most extreme environments in which stars and planets can form. Until now, super star clusters were only known to exist very far away, mostly in pairs or groups of interacting galaxies. Now, however, a team of European astronomers [1] have used ESO's telescopes to uncover such a monster object within our own Galaxy, the Milky Way, almost, but not quite, in our own backyard! The newly found massive structure is hidden behind a large cloud of dust and gas and this is why it took so long to unveil its true nature. It is known as "Westerlund 1" and is a thousand times closer than any other super star cluster known so far. It is close enough that astronomers may now probe its structure in some detail. Westerlund 1 contains hundreds of very massive stars, some shining with a brilliance of almost one million suns and some two-thousand times larger than the Sun (as large as the orbit of Saturn)! Indeed, if the Sun were located at the heart of this remarkable cluster, our sky would be full of hundreds of stars as bright as the full Moon. Westerlund 1 is a most unique natural laboratory for the study of extreme stellar physics, helping astronomers to find out how the most massive stars in our Galaxy live and die. From their observations, the astronomers conclude that this extreme cluster most probably contains no less than 100,000 times the mass of the Sun, and all of its stars are located within a region less than 6 light-years across. Westerlund 1 thus appears to be the most massive compact young cluster yet identified in the Milky Way Galaxy. PR Photo 09a/05: The Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1 (2.2m MPG/ESO + WFI) PR Photo 09b/05: Properties of Young Massive Clusters Super Star Clusters Stars are generally born in small groups, mostly in so-called "open clusters" that typically contain a few hundred stars. From a wide range of

  9. BROOKHAVEN: Glueballs, hybrids and exotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S. -U.

    1988-12-15

    A workshop at Brookhaven from August 29 to September 1 looked at the current status of hadron spectroscopy beyond the realm of states conventionally built up from quarks and discussed future experimental effort to explore such exotic states.

  10. New possibilities for exotic hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    New theoretical ideas and experimental evidence for exotic hadrons are presented. A new exciting candidate is an anticharmed baryon; i.e., a bound state of a nucleon and an F (now called D 3 ). New experimental evidence for four-quark exotic mesons presented at this conference is discussed. The confusion in the E-iota region and the pseudoscalar spectrum still await further experimental clarification

  11. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs

  12. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosionis, Spyridon G; Terzis, Andreas F; Sadeghi, Seyed M; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-30

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  13. Probing the interaction of microscopic material defects with quasiparticles using a superconducting qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilmes, Alexander; Lisenfeld, Juergen; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V. [PI, Fakultaet fuer Physik, KIT, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Heimes, Andreas; Zanker, Sebastian; Schoen, Gerd [TFP, Fakultaet fuer Physik, KIT, Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Two-Level-Systems (TLS) are one of the main sources of decoherence in superconducting nano-scale devices such as SQUIDs, photon detectors, resonators and quantum bits (qubits), although the TLS' microscopic nature remains unclear. We use a superconducting phase qubit to detect TLS contained within the tunnel barrier of the qubit's Josephson junction. We coherently operate individual TLS by resonant microwave pulses and access their quantum state by utilizing their strong coupling to the qubit. Our previous measurements of TLS coherence in dependence of the temperature indicate that quasiparticles may give rise to TLS energy loss and dephasing. Here, we probe the TLS-quasiparticle interaction using a reliable method of in-situ quasiparticle injection via an on-chip dc-SQUID that is pulse-biased beyond its critical current. The quasiparticle density is calibrated by measuring associated characteristic changes to the qubit's resonance frequency and energy relaxation rate. We will present experimental data that clearly show the influence of quasiparticles on TLS coherence.

  14. Future energy, exotic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumon, R

    1974-01-01

    The Detroit Energy Conference has highlighted the declining oil reserves, estimated worldwide at 95 billion tons vs. an annual rate of consumption of over 3 billion tons. The present problem is one of price; also, petroleum seems too valuable to be simply burned. New sources must come into action before 1985. The most abundant is coal, with 600 billion tons of easily recoverable reserves; then comes oil shale with a potential of 400 billion tons of oil. Exploitation at the rate of 55 go 140 million tons/yr is planned in the U.S. after 1985. More exotic and impossible to estimate quantitatively are such sources as wind, tides, and the thermal energy of the oceans--these are probably far in the future. The same is true of solar and geothermal energy in large amounts. The only other realistic energy source is nuclear energy: the European Economic Community looks forward to covering 60% of its energy needs from nuclear energy in the year 2000. Even today, from 400 mw upward, a nuclear generating plant is more economical than a fossil fueled one. Conservation will become the byword, and profound changes in society are to be expected.

  15. Are exotic herbivores better competitors? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radville, Laura; Gonda-King, Liahna; Gómez, Sara; Kaplan, Ian; Preisser, Evan L

    2014-01-01

    Competition plays an important role in structuring the community dynamics of phytophagous insects. As the number and impact of biological invasions increase, it has become increasingly important to determine whether competitive differences exist between native and exotic insects. We conducted a meta-analysis to test the hypothesis that native/ exotic status affects the outcome of herbivore competition. Specifically, we used data from 160 published studies to assess plant-mediated competition in phytophagous insects. For each pair of competing herbivores, we determined the native range and coevolutionary history of each herbivore and host plant. Plant-mediated competition occurred frequently, but neither native nor exotic insects were consistently better competitors. Spatial separation reduced competition in native insects but showed little effect on exotics. Temporal separation negatively impacted native insects but did not affect competition in exotics. Insects that coevolved with their host plant were more affected by interspecific competition than herbivores that lacked a coevolutionary history. Insects that have not coevolved with their host plant may be at a competitive advantage if they overcome plant defenses. As native/exotic status does not consistently predict outcomes of competitive interactions, plant-insect coevolutionary history should be considered in studies of competition.

  16. Strong interactions studies with medium energy probes. Progress report, 1993--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-09-01

    This progress report refers to the period August 1993 to September 1994, which includes the second year of the three year period December 1, 1992--November 30, 1995 of our existing research contract. The budget proposal for the third year, December 1, 1994 to November 30, 1995 as originally approved, is also presented. As anticipated in our 1992--1995 proposal, Fermilab E760/E835 on high precision charmonium spectroscopy has remained a major part of our preoccupation and commitment during the last year, and it will remain so in the forthcoming year. In early 1994 we joined the collaboration of the Brookhaven experiment E852 on the spectroscopy of states with exotic quantum numbers. The first successful three month run of E852 was completed on July 31 and preliminary data analysis has been started. Some new commitments have resulted from this collaboration and a separate proposal for supplemental financial support is being prepared for them. At Los Alamos our experiment number-sign 1274 on search of extremely neutron rich exotic nuclei by pion absorption began making initial measurements a month ago and is expected to take data during the period October 15--November 30, 1994. In addition to the above on-going programs, our Bates proposal (94-01) for a definitive measurement of the quenching of the longitudinal response in quasi-free scattering of electrons from nuclei has been approved with high priority for 600 hours of beam time, and we expect to start the experiment in late 1995

  17. Assorted interactions of amino acids prevailing in aqueous vitamin C solutions probed by physicochemical and ab-initio contrivances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koyeli; Roy, Milan Chandra; Rajbanshi, Biplab; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in tyrosine and tryptophan in aqueous solution of vitamin C have been probed by thermophysical properties. The apparent molar volume (ϕV), viscosity B-coefficient, molal refraction (RM) of tyrosine and tryptophan have been studied in aqueous vitamin C solutions at diverse temperatures via Masson equation which deduced solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, respectively. Spectroscopic study along with physicochemical and computational techniques provides lots of interesting and highly significant insights of the model biological systems. The overall results established strong solute-solvent interactions between studied amino acids and vitamin C mixture in the ternary solutions.

  18. An inverse method for determining the interaction force between the probe and sample using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Win-Jin; Fang, Te-Hua

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a means for calculating the interaction force during the scanning process using a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe. The determination of the interaction force in the scanning system is regarded as an inverse vibration problem. The conjugate gradient method is applied to treat the inverse problem using available displacement measurements. The results show that the conjugate gradient method is less sensitive to measurement errors and prior information on the functional form of quality was not required. Furthermore, the initial guesses for the interaction force can be arbitrarily chosen for the iteration process

  19. Preliminary results on observation of genetic relations among the exotic cosmic-ray phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, S.

    1984-01-01

    In order to see the genetic hypothesis on the exotic interactions, a systematic study is made for the Chiron-type families on their secondary interactions in the emulsion chamber, and the results are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  20. Vertical wind velocity measurements using a five-hole probe with remotely piloted aircraft to study aerosol–cloud interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Calmer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vertical wind velocities (in particular positive vertical wind velocities or updrafts in atmospheric science has motivated the need to deploy multi-hole probes developed for manned aircraft in small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA. In atmospheric research, lightweight RPAs ( <  2.5 kg are now able to accurately measure atmospheric wind vectors, even in a cloud, which provides essential observing tools for understanding aerosol–cloud interactions. The European project BACCHUS (impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding focuses on these specific interactions. In particular, vertical wind velocity at cloud base is a key parameter for studying aerosol–cloud interactions. To measure the three components of wind, a RPA is equipped with a five-hole probe, pressure sensors, and an inertial navigation system (INS. The five-hole probe is calibrated on a multi-axis platform, and the probe–INS system is validated in a wind tunnel. Once mounted on a RPA, power spectral density (PSD functions and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE derived from the five-hole probe are compared with sonic anemometers on a meteorological mast. During a BACCHUS field campaign at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (Ireland, a fleet of RPAs was deployed to profile the atmosphere and complement ground-based and satellite observations of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, clouds, and meteorological state parameters. The five-hole probe was flown on straight-and-level legs to measure vertical wind velocities within clouds. The vertical velocity measurements from the RPA are validated with vertical velocities derived from a ground-based cloud radar by showing that both measurements yield model-simulated cloud droplet number concentrations within 10 %. The updraft velocity distributions illustrate distinct relationships between vertical cloud fields in different meteorological

  1. Exotic Higgs and mh ≅ 125 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, C.

    2014-01-01

    We review non-SM (Standard Model) Higgs signatures which are missed in standard analyses by both ATLAS and CMS and show how the strong bounds by recent measurements can be relaxed in strongly-interacting theories. We also review strategies how to measure or constrain exotic Higgs decay at the LHC and a future linear collider. (author)

  2. Backward exotic meson production in π-n→px--

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, D.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion is given of some of the theory and theoretical techniques as well as actual previous experiments for the study of π - + n → p + X -- interactions. Included are the forces, classification, inclusive reactions, quark diagrams, properties of the unobserved X, cross sections, exotic mesons, duality and crossing, the working and normalization of some actual rexperiments, and analysis. 10 references

  3. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  4. Multiquark exotics (baryonium, dibaryons etc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiquark exotic resonant states q 2 -(anti q) 2 , q 3 -(anti q) 3 , q 6 and q 9 are discussed as systems composed of the few colour clusters. Special attention is devoted to the problem of narrow resonances in channels anti NN, Δanti p+pions, πNN and NN. 42 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  6. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geiger–Nuttall plots were studied for different clusters and are found to be linear. Inclusion of proximity potential will not produce much deviation to linear nature of Geiger–Nuttall plots. It is observed that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slow down the exotic decay process. These findings support the earlier observations ...

  7. Exotic power and propulsion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forward, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The status of some exotic physical phenomena and unconventional spacecraft concepts that might produce breakthroughs in power and propulsion in the 21st Century are reviewed. The subjects covered include: electric, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, antimatter, high energy density materials, metallic hydrogen, laser thermal, solar thermal, solar sail, magnetic sail, and tether propulsion

  8. Scanning Probe Optical Tweezers: a new tool to study DNA-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, J.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the work described in this thesis is to construct a microscope in which OT and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are combined, to be able to localize proteins while simultaneously controlling the tension within the DNA molecule. This apparatus enables the study of the effect of

  9. An interactive tool for processing sap flux data from thermal dissipation probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew C. Oishi; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2016-01-01

    Sap flux sensors are an important tool for estimating tree-level transpiration in forested and urban ecosystems around the world. Thermal dissipation (TD) or Granier-type sap flux probes are among the most commonly used due to their reliability, simplicity, and low cost.

  10. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...

  11. Selective interaction between Xanthophylls and Chlorophylls in LHCII probed by femtosecond transient absoprtion spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradinaru, C.C.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed femtosecond transient absorption measurements on trimeric light-harvesting complex II from spinach. Either chlorophyll (Chl) a (675 nm) or Chl b (650 nm) was excited, and the spectral response was probed for wavelengths longer than 470 nm. Excitation of Chl b led to instantaneous

  12. A subnanomolar fluorescent probe for protein kinase CK2 interaction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enkvist, Erki; Viht, Kaido; Bischoff, Nils

    2012-01-01

    of the functions of CK2 could be facilitated by the application of small-molecule fluorescent probes that bind to the active site of the enzyme with high affinity and selectivity. We have used a bisubstrate approach for the development of a highly potent inhibitor of CK2. 4,5,6,7-Tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole...

  13. From Exotic to Mainstream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baskerville, Richard; Pries-Heje, Jan; Madsen, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Based on four empirical studies conducted over a 10-year time period from 1999 to 2008 we investigate how local software processes interact with global changes in the software development context. In 1999 companies were de-veloping software at high speed in a desperate rush to be first-to-market....

  14. Probes & Drugs portal: an interactive, open data resource for chemical biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škuta, Ctibor; Popr, M.; Muller, Tomáš; Jindřich, Jindřich; Kahle, Michal; Sedlák, David; Svozil, Daniel; Bartůněk, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2017), s. 758-759 ISSN 1548-7091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1220 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : bioactive compound, ,, * chemical probe * chemical biology * portal Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 25.062, year: 2016

  15. Peptide microarrays to probe for competition for binding sites in a protein interaction network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinzinger, M.D.S.; Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Gloerich, J.; Wessels, H.; Chung, Y.D.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Brock, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular protein interaction networks are a result of the binding preferences of a particular protein and the entirety of interactors that mutually compete for binding sites. Therefore, the reconstruction of interaction networks by the accumulation of interaction networks for individual proteins

  16. Deposition of lithium on a plasma edge probe in TFTR -- Behavior of lithium-painted walls interacting with edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Ashida, K. [Toyama Univ. (Japan); Kugel, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1998-05-01

    Recent observations have indicated that lithium pellet injection wall conditioning plays an important role in achieving the enhanced supershot regime in TFTR. However, little is understood about the behavior of lithium-coated limiter walls, interacting with edge plasmas. In the final campaign of TFTR, a cylindrical carbon fiber composite probe was inserted into the boundary plasma region and exposed to ohmically-heated deuterium discharges with lithium pellet injection. The ion-drift side probe surface exhibits a sign of codeposition of lithium, carbon, oxygen, and deuterium, whereas the electron side essentially indicates high-temperature erosion. It is found that lithium is incorporated in these codeposits in the form of oxide at the concentration of a few percent. In the electron side, lithium has been found to penetrate deeply into the probe material, presumably via rapid diffusion through interplane spaces in the graphite crystalline. Though it is not conclusive, materials mixing in the carbon and lithium system appears to be a key process in successful lithium wall conditioning.

  17. Coulomb drag: a probe of electron interactions in coupled quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1996-01-01

    As semiconductor devices shrink in size and in dimensionality, interactions between charge carriers become more and more important. There is a simple physical reason behind this behavior: fewer carriers lead to less effective screening, and hence stronger effective interactions. A point in case...... are one-dimensional systems (quantum wires): there electron-electron interactions may lead to a behavior, which is qualitatively different from the standard Fermi liquid picture (Luttinger liquids). Electron-electron interactions also play a central role in the fractional quantum Hall effect, which...... be the study of quantum wires: there the interactions may lead to even more dramatic effects...

  18. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, N. [RIKEN, Wako, iTHES Research Group, Saitama (Japan); Far Eastern Federal University, Complex Simulation Group, School of Biomedicine, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Sahoo, B.K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Division, Ahmedabad (India); Yoshinaga, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama (Japan); Sato, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Asahi, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Das, B.P. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested. (orig.)

  19. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  20. Bottomonium, charmonium and exotic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy quarkonia states have been extensively studied in the past decade by B-factories and other experiments, and have provided many surprises that suggest that our understanding of the meson is still incomplete. The recent BaBar and Belle data filled many of the missing seats in the bottomonium table such as η b or h b , while LHC experiments are also contributing, for example in the observation of χ b (3P) state by ATLAS. There are clear signs of exotic states, such as the charged Z b + and Z c + found by Belle, yet puzzling X(3872), and overpopulated Y state series. Recent progress on the bottomonium, charmonium and exotic states is discussed in this review. (author)

  1. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.

  2. Exotic phases in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, A.; Burgio, G.F.; Lombardo, U.; Peng, G.X.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of exotic phases in neutron stars is studied. The possible transition from hadron to quark phase is studied within the density dependent mass quark model, and the kaon condensation within the Nelson and Kaplan model. In both cases a microscopic approach is adopted for dense hadron matter. From the study of the possible coexistence between the two phases it is found that the hybrid phase may strongly hinder the onset of kaon condensation. (author)

  3. Exotic Nuclei and Yukawa's Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    In this plenary talk, we will overview the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei as a new paradigm of nuclear structure physics. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The nuclear magic numbers have been believed, since Mayer and Jensen, to be constants as 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, ... This turned out to be changed, once we entered the regime of exotic nuclei. This shell evolution develops at many places on the nuclear chart in various forms. For example, superheavy magic numbers may be altered. Thus, we are led to a new paradigm as to how and where the nuclear shell evolves, and what consequences arise. The evolution of the shell affects weak process transitions, and plays a crucial role in deformation. The π and ρ mesons generate tensor forces, and are the fundamental elements of such intriguing phenomena. Thus, physics of exotic nuclei arises as a manifestation of Yukawa's forces

  4. Validation of a microdose probe drug cocktail for clinical drug interaction assessments for drug transporters and CYP3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksaritanont, T; Tatosian, D A; Chu, X; Railkar, R; Evers, R; Chavez-Eng, C; Lutz, R; Zeng, W; Yabut, J; Chan, G H; Cai, X; Latham, A H; Hehman, J; Stypinski, D; Brejda, J; Zhou, C; Thornton, B; Bateman, K P; Fraser, I; Stoch, S A

    2017-04-01

    A microdose cocktail containing midazolam, dabigatran etexilate, pitavastatin, rosuvastatin, and atorvastatin has been established to allow simultaneous assessment of a perpetrator impact on the most common drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A, and the major transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP)1B, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and MDR1 P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The clinical utility of these microdose cocktail probe substrates was qualified by conducting clinical drug interaction studies with three inhibitors with different in vitro inhibitory profiles (rifampin, itraconazole, and clarithromycin). Generally, the pharmacokinetic profiles of the probe substrates, in the absence and presence of the inhibitors, were comparable to their reported corresponding pharmacological doses, and/or in agreement with theoretical expectations. The exception was dabigatran, which resulted in an approximately twofold higher magnitude for microdose compared to conventional dosing, and, thus, can be used to flag a worst-case scenario for P-gp. Broader application of the microdose cocktail will facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the roles of drug transporters in drug disposition and drug interactions. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  5. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-15

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons {theta}{sup +} and {xi}{sup --}. A narrow resonance identified as the {theta}{sup +} was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK{sup 0}{sub S} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} revealed a narrow resonance in the pK{sup 0}{sub S} invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle {xi}{sup --} the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the {theta}{sup +}. An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} is determined. The search for the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated

  6. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-01

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons Θ + and Ξ -- . A narrow resonance identified as the Θ + was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon Θ + on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK 0 S → pπ + π - revealed a narrow resonance in the pK 0 S invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle Ξ -- the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon Ξ -- on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the Θ + . An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon Ξ -- is determined. The search for the exotic baryon Θ + on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon Θ + remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated luminosity that is several times higher than in previous data sets. After investigating all data sets collected with the HERMES

  7. AC susceptibility as a tool to probe the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, Gabriel T., E-mail: gtlandi@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Arantes, Fabiana R. [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Cornejo, Daniel R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bakuzis, Andris F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia-GO (Brazil); Andreu, Irene; Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    The dipolar interaction is known to substantially affect the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. This is particularly important when the particles are kept in a fluid suspension or packed within nano-carriers. In addition to its usual long-range nature, in these cases the dipolar interaction may also induce the formation of clusters of particles, thereby strongly modifying their magnetic anisotropies. In this paper we show how AC susceptibility may be used to obtain information regarding the influence of the dipolar interaction in a sample. We develop a model which includes both aspects of the dipolar interaction and may be fitted directly to the susceptibility data. The usual long-range nature of the interaction is implemented using a mean-field approximation, whereas the particle-particle aggregation is modeled using a distribution of anisotropy constants. The model is then applied to two samples studied at different concentrations. One consists of spherical magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in oil and the other of cubic magnetite nanoparticles embedded on polymeric nanospheres. We also introduce a simple technique to address the presence of the dipolar interaction in a given sample, based on the height of the AC susceptibility peaks for different driving frequencies. - Highlights: We discuss the importance of the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticle samples. It is shown that AC susceptibility may be used to estimate the extent of this interaction. We develop a model that accounts for particle aggregation. The theoretical model is then fitted to distinct magnetite samples.

  8. N(1)-methylnicotinamide as an endogenous probe for drug interactions by renal cation transporters: studies on the metformin-trimethoprim interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Fabian; Pontones, Constanza A; Renner, Bertold; Mieth, Maren; Hoier, Eva; Auge, Daniel; Maas, Renke; Zolk, Oliver; Fromm, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    N(1)-methylnicotinamide (NMN) was proposed as an in vivo probe for drug interactions involving renal cation transporters, which, for example, transport the oral antidiabetic drug metformin, based on a study with the inhibitor pyrimethamine. The role of NMN for predicting other interactions with involvement of renal cation transporters (organic cation transporter 2, OCT2; multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 and 2-K, MATE1 and MATE2-K) is unclear. We determined inhibition of metformin or NMN transport by trimethoprim using cell lines expressing OCT2, MATE1, or MATE2-K. Moreover, a randomized, open-label, two-phase crossover study was performed in 12 healthy volunteers. In each phase, 850 mg metformin hydrochloride was administered p.o. in the evening of day 4 and in the morning of day 5. In phase B, 200 mg trimethoprim was administered additionally p.o. twice daily for 5 days. Metformin pharmacokinetics and effects (measured by OGTT) and NMN pharmacokinetics were determined. Trimethoprim inhibited metformin transport with K i values of 27.2, 6.3, and 28.9 μM and NMN transport with IC50 values of 133.9, 29.1, and 0.61 μM for OCT2, MATE1, and MATE2-K, respectively. In the clinical study, trimethoprim increased metformin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) by 29.5 % and decreased metformin and NMN renal clearances by 26.4 and 19.9 %, respectively (p ≤ 0.01). Moreover, decreases of NMN and metformin renal clearances due to trimethoprim correlated significantly (r S=0.727, p=0.010). These data on the metformin-trimethoprim interaction support the potential utility of N(1)-methylnicotinamide as an endogenous probe for renal drug-drug interactions with involvement of renal cation transporters.

  9. Equilibration of a strongly interacting plasma: holographic analysis of local and nonlocal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellantuono Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation of a strongly coupled plasma towards the hydrodynamic regime is studied by analyzing the evolution of local and nonlocal observables in the holographic approach. The system is driven in an initial anisotropic and far-from equilibrium state through an impulsive time-dependent deformation (quench of the boundary spacetime geometry. Effective temperature and entropy density are related to the position and area of a black hole horizon, which has formed as a consequence of the distortion. The behavior of stress-energy tensor, equal-time correlation functions and Wilson loops of different shapes is examined, and a hierarchy among their thermalization times emerges: probes involving shorter length scales thermalize faster.

  10. Probing the Interaction of Ionic Liquids with CO2: A Raman Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eucker, IV, William

    2008-01-01

    ...) with selected ionic liquids (ILs). Raman spectroscopy and first principle quantum mechanical calculations were performed on selected IL solvents in contact with CO2 in the effort to discover how the solvents interact with the gas. ILs are salts...

  11. A direct probe of dark energy interactions with a solar System laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a mission concept for direct detection of dark energy interactions with normal matter in a Solar System laboratory. Dark energy is the leading proposal to...

  12. Probing nanoparticle-macromolecule interaction and resultant structure by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aswal, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles display unique and distinct characteristics from those of their constituent atoms and bulk materials which are being employed in numerous applications in the fields of medicine, electronics, optics, communications, energy, environment etc. Many of these applications require adjoining of nanoparticles with macromolecules such as proteins, polymers and surfactants to obtain functional objects. For example, nanoparticle-protein complexes are of great importance in controlling enzymatic behavior, targeted drug delivery and developing biocompatible materials. The nanoparticles interfaced with polymers are shown to be useful in developing protein sensor arrays. Interaction of surfactants with nanoparticles is utilized extensively for technical and industrial applications associated with colloidal stability, detergency and design of nanostructured functional interfaces. The interaction of two components, nanoparticles and macromolecule, strongly depends on the characteristics of both the nanoparticles (size, shape, surface roughness, charge density etc.) and macromolecules (type, charge, shape and solution conditions etc.) used. The interaction of macromolecule on nanoparticle surface is a cumulative effect of a number of forces such as electrostatic force, covalent bonding, hydrogen bonding, non-polar interaction, hydrophobic interactions etc. These interactions depending on the system conditions can lead to various structures. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with the possibility to vary contrast is an ideal technique to study such multi-component systems. In this talk, some of our results of SANS from the complexes of nanoparticle-protein and nanoparticle surfactant systems will be discussed. (author)

  13. Probing dark matter self-interaction in the Sun with IceCube-PINGU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chian-Shu; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Yen-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    We study the capture, annihilation and evaporation of dark matter (DM) inside the Sun. It has been shown that the DM self-interaction can increase the DM number inside the Sun. We demonstrate that this enhancement becomes more significant in the regime of small DM mass, given a fixed DM self-interaction cross section. This leads to the enhancement of neutrino flux from DM annihilation. On the other hand, for DM mass as low as as a few GeVs, not only the DM-nuclei scatterings can cause the DM evaporation, DM self-interaction also provides non-negligible contributions to this effect. Consequently, the critical mass for DM evaporation (typically 3 ∼ 4 GeV without the DM self-interaction) can be slightly increased. We discuss the prospect of detecting DM self-interaction in IceCube-PINGU using the annihilation channels χχ → τ + τ - , νν-bar as examples. The PINGU sensitivities to DM self-interaction cross section σ χχ are estimated for track and cascade events

  14. Extreme exotic calcium lambda hypernuclei in the relativistic continuum Hartree-Bogoliubov theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Hongfeng

    2008-01-01

    Exotic calcium lambda hypernuclei properties with the neutron number of 20-400 by a step of 20 are discussed by employing the relativistic continuum Hartree-Bogoliubov theory with a zero range pairing interaction. The Bethe-Weizsaecker mass formula of a multi-strange system and the Woods-Saxon-type potential of lambda need to be modified for exotic calcium hypernuclei with unusual number of neutrons and lambdas. The possible neutron and lambda limits of exotic Ca lambda hypernuclei are also investigated. (authors)

  15. Probing the stereoselective interaction of ofloxacin enantiomers with corresponding monoclonal antibodies by multiple spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hongtao; Xu, Zhenlin; Liu, Yingju; Sun, Yuanming; Wang, Baoling; Sun, Xiulan; Wang, Zhanhui; Eremin, Sergei; Zherdev, Anatoly V.; Dzantiev, Boris B.; Lei, Hongtao

    2018-04-01

    Although stereoselective antibody has immense potential in chiral compounds detection and separation, the interaction traits between stereoselective antibody and the corresponding antigenic enantiomers are not yet fully exploited. In this study, the stereospecific interactions between ofloxacin isomers and corresponding monoclonal antibodies (McAb-WR1 and McAb-MS1) were investigated using time-resolved fluorescence, steady-state fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. The chiral recognition discrepancies of antibodies with ofloxacin isomers were reflected through binding constant, number of binding sites, driving forces and conformational changes. The major interacting forces of McAb-WR1 and McAb-MS1 chiral interaction systems were hydrophobic force and van der Waals forces joined up with hydrogen bonds, respectively. Synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra results showed that the disturbing of tyrosine and tryptophan micro-environments were so slightly that no obvious secondary structure changes were found during the chiral hapten binding. Clarification of stereospecific interaction of antibody will facilitate the application of immunoassay to analyze chiral contaminants in food and other areas.

  16. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Lange, Jens Soeren; Stone, Sheldon

    2017-07-01

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e"+e"- and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  17. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Lange, Jens Soeren [Giessen Univ. (Germany). II. Physikalisches Inst.; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-07-15

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  18. Search for exotic barton resonances in the final states of K/sup -/p and K/sup -/d interactions at 2. 9 GeV/c. [Cross section upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staab, R.W.

    1975-11-01

    The reactions K/sup -/p ..-->.. ..xi../sup 0/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/K/sup 0/ in hydrogen and K/sup -/n ..-->.. ..xi../sup -/..pi../sup -/K/sup +/ in deuterium were analyzed for isotopic spin-3/2 exotic cascade resonance production at a K/sup -/ beam momentum of 2.9 GeV/c. In addition, the strangeness +1 baryons (Z*'s) were searched for in the reaction K/sup -/d ..-->.. ..xi../sup -/Z* at the same beam momentum. The three particle states under consideration lie at the corners of an exotic decuplet. The data came from the Brandeis-Maryland-Syracuse-Tufts collaboration involving two experiments at the 31'' bubble chamber at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each involved 10/sup 6/ pictures with a 30 event/..mu..barn exposure in hydrogen and a 17 event/..mu..barn exposure in deuterium.

  19. Using ATTO dyes to probe bacterial interactions with the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, S.; Sison-Mangus, M.

    2016-02-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia blooms are known to be highly toxic and detrimental to wildlife. The neurotoxin produced by the algae can ripple through the entire food web creating a direct impact on oceanic life and human-related industries. With coastal blooms increasing in both size and duration in recent years, it is crucial that we uncover more microbial interactions that may affect the toxicity of these blooms. Current harmful algal bloom studies have shown that different bacterial consortia can have a great impact Pseudo-nitzschia physiology. More specifically, research suggests that bacteria affect both growth rates and domoic acid concentrations of laboratory grown cultures. However, these studies do not explore the attachment patterns of these bacteria with the diatom. Bacterial attachment may dictate the different types of interactions between bacteria and the diatoms, a trait that is largely unexplored in the symbiotic interactions between the two organisms. In this study, we seek to identify direct and indirect interactions between four bacteria taxa from different phyla and three different species of Pseudo-nitzschia. Our preliminary scanning electron microscopy and DAPI staining experiments hint at distinct differences in attachment among bacterial taxa. To explore this work further, we aim to employ ATTO dyes and epifluorescent microscopy on both binary and multiple cultures to visualize patterns in attachment. By utilizing ATTO dyes with distinct wavelength emissions, we can perform a series experiment that highlights the interaction between bacteria and diatoms, without inserting a fluorescent reporter gene in the bacteria. Multiple cultures will be used to identify possible cooperative or negative interactive traits between bacteria that can affect diatom host physiology. Implications on both phytoplankton physiology and nutrient cycling will be subsequently discussed.

  20. Exotic Nuclei Arena in JHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1991-12-01

    The Exotic Nuclei Arena planned in Japanese Hadron Project aims to accelerate various unstable nuclei produced in 1-GeV proton-induced reactions up to 6.5 MeV/u by means of heavy-ion linacs. The present status of research and development for the Earena is briefly reported. The construction of the prototype facility to accelerate unstable beams up to 0.8 MeV/u is planned in 1992-94, in which the existing cyclotron in INS is used as the primary accelerator. (author)

  1. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.  Created: 4/9/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/9/2009.

  2. Mitigating exotic impacts: restoring native deer mouse populations elevated by an exotic food subsidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Robert J. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    The threat posed by exotic organisms to native systems has led to extensive research on exotic invaders, yet management of invasives has progressed relatively slowly. This is partly due to poor understanding of how exotic species management influences native organisms. To address this shortfall, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of an invasives management tool...

  3. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-10-01

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  4. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  5. Electrostatic interactions in protein adsorption probed by comparing lysozyme and succinylated lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der M.; Norde, W.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on protein adsorption was studied by comparing the adsorption of lysozyme and succinylated lysozyme at silica surfaces. The succinylation affects the charge of the protein, but also the stability. Although changes in stability can have an influence on

  6. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  7. Probing nanomechanical interaction at the interface between biological membrane and potentially toxic chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chanoong; Park, Sohee; Park, Jinwoo; Ko, Jina; Lee, Dong Woog; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2018-04-12

    Various xenobiotics interact with biological membranes, and precise evaluations of the molecular interactions between them are essential to foresee the toxicity and bioavailability of existing or newly synthesized molecules. In this study, surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurement and Langmuir trough based tensiometry are performed to reveal nanomechanical interaction mechanisms between potential toxicants and biological membranes for ex vivo toxicity evaluation. As a toxicant, polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) was selected because PHMG containing humidifier disinfectant and Vodka caused lots of victims in both S. Korea and Russia, respectively, due to the lack of holistic toxicity evaluation of PHMG. Here, we measured strong attraction (Wad ∼4.2 mJ/m 2 ) between PHMG and head group of biological membranes while no detectable adhesion force between the head group and control molecules was measured. Moreover, significant changes in π-A isotherm of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers were measured upon PHMG adsorption. These results indicate PHMG strongly binds to hydrophilic group of lipid membranes and alters the structural and phase behavior of them. More importantly, complementary utilization of SFA and Langmuir trough techniques are found to be useful to predict the potential toxicity of a chemical by evaluating the molecular interaction with biological membranes, the primary protective barrier for living organisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing molecular interactions in bone biomaterials: Through molecular dynamics and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, Rahul; Katti, Kalpana S.; Verma, Devendra; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-hydroxyapatite (HAP) composites are widely investigated for their potential use as bone replacement materials. The molecular interactions at mineral polymer interface are known to have significant role of mechanical response of the composite system. Modeling interactions between such dissimilar molecules using molecular dynamics (MD) is an area of current interest. Molecular dynamics studies require potential function or force field parameters. Some force fields are described in literature that represents the structure of hydroxyapatite reasonably well. Yet, the applicability of these force fields for studying the interaction between dissimilar materials (such as mineral and polymer) is limited, as there is no accurate representation of polymer in these force fields. We have obtained the parameters of consistent valence force field (CVFF) for monoclinic hydroxyapatite. Validation of parameters was done by comparing the computationally obtained unit cell parameters, vibrational spectra and atomic distances with XRD and FTIR experiments. Using the obtained parameters of HAP, and available parameters of polymer (polyacrylic acid), interaction study was performed with MD simulations. The MD simulations showed that several hydrogen bonds may form between HAP and polyacrylic acid depending upon the exposed surface of HAP. Also there are some favourable planes of HAP where polyacrylic acid is most likely to attach. We have also simulated the mineralization of HAP using a 'synthetic biomineralization'. These modeling studies are supported by photoacoustic spectroscopy experiments on both porous and non porous composite samples for potential joint replacement and bone tissue engineering applications

  9. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue

    2015-01-01

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimesional (2D) material for nanomedecine, but its...

  10. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  11. Multi probes measurements at the PALS Facility Research Centre during high intense laser pulse interactions with various target materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the interaction of high intense laser pulse with solid target, a large amount of hot electrons is produced and a giant Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP is generated due to the current flowing into the system target–target holder, as well as due to the escaping charged particles in vacuum. EMP production for different target materials is investigated inside and outside the target chamber, using monopole antenna, super wide-band microstrip antenna and Moebius antenna. The EMP consists in a fast transient magnetic field lasting hundreds of nanosecond with frequencies ranging from MHz to tens of GHz. Measurements of magnetic field and return target current in the range of kA were carried out by an inductive target probe (Cikhardt J. et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014 103507.

  12. Level rearrangement in exotic atoms and quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combescure, Monique; Khare, Avinash; Raina, Ashok; Richard Jean-Marc; Weydert, Carole

    2007-01-01

    A presentation and a generalisation are given of the phenomenon of level rearrangement, which occurs when an attractive long-range potential is supplemented by a short-range attractive potential of increasing strength. This problem has been discovered in condensate-matter physics and has also been studied in the physics of exotic atoms. A similar phenomenon occurs in a situation inspired by quantum dots, where a short-range interaction is added to an harmonic confinement. (authors)

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy Probing of Receptor–Nanoparticle Interactions for Riboflavin Receptor Targeted Gold–Dendrimer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin receptors are overexpressed in malignant cells from certain human breast and prostate cancers, and they constitute a group of potential surface markers important for cancer targeted delivery of therapeutic agents and imaging molecules. Here we report on the fabrication and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization of a core–shell nanocomposite consisting of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) coated with riboflavin receptor-targeting poly(amido amine) dendrimer. We designed this nanocomposite for potential applications such as a cancer targeted imaging material based on its surface plasmon resonance properties conferred by AuNP. We employed AFM as a technique for probing the binding interaction between the nanocomposite and riboflavin binding protein (RfBP) in solution. AFM enabled precise measurement of the AuNP height distribution before (13.5 nm) and after chemisorption of riboflavin-conjugated dendrimer (AuNP–dendrimer; 20.5 nm). Binding of RfBP to the AuNP–dendrimer caused a height increase to 26.7 nm, which decreased to 22.8 nm when coincubated with riboflavin as a competitive ligand, supporting interaction of AuNP–dendrimer and its target protein. In summary, physical determination of size distribution by AFM imaging can serve as a quantitative approach to monitor and characterize the nanoscale interaction between a dendrimer-covered AuNP and target protein molecules in vitro. PMID:24571134

  14. Effects of exotic composite bosons in the TRISTAN, SLC and LEP region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi; Hattori, Takashi; Yasue, Masaki.

    1989-11-01

    Starting with typical dynamical composite models for exotic bosons as well as weak bosons, we derive their effective interactions, examine the restrictions from the presently known experimental results, and estimate possible effects on e + e - scattering. Some of the neutral exotics in the composite model, which decouple from neutrinos at low energies, can be as light as the order of the weak boson masses and offer the possibility of detecting sizable effects in the TRISTAN, SLC and LEP energy region. (author)

  15. Exotic baryon resonances. Modern status. Possibilities to search and investigate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasaryan, L.S.; Galumyan, P.I.; Grigoryan, A.A.; Kazaryan, S.P.; Khachatryan, G.N.; Oganesyan, A.G.; Vartapetyan, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility to investigate the exotic baryon resonances with qqqqq quark composition, in the systems pπ + π + , Λπ - π - , Σ - π - , etc. possessing exotic quantum numbers of isospin is considered. The most favourable reactions and kinematical regions where an effective search for the exotic baryons is possible are grounded. The contribution of the background subprocesses to the investigated systems is analyzed in various reactions and momenta configurations of the particles. The analysis shows that the search for the I=5/2 resonances in the system pπ + π + (Δ ++ π + ) is more reasonable in the π + p-interaction process, this system carrying the main portion of momentum in the lab. system. The exotic hyperons with S=-1 srangeness and I=2 isospin are to be searched in the fast-flying systems Λπ - π - (Σ* - (1385)π - ) and Σ - π - produced in the reactions on the K - beams. The cross sections of the production of the E 55 -baryon (J p =5/2 + , I=5/2) in the π + p → E 55 +++ π- and π + p → E 55 +++ x processes are theoretically estimated. The estimations show that in the experiments with the OMEGA spectometer at CERN one can get a substantial increase in the statistics as compared to that available, thus providing a detailed analysis of the pπ + π + system on the high confidence level. The question of investigation of the exotic baryon Regge trajectories in the processes of the inclusive production of ordinary (nonexotic) Δ ++ (1232), Σ* + (1385)- and Σ + -resonances in the π - -beam fragmentation region is also considered

  16. Neocarzinostatin as a probe for DNA protection activity--molecular interaction with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Der-Hang; Li, Huang-Hsien; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Liu, Chia-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), a potent mutagen and carcinogen, consists of an enediyne prodrug and a protein carrier. It has a unique double role in that it intercalates into DNA and imposes radical-mediated damage after thiol activation. Here we employed NCS as a probe to examine the DNA-protection capability of caffeine, one of common dietary phytochemicals with potential cancer-chemopreventive activity. NCS at the nanomolar concentration range could induce significant single- and double-strand lesions in DNA, but up to 75 ± 5% of such lesions were found to be efficiently inhibited by caffeine. The percentage of inhibition was caffeine-concentration dependent, but was not sensitive to the DNA-lesion types. The well-characterized activation reactions of NCS allowed us to explore the effect of caffeine on the enediyne-generated radicals. Postactivation analyses by chromatographic and mass spectroscopic methods identified a caffeine-quenched enediyne-radical adduct, but the yield was too small to fully account for the large inhibition effect on DNA lesions. The affinity between NCS chromophore and DNA was characterized by a fluorescence-based kinetic method. The drug-DNA intercalation was hampered by caffeine, and the caffeine-induced increases in DNA-drug dissociation constant was caffeine-concentration dependent, suggesting importance of binding affinity in the protection mechanism. Caffeine has been shown to be both an effective free radical scavenger and an intercalation inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that caffeine ingeniously protected DNA against the enediyne-induced damages mainly by inhibiting DNA intercalation beforehand. The direct scavenging of the DNA-bound NCS free radicals by caffeine played only a minor role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Probing the WL'WH and WR'WH interactions at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shoushan; Li Honglei; Si Zongguo; Zhou Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Many new physics models predict the existence of TeV-scale charged gauge boson W ' together with Higgs-boson(s). We study the W ' WH interaction and explore the angular distribution of charged leptons to distinguish W R ' WH from W L ' WH in the pp→HW→bblν process at the LHC. It is found that a new type forward-backward asymmetry (A FB ) relating to the angle between the direction of the charged lepton in the W rest frame and that of the reconstructed W ' in the laboratory frame is useful to investigate the properties of W ' WH interaction. We analyze the standard model backgrounds and develop a set of cuts to highlight the signal and suppress the backgrounds at LHC. We find that A FB can reach 0.03(-0.07) for W R ' (W L ' ) production at √(S)=14 TeV.

  18. Probing into the Interaction of Nicotine and Bovine Submaxillary Mucin: NMR, Fluorescence, and FTIR Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiang Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine, the important component of cigarette products, may have an impact on the oral environment after inhalation. The research of interaction between nicotine and bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM contributes to understand the binding mechanism of nicotine and BSM, and the effects of nicotine on the structure and function of the mucin. NMR data demonstrated that the interaction between nicotine and BSM did exist, and it was pyrrolidyl ring of nicotine playing the major role in the binding. The quenching mechanisms of nicotine and BSM in different pH were different: for acidic environment, the quenching was dynamic; while it became static in the alkaline circumstance. Synchronous fluorescence spectra indicated that nicotine had effect on the microenvironment of the Trp rather than Tyr residue. Meanwhile, the impact of nicotine on the conformation of BSM was also confirmed by 3D fluorescence and FTIR spectra.

  19. X ray emission: a tool and a probe for laser - clusters interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prigent, Ch.

    2004-12-01

    In intense laser-cluster interaction, the experimental results show a strong energetic coupling between radiation and matter. We have measured absolute X-ray yields and charge state distributions under well control conditions as a function of physical parameters governing the interaction; namely laser intensity, pulse duration, wavelength or polarization state of the laser light, the size and the species of the clusters (Ar, Kr, Xe). We have highlighted, for the first time, an intensity threshold in the X-ray production very low (∼ 2.10 14 W/cm 2 for a pulse duration of 300 fs) which can results from an effect of the dynamical polarisation of clusters in an intense electric field. A weak dependence with the wavelength (400 nm / 800 nm) on the absolute X-ray yields has been found. Moreover, we have observed a saturation of the X-ray emission probability below a critical cluster size. (author)

  20. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan S. Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle.

  1. Adhesive interaction measured between AFM probe and lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonenko, Zoya; Finot, Eric; Amrein, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles entering the body through the lung is thought to be initially defined by the electrostatic and adhesive interaction of the particles with lung's wall. Here, we investigated the first step of the interaction of nanoparticles with lung epithelial cells using atomic force microscope (AFM) as a force apparatus. Nanoparticles were modeled by the apex of the AFM tip and the forces of interaction between the tip and the cell analyzed over time. The adhesive force and work of adhesion strongly increased for the first 100 s of contact and then leveled out. During this time, the tip was penetrating deeply into the cell. It first crossed a stiff region of the cell and then entered a much more compliant cell region. The work of adhesion and its progression over time were not dependent on the load with which the tip was brought into contact with the cell. We conclude that the initial thermodynamic aspects and the time course of the uptake of nanoparticles by lung epithelial cells can be studied using our experimental approach. It is discussed how the potential health threat posed by nanoparticles of different size and surface characteristics can be evaluated using the method presented

  2. Probing protein interactions with hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry—A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percy, Andrew J.; Rey, Martial; Burns, Kyle M.; Schriemer, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protein chemistry generates mass shifts useful for structure–function studies. ► H/DX supports a powerful mass shift method for protein interaction analysis. ► H/DX mass shifts are useful for determining binding data (K d , off-rates). ► Improved H/DX–MS workflows can accommodate complex protein systems. - Abstract: Assessing the functional outcome of protein interactions in structural terms is a goal of structural biology, however most techniques have a limited capacity for making structure–function determinations with both high resolution and high throughput. Mass spectrometry can be applied as a reader of protein chemistries in order to fill this void, and enable methodologies whereby protein structure–function determinations may be made on a proteome-wide level. Protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) offers a chemical labeling strategy suitable for tracking changes in “dynamic topography” and thus represents a powerful means of monitoring protein structure–function relationships. This review presents the exchange method in the context of interaction analysis. Applications involving interface detection, quantitation of binding, and conformational responses to ligation are discussed, and commentary on recent analytical developments is provided.

  3. Recent shell-model results for exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utsuno Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on our recent advancement in the shell model and its applications to exotic nuclei, focusing on the shell evolution and large-scale calculations with the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM. First, we test the validity of the monopole-based universal interaction (VMU as a shell-model interaction by performing large-scale shell-model calculations in two different mass regions using effective interactions which partly comprise VMU. Those calculations are successful and provide a deeper insight into the shell evolution beyond the single-particle model, in particular showing that the evolution of the spin-orbit splitting due to the tensor force plays a decisive role in the structure of the neutron-rich N ∼ 28 region and antimony isotopes. Next, we give a brief overview of recent developments in MCSM, and show that it is applicable to exotic nuclei that involve many valence orbits. As an example of its applications to exotic nuclei, shape coexistence in 32Mg is examined.

  4. Probes for dark matter physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.

    The existence of cosmological dark matter is in the bedrock of the modern cosmology. The dark matter is assumed to be nonbaryonic and consists of new stable particles. Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) miracle appeals to search for neutral stable weakly interacting particles in underground experiments by their nuclear recoil and at colliders by missing energy and momentum, which they carry out. However, the lack of WIMP effects in their direct underground searches and at colliders can appeal to other forms of dark matter candidates. These candidates may be weakly interacting slim particles, superweakly interacting particles, or composite dark matter, in which new particles are bound. Their existence should lead to cosmological effects that can find probes in the astrophysical data. However, if composite dark matter contains stable electrically charged leptons and quarks bound by ordinary Coulomb interaction in elusive dark atoms, these charged constituents of dark atoms can be the subject of direct experimental test at the colliders. The models, predicting stable particles with charge ‑ 2 without stable particles with charges + 1 and ‑ 1 can avoid severe constraints on anomalous isotopes of light elements and provide solution for the puzzles of dark matter searches. In such models, the excessive ‑ 2 charged particles are bound with primordial helium in O-helium atoms, maintaining specific nuclear-interacting form of the dark matter. The successful development of composite dark matter scenarios appeals for experimental search for doubly charged constituents of dark atoms, making experimental search for exotic stable double charged particles experimentum crucis for dark atoms of composite dark matter.

  5. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well

  6. The mass and radius of exotic fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of exotic nuclei are presented. A method to measure the ground-state mass is presented and the results are compared with standard models. Total reaction cross section measurements for exotic nuclei are also presented and interpreted in terms of matter distribution in the nucleus

  7. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  8. Large acceptance spectrometers for invariant mass spectroscopy of exotic nuclei and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also investigate the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  9. Calculation of the radii of neutron rich light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charagi, S.K.; Gupta, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction cross section of a few unstable neutron rich nuclei have been measured using exotic isotope beams produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Interaction cross section of He, Li, Be and B isotope projectiles with Be, C and Al targets have thus been measured at 790 MeV/nucleon. We have made a comprehensive analysis of the data on the interaction cross section, to extract the radii of these neutron rich light nuclei. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  10. Tailor-made ezrin actin binding domain to probe its interaction with actin in-vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well.

  11. Few-Nucleon Research at TUNL: Probing Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions with Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Witała, H.

    2016-03-01

    The central goal of few-nucleon research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is to perform measurements that contribute to advancing ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. The program aims include evaluating theoretical treatments of few-nucleon reaction dynamics through strategically comparing theory predictions to data, determining properties of the neutron-neutron interaction that are not accessible in two-nucleon reactions, and searching for evidence of longrange features of three-nucleon interactions, e.g., spin and isospin dependence. This paper will review studies of three- and four-nucleon systems at TUNL conducted using unpolarized and polarized neutron beams. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions performed by groups at TUNL over the last six years are described in comparison with theory predictions. The results are discussed in the context of the program goals stated above. Measurements of vector analyzing powers for elastic scattering in A=3 and A=4 systems, differential cross sections for neutron-deuteron elastic scattering and neutrondeuteron breakup in several final-state configurations are described. The findings from these studies and plans for the coming three years are presented in the context of worldwide activities in this front, in particular, research presented in this session.

  12. Probing the mechanical properties, conformational changes, and interactions of nucleic acids with magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Franziska; Ermann, Niklas; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acids are central to the storage and transmission of genetic information. Mechanical properties, along with their sequence, both enable and fundamentally constrain the biological functions of DNA and RNA. For small deformations from the equilibrium conformations, nucleic acids are well described by an isotropic elastic rod model. However, external forces and torsional strains can induce conformational changes, giving rise to a complex force-torque phase diagram. This review focuses on magnetic tweezers as a powerful tool to precisely determine both the elastic parameters and conformational transitions of nucleic acids under external forces and torques at the single-molecule level. We review several variations of magnetic tweezers, in particular conventional magnetic tweezers, freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers, and discuss their characteristic capabilities. We then describe the elastic rod model for DNA and RNA and discuss conformational changes induced by mechanical stress. The focus lies on the responses to torque and twist, which are crucial in the mechanics and interactions of nucleic acids and can directly be measured using magnetic tweezers. We conclude by highlighting several recent studies of nucleic acid-protein and nucleic acid-small-molecule interactions as further applications of magnetic tweezers and give an outlook of some exciting developments to come. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Few-Nucleon Research at TUNL: Probing Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions with Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howell C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The central goal of few-nucleon research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL is to perform measurements that contribute to advancing ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. The program aims include evaluating theoretical treatments of few-nucleon reaction dynamics through strategically comparing theory predictions to data, determining properties of the neutron-neutron interaction that are not accessible in two-nucleon reactions, and searching for evidence of longrange features of three-nucleon interactions, e.g., spin and isospin dependence. This paper will review studies of three- and four-nucleon systems at TUNL conducted using unpolarized and polarized neutron beams. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions performed by groups at TUNL over the last six years are described in comparison with theory predictions. The results are discussed in the context of the program goals stated above. Measurements of vector analyzing powers for elastic scattering in A=3 and A=4 systems, differential cross sections for neutron-deuteron elastic scattering and neutrondeuteron breakup in several final-state configurations are described. The findings from these studies and plans for the coming three years are presented in the context of worldwide activities in this front, in particular, research presented in this session.

  14. A probe to study the toxic interaction of tartrazine with bovine hemoglobin at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yating; Wei, Haoran; Liu, Rutao

    2014-03-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in food products, but tartrazine in the environment is potentially harmful. The toxic interaction between tartrazine and bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was investigated using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling techniques under simulated physiological conditions. The fluorescence data showed that tartrazine can bind with BHb to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction, in which van der Waals' forces and hydrogen bonds played major roles. Molecular docking results showed that the hydrogen bonds exist between the oxygen atoms at position 31 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys99, and also between the oxygen atoms at position 15 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys104, Lys105. The results of UV-vis and CD spectra revealed that tartrazine led to conformational changes in BHb, including loosening of the skeleton structure and decreasing α helix in the secondary structure. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that tartrazine binds into the hemoglobin central cavity, and this was verified using a molecular modeling study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Probing quantum and thermal noise in an interacting many-body system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofferberth, S.; Lesanovsky, Igor; Schumm, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    of the shot-to-shot variations of interference-fringe contrast for pairs of independently created one-dimensional Bose condensates. Analysing different system sizes, we observe the crossover from thermal to quantum noise, reflected in a characteristic change in the distribution functions from poissonian......The probabilistic character of the measurement process is one of the most puzzling and fascinating aspects of quantum mechanics. In many-body systems quantum-mechanical noise reveals non-local correlations of the underlying many-body states. Here, we provide a complete experimental analysis....... Furthermore, our experiments constitute the first analysis of the full distribution of quantum noise in an interacting many-body system....

  16. On the interactions between energetic electrons and lightning whistler waves observed at high L-shells on Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Brundell, J. B.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands of kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. A good match has previously been shown between WWLLN sferics and Van Allen Probes lightning whistler waves. It is well known that lightning whistler waves can modify the distribution of energetic electrons in the Van Allen belts by pitch angle scattering into the loss cone, especially at low L-Shells (referred to as LEP - Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation). It is an open question whether lightning whistler waves play an important role at high L-shells. The possible interactions between energetic electrons and lightning whistler waves at high L-shells are considered to be weak in the past. However, lightning is copious, and weak pitch angle scattering into the drift or bounce loss cone would have a significant influence on the radiation belt populations. In this work, we will analyze the continuous burst mode EMFISIS data from September 2012 to 2016, to find out lightning whistler waves above L = 3. Based on that, MAGEIS data are used to study the related possible wave-particle interactions. In this talk, both case study and statistical analysis results will be presented.

  17. Spectral-fluorescent study of the interaction of the polymethine dye probe Cyan 2 with chondroitin-4-sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikolov, Alexander S.; Akimkin, Timofey M.; Panova, Ina G.; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M.

    2017-04-01

    The noncovalent interaction of the polymethine dye probe 3,3‧,9-trimethylthiacarbocyanine iodide (Cyan 2) with chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) in buffer solutions with different pH and in water in the absence of buffers has been studied by spectral-fluorescent methods. It has been shown that in all media studied, at relatively high concentrations, the dye is bound to C4S mainly as a monomer, which is accompanied by a steep rise of fluorescence (the intermediate formation of dye aggregates on the biopolymer is also observed). From the dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield on the concentration of C4S, the parameters of binding of the dye monomer to C4S were obtained: the effective binding constant K, the number of the monomeric C4S units n per one dye monomer bound to C4S, and the fluorescence quantum yield of the bound dye monomer Φfb. The dependence of Φfb (and K) on pH of the medium is not monotonic: it has a minimum in the region of neutral pH and a growth in the regions of acid and basic pH. This can be explained by changing the charge of a C4S macromolecule as a function of pH and related conformational alterations in the biopolymer, which can affect the rigidity of a dye molecule and the energy of its interaction with the biopolymer.

  18. Exotic RG flows from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Nitti, Francesco; Silva Pimenta, Leandro [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France)

    2017-02-15

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated with asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic β-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have β-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the β-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  20. Apparent competition and native consumers exacerbate the strong competitive effect of an exotic plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrock, John L; Dutra, Humberto P; Marquis, Robert J; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Direct and indirect effects can play a key role in invasions, but experiments evaluating both are rare. We examined the roles of direct competition and apparent competition by exotic Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) by manipulating (1) L. maackii vegetation, (2) presence of L. maackii fruits, and (3) access to plants by small mammals and deer. Direct competition with L. maackii reduced the abundance and richness of native and exotic species, and native consumers significantly reduced the abundance and richness of native species. Although effects of direct competition and consumption were more pervasive, richness of native plants was also reduced through apparent competition, as small-mammal consumers reduced richness only when L. maackii fruits were present. Our experiment reveals the multiple, interactive pathways that affect the success and impact of an invasive exotic plant: exotic plants may directly benefit from reduced attack by native consumers, may directly exert strong competitive effects on native plants, and may also benefit from apparent competition.

  1. Probing velocity dependent self-interacting dark matter with neutrino telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Denis S.; Albuquerque, Ivone F. M.

    2018-02-01

    Self-interacting dark matter models constitute an attractive solution to problems in structure formation on small scales. A simple realization of these models considers the dark force mediated by a light particle which can couple to the Standard Model through mixings with the photon or the Z boson. Within this scenario we investigate the sensitivity of the IceCube-DeepCore and PINGU neutrino telescopes to the associated muon neutrino flux produced by dark matter annihilations in the Sun. Despite the model's simplicity, several effects naturally appear: momentum suppressed capture by nuclei, velocity dependent dark matter self-capture, Sommerfeld enhanced annihilation, as well as the enhancement on the neutrino flux due to mediator late decays. Taking all these effects into account, we find that most of the model relevant parameter space can be tested by the three years of data already collected by the IceCube-DeepCore. We show that indirect detection through neutrinos can compete with the strong existing limits from direct detection experiments, specially in the case of isospin violation.

  2. Probing the interaction of noble gases with pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene through Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Renato; Perea-López, Néstor; Elías, Ana Laura; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Carozo, Victor; Feng, Simin; Lv, Ruitao; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Terrones, Mauricio; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2018-05-01

    The interactions of adsorbates with graphene have received increasing attention due to its importance in the development of applications involving graphene-based coatings. Here, we present a study of the adsorption of noble gases on pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene. Single-layer graphene samples were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Several noble gases were allowed to adsorb on the suspended graphene substrate at very low temperatures. Raman spectra show distinct frequency blue shifts in both the 2D and G bands, which are induced by gas adsorption onto high quality single layer graphene (1LG). These shifts, which we associate with compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layers induced by the noble gases, are negligible for nitrogen-doped graphene. Additionally, a thermal depinning transition, which is related to the desorption of a noble gas layer from the graphene surface at low temperatures (ranging from 20 to 35 K), was also observed at different transition temperatures for different noble gases. These transition temperatures were found to be 25 K for argon and 35 K for xenon. Moreover, we were able to obtain values for the compressive biaxial strain in graphene induced by the adsorbed layer of noble gases, using Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations confirmed the correlation between the noble gas-induced strain and the changes in the Raman features observed.

  3. Probing the sign-changeable interaction between dark energy and dark matter with current observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan-Juan; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Li, Yun-He; He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Xin

    2018-03-01

    We consider the models of vacuum energy interacting with cold dark matter in this study, in which the coupling can change sigh during the cosmological evolution. We parameterize the running coupling b by the form b( a) = b 0 a+ b e(1- a), where at the early-time the coupling is given by a constant b e and today the coupling is described by another constant b 0. We explore six specific models with (i) Q = b( a) H 0 ρ 0, (ii) Q = b( a) H 0 ρ de, (iii) Q = b( a) H 0 ρ c, (iv) Q = b( a) Hρ 0, (v) Q = b( a) H ρ de, and (vi) Q = b( a) Hρ c. The current observational data sets we use to constrain the models include the JLA compilation of type Ia supernova data, the Planck 2015 distance priors data of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the Hubble constant direct measurement. We find that, for all the models, we have b 0 0 at around the 1 σ level, and b 0 and b e are in extremely strong anti-correlation. Our results show that the coupling changes sign during the evolution at about the 1 σ level, i.e., the energy transfer is from dark matter to dark energy when dark matter dominates the universe and the energy transfer is from dark energy to dark matter when dark energy dominates the universe.

  4. Probing the interactions of charmed mesons with nuclei in anti p-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubeva, Ye.S.; Cassing, W.; Kondratyuk, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    We study the perspectives of resonant and nonresonant charmed-meson production in anti p+A reactions within the Multiple Scattering Monte Carlo (MSMC) approach. We calculate the production of the resonances Ψ(3770), Ψ(4040) and Ψ(4160) on various nuclei, their propagation and decay to D, anti D, D * , anti DD * , D s , anti D s in the medium and vacuum, respectively. The modifications of the open charm vector mesons in the nuclear medium are found to be rather moderate or even small such that dilepton spectroscopy will require an invariant mass resolution of a few MeV. Furthermore, the elastic and inelastic interactions of the open charm mesons in the medium are taken into account, which can be related to (u, d)-, s- or c-quark exchange with nucleons. It is found that by studying the D/ anti D ratio for low momenta in the laboratory (≤2-2.2 GeV/c) as a function of the target mass A stringent constraints on the c-quark exchange cross-section can be obtained. On the other hand, the ratios D - s /D + s as well as D/D - s and D/D + s at low momenta as a function of A will permit to fix independently the strength of the s-quark exchange reaction in D - s N scattering. (orig.)

  5. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a new fluorescent probe for measuring polymyxin-lipopolysaccharide binding interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Rachel L.; Velkov, Tony; Chiu, Francis; Thompson, Philip E.; Kancharla, Rashmi; Roberts, Kade; Larson, Ian; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence assays employing semi-synthetic or commercial dansyl-polymyxin B, have been widely employed to assess the affinity of polycations, including polymyxins, for bacterial cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The five primary γ-amines on diaminobutyric-acid residues of polymyxin B are potentially derivatized with dansyl-cholride. Mass spectrometric analysis of the commercial product revealed a complex mixture of di- or tetra- dansyl-substituted polymyxin B. We synthesized a mono-substituted fluorescent derivative, dansyl[Lys]1polymyxinB3. The affinity of polymyxin for purified Gram-negative LPS, and whole bacterial cells was investigated. The affinity of dansyl[Lys]1polymyxinB3 for LPS was comparable to polymyxin B and colistin, and considerably greater (kd dansyl[Lys]1polymyxinB3 to LPS, attributed to electrostatic interactions. The hydrophobic dansyl moiety imparted a greater entropic contribution to the dansyl[Lys]1polymyxinB3-LPS reaction. Molecular modeling revealed a loss of electrostatic contact within the dansyl[Lys]1polymyxinB3-LPS complex due to steric hindrance from the dansyl[Lys]1 fluorophore; this corresponded with diminished antibacterial activity (MIC ≥ 16 μg/mL). Dansyl[Lys]1polymyxinB3 may prove useful as a screening tool for drug development. PMID:21050838

  6. Micro-rheology and interparticle interactions in aerosols probed with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jonathan P.; Power, Rory M.; Cai, Chen; Simpson, Stephen H.

    2014-09-01

    Using optical tweezers for micro-rheological investigations of a surrounding fluid has been routinely demonstrated. In this work, we will demonstrate that rheological measurements of the bulk and surface properties of aerosol particles can be made directly using optical tweezers, providing important insights into the phase behavior of materials in confined environments and the rate of molecular diffusion in viscous phases. The use of holographic optical tweezers to manipulate aerosol particles has become standard practice in recent years, providing an invaluable tool to investigate particle dynamics, including evaporation/ condensation kinetics, chemical aging and phase transformation. When combined with non-linear Raman spectroscopy, the size and refractive index of a particle can be determined with unprecedented accuracy viscosity and surface tension of particles can be measured directly in the under-damped regime at low viscosity. In the over-damped regime, we will show that viscosity measurements can extend close to the glass transition, allowing measurements over an impressive dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude in relaxation timescale and viscosity. Indeed, prior to the coalescence event, we will show how the Brownian trajectories of trapped particles can yield important and unique insights into the interactions of aerosol particles.

  7. Electroweak oblique parameters as a probe of the trilinear Higgs boson self-interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Maier, Andreas; Rzehak, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the two-loop contributions from a modified trilinear Higgs self-interaction, κλλSMvh3, to the electroweak oblique parameters S and T. Using the current bounds on S and T from electroweak measurements, we find the 95% C.L. constraint on the modified trilinear coupling to be -14.0≤κλ≤17.......4. The largest effects on S and T arise from two insertions of the modified trilinear coupling that result in T/S≃-3/2; remarkably, this is nearly parallel to the axis of the tightest experimental constraint in the S-T plane. No contributions to S and T arise from a modified Higgs quartic coupling at two......-loop order. These calculations utilized a gauge-invariant parametrization of the trilinear Higgs coupling in terms of higher-dimensional operators (H†H)n with n≥3. Interestingly, the bounds on κλ that we obtain are comparable to constraints from di-Higgs production at the LHC as well as recent bounds from...

  8. Lattice QCD results on soft and hard probes of strongly interacting matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Olaf

    2017-11-01

    We present recent results from lattice QCD relevant for the study of strongly interacting matter as it is produced in heavy ion collision experiments. The equation of state at non-vanishing density from a Taylor expansion up to 6th order will be discussed for a strangeness neutral system and using the expansion coefficients of the series limits on the critical point are estimated. Chemical freeze-out temperatures from the STAR and ALICE Collaborations will be compared to lines of constant physics calculated from the Taylor expansion of QCD bulk thermodynamic quantities. We show that qualitative features of the √{sNN} dependence of skewness and kurtosis ratios of net proton-number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration can be understood from QCD results for cumulants of conserved baryon-number fluctuations. As an example for recent progress towards the determination of spectral and transport properties of the QGP from lattice QCD, we will present constraints on the thermal photon rate determined from a spectral reconstruction of continuum extrapolated lattice correlation functions in combination with input from most recent perturbative calculations.

  9. An Introduction to Drug Discovery by Probing Protein-Substrate Interactions Using Saturation Transfer Difference-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (STD-NMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Jean-Paul; Daniellou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing and identifying molecules and nowadays is even used to characterize complex systems in biology. In the experiment presented here, students learned how to apply this modern technique to probe interactions between small molecules and proteins. With the use of simple organic synthesis, students…

  10. Acceleration of exotic plant invasion in a forested ecosystem by a generalist herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschtruth, Anne K; Battles, John J

    2009-04-01

    The successful invasion of exotic plants is often attributed to the absence of coevolved enemies in the introduced range (i.e., the enemy release hypothesis). Nevertheless, several components of this hypothesis, including the role of generalist herbivores, remain relatively unexplored. We used repeated censuses of exclosures and paired controls to investigate the role of a generalist herbivore, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), in the invasion of 3 exotic plant species (Microstegium vimineum, Alliaria petiolata, and Berberis thunbergii) in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forests in New Jersey and Pennsylvania (U.S.A.). This work was conducted in 10 eastern hemlock (T. canadensis) forests that spanned gradients in deer density and in the severity of canopy disturbance caused by an introduced insect pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). We used maximum likelihood estimation and information theoretics to quantify the strength of evidence for alternative models of the influence of deer density and its interaction with the severity of canopy disturbance on exotic plant abundance. Our results were consistent with the enemy release hypothesis in that exotic plants gained a competitive advantage in the presence of generalist herbivores in the introduced range. The abundance of all 3 exotic plants increased significantly more in the control plots than in the paired exclosures. For all species, the inclusion of canopy disturbance parameters resulted in models with substantially greater support than the deer density only models. Our results suggest that white-tailed deer herbivory can accelerate the invasion of exotic plants and that canopy disturbance can interact with herbivory to magnify the impact. In addition, our results provide compelling evidence of nonlinear relationships between deer density and the impact of herbivory on exotic species abundance. These findings highlight the important role of herbivore density in determining impacts on

  11. Probing Interaction Between Platinum Group Metal (PGM) and Non-PGM Support Through Surface Characterization and Device Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shibely

    High cost and limited abundance of Platinum (Pt) have hindered effective commercialization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer. Efforts have been undertaken to reduce precious group metal (PGM) requirement for these devices without compromising the activity of the catalyst by using transition metal carbides (TMC) as non-PGM support thanks to their similar electronic and geometric structures as Pt. In this work Mo2C was selected as non-PGM support and Pt was used as the PGM of interest. We hypothesize that the hollow nanotube morphology of Mo2C support combined with Pt nano particles deposited on it via atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique would allow increased interaction between them which may increase the activity of Pt and Mo2C as well as maximize the Pt active surface area. Specifically, a rotary ALD equipment was used to grow Pt particles from atomic level to 2--3 nanometers by simply adjusting number of ALD cycles in order to probe the interaction between the deposited Pt nanoparticles and Mo2C nanotube support. Interaction between the Pt and Mo2 C was analyzed via surface characterization and electrochemical characterization. Interaction between Pt and Mo2C arises due to the lattice mismatch between Pt and Mo2C as well as electron migration between them. Lattice spacing analysis using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, combined with Pt binding energy shift in XPS results, clearly showed strong bonding between Pt nanoparticles and the Mo2C nanotube support in all the resultant Pt/Mo2C samples. We postulate that this strong interaction is responsible for the significantly enhanced durability observed in our constant potential electrolysis (CPE) and accelerated degradation testing (ADT). Of the three samples from different ALD cycles (15, 50 and 100), Mo2C nanotubes modified by 50 (1.07 wt% Pt loading) and 100 cycles (4.4 wt% Pt) of Pt deposition, showed higher HER and HOR activity per Pt mass than commercial

  12. Sugar-influenced water diffusion, interaction, and retention in clay interlayer nanopores probed by theoretical simulations and experimental spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Galdi, Stephen M.; Kelch, Sabrina E.; Aoki, Thalia G.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamics in clay nanopores is important for gaining insights into the trapping of water, nutrients, and contaminants in natural and engineered soils. Previous investigations have focused on the interlayer organization and molecular diffusion coefficients (D) of cations and water molecules in cation-saturated interlayer nanopores of smectite clays. Little is known, however, about how these interlayer dynamic properties are influenced by the ubiquitous presence of small organic compounds such as sugars in the soil environment. Here we probed the effects of glucose molecules on montmorillonite interlayer properties. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed re-structuring of the interlayer organization of the adsorptive species. Water-water interactions were disrupted by glucose-water H-bonding interactions. ;Dehydration; of the glucose-populated nanopore led to depletion in the Na solvation shell, which resulted in the accumulation of both Na ions (as inner-sphere complexes) and remaining hydrated water molecules at the mineral surface. This accumulation led to a decrease in both DNa and Dwater. In addition, the reduction in Dglucose as a function of increasing glucose content can be explained by the aggregation of glucose molecules into organic clusters H-bonded to the mineral surface on both walls of the nanopore. Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction data were consistent with the theoretical predictions. Compared to clay interlayers devoid of glucose, increased intensities and new peaks in the 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectra confirmed increasing immobilization of Na as a function of increasing glucose content. And, the X-ray diffraction data indicated a reduced collapse of glucose-populated interlayers exposed to decreasing moisture conditions, which led to the maintenance of hydrated clay nanopores. The coupling of theoretical and experimental findings sheds light on the molecular to nanoscale mechanisms that

  13. Probabilistic methods in exotic option pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderluh, J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presents three ways of calculating the Parisian option price as an illustration of probabilistic methods in exotic option pricing. Moreover options on commidities are considered and double-sided barrier options in a compound Poisson framework.

  14. A comprehensive method for exotic option pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Rossella Agliardi

    2010-01-01

    This work illustrates how several new pricing formulas for exotic options can be derived within a Levy framework by employing a unique pricing expression. Many existing pricing formulas of the traditional Gaussian model are obtained as a by-product.

  15. Using a botanical garden to assess factors influencing the colonization of exotic woody plants by phyllophagous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Natalia; Kenis, M

    2016-09-01

    The adoption of exotic plants by indigenous herbivores in the region of introduction can be influenced by numerous factors. A botanical garden in Western Siberia was used to test various hypotheses on the adaptation of indigenous phyllophagous insects to exotic plants invasions, focusing on two feeding guilds, external leaf chewers and leaf miners. A total of 150 indigenous and exotic woody plant species were surveyed for insect damage, abundance and species richness. First, exotic woody plants were much less damaged by chewers and leaf miners than native plants, and the leaf miners' species richness was much lower on exotic than native plants. Second, exotic woody plants having a congeneric species in the region of introduction were more damaged by chewers and hosted a more abundant and species-rich community of leaf miners than plants without native congeneric species. Third, damage by chewers significantly increased with the frequency of planting of exotic host plants outside the botanical garden, and leaf miners' abundance and species richness significantly increased with residence time in the garden. Finally, no significant relationship was found between insect damage or abundance and the origin of the exotic plants. Besides the ecological implications of the results, this study also illustrates the potential of botanical gardens to test ecological hypotheses on biological invasions and insect-plant interactions on a large set of plant species.

  16. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  17. Exotic hadron and string junction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imachi, Masahiro

    1978-01-01

    Hadron structure is investigated adopting string junction model as a realization of confinement. Besides exotic hadrons (M 4 , B 5 etc.), unconventional hadrons appear. A mass formula for these hadrons is proposed. New selection rule is introduced which requires the covalence of constituent line at hadron vertex. New duality appears due to the freedom of junction, especially in anti BB→anti BB reaction. A possible assignment of exotic and unconventional hadrons to recently observed narrow meson states is presented. (auth.)

  18. Deep electroproduction of exotic hybrid mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluate the leading order amplitude for the deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. We show that, contrarily to naive expectation, this amplitude factorizes at the twist 2 level and thus scales like usual meson electroproduction when the virtual photon and the hybrid meson are longitudinally polarized. Exotic hybrid mesons may thus be studied in electroproduction experiments at JLAB, HERA (HERMES) or CERN (Compass)

  19. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  20. Everyday and Exotic Foodborne Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn B Lee

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Canada because of effective sewage treatment. However, a common foodborne parasite of significance is Toxoplasma gondii. Although infection can be acquired from accidental ingestion of oocysts from cat feces, infection can also result from consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat, such as pork or lamb. Congenital transmission poses an immense financial burden, costing Canada an estimated $240 million annually. Also of concern is toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which may lead to toxoplasmosis encephalitis, the second most common AIDS-related opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. Exotic parasites (ie, those acquired from abroad or from imported food are of growing concern because more Canadians are travelling and the number of Canada?s trading partners is increasing. Since 1996, over 3000 cases of Cyclospora infection reported in the United States and Canada were epidemiologically associated with importation of Guatemalan raspberries. Unlike toxoplasmosis, where strategies for control largely rest with individual practices, control of cyclosporiasis rests with government policy, which should prohibit the importation of foods at high risk.

  1. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Davide M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Riccioni, Fabio [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Risoli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-12-21

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T{sup 6}/[ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  2. P fluxes and exotic branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T 6 /[ℤ 2 ×ℤ 2 ] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  3. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karataglidis, S.

    2017-01-01

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  4. EXOTIC: Development of ceramic tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flipot, A.J.; Kennedy, P.; Conrad, R.

    1989-03-01

    As part of the joint European Programme on fusion blanket technology three laboratories, Northern Research Laboratories (NRL), Springfields in the UK, SCK/CEN-Mol in Belgium and ECN-Petten in conjunction with JRC-Petten in the Netherlands have worked closely together since 1983 on the development of ceramic breeder materials, the programme being codenamed EXOTIC. Lithium oxides, aluminates, silicates and zirconates have been produced, characterised and irradiated in the HFR-Petten in experiments EXOTIC-1, -2 and -3. EXOTIC-4 is in preparation. In this fourth annual progress report the work achieved in 1987 is reported. For EXOTIC-1 to -3 mainly post irradiation examinations have been carried out like: visual inspection, puncturing of closed capsules, tritium retention measurements and material characterisation. Moreover, tritium release experiments on small specimens have started. SCK/CEN performed a general study on lithium silicates, in particular on the thermal stability. Finally, the fabrication and the characterisation of the materials to be irradiated in experiment EXOTIC-4 are presented. The eight capsules of EXOTIC-4 will be loaed with samples of Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 2 O, Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 6 Zr 2 O 7 and Li 8 ZrO 6 . The irradiation will last 4 reactor cycles or about 100, Full Power Day, FPD. The main objective is to determine the tritium residence time of the various lithium zirconates. 18 figs., 8 refs., 15 tabs

  5. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  6. Probing the Selectivity and Protein•Protein Interactions of a Non-Reducing Fungal Polyketide Synthase Using Mechanism-Based Crosslinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegger, Joel; Haushalter, Bob; Vagstad, Anna; Shakya, Gaurav; Mih, Nathan; Townsend, Craig A.; Burkart, Michael D.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein•protein interactions, which often involve interactions between an acyl carrier protein (ACP) and its partner enzymes, are important for coordinating polyketide biosynthesis. However, the nature of such interactions is not well understood, especially in the fungal non-reducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) that biosynthesize toxic and pharmaceutically important polyketides. Here, we employ a mechanism-based crosslinker to successfully probe ACP and ketosynthase (KS) domain interactions in NR-PKSs. We found that crosslinking efficiency is closely correlated with the strength of ACP•KS interactions, and that KS demonstrates strong starter unit selectivity. We further identified positively charged surface residues by KS mutagenesis, which mediate key interactions with the negatively-charged ACP surface. Such complementary/matching contact pairs can serve as “adapter surfaces” for future efforts to generate new polyketides using NR-PKSs. PMID:23993461

  7. On the chemistry of the lightest exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical aspects of formation of three hydrogen-like exotic atoms, positronium, muonium and pionic hydrogen are discussed. For positronium two formation mechanisms, the Ore model with hot-atom reactions, and the spur reaction model are set against experimental observations in solutions. The use of pionic hydrogen atoms in obtaining information on the bond properties of hydrogen is illustrated by recent experiments performed in JINR. The use of negative pions in chemistry is demonstrated by electronic structure investigations performed in Dubna. The probability W that in a chemical system containing bound hydrogen atoms a stopped negative pion is captured by a proton reflects the bond properties of hydrogen. Recent results haVe shown that the hydrogen bond formation in liquid water and the coordination of water molecules in aquacomplexes lead to significant decreases in probability W for water. A comparison of the chemical uses of the exotic atoms shows that positronium and muonium inform us on intermolecular level probing a small environment of a few molecules while the pionic hydrogen atoms deliver information on the chemical bond of hydrogen, i.e. on intramolecular level

  8. Experimental Searches for Exotic Short-Range Forces Using Mechanical Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Evan

    Experimental searches for forces beyond gravity and electromagnetism at short range have attracted a great deal of attention over the last decade. In this thesis I describe the test mass development for two new experiments searching for forces below 1 mm. Both modify a previous experiment that used 1 kHz mechanical oscillators as test masses with a stiff conducting shield between them to suppress backgrounds, a promising technique for probing exceptionally small distances at the limit of instrumental thermal noise. To further reduce thermal noise, one experiment will use plated silicon test masses at cryogenic temperatures. The other experiment, which searches for spin-dependent interactions, will apply the spin-polarizable material Dy3Fe5O 12 to the test mass surfaces. This material exhibits orbital compensation of the magnetism associated with its intrinsic electron spin, minimizing magnetic backgrounds. Several plated silicon test mass prototypes were fabricated using photolithography (useful in both experiments), and spin-dependent materials were synthesized with a simple chemical recipe. Both silicon and spin-dependent test masses demonstrate the mechanical and magnetic properties necessary for sensitive experiments. I also describe sensitivity calculations of another proposed spin-dependent experiment, based on a modified search for the electron electric dipole moment, which show unprecedented sensitivity to exotic monopole-dipole forces. Inspired by a finite element model, a study attempting to maximize detector quality factor versus geometry is also presented, with experimental results so far not explained by the model.

  9. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  10. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  11. Generation of Exotic Quantum States of a Cold Atomic Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Lund

    Over the last decades quantum effects have become more and more controllable, leading to the implementations of various quantum information protocols. These protocols are all based on utilizing quantum correlation. In this thesis we consider how states of an atomic ensemble with such correlations...... can be created and characterized. First we consider a spin-squeezed state. This state is generated by performing quantum non-demolition measurements of the atomic population difference. We show a spectroscopically relevant noise reduction of -1.7dB, the ensemble is in a many-body entangled state...... — a nanofiber based light-atom interface. Using a dual-frequency probing method we measure and prepare an ensemble with a sub-Poissonian atom number distribution. This is a first step towards the implementation of more exotic quantum states....

  12. Distinctive exotic flavor and aroma compounds of some exotic tropical fruits and berries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Ola; Abbas, Kassim A

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic flavor of exotic tropical fruits is one of their most attractive attributes to consumers. In this article, the enormous diversity of exotic fruit flavors is reviewed. Classifying some of the exotic fruits into two classes on the basis of whether esters or terpenes predominate in the aroma was also attempted. Indeed, as far as exotic tropical fruits are concerned, the majority of fruits have terpenes predominating in their aroma profile. Some of the fruits in this group are the Amazonian fruits such as pitanga, umbu-caja, camu-camu, garcinia, and bacuri. The ester group is made up of rambutan, durians, star fruit, snake fruit, acerola, tamarind, sapodilla, genipap, soursop, cashew, melon, jackfruit, and cupuacu respectively. Also, the role of sulphur-volatiles in some of the exotic fruits is detailed.

  13. Exotic magnetic states in Pauli-limited superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, M

    2017-03-01

    Magnetism and superconductivity compete or interact in complex and intricate ways. Here we review the special case where novel magnetic phenomena appear due to superconductivity, but do not exist without it. Such states have recently been identified in unconventional superconductors. They are different from the mere coexistence of magnetic order and superconductivity in conventional superconductors, or from competing magnetic and superconducting phases in many materials. We describe the recent progress in the study of such exotic magnetic phases, and articulate the many open questions in this field.

  14. Search for the exotic $\\Theta^+$ resonance in the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Samoylov, O; Autiero, D; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, M; Banner, M; Bassompierre, G; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A; Bunyatov, S; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R; Daniels, D; De Santo, A; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; Di Lella, L; Dignan, T; Do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, V; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S; Godley, A; Gosset, J; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gössling, C; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hubbard, D; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C; Juget, F; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; La Rotonda, L; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Linssen, L; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Lyubushkin, V; Lévy, J M; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, M; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Méchain, X; Naumov, D; Nefedov, Yu; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nédélec, P; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A; Touchard, A M; Tovey, S N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V; Vannucci, F; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P

    2007-01-01

    A search for exotic Theta baryon via Theta -> proton +Ks decay mode in the NOMAD muon neutrino DIS data is reported. The special background generation procedure was developed. The proton identification criteria are tuned to maximize the sensitivity to the Theta signal as a function of xF which allows to study the Theta production mechanism. We do not observe any evidence for the Theta state in the NOMAD data. We provide an upper limit on Theta production rate at 90% CL as 2.13 per 1000 of neutrino interactions.

  15. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  16. Ultra-compact structure in radio quasars as a cosmological probe: a revised study of the interaction between cosmic dark sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiaogang; Biesiada, Marek; Cao, Shuo; Qi, Jingzhao; Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: zhengxg2012@mail.bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl, E-mail: caoshuo@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: 11132016039@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-10-01

    A new compilation of 012 angular-size/redshift data for compact radio quasars from very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) surveys motivates us to revisit the interaction between dark energy and dark matter with these probes reaching high redshifts z ∼ 3.0. In this paper, we investigate observational constraints on different phenomenological interacting dark energy (IDE) models with the intermediate-luminosity radio quasars acting as individual standard rulers, combined with the newest BAO and CMB observation from Planck results acting as statistical rulers. The results obtained from the MCMC method and other statistical methods including figure of Merit and Information Criteria show that: (1) Compared with the current standard candle data and standard clock data, the intermediate-luminosity radio quasar standard rulers , probing much higher redshifts, could provide comparable constraints on different IDE scenarios. (2) The strong degeneracies between the interaction term and Hubble constant may contribute to alleviate the tension of H {sub 0} between the recent Planck and HST measurements. (3) Concerning the ranking of competing dark energy models, IDE with more free parameters are substantially penalized by the BIC criterion, which agrees very well with the previous results derived from other cosmological probes.

  17. Quasi-exotic open-flavor mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A. [University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Institute of Physics, Graz (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Meson states with exotic quantum numbers arise naturally in a covariant bound-state framework in QCD. We investigate the consequences of shifting quark masses such that the states are no longer restricted to certain C-parities, but only by J{sup P}. Then, a priori, one can no longer distinguish exotic or conventional states. In order to identify signatures of the different states to look for experimentally, we provide the behavior of masses, leptonic decay constants, and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition of such mesons, as well as the constellations in which they could be found. Most prominently, we consider the case of charged quasi-exotic excitations of the pion. (orig.)

  18. Status of exotic states at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yeletskikh, Ivan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of searches and measurements of exotic hadron states at ATLAS. Among them: the search for the beauty partner of X(3872) charmonium state, the measurement of differential cross-section of the prompt and non-prompt production of X(3872) in the J/psi pi pi final states, the search for the structure in the B_s pi invariant mass, reported by D0 experiment, search for exotic states in B-hadron decays: pentaquarks in Lambda_b decays and tetraquarks in B-meson decays. ATLAS results and ongoing analyses perspectives are highlighted together with CMS and LHCb results.

  19. Nuclear structure of weakly bound radioactive nuclei through elastic and and inelastic scattering on proton. Impacts of the couplings induced by these exotic nuclei on direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapoux, V.

    2005-09-01

    Information on the structure, spectroscopy and target interaction potentials of exotic nuclei can be inferred by interpreting measured data from direct reactions on proton such as elastic or inelastic scattering of proton (p,p') or one-nucleon transfer reaction (p,d). A series of experimental results has been obtained at the GANIL facilities on the setting composed of the MUST telescope array used for the detection of light charged-particles and of CATS beam detectors. This setting aims at measuring reactions on light proton or deuteron targets through reverse kinematics. Particularly, results on C 10 , C 11 and on direct reactions with the He 8 beam of Spiral are presented. The first chapter is dedicated to the description of the most important theories concerning the nucleus. The experimental tools used to probe the nucleus are reported in the second chapter. The third and fourth chapters present the framework that has allowed us to analyse results from (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on weakly bound exotic nuclei. The last chapter is dedicated to the description of future experimental programs. (A.C.)

  20. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  1. Confirmation of the Z(4430)- resonance and other exotic meson results from the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN has recently confirmed the existence of the exotic Z(4430)- state first observed by the Belle experiment in 2008. Its quantum numbers have been measured and the resonant nature of this state has been demonstrated for the first time. As it is charged, the Z(4430)- cannot be classified as a conventional charmonium (ccbar) state, making it a candidate for an exotic resonance composed of four quarks (ccbar udbar). This talk will outline the history of the Z(4430)-, its possible interpretations and describe how the signature of this exotic state can be extracted from the large sample of B0 -> psi(2S) K+pi- decays that LHCb has collected during Run-1 of the LHC. I will also describe recent LHCb results that probe the nature of the exotic X(3872) particle and help to clarify our understanding of the f0(500) and f0(980) scalar mesons that have long thought to be four quark states.

  2. Are local filters blind to provenance? Ant seed predation suppresses exotic plants more than natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Nadia S. Icasatti; Jose L. Hierro; Benjamin J. Bird

    2014-01-01

    The question of whether species' origins influence invasion outcomes has been a point of substantial debate in invasion ecology. Theoretically, colonization outcomes can be predicted based on how species' traits interact with community filters, a process presumably blind to species' origins. Yet, exotic plant introductions commonly result in monospecific...

  3. Rodent seed predation as a biotic filter influencing exotic plant abundance and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. E. Pearson; J. L. Hierro; M. Chiuffo; D. Villarreal

    2014-01-01

    Biotic resistance is commonly invoked to explain why many exotic plants fail to thrive in introduced ranges, but the role of seed predation as an invasion filter is understudied. Abiotic conditions may also influence plant populations and can interact with consumers to determine plant distributions, but how these factors jointly influence invasions is poorly understood...

  4. Effect of parent and daughter deformation on half-life time in exotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shi and Swiatecki [6] put forward a model for exotic decay studies that uses Coulomb and proximity potential as interacting barrier for post-scission region and uses simple power law for overlap region. These authors [7] studied the effect of deformation of parent, daughter and shell attenuation on half-life time treating ...

  5. Results from searches for exotic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will review the current state of experimental searches for "exotic" physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The talk will cover a wide range of searches from ATLAS and CMS, in a (hopefully) jargon free pedagogical fashion, showing the big picture of the field at this time.

  6. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M; Buervenich, T; Maruhn, J A; Greiner, W [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P G [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  7. Microscopic Cluster Theory for Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, M; Kuehl, T; Ursescu, D; Fritzsche, S

    2006-01-01

    For a better understanding of the dynamics of complex exotic nuclei it is of crucial importance to develop a practical microscopic theory easy to be applied to a wide range of masses. In this paper we propose to calculate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei within a dynamic model based on the EoM theory

  8. Biodiversity and the exotic species threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. White

    1998-01-01

    Exotic species invasions, called by one conservation biologist the "least reversible" of all human impacts, cause harm to economies (e.g., fisheries, wildlife populations, tourism), the environment (e.g., in the form of broadcast of pesticides and herbicides), human health and wellbeing (e.g., allergic responses and the increase in fire severity in some...

  9. EXOTIC: Development of ceramic tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwast, H.; Conrad, R.

    1989-09-01

    In this fifth EXOTIC annual progress report the work carried out in 1988 is reported. For EXOTIC-1, -2 and -3 the post-irradiation examinations have been continued with tritium retention measurements, annealng experiments, determination of physical and mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction analysis. Irradiation of EXOTIC-4 has been performde and the post-irradiation examination has started. Transient tritium release curves are given and analysed. The resulting tritium residence times show that for the Li-zirconates a residence time of less than one day can be achieved in the temperature region of 350-600 C. The loading scheme, the objectives and some fabrication data of EXOTIC-5 are give. Moreover, the fabrication of laboratory scale batches has started to investigate the effect of microstructural parameters on tritium release. Finally, an investigation was started on the system Li 2 O-ZrO 2 , with emphasis on the lithia-rich compositions. 40 figs., 9 refs., 10 tabs

  10. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  11. Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proceeding for the conference plenary talk at HEPMAD16, Madagascar on the topic of "Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2016-807 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2225222) Deadline: 16/12/2016 (could be postponed for some days later upon request as recently suggested by the conference organizer)

  12. Summary of exotic collider concepts group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1995-01-01

    We present a summary of the discussions in the Exotic Collider Concepts Group. Most of the discussions were centered around the status and open problems for muon-muon and gamma-gamma colliders. In addition the group discussed some general problems and new results of accelerator physics. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. Top 5 exotic clones for potato breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild and cultivated relatives of potato feature prominently in breeding programs. In this short article, I describe five exotic clones that have promising traits for the future of the US potato industry. They include M6, an inbred line of S. chacoense that provides a source of genes for self-compati...

  14. Resource diversity and provenance underpin spatial patterns in functional diversity across native and exotic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Verónica; Wood, Jamie R; Butler, Simon J

    2018-05-01

    Functional diversity metrics are increasingly used to augment or replace taxonomic diversity metrics to deliver more mechanistic insights into community structure and function. Metrics used to describe landscape structure and characteristics share many of the same limitations as taxonomy-based metrics, particularly their reliance on anthropogenically defined typologies with little consideration of structure, management, or function. However, the development of alternative metrics to describe landscape characteristics has been limited. Here, we extend the functional diversity framework to characterize landscapes based on the diversity of resources available across habitats present. We then examine the influence of resource diversity and provenance on the functional diversities of native and exotic avian communities in New Zealand. Invasive species are increasingly prevalent and considered a global threat to ecosystem function, but the characteristics of and interactions between sympatric native and exotic communities remain unresolved. Understanding their comparative responses to environmental change and the mechanisms underpinning them is of growing importance in predicting community dynamics and changing ecosystem function. We use (i) matrices of resource use (species) and resource availability (habitats) and (ii) occurrence data for 62 native and 25 exotic species and 19 native and 13 exotic habitats in 2015 10 × 10 km quadrats to examine the relationship between native and exotic avian and landscape functional diversity. The numbers of species in, and functional diversities of, native and exotic communities were positively related. Each community displayed evidence of environmental filtering, but it was significantly stronger for exotic species. Less environmental filtering occurred in landscapes providing a more diverse combination of resources, with resource provenance also an influential factor. Landscape functional diversity explained a greater

  15. Exotic nuclei with charm and bottom flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility of existence of exotic nuclei containing charm and bottom mesons. We study the interaction between $ar{D}$ (B mesons and nucleons from view of heavy quark symmetry, and derive the one pion exchange potentials. We apply these potentials to the two body system of $ar{D}$ (B meson and nucleon N , and find there are possible stable bound states with spin JP = 1/2− and isospin I = 0. We find that the tensor interaction mixing $ar{D}$N and $ar{D}$*N (BN and B*N plays an important role. We also qualitatively discuss the possible bound states of $ar{D}$ (B meson and two nucleons.

  16. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, $\

  17. Method for accurate determination of dissociation constants of optical ratiometric systems: chemical probes, genetically encoded sensors, and interacting molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, Adam; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Miłoch, Anna; Krężel, Artur

    2013-12-03

    Ratiometric chemical probes and genetically encoded sensors are of high interest for both analytical chemists and molecular biologists. Their high sensitivity toward the target ligand and ability to obtain quantitative results without a known sensor concentration have made them a very useful tool in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Although ratiometric sensors are widely used in many applications, their successful and accurate usage depends on how they are characterized in terms of sensing target molecules. The most important feature of probes and sensors besides their optical parameters is an affinity constant toward analyzed molecules. The literature shows that different analytical approaches are used to determine the stability constants, with the ratio approach being most popular. However, oversimplification and lack of attention to detail results in inaccurate determination of stability constants, which in turn affects the results obtained using these sensors. Here, we present a new method where ratio signal is calibrated for borderline values of intensities of both wavelengths, instead of borderline ratio values that generate errors in many studies. At the same time, the equation takes into account the cooperativity factor or fluorescence artifacts and therefore can be used to characterize systems with various stoichiometries and experimental conditions. Accurate determination of stability constants is demonstrated utilizing four known optical ratiometric probes and sensors, together with a discussion regarding other, currently used methods.

  18. Vertical wind velocity measurements using a five-hole probe with remotely piloted aircraft to study aerosol-cloud interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmer, Radiance; Roberts, Gregory C.; Preissler, Jana; Sanchez, Kevin J.; Derrien, Solène; O'Dowd, Colin

    2018-05-01

    The importance of vertical wind velocities (in particular positive vertical wind velocities or updrafts) in atmospheric science has motivated the need to deploy multi-hole probes developed for manned aircraft in small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). In atmospheric research, lightweight RPAs ( power spectral density (PSD) functions and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) derived from the five-hole probe are compared with sonic anemometers on a meteorological mast. During a BACCHUS field campaign at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (Ireland), a fleet of RPAs was deployed to profile the atmosphere and complement ground-based and satellite observations of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, clouds, and meteorological state parameters. The five-hole probe was flown on straight-and-level legs to measure vertical wind velocities within clouds. The vertical velocity measurements from the RPA are validated with vertical velocities derived from a ground-based cloud radar by showing that both measurements yield model-simulated cloud droplet number concentrations within 10 %. The updraft velocity distributions illustrate distinct relationships between vertical cloud fields in different meteorological conditions.

  19. A predictive framework and review of the ecological impacts of exotic plant invasions on reptiles and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Leigh J; Murray, Brad R

    2011-05-01

    The invasive spread of exotic plants in native vegetation can pose serious threats to native faunal assemblages. This is of particular concern for reptiles and amphibians because they form a significant component of the world's vertebrate fauna, play a pivotal role in ecosystem functioning and are often neglected in biodiversity research. A framework to predict how exotic plant invasion will affect reptile and amphibian assemblages is imperative for conservation, management and the identification of research priorities. Here, we present a new predictive framework that integrates three mechanistic models. These models are based on exotic plant invasion altering: (1) habitat structure; (2) herbivory and predator-prey interactions; (3) the reproductive success of reptile and amphibian species and assemblages. We present a series of testable predictions from these models that arise from the interplay over time among three exotic plant traits (growth form, area of coverage, taxonomic distinctiveness) and six traits of reptiles and amphibians (body size, lifespan, home range size, habitat specialisation, diet, reproductive strategy). A literature review provided robust empirical evidence of exotic plant impacts on reptiles and amphibians from each of the three model mechanisms. Evidence relating to the role of body size and diet was less clear-cut, indicating the need for further research. The literature provided limited empirical support for many of the other model predictions. This was not, however, because findings contradicted our model predictions but because research in this area is sparse. In particular, the small number of studies specifically examining the effects of exotic plants on amphibians highlights the pressing need for quantitative research in this area. There is enormous scope for detailed empirical investigation of interactions between exotic plants and reptile and amphibian species and assemblages. The framework presented here and further testing of

  20. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wienholtz, F; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-01-01

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes $^{40}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of $^{51}$Ca and $^{52}$Ca have been validated by direct measurements$^4$, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes $^{53}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our t...

  1. Amide I SFG Spectral Line Width Probes the Lipid-Peptide and Peptide-Peptide Interactions at Cell Membrane In Situ and in Real Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baixiong; Tan, Junjun; Li, Chuanzhao; Zhang, Jiahui; Ye, Shuji

    2018-06-13

    The balance of lipid-peptide and peptide-peptide interactions at cell membrane is essential to a large variety of cellular processes. In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy can be used to probe the peptide-peptide and lipid-peptide interactions in cell membrane in situ and in real time by determination of the line width of amide I band of protein backbone. Using a "benchmark" model of α-helical WALP23, it is found that the dominated lipid-peptide interaction causes a narrow line width of the amide I band, whereas the peptide-peptide interaction can markedly broaden the line width. When WALP23 molecules insert into the lipid bilayer, a quite narrow line width of the amide I band is observed because of the lipid-peptide interaction. In contrast, when the peptide lies down on the bilayer surface, the line width of amide I band becomes very broad owing to the peptide-peptide interaction. In terms of the real-time change in the line width, the transition from peptide-peptide interaction to lipid-peptide interaction is monitored during the insertion of WALP23 into 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'- rac-glycerol) (DPPG) lipid bilayer. The dephasing time of a pure α-helical WALP23 in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'- rac-glycerol) and DPPG bilayer is determined to be 2.2 and 0.64 ps, respectively. The peptide-peptide interaction can largely accelerate the dephasing time.

  2. Electroweak scale physics & exotic searches at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lupton, Olli

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer covering the pseudorapidity range 2–5 that is principally designed for the study of b- and c-hadrons, but which is well-suited to a wide variety of electroweak scale measurements and exotic searches that are highly complementary to other experiments at the LHC and elsewhere. Several features of the detector that are crucial for the core flavour physics programme, such as excellent vertex and momentum resolution, and a powerful trigger system, contribute to excellent jet tagging performance and sensitivity to low mass exotic states. LHCb operates at a substantially lower instantaneous luminosity than the general purpose detectors at the LHC, ATLAS and CMS, which results in a clean, low pile-up environment in which to search for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM).

  3. Electron microscopy of some exotic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.E.

    1998-01-01

    Just about every material has been looked at under the microscope, either out of pure inquisitiveness or the need to relate the microstructure to its properties. Some of these materials are mundane, like steels or glass or polyethylene; others are so-called advanced, such as intermetallics, silicon nitride or zirconia; yet others might be called exotic whether they be martian rocks, high temperature superconductors, fullerenes, diamonds, or the latest thin film device. Many exotic materials are important in Los Alamos, not only weapons materials such as actinides, tritium and explosives, but also civilian materials for energy applications. Here the author will report briefly on plutonium and uranium, on rhenium disilicide, and on Cu-Nb nanolayered composites

  4. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins into leather. In addition, Kakap fish leather have physical property of good tensile strength that may be used as material for leather goods. Although small however the exotic leather of kakap fish skins are prospective to be developed as material to manufacture exclusive leather goods, especially for niche markets. They also can be used as an alternative to substitute conventional leather.

  5. Exotic nuclei: production, properties and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Duppen, Piet

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we will put the production of energetic radioactive ion beams of exotic nuclei in perspective and describe the two complementary production processes that are used nowadays: Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) followed by post-acceleration, and In-Flight Separation (IFS). After a general description of the process we will focus on recent technical developments in the field. In the subsequent section we give some 'typical' examples of physics cases that are addressed with exotic beams. The examples are chosen not only because their physics importance but also to demonstrate the complementary aspects in the production process and the detection systems. This overview will not be complete and the reader is referred to literature for further information, nor is the lecture intended to give an overview of all the efforts that are taking place in the field by mentioning every project separately. (author)

  6. 2d orbifolds with exotic supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florakis, Ioannis; García-Etxebarria, Iñaki; Lüst, Dieter; Regalado, Diego

    2018-02-01

    We analyse various two dimensional theories arising from compactification of type II and heterotic string theory on asymmetric orbifolds. We find extra supersymmetry generators arising from twisted sectors, giving rise to exotic supersymmetry algebras. Among others we discover new cases with a large number of supercharges, such as N=(20,8), N=(24,8), N=(32,0), N=(24,24) and N=(48,0).

  7. Constraints on fermion mixing with exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, E.; Tommasini, D.

    1991-11-01

    We analyze the constraints on the mixing angles of the standard fermions with new heavy particles with exotic SU(2) x U(1) quantum number assignments (left-handed singlets or right-handed doublets), that appear in many extensions of the electroweak theory. The updated Charged Current and Neutral Current experimental data, including also the recent Z-peak measurements, are considered. The results of the global analysis of all these data are then presented

  8. Remarks on the exotic U-meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Hongmo; Tsou Sheungtsun

    1991-12-01

    In expectation of imminent results from the new hyperon beam experiment at CERN concerning the exotic U-meson at 3.1 GeV, we propose a detailed program of experimental tests to check the suggestion that U is a qqq-barq-bar ''M-diquonium'' state. Apart from some very characteristic decay modes, the U is expected to occur together with several analogous states with various quantum numbers to which it is intimately related. (author)

  9. Strange exotic states and compact stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagert, Irina; Wietoska, Mirjam; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the possible appearance of strange exotic multi-quark states in the interiors of neutron stars and signals for the existence of strange quark matter in the cores of compact stars. We show how the in-medium properties of possible pentaquark states are constrained by pulsar mass measurements. The possibility of generating the observed large pulsar kick velocities by asymmetric emission of neutrinos from strange quark matter in magnetic fields is outlined

  10. Production and identification of very exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougheon, F.

    1986-01-01

    New very exotic nuclei have been produced by fragmentation of the projectile at intermediate energy at GANIL. They have been identified through time of flight and ΔE-E measurements after a magnetic separation with the 0 0 LISE spectrometer. New neutron rich isotopes have been identified up to Z = 26 and evidence for the stability of the new series Tz = -5/2 has been shown. These results improve the knowledge of the neutron and proton drip lines

  11. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-01-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosi...

  12. Exploring exotic states with twisted boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Dimitri

    2017-01-01

    he goal of this thesis is to develop methods to study the nature and properties of exotic hadrons from lattice simulations. The main focus lies in the application of twisted boundary conditions. The thesis consists of a general introduction and the collection of three papers, represented respectively in three chapters. The introduction of the thesis reviews the theoretical background, which is further used in the rest of the thesis. Further implementing partially twisted boundary conditions in the scalar sector of lattice QCD is studied. Then we develop a method to study the content of the exotic hadrons by determining the wave function renormalization constant from lattice simulations, exploiting the dependence of the spectrum on the twisted boundary conditions. The final chapter deals with a novel method to study the multi-channel scattering problem in a finite volume, which is relevant for exotic states. Its key idea is to extract the complex hadron-hadron optical potential, avoiding the difficulties, associated with the solution of the multi-channel Luescher equation.

  13. Exploring exotic states with twisted boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agadjanov, Dimitri

    2017-09-11

    he goal of this thesis is to develop methods to study the nature and properties of exotic hadrons from lattice simulations. The main focus lies in the application of twisted boundary conditions. The thesis consists of a general introduction and the collection of three papers, represented respectively in three chapters. The introduction of the thesis reviews the theoretical background, which is further used in the rest of the thesis. Further implementing partially twisted boundary conditions in the scalar sector of lattice QCD is studied. Then we develop a method to study the content of the exotic hadrons by determining the wave function renormalization constant from lattice simulations, exploiting the dependence of the spectrum on the twisted boundary conditions. The final chapter deals with a novel method to study the multi-channel scattering problem in a finite volume, which is relevant for exotic states. Its key idea is to extract the complex hadron-hadron optical potential, avoiding the difficulties, associated with the solution of the multi-channel Luescher equation.

  14. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-11-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosis is once again being recognized as a resurgent disease. From 1993 to 1995, there were more than 20,000 laboratory-confirmed human cases of salmonellosis in Canada. The major source of Salmonella infection is food; however, an estimated 3 to 5% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets. Among the isolates from these patients with salmonellosis, a variety of Salmonella serotypes were also associated with exotic pets and included the following: S. java, S. stanley, S. poona, S. jangwani, S. tilene, S. litchfield, S. manhattan, S. pomona, S. miami, S. rubislaw, S. marina subsp. IV, and S. wassenaar subsp. IV.

  15. Infectious threats from exotic pets: dermatological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ted; Jablon, Jennifer

    2003-04-01

    Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. More than 250 distinct zoonoses have been described in the literature. It is estimated that 56% of United States households contain at least one pet, and although considerable research has been performed regarding the more common household animals including dogs, cats, small birds, and rodents, surprisingly little is known about the zoonotic hazards of owning the more exotic pets. According to the 1997 USPHS/IDSA Report on the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the immunocompromised patient should avoid contact with feces-laden soil, litter boxes, reptiles, most pet birds, and any animal less than 6 months old . It has also been documented that because of their inquisitive nature, children are at even higher risk for infection from animals than adolescents or immunocompetent adults. In this article the authors have reviewed the available data regarding hazards associated with the hedgehog, flying squirrel, iguana, chinchilla, and cockatoo. With the growing popularity of such exotic pets, further observation and research is warranted. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of zoonotic disease related to exotic pet ownership, and they should address this issue when obtaining a history and formulating a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions suggestive of such illnesses.

  16. Cosmological constraints on exotic injection of electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale D. [LAPTh, Université Savoie Mont Blanc and CNRS, 9 Chemin de Bellevue BP 110 Annecy-le-Vieux F-74941 Annecy Cedex (France); Lesgourgues, Julien, E-mail: Vivian.Poulin@lapth.cnrs.fr, E-mail: Pasquale.Serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr, E-mail: Julien.Lesgourgues@physik.rwth-aachen.de [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology (TTK), RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    We compute cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy constraints on exotic forms of energy injection in electromagnetic (e.m.) channels over a large range of timescales. We show that these constraints are very powerful around or just after recombination, although CMB keeps some sensitivity e.g. to decaying species with lifetimes as long as 10{sup 25} s. These bounds are complementary to CMB spectral distortions and primordial nucleosynthesis ones, which dominate at earlier timescales, as we also review here. For the first time, we describe the effects of the e.m. energy injection on the CMB power spectra as a function of the injection epoch , using the lifetime of a decaying particle as proxy. We also identify a suitable on-the-spot approximation, that can be used to derive accurate constraints, and describe its differences with the most up-to-date treatment. Our results are of interest not only for early universe relics constituting (a fraction of) the dark matter, but also for other exotic injection of e.m. radiation. For illustration, we apply our formalism to: i) Primordial black holes of mass 10{sup 13.5} g ∼< M ∼< 10{sup 16.8} g, showing that the constraints are comparable to the ones obtained from gamma-ray background studies and even dominate below ∼ 10{sup 14} g. ii) To a peculiar mass-mixing range in the sterile neutrino parameter space, complementary to other astrophysical and laboratory probes. iii) Finally, we provide a first estimate of the room for improvement left for forthcoming 21 cm experiments, comparing it with the reach of proposed CMB spectral distortion (PiXiE) and CMB angular power spectrum (CORE) missions. We show that the best and most realistic opportunity to look for this signal (or to improve over current constraints) in the 21 cm probe is to focus on the Cosmic Dawn epoch, 15 ∼< z ∼< 30, where the qualitatively unambiguous signature of a spectrum in emission can be expected for models that evade all current constraints.

  17. Exotic Galilean conformal symmetry and its dynamical realisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukierski, J.; Stichel, P.C.; Zakrzewski, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    The six-dimensional exotic Galilean algebra in (2+1) dimensions with two central charges m and θ, is extended when m=0, to a ten-dimensional Galilean conformal algebra with dilatation, expansion, two acceleration generators and the central charge θ. A realisation of such a symmetry is provided by a model with higher derivatives recently discussed in [P.C. Stichel, W.J. Zakrzewski, Ann. Phys. 310 (2004) 158]. We consider also a realisation of the Galilean conformal symmetry for the motion with a Coulomb potential and a magnetic vortex interaction. Finally, we study the restriction, as well as the modification, of the Galilean conformal algebra obtained after the introduction of the minimally coupled constant electric and magnetic fields

  18. Exotic particle searches using the Purdue AMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javorsek, D. II; Elmore, D.; Fischbach, E.; Miller, T.

    2001-01-01

    Two exotic particle searches are being performed using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab). Recent theoretical developments allow for the possibility of small violations of the symmetrization postulate, which may lead in turn to detectable violations of the Pauli exclusion principle. We report the results of a new experimental search for paronic (Pauli-violating) Be, denoted by Be', in samples where Be' retention would be highest. Our limits represent an improvement by a factor of approximately 300 over a previous search for Be'. There are also several recent cosmological motivations for strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs). We present results from our current search for anomalous heavy isotopes of Au in samples of Australian and laboratory gold with a limit on SIMP abundance ratios as low as 10 -12 . This experiment provides significant constraints on the existence of such particles in high Z nuclei

  19. Exotic becomes erotic: interpreting the biological correlates of sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, D J

    2000-12-01

    Although biological findings currently dominate the research literature on the determinants of sexual orientation, biological theorizing has not yet spelled out a developmental path by which any of the various biological correlates so far identified might lead to a particular sexual orientation. The Exotic-Becomes-Erotic (EBE) theory of sexual orientation (Bem, 1996) attempts to do just that, by suggesting how biological variables might interact with experiential and sociocultural factors to influence an individual's sexual orientation. Evidence for the theory is reviewed, and a path analysis of data from a large sample of twins is presented which yields preliminary support for the theory's claim that correlations between genetic variables and sexual orientation are mediated by childhood gender nonconformity.

  20. On Emergent Physics, "Unparticles" and Exotic "Unmatter" States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergent physics refers to the formation and evolution of collective patterns in systems that are nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium. This type of large-scale behavior often develops as a result of simple interactions at the component level and involves a dynamic interplay between order and randomness. On account of its universality, there are credible hints that emergence may play a leading role in the Tera-ElectronVolt (TeV sector of particle physics. Following this path, we examine the possibility of hypothetical high-energy states that have fractional number of quanta per state and consist of arbitrary mixtures of particles and antiparticles. These states are similar to "un-particles", massless fields of non-integral scaling dimensions that were recently conjectured to emerge in the TeV sector of particle physics. They are also linked to "unmatter", exotic clusters of matter and antimatter introduced few years ago in the context of Neutrosophy.

  1. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(bar nu) + p → ν(bar nu) + p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), bar nue + p → n + e+, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of bar nue flux with the bar nux (x = μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  2. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Fei-Fan; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(ν-bar)+p→ν(ν-bar)+p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), ν-bar_e+p→n+e"+, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of ν-bar_e flux with the ν-bar_x (x=μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  3. The quest for novel modes of excitation in exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paar, N.

    2010-06-01

    This paper provides an insight into several open problems in the quest for novel modes of excitation in nuclei with isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite-temperature characteristics in stellar environments. Major unsolved problems include the nature of pygmy dipole resonances, the quest for various multipole and spin-isospin excitations both in neutron-rich and proton drip-line nuclei mainly driven by loosely bound nucleons, excitations in unstable deformed nuclei and evolution of their properties with the shape phase transition. Exotic modes of excitation in nuclei at finite temperatures characteristic of supernova evolution present open problems with a possible impact in modeling astrophysically relevant weak interaction rates. All these issues challenge self-consistent many-body theory frameworks at the frontiers of on-going research, including nuclear energy density functionals, both phenomenological and constrained by the strong interaction physics of QCD, models based on low-momentum two-nucleon interaction Vlow-k and correlated realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction VUCOM, supplemented by three-body force, as well as two-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions derived from the chiral effective field theory. Joined theoretical and experimental efforts, including research with radioactive isotope beams, are needed to provide insight into dynamical properties of nuclei away from the valley of stability, involving the interplay of isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite temperature.

  4. Cosmic neutrinos as a probe of TeV-scale physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, M.

    2007-02-15

    Ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos are versatile probes of astrophysics, astronomy, and particle physics. They represent the messengers of hadronic processes in cosmic accelerators and survive the propagation through the interstellar medium practically unscathed. We investigate the neutrino fluxes associated with optically thin proton sources which provide a diagnostic of the transition between galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. The center of mass energies in collisions of these cosmic neutrinos with atomic nuclei in the atmosphere or the Earth's interior easily exceed those so far reached in man-made accelerators. We discuss the prospects of observing supersymmetric neutrino interactions with Cherenkov telescopes and speculate about a neutrino component in extremely high energy cosmic rays from exotic interactions in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  5. Probing Interactions of N-Donor Molecules with Open Metal Sites within Paramagnetic Cr-MIL-101: A Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic and Density Functional Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Thomas; Mondal, Arobendo; Tschense, Carsten B L; Wittmann, Johannes J; Klimm, Ottokar; Siegel, Renée; Corzilius, Björn; Weber, Birgit; Kaupp, Martin; Senker, Juergen

    2018-02-14

    Understanding host-guest interactions is one of the key requirements for adjusting properties in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In particular, systems with coordinatively unsaturated Lewis acidic metal sites feature highly selective adsorption processes. This is attributed to strong interactions with Lewis basic guest molecules. Here we show that a combination of 13 C MAS NMR spectroscopy with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations allows one to unravel the interactions of water, 2-aminopyridine, 3-aminopyridine, and diethylamine with the open metal sites in Cr-MIL-101. The 13 C MAS NMR spectra, obtained with ultrafast magic-angle spinning, are well resolved, with resonances distributed over 1000 ppm. They present a clear signature for each guest at the open metal sites. Based on competition experiments this leads to the following binding preference: water open metal sites, the NMR data offer additional information about the guest and framework dynamics. We expect that our strategy has the potential for probing the binding situation of adsorbate mixtures at the open metal sites of MOFs in general and thus accesses the microscopic interaction mechanisms for this important material class, which is essential for deriving structure-property relationships.

  6. Interaction between water-soluble rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)₂ and surfactants probed by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Mei; Guo, Cai-Hong; Fu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Hua; Li, Rui-Xiang; Li, Xian-Jun

    2012-07-01

    The interactions of rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)(2) [TPPTS=P(m-C(6)H(4)SO(3)Na)(3)] with cationic, nonionic, and anionic surfactants have been investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence and (1)H NMR measurements. The presence of four different species of RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)(2) in cationic cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB) solution has been demonstrated: free rhodium complex, rhodium complex bound to CTAB monomer, rhodium complex bound to CTAB premicelles, rhodium complex bound to CTAB micelles. The spectroscopy data show that RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)(2) can adsorb on the interface of cationic CTAB micelles by strong electrostatic attraction, weakly bind to the nonionic polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) micelles by hydrophobic interaction, and does not interact with anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles due to the strong electrostatic repulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of exotic tree species in Nordic forestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Erik Dahl; Lobo, Albin; Myking, Tor

    2014-01-01

    the vegetation and forest history and its implications for the interest in using exotic species. We review to what extent exotic species can contribute to increased economic returns from forest plantings and the potential negative ecological effects associated with introduction of new species. Considering...... the expected climate changes, we discuss whether and how the increased use of exotic species can contribute to sustained and increased health and productivity of Nordic forests without jeopardising ecological and social values....

  8. The $\\Xi^- +d\\to n+\\Lambda+\\Lambda$ reaction as a probe of the $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Afnan, I. R.

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of the Faddeev equations we demonstrate that a $\\Lambda\\Lambda-\\Xi N$ interaction that gives a $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ scattering length comparable to the $nn$ scattering length, and the binding energy of $^{\\ 6}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$He as an $\\alpha\\Lambda\\Lambda-\\alpha\\Xi N$ system, produces a final state interaction peak in the neutron spectrum for the reaction $\\Xi^- d \\to n\\Lambda\\Lambda$. This suggests that this reaction could be used to constrain the $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ scatteri...

  9. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  10. Carbon-carbon: Multi-use composite of exotic artifact?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hager, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon composites evolved as the pyrolyzed cousins of the polymer matrix composites, capitalizing on the development of carbon fiber reinforcements. Early success as thermal protection material in ballistic missile reentry vehicles quickly spawned other military applications such as rocket nozzles and exit cones. Despite regulations limiting dissemination of information, the space shuttle and aircraft brake industry benefited from these developments by adapting the C-C fabrication processes to their products. Carbon-carbon has been considered, proposed or used for many other exotic applications: protection against laser weapon assault for SDI; thermal protection for NASP; components of expendable gas turbine engines: dimensionally stable space platforms, mirrors and antennas; thermal management applications such as printed circuit boards and space-based radiators. They have also been incorporated into the design of the Tokamak fusion reactors and NASA space probes and are being considered as replacements for graphite in other nuclear applications. There is significant world-wide interest and research in C-C. The paper traces the history of these developments and explores the technical consequences of rapid product development in the absence of an adequate science base. The unexploited potential of this material system is examined, and the technical challenges and barriers to commercialization are highlighted

  11. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure; Les noyaux exotiques: un autre regard sur la structure nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J [Warsaw Univ., Institute of Theoretical Physics (Poland); Blumenfeld, Y; Flocard, H; Garcia Borge, M J; Nowacki, F; Rombouts, S; Theisen, Ch; Marques, F M; Lacroix, D; Dessagne, P; Gaeggeler, H

    2002-07-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements.

  12. Probing strongly interacting electroweak dynamics through W+W-/ZZ ratios at future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.; Cheung, K.; Han, T.; Phillips, R.J.N.

    1995-01-01

    We point out that the ratio of W + W - →W + W - and W + W - →ZZ cross sections is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking, in the c.m. energy region √s WW approx-gt 1 TeV where vector boson scattering may well become strong. We suggest ways in which this ratio can be extracted at a 1.5 TeV e + e - linear collider, using W ± ,Z→jj hadronic decays and relying on dijet mass resolution to provid statistical discrimination between W ± and Z. WW fusion processes studied here are unique for exploring scalar resonances of mass of about 1 TeV and are complementary to studies via the direct channel e + e - →W + W - for the vector and nonresonant cases. With an integrated luminosity of 200 fb -1 , the signals obtained are statistically significant. A comparision with a study of the e - e - →ννW - W - process is made. Enhancements of the signal rate from using a polarized electron beam, or at a 2 TeV e + e - linear colider and possible higher energy μ + μ - colliders, are also presented

  13. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Probing strongly-interacting electroweak dynamics through W+W-/ZZ ratios at future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.

    1995-01-01

    The authors point out that the ratio of W + W - → W + W - and W + W - → ZZ cross sections is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking, in the CM energy region √s ww approx-gt 1 TeV where vector boson scattering may well become strong. They suggest ways in which this ratio can be extracted at a 1.5 TeV e + e - linear collider, using W ± , Z → jj hadronic decays and relying on dijet mass resolution to provide statistical discrimination between W ± and Z. WW fusion processes studied here are unique for exploring scalar resonances of mass about 1 TeV and are complementary to studies via the direct channel e + e - → W + W - for the vector and non-resonant cases. With an integrated luminosity of 200 fb -1 , the signals obtained are statistically significant. Comparison with a study of e - e - → ννW - W - process is made. Enhancements of the signal rate from using a polarized electron beam, or at a 2 TeV e + e - linear collider and possible higher energy μ + μ - colliders, are also presented

  15. Probing nucleic acid interactions and pre-mRNA splicing by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimková, Eva; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 11 (2012), s. 14929-14945 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : FRET * FLIM * acceptor photobleaching * RNA interactions * spliceosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2012

  16. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang [Center for General Education, Chang Gung University,Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Fei-Fan [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, Feng-Shiuh [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Guey-Lin [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Tsung-Che [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Yi [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-22

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(ν-bar)+p→ν(ν-bar)+p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), ν-bar{sub e}+p→n+e{sup +}, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of ν-bar{sub e} flux with the ν-bar{sub x} (x=μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  17. Toehold-mediated internal control to probe the near-field interaction between the metallic nanoparticle and the fluorophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Y. S.; Yung, L. Y. L.

    2014-10-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are known to alter the emission of vicinal fluorophores through the near-field interaction, leading to either fluorescence quenching or enhancement. Much ambiguity remains in the experimental outcome of such a near-field interaction, particularly for bulk colloidal solution. It is hypothesized that the strong far-field interference from the inner filter effect of the MNPs could mask the true near-field MNP-fluorophore interaction significantly. Thus, in this work, a reliable internal control capable of decoupling the near-field interaction from far-field interference is established by the use of the DNA toehold concept to mediate the in situ assembly and disassembly of the MNP-fluorophore conjugate. A model gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-Cy3 system is used to investigate our proposed toehold-mediated internal control system. The maximum fluorescence enhancement is obtained for large-sized AuNP (58 nm) separated from Cy3 at an intermediate distance of 6.8 nm, while fluorescence quenching is observed for smaller-sized AuNP (11 nm and 23 nm), which is in agreement with the theoretical values reported in the literature. This work shows that the toehold-mediated internal control design can serve as a central system for evaluating the near-field interaction of other MNP-fluorophore combinations and facilitate the rational design of specific MNP-fluorophore systems for various applications.Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are known to alter the emission of vicinal fluorophores through the near-field interaction, leading to either fluorescence quenching or enhancement. Much ambiguity remains in the experimental outcome of such a near-field interaction, particularly for bulk colloidal solution. It is hypothesized that the strong far-field interference from the inner filter effect of the MNPs could mask the true near-field MNP-fluorophore interaction significantly. Thus, in this work, a reliable internal control capable of decoupling the near

  18. The Independent Gradient Model: A New Approach for Probing Strong and Weak Interactions in Molecules from Wave Function Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Corentin; Khartabil, Hassan; Boisson, Jean-Charles; Contreras-García, Julia; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Hénon, Eric

    2018-03-19

    Extraction of the chemical interaction signature from local descriptors based on electron density (ED) is still a fruitful field of development in chemical interpretation. In a previous work that used promolecular ED (frozen ED), the new descriptor, δg , was defined. It represents the difference between a virtual upper limit of the ED gradient (∇ρIGM , IGM=independent gradient model) that represents a noninteracting system and the true ED gradient (∇ρ ). It can be seen as a measure of electron sharing brought by ED contragradience. A compelling feature of this model is to provide an automatic workflow that extracts the signature of interactions between selected groups of atoms. As with the noncovalent interaction (NCI) approach, it provides chemists with a visual understanding of the interactions present in chemical systems. ∇ρIGM is achieved simply by using absolute values upon summing the individual gradient contributions that make up the total ED gradient. Hereby, we extend this model to relaxed ED calculated from a wave function. To this end, we formulated gradient-based partitioning (GBP) to assess the contribution of each orbital to the total ED gradient. We highlight these new possibilities across two prototypical examples of organic chemistry: the unconventional hexamethylbenzene dication, with a hexa-coordinated carbon atom, and β-thioaminoacrolein. It will be shown how a bond-by-bond picture can be obtained from a wave function, which opens the way to monitor specific interactions along reaction paths. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for 'hands-on' projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the "1"2C(d,p)"1"3C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  20. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  1. Study on the inclusion interaction of p-sulfonated calix[n]arenes with Vitamin K3 using methylene blue as a spectral probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qin; Gu, Jiashan; Yu, Huapeng; Liu, Chun; Wang, Lun; Zhou, Yunyou

    2007-09-01

    The characteristics of host-guest complexation between p-sulfonated calix[n]arene (SCnA, n = 4, 6) and Vitamin K(3) (VK(3)) were investigated by fluorescence spectrometry and absorption spectrometry using methylene blue (MB) as a probe. Interaction with MB and SCnA led to an obvious decrease in fluorescence intensity of MB, accompanying with shifts of emission peaks. Absorption peaks also showed interesting changes; however, when VK(3) was added, fluorescence intensity and absorbance recovered and a slight and slow red shift was observed. The obtained results showed that the inclusion ability of p-sulphonated calix[n]arenes towards VK(3) was the order: p-sulphonated calix[6]arene (SC6A) >p-sulphonated calix[4]arene (SC4A). Relative mechanism was proposed to explain the inclusion process.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  3. Exotic nuclei from a theoretical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Univ. of Warsaw

    1998-01-01

    One of the main frontiers of nuclear structure today is the physics of radioactive nuclear beams. Experiments with radioactive beams will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. What makes this subject both exciting and difficult is: (i) the weak binding and corresponding closeness of the particle continuum, implying a large diffuseness of the nuclear surface and extreme spatial dimensions characterizing the outermost nucleons, and (ii) access to the exotic combinations of proton and neutron numbers which offer prospects for completely new structural phenomena

  4. Exotic woody plant invaders of the Transvaal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Henderson

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and abundance o ;f exotic, woody plant invaders were recorded in 60% of the quarter degree squares in the study area. Sixty-one invaders were encountered o f which the most important and aggressive were Acacia dealbaia, Populus spp.,  Melia azedarach, Opuntia ficus-indica, Salix babylonica and  Acacia mearnsii. Invasion patterns are discussed and an attempt is made to correlate distribution with environmental factors. Attention is drawn to the areas of greatest invasion and the areas that are liable to show the greatest expansion in the future.

  5. Hard production of exotic hybrid mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, I.; Teryaev, O.V. [Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pire, B.; Anikin, I. [Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Szymanowski, I. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Liege Univ. (Belgium); Anikin, I.; Wallon, S. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. de Physique Theorique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    Exotic hybrid mesons H, with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} may be copiously produced in the hard exclusive processes {gamma}{sup *}(Q{sup 2}){gamma} {yields} H and {gamma}{sup *}(Q{sup 2})P(p) {yields} HP(p') because they have a leading twist distribution amplitude with a sizable coupling constant f{sub H}, which may be estimated through QCD sum rules. The reaction rates scale in the same way as the corresponding rates for usual mesons. (authors)

  6. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei is given. Binding energies including p and p-sd model spaces and sd and sd-pf model spaces; cross-shell excitations around 32 Mg, including weak-coupling aspects and mechanisms for lowering the ntw excitations; beta decay properties of neutron-rich sd model, of p-sd and sd-pf model spaces, of proton-rich sd model space; coulomb break-up cross sections are discussed. (G.P.) 76 refs.; 12 figs

  7. Probing the interaction of ferrocene containing hyperbranched poly-ester with model plasma protein: Effect on the interaction mechanism and conformational change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Fengjuan, E-mail: xfj66@126.com; Gu, Muqing; Liang, Ye; Li, Lanlan; Yu, Xiaolei; Wu, Xiangfeng

    2014-05-01

    Interaction mechanism and conformational change of model plasma protein-bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced by ferrocenyl-functionalized hyperbranched polyester (HBPE-Fc) were investigated using cyclicvoltammetry (CV), differential pulsed voltammetry (DPV), fluorescence, UV–vis absorption spectrometry and circular dichroism (CD). Some complicated interactions occurred between BSA and HBPE-Fc and the new redox centers appeared in the BSA/HBPE-Fc complex that changed and hindered the electron transfer of Fe/Fe{sup 2+}. Fluorescence quenching data showed that the fluorescence of BSA was statically quenched by HBPE-Fc, which implied that ground state complex formed between BSA and HBPE-Fc. van der Waals force and hydrogen bond played major roles in the interaction of HBPE-Fc with BSA. The binding constant Ka for HBPE-Fc–protein interaction is in the order of 10{sup 6} at room temperature indicates that there is a strong interaction between HBPE-Fc and BSA. Synchronous, three-dimensional fluorescence and CD studies indicated that the interaction of BSA with HBPE-Fc induced conformational changes in BSA with overall decrease in the α-helical structure and increase in β-pleated sheet structure. The molecular model of the interaction between HBPE-Fc and BSA was also presented according to the results in this study. - Highlights: • A novel ferrocenyl-functionalized hyperbranched polymer (HBPE-Fc) with potential anticancer effects. • New redox centers appear in the BSA/HBPE-Fc complex that changed and hindered the electron transfer of Fe/Fe{sup 2+}. • BSA fluorescence was statically quenched by HBPE-Fc. • BSA/HBPE-Fc ground state complex was mainly formed by the hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. • HBPE-Fc induced conformational changes in BSA with overall decrease in the α-helical structure and increase in β-pleated sheet structure. • The molecular model of the interaction was presented according to the results in this study.

  8. EPR of Cu(II) in sarcosine cadmium chloride: probe into dopant site - symmetry and copper-sarcosine interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pathinettam-Padiyan, D; Murugesan, R

    2000-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) doped sarcosine cadmium chloride single crystals have been investigated at room temperature. Experimental results reveal that the Cu(II) ion enters the lattice interstitially. The observed superhyperfine lines indicate the superposition of two sets of quintet structure with interaction of nitrogen atoms and the two isotopes of copper. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are evaluated by Schonland method and the electric field symmetry around the copper ion is rhombic. An admixture of d sub z sup 2 orbital with the d sub x sub sup 2 sub - sub y sub sup 2 ground state is observed. Evaluation of MO coefficients reveals that the in-plane interaction between copper and nitrogen is strong in this lattice.

  9. Interaction between the magnetic moments of the 3d and the 4f electrons in manganite, probed by Ga substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Langsheng; Zhang Lei; Tong Wei; Qu Zhe; Pi Li; Zhang Yuheng

    2012-01-01

    The substitution of Ga for Mn in manganite Nd 0.6 Dy 0.1 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 with a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state has been performed to study the influence of the Mn-sublattice magnetic ordering on the magnetic rare-earth sublattice. It is found that the substitution of Mn 3+ with Ga 3+ ions results in a sharp decrease of T C , reflecting the reduction of the double-exchange interactions strength J Mn–Mn . At the same time, a depinning effect of the rare-earth magnetic moment has been observed. This behavior unambiguously proves that the exchange interaction between Mn and rare-earth ions J Mn–R strongly influences the rare-earth magnetic ordering at temperatures below T C and stabilizes the rare-earth magnetic ground state.

  10. Probing Interactions between AuNPs/AgNPs and Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs Using Hyperspectral Dark-field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Bhat

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs such as gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs and AgNPs have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor effect in anti-angiogenesis, photothermal and radio therapeutics. On the other hand, cell membranes are critical locales for specific targeting of cancerous cells. Therefore, NP-membrane interactions need be studied at molecular level to help better understand the underlying physicochemical mechanisms for future applications in cancer nanotechnology. Herein, we report our study on the interactions between citrate stabilized colloidal AuNPs/AgNPs (10 nm in size and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs using hyperspectral dark-field microscopy. GUVs are large model vesicle systems well established for the study of membrane dynamics. GUVs used in this study were prepared with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC and doped with cholesterol at various molar concentrations. Both imaging and spectral results support that AuNPs and AgNPs interact very differently with GUVs, i.e., AuNPs tend to integrate in between the lipid bilayer and form a uniform golden-brown crust on vesicles, whereas AgNPs are bejeweled on the vesicle surface as isolated particles or clusters with much varied configurations. The more disruptive capability of AuNPs is hypothesized to be responsible for the formation of golden brown crusts in AuNP-GUV interaction. GUVs of 20 mol% CHOL:DMPC were found to be a most economical concentration for GUVs to achieve the best integrity and the least permeability, consistent with the finding from other phase studies of lipid mixture that the liquid-ordered domains have the largest area fraction of the entire membrane at around 20 mol% of cholesterol.

  11. Probing the communication of deoxythymidine triphosphate in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by communication maps and interaction energy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran

    2017-11-08

    We calculate communication maps for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) to elucidate energy transfer pathways between deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) and other parts of the protein. This approach locates energy transport channels from the dTTP to remote regions of the protein via residues and water molecules. We examine the water dynamics near the catalytic site of HIV-1 RT by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that, within the catalytic site, the relaxation of water molecules is similar to that of the hydration water molecules present in other proteins and the relaxation time scale is fast enough to transport energy and helps in communication between dTTP and other residues in the system. To quantify energy transfer, we also calculate the interaction energies of dTTP, 2Mg 2+ , doxy-guanosine nucleotide (DG22) with their surrounding residues by using the B3LYP-D3 method. The results, from classical vibrational energy diffusivity and QM interaction energy, are complementary to identify the important residues involved in the process of polymerization. The positive and negative interactions by dTTP with different types of residues in the catalytic region make the residues transfer energy through vibrational communication.

  12. Probing into the binding interaction between medroxyprogesterone acetate and bovine serum albumin (BSA): spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Dong-Qi; Qiu, Min-Jie; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min; Wang, Qi; Shi, Jie-Hua

    2016-09-01

    To further understand the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the binding interaction of MPA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) was studied using fluorescence emission spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular docking methods. The experimental results reveal that the fluorescence of BSA quenches due to the formation of MPA-BSA complex. The number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant for MPA-BSA complex are ~1 and 4.6 × 10(3)  M(-1) at 310 K, respectively. However, it can be concluded that the binding process of MPA with BSA is spontaneous and the main interaction forces between MPA and BSA are van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction due to the negative values of ΔG(0) , ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) in the binding process of MPA with BSA. MPA prefers binding on the hydrophobic cavity in subdomain IIIA (site II'') of BSA resulting in a slight change in the conformation of BSA, but BSA retaining the α-helix structure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Probing different regimes of strong field light-matter interaction with semiconductor quantum dots and few cavity photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargart, F.; Roy-Choudhury, K.; John, T.; Portalupi, S. L.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Hughes, S.; Michler, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we present an extensive experimental and theoretical investigation of different regimes of strong field light-matter interaction for cavity-driven quantum dot (QD) cavity systems. The electric field enhancement inside a high-Q micropillar cavity facilitates exceptionally strong interaction with few cavity photons, enabling the simultaneous investigation for a wide range of QD-laser detuning. In case of a resonant drive, the formation of dressed states and a Mollow triplet sideband splitting of up to 45 μeV is measured for a mean cavity photon number ≤slant 1. In the asymptotic limit of the linear AC Stark effect we systematically investigate the power and detuning dependence of more than 400 QDs. Some QD-cavity systems exhibit an unexpected anomalous Stark shift, which can be explained by an extended dressed 4-level QD model. We provide a detailed analysis of the QD-cavity systems properties enabling this novel effect. The experimental results are successfully reproduced using a polaron master equation approach for the QD-cavity system, which includes the driving laser field, exciton-cavity and exciton-phonon interactions.

  14. The Influence of Exotic Service Quality Towards Overall Satisfaction at Hotels in Makassar

    OpenAIRE

    Bata Ilyas, Gunawan; Munir, Abdul Razak

    2017-01-01

    As one of tourism destination place, Makassar become potential area to develop hotel industry. This study aimed to asses influence exotic dimensions quality comprising of service performance interaction quality, physical environment quality against Overall Satisfaction. This research used descriptive survey and explanatory. Population selected were all the customers at the hotel in Makassar who have a minimum 2 days and who had used the services of this hotel before. Samples in taken from Max...

  15. Experiments with stored relativistic exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.; Attallah, F.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Dolinskiy, A.; Eickhoff, H.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Hellstroem, M.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kozhuharov, C.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Quint, W.; Tradon, T.; Reich, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schlitt, B.; Steck, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Vermeeren, L.; Winkler, M.; Winkler, Th.; Falch, M.; Kerscher, Th.; Loebner, K.E.G.; Fujita, Y.; Novikov, Yu.; Patyk, Z.; Stadlmann, J.; Wollnik, H.

    1999-01-01

    Beams of relativistic exotic nuclei were produced, separated and investigated with the combination of the fragment separator FRS and the storage ring ESR. The following experiments are presented: 1) Direct mass measurements of relativistic nickel and bismuth projectile fragments were performed using Schottky spectrometry. Applying electron cooling, the relative velocity spread of the circulating secondary nuclear beams of low intensity was reduced to below 10 -6 . The achieved mass resolving power of m/Δm = 6.5·10 5 (FWHM) in recent measurements represents an improvement by a factor of two compared to authors' previous experiments. The previously unknown masses of more than 100 proton-rich isotopes have been measured in the range of 54≤Z≤84. The results are compared with mass models and estimated values based on extrapolations of experimental values. 2) Exotic nuclei with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling can be investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique has been successfully applied in a first measurement with nickel fragments. A mass resolving power of m/Δm = 1.5·10 5 (FWHM) was achieved in this mode of operation. 3) Nuclear half-lives of stored and cooled bare projectile fragments have been measured to study the influence of the ionic charge state on the beta-decay probability

  16. Exotic hybrid mesons in hard electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the sizeable cross section for deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic J PC =1 -+ hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. The production amplitude scales like the one for usual meson electroproduction, i.e., as 1/Q 2 . This is due to the nonvanishing leading twist distribution amplitude for the hybrid meson, which may be normalized thanks to its relation to the energy-momentum tensor and to the QCD sum rules technique. The hard amplitude is considered up to next-to-leading order in α S and we explore the consequences of fixing the renormalization scale ambiguity through the Brodsky-Lepage-Mackenzie (BLM) procedure. We study the particular case where the hybrid meson decays through a πη meson pair. We discuss the πη generalized distribution amplitude and then calculate the production amplitude for this process. We propose a forward-backward asymmetry in the production of π and η mesons as a signal for the hybrid meson production. We briefly comment on hybrid electroproduction at very high energy, in the diffractive limit where a QCD Odderon exchange mechanism should dominate. The conclusion of our study is that hard electroproduction is a promising way to study exotic hybrid mesons, in particular, at JLAB, HERA (HERMES), or CERN (Compass)

  17. Is Large-Scale-Structure formation a new probe of the Dark Matter interactions with Standard Model particles?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been extensive efforts made to discover dark matter particles through a significant experimental program based on direct and indirect detection techniques. However so far these searches remain unsuccessful, thus questioning our ability to elucidate one of the biggest challenges of modern Cosmology. In this talk I will review some of the key aspects of these techniques and present a new strategy to characterise the dark matter interactions with the visible sector without having to rely on critical assumptions.

  18. X ray emission: a tool and a probe for laser - clusters interaction; L'emission X: un outil et une sonde pour l'interaction laser - agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prigent, Ch

    2004-12-01

    In intense laser-cluster interaction, the experimental results show a strong energetic coupling between radiation and matter. We have measured absolute X-ray yields and charge state distributions under well control conditions as a function of physical parameters governing the interaction; namely laser intensity, pulse duration, wavelength or polarization state of the laser light, the size and the species of the clusters (Ar, Kr, Xe). We have highlighted, for the first time, an intensity threshold in the X-ray production very low ({approx} 2.10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for a pulse duration of 300 fs) which can results from an effect of the dynamical polarisation of clusters in an intense electric field. A weak dependence with the wavelength (400 nm / 800 nm) on the absolute X-ray yields has been found. Moreover, we have observed a saturation of the X-ray emission probability below a critical cluster size. (author)

  19. High spin exotic states and new method for pairing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molique, H.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new method called 'PSY-MB', initially developed in the framework of abstract group theory for the solution of the problem of strongly interacting multi-fermionic systems with particular to systems in an external rotating field. The validity of the new method (PSY-MB) is tested on model Hamiltonians. A detailed comparison between the obtained solutions and the exact ones is performed. The new method is used in the study of realistic nuclear Hamiltonians based on the Woods-Saxon potential within the cranking approximation to study the influence of residual monopole pairing interactions in the rare-earth mass region. In parallel with this new technique we present original results obtained with the Woods-Saxon mean-field and the self-consistent Hartree-Fock approximation in order to investigate such exotic effects as octupole deformations and hexadecapole C 4 -polarizing deformations in the framework of high-spin physics. By developing these three approaches in one single work we prepare the ground for the nuclear structure calculations of the new generation - where the residual two-body interactions are taken into account also in the weak pairing limit. (author)

  20. Exotic light nuclei and nuclei in the lead region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppelier, N.A.F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for modifying, or renormalizing, a truncated nuclear hamiltonian such that the wave functions obtained by diagonalizing this modified or effective hamiltoniandescribe the nucleus as well as possible: deriving the hamiltonian directly from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction between free nucleons; parametrizing the hamiltonian in terms of a number of parameters and determining these parameters from a least-squares fit of calculated properties to experimental data; approximating the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction between two nucleons in a nucleus by a simple analytic expression. An effective hamiltonian derived following the second method is applied in a theoretical study of exotic nuclei in the region of Z=2-9 and A=4-30 and the problem of the neutron halo in 11 Li is discussed. Results of shell-model calculations of 20i Pb and nuclei in its neighbourhood are presented in which an effective hamiltonian was employed derived with the last method. The quenching of M1 strength in 208 Pb, and the spectroscopic factors measured in proton knock-out reactions could be described quite satisfactory. Finally, a method is presented for deriving the effective hamiltonian directly from the realistic NN interaction with algebraic techniques. (H.W.). 114 refs.; 34 figs.; 12 tabs.; schemes

  1. Angular distributions as a probe of anomalous ZZH and γZH interactions at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindani, Saurabh D.; Sharma, Pankaj

    2009-01-01

    We examine the contribution of general Z*ZH and γ*ZH three-point interactions arising from new physics to the Higgs production process e + e - →HZ. From Lorentz covariance, each of these vertices may be written in terms of three (complex) form factors, whose real and imaginary parts together make six independent couplings. We take into account possible longitudinal or transverse beam polarization likely to be available at a linear collider. We show how partial cross sections and angular asymmetries in suitable combinations with appropriate beam polarizations can be used to disentangle various couplings from one another. A striking result is that using transverse polarization, one of the γZH couplings, not otherwise accessible, can be determined independently of all other couplings. Transverse polarization also helps in the independent determination of a combination of two other couplings, in contrast to a combination of four accessible with unpolarized or longitudinally polarized beams. We also obtain the sensitivity of the various observables in constraining the new-physics interactions at a linear collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV with longitudinal or transverse polarization.

  2. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A

    2014-04-18

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  3. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Kunze, Angelika; Carlsson, Nils; Altgä rde, Noomi; Svedhem, Sofia; Nordé n, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  4. Facet-specific interaction between methanol and TiO2 probed by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deheng; Li, Yadong; Liu, Xinyi; Cao, Yue; Gao, Yi; Shen, Y Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2018-04-24

    The facet-specific interaction between molecules and crystalline catalysts, such as titanium dioxides (TiO 2 ), has attracted much attention due to possible facet-dependent reactivity. Using surface-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, we have studied how methanol interacts with different common facets of crystalline TiO 2 , including rutile(110), (001), (100), and anatase(101), under ambient temperature and pressure. We found that methanol adsorbs predominantly in the molecular form on all of the four surfaces, while spontaneous dissociation into methoxy occurs preferentially when these surfaces become defective. Extraction of Fermi resonance coupling between stretch and bending modes of the methyl group in analyzing adsorbed methanol spectra allows determination of the methanol adsorption isotherm. The isotherms obtained for the four surfaces are nearly the same, yielding two adsorbed Gibbs free energies associated with two different adsorption configurations singled out by ab initio calculations. They are ( i ) ∼-20 kJ/mol for methanol with its oxygen attached to a low-coordinated surface titanium, and ( ii ) ∼-5 kJ/mol for methanol hydrogen-bonded to a surface oxygen and a neighboring methanol molecule. Despite similar adsorption energetics, the Fermi resonance coupling strength for adsorbed methanol appears to depend sensitively on the surface facet and coverage.

  5. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with DPPH in the absence and presence of the eight antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangrong; Chen, Dejun; Wang, Gongke; Lu, Yan

    2015-02-25

    Albumin represents a very abundant and important circulating antioxidant in plasma. DPPH radical is also called 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. It has been widely used for measuring the efficiency of antioxidants. In this paper, the ability of human serum albumin (HSA) to scavenge DPPH radical was investigated using UV-vis absorption spectra. The interaction between HSA and DPPH was investigated in the absence and presence of eight popular antioxidants using fluorescence spectroscopy. These results indicate the antioxidant activity of HSA against DPPH radical is similar to glutathione and the value of IC50 is 5.200×10(-5) mol L(-1). In addition, the fluorescence experiments indicate the quenching mechanism of HSA, by DPPH, is a static process. The quenching process of DPPH with HSA is easily affected by the eight antioxidants, however, they cannot change the quenching mechanism of DPPH with HSA. The binding of DPPH to HSA primarily takes place in subdomain IIA and exists two classes of binding sites with two different interaction behaviors. The decreased binding constants and the number of binding sites of DPPH with HSA by the introduction of the eight antioxidants may result from the competition of the eight antioxidants and DPPH binding to HSA. The binding of DPPH to HSA may induce the micro-environment of the lone Trp-214 from polar to slightly nonpolar. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous Assessment of Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Using a Probe Drug Cocktail in Cynomolgus Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosa, Rachel E; Lazzaro, Sarah; Bi, Yi-An; Tierney, Brendan; Gates, Dana; Modi, Sweta; Costales, Chester; Rodrigues, A David; Tremaine, Larry M; Varma, Manthena V

    2018-06-07

    We aim to establish an in vivo preclinical model to enable simultaneous assessment of inhibition potential of an investigational drug on clinically relevant drug transporters, organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and organic anion transporter (OAT)3. Pharmacokinetics of substrate cocktail consisting of pitavastatin (OATP1B substrate), rosuvastatin (OATP1B/BCRP/OAT3), sulfasalazine (BCRP) and talinolol (P-gp) were obtained in cynomolgus monkey - alone or in combination with transporter inhibitors. Single dose rifampicin (30 mg/kg) significantly (pdrugs, with a marked effect on pitavastatin and rosuvastatin (AUC ratio ~21-39). Elacridar, BCRP/P-gp inhibitor, increased the AUC of sulfasalazine, talinolol, as well as rosuvastatin and pitavastatin. An OAT1/3 inhibitor (probenecid) significantly (pdrug-drug interaction risk assessment, before advancing a new molecular entity into clinical development, as well as providing mechanistic insights on transporter-mediated interactions. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Exotic aspects of hadronic atoms-anomalous quasi-stabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1993-07-01

    Recently revealed, but hitherto unknown, new aspects of hadronic atoms, namely, anomalous quasi-stabilities of negative hadrons, are discussed. One is on long-lived antiprotonic helium atoms, characterized as 'atomic exotic halo' and the other is on deeply bound pionic atoms, characterized as 'nuclear exotic halo'. (author)

  8. Invasion of exotic earthworms into ecosystems inhabited by native earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. F. Hendrix; G. H. Baker; M. A. Callaham Jr; G. A. Damoff; Fragoso C.; G. Gonzalez; S. W. James; S. L. Lachnicht; T. Winsome; X. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The most conspicuous biological invasions in terrestrial ecosystems have been by exotic plants, insects and vertebrates. Invasions by exotic earthworms, although not as well studied, may be increasing with global commerce in agriculture, waste management and bioremediation. A number of cases has documented where invasive earthworms have caused significant changes in...

  9. A survey of exotic plants in federal wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marilyn Marler

    2000-01-01

    I conducted a survey of wilderness areas to provide an overview of plant invasions in the National Wilderness Preservation System. Fifteen per cent of responding mangers reported that exotic plants were among their top 10 management concerns, either because they are actively dealing with control of exotic pest plants or have prioritized prevention of their...

  10. Comparative study of genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated comparatively the genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic cockerels, pullets and broilers to natural infection with infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus in a flock of 150 seven-week-old exotic breed of chickens comprising of 50 Black Harco cockerels, 50 Black Harco pullets and 50 White ...

  11. A possible global group structure for exotic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xue-Qian [Nankai University, School of Physics, Tianjin (China); Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2014-12-01

    Based on the fact that the long expected pentaquark which possesses the exotic quantum numbers of B = 1 and S = 1 was not experimentally found, although exotic states of XY Z have been observed recently, we conjecture that the heavy flavors may play an important role in stabilizing the hadronic structures beyond the traditional q anti q and qqq composites. (orig.)

  12. Rapid detection of exotic Lymantriids and Scolytids pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Ellen Dix

    2003-01-01

    Exotic invasive species, inadvertently introduced into North America through importation and travel, are threatening the integrity of North American forest ecosystems. The National Invasive Species Council in their 2001 Strategic Plan identified a collaborative program for early detection, diagnosis and response to high-risk, exotic, invasive insects, pathogens and...

  13. On the Revealing Firsthand Probing of Ocean-Ice-Atmosphere Interactions off Sabrina Coast During NBP1402

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, B. A.; Orsi, A. H.; Zielinski, N. J.; Durkin, W. J., IV; Clark, P.; Wiederwohl, C. L.; Rosenberg, M. A.; Gwyther, D.; Greenbaum, J. S.; Lavoie, C.; Shevenell, A.; Leventer, A.; Blankenship, D. D.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Domack, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Diverse interactions of winds, currents and ice around Antarctica dictate how, where and when the world's densest waters form and massive floating ice shelves and glaciers melt, as well as control sea surface gas exchange and primary productivity. Compelled by recent rate estimates of East Antarctic Ice Sheet mass loss, we contrast the paths and mixing histories of oceanic waters reaching the continental ice edge off the Sabrina and Adelie coasts relying on the unique set of synoptic shipboard measurements from NBP1402 (swath bathymetry, ADCP, underway CTD). Analysis of historical hydrography and sea ice concentration fields within the Mertz Polynya indicates the apparent effect of evolving ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions on the characteristics of local Shelf Water (SW) sources to current outflow of newly formed Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). A polynya dominated water mass structure similar to that observed off the Adelie Coast before the removal of the Mertz Ice Tongue was expected to the west of the Dalton Ice Tongue (DIT). However, we found no evidence of dense SW off Sabrina Coast, which may lessen the region's preconceived influence to global meridional overturning. Present sea ice production within the eastern Dalton Polynya is overshadowed by freshwater input to relatively stable interior upper waters. The Antarctic Coastal Current (ACoC) picks up distinct meltwater contributions along the DIT western flank and in front of the Moscow University Ice Shelf (MUIS) and Totten Glacier (TG). Unlike over other highly influential margins to global sea level rise, there is no evidence of local cross-shelf inflow and mixing of warm Circumpolar Deep Water. Relatively cold thermocline waters from the continental slope enter the eastern trough off Sabrina Coast, and they are swiftly steered poleward by complex underlying topography. Meltwater export from beneath the MUIS and TG is observed at newly discovered trenches that effectively constrain sub-cavity inflow to low

  14. Perturbations in DNA structure upon interaction with porphyrins revealed by chemical probes, DNA footprinting and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K G; Neidle, S

    1995-06-01

    The interactions of several porphyrins with a 74 base-pair DNA sequence have been examined by footprinting and chemical protection methods. Tetra-(4-N-methyl-(pyridyl)) porphyrin (TMPy), two of its metal complexes and tetra-(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP) bind to closely similar AT-rich sequences. The three TMPy ligands produce modest changes in DNA structure and base accessibility on binding, in contrast to the large-scale conformational changes observed with TMAP. Molecular modelling studies have been performed on TMPy and TMAP bound in the AT-rich minor groove of an oligonucleotide. These have shown that significant structural change is needed to accommodate the bulky trimethyl substituent groups of TMAP, in contrast to the facile minor groove fit of TMPy.

  15. Micron-scale mapping of megagauss magnetic fields using optical polarimetry to probe hot electron transport in petawatt-class laser-solid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Robinson, A P L; Blackman, D; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Gizzi, L A; Gray, R J; Green, J S; Koester, P; Kumar, G Ravindra; Labate, L; Lad, Amit D; Lancaster, K L; Pasley, J; Woolsey, N C; Rajeev, P P

    2017-08-21

    The transport of hot, relativistic electrons produced by the interaction of an intense petawatt laser pulse with a solid has garnered interest due to its potential application in the development of innovative x-ray sources and ion-acceleration schemes. We report on spatially and temporally resolved measurements of megagauss magnetic fields at the rear of a 50-μm thick plastic target, irradiated by a multi-picosecond petawatt laser pulse at an incident intensity of ~10 20 W/cm 2 . The pump-probe polarimetric measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution reveal the dynamics of the magnetic fields generated by the hot electron distribution at the target rear. An annular magnetic field profile was observed ~5 ps after the interaction, indicating a relatively smooth hot electron distribution at the rear-side of the plastic target. This is contrary to previous time-integrated measurements, which infer that such targets will produce highly structured hot electron transport. We measured large-scale filamentation of the hot electron distribution at the target rear only at later time-scales of ~10 ps, resulting in a commensurate large-scale filamentation of the magnetic field profile. Three-dimensional hybrid simulations corroborate our experimental observations and demonstrate a beam-like hot electron transport at initial time-scales that may be attributed to the local resistivity profile at the target rear.

  16. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  17. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  18. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  19. Production and decay of exotic fermions in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco de

    1995-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the production and decay of exotic fermions predicted by some extensions of the standard model. We select for our study the more popular models: vector singlet, vector doublet and Fermion Mirror-Fermion. We want to establish the differences between these models and also in relation to the Standard Model. We make investigations by Monte Carlo simulations, to study the phenomenology of the particles expected in these models, particularly the exotic fermions. These studies were done for electron-proton collisions at DESY HERA energies. We considered the investigation of exotic quark production, electron-positron collisions in LEP II and NLC energies in order to study the production of exotic leptons, and virtual exotic lepton contribution in the specific process e + e - → ιν-bar ι W + . (author)

  20. Effects of exotic composite bosons in e+e- scattering at 50--100 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, K.; Hattori, T.; Yasue, M.

    1990-01-01

    We show that some of the neutral exotics in the composite model decouple from neutrinos at low energies, and can be as light as the mass scale of the weak interactions, offering the possibility of detecting sizable effects in e + e - scattering at 50--100 GeV

  1. Impact of exotic earthworms on organic carbon sorption on mineral surfaces and soil carbon inventories in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy Lyttle; Kyungsoo Yoo; Cindy Hale; Anthony Aufdenkampe; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Kathryn Resner; Alex. Blum

    2015-01-01

    Exotic earthworms are invading forests in North America where native earthworms have been absent since the last glaciation. These earthworms bioturbate soils and may enhance physical interactions between minerals and organic matter (OM), thus affecting mineral sorption of carbon (C) which may affect C cycling. We quantitatively show how OM-mineral sorption and soil C...

  2. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  3. Ellipsometry-based combination of isothermal sorption-desorption measurement and temperature programmed desorption technique: A probe for interaction of thin polymer films with solvent vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2018-05-01

    An environmental chamber equipped with an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer, programmatic vapor pressure control, and variable temperature substrate holder has been designed for studying polymer coating behavior during an exposure to a solvent vapor and also for probing the residual solvent in the film afterwards. Both sorption-desorption cycle at a constant temperature and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the residual solvent manifest themselves as a change of the film thickness. Monitoring of ellipsometric angles of the coating allows us to determine the thickness as a function of the vapor pressure or sample temperature. The solvent vapor pressure is precisely regulated by a computer-controlled pneumatics. TPD spectra are recorded during heating of the film in an oil-free vacuum. The vapor pressure control system is described in detail. The system has been tested on 6-170 nm thick polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(2-vinyl pyridine) films deposited on silicon substrates. Liquid toluene, water, ethanol, isopropanol, cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chlorobenzene were used to create a vapor atmosphere. Typical sorption-desorption and TPD curves are shown. The instrument achieves sub-monolayer sensitivity for adsorption studies on flat surfaces. Polymer-solvent vapor systems with strong interaction demonstrate characteristic absorption-desorption hysteresis spanning from vacuum to the glass transition pressure. Features on the TPD curves can be classified as either glass transition related film contraction or low temperature broad contraction peak. Typical absorption-desorption and TPD dependencies recorded for the 6 nm thick polystyrene film demonstrate the possibility to apply the presented technique for probing size effects in extremely thin coatings.

  4. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  5. How exotic does an exotic information and education initiative about the impact of non-indigenous species need to be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. Hammond

    1998-01-01

    Providing individuals with effective information, programs, and educational materials about "exotics" or non-indigenous species is generally not a very effective way to get people to act to control, eliminate, and restore damage from exotic species to native ecosystems. Information tends to inform the motivated and educated. Educational research and marketing...

  6. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowthami, T; Raina, Gargi; Kurra, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84–88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. (paper)

  7. Solvent Dependency of the UV-Vis Spectrum of Indenoisoquinolines: Role of Keto-Oxygens as Polarity Interaction Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Andrea; Castelli, Silvia; Chillemi, Giovanni; Sanna, Nico; Cushman, Mark; Pommier, Yves; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Indenoisoquinolines are the most promising non-campthotecins topoisomerase IB inhibitors. We present an integrated experimental/computational investigation of the UV-Vis spectra of the IQNs parental compound (NSC314622) and two of its derivatives (NSC724998 and NSC725776) currently undergoing Phase I clinical trials. In all the three compounds a similar dependence of the relative absorption intensities at 270 nm and 290 nm on solvent polarity is found. The keto-oxygens in positions 5 and 11 of the molecular scaffold of the molecule are the principal chromophores involved in this dependence. Protic interactions on these sites are also found to give rise to absorptions at wavelength <250 nm observed in water solution, due to the stabilization of highly polarized tautomers of the molecule. These results suggest that the keto-oxygens are important polarizable groups that can act as useful interactors with the molecular receptor, providing at the same time an useful fingerprint for the monitoring of the drug binding to topoisomerase IB. PMID:24086299

  8. Strong Metal Support Interaction of Pt and Ru Nanoparticles Deposited on HOPG Probed by the H-D Exchange Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Dahl, Søren; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between metals and support is investigated in the case of 50 Å Pt and 50 Å Ru films deposited on a HOPG substrate. The films are prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition and annealed in UHV to temperatures up to 700 °C. The equilibrium hydrogen exchange rate between...... adsorbed and gas phase at 1 bar is measured before and after annealing. The rate is measured in the temperature range of 40–200 °C at 1 bar, by utilization of the H-D exchange reaction. Experiments are performed on fresh cleaved and sputtered HOPG, which give similar results. We find that annealing...... the films from 150 up to 700 °C increases the amount of carbon present in the films up to 95%, as derived by surface analysis, indicating the formation of a carbon layer on top of the metal films. The exchange rate decreases dramatically with increasing carbon content on the films for both metals, pointing...

  9. Probing the role of long-range interactions in the dynamics of a long-range Kitaev chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Dutta, Amit

    2017-09-01

    We study the role of long-range interactions (more precisely, the long-range superconducting gap term) on the nonequilibrium dynamics considering a long-range p -wave superconducting chain in which the superconducting term decays with distance between two sites in a power-law fashion characterized by an exponent α . We show that the Kibble-Zurek scaling exponent, dictating the power-law decay of the defect density in the final state reached following a slow (in comparison to the time scale associated with the minimum gap in the spectrum of the Hamiltonian) quenching of the chemical potential μ across a quantum critical point, depends nontrivially on the exponent α as long as α 2 , we find that the exponent saturates to the corresponding well-known value of 1 /2 expected for the short-range model. Furthermore, studying the dynamical quantum phase transitions manifested in the nonanalyticities in the rate function of the return possibility I (t ) in subsequent temporal evolution following a sudden change in μ , we show the existence of a new region; in this region, we find three instants of cusp singularities in I (t ) associated with a single sector of Fisher zeros. Notably, the width of this region shrinks as α increases and vanishes in the limit α →2 , indicating that this special region is an artifact of the long-range nature of the Hamiltonian.

  10. Probing the interaction of a therapeutic flavonoid, pinostrobin with human serum albumin: multiple spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevin R Feroz

    Full Text Available Interaction of a pharmacologically important flavonoid, pinostrobin (PS with the major transport protein of human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA has been examined using a multitude of spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. Analysis of the fluorescence quenching data showed a moderate binding affinity (1.03 × 10(5 M(-1 at 25°C between PS and HSA with a 1∶1 stoichiometry. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (ΔS = +44.06 J mol(-1 K(-1 and ΔH = -15.48 kJ mol(-1 and molecular simulation results suggested the involvement of hydrophobic and van der Waals forces, as well as hydrogen bonding in the complex formation. Both secondary and tertiary structural perturbations in HSA were observed upon PS binding, as revealed by intrinsic, synchronous, and three-dimensional fluorescence results. Far-UV circular dichroism data revealed increased thermal stability of the protein upon complexation with PS. Competitive drug displacement results suggested the binding site of PS on HSA as Sudlow's site I, located at subdomain IIA, and was well supported by the molecular modelling data.

  11. Exotic Phenomena Searches at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00305407

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a selection of the final results of searches for various exotic physics phenomena in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and 8~TeV delivered by the LHC and collected with the ATLAS and CMS detectors in 2011 (5 $fb^{-1}$) and in the first part of 2012 (4 $fb^{-1}$). Searches for large extra dimensions, gravitons, microscopic black holes, long-lived particles, dark matter, and leptoquarks are presented in this report. No sign of new physics beyond the standard model has been observed so far. In the majority of the cases these searches set the most stringent limits to date on the aforementioned new physics phenomena.

  12. Exotic highly ionising particles at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, A; Mermod, P; Milstead, D; Sloan, T

    2012-01-01

    The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are able to discover or set limits on the production of exotic particles with TeV-scale masses possessing values of electric and/or magnetic charge such that they appear as highly ionising particles (HIPs). In this paper the sensitivity of the LHC experiments to HIP production is discussed in detail. It is shown that a number of different detection methods are required to investigate as fully as possible the charge-mass range. These include direct detection as the HIPs pass through detectors and, in the case of magnetically charged objects, the so-called induction method with which monopoles which stop in accelerator and detector material could be observed. The benefit of using complementary approaches to HIP detection is discussed.

  13. Search for exotic mesons at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, P.; Baggett, N.; Fieguth, T.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical justification and results from recent experimental searches for backward-produced exotic mesons including two experiments carried out by the collaboration at SLAC are reviewed. The first experiment put upper limits of about 1 to 2 μb for X ++ → (2π, 4π, 6π) ++ and anti ppπ + π + in the reaction π + + p → X ++ + n/sub forward/ at 8.4 GeV/c studied with the SLAC 14 inch rapid cycling bubble chamber triggered by a downstream neutron detector. Also the important features of the recently completed second experiment with the SLAC streamer chamber to study the reaction π - + p → X -- + p/sub forward/ at 14 GeV/c are discussed

  14. Rational F-theory GUTs without exotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Peña, Damián Kaloni Mayorga; Oehlmann, Paul-Konstantin; Ruehle, Fabian

    2014-07-01

    We construct F-theory GUT models without exotic matter, leading to the MSSM matter spectrum with potential singlet extensions. The interplay of engineering explicit geometric setups, absence of four-dimensional anomalies, and realistic phenomenology of the couplings places severe constraints on the allowed local models in a given geometry. In constructions based on the spectral cover we find no model satisfying all these requirements. We then provide a survey of models with additional U(1) symmetries arising from rational sections of the elliptic fibration in toric constructions and obtain phenomenologically appealing models based on SU(5) tops. Furthermore we perform a bottom-up exploration beyond the toric section constructions discussed in the literature so far and identify benchmark models passing all our criteria, which can serve as a guideline for future geometric engineering.

  15. Rational F-theory GUTs without exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Pena, Damian Kaloni Mayorga; Oehlmann, Paul-Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    We construct F-theory GUT models without exotic matter, leading to the MSSM matter spectrum with potential singlet extensions. The interplay of engineering explicit geometric setups, absence of four-dimensional anomalies, and realistic phenomenology of the couplings places severe constraints on the allowed local models in a given geometry. In constructions based on the spectral cover we find no model satisfying all these requirements. We then provide a survey of models with additional U(1) symmetries arising from rational sections of the elliptic fibration in toric constructions and obtain phenomenologically appealing models based on SU(5) tops. Furthermore we perform a bottom-up exploration beyond the toric section constructions discussed in the literature so far and identify benchmark models passing all our criteria, which can serve as a guideline for future geometric engineering.

  16. Rational F-theory GUTs without exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Peña, Damián Kaloni Mayorga; Oehlmann, Paul-Konstantin; Ruehle, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We construct F-theory GUT models without exotic matter, leading to the MSSM matter spectrum with potential singlet extensions. The interplay of engineering explicit geometric setups, absence of four-dimensional anomalies, and realistic phenomenology of the couplings places severe constraints on the allowed local models in a given geometry. In constructions based on the spectral cover we find no model satisfying all these requirements. We then provide a survey of models with additional U1 symmetries arising from rational sections of the elliptic fibration in toric constructions and obtain phenomenologically appealing models based on SU(5) tops. Furthermore we perform a bottom-up exploration beyond the toric section constructions discussed in the literature so far and identify benchmark models passing all our criteria, which can serve as a guideline for future geometric engineering.

  17. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  18. Exotic meson decay widths using lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, M. S.; Fiebig, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    A decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson h, with J PC =1 -+ , is presented for the channel h→πa 1 . This quenched lattice QCD simulation employs Luescher's finite box method. Operators coupling to the h and πa 1 states are used at various levels of smearing and fuzzing, and at four quark masses. Eigenvalues of the corresponding correlation matrices yield energy spectra that determine scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative πa 1 momenta. Although the phase shift data is sparse, fits to a Breit-Wigner model are attempted, resulting in a decay width of about 60 MeV when averaged over two lattice sizes having a lattice spacing of 0.07 fm

  19. Exotic nuclei arena in Japanese Hadron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1990-04-01

    A description is given on the radioactive beam facility proposed as one of the research arenas in Japanese Hadron Project. The facility consists of a 1 GeV proton linac, an isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and a series of heavy-ion (HI) linacs. Various exotic nuclei produced by 1 GeV proton beam mainly via spallation processes of a thick target, are mass-separated by the ISOL with a high mass-resolving power and are injected into the HI linac with the energy of 1 keV/u. The acceleration is made in three stages using different types of linacs, i.e., split-coaxial RFQ. Interdigital-H, and Alvarez, the maximum energy in each stage being 0.17, 1.4 and 6.5 MeV/u, respectively. A few examples of scientific interests realized in this facility will be briefly discussed. (author)

  20. Microsporidiosis in Vertebrate Companion Exotic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Vergneau-Grosset

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Veterinarians caring for companion animals may encounter microsporidia in various host species, and diagnosis and treatment of these fungal organisms can be particularly challenging. Fourteen microsporidial species have been reported to infect humans and some of them are zoonotic; however, to date, direct zoonotic transmission is difficult to document versus transit through the digestive tract. In this context, summarizing information available about microsporidiosis of companion exotic animals is relevant due to the proximity of these animals to their owners. Diagnostic modalities and therapeutic challenges are reviewed by taxa. Further studies are needed to better assess risks associated with animal microsporidia for immunosuppressed owners and to improve detection and treatment of infected companion animals.

  1. Probing the role of Skyrme interactions on the fission dynamics of the {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ishita; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K. [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Patiala (India)

    2017-06-15

    The performance of selected five Skyrme forces (out of a set of 240), tested by Dutra et al., is analyzed in view of fusion-fission dynamics. These forces are assumed to perform better for neutron-rich systems, so the choice of the reaction is accordingly made by opting for a neutron-rich target in {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction. This reaction is diagnosed further in reference to fusion hindrance within the dynamical approach of the cluster-decay model (DCM). In order to reduce the computational time, three Skyrme forces are figured out with the criteria that these forces cover the barrier characteristics of the remaining two forces as well. The fission cross-sections are successfully addressed at low energies for the {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction. However, at relatively higher energies, the excitation functions show theoretical suppression with respect to experimental data, which may be associated with the possible existence of incomplete fusion (ICF). For ICF, we have considered that the {sup 6}Li broke into {sup 4}He + {sup 2}H, as mentioned in the experimental work. The calculations of ICF are carried out for the {sup 4}He + {sup 238}U reaction with the selected Skyrme forces at E{sub c.m.} = 26.20 and 27.51 MeV. These forces address the data nicely for the compound nucleus (CN) as well as ICF processes. Here, the NRAPR force seems to require lesser barrier modification as compared to the other forces, therefore it can be used as an alternate choice for calculating the interaction potential. Additionally, the prediction of cross-sections at lower energies has been done with DCM using the NRAPR force. The l-dependent % barrier modification of the Skyrme forces undertaken is also worked out in reference to fusion hindrance at below barrier energies. (orig.)

  2. Probing the interaction of flower-like CdSe nanostructure particles targeted to bovine serum albumin using spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Peng; Fan Hai; Liu Tao; Cui Lin; Ai Shiyun

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between flower-like CdSe nanostructure particles (CdSe NP) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated from a spectroscopic angle under simulative physiological conditions. Under pH 7.4, CdSe NP could effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via static quenching. The binding constant (K A ) was 6.38, 3.27, and 1.90x10 4 M -1 at 298, 304, and 310 K, respectively and the number of binding sites was 1.20. According to the Van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o =-77.48 kJ mol -1 , ΔS o =-168.17 J mol -1 K -1 ) indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a major role in stabilizing the BSA-CdSe complex. Besides, UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) results showed that the addition of CdSe NP changed the secondary structure of BSA and led to a decrease in α-helix. These results suggested that BSA underwent substantial conformational changes induced by flower-like CdSe nanostructure particles. - Highlights: → Estimate the binding of flower-like CdSe NP to BSA by spectroscopic methods. → Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were the major forces. →Addition of CdSe changed the micro-environmentl of BSA. → Decrease in α-helix of BSA secondary structure induced by CdSe.

  3. Probing interaction of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells with ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Aanchal; Bhargava, Richa; Poddar, Pankaj, E-mail: p.poddar@ncl.res.in

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, the physiological effects of the ZnO nanorods on the Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Aerobacter aerogenes) bacterial cells have been studied. The analysis of bacterial growth curves for various concentrations of ZnO nanorods indicates that Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cells show inhibition at concentrations of ∼ 64 and ∼ 256 μg/mL respectively. The marked difference in susceptibility towards nanorods was also validated by spread plate and disk diffusion methods. In addition, the scanning electron micrographs show a clear damage to the cells via changed morphology of the cells from rod to coccoid etc. The confocal optical microscopy images of these cells also demonstrate the reduction in live cell count in the presence of ZnO nanorods. These, results clearly indicate that the antibacterial activity of ZnO nanorods is higher towards Gram positive bacterium than Gram negative bacterium which indicates that the structure of the cell wall might play a major role in the interaction with nanostructured materials and shows high sensitivity to the particle concentration. Highlights: ► Effect of ZnO nanorods on the growth cycles of four bacterial strains. ► A relation has been established between growth rate of bacteria and concentration. ► Serious damage in the morphology of bacterial cells in the presence of ZnO nanorods. ► Microscopic studies to see the time dependent effect on bacterial cells.

  4. A high sensitive ion pairing probe (the interaction of pyrenetetrasulphonate and methyl viologen): Salt and temperature dependences and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Jeferson [Departamento de Bioquímica e Departamento de Química, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Perez, Katia R. [Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo-SP (Brazil); Pisco, Thiago B.; Pavanelli, David D.; Briotto Filho, Décio; Rezende, Daisy [Departamento de Bioquímica e Departamento de Química, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rezende Triboni, Eduardo [Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, São Paulo-SP (Brazil); Chagas Alves Lima, Francisco das [Coordenação de Química, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, Teresina-PI (Brazil); Lopes Magalhães, Janildo [Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências da Natureza, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Centro de Ciências da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Midea Cuccovia, Iolanda [Departamento de Bioquímica e Departamento de Química, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); and others

    2014-07-01

    The interaction between pyrenetetrasulphonate (PTS) and methyl viologen (MV{sup 2+}) leads to a 1:1 charge transfer complex (CTC) in the concentration range below mmol L{sup −1} of the ligands. Quantum mechanical calculations show the 1:1 complex having the planar moiety of PTS and the charges of the sulfonate groups stabilized by the twisted rings of the positively charged MV{sup 2+} species. The peculiar nature of PTS includes high fluorescence quantum yield (∼1), clear specular UV–vis spectra and fluorescence emission images, as well similar S{sub 2}←S{sub 0} and S{sub 3}←S{sub 0} transitions as those of S{sub 1}←S{sub 0,} all of them exhibiting well resolved vibrational structure. MV{sup 2+} has well known electron-accepting properties that favor the complexation. These features were studied as a function of salt concentration and temperature dependences allowing a detailed comprehension of static and dynamic association processes. Quantum mechanical calculations show the 1:1 stabilization of PTS/MV{sup 2+}. In addition the effect of urea on the CTC equilibrium is presented, as expected the additive acts towards the non-complexed species (solvated free ions). The fluorescence quenching of MV{sup 2+}over PTS highlights is one of the applications of this effect for giant vesicles characterization. - Highlights: • We determined the details of PTS/MV{sup 2+} 1:1 complex formation. • Ground and excited states formation is operative. • Ion pairing effects due to urea effect are shown. • Vesicle formation is illustrated by the pair.

  5. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2009-01-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban sett...

  6. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-01-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban sett...

  7. The exotic exchange of smoke rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, Antti J.

    2006-01-01

    Smoke rings are fascinating, to humans and animals alike. Experienced cigarette smokers blow them for entertainment while dolphins play with air-filled underwater rings that know how to puff. Smoke ring machines can be bought from science gadget shops and Lord Kelvin explains in a paper [Lord Kelvin, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. VI (1867), p. 94; reprinted in Philos. Mag. Vol. XXXIV (1867), p. 15] how one can be constructed from a cardboard box. Even Mount Etna [http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/696953.stm] and our Sun [http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast03feb 1 .htm] are known to be sources of huge smoke rings. But a smoke ring is not only fun to watch. It is also an organized structure with the ability to engage in complex acts, best exemplified by the leapfrogging motion of two smoke rings. Here we propose that the leapfrogging actually encodes very important Physics: It is a direct three dimensional generalization of the motion that in the two dimensional context is responsible for exotic exchange statistics which rules the properties of structures and materials such as quantum Hall systems and high-temperature superconductors. By employing very simple and universal concepts with roots in the hydrodynamical Euler equation, the universal law that describes the properties of fluids and gases, we argue that three dimensional exotic exchange statistics is commonplace. Our observations could have far reaching consequences in fluids and gases which are subject to the laws of quantum mechanics, from helium superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases and even metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases. (author)

  8. Structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy elements in meson field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Khin Nyan

    2008-07-01

    In this work the nuclear structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei is studied in a relativistic framework. In the relativistic mean-field (RMF) approximation, the nucleons interact with each other through the exchange of various effective mesons (scalar, vector, isovector-vector). Ground state properties of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei are studied in the RMF theory with the three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2). Axial deformation of nuclei within two drip lines are performed with the parameter set (ChiM). The position of drip lines are investigated with three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2) and compared with the experimental drip line nuclei. In addition, the structure of hypernuclei are studied and for a certain isotope, hyperon halo nucleus is predicted. (orig.)

  9. Structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy elements in meson field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Khin Nyan

    2008-07-15

    In this work the nuclear structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei is studied in a relativistic framework. In the relativistic mean-field (RMF) approximation, the nucleons interact with each other through the exchange of various effective mesons (scalar, vector, isovector-vector). Ground state properties of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei are studied in the RMF theory with the three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2). Axial deformation of nuclei within two drip lines are performed with the parameter set (ChiM). The position of drip lines are investigated with three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2) and compared with the experimental drip line nuclei. In addition, the structure of hypernuclei are studied and for a certain isotope, hyperon halo nucleus is predicted. (orig.)

  10. Probing the interactions of bromchlorbuterol-HCl and phenylethanolamine A with HSA by multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Huifeng; Wang, Yu; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular docking showed that BCB/PEA was bound at sub-domain IIA of HSA. • Fluorescence lifetimes indicated that the quenching was a static quenching. • CD spectra showed that BCB/PEA changed the conformation of HSA. • The competitive binding between site markers and BCB/PEA was studied. • The mutual influence on the two drugs binding HSA was studied. - Abstract: Using fluorescence quenching, fluorescence lifetime, (UV + vis) absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking technique, the interactions of human serum albumin (HSA) with bromchlorbuterol-HCl (BCB) and phenylethanolamine A (PEA) were investigated. The quenching rate constants and binding constants for BCB/PEA with HSA were determined at T = (292.15, 302.15 and 312.15) K respectively, which were all decreased with the increase of the temperature, showing not a dynamic quenching. The fluorescence lifetime of HSA with BCB/PEA had changed little compared to that of HSA alone (τ_0), further confirming that BCB/PEA quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of HSA is a static quenching. The effects of K"+, Ca"2"+, Cu"2"+, Zn"2"+ and Fe"3"+ on the binding were studied. The analysis of the thermodynamic parameters for BCB/(PEA + HSA) showed that BCB/PEA could bind to HSA via hydrophobic force. The binding distances were determined as 2.90 and 4.11 nm for (BCB + HSA) and (PEA + HSA) based on the Förster’s non-radiative energy transfer theory (FRET). Synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra indicated that the conformation of HSA was changed by BCB/PEA. The competitive studies for the drug with site marker suggested that both BCB and PEA were bound at Sudlow’s sites I (sub-domain IIA, also known as indometacin binding site) in HSA, and the results of the study of molecular docking also leads to the same conclusion. The competitive binding experiments for the two drugs were also performed, which further indicates that PEA and BCB could share the same binding site, and PEA has a much

  11. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  12. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  13. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  14. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Formation of fast exotic atoms by radiative Coulomb capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, L.; Das, G.; Chakravorty, A.; Goswami, R.; Mondal, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    Interesting surprises in some exotic atom kinetics have been reported recently. These involve muonic atom transfer cross sections, nuclear pion capture and the q 1s effect in μCF. These can be explained if the exotic atom population contains a contributing fast component. Such fast atoms can be formed by radiative continuum to bound transitions of fast (keV) muons or pions. Cross sections for formation of such fast pionic and muonic atoms and their velocity distributions are reported. The possibility of these processes competing with the thermalisation channels and contributing effectively to the exotic atom population discussed. (orig.)

  16. Probing the interaction of Rh, Co and bimetallic Rh-Co nanoparticles with the CeO2 support: catalytic materials for alternative energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, E; Pusztai, P; Óvári, L; Oszkó, A; Erdőhelyi, A; Papp, C; Steinrück, H-P; Kónya, Z; Kiss, J

    2015-10-28

    The interaction of CeO2-supported Rh, Co and bimetallic Rh-Co nanoparticles, which are active catalysts in hydrogen production via steam reforming of ethanol, a process related to renewable energy generation, was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy ion scattering (LEIS). Furthermore, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) of adsorbed CO as a probe molecule was used to characterize the morphology of metal particles. At small loadings (0.1%), Rh is in a much dispersed state on ceria, while at higher contents (1-5%), Rh forms 2-8 nm particles. Between 473-673 K pronounced oxygen transfer from ceria to Rh is observed and at 773 K significant agglomeration of Rh occurs. On reduced ceria, XPS indicates a possible electron transfer from Rh to ceria. The formation of smaller ceria crystallites upon loading with Co was concluded from XRD and HRTEM; for 10% Co, the CeO2 particle size decreased from 27.6 to 10.7 nm. A strong dissolution of Co into ceria and a certain extent of encapsulation by ceria were deduced by XRD, XPS and LEIS. In the bimetallic system, the presence of Rh enhances the reduction of cobalt and ceria. During thermal treatments, reoxidation of Co occurs, and Rh agglomeration as well as oxygen migration from ceria to Rh are hindered in the presence of cobalt.

  17. Ionic interaction of myosin loop 2 with residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin probed by chemical cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliszka, Barbara; Martin, Brian M; Karczewska, Emilia

    2008-02-01

    To probe ionic contacts of skeletal muscle myosin with negatively charged residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin, myosin subfragment 1 (S1) and actin split by ECP32 protease (ECP-actin) were cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC). We have found that unmodified S1 can be cross-linked not only to the N-terminal part, but also to the C-terminal 36 kDa fragment of ECP-actin. Subsequent experiments performed on S1 cleaved by elastase or trypsin indicate that the cross-linking site in S1 is located within loop 2. This site is composed of Lys-636 and Lys-637 and can interact with negatively charged residues of the 36 kDa actin fragment, most probably with Glu-99 and Glu-100. Cross-links are formed both in the absence and presence of MgATP.P(i) analog, although the addition of nucleotide decreases the efficiency of the cross-linking reaction.

  18. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ablid-Pedersen, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  19. 9 CFR 352.3 - Application by official exotic animal establishment for inspection services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) Any person desiring to process an exotic animal, exotic animal carcasses, exotic animal meat and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application by official exotic animal establishment for inspection services. 352.3 Section 352.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND...

  20. Thermodynamics of poly(7-methoxy-2-acetylbenzofurane methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) and poly(2-acetylbenzofurane methyl methacrylate-co-styrene)-probe interactions at different temperatures by inverse gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    İlter, Zülfiye; Demir, Abdullah; Kaya, İsmet

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic of methacrylate-co-styrene polymers were studied by the inverse gas chromatography. • The sorption parameters of polymer-solute systems were determined under glass transition temperature of polymers. • The solubility parameter (δ 2 ) of the polymer was obtained from the slope and intercepts. • Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ 12 ∞ ) were determined for polymer-solute systems. - Abstract: In this study, some thermodynamic properties of poly(7-methoxy-2-acetylbenzofurane methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) Poly(MABMM-co-St) and poly(2-acetylbenzofurane methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) Poly(ABMM-co-St) were studied by the inverse gas chromatography (IGC) technique. The retention times (t r ) of selected organic probes were determined from the interactions with Poly(MABMM-co-St) and Poly(ABMM-co-St) of four groups of solvents with different chemical natures and polarities. Then, specific volume (V g 0 ) values of probes were calculated at different column temperatures. The glass transition temperatures (T g ) of Poly(MABMM-co-St) and Poly(ABMM-co-St) were found as 393, 413 K from inverse gas chromatography measurements, respectively. Under the glass transition temperatures adsorption heat (ΔH a ) and above the glass transition molar heat (ΔH 1 S ), free energies (ΔG 1 S ) and entropies (ΔS 1 S ) belonging to sorption for every probe were calculated from inverse gas chromatography measurements. The partial molar heat (ΔH 1 ∞ ), partial molar free energy (ΔG 1 ∞ ), Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ 12 ∞ ) and weight fraction activity coefficient (a 1 /w 1 ) ∞ , values for infinite dilute solutions were calculated for polymer-probe systems. The solubility parameter (δ 2 ) of the polymer was obtained from the slope and intercepts of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ 12 ∞ ) graphs with solubility parameters (δ 1 ) of probes.

  1. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  2. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  3. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  4. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  5. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Bergshoeff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond–Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana–Weyl spinor of O(D,D. Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor–spinor of O(D,D is determined. This tensor–spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O(D,D to GL(D, one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  6. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active

  7. Reverting urban exotic pine forests to Macchia and indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reverting urban exotic pine forests to Macchia and indigenous forest ... Harvesting operations were planned to make the transition from high open ... Key words: Strip-cutting, Cable yarding, Participatory planning, Shelterwood, Urban forests ...

  8. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  9. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra “effective energy” is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

  11. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-09

    The structure and chemical ordering of PtAu nanoclusters of 79, 135, and 201 atoms are studied via a combination of a basin hopping atom-exchange technique (to locate the lowest energy homotops at fixed composition), a symmetry orbit technique (to find the high symmetry isomers), and density functional theory local reoptimization (for determining the most stable homotop). The interatomic interactions between Pt and Au are derived from the empirical Gupta potential. The lowest energy structures show a marked tendency toward PtcoreAushell chemical ordering by enrichment of the more cohesive Pt in the core region and of Au in the shell region. We observe a preferential segregation of Pt atoms to (111) facets and Au atoms to (100) facets of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active sites. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. On Emergent Physics, "Unparticles" and Exotic "Unmatter" States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldfain E.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergent physics refers to the formation and evolution of collective patterns in systems that are nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium. This type of large-scale behavior often de- velops as a result of simple interactions at the component level and involves a dynamic interplay between order and randomness. On account of its universality, there are credi- ble hints that emergence may play a leading role in the Tera-ElectronVolt (TeV sector of particle physics. Following this path, we examine the possibility of hypothetical high- energy states that have fractional number of quanta per state and consist of arbitrary mixtures of particles and antiparticles. These states are similar to “un-particles”, mass- less fields of non-integral scaling dimensions that were recently conjectured to emerge in the TeV sector of particle physics. They are also linked to “unmatter”, exotic clusters of matter and antimatter introduced few years ago in the context of Neutrosophy.

  13. 2nd International School of Physics of Exotic Atoms "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Duclos, J; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Torelli, Gabriele; Exotic atoms : fundamental interactions and structure of matter

    1980-01-01

    The second course of the International School on the Physics of Exotic Atoms took place at the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scien­ tific Culture, Erice, Sicily, during the period from March 25 to April 5, 1979. It was attended by 40 participants from 23 insti­ tutes in 8 countries. The purpose of the course was to review the various aspects of the physics of exotic atoms, with particular emphasis on the re­ sults obtained in the last two years, i.e., after the first course of the School (Erice, April 24-30, 1977). The course dealt with two main topics, A) Exotic atoms and fundamental interactions and B) Applications to the study of the structure of matter. One of the aims of the course was to offer an opportunity for the exchange of experiences between scientists working in the two fields. In view of this, the lectures in the morning discussed the more general arguments in a common session, whereas the more specialized topics were treated in the afternoon, in two parallel sections. Section A was or...

  14. Probing the nanoscale interaction forces and elastic properties of organic and inorganic materials using force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Abhilash

    Due to their therapeutic applications such as radical scavenging, MRI contrast imaging, Photoluminescence imaging, drug delivery, etc., nanoparticles (NPs) have a significant importance in bio-nanotechnology. The reason that prevents the utilizing NPs for drug delivery in medical field is mostly due to their biocompatibility issues (incompatibility can lead to toxicity and cell death). Changes in the surface conditions of NPs often lead to NP cytotoxicity. Investigating the role of NP surface properties (surface charges and surface chemistry) on their interactions with biomolecules (Cells, protein and DNA) could enhance the current understanding of NP cytotoxicity. Hence, it is highly beneficial to the nanotechnology community to bring more attention towards the enhancement of surface properties of NPs to make them more biocompatible and less toxic to biological systems. Surface functionalization of NPs using specific ligand biomolecules have shown to enhance the protein adsorption and cellular uptake through more favorable interaction pathways. Cerium oxide NPs (CNPs also known as nanoceria) are potential antioxidants in cell culture models and understanding the nature of interaction between cerium oxide NPs and biological proteins and cells are important due to their therapeutic application (especially in site specific drug delivery systems). The surface charges and surface chemistry of CNPs play a major role in protein adsorption and cellular uptake. Hence, by tuning the surface charges and by selecting proper functional molecules on the surface, CNPs exhibiting strong adhesion to biological materials can be prepared. By probing the nanoscale interaction forces acting between CNPs and protein molecules using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy, the mechanism of CNP-protein adsorption and CNP cellular uptake can be understood more quantitatively. The work presented in this dissertation is based on the application of AFM in

  15. Using anti pp annihilation to find exotic mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Present data suggests that a number of mesons have been found which cannot be accommodated in standard anti qq multiplets. Theory suggests that such exotic mesons should exist in the spectrum of Quantum Chromodynamics, but provides little guide to their properties. It is argued that a high luminosity, low energy anti pp machine would be a powerful tool with which to search for such exotics

  16. Parent di-nuclear quasimolecular states as exotic resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, N.

    2002-01-01

    It in shown that the parent di-nuclear quasimolecular state is an exotic resonant state that corresponds to a S-matrix pole in the neighbourhood of an attractor in the k-plane. The properties of the parent quasimolecular states i.e. energy, widths, deviation from the linear dependence of the energy on l(l + 1) doorway character and criteria for observability, result naturally from the general properties of the exotic resonant states. (author)

  17. The exotic atoms of QCD: glueballs, hybrids and baryonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1984-05-01

    The theoretical basis underlying the expected ''exotic'' states in QCD, the theory of quarks and gluons, is reviewed in three lectures. The first lecture is an historical introduction to QCD. The second lecture is a critical review of the MIT bag model and QCD on a lattice. The status of three candidate ''exotic'' states seen in psi radiative decays, the i(1440), O(1700) and zeta(2220) are discussed in the third lecture. (author)

  18. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams; Noyaux exotiques et faisceaux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs.

  19. International symposium on exotic nuclear structures. Book of abstracst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The following topics were discussed at the meeting: Physics of weakly bound nuclei, neutron skin and halo; Evolution of shell structures for neutron-rich nuclei; Collective excitations in nuclei with exotic nuclear shapes; Cluster structures; Super- and hyperdeformed nuclei, exotic structures in the actinides; Superheavy elements; Towards understanding the structure of nucleons; New experimental techniques, facilities for radioactive beams. All abstracts (75 items) were submitted as full text to the INIS database. (R.P.)

  20. Doubly charmed exotic mesons: A gift of nature?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carames, T.F. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Valcarce, A., E-mail: valcarce@usal.e [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Vijande, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Valencia (UV) and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Valencia (Spain)

    2011-05-16

    We study doubly charmed exotic states by solving the scattering problem of two D mesons. Our results point to the existence of a stable isoscalar doubly charmed meson with quantum numbers (I)J{sup P}=(0)1{sup +}. We perform a thorough comparison to the results obtained within the hyperspherical harmonic formalism. Such exotic states could be measured at LHC and RHIC. Their experimental observation would, for the first time, confirm the contribution of multiquark structures to hadron spectroscopy.

  1. Exotic Optical Beam Classes for Free-Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    wandering of an optical vortex is one of the significant problems with the application of vortex beams to FSO applications. From a geometrical optics ...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0131 Exotic optical beam classes for free-space communication Greg Gbur UNIVERSITY OF NOTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE Final Report...12-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exotic optical beam classes for free-space communication 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0009 5c

  2. Exotic hadron production in a quark combination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Shao Fenglan; Li Shiyuan; Shang Yonghui; Yao Tao

    2009-01-01

    The philosophy on production of exotic hadrons (multiquark states) in the framework of the quark combination model is investigated, taking f 0 (980) as an example. The production rate and p T spectra of f 0 (980) considered as (ss) or (sqsq), respectively, are calculated and compared in Au+Au collisions at √(s NN )=200 GeV. The unitarity of various combination models, when open for exotic hadron production, is addressed.

  3. Constraints on Exotic Dipole-Dipole Couplings between Electrons at the Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Kimball, Derek F Jackson

    2015-08-21

    New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped 88Sr(+) ions. For light bosons (mass≤0.1  eV) we obtain a 90% confidence interval for an axial-vector-mediated interaction strength of |g(A)(e)g(A)(e)/4πℏc|≤1.2×10(-17). Assuming CPT invariance, this constraint is compared to that on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. We find that the electron-electron constraint is 6 orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron counterpart. Bounds on pseudoscalar-mediated interaction as well as on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales. Our constraints benefit from the high controllability of the experimental system which contained only two trapped particles. It therefore suggests a useful new platform for exotic particle searches, complementing other experimental efforts.

  4. Exotic colored scalars at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Frugiuele, Claudia; Nir, Yosef [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel)

    2017-02-21

    We study the phenomenology of exotic color-triplet scalar particles X with charge |Q|=2/3,4/3,5/3,7/3,8/3 and 10/3. If X is an SU(2){sub W}-non-singlet, mass splitting within the multiplet allows for cascade decays of the members into the lightest state. We study examples where the lightest state, in turn, decays into a three-body W{sup ±}jj final state, and show that in such case the entire multiplet is compatible with indirect precision tests and with direct collider searches for continuum pair production of X down to m{sub X}∼250 GeV. However, bound states S, made of XX{sup †} pairs at m{sub S}≈2m{sub X}, form under rather generic conditions and their decay to diphoton can be the first discovery channel of the model. Furthermore, for SU(2){sub W}-non-singlets, the mode S→W{sup +}W{sup −} may be observable and the width of S→γγ and S→jj may appear large as a consequence of mass splittings within the X-multiplet. As an example we study in detail the case of an SU(2){sub W}-quartet, finding that m{sub X}≃450 GeV is allowed by all current searches.

  5. Exotic hybrid mesons in hard electroproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Anikin, I V; Szymanowski, L; Teryaev, O V; Wallon, S

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the sizeable cross section for deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. The production amplitude scales like the one for usual meson electroproduction, i.e. as $1/Q^2$. This is due to the non-vanishing leading twist distribution amplitude for the hybrid meson, which may be normalized thanks to its relation to the energy momentum tensor and to the QCD sum rules technique. The hard amplitude is considered up to next-to-leading order in $\\alpha_{S}$ and we explore the consequences of fixing the renormalization scale ambiguity through the BLM procedure. We study the particular case where the hybrid meson decays through a $\\pi\\eta $ meson pair. We discuss the $\\pi\\eta$ generalized distribution amplitude and then calculate the production amplitude for this process. We propose a forward-backward asymmetry in the production of $\\pi$ and $\\eta$ mesons as a signal for the hybrid meson production. We briefly comment on hybrid electroproduction at very ...

  6. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 exotic particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  7. Exotic quarkonium states in CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Using large data samples of di-muon events, CMS can perform detailed measurements and searches for new states in the field of exotic quarkonium. We present our results on the production of prompt and non-prompt $\\rm X(3872)$, detected in the ${\\rm J}/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay channel, which extend to higher $p_{\\rm T}$ values than in any previous measurement. The cross-section ratio with respect to the $\\psi(2S)$ is given differentially in $p_{\\rm T}$, as well as $p_{\\rm T}$ integrated. For the first time at the LHC, the fraction of $\\rm X(3872)$ coming from B hadron decays has been measured. After these studies of the charmonium $\\rm X$, we present a new search for its bottomonium counterpart, denoted as $\\rm X_b$, based on a data sample of pp collisions at 8 TeV collected by CMS in 2012. In analogy to the $\\rm X(3872)$ studies, the analysis uses the ${\\rm X_b} \\to \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi \\pi$ exclusive decay channel, with the $\\Upsilon(1S)$ decaying to $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ pairs. No evidence for $\\rm X_b$ is observed and up...

  8. Using exotic atoms to keep borders safe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocki, T J; Olsthoorn, J; Jason, A; Miyadera, H; Esch, E-I; Hoteling, N J; Heffner, R H; Green, A; Adelmann, A

    2011-01-01

    Muons, created by a particle accelerator, can be used to scan cargo for special nuclear materials (SNM). These muons have a sufficiently long lifetime and are penetrating enough that they can be used to actively scan cargo to ensure the non-proliferation of SNM. A set of 'proof-of-concept' experiments have been performed to show that active muon analysis can be used. Experiments were performed at high intensity, medium energy particle accelerators (TRIUMF and PSI). Negative muons form exotic atoms with one electron replaced by the muon. Since the muon is captured in an excited state, it will give off x-rays which can be detected by high purity germanium detectors. The characteristic x-ray spectrum can be potentially used to identify nuclides. The muonic x-rays corresponding to the SNM of interest have been measured, even with the use of various shielding configurations composed of lead, iron, polyethylene, or fibreglass. These preliminary results show that muon scanning systems can be successfully used to find shielded SNM, helping to ensure the safety of all citizens.

  9. Using exotic atoms to keep borders safe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, A.; Miyadera, H.; Esch, E.I.; Hoteling, N.J.; Adelmann, A.; Heffner, R.H.; Green, A.; Olsthoorn, J.; Stocki, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Muons, created by a particle accelerator, can be used to scan cargo for special nuclear materials (SNM). These muons exist long enough and are penetrating enough that they can be used to actively scan cargo to ensure the non-proliferation of SNM. A set of 'proof-of-concept' experiments have been performed to show that active muon analysis can be used. Experiments were performed at high intensity, medium energy particle accelerators (TRIUMF and PSI). Negative muons form exotic atoms with one electron replaced by the muon. Since the muon is captured in an excited state, it will give off x-rays which can be detected by high purity germanium detectors. These characteristic x-rays can be used to identify the nuclide. The muonic x-rays corresponding to the SNM of interest have been measured, even with the use of various shielding configurations composed of lead, iron, polyethylene, or fiberglass. These preliminary results show that muons can be successfully used to find shielded SNM. The safety of North Americans can be protected by the use of this technology.

  10. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Daniel P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstone's grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  11. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baocheng, E-mail: zhangbc.zhang@yahoo.com

    2016-04-15

    An exotic Bañados–Teitelboim–Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are “dumb”, which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  12. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Baocheng

    2016-01-01

    An exotic Bañados–Teitelboim–Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are “dumb”, which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  13. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  15. The Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe - A Mission to Discover the Origin of Particle Acceleration and its Fundamental Connection to the Global Interstellar Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N.

    2017-12-01

    Our piece of cosmic real-estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence - an astrophysical case-history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) was the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. In parallel, Cassini/INCA maps the global heliosphere at energies ( 5-55 keV) above those measured by IBEX. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon and the INCA belt were unanticipated discoveries demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. The global structure of the heliosphere is highly complex and influenced by competing factors ranging from the local interstellar magnetic field, suprathermal populations both within and beyond the heliopause, and the detailed flow properties of the LISM. Global heliospheric structure and microphysics in turn influences the acceleration of energetic particles and creates feedbacks that modify the interstellar interaction as a whole. The next quantum leap enabled by IMAP will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics and probe the acceleration of suprathermal and higher energy particles at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP ultimately connects the acceleration processes observed directly at 1 AU with unprecedented sensitivity and temporal resolution with the global structure of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. IMAP, like ACE before it, will be a keystone of the Heliophysics System Observatory by providing comprehensive energetic particle, pickup ion, suprathermal ion, neutral atom, solar wind, solar wind heavy ion, and magnetic field observations to diagnose

  16. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  17. Methodology of Integration for Competitive Technical Intelligence with Blue Ocean Strategy: Application to an exotic fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Rodríguez Salvador

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new methodology that integrates Competitive Technical Intelligence with Blue Ocean Strategy. We explore new business niches taking advantage of the synergy that both areas offer, developing a model based on cyclic interactions through a process developed in two stages: Understanding opportunity that arise from idea formulation to decision making and strategic development. The validity of our approach (first stage was observed in the evaluation of an exotic fruit, Anacardium Occidentale, in the South of the State of Veracruz, Mexico with the support of the university ITESM, Campus Monterrey. We identified critical factors for success, opportunities and threats. Results confirm the attractiveness of this crop.

  18. Proceedings of the First Workshop on Exotic Physics with Neutrino Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    EPNT06

    2007-01-01

    The first Workshop on Exotic Physics with Neutrino Telescopes was held in Uppsala, Sweden, between September 20-22, 2006. The workshop was based on talks giving an overview of relevant subjects both from experiments and theorists. The theory talks provided guidelines for experimental searches, and covered the signatures expected in neutrino telescopes from different dark matter candidates, micro black holes, models with extra dimensions, non--standard neutrino oscillation scenarios and new neutrino interactions. The existing and planned neutrino telescopes presented their results and perspectives on the mentioned subjects.

  19. Exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divari, P.C.; Vergados, J.D.; Kosmas, T.S.; Skouras, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the exotic (μ - ,e + ) conversion in 27 Al, 27 Al(μ - ,e + ) 27 Na is presented. The relevant operators are deduced assuming one-pion and two-pion modes in the framework of intermediate neutrino mixing models, paying special attention to the light neutrino case. The total rate is calculated by summing over partial transition strengths for all kinematically accessible final states derived with s-d shell model calculations employing the well-known Wildenthal realistic interaction

  20. Exotic Higgs decay h → φφ → 4b at the LHeC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shang; Zhang, Chen [Peking University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Tang, Yi-Lei [Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shou-hua [Peking University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2017-07-15

    We study the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson (h) into a pair of light spin-0 particles (φ) which subsequently decay and result in a 4b final state. This channel is well motivated in models with an extended Higgs sector. Instead of searching at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) which are beset by large standard model (SM) backgrounds, we investigate this decay channel at the much cleaner Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC). With some simple selection cuts this channel becomes nearly free of background at this ep machine, in sharp contrast to the situation at the (HL-)LHC. With a parton level analysis we show that for the φ mass range [20,60] GeV, with 100 fb{sup -1} luminosity the LHeC is generally capable of constraining C{sub 4b}{sup 2} ≡ κ{sub V}{sup 2} x Br(h → φφ) x Br{sup 2}(φ → b anti b) (κ{sub V} denotes the hVV(V = W, Z) coupling strength relative to the SM value) to a few percent level (95% CLs). With 1 ab{sup -1} luminosity C{sub 4b}{sup 2} at a few per mille level can be probed. These sensitivities are much better than the HL-LHC performance and demonstrate the important role expected to be played by the LHeC in probing exotic Higgs decay processes, in addition to the already proposed invisible Higgs decay channel. (orig.)

  1. CERN: Antiprotons probe the nuclear stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The outer periphery of heavy stable nuclei is notoriously difficult to study experimentally. While the well understood electromagnetic interaction between electrons (or muons) and protons has given the nuclear charge (or proton) distribution with high precision for almost all stable nuclei, neutron distribution studies are much less precise. This is especially true for large nuclear distances, where the nuclear density is small. A few previous experiments probing the nuclear ''stratosphere'' suggested that far from the centre of the nucleus (of the order of 2 nuclear radii) this stratosphere may be composed predominantly of neutrons. At the end of the sixties the term ''neutron halo'' was introduced to describe this phenomenon, but experimental evidence was scarce or even controversial, and remained so for almost a quarter of a century. Recently, the Warsaw/Munich/Berlin collaboration working within the PS203 experiment at CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring, proposed a new method to study the nuclear periphery using stopped antiprotons. The halo now looks firmer. A 200 MeV/c beam of antiprotons was slowed down by interactions with atomic electrons. When antiproton kinetic energy drops well below 1 keV, the particles are captured in the outermost orbits of ''exotic atoms'', where the antiprotons take the place of the usual orbital electrons. With the lower orbits in this antiprotonic atom empty, the antiproton drops toward the nuclear surface, first emitting Auger electrons and later predominantly antiprotonic X-rays. Due to the strong interaction between antiprotons and nucleons, the antiproton succumbs to annihilation with a nucleon in the rarified nuclear stratosphere, far above the innermost Bohr orbit of the atom. The annihilation probability in heavy nuclei is maximal where the nuclear density is about 3% of its central value and extends to densities many orders of magnitude smaller

  2. CERN: Antiprotons probe the nuclear stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-06-15

    The outer periphery of heavy stable nuclei is notoriously difficult to study experimentally. While the well understood electromagnetic interaction between electrons (or muons) and protons has given the nuclear charge (or proton) distribution with high precision for almost all stable nuclei, neutron distribution studies are much less precise. This is especially true for large nuclear distances, where the nuclear density is small. A few previous experiments probing the nuclear ''stratosphere'' suggested that far from the centre of the nucleus (of the order of 2 nuclear radii) this stratosphere may be composed predominantly of neutrons. At the end of the sixties the term ''neutron halo'' was introduced to describe this phenomenon, but experimental evidence was scarce or even controversial, and remained so for almost a quarter of a century. Recently, the Warsaw/Munich/Berlin collaboration working within the PS203 experiment at CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring, proposed a new method to study the nuclear periphery using stopped antiprotons. The halo now looks firmer. A 200 MeV/c beam of antiprotons was slowed down by interactions with atomic electrons. When antiproton kinetic energy drops well below 1 keV, the particles are captured in the outermost orbits of ''exotic atoms'', where the antiprotons take the place of the usual orbital electrons. With the lower orbits in this antiprotonic atom empty, the antiproton drops toward the nuclear surface, first emitting Auger electrons and later predominantly antiprotonic X-rays. Due to the strong interaction between antiprotons and nucleons, the antiproton succumbs to annihilation with a nucleon in the rarified nuclear stratosphere, far above the innermost Bohr orbit of the atom. The annihilation probability in heavy nuclei is maximal where the nuclear density is about 3% of its central value and extends to densities many orders of magnitude smaller. Antiproton annihilation on a proton or on a neutron at the nuclear

  3. Far Western: probing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarson, Margret B; Pugacheva, Elena N; Orlinick, Jason R

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe far-Western technique described in this protocol is fundamentally similar to Western blotting. In Western blots, an antibody is used to detect a query protein on a membrane. In contrast, in a far-Western blot (also known as an overlay assay) the antibody is replaced by a recombinant GST fusion protein (produced and purified from bacteria), and the assay detects the interaction of this protein with target proteins on a membrane. The membranes are washed and blocked, incubated with probe protein, washed again, and subjected to autoradiography. The GST fusion (probe) proteins are often labeled with (32)P; alternatively, the membrane can be probed with unlabeled GST fusion protein, followed by detection using commercially available GST antibodies. The nonradioactive approach is substantially more expensive (due to the purchase of antibody and detection reagents) than using radioactively labeled proteins. In addition, care must be taken to control for nonspecific interactions with GST alone and a signal resulting from antibody cross-reactivity. In some instances, proteins on the membrane are not able to interact after transfer. This may be due to improper folding, particularly in the case of proteins expressed from a phage expression library. This protocol describes a way to overcome this by washing the membrane in denaturation buffer, which is then serially diluted to permit slow renaturation of the proteins.

  4. Light-ion spectroscopy with exotic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, G.L.; Lanier, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the rich and diverse aspects underlying the physics of nuclear structure requires a variety of experimental techniques. In our laboratory, we have concentrated on experimental techniques using light-ion probes and isotopes that are technically difficult to fabricate into targets. In particular, our studies of p-, d-, and t-induced nuclear reactions on the radioactive targets of 152,154 Eu and 148 Gd have illuminated some very specific and very interesting features of nuclear structure near the N = 89 shape-transition region

  5. Full information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Somnath, Suhas

    2017-04-04

    Apparatus and methods are described for scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy based on acquisition of full probe response. The full probe response contains valuable information about the probe-sample interaction that is lost in traditional scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy methods. The full probe response is analyzed post data acquisition using fast Fourier transform and adaptive filtering, as well as multivariate analysis. The full response data is further compressed to retain only statistically significant components before being permanently stored.

  6. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  7. Effect of the interaction conditions of the probe of an atomic-force microscope with the n-GaAs surface on the triboelectrization phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklanov, A. V., E-mail: baklanov@mail.ioffe.ru [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation); Gutkin, A. A.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Brunkov, P. N. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Triboelectrization as a result of the scanning of an atomic-force-microscope probe over an n-GaAs surface in the contact mode is investigated. The dependences of the local potential variation on the scanning rate and the pressing force of the probe are obtained. The results are explained by point-defect formation in the surface layers of samples under the effect of deformation of these layers during probe scanning. The charge localized at these defects in the case of equilibrium changes the potential of surface, which is subject to triboelectrization. It is shown that, for qualitative explanation of the observed dependences, it is necessary to take into account both the generation and annihilation of defects in the region experiencing deformation.

  8. Highlights on searches for supersymmetry and exotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerbaux, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we present highlight results of the first three years of the LHC running on searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). The excellent performance of the LHC machine and detectors has provided a large, high-quality dataset, mainly proton-proton interactions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV (collected in 2010 and 2011) and 8 TeV (collected in 2012). This allowed the experiments to test the Standard Model (SM) at the highest available energy and to search for new phenomena in a considerably enlarged phase space compared to previous colliders. The present review is organised as follows. Section 2 gives motivations to search for new physics beyond the SM, and a brief description of the main classes of BSM theory candidates is reported in Section 3. Section 4 summarises the characteristics of the 3-year LHC dataset, called in the following the Run 1 dataset. Precise tests of the SM are reported in Section 5. The following next sections are the core of the review and present a selection of results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments on BSM searches, gathered in four parts: the search for new physics in the scalar sector in Section 6, the search for supersymmetric particles in Section 7, the search for dark matter candidates in Section 8, and a non-exhaustive list of other exotics BSM (heavy resonances, excited fermions, leptoquarks and vector-like quarks) searches in Section 9. Future plans of the LHC running are reported in Section 10

  9. On hypercharge flux and exotics in F-theory GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; 10.1007

    2010-01-01

    We study SU(5) Grand Unified Theories within a local framework in F-theory with multiple extra U(1) symmetries arising from a small monodromy group. The use of hypercharge flux for doublet-triplet splitting implies massless exotics in the spectrum that are protected from obtaining a mass by the U(1) symmetries. We find that lifting the exotics by giving vacuum expectation values to some GUT singlets spontaneously breaks all the U(1) symmetries which implies that proton decay operators are induced. If we impose an additional R-parity symmetry by hand we find all the exotics can be lifted while proton decay operators are still forbidden. These models can retain the gauge coupling unification accuracy of the MSSM at 1-loop. For models where the generations are distributed across multiple curves we also present a motivation for the quark-lepton mass splittings at the GUT scale based on a Froggatt-Nielsen approach to flavour.

  10. Compounding and Extralabel Use of Drugs in Exotic Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lauren V; Davidson, Gigi

    2018-05-01

    Extralabel drug use is the use of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug in a manner different from what is stipulated on the approved label. Compounding is the process of preparing a medication in a manner not indicated on the label to create a formulation specifically tailored to the needs of an individual patient. Extralabel drug use and compounding are vital aspects of safe and effective drug delivery to patients in exotic animal practice. There are few FDA-approved drugs for exotic animal species, and many approved drugs for other species are not available in suitable formulations for use in exotic animals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Cynocephali and Blemmyae. Congenital anomalies and medieval exotic races].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, C A; Baljet, B

    1999-12-18

    In the mediaeval Dutch manuscript Der naturen bloeme ('On the flowers of nature') by Jacob van Maerlant (circa 1230-circa 1296), an encyclopaedia of descriptions of people, animals, plants and minerals dating from about 1270, many illustrations refer to the text. An intriguing part of the book is called 'Vreemde volkeren' ('Exotic people'). In another manuscript of Van Maerlant, Dit is die istory van Troyen ('The history of Troyes') in the chapter 'De wonderen van het Verre Oosten' ('The miracles of the Far East') the exotic people are also described. These exotic people have many features similar to congenital malformations. 'Hippopodes' are probably based on the lobster claw syndrome, 'Cynocephali' on anencephaly, 'Arimaspi' on cyclopia, 'Blemmyae' on acardiacus, the double-faced on diprosopus, 'Sciopods' on polydactyly and 'Antipodes' on the sirenomelia sequence.

  12. Exotic fermions in the left-right symmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.; Volkas, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study is made of non-standard fermion multiplets in left-right symmetric models with gauge group SU(3) x SU(2) L x SU(2) R x U(1) BL . Constraints from gauge anomaly cancellation and invariance of Yukawa coupling terms are used to define interesting classes of exotic fermions. The standard quark lepton spectrum of left-right symmetric models was identified as the simplest member of an infinite class. Phenomenological implications of the next simplest member of this class are then studied. Classes of exotic fermions which may couple to the standard fermions through doublet Higgs bosons were also considered, then shown that some of these exotics may be used to induce a generalised universal see-saw mechanism. 12 refs., 1 tab

  13. Time delayed K sup + N reactions and exotic baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P

    2003-01-01

    Evidence and hints, from both the theoretical and experimental sides, of exotic baryon resonances with B = S, have been with us for the last 30 years. The poor status of the general acceptance of these Z* resonances is partly due to the prejudice against penta-quark baryons and partly due to the opinion that a proof of the existence of exotic states must be rigorous. This can refer to the quality and amount of data gathered, and also to the analytical methods applied in the study of these resonances. It then seems mandatory that all possibilities and aspects be exploited. We do that by analysing the time delay in K sup + N scattering, encountering clear signals of the exotic Z* resonances close to the pole values found in partial wave analyses.

  14. Search for Exotic Strange Dibaryon in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Shou

    2003-01-01

    The exotic strange dibaryon particle (ΩΩ)0+ with S = -6 can be produced in relativistic heavyioncollisions. The yields of this kind of exotic strange dibaryon particles can increase significantly soon as the formation ofQGP does exhibit after the collision. If there is no phase transition after the collision, the upper bound of the productionof this diomega can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclear matter. The relative yield ratio of diomegato deuteron is less than 0.000205, this means that if there is no QGP creation it is difficult to observe the production ofdiomega in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  15. Search for Exotic Strange Dibaryon in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOChong-Shou

    2003-01-01

    The exotic strange dibaryon particle (ΩΩ)0+ with S = -6 can be produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The yields of this kind of exotic strange dibaryon particles can increase signitlcantly soon as the formation of QGP does exhibit after the collision. If there is no phase transition after the collision, the upper bound of the production of this diomega can be estimated from the free hadronic gas model for nuclear matter. The relative yield ratio of diomega to deuteron is less than 0.000205, this means that if there is no QGP creation it is difficult to observe the production of diomega in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  16. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  17. CALORIFIC PROPERTIES OF WASTES FROM SOME EXOTIC WOOD SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel LUNGULEASA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present some results about the calorific properties of biomass wastes from exotic species used as fuels. There are presented the main characteristics of biomass energy, respectively the low and high calorific value, burning speed and energy efficiency. Methodology takes into consideration the equipment, wooden species and relationships for calorific determination. The final conclusion resulting from the experiments is that the biomass of exotic species is as good as any other woody biomass, when is used as fuel, because the calorific properties are closely, even slightly higher than of classical fuels.

  18. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-01-01

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of β-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  19. Nuclear structure of weakly bound radioactive nuclei through elastic and and inelastic scattering on proton. Impacts of the couplings induced by these exotic nuclei on direct reactions; Structure de noyaux radioactifs faiblement lies par diffusions elastiques et inelastiques sur proton. Effets des couplages induits par ces noyaux exotiques sur les reactions directes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapoux, V

    2005-09-15

    Information on the structure, spectroscopy and target interaction potentials of exotic nuclei can be inferred by interpreting measured data from direct reactions on proton such as elastic or inelastic scattering of proton (p,p') or one-nucleon transfer reaction (p,d). A series of experimental results has been obtained at the GANIL facilities on the setting composed of the MUST telescope array used for the detection of light charged-particles and of CATS beam detectors. This setting aims at measuring reactions on light proton or deuteron targets through reverse kinematics. Particularly, results on C{sup 10}, C{sup 11} and on direct reactions with the He{sup 8} beam of Spiral are presented. The first chapter is dedicated to the description of the most important theories concerning the nucleus. The experimental tools used to probe the nucleus are reported in the second chapter. The third and fourth chapters present the framework that has allowed us to analyse results from (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on weakly bound exotic nuclei. The last chapter is dedicated to the description of future experimental programs. (A.C.)

  20. NASA's interstellar probe mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewer, P.C.; Ayon, J.A.; Wallace, R.A.; Mewaldt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Interstellar Probe will be the first spacecraft designed to explore the nearby interstellar medium and its interaction with our solar system. As envisioned by NASA's Interstellar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team, the spacecraft will be propelled by a solar sail to reach >200 AU in 15 years. Interstellar Probe will investigate how the Sun interacts with its environment and will directly measure the properties and composition of the dust, neutrals and plasma of the local interstellar material which surrounds the solar system. In the mission concept developed in the spring of 1999, a 400-m diameter solar sail accelerates the spacecraft to ∼15 AU/year, roughly 5 times the speed of Voyager 1 and 2. The sail is used to first bring the spacecraft to ∼0.25 AU to increase the radiation pressure before heading out in the interstellar upwind direction. After jettisoning the sail at ∼5 AU, the spacecraft coasts to 200-400 AU, exploring the Kuiper Belt, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and the nearby interstellar medium

  1. Atomic quantum superposition state generation via optical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Poulsen, Uffe Vestergaard; Negretti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    investigate cavity enhanced probing with continuous beams of both coherent and squeezed light. The stochastic master equations used in the analysis are expressed in terms of the Hamiltonian of the probed system and the interaction between the probed system and the probe field and are thus quite generally...

  2. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabloom, Eric W. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Buckley, Yvonne [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Cleland, Elsa E. [Ecology, Behavior & Evolution Section, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Davies, Kendi [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Firn, Jennifer [Queensland University of Technology, Biogeosciences, Brisbane Queensland 4000 Australia; Harpole, W. Stanley [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Hautier, Yann [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Lind, Eric [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; MacDougall, Andrew [Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Prober, Suzanne M. [CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Private Bag 5 Wembley WA 6913 Australia; Adler, Peter [Department of Wildland Resources and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322 USA; Alberti, Juan [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Michael Anderson, T. [Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 USA; Bakker, Jonathan D. [School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195-4115 USA; Biederman, Lori A. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Blumenthal, Dana [Rangeland Resources Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Fort Collins CO 80526 USA; Brown, Cynthia S. [Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 USA; Caldeira, Maria [Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon Portugal; Chu, Chengjin [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Crawley, Michael J. [Department of Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Ascot SL5 7PY UK; Daleo, Pedro [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; D' Antonio, Carla M. [Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106 USA; DeCrappeo, Nicole M. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Dickman, Chris R. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Du, Guozhen [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Fay, Philip A. [USDA-ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Lab, Temple TX 76502 USA; Frater, Paul [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Gruner, Daniel S. [Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Hagenah, Nicole [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Hector, Andrew [Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Helm, Aveliina [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Hillebrand, Helmut [Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Carl-von-Ossietzky University, Wilhelmshaven Germany; Hofmockel, Kirsten S. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Humphries, Hope C. [INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309-0450 USA; Iribarne, Oscar [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Jin, Virginia L. [USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit, Lincoln NE 68583 USA; Kay, Adam [Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul MN 55105 USA; Kirkman, Kevin P. [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Klein, Julia A. [Department Forest, Rangeland & Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523-1472 USA; Knops, Johannes M. H. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln NE 68588 USA; La Pierre, Kimberly J. [Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Ladwig, Laura M. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87103 USA; Lambrinos, John G. [Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Leakey, Andrew D. B. [Department of Plant Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL 61801 USA; Li, Qi [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 Qinghai China; Li, Wei [Yunnan Academy of Biodiversity, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224 China; McCulley, Rebecca [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40546 USA; Melbourne, Brett [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Mitchell, Charles E. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC 27599 USA; Moore, Joslin L. [Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Melbourne, c/o School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia; Morgan, John [Department of Botany, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086 Victoria Australia; Mortensen, Brent [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; O' Halloran, Lydia R. [Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Pärtel, Meelis [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Pascual, Jesús [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Pyke, David A. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Risch, Anita C. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Sankaran, Mahesh [National Centre for Biological Sciences, GKVK Campus, Bellary Road Bangalore 560065 India; Schuetz, Martin [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Simonsen, Anna [Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5S 3B2 Canada; Smith, Melinda [Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Stevens, Carly [Lancaster Environment Center, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ UK; Sullivan, Lauren [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Wardle, Glenda M. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M. [Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z4 Canada; Wragg, Peter D. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Wright, Justin [Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Yang, Louie [Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA

    2013-10-16

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  3. Nuclear moments as a probe of electronic structure in material, exotic nuclear structure and fundamental symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuta, K., E-mail: matsuta@vg.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Minamisono, T.; Mihara, M.; Fukuda, M. [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Physics (Japan); Zhu, Shengyun [CIAE (China); Masuda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Hatanaka, K. [Osaka Univ., RCNP (Japan); Yuan Daqing; Zheng Yongnan; Zuo Yi; Fang Ping; Zhou Dongmei [CIAE (China); Ohtsubo, T. [Niigata Univ., Dept. of Physics (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [Niigata Univ., RI Center (Japan); Momota, S. [Kochi Univ. of Technology (Japan); Nishimura, D. [Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Matsumiya, R. [Osaka Univ., RCNP (Japan); Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.; Kanazawa, M. [Nat. Inst. Radiological Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: Osaka-CIAE-NIRS-Niigata-Kochi-LBL Collaboration; and others

    2013-05-15

    We report our studies in various fields of Physics through nuclear moments utilizing the {beta}-NMR technique, including material sciences, nuclear structures and fundamental symmetries. Especially, we focus on the recent progress in the studies on the electronic structure in Pt through Knight shifts of various impurities, lattice locations of impurities, electric field gradients, the analysis of nuclear spin in terms of its components, anomaly in the spin expectation value for {sup 9}C-{sup 9}Li mirror pair, the G-parity conservation law, and the Ramsey resonance on UCN for future neutron EDM measurements.

  4. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  5. Characterization of Indian and exotic quality protein maize (QPM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphism analysis and genetic diversity of normal maize and quality protein maize (QPM) inbreds among locally well adapted germplasm is a prerequisite for hybrid maize breeding program. The diversity analyses of 48 maize accessions including Indian and exotic germplasm using 75 simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  6. Productivity of Indigenous and Exotic Cattle on Kenya Ranches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of productivity and adaptability of indigenous (Boran and Small East African Zebu) and the exotic (Sahiwal and Ayrshire) cattle on Kenyan ranches located in semi-arid areas of the Rift Valley Provinces was done. Data sets of the cattle breeds over the 1979-1993 period on Deloraine, Elkarama, Ilkerin, ...

  7. Exotic Options: a Chooser Option and its Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Martinkutė-Kaulienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial instruments traded in the markets and investors’ situation in such markets are getting more and more complex. This leads to more complex derivative structures used for hedging that are harder to analyze and which risk is harder managed. Because of the complexity of these instruments, the basic characteristics of many exotic options may sometimes be not clearly understood. Most scientific studies have been focused on developing models for pricing various types of exotic options, but it is important to study their unique characteristics and to understand them correctly in order to use them in proper market situations. The paper examines main aspects of options, emphasizing the variety of exotic options and their place in financial markets and risk management process. As the exact valuation of exotic options is quite difficult, the article deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of pricing of chooser options that suggest a broad range of usage and application in different market conditions. The calculations made in the article showed that the price of the chooser is closely correlated with the choice time and low correlated with its strike price. So the first mentioned factor should be taken into consideration when making appropriate hedging and investing decisions.

  8. Present and Future Experiments with Stored Exotic Nuclei at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent results and perspectives of experiments with stored exotic nuclei at GSI-FAIR will presented. An overview on the planned NUSTAR experiments will also presented. Relativistic exotic nuclei produced via projectile fragmentation and fission were separated in flight by the fragment separator FRS and injected into the storage-cooler ring ESR for accurate mass- and lifetime measurements. Direct mass measurements of electron-cooled exotic nuclei were performed using time-resolved Schottky spectrometry. Fragments with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling have been investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique gives access to all nuclei with half-lives down to the microsecond range and has been successfully applied. Lifetimes of stored bare and few-electron ions have been measured with the goal to study the beta-decay under ionization conditions prevailing in stellar plasma. For the first time the direct observation of bound-state beta decay has been achieved with 2 07T l fragments. The future project FAIR includes a new large-acceptance in-flight separator (Super-FRS) in combination with a new storage ring system (CR, NESR) which will be ideal tools to study exotic nuclei far from stability.(author)

  9. Phenology of exotic invasive weeds associated with downy brome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The exotic and highly invasive annual grass downy brome (Bromus tectorum) has invaded millions of hectares of rangelands throughout the Intermountain West. Downy brome increases the chance, rate, season and spread of wildfires, resulting in the destruction of native plant communities and the wildli...

  10. Ecosystem impacts of exotic annual invaders in the genus Bromus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Germino; Jayne Belnap; John M. Stark; Edith B Allen; Benjamin Rau

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystems is necessary to justify and guide efforts to limit their spread, restore natives, and plan for conservation. Invasive annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum, B. rubens, B. hordeaceus, and B. diandrus (hereafter collectively referred to as Bromus) transform the structure and function of ecosystems...

  11. Antimicrobial Screening of Some Exotic Tree Species of Rajasthan Desert

    OpenAIRE

    B.B.S. Kapoor* and Shelja Pandita

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial screening of ethyl ether and alcoholic extracts of leaves of four selected exotic tree species growing inRajasthan Desert was carried out. Colophospermum mopane, Holoptelea integrifolia, Kigelia pinnata andPutranjiva roxburghii showed positive reactions against bacterial pathogens i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichiacoli and a fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

  12. Developing survey grids to substantiate freedom from exotic pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Frank H. Koch; William D. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Systematic, hierarchical intensification of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program hexagon for North America yields a simple procedure for developing national-scale survey grids. In this article, we describe the steps to create a national-scale survey grid using a risk map as the starting point. We illustrate the steps using an exotic pest example in which...

  13. On the exotic Higgs decays in effective field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélusca-Maïto, Hermès; Falkowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We discuss exotic Higgs decays in an effective field theory where the Standard Model is extended by dimension-6 operators. We review and update the status of two-body lepton- and quark-flavor-violating decays involving the Higgs boson. We also comment on the possibility of observing three-body flavor-violating Higgs decays in this context.

  14. Some exotic mesons and glueballs from the string model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, C.J.; Tassie, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    Planar solutions are found to the relativistic string equation corresponding to rigid-body rotation. These solutions allow for the construction of certain classes of exotic mesons and of glueballs with asymptotically straight Chew-Frautschi plots. We determine the asymtotic slope of the Chew-Frautschi plots for these hadrons. (orig.)

  15. The effects of exotic weed Flaveria bidentis with different invasion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new exotic weed, Flaveria bidentis, is spreading in central China where it forms dense monospecific patches modifying the structure of different native ecosystems and threatening native aboveground biodiversity. However, little is known about the consequences of such an invasion for soil bacterial community, especially ...

  16. {pi}{eta} pair hard electroproduction and exotic hybrid mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, I.V. [LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay, France, UMR 8627 du CNRS (France); BLTP, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France, UMR 7644 du CNRS (France); Pire, B. [CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France, UMR 7644 du CNRS (France); Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland) and Univ. de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Teryaev, O.V. [BLTP, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Wallon, S. [LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay, France, UMR 8627 du CNRS (France)

    2005-06-13

    We show that hard electroproduction is a promising way to study exotic hybrid mesons, in particular through the hybrid decay channel H->{pi}{eta}. We discuss the {pi}{eta} generalized distribution amplitude, calculate the production amplitude and propose a forward-backward asymmetry as a signal for the hybrid meson production.

  17. πη pair hard electroproduction and exotic hybrid mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We show that hard electroproduction is a promising way to study exotic hybrid mesons, in particular through the hybrid decay channel H->πη. We discuss the πη generalized distribution amplitude, calculate the production amplitude and propose a forward-backward asymmetry as a signal for the hybrid meson production

  18. Introduction: Exotic annual Bromus in the western USA [Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Germino; Jeanne C. Chambers; Cynthia S. Brown

    2016-01-01

    The spread and impacts of exotic species are unambiguous, global threats to many ecosystems. A prominent example is the suite of annual grasses in the Bromus genus (Bromus hereafter) that originate from Europe and Eurasia but have invaded or are invading large areas of the Western USA. This book brings a diverse, multidisciplinary group of authors together to...

  19. Bounds on charged lepton mixing with exotic charged leptons Ф

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    imposing the constraints that the amplitude should not exceed the perturbative unitarity limit at high energy (. Ф. × = A), we obtain bounds on light heavy charged lepton mixing parameter sin. 2. (2 a. L) where a. L is the mixing angle of the ordinary charged lepton with its exotic partner. For A = 1 TeV, no bound is obtained on ...

  20. Physico-chemical properties of topsoil under indigenous and exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated selected physico-chemical properties of topsoil under monoculture plantation of an indigenous tree species - Nauclea diderrichii, and those of four exotic tree species – Theobroma cacao, Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea and Tectona grandis, located in Omo Biosphere Reserve, Ogun State, Nigeria.