WorldWideScience

Sample records for interaction misfolding induced

  1. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  2. Physico-Pathologic Mechanisms Involved in Neurodegeneration: Misfolded Protein-Plasma Membrane Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2017-07-05

    Several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, are characterized by prominent loss of synapses and neurons associated with the presence of abnormally structured or misfolded protein assemblies. Cell-to-cell transfer of misfolded proteins has been proposed for the intra-cerebral propagation of these diseases. When released, misfolded proteins diffuse in the 3D extracellular space before binding to the plasma membrane of neighboring cells, where they diffuse on a 2D plane. This reduction in diffusion dimension and the cell surface molecular crowding promote deleterious interactions with native membrane proteins, favoring clustering and further aggregation of misfolded protein assemblies. These processes open up new avenues for therapeutics development targeting the initial interactions of deleterious proteins with the plasma membrane or the subsequent pathological signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of fullerenol surface chemistry on nanoparticle binding-induced protein misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, Slaven; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Chen, Ran; Salonen, Emppu; Brown, Jared M.; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and dynamics of ubiquitin. We found that all derivatives bound to the model protein. Specifically, the more hydrophilic nanoparticles with a higher number of hydroxyl groups bound to the surface of the protein via hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the protein without inducing large conformational changes in the protein structure. In contrast, fullerene derivatives with a smaller number of hydroxyl groups buried their hydrophobic surface inside the protein, thereby causing protein denaturation. Overall, our results revealed a distinct role of surface chemistry on nanoparticle-protein binding and binding-induced protein misfolding.Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and

  4. Mechanisms of protein misfolding: Novel therapeutic approaches to protein-misfolding diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Khan, Sanaullah; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-11-01

    In protein misfolding, protein molecule acquires wrong tertiary structure, thereby induces protein misfolding diseases. Protein misfolding can occur through various mechanisms. For instance, changes in environmental conditions, oxidative stress, dominant negative mutations, error in post-translational modifications, increase in degradation rate and trafficking error. All of these factors cause protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that partially unfolded or misfolded intermediates are particularly prone to aggregation. These partially misfolded intermediates aggregate via the interaction with the complementary intermediates and consequently enhance oligomers formation that grows into fibrils and proto-fibrils. The amyloid fibrils for example, accumulate in the brain and central nervous system (CNS) as amyloid deposits in the Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Prion disease and Amylo lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Furthermore, tau protein shows intrinsically disorder conformation; therefore its interaction with microtubule is impaired and this protein undergoes aggregation. This is also underlying cause of Alzheimers and other neurodegenerative diseases. Treatment of such misfolding maladies is considered as one of the most important challenges of the 21st century. Currently, several treatments strategies have been and are being discovered. These therapeutic interventions partly reversed or prevented the pathological state. More recently, a new approach was discovered, which employs nanobodies that targets multisteps in fibril formation pathway that may possibly completely cure these misfolding diseases. Keeping the above views in mind in the current review, we have comprehensively discussed the different mechanisms underlying protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions and their therapeutic interventions.

  5. Mechanisms of protein misfolding: Novel therapeutic approaches to protein-misfolding diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Khan, Sanaullah

    2016-01-01

    ’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Prion disease and Amylo lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Furthermore, tau protein shows intrinsically disorder conformation; therefore its interaction with microtubule is impaired and this protein undergoes aggregation. This is also underlying cause of Alzheimers and other......In protein misfolding, protein molecule acquires wrong tertiary structure, thereby induces protein misfolding diseases. Protein misfolding can occur through various mechanisms. For instance, changes in environmental conditions, oxidative stress, dominant negative mutations, error in post......-translational modifications, increase in degradation rate and trafficking error. All of these factors cause protein misfolding thereby leading to diseases conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that partially unfolded or misfolded intermediates are particularly prone to aggregation. These partially...

  6. TDP-43 or FUS-induced misfolded human wild-type SOD1 can propagate intercellularly in a prion-like fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrishevsky, Edward; Grad, Leslie I; Cashman, Neil R

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which appears to spread through the neuroaxis in a spatiotemporally restricted manner, is linked to heritable mutations in genes encoding SOD1, TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72, or can occur sporadically without recognized genetic mutations. Misfolded human wild-type (HuWt) SOD1 has been detected in both familial and sporadic ALS patients, despite mutations in SOD1 accounting for only 2% of total cases. We previously showed that accumulation of pathological TDP-43 or FUS coexist with misfolded HuWtSOD1 in patient motor neurons, and can trigger its misfolding in cultured cells. Here, we used immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that TDP-43 or FUS-induced misfolded HuWtSOD1 can propagate from cell-to-cell via conditioned media, and seed cytotoxic misfolding of endogenous HuWtSOD1 in the recipient cells in a prion-like fashion. Knockdown of SOD1 using siRNA in recipient cells, or incubation of conditioned media with misfolded SOD1-specific antibodies, inhibits intercellular transmission, indicating that HuWtSOD1 is an obligate seed and substrate of propagated misfolding. In this system, intercellular spread of SOD1 misfolding is not accompanied by transmission of TDP-43 or FUS pathology. Our findings argue that pathological TDP-43 and FUS may exert motor neuron pathology in ALS through the initiation of propagated misfolding of SOD1.

  7. H ferritin silencing induces protein misfolding in K562 cells: A Raman analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zolea, Fabiana

    2015-10-09

    The redox state of the cell is involved in the regulation of many physiological functions as well as in the pathogenesis of several diseases, and is strictly dependent on the amount of iron in its catalytically active state. Alterations of iron homeostasis determine increased steady-state concentrations of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) that cause lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and altered protein folding. Ferritin keeps the intracellular iron in a non-toxic and readily available form and consequently plays a central role in iron and redox homeostasis. The protein is composed by 24 subunits of the H- and L-type, coded by two different genes, with structural and functional differences. The aim of this study was to shed light on the role of the single H ferritin subunit (FHC) in keeping the native correct protein three-dimensional structure. To this, we performed Raman spectroscopy on protein extracts from K562 cells subjected to FHC silencing. The results show a significant increase in the percentage of disordered structures content at a level comparable to that induced by H2O2 treatment in control cells. ROS inhibitor and iron chelator were able to revert protein misfolding. This integrated approach, involving Raman spectroscopy and targeted-gene silencing, indicates that an imbalance of the heavy-to-light chain ratio in the ferritin composition is able to induce severe but still reversible modifications in protein folding and uncovers new potential pathogenetic mechanisms associated to intracellular iron perturbation.

  8. H ferritin silencing induces protein misfolding in K562 cells: A Raman analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zolea, Fabiana; Biamonte, Flavia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Cozzi, Anna; Di Vito, Anna; Quaresima, Barbara; Lobello, Nadia; Trecroci, Francesca; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Levi, Sonia; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The redox state of the cell is involved in the regulation of many physiological functions as well as in the pathogenesis of several diseases, and is strictly dependent on the amount of iron in its catalytically active state. Alterations of iron homeostasis determine increased steady-state concentrations of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) that cause lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and altered protein folding. Ferritin keeps the intracellular iron in a non-toxic and readily available form and consequently plays a central role in iron and redox homeostasis. The protein is composed by 24 subunits of the H- and L-type, coded by two different genes, with structural and functional differences. The aim of this study was to shed light on the role of the single H ferritin subunit (FHC) in keeping the native correct protein three-dimensional structure. To this, we performed Raman spectroscopy on protein extracts from K562 cells subjected to FHC silencing. The results show a significant increase in the percentage of disordered structures content at a level comparable to that induced by H2O2 treatment in control cells. ROS inhibitor and iron chelator were able to revert protein misfolding. This integrated approach, involving Raman spectroscopy and targeted-gene silencing, indicates that an imbalance of the heavy-to-light chain ratio in the ferritin composition is able to induce severe but still reversible modifications in protein folding and uncovers new potential pathogenetic mechanisms associated to intracellular iron perturbation.

  9. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    For almost half of a century, we have known that aminoglycoside antibiotics corrupt ribosomes, causing translational misreading, yet it remains unclear whether or not misreading triggers protein misfolding, and possible effects of chaperone action on drug susceptibilities are poorly understood...

  10. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification induces the conversion of recombinant prion protein to PrP oligomers causing neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Yang, Lifeng; Chen, Baian; Zhu, Ting; Hassan, Mohammad Farooque; Yin, Xiaomin; Zhou, Xiangmei; Zhao, Deming

    2015-06-01

    The formation of neurotoxic prion protein (PrP) oligomers is thought to be a key step in the development of prion diseases. Recently, it was determined that the sonication and shaking of recombinant PrP can convert PrP monomers into β-state oligomers. Herein, we demonstrate that β-state oligomeric PrP can be generated through protein misfolding cyclic amplification from recombinant full-length hamster, human, rabbit, and mutated rabbit PrP, and that these oligomers can be used for subsequent research into the mechanisms of PrP-induced neurotoxicity. We have characterized protein misfolding cyclic amplification-induced monomer-to-oligomer conversion of PrP from three species using western blotting, circular dichroism, size-exclusion chromatography, and resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. We have further shown that all of the resulting β-oligomers are toxic to primary mouse cortical neurons independent of the presence of PrP(C) in the neurons, whereas the corresponding monomeric PrP were not toxic. In addition, we found that this toxicity is the result of oligomer-induced apoptosis via regulation of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in both wild-type and PrP(-/-) cortical neurons. It is our hope that these results may contribute to our understanding of prion transformation within the brain. We found that β-state oligomeric PrPs can be generated through protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) from recombinant full-length hamster, human, rabbit, and mutated rabbit PrP. β-oligomers are toxic to primary mouse cortical neurons independent of the presence of PrP(C) in the neurons, while the corresponding monomeric PrPs were not toxic. This toxicity is the result of oligomers-induced apoptosis via regulation of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3. These results may contribute to our understanding of prion transformation within the brain. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD+ followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD+ or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD+ levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD+ depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD+. Intranasal NAD+ treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD+ starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD+ replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25678560

  12. Protein misfolding and obstructive lung disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has evolved a number of mechanisms to manage the accumulation of incorrectly folded proteins. This results in loss of function of these proteins, but occasionally, in conditions such as α-1 antitrpysin (A1AT) deficiency, the misfolded protein can acquire a toxic gain of function promoting exaggerated ER stress responses and inflammation. Mutations leading to deficiency in a second serine proteinase inhibitor, α-1 antichymotrpysin (ACT), can induce potentially similar consequences. A1AT and ACT deficiencies are associated with chronic obstructive lung disease. Until recently, it was thought that the lung diseases associated with these conditions were entirely due to loss of antiprotease protection in the lung (i.e., loss of function), whereas gain of function was the major cause of the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency. This paradigm is being increasingly challenged because ER stress is being recognized in bronchial epithelial cells and inflammatory cells normally resident in the lung, giving rise to an inflammatory phenotype that adds to the proteolytic burden associated with these conditions. In this article, we describe the cellular mechanisms that are activated to cope with an increasing burden of misfolded proteins within the ER in A1AT and ACT deficiency, show how these events are linked to inflammation, and outline the therapeutic strategies that can potentially interfere with production of misfolded proteins.

  13. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute...

  14. Cellular proteostasis: degradation of misfolded proteins by lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteostasis refers to the regulation of the cellular concentration, folding, interactions and localization of each of the proteins that comprise the proteome. One essential element of proteostasis is the disposal of misfolded proteins by the cellular pathways of protein degradation. Lysosomes are an important site for the degradation of misfolded proteins, which are trafficked to this organelle by the pathways of macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy and endocytosis. Conversely, amyloid diseases represent a failure in proteostasis, in which proteins misfold, forming amyloid deposits that are not degraded effectively by cells. Amyloid may then exacerbate this failure by disrupting autophagy and lysosomal proteolysis. However, targeting the pathways that regulate autophagy and the biogenesis of lysosomes may present approaches that can rescue cells from the deleterious effects of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:27744333

  15. Laser-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    This dissertation discusses some of the new ways that lasers can be used to control the energy flow in a medium. Experimental and theoretical considerations of the laser-induced collision are discussed. The laser-induced collision is a process in which a laser is used to selectively transfer energy from a state in one atomic or molecular species to another state in a different species. The first experimental demonstration of this process is described, along with later experiments in which lasers were used to create collisional cross sections as large as 10 - 13 cm 2 . Laser-induced collisions utilizing both a dipole-dipole interaction and dipole-quadrupole interaction have been experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical aspects of other related processes such as laser-induced spin-exchange, collision induced Raman emission, and laser-induced charge transfer are discussed. Experimental systems that could be used to demonstrate these various processes are presented. An experiment which produced an inversion of the resonance line of an ion by optical pumping of the neutral atom is described. This type of scheme has been proposed as a possible method for constructing VUV and x-ray lasers

  16. Mechanisms of protein misfolding in conformational lung diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McElvaney, N G

    2012-08-01

    Genetic or environmentally-induced alterations in protein structure interfere with the correct folding, assembly and trafficking of proteins. In the lung the expression of misfolded proteins can induce a variety of pathogenetic effects. Cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two major clinically relevant pulmonary disorders associated with protein misfolding. Both are genetic diseases the primary causes of which are expression of mutant alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and SERPINA1, respectively. The most common and best studied mutant forms of CFTR and AAT are ΔF508 CFTR and the Glu342Lys mutant of AAT called ZAAT, respectively. Non-genetic mechanisms can also damage protein structure and induce protein misfolding in the lung. Cigarette-smoke contains oxidants and other factors that can modify a protein\\'s structure, and is one of the most significant environmental causes of protein damage within the lung. Herein we describe the mechanisms controlling the folding of wild type and mutant versions of CFTR and AAT proteins, and explore the consequences of cigarette-smoke-induced effects on the protein folding machinery in the lung.

  17. Frustration in the energy landscapes of multidomain protein misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weihua; Schafer, Nicholas P; Wolynes, Peter G

    2013-01-29

    Frustration from strong interdomain interactions can make misfolding a more severe problem in multidomain proteins than in single-domain proteins. On the basis of bioinformatic surveys, it has been suggested that lowering the sequence identity between neighboring domains is one of nature's solutions to the multidomain misfolding problem. We investigate folding of multidomain proteins using the associative-memory, water-mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM), a predictive coarse-grained protein force field. We find that reducing sequence identity not only decreases the formation of domain-swapped contacts but also decreases the formation of strong self-recognition contacts between β-strands with high hydrophobic content. The ensembles of misfolded structures that result from forming these amyloid-like interactions are energetically disfavored compared with the native state, but entropically favored. Therefore, these ensembles are more stable than the native ensemble under denaturing conditions, such as high temperature. Domain-swapped contacts compete with self-recognition contacts in forming various trapped states, and point mutations can shift the balance between the two types of interaction. We predict that multidomain proteins that lack these specific strong interdomain interactions should fold reliably.

  18. Misfolded Gβ is recruited to cytoplasmic dynein by Nudel for efficient clearance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yihan Wan; Zhenye Yang; Jing Guo; Qiangge Zhang; Liyong Zeng; Wei Song; Yue Xiao; Xueliang Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The Gβγ heterodimer is an important signal transducer.Gβ,however,is prone to misfolding due to its requirement for Gγ and chaperones for proper folding.How cells dispose of misfolded Gβ (mfGβ) is not clear.Here,we showed that mfGβ was able to be polyubiquitinated and subsequently degraded by the proteasome.It was sequestered in aggresomes after the inhibition of the proteasome activity with MG132.Sustained activation of Gβγ signaling further elevated cellular levels of the ubiquitinated Gβ.Moreover,Nudel,a regulator of cytoplasmic dynein,the microtubule minus end-directed motor,directly interacted with both the unubiquitinated and ubiquitinated mfGβ.Increasing the levels of both mfGβ and Nudel promoted the association of Gβ with both Nudel and dynein,resulting in robust aggresome formation in a dynein-dependent manner.Depletion of Nudel by RNAi reduced the dynein-associated mfGβ,impaired the MG132-induced aggresome formation,and markedly prolonged the half-life of nascent Gβ.Therefore,cytosolic mfGβ is recruited to dynein by Nudel and transported to the centrosome for rapid sequestration and degradation.Such a process not only eliminates mfGβ efficiently for the control of protein quality,but may also help to terminate the Gβγ signaling.

  19. Markov state models of protein misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirur, Anshul; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B.

    2016-02-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) are an extremely useful tool for understanding the conformational dynamics of macromolecules and for analyzing MD simulations in a quantitative fashion. They have been extensively used for peptide and protein folding, for small molecule binding, and for the study of native ensemble dynamics. Here, we adapt the MSM methodology to gain insight into the dynamics of misfolded states. To overcome possible flaws in root-mean-square deviation (RMSD)-based metrics, we introduce a novel discretization approach, based on coarse-grained contact maps. In addition, we extend the MSM methodology to include "sink" states in order to account for the irreversibility (on simulation time scales) of processes like protein misfolding. We apply this method to analyze the mechanism of misfolding of tandem repeats of titin domains, and how it is influenced by confinement in a chaperonin-like cavity.

  20. Protein misfolding disorders: pathogenesis and intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    of the functional structure of cellular proteins. Aberrant proteins, the result of production errors, inherited or acquired amino acid substitutions or damage, especially oxidative modifications, can in many cases not fold correctly and will be trapped in misfolded conformations. To rid the cell of misfolded...... be accompanied by a gain-of-function pathogenesis, which in many cases determines the pathological and clinical features. Examples are Parkinson and Huntington diseases. Although a number of strategies have been tried to decrease the amounts of accumulated and aggregated proteins, a likely future strategy seems......Newly synthesized proteins in the living cell must go through a folding process to attain their functional structure. To achieve this in an efficient fashion, all organisms, including humans, have evolved a large set of molecular chaperones that assist the folding as well as the maintenance...

  1. Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification of Infectious Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases, are a group of incurable disorders caused by the accumulation of an abnormally folded prion protein (PrP Sc ) in the brain. According to the "protein-only" hypothesis, PrP Sc is the infectious agent able to propagate the disease by acting as a template for the conversion of the correctly folded prion protein (PrP C ) into the pathological isoform. Recently, the mechanism of PrP C conversion has been mimicked in vitro using an innovative technique named protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). This technology represents a great tool for studying diverse aspects of prion biology in the field of basic research and diagnosis. Moreover, PMCA can be expanded for the study of the misfolding process associated to other neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental investigation of protein folding and misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Christopher M

    2004-09-01

    Newly synthesised proteins need to fold, often to intricate and close-packed structures, in order to function. The underlying mechanism by which this complex process takes place both in vitro and in vivo is now becoming understood, at least in general terms, as a result of the application of a wide range of biophysical and computational methods used in combination with the techniques of biochemistry and protein engineering. It is increasingly apparent, however, that folding is not only crucial for generating biological activity, but that it is also coupled to a wide range of processes within the cell, ranging from the trafficking of proteins to specific organelles to the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Not surprisingly, therefore, the failure of proteins to fold appropriately, or to remain correctly folded, is associated with a large number of cellular malfunctions that give rise to disease. Misfolding, and its consequences such as aggregation, can be investigated by extending the types of techniques used to study the normal folding process. Application of these techniques is enabling the development of a unified description of the interconversion and regulation of the different conformational states available to proteins in living systems. Such a description proves a generic basis for understanding the fundamental links between protein misfolding and its associated clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Type II diabetes, and for exploring novel therapeutic strategies directed at their prevention and treatment on a rational basis.

  3. Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Annalisa; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2012-06-01

    Protein aggregation and misfolding have important implications in an increasing number of fields ranging from medicine to biology to nanotechnology and material science. The interest in understanding this field has accordingly increased steadily over the last two decades. During this time the number of publications that have been dedicated to protein aggregation has increased exponentially, tackling the problem from several different and sometime contradictory perspectives. This review is meant to summarize some of the highlights that come from these studies and introduce this topical issue on the subject. The factors that make a protein aggregate and the cellular strategies that defend from aggregation are discussed together with the perspectives that the accumulated knowledge may open.

  4. Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, Annalisa; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation and misfolding have important implications in an increasing number of fields ranging from medicine to biology to nanotechnology and material science. The interest in understanding this field has accordingly increased steadily over the last two decades. During this time the number of publications that have been dedicated to protein aggregation has increased exponentially, tackling the problem from several different and sometime contradictory perspectives. This review is meant to summarize some of the highlights that come from these studies and introduce this topical issue on the subject. The factors that make a protein aggregate and the cellular strategies that defend from aggregation are discussed together with the perspectives that the accumulated knowledge may open. (topical review)

  5. Non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David S

    2012-01-01

    We discuss non-equilibrium aspects of fluctuation-induced interactions. While the equilibrium behavior of such interactions has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood, the study of these interactions out of equilibrium is relatively new. We discuss recent results on the non-equilibrium behavior of systems whose dynamics is of the dissipative stochastic type and identify a number of outstanding problems concerning non-equilibrium fluctuation-induced interactions.

  6. Interplay between Molecular Chaperones and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Targeting of Misfolded Proteins for Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    interacting with purified 26S proteasomes, and the subsequent characterization of two novel proteasome interacting proteins. The third study was aimed at analyzing the chaperone-assisted pathway leading to degradation of misfolded kinetochore proteins in S. pombe. In this study chaperones, E2s, E3s and DUBs...

  7. Kosmotropic anions promote conversion of recombinant prion protein into a PrPSc-like misfolded form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diaz-Espinoza

    Full Text Available Prions are self-propagating proteins involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopaties in mammals. An aberrant conformation with amyloid-like features of a cell surface protein, termed prion protein (PrP, is thought to be the essential component of the infectious particle, though accessory co-factor molecules such as lipids and nucleotides may be involved. The cellular co-factors and environmental conditions implicated in PrP misfolding are not completely understood. To address this issue, several studies have been done inducing misfolding of recombinant PrP (recPrP into classical amyloid structures using partially denaturing conditions. In this work, we report that misfolding of recPrP into PrP(Sc-like aggregates can be induced by simply incubating the protein in the presence of kosmotropic salts at concentrations that are known to retain or increase the stability of the protein. We used a simple experimental reaction (protein, buffer and salts submitted to agitation/incubation cycles at physiological temperature and pH. The formation of protease resistant-recPrP was time and salt-concentration dependent and required the presence of kosmotropic anions such as F(- or SO(4(-2. The molecular weights of the protease resistant recPrP fragments are reminiscent of those found in degradation assays of bona fide PrP(Sc. The aggregates also exhibited PrP(Sc-like ultrastructural features including rod-shape morphology under electron microscope, high beta-sheet content and thioflavin-T positive signal. The formation of recPrP aggregates with PrP(Sc biochemical features under conditions closer to physiological in the absence of organic co-factor molecules provides a simple setup that may prove helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of PrP misfolding.

  8. Induced gravity and gauge interactions revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, Boguslaw; Szanecki, Michal

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that the primary, old-fashioned idea of Sakharov's induced gravity and gauge interactions, in the 'one-loop dominance' version, works astonishingly well yielding phenomenologically reasonable results. As a byproduct, the issue of the role of the UV cutoff in the context of the induced gravity has been reexamined (an idea of self-cutoff induced gravity). As an additional check, the black hole entropy has been used in the place of the action. Finally, it has been explicitly shown that the induced coupling constants of gauge interactions of the standard model assume qualitatively realistic values.

  9. Strain-dependent profile of misfolded prion protein aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rodrigo; Hu, Ping Ping; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moda, Fabio; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Chen, Baian; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V; Soto, Claudio

    2016-02-15

    Prions are composed of the misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) organized in a variety of aggregates. An important question in the prion field has been to determine the identity of functional PrP(Sc) aggregates. In this study, we used equilibrium sedimentation in sucrose density gradients to separate PrP(Sc) aggregates from three hamster prion strains (Hyper, Drowsy, SSLOW) subjected to minimal manipulations. We show that PrP(Sc) aggregates distribute in a wide range of arrangements and the relative proportion of each species depends on the prion strain. We observed a direct correlation between the density of the predominant PrP(Sc) aggregates and the incubation periods for the strains studied. The relative presence of PrP(Sc) in fractions of different sucrose densities was indicative of the protein deposits present in the brain as analyzed by histology. Interestingly, no association was found between sensitivity to proteolytic degradation and aggregation profiles. Therefore, the organization of PrP molecules in terms of the density of aggregates generated may determine some of the particular strain properties, whereas others are independent from it. Our findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms of strain variation and the role of PrP(Sc) aggregates in prion-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    decrease in solvation free energy, harnessing the monomer solvation free energy earned during the misfolding. The second step, where a compact dimer structure is formed, is driven by direct protein-protein interactions, but again it is accompanied by an increase in solvation free energy. The increased solvation free energy of the dimer will function as the driving force to recruit another Aβ protein in the approach stage of subsequent oligomerizations. The fluctuating thermodynamics analysis of the misfolding and dimerization of the Aβ protein indicates that the interaction of the protein with surrounding water plays a critical role in protein aggregation. Such a water-centric perspective is further corroborated by demonstrating that, for a large number of Aβ mutants and mutants of other protein systems, the change in the experimental aggregation propensity upon mutation has a significant correlation with the protein solvation free energy change. We also find striking discrimination between the positively and negatively charged residues on the protein surface by surrounding water molecules, which is shown to play a crucial role in determining the protein aggregation propensity. We argue that the protein total charge dictates such striking behavior of the surrounding water molecules. Our results provide new insights for understanding and predicting the protein aggregation propensity, thereby offering novel design principles for producing aggregation-resistant proteins for biotherapeutics.

  11. An emerging role for misfolded wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S Rotunno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that targets motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death within a few years of disease onset. While several genes have been linked to the inheritable, or familial, form of ALS, much less is known about the cause(s of sporadic ALS, which accounts for approximately 90% of ALS cases. Due to the clinical similarities between familial and sporadic ALS, it is plausible that both forms of the disease converge on a common pathway and, therefore, involve common factors. Recent evidence suggests the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 protein to be one such factor that is common to both sporadic and familial ALS. In 1993, mutations were uncovered in SOD1 that represent the first known genetic cause of familial ALS. While the exact mechanism of mutant-SOD1 toxicity is still not known today, most evidence points to a gain of toxic function that stems, at least in part, from the propensity of this protein to misfold. In the wild-type SOD1 protein, non-genetic perturbations such as metal depletion, disruption of the quaternary structure, and oxidation, can also induce SOD1 to misfold. In fact, these aforementioned post-translational modifications cause wild-type SOD1 to adopt a toxic conformation that is similar to familial ALS-linked SOD1 variants. These observations, together with the detection of misfolded wild-type SOD1 within human post-mortem sporadic ALS samples, have been used to support the controversial hypothesis that misfolded forms of wild-type SOD1 contribute to sporadic ALS pathogenesis. In this review, we present data from the literature that both support and contradict this hypothesis. We also discuss SOD1 as a potential therapeutic target for both familial and sporadic ALS.

  12. Galaxies interactions and induced star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kennicutt Jr, Robert C; Barnes, JE

    1998-01-01

    The papers that make up this volume present a comprehensive review of the field of galaxy interaction. Galaxies are dynamic forces that evolve, interact, merge, blaze and reshape. This book offers a historical perspective and studies such topics as induced star formation.

  13. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Natale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-to-cell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs; mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs. The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step.

  14. Geometrically Induced Interactions and Bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the proper boundary conditions in spin dynamics eventually leading to the emergence of natural and artificial solitons providing for strong interactions and potentials with monopole charges, the paper outlines a new concept referring to a curvature-invariant formalism, where superintegrability is given by a special isometric condition. Instead of referring to the spin operators and Casimir/Euler invariants as the generator of rotations, a curvature-invariant description is introduced utilizing a double Gudermann mapping function (generator of sine Gordon solitons and Mercator projection) cross-relating two angular variables, where geometric phases and rotations arise between surfaces of different curvature. Applying this stereographic projection to a superintegrable Hamiltonian can directly map linear oscillators to Kepler/Coulomb potentials and/or monopoles with Pöschl-Teller potentials and vice versa. In this sense a large scale Kepler/Coulomb (gravitational, electro-magnetic) wave dynamics with a hyperbolic metric could be mapped as a geodesic vertex flow to a local oscillator singularity (Dirac monopole) with spherical metrics and vice versa. Attracting fixed points and dynamic constraints are given by special isometries with magic precession angles. The nonlinear angular encoding directly provides for a Shannon mutual information entropy measure of the geodesic phase space flow. The emerging monopole patterns show relations to spiral Fresnel holography and Berry/Aharonov-Bohm geometric phases subject to bifurcation instabilities and singularities from phase ambiguities due to a local (entropy) overload. Neutral solitons and virtual patterns emerging and mediating in the overlap region between charged or twisted holographic patterns are visualized and directly assigned to the Berry geometric phase revealing the role of photons, neutrons, and neutrinos binding repulsive charges in Coulomb, strong and weak interaction.

  15. Protein degradation and protection against misfolded or damaged proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2003-12-01

    The ultimate mechanism that cells use to ensure the quality of intracellular proteins is the selective destruction of misfolded or damaged polypeptides. In eukaryotic cells, the large ATP-dependent proteolytic machine, the 26S proteasome, prevents the accumulation of non-functional, potentially toxic proteins. This process is of particular importance in protecting cells against harsh conditions (for example, heat shock or oxidative stress) and in a variety of diseases (for example, cystic fibrosis and the major neurodegenerative diseases). A full understanding of the pathogenesis of the protein-folding diseases will require greater knowledge of how misfolded proteins are recognized and selectively degraded.

  16. Complex folding and misfolding effects of deer-specific amino acid substitutions in the β2-α2 loop of murine prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sonya; Döring, Kristina; Gierusz, Leszek A.; Iyer, Pooja; Lane, Fiona M.; Graham, James F.; Goldmann, Wilfred; Pinheiro, Teresa J. T.; Gill, Andrew C.

    2015-10-01

    The β2-α2 loop of PrPC is a key modulator of disease-associated prion protein misfolding. Amino acids that differentiate mouse (Ser169, Asn173) and deer (Asn169, Thr173) PrPC appear to confer dramatically different structural properties in this region and it has been suggested that amino acid sequences associated with structural rigidity of the loop also confer susceptibility to prion disease. Using mouse recombinant PrP, we show that mutating residue 173 from Asn to Thr alters protein stability and misfolding only subtly, whilst changing Ser to Asn at codon 169 causes instability in the protein, promotes oligomer formation and dramatically potentiates fibril formation. The doubly mutated protein exhibits more complex folding and misfolding behaviour than either single mutant, suggestive of differential effects of the β2-α2 loop sequence on both protein stability and on specific misfolding pathways. Molecular dynamics simulation of protein structure suggests a key role for the solvent accessibility of Tyr168 in promoting molecular interactions that may lead to prion protein misfolding. Thus, we conclude that ‘rigidity’ in the β2-α2 loop region of the normal conformer of PrP has less effect on misfolding than other sequence-related effects in this region.

  17. Who fans the flames of Alzheimer's disease brains? Misfolded tau on the crossroad of neurodegenerative and inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilka, Norbert; Kazmerova, Zuzana; Jadhav, Santosh; Neradil, Peter; Madari, Aladar; Obetkova, Dominika; Bugos, Ondrej; Novak, Michal

    2012-03-07

    Neurodegeneration, induced by misfolded tau protein, and neuroinflammation, driven by glial cells, represent the salient features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related human tauopathies. While tau neurodegeneration significantly correlates with disease progression, brain inflammation seems to be an important factor in regulating the resistance or susceptibility to AD neurodegeneration. Previously, it has been shown that there is a reciprocal relationship between the local inflammatory response and neurofibrillary lesions. Numerous independent studies have reported that inflammatory responses may contribute to the development of tau pathology and thus accelerate the course of disease. It has been shown that various cytokines can significantly affect the functional and structural properties of intracellular tau. Notwithstanding, anti-inflammatory approaches have not unequivocally demonstrated that inhibition of the brain immune response can lead to reduction of neurofibrillary lesions. On the other hand, our recent data show that misfolded tau could represent a trigger for microglial activation, suggesting the dual role of misfolded tau in the Alzheimer's disease inflammatory cascade. On the basis of current knowledge, we can conclude that misfolded tau is located at the crossroad of the neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathways. Thus disease-modified tau represents an important target for potential therapeutic strategies for patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Relevance of induced gauge interactions in decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.P.

    1994-07-01

    Decoherence in quantum cosmology is shown to occur naturally in the presence of induced geometric gauge interactions associated with particle production. A new ''gauge'' - variant form of the semiclassical Einstein equations is also presented which makes the non-gravitating character of the vacuum polarization energy explicit. (author). 20 refs

  19. Amyloid-β Peptide Induces Prion Protein Amyloid Formation: Evidence for Its Widespread Amyloidogenic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo

    2018-04-12

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is associated with misfolding of prion protein (PrP) into an amyloid β-rich aggregate. Previous studies have indicated that PrP interacts with Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), but it remains elusive how this interaction impacts on the misfolding of PrP. This study presents the first in vitro evidence that Aβ induces PrP-amyloid formation at submicromolar concentrations. Interestingly, systematic mutagenesis of PrP revealed that Aβ requires no specific amino acid sequences in PrP, and induces the misfolding of other unrelated proteins (insulin and lysozyme) into amyloid fibrils in a manner analogous to PrP. This unanticipated nonspecific amyloidogenic effect of Aβ indicates that this peptide might be involved in widespread protein aggregation, regardless of the amino acid sequences of target proteins, and exacerbate the pathology of many neurodegenerative diseases. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Region-specific protein misfolding cyclic amplification reproduces brain tropism of prion strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Nicolas; Levavasseur, Etienne; Yildirim, Serfildan; Hannaoui, Samia; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Béringue, Vincent; Seilhean, Danielle; Haïk, Stéphane

    2017-10-06

    Human prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are transmissible brain proteinopathies, characterized by the accumulation of a misfolded isoform of the host cellular prion protein (PrP) in the brain. According to the prion model, prions are defined as proteinaceous infectious particles composed solely of this abnormal isoform of PrP (PrP Sc ). Even in the absence of genetic material, various prion strains can be propagated in experimental models. They can be distinguished by the pattern of disease they produce and especially by the localization of PrP Sc deposits within the brain and the spongiform lesions they induce. The mechanisms involved in this strain-specific targeting of distinct brain regions still are a fundamental, unresolved question in prion research. To address this question, we exploited a prion conversion in vitro assay, protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), by using experimental scrapie and human prion strains as seeds and specific brain regions from mice and humans as substrates. We show here that region-specific PMCA in part reproduces the specific brain targeting observed in experimental, acquired, and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases. Furthermore, we provide evidence that, in addition to cellular prion protein, other region- and species-specific molecular factors influence the strain-dependent prion conversion process. This important step toward understanding prion strain propagation in the human brain may impact research on the molecular factors involved in protein misfolding and the development of ultrasensitive methods for diagnosing prion disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. α-Synuclein Immunotherapy Blocks Uptake and Templated Propagation of Misfolded α-Synuclein and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien T. Tran

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of misfolded alpha-synuclein (α-syn into Lewy bodies (LBs and Lewy neurites (LNs is a major hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD and dementia with LBs (DLB. Recent studies showed that synthetic preformed fibrils (pffs recruit endogenous α-syn and induce LB/LN pathology in vitro and in vivo, thereby implicating propagation and cell-to-cell transmission of pathological α-syn as mechanisms for the progressive spread of LBs/LNs. Here, we demonstrate that α-syn monoclonal antibodies (mAbs reduce α-syn pff-induced LB/LN formation and rescue synapse/neuron loss in primary neuronal cultures by preventing both pff uptake and subsequent cell-to-cell transmission of pathology. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of mAb specific for misfolded α-syn into nontransgenic mice injected intrastriatally with α-syn pffs reduces LB/LN pathology, ameliorates substantia nigra dopaminergic neuron loss, and improves motor impairments. We conclude that α-syn antibodies could exert therapeutic effects in PD/DLB by blocking entry of pathological α-syn and/or its propagation in neurons.

  2. Crossed wires: 3D genome misfolding in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Heidi K; Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E

    2017-11-06

    Mammalian genomes are folded into unique topological structures that undergo precise spatiotemporal restructuring during healthy development. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of how the genome folds inside the 3D nucleus and how these folding patterns are miswired during the onset and progression of mammalian disease states. We discuss potential mechanisms underlying the link among genome misfolding, genome dysregulation, and aberrant cellular phenotypes. We also discuss cases in which the endogenous 3D genome configurations in healthy cells might be particularly susceptible to mutation or translocation. Together, these data support an emerging model in which genome folding and misfolding is critically linked to the onset and progression of a broad range of human diseases. © 2017 Norton and Phillips-Cremins.

  3. Protein folding and misfolding shining light by infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a new and innovative technology to study protein folding/misfolding events in the broad arsenal of techniques conventionally used in this field. The progress in understanding protein folding and misfolding is primarily due to the development of biophysical methods which permit to probe conformational changes with high kinetic and structural resolution. The most commonly used approaches rely on rapid mixing methods to initiate the folding event via a sudden change in solvent conditions. Traditionally, techniques such as fluorescence, circular dichroism or visible absorption are applied to probe the process. In contrast to these techniques, infrared spectroscopy came into play only very recently, and the progress made in this field up to date which now permits to probe folding events over the time scale from picoseconds to minutes has not yet been discussed in a book. The aim of this book is to provide an overview of the developments as seen by some of the main contributors to the field...

  4. Semiotic Selection of Mutated or Misfolded Receptor Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    contention that the plasma membrane acts as the locus where several contextual cues may be integrated. As such it allows the semiotic selection of those receptor configurations that provide cells with the minimum essential requirements for agency. The occurrence of protein misfolding makes it impossible...... focused on the significance and semiotic nature of the interplay between membrane receptors and the epigenetic control of gene expression, as mediated by the control of mismatched repairing and protein folding mechanisms....

  5. Hemin as a generic and potent protein misfolding inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanqin [School of Chemistry and Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Carver, John A. [Discipline of Pharmacology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Ho, Lam H.; Elias, Abigail K. [School of Chemistry and Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Musgrave, Ian F. [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Pukala, Tara L., E-mail: tara.pukala@adelaide.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • Hemin prevents Aβ42, α-synuclein and RCM-κ-casein forming amyloid fibrils. • Hemin inhibits the β-sheet structure formation of Aβ42. • Hemin reduces the cell toxicity caused by fibrillar Aβ42. • Hemin dissociates partially formed Aβ42 fibrils. • Hemin prevents amorphous aggregation by ADH, catalase and γs-crystallin. - Abstract: Protein misfolding causes serious biological malfunction, resulting in diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and cataract. Molecules which inhibit protein misfolding are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, thioflavin T fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated that hemin prevents amyloid fibril formation of kappa-casein, amyloid beta peptide and α-synuclein by blocking β-sheet structure assembly which is essential in fibril aggregation. Further, inhibition of fibril formation by hemin significantly reduces the cytotoxicity caused by fibrillar amyloid beta peptide in vitro. Interestingly, hemin degrades partially formed amyloid fibrils and prevents further aggregation to mature fibrils. Light scattering assay results revealed that hemin also prevents protein amorphous aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase and γs-crystallin. In summary, hemin is a potent agent which generically stabilises proteins against aggregation, and has potential as a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases.

  6. Common features in the unfolding and misfolding of PDZ domains and beyond: the modulatory effect of domain swapping and extra-elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra; Martinez, Jose C

    2016-01-12

    PDZ domains are protein-protein interaction modules sharing the same structural arrangement. To discern whether they display common features in their unfolding/misfolding behaviour we have analyzed in this work the unfolding thermodynamics, together with the misfolding kinetics, of the PDZ fold using three archetypical examples: the second and third PDZ domains of the PSD95 protein and the Erbin PDZ domain. Results showed that all domains passed through a common intermediate, which populated upon unfolding, and that this in turn drove the misfolding towards worm-like fibrillar structures. Thus, the unfolding/misfolding behaviour appears to be shared within these domains. We have also analyzed how this landscape can be modified upon the inclusion of extra-elements, as it is in the nNOS PDZ domain, or the organization of swapped species, as happens in the second PDZ domain of the ZO2 protein. Although the intermediates still formed upon thermal unfolding, the misfolding was prevented to varying degrees.

  7. Epidemic spreading model to characterize misfolded proteins propagation in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Sotero, Roberto C; Toussaint, Paule J; Evans, Alan C

    2014-11-01

    Misfolded proteins (MP) are a key component in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. For example, misfolded Amyloid-ß (Aß) and tau proteins are two neuropathogenic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying intra-brain MP propagation/deposition remain essentially uncharacterized. Here, is introduced an epidemic spreading model (ESM) for MP dynamics that considers propagation-like interactions between MP agents and the brain's clearance response across the structural connectome. The ESM reproduces advanced Aß deposition patterns in the human brain (explaining 46∼56% of the variance in regional Aß loads, in 733 subjects from the ADNI database). Furthermore, this model strongly supports a) the leading role of Aß clearance deficiency and early Aß onset age during Alzheimer's disease progression, b) that effective anatomical distance from Aß outbreak region explains regional Aß arrival time and Aß deposition likelihood, c) the multi-factorial impact of APOE e4 genotype, gender and educational level on lifetime intra-brain Aß propagation, and d) the modulatory impact of Aß propagation history on tau proteins concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an interrelated pathway between Aß pathophysiology and tauopathy. To our knowledge, the ESM is the first computational model highlighting the direct link between structural brain networks, production/clearance of pathogenic proteins and associated intercellular transfer mechanisms, individual genetic/demographic properties and clinical states in health and disease. In sum, the proposed ESM constitutes a promising framework to clarify intra-brain region to region transference mechanisms associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Epidemic spreading model to characterize misfolded proteins propagation in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Iturria-Medina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Misfolded proteins (MP are a key component in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. For example, misfolded Amyloid-ß (Aß and tau proteins are two neuropathogenic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying intra-brain MP propagation/deposition remain essentially uncharacterized. Here, is introduced an epidemic spreading model (ESM for MP dynamics that considers propagation-like interactions between MP agents and the brain's clearance response across the structural connectome. The ESM reproduces advanced Aß deposition patterns in the human brain (explaining 46∼56% of the variance in regional Aß loads, in 733 subjects from the ADNI database. Furthermore, this model strongly supports a the leading role of Aß clearance deficiency and early Aß onset age during Alzheimer's disease progression, b that effective anatomical distance from Aß outbreak region explains regional Aß arrival time and Aß deposition likelihood, c the multi-factorial impact of APOE e4 genotype, gender and educational level on lifetime intra-brain Aß propagation, and d the modulatory impact of Aß propagation history on tau proteins concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an interrelated pathway between Aß pathophysiology and tauopathy. To our knowledge, the ESM is the first computational model highlighting the direct link between structural brain networks, production/clearance of pathogenic proteins and associated intercellular transfer mechanisms, individual genetic/demographic properties and clinical states in health and disease. In sum, the proposed ESM constitutes a promising framework to clarify intra-brain region to region transference mechanisms associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. The domain-specific and temperature-dependent protein misfolding phenotype of variant medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jank, Johanna M.; Maier, Esther M.; Reiβ, Dunja D.; Haslbeck, Martin; Kemter, Kristina F.; Truger, Marietta S.; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Wanders, Ronald J.; Gersting, Søren W.; Muntau, Ania C.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of expanded newborn screening programs reduced mortality and morbidity in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) caused by mutations in the ACADM gene. However, the disease is still potentially fatal. Missense induced MCADD is a protein misfolding disease with a

  10. Effects of instanton induced interactions on pentaquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Oka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Sachiko

    2005-01-01

    Roles of instanton induced interactions (III) in the masses of pentaquark baryons, Θ + (J=1/2 and 3/2) and Ξ -- , and a dibaryon, H, are discussed using the MIT bag model. It is shown that the two-body terms in III give a strong attraction mainly due to the increase of the number of flavor antisymmetric quark pairs in multiquark systems. In contrast, the three-body u-d-s interaction is repulsive. It is found that III lowers the mass of negative-parity Θ + as much as 100 MeV from the mass predicted by the bag model without III. We also consider possible quark model configurations for positive-parity Θ + under III

  11. Import and Export of Misfolded α-Synuclein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Rodriguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, intracellular α-synuclein (α-syn inclusions form in neurons and are referred to as Lewy bodies. These aggregates spread through the brain following a specific pattern leading to the hypothesis that neuron-to-neuron transfer is critical for the propagation of Lewy body pathology. Here we review recent studies employing pre-formed fibrils generated from recombinant α-syn to evaluate the uptake, trafficking, and release of α-syn fibrils. We outline methods of internalization as well as cell surface receptors that have been described in the literature as regulating α-syn fibril uptake. Pharmacological and genetic studies indicate endocytosis is the primary method of α-syn internalization. Once α-syn fibrils have crossed the plasma membrane they are typically trafficked through the endo-lysosomal system with autophagy acting as the dominant method of α-syn clearance. Interestingly, both chaperone-mediated autophagy and macroautophagy have been implicated in the degradation of α-syn, although it remains unclear which system is chiefly responsible for the removal of α-syn fibrils. The major hallmark of α-syn spreading is the templating of misfolded properties onto healthy protein resulting in a conformational change; we summarize the evidence indicating misfolded α-syn can seed endogenous α-syn to form new aggregates. Finally, recent studies demonstrate that cells release misfolded and aggregated α-syn and that these processes may involve different chaperones. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism for the release of fibrillar α-syn remains unclear. This review highlights what is known, and what requires further clarification, regarding each step of α-syn transmission.

  12. A hydrophobic gold surface triggers misfolding and aggregation of the amyloidogenic Josephin domain in monomeric form, while leaving the oligomers unaffected.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Apicella

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding and aggregation in intracellular and extracellular spaces is regarded as a main marker of the presence of degenerative disorders such as amyloidoses. To elucidate the mechanisms of protein misfolding, the interaction of proteins with inorganic surfaces is of particular relevance, since surfaces displaying different wettability properties may represent model systems of the cell membrane. Here, we unveil the role of surface hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity in the misfolding of the Josephin domain (JD, a globular-shaped domain of ataxin-3, the protein responsible for the spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. By means of a combined experimental and theoretical approach based on atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, we reveal changes in JD morphology and secondary structure elicited by the interaction with the hydrophobic gold substrate, but not by the hydrophilic mica. Our results demonstrate that the interaction with the gold surface triggers misfolding of the JD when it is in native-like configuration, while no structural modification is observed after the protein has undergone oligomerization. This raises the possibility that biological membranes would be unable to affect amyloid oligomeric structures and toxicity.

  13. Molecular chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins for ubiquitin-dependent degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Ellgaard, Lars; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins presents a considerable threat to the health of individual cells and has been linked to severe diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Considering that, in nature, cells often are exposed to stress conditions that may lead to aberrant protein...... conformational changes, it becomes clear that they must have an efficient quality control apparatus to refold or destroy misfolded proteins. In general, cells rely on molecular chaperones to seize and refold misfolded proteins. If the native state is unattainable, misfolded proteins are targeted for degradation...... via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The specificity of this proteolysis is generally provided by E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases, hundreds of which are encoded in the human genome. However, rather than binding the misfolded proteins directly, most E3s depend on molecular chaperones to recognize...

  14. ApoE4-specific Misfolded Intermediate Identified by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benfeard Williams

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD is associated with the APOE gene, which encodes for three variants of Apolipoprotein E, namely E2, E3, E4, differing only by two amino acids at positions 112 and 158. ApoE4 is known to be the strongest risk factor for AD onset, while ApoE3 and ApoE2 are considered to be the AD-neutral and AD-protective isoforms, respectively. It has been hypothesized that the ApoE isoforms may contribute to the development of AD by modifying the homeostasis of ApoE physiological partners and AD-related proteins in an isoform-specific fashion. Here we find that, despite the high sequence similarity among the three ApoE variants, only ApoE4 exhibits a misfolded intermediate state characterized by isoform-specific domain-domain interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. The existence of an ApoE4-specific intermediate state can contribute to the onset of AD by altering multiple cellular pathways involved in ApoE-dependent lipid transport efficiency or in AD-related protein aggregation and clearance. We present what we believe to be the first structural model of an ApoE4 misfolded intermediate state, which may serve to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ApoE4 in AD pathogenesis. The knowledge of the structure for the ApoE4 folding intermediate provides a new platform for the rational design of alternative therapeutic strategies to fight AD.

  15. Genetic complexity in a Drosophila model of diabetes-associated misfolded human proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Young; Ludwig, Michael Z; Tamarina, Natalia A; He, Bin Z; Carl, Sarah H; Dickerson, Desiree A; Barse, Levi; Arun, Bharath; Williams, Calvin L; Miles, Cecelia M; Philipson, Louis H; Steiner, Donald F; Bell, Graeme I; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been widely used as a model of human Mendelian disease, but its value in modeling complex disease has received little attention. Fly models of complex disease would enable high-resolution mapping of disease-modifying loci and the identification of novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe a fly model of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus and explore the complexity of this model. The approach involves the transgenic expression of a misfolded mutant of human preproinsulin, hINS(C96Y), which is a cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. When expressed in fly imaginal discs, hINS(C96Y) causes a reduction of adult structures, including the eye, wing, and notum. Eye imaginal discs exhibit defects in both the structure and the arrangement of ommatidia. In the wing, expression of hINS(C96Y) leads to ectopic expression of veins and mechano-sensory organs, indicating disruption of wild-type signaling processes regulating cell fates. These readily measurable "disease" phenotypes are sensitive to temperature, gene dose, and sex. Mutant (but not wild-type) proinsulin expression in the eye imaginal disc induces IRE1-mediated XBP1 alternative splicing, a signal for endoplasmic reticulum stress response activation, and produces global change in gene expression. Mutant hINS transgene tester strains, when crossed to stocks from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, produce F1 adults with a continuous range of disease phenotypes and large broad-sense heritability. Surprisingly, the severity of mutant hINS-induced disease in the eye is not correlated with that in the notum in these crosses, nor with eye reduction phenotypes caused by the expression of two dominant eye mutants acting in two different eye development pathways, Drop (Dr) or Lobe (L), when crossed into the same genetic backgrounds. The tissue specificity of genetic variability for mutant hINS-induced disease has, therefore, its own distinct signature. The genetic dominance

  16. Characterization of Bars Induced by Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inma Martinez-Valpuesta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether the formation of bars is triggered by interactions or by internal processes has been discussed for many decades. In this work, we study differences between both mechanisms by means of numerical simulations. We relate our analysis to fly-by interactions in different mass groups or clusters according to the velocity of the encounters. We find that once the bar is created, the interaction does not much affect its evolution. We also find that bars can be triggered purely by a slow interaction. Those bars affected or triggered by interaction stay for a longer time in the slow regime, i.e., the corotation radius is more than 1.4 times the bar radius.

  17. Protein misfolding specifies recruitment to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersuker, Kirill; Brandeis, Michael; Kopito, Ron R

    2016-04-25

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) containing aggregated disease-associated proteins and polyubiquitin (poly-Ub) conjugates are universal histopathological features of neurodegenerative diseases. Ub has been proposed to target proteins to IBs for degradation via autophagy, but the mechanisms that govern recruitment of ubiquitylated proteins to IBs are not well understood. In this paper, we use conditionally destabilized reporters that undergo misfolding and ubiquitylation upon removal of a stabilizing ligand to examine the role of Ub conjugation in targeting proteins to IBs that are composed of an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin, the causative protein of Huntington's disease. We show that reporters are excluded from IBs in the presence of the stabilizing ligand but are recruited to IBs after ligand washout. However, we find that Ub conjugation is not necessary to target reporters to IBs. We also report that forced Ub conjugation by the Ub fusion degradation pathway is not sufficient for recruitment to IBs. Finally, we find that reporters and Ub conjugates are stable at IBs. These data indicate that compromised folding states, rather than conjugation to Ub, can specify recruitment to IBs. © 2016 Bersuker et al.

  18. Conformational Analysis of Misfolded Protein Aggregation by FRET and Live-Cell Imaging Techniques

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    Akira Kitamura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is maintained by several types of protein machinery, including molecular chaperones and proteolysis systems. Dysregulation of the proteome disrupts homeostasis in cells, tissues, and the organism as a whole, and has been hypothesized to cause neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Huntington’s disease (HD. A hallmark of neurodegenerative disorders is formation of ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies in neurons, suggesting that the aggregation process of misfolded proteins changes during disease progression. Hence, high-throughput determination of soluble oligomers during the aggregation process, as well as the conformation of sequestered proteins in inclusion bodies, is essential for elucidation of physiological regulation mechanism and drug discovery in this field. To elucidate the interaction, accumulation, and conformation of aggregation-prone proteins, in situ spectroscopic imaging techniques, such as Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC have been employed. Here, we summarize recent reports in which these techniques were applied to the analysis of aggregation-prone proteins (in particular their dimerization, interactions, and conformational changes, and describe several fluorescent indicators used for real-time observation of physiological states related to proteostasis.

  19. Oxidized/misfolded superoxide dismutase-1: the cause of all amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Valdmanis, Paul N; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A

    2007-12-01

    The identification in 1993 of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutations as the cause of 10 to 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases, which represents 1 to 2% of all amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases, prompted a substantial amount of research into the mechanisms of SOD1-mediated toxicity. Recent experiments have demonstrated that oxidation of wild-type SOD1 leads to its misfolding, causing it to gain many of the same toxic properties as mutant SOD1. In vitro studies of oxidized/misfolded SOD1 and in vivo studies of misfolded SOD1 have indicated that these protein species are selectively toxic to motor neurons, suggesting that oxidized/misfolded SOD1 could lead to ALS even in individuals who do not carry an SOD1 mutation. It has also been reported that glial cells secrete oxidized/misfolded mutant SOD1 to the extracellular environment, where it can trigger the selective death of motor neurons, offering a possible explanation for the noncell autonomous nature of mutant SOD1 toxicity and the rapid progression of disease once the first symptoms develop. Therefore, considering that sporadic (SALS) and familial ALS (FALS) cases are clinically indistinguishable, the toxic properties of mutated SOD1 are similar to that of oxidized/misfolded wild-type SOD1 (wtSOD1), and secreted/extracellular misfolded SOD1 is selectively toxic to motor neurons, we propose that oxidized/misfolded SOD1 is the cause of most forms of classic ALS and should be a prime target for the design of ALS treatments.

  20. Dual Functional Small Molecule Probes as Fluorophore and Ligand for Misfolding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xueli; Ran, Chongzhao

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding of a protein is a destructive process for variety of diseases that include neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, mad cow disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontal temporal dementia (FTD), and other non-CNS diseases such as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and lysosomal storage diseases. Formation of various misfunctional large assembles of the misfolded protein is the primary consequence. To detect the formation of ...

  1. Protein misfolding and cellular stress in disease and ageing - Concepts and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To those readers that already got the Protein misfolding and disease volume, this new title can sound as an update or a second edition of the previous volume: well, this is not the case. To those colleagues that would like to enter the fascinating field of protein’s misfolding this new volume constitutes an excellent opportunity to be driven on the causes and mechanisms that are actually know to produce the misfolding. For both types of scientists this volume is a must: the subtitle already sounds as a warning since it reads concepts and protocols rather than methods and protocols. In other words, there is an entire section (part I, chapters 1-8 devoted to explain the concepts and the approaches we have gathered in these last years on the misfolding. These chapters are presented in the review style so that the relevant bibliographies are all there; in addition, this section is presenting the conceptual paradigma linking protein misfolding to ageing by conceiving the disease itself as premature ageing processes. Thus, the reader can take profit from this first part and become acquiented on the molecular effects brought about by protein misfolding at a cellular level and, generally speaking, on the pathogenetic mechanisms thereafter triggered by soluble prefibrillar aggregates...

  2. Asymptotics of Resonances Induced by Point Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lipovský, J.; Lotoreichik, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 6 (2017), s. 1677-1682 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : self-adjoint three-dimensional Schrodinger operator * interactions * resonances Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2016

  3. Chaperoning Proteins for Destruction: Diverse Roles of Hsp70 Chaperones and their Co-Chaperones in Targeting Misfolded Proteins to the Proteasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Shiber

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones were originally discovered as heat shock-induced proteins that facilitate proper folding of proteins with non-native conformations. While the function of chaperones in protein folding has been well documented over the last four decades, more recent studies have shown that chaperones are also necessary for the clearance of terminally misfolded proteins by the Ub-proteasome system. In this capacity, chaperones protect misfolded degradation substrates from spontaneous aggregation, facilitate their recognition by the Ub ligation machinery and finally shuttle the ubiquitylated substrates to the proteasome. The physiological importance of these functions is manifested by inefficient proteasomal degradation and the accumulation of protein aggregates during ageing or in certain neurodegenerative diseases, when chaperone levels decline. In this review, we focus on the diverse roles of stress-induced chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins to the proteasome and the consequences of their compromised activity. We further discuss the implications of these findings to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  4. Ordering transitions induced by Coulomb interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovere, M.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1988-11-01

    We briefly review recent progress in treating phase transitions to ordered states driven by Coulomb interactions. Wigner crystallization of the one-component plasma, in the degenerate Fermi limit and in the classical limit, is the foremost example and developments in its theory are discussed in some detail. Attention is also given to quasi-twodimensional realizations of the plasma model in the laboratory. The usefulness of these ideas in relation to freezing and ordering transitions is illustrated with reference to alkali metals, elemental and polar semiconductors, and various types of ionic systems (molten salts, colloidal suspensions and astrophysical plasmas). (author). 70 refs, 5 figs

  5. Larger aggregates of mutant seipin in Celia's Encephalopathy, a new protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Riquelme, Alejandro; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Rábano, Alberto; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Domingo-Jiménez, Rosario; Ramos, Adriana; Rosa, Isaac; Senra, Ana; Nilsson, Peter; García, Ángel; Araújo-Vilar, David; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-11-01

    Celia's Encephalopathy (MIM #615924) is a recently discovered fatal neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a new BSCL2 mutation (c.985C>T) that results in an aberrant isoform of seipin (Celia seipin). This mutation is lethal in both homozygosity and compounded heterozygosity with a lipodystrophic BSCL2 mutation, resulting in a progressive encephalopathy with fatal outcomes at ages 6-8. Strikingly, heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic, conflicting with the gain of toxic function attributed to this mutation. Here we report new key insights about the molecular pathogenic mechanism of this new syndrome. Intranuclear inclusions containing mutant seipin were found in brain tissue from a homozygous patient suggesting a pathogenic mechanism similar to other neurodegenerative diseases featuring brain accumulation of aggregated, misfolded proteins. Sucrose gradient distribution showed that mutant seipin forms much larger aggregates as compared with wild type (wt) seipin, indicating an impaired oligomerization. On the other hand, the interaction between wt and Celia seipin confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays, together with the identification of mixed oligomers in sucrose gradient fractionation experiments can explain the lack of symptoms in heterozygous carriers. We propose that the increased aggregation and subsequent impaired oligomerization of Celia seipin leads to cell death. In heterozygous carriers, wt seipin might prevent the damage caused by mutant seipin through its sequestration into harmless mixed oligomers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Cellular Pathway Disturbances on Misfolded Superoxide Dismutase-1 in Fibroblasts Derived from ALS Patients.

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    Isil Keskin

    Full Text Available Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1 are a common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The neurotoxicity of mutant SOD1s is most likely caused by misfolded molecular species, but disease pathogenesis is still not understood. Proposed mechanisms include impaired mitochondrial function, induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, reduction in the activities of the proteasome and autophagy, and the formation of neurotoxic aggregates. Here we examined whether perturbations in these cellular pathways in turn influence levels of misfolded SOD1 species, potentially amplifying neurotoxicity. For the study we used fibroblasts, which express SOD1 at physiological levels under regulation of the native promoter. The cells were derived from ALS patients expressing 9 different SOD1 mutants of widely variable molecular characteristics, as well as from patients carrying the GGGGCC-repeat-expansion in C9orf72 and from non-disease controls. A specific ELISA was used to quantify soluble, misfolded SOD1, and aggregated SOD1 was analysed by western blotting. Misfolded SOD1 was detected in all lines. Levels were found to be much lower in non-disease control and the non-SOD1 C9orf72 ALS lines. This enabled us to validate patient fibroblasts for use in subsequent perturbation studies. Mitochondrial inhibition, endoplasmic reticulum stress or autophagy inhibition did not affect soluble misfolded SOD1 and in most cases, detergent-resistant SOD1 aggregates were not detected. However, proteasome inhibition led to uniformly large increases in misfolded SOD1 levels in all cell lines and an increase in SOD1 aggregation in some. Thus the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a principal determinant of misfolded SOD1 levels in cells derived both from patients and controls and a decline in activity with aging could be one of the factors behind the mid-to late-life onset of inherited ALS.

  7. The Type II Hsp40 Sis1 cooperates with Hsp70 and the E3 ligase Ubr1 to promote degradation of terminally misfolded cytosolic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Summers

    Full Text Available Mechanisms for cooperation between the cytosolic Hsp70 system and the ubiquitin proteasome system during protein triage are not clear. Herein, we identify new mechanisms for selection of misfolded cytosolic proteins for degradation via defining functional interactions between specific cytosolic Hsp70/Hsp40 pairs and quality control ubiquitin ligases. These studies revolved around the use of S. cerevisiae to elucidate the degradation pathway of a terminally misfolded reporter protein, short-lived GFP (slGFP. The Type I Hsp40 Ydj1 acts with Hsp70 to suppress slGFP aggregation. In contrast, the Type II Hsp40 Sis1 is required for proteasomal degradation of slGFP. Sis1 and Hsp70 operate sequentially with the quality control E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1 to target slGFP for degradation. Compromise of Sis1 or Ubr1 function leads slGFP to accumulate in a Triton X-100-soluble state with slGFP degradation intermediates being concentrated into perinuclear and peripheral puncta. Interestingly, when Sis1 activity is low the slGFP that is concentrated into puncta can be liberated from puncta and subsequently degraded. Conversely, in the absence of Ubr1, slGFP and the puncta that contain slGFP are relatively stable. Ubr1 mediates proteasomal degradation of slGFP that is released from cytosolic protein handling centers. Pathways for proteasomal degradation of misfolded cytosolic proteins involve functional interplay between Type II Hsp40/Hsp70 chaperone pairs, PQC E3 ligases, and storage depots for misfolded proteins.

  8. Degradation of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases: therapeutic targets and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechanover, Aaron; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2015-03-13

    Mammalian cells remove misfolded proteins using various proteolytic systems, including the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS), chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA) and macroautophagy. The majority of misfolded proteins are degraded by the UPS, in which Ub-conjugated substrates are deubiquitinated, unfolded and cleaved into small peptides when passing through the narrow chamber of the proteasome. The substrates that expose a specific degradation signal, the KFERQ sequence motif, can be delivered to and degraded in lysosomes via the CMA. Aggregation-prone substrates resistant to both the UPS and the CMA can be degraded by macroautophagy, in which cargoes are segregated into autophagosomes before degradation by lysosomal hydrolases. Although most misfolded and aggregated proteins in the human proteome can be degraded by cellular protein quality control, some native and mutant proteins prone to aggregation into β-sheet-enriched oligomers are resistant to all known proteolytic pathways and can thus grow into inclusion bodies or extracellular plaques. The accumulation of protease-resistant misfolded and aggregated proteins is a common mechanism underlying protein misfolding disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease (HD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), prion diseases and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In this review, we provide an overview of the proteolytic pathways in neurons, with an emphasis on the UPS, CMA and macroautophagy, and discuss the role of protein quality control in the degradation of pathogenic proteins in neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, we examine existing putative therapeutic strategies to efficiently remove cytotoxic proteins from degenerating neurons.

  9. Fluctuation-induced long-range interactions in polymer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, A N; Obukhov, S P

    2005-01-01

    We discover a new universal long-range interaction between solid objects in polymer media. This polymer-induced interaction is directly opposite to the van der Waals attraction. The predicted effect is deeply related to the classical Casimir interactions, providing a unique example of universal fluctuation-induced repulsion rather than normal attraction. This universal repulsion comes from the subtracted soft fluctuation modes in the ideal counterpart of the real polymer system. The effect can also be interpreted in terms of subtracted (ghost) large-scale polymer loops. We establish the general expressions for the energy of polymer-induced interactions for arbitrary solid particles in a concentrated polymer system. We find that the correlation function of the polymer density in a concentrated solution of very long chains follows a scaling law rather than an exponential decay at large distances. These novel universal long-range interactions can be of importance in various polymer systems. We discuss the ways to observe/simulate these fluctuation-induced effects

  10. Prion protein misfolding affects calcium homeostasis and sensitizes cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Torres

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prion-related disorders (PrDs are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive neuronal impairment as well as the accumulation of an abnormally folded and protease resistant form of the cellular prion protein, termed PrP(RES. Altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis is associated with the occurrence of neurodegeneration in sporadic, infectious and familial forms of PrDs. The ER operates as a major intracellular calcium store, playing a crucial role in pathological events related to neuronal dysfunction and death. Here we investigated the possible impact of PrP misfolding on ER calcium homeostasis in infectious and familial models of PrDs. Neuro2A cells chronically infected with scrapie prions showed decreased ER-calcium content that correlated with a stronger upregulation of UPR-inducible chaperones, and a higher sensitivity to ER stress-induced cell death. Overexpression of the calcium pump SERCA stimulated calcium release and increased the neurotoxicity observed after exposure of cells to brain-derived infectious PrP(RES. Furthermore, expression of PrP mutants that cause hereditary Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or fatal familial insomnia led to accumulation of PrP(RES and their partial retention at the ER, associated with a drastic decrease of ER calcium content and higher susceptibility to ER stress. Finally, similar results were observed when a transmembrane form of PrP was expressed, which is proposed as a neurotoxic intermediate. Our results suggest that alterations in calcium homeostasis and increased susceptibility to ER stress are common pathological features of both infectious and familial PrD models.

  11. Diminished self-chaperoning activity of the DeltaF508 mutant of CFTR results in protein misfolding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian W R Serohijos

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The absence of a functional ATP Binding Cassette (ABC protein called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR from apical membranes of epithelial cells is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF. Over 90% of CF patients carry at least one mutant allele with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 located in the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1. Biochemical and cell biological studies show that the DeltaF508 mutant exhibits inefficient biosynthetic maturation and susceptibility to degradation probably due to misfolding of NBD1 and the resultant misassembly of other domains. However, little is known about the direct effect of the Phe508 deletion on the NBD1 folding, which is essential for rational design strategies of cystic fibrosis treatment. Here we show that the deletion of Phe508 alters the folding dynamics and kinetics of NBD1, thus possibly affecting the assembly of the complete CFTR. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we find that meta-stable intermediate states appearing on wild type and mutant folding pathways are populated differently and that their kinetic accessibilities are distinct. The structural basis of the increased misfolding propensity of the DeltaF508 NBD1 mutant is the perturbation of interactions in residue pairs Q493/P574 and F575/F578 found in loop S7-H6. As a proof-of-principle that the S7-H6 loop conformation can modulate the folding kinetics of NBD1, we virtually design rescue mutations in the identified critical interactions to force the S7-H6 loop into the wild type conformation. Two redesigned NBD1-DeltaF508 variants exhibited significantly higher folding probabilities than the original NBD1-DeltaF508, thereby partially rescuing folding ability of the NBD1-DeltaF508 mutant. We propose that these observed defects in folding kinetics of mutant NBD1 may also be modulated by structures separate from the 508 site. The identified structural determinants of increased misfolding propensity of

  12. Protein misfolding and disease: from the test tube to the organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luheshi, Leila M; Crowther, Damian C; Dobson, Christopher M

    2008-02-01

    Protein misfolding is the underlying cause of many highly debilitating disorders ranging from Alzheimer's Disease to Cystic Fibrosis. Great strides have been made recently in understanding what causes proteins to misfold, primarily through the use of biophysical and computational techniques that enable systematic and quantitative analysis of the effects of a range of different perturbations in proteins. Correlation of the results of such analyses with observations made in animal models of disease has however been limited by their seemingly irreconcilable differences in methodology and scope. Several recent studies have however begun to overcome this limitation by combining the two approaches. This strategy has made it possible to investigate many of the consequences of protein misfolding in vivo, ranging from disease pathogenesis to epigenetic regulation, in the context of the fundamental physico-chemical principles derived from extensive and highly detailed studies undertaken in vitro.

  13. Na+/K+-ATPase is present in scrapie-associated fibrils, modulates PrP misfolding in vitro and links PrP function and dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Graham

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are characterised by widespread deposition of fibrillar and/or plaque-like forms of the prion protein. These aggregated forms are produced by misfolding of the normal prion protein, PrP(C, to the disease-associated form, PrP(Sc, through mechanisms that remain elusive but which require either direct or indirect interaction between PrP(C and PrP(Sc isoforms. A wealth of evidence implicates other non-PrP molecules as active participants in the misfolding process, to catalyse and direct the conformational conversion of PrP(C or to provide a scaffold ensuring correct alignment of PrP(C and PrP(Sc during conversion. Such molecules may be specific to different scrapie strains to facilitate differential prion protein misfolding. Since molecular cofactors may become integrated into the growing protein fibril during prion conversion, we have investigated the proteins contained in prion disease-specific deposits by shotgun proteomics of scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF from mice infected with 3 different strains of mouse-passaged scrapie. Concomitant use of negative control preparations allowed us to identify and discount proteins that are enriched non-specifically by the SAF isolation protocol. We found several proteins that co-purified specifically with SAF from infected brains but none of these were reproducibly and demonstrably specific for particular scrapie strains. The α-chain of Na(+/K(+-ATPase was common to SAF from all 3 strains and we tested the ability of this protein to modulate in vitro misfolding of recombinant PrP. Na(+/K(+-ATPase enhanced the efficiency of disease-specific conversion of recombinant PrP suggesting that it may act as a molecular cofactor. Consistent with previous results, the same protein inhibited fibrillisation kinetics of recombinant PrP. Since functional interactions between PrP(C and Na(+/K(+-ATPase have previously been reported in astrocytes, our data highlight this molecule as

  14. Biophysical Characterization of α-Synuclein and Rotenone Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. Fink

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that pesticides interact with α-synuclein and accelerate the rate of fibrillation. These results are consistent with the prevailing hypothesis that the direct interaction of α-synuclein with pesticides is one of many suspected factors leading to α-synuclein fibrillation and ultimately to Parkinson’s disease. In this study, the biophysical properties and fibrillation kinetics of α-synuclein in the presence of rotenone were investigated and, more specifically, the effects of rotenone on the early-stage misfolded forms of α-synuclein were considered. The thioflavine T (ThT fluorescence assay studies provide evidence that early-phase misfolded α-synuclein forms are affected by rotenone and that the fibrillation process is accelerated. Further characterization by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR shows that rotenone increases the amount of ordered secondary structure in this intrinsically disordered protein. Morphological characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM provide visualization of the differences in the aggregated α-synuclein species developing during the early kinetics of the fibrillation process in the absence and presence of rotenone. We believe that these data provide useful information for a better understanding of the molecular basis of rotenone-induced misfolding and aggregation of α-synuclein.

  15. Aggregation in charged nanoparticles solutions induced by different interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, S.; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles as induced through different interactions. The nanoparticle aggregation is induced by addition of salt (NaCl), cationic protein (lysozyme) and non-ionic surfactant (C12E10) employing different kind of interactions. The results show that the interaction in presence of salt can be explained using DLVO theory whereas non-DLVO forces play important role for interaction of nanoparticles with protein and surfactant. The presence of salt screens the repulsion between charged nanoparticles giving rise to a net attraction in the DLVO potential. On the other hand, strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticle and oppositely charged protein leads to protein-mediated nanoparticle aggregation. In case of non-ionic surfactant, the relatively long-range attractive depletion interaction is found to be responsible for the particle aggregation. Interestingly, the completely different interactions lead to similar kind of aggregate morphology. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are found to have mass fractal nature having a fractal dimension (~2.5) consistent with diffusion limited type of fractal morphology in all three cases.

  16. Effect of genetic variation in a Drosophila model of diabetes-associated misfolded human proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin Z; Ludwig, Michael Z; Dickerson, Desiree A; Barse, Levi; Arun, Bharath; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Jiang, Pengyao; Park, Soo-Young; Tamarina, Natalia A; Selleck, Scott B; Wittkopp, Patricia J; Bell, Graeme I; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-02-01

    The identification and validation of gene-gene interactions is a major challenge in human studies. Here, we explore an approach for studying epistasis in humans using a Drosophila melanogaster model of neonatal diabetes mellitus. Expression of the mutant preproinsulin (hINS(C96Y)) in the eye imaginal disc mimics the human disease: it activates conserved stress-response pathways and leads to cell death (reduction in eye area). Dominant-acting variants in wild-derived inbred lines from the Drosophila Genetics Reference Panel produce a continuous, highly heritable distribution of eye-degeneration phenotypes in a hINS(C96Y) background. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 154 sequenced lines identified a sharp peak on chromosome 3L, which mapped to a 400-bp linkage block within an intron of the gene sulfateless (sfl). RNAi knockdown of sfl enhanced the eye-degeneration phenotype in a mutant-hINS-dependent manner. RNAi against two additional genes in the heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthetic pathway (ttv and botv), in which sfl acts, also modified the eye phenotype in a hINS(C96Y)-dependent manner, strongly suggesting a novel link between HS-modified proteins and cellular responses to misfolded proteins. Finally, we evaluated allele-specific expression difference between the two major sfl-intronic haplotypes in heterozygtes. The results showed significant heterogeneity in marker-associated gene expression, thereby leaving the causal mutation(s) and its mechanism unidentified. In conclusion, the ability to create a model of human genetic disease, map a QTL by GWAS to a specific gene, and validate its contribution to disease with available genetic resources and the potential to experimentally link the variant to a molecular mechanism demonstrate the many advantages Drosophila holds in determining the genetic underpinnings of human disease.

  17. Why do alpha-beta parallel proteins, like flavodoxins, form misfolded off-pathway intermediates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The question: “Why do α-β parallel proteins, like flavodoxins, form misfolded off-pathway
    intermediates?" is the main subject of this thesis. A. vinelandii apoflavodoxin is chosen as protein
    of interest as it is a representative of α-β parallel proteins, which are widely prevalent in

  18. Tributyltin interacts with mitochondria and induces cytochrome c release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikimi, A; Kira, Y; Kasahara, E; Sato, E F; Kanno, T; Utsumi, K; Inoue, M

    2001-01-01

    Although triorganotins are potent inducers of apoptosis in various cell types, the critical targets of these compounds and the mechanisms by which they lead to cell death remain to be elucidated. There are two major pathways by which apoptotic cell death occurs: one is triggered by a cytokine mediator and the other is by a mitochondrion-dependent mechanism. To elucidate the mechanism of triorganotin-induced apoptosis, we studied the effect of tributyltin on mitochondrial function. We found that moderately low doses of tributyltin decrease mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release by a mechanism inhibited by cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid. Tributyltin-induced cytochrome c release is also prevented by dithiols such as dithiothreitol and 2,3-dimercaptopropanol but not by monothiols such as GSH, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol. Further studies with phenylarsine oxide agarose revealed that tributyltin interacts with the adenine nucleotide translocator, a functional constituent of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, which is selectively inhibited by dithiothreitol. These results suggest that, at low doses, tributyltin interacts selectively with critical thiol residues in the adenine nucleotide translocator and opens the permeability transition pore, thereby decreasing membrane potential and releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria, a series of events consistent with established mechanistic models of apoptosis. PMID:11368793

  19. Vegetation dynamics induced by phreatophyte--aquifer interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Luca; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco

    2007-09-21

    The dynamics of phreatophyte vegetation are strongly coupled to those of the shallow phreatic aquifers from which phreatophytes extract water. Vegetation is able to influence the depth of the water table, which, in turn, can induce stress in vegetation. These interactions are likely to affect the composition and structure of phreatophyte plant communities, as well as their successional dynamics. Despite the environmental and economical value of many wetland plant ecosystems around the world, the impact of vegetation-water table interactions on ecosystem succession and interspecies competition in phreatophyte plant communities remains poorly understood. This study develops a minimalistic modelling framework to investigate the dynamics of two phreatophyte species, and their interactions with the water table. In spite of its simplicity, the model exhibits a remarkable variety of dynamical behaviors, especially when the water table depth is forced by external drivers. It is shown that, even when one of the two species is dominant with respect to the other, these two species can coexist showing periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamics. Moreover, in the presence of a random environmental forcing, noise-induced coexistence may emerge.

  20. Post-foil interaction in foil-induced molecular dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Kanter, E.P.; Koenig, W.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have investigated the foil-induced dissociation of 175- 250- keV/amu CH + , NH + , and OH + , FH + and NeH + ions by coincident detection of the fragment atoms. The dissociation energies corresponding to in-foil and post-foil interactions were deduced from the measured relative flight times of the fragment pairs to a set of detectors downstream from the target. The authors considered final states consisting of a) a proton and a heavy-ion and, b) a hydrogen atom and a heavy-ion. Surprisingly, in both cases the energy released in the post-target interaction shows a similar linear increase with the charge state of the heavy partner

  1. Induced interactions in a superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Jami; Bruun, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) mixed with a superfluid two-component Fermi gas in the whole BCS-BEC crossover. Using a quasiparticle random-phase approximation combined with Beliaev theory to describe the Fermi superfluid and the BEC, respectively, we show that the single-particle an......We analyze a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) mixed with a superfluid two-component Fermi gas in the whole BCS-BEC crossover. Using a quasiparticle random-phase approximation combined with Beliaev theory to describe the Fermi superfluid and the BEC, respectively, we show that the single...... shift in the excitation spectrum of the BEC. In addition, the excitation of quasiparticles in the Fermi superfluid leads to damping of the excitations in the BEC. Besides studying induced interactions themselves, we can use these prominent effects to systematically probe the strongly interacting Fermi...

  2. Early Delivery of Misfolded PrP from ER to Lysosomes by Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Constanza J.; Qin, Kefeng; Norstrom, Eric M.; Green, William N.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Mastrianni, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are linked to the accumulation of a misfolded isoform (PrPSc) of prion protein (PrP). Evidence suggests that lysosomes are degradation endpoints and sites of the accumulation of PrPSc. We questioned whether lysosomes participate in the early quality control of newly generated misfolded PrP. We found PrP carrying the disease-associated T182A mutation (Mut-PrP) was delivered to lysosomes in a Golgi-independent manner. Time-lapse live cell imaging revealed early formation and uptake of GFP-tagged Mut-PrP aggregates into LysoTracker labeled vesicles. Compared with Wt-PrP, Mut-PrP expression was associated with an elevation in several markers of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and it extensively colocalized with the autophagosome-specific marker, LC3B. In autophagy deficient (ATG5−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts, or in normal cells treated with the autophagy-inhibitor 3-MA, Mut-PrP colocalization with lysosomes was reduced to a similar extent. Additionally, 3-MA selectively impaired the degradation of insoluble Mut-PrP, resulting in an increase in protease-resistant PrP, whereas the induction of autophagy by rapamycin reduced it. These findings suggest that autophagy might function as a quality control mechanism to limit the accumulation of misfolded PrP that normally leads to the generation of PrPSc. PMID:24454378

  3. Catching the PEG-induced attractive interaction between proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivarès, D; Belloni, L; Tardieu, A; Bonneté, F

    2002-09-01

    We present the experimental and theoretical background of a method to characterize the protein-protein attractive potential induced by one of the mostly used crystallizing agents in the protein-field, the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). This attractive interaction is commonly called, in colloid physics, the depletion interaction. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering experiments and numerical treatments based on liquid-state theories were performed on urate oxidase-PEG mixtures with two different PEGs (3350 Da and 8000 Da). A "two-component" approach was used in which the polymer-polymer, the protein-polymer and the protein-protein pair potentials were determined. The resulting effective protein-protein potential was characterized. This potential is the sum of the free-polymer protein-protein potential and of the PEG-induced depletion potential. The depletion potential was found to be hardly dependent upon the protein concentration but strongly function of the polymer size and concentration. Our results were also compared with two models, which give an analytic expression for the depletion potential.

  4. Induced Hyperon-Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions and the Hyperon Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Roland; Roth, Robert

    2016-10-28

    We present the first ab initio calculations for p-shell hypernuclei including hyperon-nucleon-nucleon (YNN) contributions induced by a similarity renormalization group transformation of the initial hyperon-nucleon interaction. The transformation including the YNN terms conserves the spectrum of the Hamiltonian while drastically improving model-space convergence of the importance-truncated no-core model, allowing a precise extraction of binding and excitation energies. Results using a hyperon-nucleon interaction at leading order in chiral effective field theory for lower- to mid-p-shell hypernuclei show a good reproduction of experimental excitation energies while hyperon separation energies are typically overestimated. The induced YNN contributions are strongly repulsive and we show that they are related to a decoupling of the Σ hyperons from the hypernuclear system, i.e., a suppression of the Λ-Σ conversion terms in the Hamiltonian. This is linked to the so-called hyperon puzzle in neutron-star physics and provides a basic mechanism for the explanation of strong ΛNN three-baryon forces.

  5. ELM-Induced Plasma Wall Interactions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Yu, J.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Groth, M.; Hollmann, E.M.; Lasnier, C.J.; McLean, A.G.; Moyer, R.A.; Stangeby, P.C.; Tynan, G.R.; Wampler, W.R.; Watkins, J.G.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.C.; Zeng, L.; Bastasz, R.J.; Buchenauer, D.; Whaley, J.

    2008-01-01

    Intense transient fluxes of particles and heat to the main chamber components induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) are of serious concern for ITER. In DIII-D, plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics including a fast framing camera. Camera data shows that ELMs feature helical filamentary structures localized at the low field side of the plasma and aligned with the local magnetic field. During the nonlinear phase of an ELM, multiple filaments are ejected from the plasma edge and propagate towards the outboard wall with velocities of 0.5-0.7 km/s. When reaching the wall, filaments result in 'hot spots'--regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where the peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. This interaction pattern has a complicated geometry and is neither toroidally nor poloidally symmetric. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. In high density/collisionality discharges, contributions of ELMs and inter-ELM periods to PMI at the wall are comparable. A Midplane Material Evaluation Station (MiMES) has been recently installed in order to conduct in situ measurements of erosion/redeposition at the outboard chamber wall, including those caused by ELMs

  6. Insight into PreImplantation Factor (PIF* mechanism for embryo protection and development: target oxidative stress and protein misfolding (PDI and HSP through essential RIKP [corrected] binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eytan R Barnea

    Full Text Available Endogenous PIF, upon which embryo development is dependent, is secreted only by viable mammalian embryos, and absent in non-viable ones. Synthetic PIF (sPIF administration promotes singly cultured embryos development and protects against their demise caused by embryo-toxic serum. To identify and characterize critical sPIF-embryo protein interactions novel biochemical and bio-analytical methods were specifically devised.FITC-PIF uptake/binding by cultured murine and equine embryos was examined and compared with scrambled FITC-PIF (control. Murine embryo (d10 lysates were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC, fractions printed onto microarray slides and probed with Biotin-PIF, IDE and Kv1.3 antibodies, using fluorescence detection. sPIF-based affinity column was developed to extract and identify PIF-protein interactions from lysates using peptide mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS. In silico evaluation examined binding of PIF to critical targets, using mutation analysis.PIF directly targets viable cultured embryos as compared with control peptide, which failed to bind. Multistep Biotin-PIF targets were confirmed by single-step PIF-affinity column based isolation. PIF binds protein disulfide isomerases a prolyl-4-hydroxylase β-subunit, (PDI, PDIA4, PDIA6-like containing the antioxidant thioredoxin domain. PIF also binds protective heat shock proteins (70&90, co-chaperone, BAG-3. Remarkably, PIF targets a common RIKP [corrected] site in PDI and HSP proteins. Further, single PIF amino acid mutation significantly reduced peptide-protein target bonding. PIF binds promiscuous tubulins, neuron backbones and ACTA-1,2 visceral proteins. Significant anti-IDE, while limited anti-Kv1.3b antibody-binding to Biotin-PIF positive lysates HPLC fractions were documented.Collectively, data identifies PIF shared targets on PDI and HSP in the embryo. Such are known to play a critical role in protecting against oxidative stress and protein misfolding. PIF-affinity-column is a

  7. Studying electron-PAG interactions using electron-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Amrit; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Ostrander, Jonathan; Schad, Jonathon; Rebeyev, Eliran; Neisser, Mark; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Denbeaux, Gregory; Brainard, Robert L.

    2016-03-01

    In extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, 92 eV photons are used to expose photoresists. Typical EUV resists are organic-based and chemically amplified using photoacid generators (PAGs). Upon exposure, PAGs produce acids which catalyze reactions that result in changes in solubility. In EUV lithography, photo- and secondary electrons (energies of 10- 80 eV) play a large role in PAG acid-production. Several mechanisms for electron-PAG interactions (e.g. electron trapping, and hole-initiated chemistry) have been proposed. The aim of this study is to explore another mechanism - internal excitation - in which a bound PAG electron can be excited by receiving energy from another energetic electron, causing a reaction that produces acid. This paper explores the mechanism of internal excitation through the analogous process of electron-induced fluorescence, in which an electron loses energy by transferring that energy to a molecule and that molecule emits a photon rather than decomposing. We will show and quantify electron-induced fluorescence of several fluorophores in polymer films to mimic resist materials, and use this information to refine our proposed mechanism. Relationships between the molecular structure of fluorophores and fluorescent quantum yield may aid in the development of novel PAGs for EUV lithography.

  8. Induced hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interactions and the hyperon puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Roland; Roth, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong experimental and theoretical interest in determining the structure of hypernuclei and the effect of strangeness in strongly interacting many-body systems. Recently, we presented the first calculations of hypernuclei in the p shell from first principles. However, these calculations showed either slow convergence with respect to model-space size or, when the hyperon-nucleon potential is transformed via the Similarity Renormalization Group, strong induced three-body terms. By including these induced hyperon-nucleon-nucleon (YNN) terms explicitly, we get precise binding and excitation energies. We present first results for p-shell hypernuclei and discuss the origin of the YNN terms, which are mainly driven by the evolution of the Λ-Σ conversion terms. We find that they are tightly connected to the hyperon puzzle, a long-standing issue where the appearance of hyperons in models of neutron star matter lowers the predicted maximum neutron star mass below the bound set by the heaviest observed objects.

  9. Interaction of antibiotics on pipecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, N E; Crul, J F; Vandermeersch, E; Mulier, J P; van Egmond, J; Van Aken, H

    1993-01-01

    To measure the interaction of two antibiotics (clindamycin and colistin) on neuromuscular blockade induced by pipecuronium bromide (a new long-acting, steroidal, nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drug). Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Inpatient gynecologic and gastroenterologic service at a university medical center. Three groups of 20 ASA physical status I and II patients with normal kidney and liver function, taking no medication, and undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and alfentanil intravenously (IV) and maintained with a propofol infusion and 60% nitrous oxide in oxygen. Pipecuronium bromide 50 micrograms/kg was administered after reaching a stable baseline of single-twitch response. At 25% recovery of pipecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade, patients received one of two antibiotics, clindamycin 300 mg or colistin 1 million IU, or a placebo. The recovery index (RI, defined as time from 25% to 75% recovery of neuromuscular blockade) was measured using the single-twitch response of the adductor pollicis muscle with supramaximal stimulation of the ulnar nerve at the wrist. RI after administration of an antibiotic (given at 25% recovery) was measured and compared with RI of the control group using Student's unpaired t-test. Statistical analyses of the results showed a significant prolongation of the recovery time (from 25% to 75% recovery) of 40 minutes for colistin. When this type of antibiotic is used during anesthesia with pipercuronium as a muscle relaxant, one must be aware of a significant prolongation of an already long-acting neuromuscular blockade and (although not observed in this study) possible problems in antagonism.

  10. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Talhouk, Rabih; Parvin, Bahram; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell-cell communication, aberrant cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization.

  11. Cuz1/Ynl155w, a Zinc-dependent Ubiquitin-binding Protein, Protects Cells from Metalloid-induced Proteotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, John; Waterman, David; Isasa, Marta; Elsasser, Suzanne; Shi, Yuan; Gygi, Steven; Finley, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding is a universal threat to cells. The ubiquitin-proteasome system mediates a cellular stress response capable of eliminating misfolded proteins. Here we identify Cuz1/Ynl155w as a component of the ubiquitin system, capable of interacting with both the proteasome and Cdc48. Cuz1/Ynl155w is regulated by the transcription factor Rpn4, and is required for cells to survive exposure to the trivalent metalloids arsenic and antimony. A related protein, Yor052c, shows similar phenotypes, suggesting a multicomponent stress response pathway. Cuz1/Ynl155w functions as a zinc-dependent ubiquitin-binding protein. Thus, Cuz1/Ynl155w is proposed to protect cells from metalloid-induced proteotoxicity by delivering ubiquitinated substrates to Cdc48 and the proteasome for destruction. PMID:24297164

  12. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous

  13. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous relation between

  14. A Bystander Mechanism Explains the Specific Phenotype of a Broadly Expressed Misfolded Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Klabonski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Misfolded proteins in transgenic models of conformational diseases interfere with proteostasis machinery and compromise the function of many structurally and functionally unrelated metastable proteins. This collateral damage to cellular proteins has been termed 'bystander' mechanism. How a single misfolded protein overwhelms the proteostasis, and how broadly-expressed mutant proteins cause cell type-selective phenotypes in disease are open questions. We tested the gain-of-function mechanism of a R37C folding mutation in an endogenous IGF-like C.elegans protein DAF-28. DAF-28(R37C is broadly expressed, but only causes dysfunction in one specific neuron, ASI, leading to a distinct developmental phenotype. We find that this phenotype is caused by selective disruption of normal biogenesis of an unrelated endogenous protein, DAF-7/TGF-β. The combined deficiency of DAF-28 and DAF-7 biogenesis, but not of DAF-28 alone, explains the gain-of-function phenotype-deficient pro-growth signaling by the ASI neuron. Using functional, fluorescently-tagged protein, we find that, in animals with mutant DAF-28/IGF, the wild-type DAF-7/TGF-β is mislocalized to and accumulates in the proximal axon of the ASI neuron. Activation of two different branches of the unfolded protein response can modulate both the developmental phenotype and DAF-7 mislocalization in DAF-28(R37C animals, but appear to act through divergent mechanisms. Our finding that bystander targeting of TGF-β explains the phenotype caused by a folding mutation in an IGF-like protein suggests that, in conformational diseases, bystander misfolding may specify the distinct phenotypes caused by different folding mutations.

  15. Hydrodynamic interaction induced spontaneous rotation of coupled active filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-12-14

    We investigate the coupled dynamics of active filaments with long range hydrodynamic interactions (HI). Remarkably, we find that filaments can rotate spontaneously under the same conditions in which a single filament alone can only move in translation. Detailed analysis reveals that the emergence of coupled rotation originates from an asymmetric flow field associated with HI which breaks the symmetry of translational motion when filaments approach. The breaking is then further stabilized by HI to form self-sustained coupled rotation. Intensive simulations show that coupled rotation forms easily when one filament tends to collide with the front-half of the other. For head-to-tail approaching, we observe another interesting HI-induced coupled motion, where filaments move together in the form of one following the other. Moreover, the radius of coupled rotation increases exponentially as the rigidity of the filament increases, which suggests that HI are also important for the alignment of rigid-rod-like filaments which has been assumed to be solely a consequence of direct collisions.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Protein Misfolding Mechanisms in Neurological Diseases: A Historical Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Felix; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Evans, Alan C

    2018-01-01

    Protein misfolding refers to a process where proteins become structurally abnormal and lose their specific 3-dimensional spatial configuration. The histopathological presence of misfolded protein (MP) aggregates has been associated as the primary evidence of multiple neurological diseases, including Prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. However, the exact mechanisms of MP aggregation and propagation, as well as their impact in the long-term patient's clinical condition are still not well understood. With this aim, a variety of mathematical models has been proposed for a better insight into the kinetic rate laws that govern the microscopic processes of protein aggregation. Complementary, another class of large-scale models rely on modern molecular imaging techniques for describing the phenomenological effects of MP propagation over the whole brain. Unfortunately, those neuroimaging-based studies do not take full advantage of the tremendous capabilities offered by the chemical kinetics modeling approach. Actually, it has been barely acknowledged that the vast majority of large-scale models have foundations on previous mathematical approaches that describe the chemical kinetics of protein replication and propagation. The purpose of the current manuscript is to present a historical review about the development of mathematical models for describing both microscopic processes that occur during the MP aggregation and large-scale events that characterize the progression of neurodegenerative MP-mediated diseases.

  17. Glycoform-independent prion conversion by highly efficient, cell-based, protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Mekrouti, Mériem; Reine, Fabienne; Herzog, Laetitia; Sibille, Pierre; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier; Andréoletti, Olivier; Rezaei, Human; Dron, Michel; Béringue, Vincent

    2016-07-07

    Prions are formed of misfolded assemblies (PrP(Sc)) of the variably N-glycosylated cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). In infected species, prions replicate by seeding the conversion and polymerization of host PrP(C). Distinct prion strains can be recognized, exhibiting defined PrP(Sc) biochemical properties such as the glycotype and specific biological traits. While strain information is encoded within the conformation of PrP(Sc) assemblies, the storage of the structural information and the molecular requirements for self-perpetuation remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the specific role of PrP(C) glycosylation status. First, we developed an efficient protein misfolding cyclic amplification method using cells expressing the PrP(C) species of interest as substrate. Applying the technique to PrP(C) glycosylation mutants expressing cells revealed that neither PrP(C) nor PrP(Sc) glycoform stoichiometry was instrumental to PrP(Sc) formation and strainness perpetuation. Our study supports the view that strain properties, including PrP(Sc) glycotype are enciphered within PrP(Sc) structural backbone, not in the attached glycans.

  18. Applying chaperones to protein-misfolding disorders: molecular chaperones against α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Ali; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Ladjimi, Moncef

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of a protein called α-synuclein (α-syn) into inclusions known as lewy bodies (LB) within neurons. This accumulation is also due to insufficient formation and activity of dopamine produced in certain neurons within the substantia nigra. Lewy bodies are the pathological hallmark of the idiopathic disorder and the cascade that allows α-synuclein to misfold, aggregate and form these inclusions has been the subject of intensive research. Targeting these early steps of oligomerization is one of the main therapeutic approaches in order to develop neurodegenerative-modifying agents. Because the folding and refolding of alpha synuclein is the key point of this cascade, we are interested in this review to summarize the role of some molecular chaperones proteins such as Hsp70, Hsp90 and small heat shock proteins (sHsp) and Hsp 104. Hsp70 and its co-chaperone, Hsp70 and small heat shock proteins can prevent neurodegeneration by preventing α-syn misfolding, oligomerization and aggregation in vitro and in Parkinson disease animal models. Hsp104 is able to resolve disordered protein aggregates and cross beta amyloid conformers. Together, these chaperones have a complementary effect and can be a target for therapeutic intervention in PD. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. GCK-MODY diabetes as a protein misfolding disease: the mutation R275C promotes protein misfolding, self-association and cellular degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Molnes, Janne; Solheim, Marie H; Johansson, Bente B; Sagen, Jørn V; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Søvik, Oddmund; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål R; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2014-01-25

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild hyperglycemia, is associated with more than 600 mutations in the glucokinase gene. Different molecular mechanisms have been shown to explain GCK-MODY. Here, we report a Pakistani family harboring the glucokinase mutation c.823C>T (p.R275C). The recombinant and in cellulo expressed mutant pancreatic enzyme revealed slightly increased enzyme activity (kcat) and normal affinity for α-D-glucose, and resistance to limited proteolysis by trypsin comparable with wild-type. When stably expressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells (at different levels), the mutant protein appeared misfolded and unstable with a propensity to form dimers and aggregates. Its degradation rate was increased, involving the lysosomal and proteasomal quality control systems. On mutation, a hydrogen bond between the R275 side-chain and the carbonyl oxygen of D267 is broken, destabilizing the F260-L271 loop structure and the protein. This promotes the formation of dimers/aggregates and suggests that an increased cellular degradation is the molecular mechanism by which R275C causes GCK-MODY. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. AAV exploits subcellular stress associated with inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum expansion, and misfolded proteins in models of cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod S Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to infection act at multiple levels to prevent viruses, bacteria, and parasites from commandeering host cells for their own purposes. An intriguing hypothesis is that if a cell experiences stress, such as that elicited by inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER expansion, or misfolded proteins, then subcellular barriers will be less effective at preventing viral infection. Here we have used models of cystic fibrosis (CF to test whether subcellular stress increases susceptibility to adeno-associated virus (AAV infection. In human airway epithelium cultured at an air/liquid interface, physiological conditions of subcellular stress and ER expansion were mimicked using supernatant from mucopurulent material derived from CF lungs. Using this inflammatory stimulus to recapitulate stress found in diseased airways, we demonstrated that AAV infection was significantly enhanced. Since over 90% of CF cases are associated with a misfolded variant of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ΔF508-CFTR, we then explored whether the presence of misfolded proteins could independently increase susceptibility to AAV infection. In these models, AAV was an order of magnitude more efficient at transducing cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR than in cells expressing wild-type CFTR. Rescue of misfolded ΔF508-CFTR under low temperature conditions restored viral transduction efficiency to that demonstrated in controls, suggesting effects related to protein misfolding were responsible for increasing susceptibility to infection. By testing other CFTR mutants, G551D, D572N, and 1410X, we have shown this phenomenon is common to other misfolded proteins and not related to loss of CFTR activity. The presence of misfolded proteins did not affect cell surface attachment of virus or influence expression levels from promoter transgene cassettes in plasmid transfection studies, indicating exploitation occurs at the level of virion trafficking or processing. Thus

  1. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  2. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial mixed layer depth and strength of the stratification that essentially set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the mixed layer. In oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean to form cold wakes which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture transfers are available through the enthalpy fluxes (typically 1 to 1.5 kW m-2) into the hurricane boundary layer. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions, tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. Thus, to constrain these models, having complete 3-D ocean profiles juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements prior, during and subsequent to passage is an absolute necessity framed within regional scale satellite derived fields.

  3. Substrate strain induced interaction of adatoms on W (110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, W.

    1980-09-01

    The interaction of adatoms due to elastic strains created in an elastically isotropic substrate is investigated. For cases where the adatoms occupy sites with low symmetry, an angular dependent interaction results which falls off as s-3 at large distances. An exact expression is given for the long range interaction in terms of an anisotropy parameter of the force dipole tensor. The short range interaction is calculated by introducing a smooth cutoff. Interactions of adatoms on near neighbour sites on W (110) are given.

  4. Cavitation during the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) method – The trigger for de novo prion generation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique has become a widely-adopted method for amplifying minute amounts of the infectious conformer of the prion protein (PrP). PMCA involves repeated cycles of 20 kHz sonication and incubation, during which the infectious conformer seeds the conversion of normally folded protein by a templating interaction. Recently, it has proved possible to create an infectious PrP conformer without the need for an infectious seed, by including RNA and the phospholipid POPG as essential cofactors during PMCA. The mechanism underpinning this de novo prion formation remains unknown. In this study, we first establish by spin trapping methods that cavitation bubbles formed during PMCA provide a radical-rich environment. Using a substrate preparation comparable to that employed in studies of de novo prion formation, we demonstrate by immuno-spin trapping that PrP- and RNA-centered radicals are generated during sonication, in addition to PrP-RNA cross-links. We further show that serial PMCA produces protease-resistant PrP that is oxidatively modified. We suggest a unique confluence of structural (membrane-mimetic hydrophobic/hydrophilic bubble interface) and chemical (ROS) effects underlie the phenomenon of de novo prion formation by PMCA, and that these effects have meaningful biological counterparts of possible relevance to spontaneous prion formation in vivo. - Highlights: • Sonication during PMCA generates free radicals at the surface of cavitation bubbles. • PrP-centered and RNA-centered radicals are formed in addition to PrP-RNA adducts. • De novo prions may result from ROS and structural constraints during cavitation

  5. Cavitation during the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) method – The trigger for de novo prion generation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haigh, Cathryn L., E-mail: chaigh@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Drew, Simon C., E-mail: sdrew@unimelb.edu.au [Florey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    The protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique has become a widely-adopted method for amplifying minute amounts of the infectious conformer of the prion protein (PrP). PMCA involves repeated cycles of 20 kHz sonication and incubation, during which the infectious conformer seeds the conversion of normally folded protein by a templating interaction. Recently, it has proved possible to create an infectious PrP conformer without the need for an infectious seed, by including RNA and the phospholipid POPG as essential cofactors during PMCA. The mechanism underpinning this de novo prion formation remains unknown. In this study, we first establish by spin trapping methods that cavitation bubbles formed during PMCA provide a radical-rich environment. Using a substrate preparation comparable to that employed in studies of de novo prion formation, we demonstrate by immuno-spin trapping that PrP- and RNA-centered radicals are generated during sonication, in addition to PrP-RNA cross-links. We further show that serial PMCA produces protease-resistant PrP that is oxidatively modified. We suggest a unique confluence of structural (membrane-mimetic hydrophobic/hydrophilic bubble interface) and chemical (ROS) effects underlie the phenomenon of de novo prion formation by PMCA, and that these effects have meaningful biological counterparts of possible relevance to spontaneous prion formation in vivo. - Highlights: • Sonication during PMCA generates free radicals at the surface of cavitation bubbles. • PrP-centered and RNA-centered radicals are formed in addition to PrP-RNA adducts. • De novo prions may result from ROS and structural constraints during cavitation.

  6. Interaction of Induced Anxiety and Verbal Working Memory: Influence of Trait Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nilam; Stoodley, Catherine; Pine, Daniel S.; Grillon, Christian; Ernst, Monique

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the influence of trait anxiety on working memory (WM) in safety and threat. Interactions between experimentally induced anxiety and WM performance (on different cognitive loads) have been reported in healthy, nonanxious subjects. Differences in trait anxiety may moderate these interactions. Accordingly, these interactions may…

  7. GCK-MODY diabetes associated with protein misfolding, cellular self-association and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Johansson, Bente B; Molnes, Janne; Molven, Anders; Matschinsky, Franz M; Søvik, Oddmund; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2012-11-01

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild fasting hyperglycemia, has been associated with >600 different mutations in the glucokinase (GK)-encoding gene (GCK). When expressed as recombinant pancreatic proteins, some mutations result in enzymes with normal/near-normal catalytic properties. The molecular mechanism(s) of GCK-MODY due to these mutations has remained elusive. Here, we aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for two such catalytically 'normal' GCK mutations (S263P and G264S) in the F260-L270 loop of GK. When stably overexpressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells, the S263P- and G264S-encoded mutations generated misfolded proteins with an increased rate of degradation (S263P>G264S) by the protein quality control machinery, and a propensity to self-associate (G264S>S263P) and form dimers (SDS resistant) and aggregates (partly Triton X-100 insoluble), as determined by pulse-chase experiments and subcellular fractionation. Thus, the GCK-MODY mutations S263P and G264S lead to protein misfolding causing destabilization, cellular dimerization/aggregation and enhanced rate of degradation. In silico predicted conformational changes of the F260-L270 loop structure are considered to mediate the dimerization of both mutant proteins by a domain swapping mechanism. Thus, similar properties may represent the molecular mechanisms for additional unexplained GCK-MODY mutations, and may also contribute to the disease mechanism in other previously characterized GCK-MODY inactivating mutations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inactivation of Template-Directed Misfolding of Infectious Prion Protein by Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Price, Luke M.; Braithwaite, Shannon L.; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    Misfolded prions (PrPSc) are well known for their resistance to conventional decontamination processes. The potential risk of contamination of the water environment, as a result of disposal of specified risk materials (SRM), has raised public concerns. Ozone is commonly utilized in the water industry for inactivation of microbial contaminants and was tested in this study for its ability to inactivate prions (263K hamster scrapie = PrPSc). Treatment variables included initial ozone dose (7.6 to 25.7 mg/liter), contact time (5 s and 5 min), temperature (4°C and 20°C), and pH (pH 4.4, 6.0, and 8.0). Exposure of dilute suspensions of the infected 263K hamster brain homogenates (IBH) (0.01%) to ozone resulted in the in vitro destruction of the templating properties of PrPSc, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay. The highest levels of prion inactivation (≥4 log10) were observed with ozone doses of 13.0 mg/liter, at pH 4.4 and 20°C, resulting in a CT (the product of residual ozone concentration and contact time) value as low as 0.59 mg · liter−1 min. A comparison of ozone CT requirements among various pathogens suggests that prions are more susceptible to ozone degradation than some model bacteria and protozoa and that ozone treatment may be an effective solution for inactivating prions in water and wastewater. PMID:22138993

  9. Accumulation of Misfolded SOD1 in Dorsal Root Ganglion Degenerating Proprioceptive Sensory Neurons of Transgenic Mice with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sábado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motoneurons (MNs. Although the motor phenotype is a hallmark for ALS, there is increasing evidence that systems other than the efferent MN system can be involved. Mutations of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene cause a proportion of familial forms of this disease. Misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 exert neurotoxicity in a noncell autonomous manner, as evidenced in studies using transgenic mouse models. Here, we used the SOD1G93A mouse model for ALS to detect, by means of conformational-specific anti-SOD1 antibodies, whether misfolded SOD1-mediated neurotoxicity extended to neuronal types other than MNs. We report that large dorsal root ganglion (DRG proprioceptive neurons accumulate misfolded SOD1 and suffer a degenerative process involving the inflammatory recruitment of macrophagic cells. Degenerating sensory axons were also detected in association with activated microglial cells in the spinal cord dorsal horn of diseased animals. As large proprioceptive DRG neurons project monosynaptically to ventral horn MNs, we hypothesise that a prion-like mechanism may be responsible for the transsynaptic propagation of SOD1 misfolding from ventral horn MNs to DRG sensory neurons.

  10. Interaction of alpha radiation with thermally-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Akbar; Majid, Abdul

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of radiation-induced defects created by energetic alpha particles and thermally-induced defects in silicon has been studied using a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. Two thermally-induced defects at energy positions E c -0.48 eV and E c -0.25 eV and three radiation-induced defects E2, E3 and E5 have been observed. The concentration of both of the thermally-induced defects has been observed to increase on irradiation. It has been noted that production rates of the radiation-induced defects are suppressed in the presence of thermally-induced defects. A significant difference in annealing characteristics of thermally-induced defects in the presence of radiation-induced defects has been observed compared to the characteristics measured in pre-irradiated samples

  11. Induced motion of domain walls in multiferroics with quadratic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimchuk, Victor S., E-mail: viktor.gera@gmail.com [National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Peremohy Avenue 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Shitov, Anatoliy A., E-mail: shitov@mail.ru [Donbass National Academy of Civil Engineering, Derzhavina Street 2, 86123 Makeevka, Donetsk Region (Ukraine)

    2013-10-15

    We theoretically study the dynamics of 180-degree domain wall of the ab-type in magnetic materials with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction in external alternating magnetic and electric fields. The features of the oscillatory and translational motions of the domain walls and stripe structures depending on the parameters of external fields and characteristics of the multiferroics are discussed. The possibility of the domain walls drift in a purely electric field is established. - Highlights: • We study DW and stripe DS in multiferroics with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction. • We build up the theory of oscillatory and translational (drift) DW and DS motion. • DW motion can be caused by crossed alternating electric and magnetic fields. • DW motion can be caused by alternating “pure” electric field. • DW drift velocity is formed by the AFM and Dzyaloshinskii interaction terms.

  12. Bag1 Co-chaperone Promotes TRC8 E3 Ligase-dependent Degradation of Misfolded Human Ether a Go-Go-related Gene (hERG) Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantouche, Christine; Williamson, Brittany; Valinsky, William C; Solomon, Joshua; Shrier, Alvin; Young, Jason C

    2017-02-10

    Cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in the human ether a go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel, many of which cause misfolding and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum instead of normal trafficking to the cell surface. The Hsc70/Hsp70 chaperones assist the folding of the hERG cytosolic domains. Here, we demonstrate that the Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Bag1 promotes hERG degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system at the endoplasmic reticulum to regulate hERG levels and channel activity. Dissociation of hERG complexes containing Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP requires the interaction of Bag1 with Hsp70, but this does not involve the Bag1 ubiquitin-like domain. The interaction with Bag1 then shifts hERG degradation to the membrane-anchored E3 ligase TRC8 and its E2-conjugating enzyme Ube2g2, as determined by siRNA screening. TRC8 interacts through the transmembrane region with hERG and decreases hERG functional expression. TRC8 also mediates degradation of the misfolded hERG-G601S disease mutant, but pharmacological stabilization of the mutant structure prevents degradation. Our results identify TRC8 as a previously unknown Hsp70-independent quality control E3 ligase for hERG. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Effect of Melatonin and Caffeine Interaction on Caffeine Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chigo Okwuosa

    Caffeine Induced Oxidative Stress and Sleep Disorders. Obochi G. O., Amali ... pregnancy, and use of oral contraceptives slow the ..... a shaking water bath at 37oC for 48 hours. The tubes .... availability and delivery of energy to all cells of the.

  14. Interaction Induced Quantum Valley Hall Effect in Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We use pseudo-quantum electrodynamics in order to describe the full electromagnetic interaction of the p electrons in graphene in a consistent 2D formulation. We first consider the effect of this interaction in the vacuum polarization tensor or, equivalently, in the current correlator. This allows us to obtain the T→0 conductivity after a smooth zero-frequency limit is taken in Kubo’s formula. Thereby, we obtain the usual expression for the minimal conductivity plus corrections due to the interaction that bring it closer to the experimental value. We then predict the onset of an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum valley Hall effect below an activation temperature of the order of 2 K. The transverse (Hall valley conductivity is evaluated exactly and shown to coincide with the one in the usual quantum Hall effect. Finally, by considering the effects of pseudo-quantum electrodynamics, we show that the electron self-energy is such that a set of P- and T-symmetric gapped electron energy eigenstates are dynamically generated, in association with the quantum valley Hall effect.

  15. Reversal of Stress-Induced Social Interaction Deficits by Buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2018-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating post-traumatic stress disorder. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of chronic social defeat stress to prospective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/d) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by chronic social defeat stress were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/d), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/d), and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/d). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by chronic social defeat stress following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 hours, also reinstated social interaction behavior in mice that were susceptible to chronic social defeat. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis found: (1) Oprm1 mRNA expression was reduced in the hippocampus and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice and (2) Oprk1 mRNA expression was reduced in the amygdala and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice compared to non-stressed controls and stress-resilient mice. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine

  16. Spin conversion induced by the spin-orbit interaction in positronium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Haruo; Nakayama, Takashi; Hyodo, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    We show the existence of a new reaction mechanism of positronium - ortho-Ps - para-Ps conversion reaction induced by the spin-orbit interaction. This interaction was previously believed to be negligibly small. Recently, however, Mitroy has suggested that this interaction could be observed in Ps-Xe collision. In the present work, we have succeeded in observing this effect and obtaining the reaction rate by using the Zeeman mixing of positronium.

  17. Highly efficient amplification of chronic wasting disease agent by protein misfolding cyclical amplification with beads (PMCAb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad J.; Aiken, Judd M.; McKenzie, Debbie; Samuel, Michael D.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) has emerged as an important technique for detecting low levels of pathogenic prion protein in biological samples. The method exploits the ability of the pathogenic prion protein to convert the normal prion protein to a proteinase K-resistant conformation. Inclusion of Teflon® beads in the PMCA reaction (PMCAb) has been previously shown to increase the sensitivity and robustness of detection for the 263 K and SSLOW strains of hamster-adapted prions. Here, we demonstrate that PMCAb with saponin dramatically increases the sensitivity of detection for chronic wasting disease (CWD) agent without compromising the specificity of the assay (i.e., no false positive results). Addition of Teflon® beads increased the robustness of the PMCA reaction, resulting in a decrease in the variability of PMCA results. Three rounds of serial PMCAb allowed detection of CWD agent from a 6.7×10−13 dilution of 10% brain homogenate (1.3 fg of source brain). Titration of the same brain homogenate in transgenic mice expressing cervid prion protein (Tg(CerPrP)1536+/−mice) allowed detection of CWD agent from the 10−6 dilution of 10% brain homogenate. PMCAb is, thus, more sensitive than bioassay in transgenic mice by a factor exceeding 105. Additionally, we are able to amplify CWD agent from brain tissue and lymph nodes of CWD-positive white-tailed deer having Prnp alleles associated with reduced disease susceptibility.

  18. Highly efficient amplification of chronic wasting disease agent by protein misfolding cyclic amplification with beads (PMCAb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J Johnson

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA has emerged as an important technique for detecting low levels of pathogenic prion protein in biological samples. The method exploits the ability of the pathogenic prion protein to convert the normal prion protein to a proteinase K-resistant conformation. Inclusion of Teflon® beads in the PMCA reaction (PMCAb has been previously shown to increase the sensitivity and robustness of detection for the 263 K and SSLOW strains of hamster-adapted prions. Here, we demonstrate that PMCAb with saponin dramatically increases the sensitivity of detection for chronic wasting disease (CWD agent without compromising the specificity of the assay (i.e., no false positive results. Addition of Teflon® beads increased the robustness of the PMCA reaction, resulting in a decrease in the variability of PMCA results. Three rounds of serial PMCAb allowed detection of CWD agent from a 6.7 × 10(-13 dilution of 10% brain homogenate (1.3 fg of source brain. Titration of the same brain homogenate in transgenic mice expressing cervid prion protein (Tg(CerPrP1536(+/- mice allowed detection of CWD agent from the 10(-6 dilution of 10% brain homogenate. PMCAb is, thus, more sensitive than bioassay in transgenic mice by a factor exceeding 10(5. Additionally, we are able to amplify CWD agent from brain tissue and lymph nodes of CWD-positive white-tailed deer having Prnp alleles associated with reduced disease susceptibility.

  19. Probing Early Misfolding Events in Prion Protein Mutants by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Ilc

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The post-translational conversion of the ubiquitously expressed cellular form of the prion protein, PrPC, into its misfolded and pathogenic isoform, known as prion or PrPSc, plays a key role in prion diseases. These maladies are denoted transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs and affect both humans and animals. A prerequisite for understanding TSEs is unraveling the molecular mechanism leading to the conversion process whereby most α-helical motifs are replaced by β-sheet secondary structures. Importantly, most point mutations linked to inherited prion diseases are clustered in the C-terminal domain region of PrPC and cause spontaneous conversion to PrPSc. Structural studies with PrP variants promise new clues regarding the proposed conversion mechanism and may help identify “hot spots” in PrPC involved in the pathogenic conversion. These investigations may also shed light on the early structural rearrangements occurring in some PrPC epitopes thought to be involved in modulating prion susceptibility. Here we present a detailed overview of our solution-state NMR studies on human prion protein carrying different pathological point mutations and the implications that such findings may have for the future of prion research.

  20. Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity is released by stress, proteasome inhibition, and protein misfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinez, Celine; Mir, Anne-Marie; Leroy, Yves; Cacan, Rene; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Lefebvre, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Numerous recent works strengthen the idea that the nuclear and cytosolic-specific O-GlcNAc glycosylation protects cells against injuries. We have first investigated O-GlcNAc level and Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity (HGBA) behaviour after exposure of HeLa and HepG 2 cells to a wide variety of stresses. O-GlcNAc and HGBA responses were different according to the stress and according to the cell. HGBA was released for almost all stresses, while O-GlcNAc level was modified either upwards or downwards, depending to the stress. Against all expectations, we demonstrated that energy charge did not significantly vary with stress whereas UDP-GlcNAc pools were more dramatically affected even if differences in UDP-GlcNAc contents were not correlated with O-GlcNAc variations suggesting that O-GlcNAc transferase is itself finely regulated during cell injury. Finally, HGBA could be triggered by proteasome inhibition and by L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (a proline analogue) incorporation demonstrating that protein misfolding is one of the key-activator of this Hsp70 property

  1. Structure and Misfolding of the Flexible Tripartite Coiled-Coil Domain of Glaucoma-Associated Myocilin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Shannon E.; Nguyen, Elaine; Donegan, Rebecca K.; Patterson-Orazem, Athéna C.; Hazel, Anthony; Gumbart, James C.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2017-11-01

    Glaucoma-associated myocilin is a member of the olfactomedins, a protein family involved in neuronal development and human diseases. Molecular studies of the myocilin N-terminal coiled coil demonstrate a unique tripartite architecture: a Y-shaped parallel dimer-of-dimers with distinct tetramer and dimer regions. The structure of the dimeric C-terminal 7-heptad repeats elucidates an unexpected repeat pattern involving inter-strand stabilization by oppositely charged residues. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal an alternate accessible conformation in which the terminal inter-strand disulfide limits the extent of unfolding and results in a kinked configuration. By inference, full-length myocilin is also branched, with two pairs of C-terminal olfactomedin domains. Selected variants within the N-terminal region alter the apparent quaternary structure of myocilin but do so without compromising stability or causing aggregation. In addition to increasing our structural knowledge of naturally occurring extracellular coiled coils and biomedically important olfactomedins, this work broadens the scope of protein misfolding in the pathogenesis of myocilin-associated glaucoma.

  2. Structure and Misfolding of the Flexible Tripartite Coiled-Coil Domain of Glaucoma-Associated Myocilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shannon E; Nguyen, Elaine; Donegan, Rebecca K; Patterson-Orazem, Athéna C; Hazel, Anthony; Gumbart, James C; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2017-11-07

    Glaucoma-associated myocilin is a member of the olfactomedins, a protein family involved in neuronal development and human diseases. Molecular studies of the myocilin N-terminal coiled coil demonstrate a unique tripartite architecture: a Y-shaped parallel dimer-of-dimers with distinct tetramer and dimer regions. The structure of the dimeric C-terminal 7-heptad repeats elucidates an unexpected repeat pattern involving inter-strand stabilization by oppositely charged residues. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal an alternate accessible conformation in which the terminal inter-strand disulfide limits the extent of unfolding and results in a kinked configuration. By inference, full-length myocilin is also branched, with two pairs of C-terminal olfactomedin domains. Selected variants within the N-terminal region alter the apparent quaternary structure of myocilin but do so without compromising stability or causing aggregation. In addition to increasing our structural knowledge of naturally occurring extracellular coiled coils and biomedically important olfactomedins, this work broadens the scope of protein misfolding in the pathogenesis of myocilin-associated glaucoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Heavy metals and metalloids as a cause for protein misfolding and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, Markus J; Sharma, Sandeep K; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-02-25

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders.

  4. The effect of electron-electron interaction induced dephasing on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahnoj, Sina Soleimani; Touski, Shoeib Babaee [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourfath, Mahdi, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@iue.tuwien.ac.at [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 27–29/E360, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-08

    The effect of dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons is theoretically investigated. In the presence of disorder in graphene nanoribbons, wavefunction of electrons can set up standing waves along the channel and the conductance exponentially decreases with the ribbon's length. Employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism along with an accurate model for describing the dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction, we show that this kind of interaction prevents localization and transport of electrons remains in the diffusive regime where the conductance is inversely proportional to the ribbon's length.

  5. Twinning interactions induced amorphisation in ultrafine silicon grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Zhang, L.C., E-mail: liangchi.zhang@unsw.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Zhang, Y. [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology (China)

    2016-03-21

    Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis on a severely deformed Al-Si composite material has revealed that partial dislocation slips and deformation twinning are the major plastic deformation carriers in ultrafine silicon grains. This resembles the deformation twinning activities and mechanisms observed in nano-crystalline face-centred-cubic metallic materials. While deformation twinning and amorphisation in Si were thought unlikely to co-exist, it is observed for the first time that excessive twinning and partial dislocation interactions can lead to localised solid state amorphisation inside ultrafine silicon grains.

  6. The Role of S-Nitrosylation and S-Glutathionylation of Protein Disulphide Isomerase in Protein Misfolding and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Halloran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases involve the progressive loss of neurons, and a pathological hallmark is the presence of abnormal inclusions containing misfolded proteins. Although the precise molecular mechanisms triggering neurodegeneration remain unclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress, and protein misfolding are important features in pathogenesis. Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI is the prototype of a family of molecular chaperones and foldases upregulated during ER stress that are increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. PDI catalyzes the rearrangement and formation of disulphide bonds, thus facilitating protein folding, and in neurodegeneration may act to ameliorate the burden of protein misfolding. However, an aberrant posttranslational modification of PDI, S-nitrosylation, inhibits its protective function in these conditions. S-nitrosylation is a redox-mediated modification that regulates protein function by covalent addition of nitric oxide- (NO- containing groups to cysteine residues. Here, we discuss the evidence for abnormal S-nitrosylation of PDI (SNO-PDI in neurodegeneration and how this may be linked to another aberrant modification of PDI, S-glutathionylation. Understanding the role of aberrant S-nitrosylation/S-glutathionylation of PDI in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases may provide insights into novel therapeutic interventions in the future.

  7. S-Nitrosylation and uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug therapy in neurodegenerative disorders of protein misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T; Lipton, S A

    2007-07-01

    Although activation of glutamate receptors is essential for normal brain function, excessive activity leads to a form of neurotoxicity known as excitotoxicity. Key mediators of excitotoxic damage include overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, resulting in excessive Ca(2+) influx with production of free radicals and other injurious pathways. Overproduction of free radical nitric oxide (NO) contributes to acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. NO can react with cysteine thiol groups to form S-nitrosothiols and thus change protein function. S-nitrosylation can result in neuroprotective or neurodestructive consequences depending on the protein involved. Many neurodegenerative diseases manifest conformational changes in proteins that result in misfolding and aggregation. Our recent studies have linked nitrosative stress to protein misfolding and neuronal cell death. Molecular chaperones - such as protein-disulfide isomerase, glucose-regulated protein 78, and heat-shock proteins - can provide neuroprotection by facilitating proper protein folding. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence that NO contributes to degenerative conditions by S-nitrosylating-specific chaperones that would otherwise prevent accumulation of misfolded proteins and neuronal cell death. In contrast, we also review therapeutics that can abrogate excitotoxic damage by preventing excessive NMDA receptor activity, in part via S-nitrosylation of this receptor to curtail excessive activity.

  8. Transport-induced correlations in weakly interacting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunin, Guy; Kafri, Yariv; Podolsky, Daniel; Lecomte, Vivien; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-01-01

    We study spatial correlations in the transport of energy between two baths at different temperatures. To do this, we introduce a minimal model in which energy flows from one bath to another through two subsystems. We show that the transport-induced energy correlations between the two subsystems are of the same order as the energy fluctuations within each subsystem. The correlations can be either positive or negative and we give bounds on their values which are associated with a dynamic energy scale. The different signs originate as a competition between fluctuations generated near the baths and fluctuations of the current between the two subsystems. This interpretation sheds light on known results for spatially-dependent heat and particle conduction models. (paper)

  9. Spin-orbit interaction induced anisotropic property in interacting quantum wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Kai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the ground state and transport property of electrons in interacting quantum wires (QWs oriented along different crystallographic directions in (001 and (110 planes in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI and Dresselhaus SOI (DSOI. The electron ground state can cross over different phases, e.g., spin density wave, charge density wave, singlet superconductivity, and metamagnetism, by changing the strengths of the SOIs and the crystallographic orientation of the QW. The interplay between the SOIs and Coulomb interaction leads to the anisotropic dc transport property of QW which provides us a possible way to detect the strengths of the RSOI and DSOI. PACS numbers: 73.63.Nm, 71.10.Pm, 73.23.-b, 71.70.Ej

  10. Reduction theories elucidate the origins of complex biological rhythms generated by interacting delay-induced oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuhiro Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Time delay is known to induce sustained oscillations in many biological systems such as electroencephalogram (EEG activities and gene regulations. Furthermore, interactions among delay-induced oscillations can generate complex collective rhythms, which play important functional roles. However, due to their intrinsic infinite dimensionality, theoretical analysis of interacting delay-induced oscillations has been limited. Here, we show that the two primary methods for finite-dimensional limit cycles, namely, the center manifold reduction in the vicinity of the Hopf bifurcation and the phase reduction for weak interactions, can successfully be applied to interacting infinite-dimensional delay-induced oscillations. We systematically derive the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and the phase equation without delay for general interaction networks. Based on the reduced low-dimensional equations, we demonstrate that diffusive (linearly attractive coupling between a pair of delay-induced oscillations can exhibit nontrivial amplitude death and multimodal phase locking. Our analysis provides unique insights into experimentally observed EEG activities such as sudden transitions among different phase-locked states and occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  11. Spatial Distribution of Flower Color Induced by Interspecific Sexual Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuma Takahashi

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms shaping the spatiotemporal distribution of species has long been a central concern of ecology and evolutionary biology. Contemporary patterns of plant assemblies suggest that sexual interactions among species, i.e., reproductive interference, lead to the exclusive distributions of closely related species that share pollinators. However, the fitness consequences and the initial ecological/evolutionary responses to reproductive interference remain unclear in nature, since reproductive isolation or allopatric distribution has already been achieved in the natural community. In Japan, three species of blue-eyed grasses (Sisyrinchium with incomplete reproductive isolation have recently colonized and occur sympatrically. Two of them are monomorphic with white flowers, whereas the other exhibits heritable color polymorphism (white and purple morphs. Here we investigated the effects of the presence of two monomorphic species on the distribution and reproductive success of color morphs. The frequency and reproductive success of white morphs decreased in area where monomorphic species were abundant, while those of purple morphs did not. The rate of hybridization between species was higher in white morphs than in the purple ones. Resource competition and habitat preference seemed not to contribute to the spatial distribution and reproductive success of two morphs. Our results supported that color-dependent reproductive interference determines the distribution of flower color polymorphism in a habitat, implying ecological sorting promoted by pollinator-mediated reproductive interference. Our study helps us to understand the evolution and spatial structure of flower color in a community.

  12. Data-driven prediction of adverse drug reactions induced by drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruifeng; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Kumar, Kamal; Yu, Xueping; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-06-08

    The expanded use of multiple drugs has increased the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) induced by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, such reactions are typically not observed in clinical drug-development studies because most of them focus on single-drug therapies. ADR reporting systems collect information on adverse health effects caused by both single drugs and DDIs. A major challenge is to unambiguously identify the effects caused by DDIs and to attribute them to specific drug interactions. A computational method that provides prospective predictions of potential DDI-induced ADRs will help to identify and mitigate these adverse health effects. We hypothesize that drug-protein interactions can be used as independent variables in predicting ADRs. We constructed drug pair-protein interaction profiles for ~800 drugs using drug-protein interaction information in the public domain. We then constructed statistical models to score drug pairs for their potential to induce ADRs based on drug pair-protein interaction profiles. We used extensive clinical database information to construct categorical prediction models for drug pairs that are likely to induce ADRs via synergistic DDIs and showed that model performance deteriorated only slightly, with a moderate amount of false positives and false negatives in the training samples, as evaluated by our cross-validation analysis. The cross validation calculations showed an average prediction accuracy of 89% across 1,096 ADR models that captured the deleterious effects of synergistic DDIs. Because the models rely on drug-protein interactions, we made predictions for pairwise combinations of 764 drugs that are currently on the market and for which drug-protein interaction information is available. These predictions are publicly accessible at http://avoid-db.bhsai.org . We used the predictive models to analyze broader aspects of DDI-induced ADRs, showing that ~10% of all combinations have the potential to induce ADRs

  13. Spin-Triplet Pairing Induced by Spin-Singlet Interactions in Noncentrosymmetric Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Tomoaki; Shimahara, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    In noncentrosymmetric superconductors, we examine the effect of the difference between the intraband and interband interactions, which becomes more important when the band splitting increases. We define the difference ΔVμ between their coupling constants, i.e., that between the intraband and interband hopping energies of intraband Cooper pairs. Here, the subscript μ of ΔVμ indicates that the interactions scatter the spin-singlet and spin-triplet pairs when μ = 0 and μ = 1,2,3, respectively. It is shown that the strong antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction reverses the target spin parity of the interaction: it converts the spin-singlet and spin-triplet interactions represented by ΔV0 and ΔVμ>0 into effective spin-triplet and spin-singlet pairing interactions, respectively. Hence, for example, triplet pairing can be induced solely by the singlet interaction ΔV0. We name the pairing symmetry of the system after that of the intraband Cooper pair wave function, but with an odd-parity phase factor excluded. The pairing symmetry must then be even, even for the triplet component, and the following results are obtained. When ΔVμ is small, the spin-triplet p-wave interactions induce spin-triplet s-wave and spin-triplet d-wave pairings in the regions where the repulsive singlet s-wave interaction is weak and strong, respectively. When ΔV0 is large, a repulsive interband spin-singlet interaction can stabilize spin-triplet pairing. When the Rashba interaction is adopted for the spin-orbit interaction, the spin-triplet pairing interactions mediated by transverse magnetic fluctuations do not contribute to triplet pairing.

  14. Final state interactions in electron induced trinucleon breakup reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijgaard, E. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis presents an exact analysis of the electromagnetic breakup process of a trinucleon system. The one-photon exchange mechanism is reviewed. The relevant components of the nuclear current are discussed and the off-shell one-body current matrix elements are derived to accommodate the evaluation of the trinucleon nuclear structure functions. The Faddeev equations are introduced. To facilitate the numerical evaluations the unitary pole expansion (UPE) is employed to describe a local S-wave spin-dependent interaction in a series of separable potential terms. The UPE convergence properties for the trinucleon bound state as well as for the N-N and N-d scattering observables are investigated. In view of the electromagnetic two-body and three-body breakup analysis the half off-shell wave functions for 3N→Nd and 3N→3N scattering are calculated. The nuclear structure functions of the electromagnetic two-body breakup structure functions of the electromagnetic two-body breakup processes are derived and exactly calculated. Results are presented and discussed for several kinetamic configurations. The nuclear response functions of the trinucleon breakup processes are calculated for a momentum transfer Q = 400 MeV/c. The results are compared with recent experimental data for the longitudinal and transverse response of both trinucleon systems. The three-body contributions to the response functions result from an essentially fourfold numerical integration of the invariant electromagnetic three-body breakup amplitude. A detailed derivation of this amplitude is presented and the treatment of the subsequent integration is discussed. An extension is formulated to include D-state components in the trinucleon bound state as well as in the disconnected final state components for the two-body breakup process. One kinematic situation is studied with the D-state extension. For the three-body breakup processes only the PWIA response is determined with the D-state component in the

  15. Coulomb-like elastic interaction induced by symmetry breaking in nematic liquid crystal colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom-Kyu; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lev, Bohdan

    2017-11-21

    It is generally thought that colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal do not generate the first multipole term called deformation elastic charge as it violates the mechanical equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this is not the case, and deformation elastic charges, as well as dipoles and quadrupoles, can be induced through anisotropic boundary conditions. We report the first direct observation of Coulomb-like elastic interactions between colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal. The behaviour of two spherical colloidal particles with asymmetric anchoring conditions induced by asymmetric alignment is investigated experimentally; the interaction of two particles located at the boundary of twist and parallel aligned regions is observed. We demonstrate that such particles produce deformation elastic charges and interact by Coulomb-like interactions.

  16. The relative importance of relativistic induced interactions in the beta decay of 170Tm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, D.; Cristu, M.I.; Holan, S.; Faessler, A.

    1982-09-01

    The log ft-values, the spectrum shape functions, and the beta-gamma angular correlation coefficients of the 170 Tm beta decay are computed in the framework of relativistic formfactor formalism using asymmetric rotor model wavefunctions. Main vector and axial vector hadron currents being strongly hindered, the relative importance of induced interaction matrix elements is accurately estimated. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for the beta decay observables when the main induced interaction terms were taken into account. The contribution of the pseudoscalar term was found insignificant. (authors)

  17. Role of microtexture in the interaction and coalescence of hydrogen-induced cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venegas, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Baudin, T. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l' Etat Solide, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, Batiment 410, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay, Cedex (France); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Penelle, R. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l' Etat Solide, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, Batiment 410, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay, Cedex (France)

    2009-05-15

    The role of microtexture in hydrogen-induced crack interaction and coalescence is investigated in line pipe steels using electron backscatter diffraction. Experimental evidence shows that, depending on the local grain orientation, crack interaction and coalescence can depart from the conditions predicted by the mixed-mode fracture mechanics of isotropic linear elastic materials. Stress simulation and microtexture analysis are used to explain the experimental observations.

  18. Role of microtexture in the interaction and coalescence of hydrogen-induced cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas, V.; Caleyo, F.; Baudin, T.; Hallen, J.M.; Penelle, R.

    2009-01-01

    The role of microtexture in hydrogen-induced crack interaction and coalescence is investigated in line pipe steels using electron backscatter diffraction. Experimental evidence shows that, depending on the local grain orientation, crack interaction and coalescence can depart from the conditions predicted by the mixed-mode fracture mechanics of isotropic linear elastic materials. Stress simulation and microtexture analysis are used to explain the experimental observations.

  19. Forty years of the establishment of the induced weak pseudoscalar interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1998-03-01

    The author describes his work on the muon capture by light nuclei through the interaction of muons with protons via a virtual pion exchange. Although the resulting capture rate was an order of magnitude slower that the experimental available data, the calculation showed that the pion exchange between muons and protons gives rise to an induced weak pseudoscalar coupling which has to be added to the Feynman-Gell-Mann-Sudarshan-Marshak V-A interaction. (author)

  20. Controlling measurement-induced nonlocality in the Heisenberg XX model by three-spin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu-Xia; Sun, Yu-Hang; Li, Zhao

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the well-defined measures of measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) for thermal states of the transverse field XX model, with the addition of three-spin interaction terms being introduced. The results showed that the MINs are very sensitive to system parameters of the chain. The three-spin interactions can serve as flexible parameters for enhancing MINs of the boundary spins, and the maximum enhancement achievable by varying strengths of the three-spin interactions are different for the chain with different number of spins.

  1. Subliminally and consciously induced cognitive conflicts interact at several processing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Friedrich, Julia; Beste, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Controlled behavior is susceptible to conflicts that can emerge from subliminal or consciously processed information. While research suggests that both sources of conflicting information may interact in their modulation of controlled behavior, it has remained unclear which cognitive sub-processes involved in controlled behavior are affected by this interaction; i.e., at which processing level subliminally and consciously induced response conflicts interact in modulating controlled behavior. Moreover, we investigated whether this interaction of subliminally and consciously induced response conflicts was due to a nexus between the two types of conflict like a common cognitive process or factor. For this, n = 38 healthy young subjects completed a paradigm which combines subliminal primes and consciously perceived flankers while an electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded. We show that the interaction of subliminal and conscious sources of conflict is not restricted to the response selection level (N2) but can already be shown at the earliest stages of perceptual and attentional processing (P1). While the degree of early attentional processing of subliminal information seems to depend on the absence of consciously perceived response conflicts, conflicts during the stage of response selection may be either reduced or enhanced by subliminal priming. Moreover, the results showed that even though the two different sources of conflict interact at the response selection level, they clearly originate from two distinct processes that interact before they detrimentally affect cognitive control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Visible lights induced polymerization reactions: interactions between rose bengal and iron aren complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burget, D.; Grotzinger, C.; Jacques, P.; Fouassier, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation of the interactions between Rose Bengal (RB) and an Iron aren (Irg(+)) complex that are usable in visible light induced polymerization reactions. Steady state and flash photolysis experiments were performed in order to elucidate the nature of the intermediates formed after light excitation. A complete scheme of evolution of the excited states is discussed

  3. Interaction-induced effects in the nonlinear coherent response of quantum-well excitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans Peter; Schätz, A.; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner

    1999-01-01

    Interaction-induced processes are studied using the third-order nonlinear polarization created in polarization-dependent four-wave-mixing experiments (FWM) on a ZnSe single quantum well. We discuss their influence by a comparison of the experimental FWM with calculations based on extended optical...

  4. Expansion of the octarepeat domain alters the misfolding pathway but not the folding pathway of the prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliveld, S Rutger; Stitz, Lothar; Korth, Carsten

    2008-06-10

    A misfolded conformation of the prion protein (PrP), PrP (Sc), is the essential component of prions, the infectious agents that cause transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. Insertional mutations that lead to an increase in the number of octarepeats (ORs) in PrP are linked to familial human prion disease. In this study, we investigated how expansion of the OR domain causes PrP to favor a prion-like conformation. Therefore, we compared the conformational and aggregation modulating properties of wild-type versus expanded OR domains, either as a fusion construct with the protein G B1 domain (GB1-OR) or as an integral part of full-length mouse PrP (MoPrP). Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we first demonstrated that ORs are not unfolded but exist as an ensemble of three distinct conformers: polyproline helix-like, beta-turn, and "Trp-related". Domain expansion had little effect on the conformation of GB1-OR fusion proteins. When part of MoPrP however, OR domain expansion changed PrP's folding landscape, not by hampering the production of native alpha-helical monomers but by greatly reducing the propensity to form amyloid and by altering the assembly of misfolded, beta-rich aggregates. These features may relate to subtle pH-dependent conformational differences between wild-type and mutant monomers. In conclusion, we propose that PrP insertional mutations are pathogenic because they enhance specific misfolding pathways of PrP rather than by undermining native folding. This idea was supported by a trial bioassay in transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type MoPrP, where intracerebral injection of recombinant MoPrP with an expanded OR domain but not wild-type MoPrP caused prion disease.

  5. Helical Polyacetylenes Induced via Noncovalent Chiral Interactions and Their Applications as Chiral Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Katsuhiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2017-08-01

    Construction of predominantly one-handed helical polyacetylenes with a desired helix sense utilizing noncovalent chiral interactions with nonracemic chiral guest compounds based on a supramolecular approach is described. As with the conventional dynamic helical polymers possessing optically active pendant groups covalently bonded to the polymer chains, this noncovalent helicity induction system can show significant chiral amplification phenomena, in which the chiral information of the nonracemic guests can transfer with high cooperativity through noncovalent bonding interactions to induce an almost single-handed helical conformation in the polymer backbone. An intriguing "memory effect" of the induced macromolecular helicity is observed for some polyacetylenes, which means that the helical conformations induced in dynamic helical polyacetylene can be transformed into metastable static ones by tuning their helix-inversion barriers. Potential applications of helical polyacetylenes with controlled helix sense constructed by the "noncovalent helicity induction and/or memory effect" as chiral materials are also described.

  6. A two-step protein quality control pathway for a misfolded DJ-1 variant in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søs Grønbæk; Larsen, Ida B.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    2015-01-01

    A mutation, L166P, in the cytosolic protein, PARK7/DJ-1, causes protein misfolding and is linked to Parkinson disease. Here, we identify the fission yeast protein Sdj1 as the orthologue of DJ-1 and calculate by in silico saturation mutagenesis the effects of point mutants on its structural...... stability. We also map the degradation pathways for Sdj1-L169P, the fission yeast orthologue of the disease-causing DJ-1 L166P protein. Sdj1-L169P forms inclusions, which are enriched for the Hsp104 disaggregase. Hsp104 and Hsp70-type chaperones are required for efficient degradation of Sdj1-L169P...

  7. Anisotropic exchange interaction induced by a single photon in semiconductor microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappe, G.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Louis, E.; Anda, E. V.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate coupling of localized spins in a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a microcavity. The lowest cavity mode and the quantum dot exciton are coupled and close in energy, forming a polariton. The fermions forming the exciton interact with localized spins via exchange. Exact diagonalization of a Hamiltonian in which photons, spins, and excitons are treated quantum mechanically shows that a single polariton induces a sizable indirect anisotropic exchange interaction between spins. At sufficiently low temperatures strong ferromagnetic correlations show up without an appreciable increase in exciton population. In the case of a (Cd,Mn)Te quantum dot, Mn-Mn ferromagnetic coupling is still significant at 1 K : spin-spin correlation around 3 for exciton occupation smaller than 0.3. We find that the interaction mediated by photon-polaritons is 10 times stronger than the one induced by a classical field for equal Rabi splitting.

  8. 17β-Estradiol-induced interaction of ERα with NPPA regulates gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Pham, Thi Hang; Kuehne, Arne; Fielitz, Britta; Dworatzek, Elke; Kararigas, Georgios; Petrov, George; Davidson, Mercy M; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera

    2012-12-01

    17β-Oestradiol (E2) and its receptors (ERα and ERβ) are important regulators of physiological and pathological processes in the cardiovascular system. ER act in concert with other regulatory factors mediating oestrogenic effects. However, the underlying mechanisms modulating ER transcriptional activity are not fully elucidated. To gain better understanding of E2-induced ERα action in the human heart, we aimed to identify and functionally analyse interaction partners of ERα. Using yeast two-hybrid assays with a human heart cDNA library, we identified atrial natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA), a well-known cardiac hypertrophy marker, as a novel ERα interaction partner interacting in an E2-dependent manner. Mutation analyses and immunofluorescence data indicated that the LXXLL motif within NPPA is necessary for its E2-induced interaction with ERα, its action as a co-repressor of ERα, and its translocation into the nucleus of human and rat cardiomyocytes. Expression analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in a human left ventricular cardiomyocyte cell line, AC16, showed that NPPA interacts with E2/ERα, suppressing the transcriptional activity of ERα on E2-target genes, such as NPPA, connexin43, αactinin-2, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, and collagens I and III. We characterize for the first time an E2-regulated interaction of NPPA with ERα in cardiomyocytes, that may be crucial in physiological and/or pathological cardiac processes, thereby representing a potential therapeutic target.

  9. Tritrophic Interactions Mediated by Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles: Mechanisms, Ecological Relevance, and Application Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlings, Ted C J; Erb, Matthias

    2018-01-07

    Tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies are an integral part of all terrestrial ecosystems. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) play a key role in these interactions, as they can attract predators and parasitoids to herbivore-attacked plants. Thirty years after this discovery, the ecological importance of the phenomena is widely recognized. However, the primary function of HIPVs is still subject to much debate, as is the possibility of using these plant-produced cues in crop protection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of HIPVs in tritrophic interactions from an ecological as well as a mechanistic perspective. This overview focuses on the main gaps in our knowledge of tritrophic interactions, and we argue that filling these gaps will greatly facilitate efforts to exploit HIPVs for pest control.

  10. Disease Transmission by Misfolded Prion-Protein Isoforms, Prion-Like Amyloids, Functional Amyloids and the Central Dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daus, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    In 1982, the term "prions" (proteinaceous infectious particles) was coined to specify a new principle of infection. A misfolded isoform of a cellular protein has been described as the causative agent of a fatal neurodegenerative disease. At the beginning of prion research scientists assumed that the infectious agent causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) was a virus, but some unconventional properties of these pathogens were difficult to bring in line with the prevailing viral model. The discovery that prions (obviously devoid of any coding nucleic acid) can store and transmit information similarly to DNA was initially even denoted as being "heretical" but is nowadays mainly accepted by the scientific community. This review describes, from a historical point of view, how the "protein-only hypothesis" expands the Central Dogma. Definition of both, the prion principle and the Central Dogma, have been essential steps to understand information storage and transfer within and among cells and organisms. Furthermore, the current understanding of the infectivity of prion-proteins after misfolding is summarized succinctly. Finally, prion-like amyloids and functional amyloids, as found in yeast and bacteria, will be discussed.

  11. Disease Transmission by Misfolded Prion-Protein Isoforms, Prion-Like Amyloids, Functional Amyloids and the Central Dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Daus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1982, the term “prions” (proteinaceous infectious particles was coined to specify a new principle of infection. A misfolded isoform of a cellular protein has been described as the causative agent of a fatal neurodegenerative disease. At the beginning of prion research scientists assumed that the infectious agent causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE was a virus, but some unconventional properties of these pathogens were difficult to bring in line with the prevailing viral model. The discovery that prions (obviously devoid of any coding nucleic acid can store and transmit information similarly to DNA was initially even denoted as being “heretical” but is nowadays mainly accepted by the scientific community. This review describes, from a historical point of view, how the “protein-only hypothesis” expands the Central Dogma. Definition of both, the prion principle and the Central Dogma, have been essential steps to understand information storage and transfer within and among cells and organisms. Furthermore, the current understanding of the infectivity of prion-proteins after misfolding is summarized succinctly. Finally, prion-like amyloids and functional amyloids, as found in yeast and bacteria, will be discussed.

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system for studying non-cell-autonomous mechanisms in protein-misfolding diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen I. Nussbaum-Krammer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans has a number of distinct advantages that are useful for understanding the basis for cellular and organismal dysfunction underlying age-associated diseases of protein misfolding. Although protein aggregation, a key feature of human neurodegenerative diseases, has been typically explored in vivo at the single-cell level using cells in culture, there is now increasing evidence that proteotoxicity has a non-cell-autonomous component and is communicated between cells and tissues in a multicellular organism. These discoveries have opened up new avenues for the use of C. elegans as an ideal animal model system to study non-cell-autonomous proteotoxicity, prion-like propagation of aggregation-prone proteins, and the organismal regulation of stress responses and proteostasis. This Review focuses on recent evidence that C. elegans has mechanisms to transmit certain classes of toxic proteins between tissues and a complex stress response that integrates and coordinates signals from single cells and tissues across the organism. These findings emphasize the potential of C. elegans to provide insights into non-cell-autonomous proteotoxic mechanisms underlying age-related protein-misfolding diseases.

  13. Misfolded SOD1 associated with motor neuron mitochondria alters mitochondrial shape and distribution prior to clinical onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vande Velde

    Full Text Available Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are causative for inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A proportion of SOD1 mutant protein is misfolded onto the cytoplasmic face of mitochondria in one or more spinal cord cell types. By construction of mice in which mitochondrially targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein is selectively expressed in motor neurons, we demonstrate that axonal mitochondria of motor neurons are primary in vivo targets for misfolded SOD1. Mutant SOD1 alters axonal mitochondrial morphology and distribution, with dismutase active SOD1 causing mitochondrial clustering at the proximal side of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures within motor axons and dismutase inactive SOD1 producing aberrantly elongated axonal mitochondria beginning pre-symptomatically and increasing in severity as disease progresses. Somal mitochondria are altered by mutant SOD1, with loss of the characteristic cylindrical, networked morphology and its replacement by a less elongated, more spherical shape. These data indicate that mutant SOD1 binding to mitochondria disrupts normal mitochondrial distribution and size homeostasis as early pathogenic features of SOD1 mutant-mediated ALS.

  14. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  15. Spin conversion induced by spin-orbit interaction in positronium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H; Nakayama, T; Hyodo, T

    2009-01-01

    The positronium spin conversion reaction induced by spin-orbit interaction is investigated. We obtain the reaction rates during positronium-Xe and positronium-Kr collisions by using the Zeeman mixing of positronium states. At thermal energies corresponding to room temperature, the reaction rate for spin conversion due to spin-orbit interaction is found to be almost twice that for the positronium pick-off reaction. We also study the energy dependence of the reaction rate. The mean energy of positronium is controlled by changing the gas temperature and using positronium in thermal equilibrium. We found that the reaction rate increases with the collision energy.

  16. Distribution of ionospheric currents induced by the solar wind interaction with Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniell, R.E. Jr.; Cloutier, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The electric currents induced in the atmosphere of a non-magnetic planet such as Venus by the interaction of the solar wind satisfy a generalized Ohm's Law relationship with tensor conductivity. The distribution of these currents within the planetary ionosphere may be calculated by a variational technique which minimizes the Joule heating over the ionospheric volume. In this paper, we present the development of the variational technique, and apply it to a model of the solar wind interaction with Venus. Potential and current distributions are shown, and the use of these distributions in determining convective transport patterns of planetary ions is discussed. (author)

  17. Conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction: Mean-field approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yu B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Zakrzewski, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    A simple phenomenological model for describing the conformational dynamics of biological macromolecules via the nonlinearity-induced instabilities is proposed. It is shown that the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom of closed molecular aggregates may act as drivers giving ...... impetus to conformational dynamics of biopolymers. It is demonstrated that initially circular aggregates may undergo transformation to polygonal shapes and possible application to aggregates of bacteriochlorophyl a molecules is considered....

  18. Enhancement of four-wave mixing induced by interacting dark resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Weifeng; Gong Shangqing; Niu Yueping; Jin Shiqi; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    We analyse a four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme in a five-level atomic system in which double-dark resonances are present. It is found that the enhancement of FWM in both electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) windows can be obtained even without the condition of multiphoton resonance. Moreover, the conversion efficiency of FWM in one EIT window can be much larger than that in the other due to the presence of interacting dark resonances

  19. Lipid-protein interaction induced domains: Kinetics and conformational changes in multicomponent vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, K. K.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The spatio-temporal organization of proteins and the associated morphological changes in membranes are of importance in cell signaling. Several mechanisms that promote the aggregation of proteins at low cell surface concentrations have been investigated in the past. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the affinity of proteins for specific lipids can hasten their aggregation kinetics. The lipid membrane is modeled as a dynamically triangulated surface with the proteins defined as in-plane fields at the vertices. We show that, even at low protein concentrations, strong lipid-protein interactions can result in large protein clusters indicating a route to lipid mediated signal amplification. At high protein concentrations, the domains form buds similar to that seen in lipid-lipid interaction induced phase separation. Protein interaction induced domain budding is suppressed when proteins act as anisotropic inclusions and exhibit nematic orientational order. The kinetics of protein clustering and resulting conformational changes are shown to be significantly different for the isotropic and anisotropic curvature inducing proteins.

  20. Bovine lactoferrin decreases cholera-toxin-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in mice by ganglioside interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulton P Rivera

    Full Text Available Secretory diarrhea caused by cholera toxin (CT is initiated by binding of CT's B subunit (CTB to GM1-ganglioside on the surface of intestinal cells. Lactoferrin, a breast milk glycoprotein, has shown protective effect against several enteropathogens. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of bovine-lactoferrin (bLF on CT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in mice, and the interaction between bLF and CT/CTB with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. Fluid accumulation induced by CT was evaluated in the mouse ileal loop model using 56 BALB/c mice, with and without bLF added before, after or at the same time of CT administration. The effect of bLF in the interaction of CT and CTB with GM1-ganglioside was evaluated by a GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. bLF decreased CT-induced fluid accumulation in the ileal loop of mice. The greatest effect was when bLF was added before CT (median, 0.066 vs. 0.166 g/cm, with and without bLF respectively, p<0.01. We conclude that bLF decreases binding of CT and CTB to GM1-ganglioside, suggesting that bLF suppresses CT-induced fluid accumulation by blocking the binding of CTB to GM1-ganglioside. bLF may be effective as adjunctive therapy for treatment of cholera diarrhea.

  1. Cavitation bubble nucleation induced by shock-bubble interaction in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Ryota; Ando, Keita

    2018-05-01

    An optical visualization technique is developed to study cavitation bubble nucleation that results from interaction between a laser-induced shock and a preexisting gas bubble in a 10 wt. % gelatin gel; images of the nucleated cavitation bubbles are captured and the cavitation inception pressure is determined based on Euler flow simulation. A spherical gas cavity is generated by focusing an infrared laser pulse into a gas-supersaturated gel and the size of the laser-generated bubble in mechanical equilibrium is tuned via mass transfer of the dissolved gas into the bubble. A spherical shock is then generated, through rapid expansion of plasma induced by the laser focusing, in the vicinity of the gas bubble. The shock-bubble interaction is recorded by a CCD camera with flash illumination of a nanosecond green laser pulse. The observation captures cavitation inception in the gel under tension that results from acoustic impedance mismatching at the bubble interface interacting with the shock. We measure the probability of cavitation inception from a series of the repeated experiments, by varying the bubble radius and the standoff distance. The threshold pressure is defined at the cavitation inception probability equal to one half and is calculated, through comparisons to Euler flow simulation, at -24.4 MPa. This threshold value is similar to that from shock-bubble interaction experiments using water, meaning that viscoelasticity of the 10 wt. % gelatin gel has a limited impact on bubble nucleation dynamics.

  2. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  3. Activity-induced clustering in model dumbbell swimmers: the role of hydrodynamic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Akira; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    Using a fluid-particle dynamics approach, we numerically study the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the collective dynamics of active suspensions within a simple model for bacterial motility: each microorganism is modeled as a stroke-averaged dumbbell swimmer with prescribed dipolar force pairs. Using both simulations and qualitative arguments, we show that, when the separation between swimmers is comparable to their size, the swimmers' motions are strongly affected by activity-induced hydrodynamic forces. To further understand these effects, we investigate semidilute suspensions of swimmers in the presence of thermal fluctuations. A direct comparison between simulations with and without hydrodynamic interactions shows these to enhance the dynamic clustering at a relatively small volume fraction; with our chosen model the key ingredient for this clustering behavior is hydrodynamic trapping of one swimmer by another, induced by the active forces. Furthermore, the density dependence of the motility (of both the translational and rotational motions) exhibits distinctly different behaviors with and without hydrodynamic interactions; we argue that this is linked to the clustering tendency. Our study illustrates the fact that hydrodynamic interactions not only affect kinetic pathways in active suspensions, but also cause major changes in their steady state properties.

  4. Tentative mapping of transcription-induced interchromosomal interaction using chimeric EST and mRNA data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Unneberg

    Full Text Available Recent studies on chromosome conformation show that chromosomes colocalize in the nucleus, bringing together active genes in transcription factories. This spatial proximity of actively transcribing genes could provide a means for RNA interaction at the transcript level. We have screened public databases for chimeric EST and mRNA sequences with the intent of mapping transcription-induced interchromosomal interactions. We suggest that chimeric transcripts may be the result of close encounters of active genes, either as functional products or "noise" in the transcription process, and that they could be used as probes for chromosome interactions. We have found a total of 5,614 chimeric ESTs and 587 chimeric mRNAs that meet our selection criteria. Due to their higher quality, the mRNA findings are of particular interest and we hope that they may serve as food for thought for specialists in diverse areas of molecular biology.

  5. Observation of Atom Wave Phase Shifts Induced by Van Der Waals Atom-Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perreault, John D.; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2005-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology and atom optics relies on understanding how atoms behave and interact with their environment. Isolated atoms can exhibit wavelike (coherent) behavior with a corresponding de Broglie wavelength and phase which can be affected by nearby surfaces. Here an atom interferometer is used to measure the phase shift of Na atom waves induced by the walls of a 50 nm wide cavity. To our knowledge this is the first direct measurement of the de Broglie wave phase shift caused by atom-surface interactions. The magnitude of the phase shift is in agreement with that predicted by Lifshitz theory for a nonretarded van der Waals interaction. This experiment also demonstrates that atom waves can retain their coherence even when atom-surface distances are as small as 10 nm

  6. Drug-interaction-induced hemodynamically mediated acute renal failure in postsurgical patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup K Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure is a life threatening condition. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cephalosporins are widely used postoperative drugs. NSAID-induced acute renal failure has been reported in the past. In this case, drug interaction and decompensated state of the patient precipitate the condition. NSAIDs inhibit prostaglandins synthesis and thus aggravate ischemia to the kidney that is already facing volume crisis due to surgery. Due to renal dysfunction, plasma ceftriaxone level increases due to decrease clearance and it also acts as nephrotoxic by unknown mechanism. On the other hand, ceftriaxone on its interaction with diclofenac for renal tubular clearance also increases the level of diclofenac and thus further aggravate the ischemia. It is a reversible condition with excluding diclofenac from the treatment regimen and giving adequate hydration to the patient. This highlights the importance of hydration and knowledge of drugs interactions in a postsurgical patient.

  7. Current-induced damping of nanosized quantum moments in the presence of spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by the need to understand current-induced magnetization dynamics at the nanoscale, we have developed a formalism, within the framework of Keldysh Green function approach, to study the current-induced dynamics of a ferromagnetic (FM) nanoisland overlayer on a spin-orbit-coupling (SOC) Rashba plane. In contrast to the commonly employed classical micromagnetic LLG simulations the magnetic moments of the FM are treated quantum mechanically. We obtain the density matrix of the whole system consisting of conduction electrons entangled with the local magnetic moments and calculate the effective damping rate of the FM. We investigate two opposite limiting regimes of FM dynamics: (1) The precessional regime where the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and precessional frequency are smaller than the exchange interactions and (2) the local spin-flip regime where the MAE and precessional frequency are comparable to the exchange interactions. In the former case, we show that due to the finite size of the FM domain, the "Gilbert damping" does not diverge in the ballistic electron transport regime, in sharp contrast to Kambersky's breathing Fermi surface theory for damping in metallic FMs. In the latter case, we show that above a critical bias the excited conduction electrons can switch the local spin moments resulting in demagnetization and reversal of the magnetization. Furthermore, our calculations show that the bias-induced antidamping efficiency in the local spin-flip regime is much higher than that in the rotational excitation regime.

  8. Temporal resolution of misfolded prion protein transport, accumulation, glial activation, and neuronal death in the retinas of mice inoculated with scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the respon...

  9. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Is Drug-Cytokine Interaction the Linchpin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert A; Maiuri, Ashley R; Ganey, Patricia E

    2017-02-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury continues to be a human health problem in part because drugs that cause these reactions are not identified in current preclinical testing and because progress in prevention is hampered by incomplete knowledge of mechanisms that underlie these adverse responses. Several hypotheses involving adaptive immune responses, inflammatory stress, inability to adapt to stress, and multiple, concurrent factors have been proposed. Yet much remains unknown about how drugs interact with the liver to effect death of hepatocytes. Evidence supporting hypotheses implicating adaptive or innate immune responses in afflicted patients has begun to emerge and is bolstered by results obtained in experimental animal models and in vitro systems. A commonality in adaptive and innate immunity is the production of cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ initiates cell signaling pathways that culminate in cell death or inhibition of proliferative repair. Tumor necrosis factor-α, another cytokine prominent in immune responses, can also promote cell death. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α interacts with IFNγ, leading to enhanced cellular responses to each cytokine. In this short review, we propose that the interaction of drugs with these cytokines contributes to idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury, and mechanisms by which this could occur are discussed. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Neutron-induced interactions: index of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, M.H.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; Perkins, S.T.

    1976-01-01

    Indexes to the neutron-induced interaction data in the Experimental Cross Section Information Library (ECSIL) as of July 4, 1976 are tabulated. The tabulation has two arrangements: isotope (ZA) order and reaction-number order

  12. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Neutron-induced interactions: index of experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGregor, M.H.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; Perkins, S.T.

    1976-07-04

    Indexes to the neutron-induced interaction data in the Experimental Cross Section Information Library (ECSIL) as of July 4, 1976 are tabulated. The tabulation has two arrangements: isotope (ZA) order and reaction-number order.

  13. Emergent spin electromagnetism induced by magnetization textures in the presence of spin-orbit interaction (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatara, Gen, E-mail: gen.tatara@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan (Japan); Nakabayashi, Noriyuki [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 Japan (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Emergent electromagnetic field which couples to electron's spin in ferromagnetic metals is theoretically studied. Rashba spin-orbit interaction induces spin electromagnetic field which is in the linear order in gradient of magnetization texture. The Rashba-induced effective electric and magnetic fields satisfy in the absence of spin relaxation the Maxwell's equations as in the charge-based electromagnetism. When spin relaxation is taken into account besides spin dynamics, a monopole current emerges generating spin motive force via the Faraday's induction law. The monopole is expected to play an important role in spin-charge conversion and in the integration of spintronics into electronics.

  14. Akt interacts directly with Smad3 to regulate the sensitivity to TGF-beta induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conery, Andrew R; Cao, Yanna; Thompson, E Aubrey; Townsend, Courtney M; Ko, Tien C; Luo, Kunxin

    2004-04-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) induces both apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in some cell lines, but only growth arrest in others. It is not clear how this differential response to TGF-beta is specified. Smad proteins are critical mediators of TGF-beta signalling. After stimulation by TGF-beta, Smad2 and Smad3 become phosphorylated by the activated TGF-beta receptor kinases, oligomerize with Smad4, translocate to the nucleus and regulate the expression of TGF-beta target genes. Here we report that the sensitivity to TGF-beta induced apoptosis is regulated by crosstalk between the Akt/PKB serine/threonine kinase and Smad3 through a mechanism that is independent of Akt kinase activity. Akt interacts directly with unphosphorylated Smad3 to sequester it outside the nucleus, preventing its phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. This results in inhibition of Smad3-mediated transcription and apoptosis. Furthermore, the ratio of Smad3 to Akt correlates with the sensitivity of cells to TGF-beta induced apoptosis. Alteration of this ratio changes the apoptotic, but not the growth-inhibitory, responses of cells to TGF-beta. These findings identify an important determinant of sensitivity to TGF-beta-induced apoptosis that involves crosstalk between the TGF-beta and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) pathways.

  15. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  16. HD domain of SAMHD1 influences Vpx-induced degradation at a post-interaction step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jian; Hou, Jingwei; Zhao, Ke; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Du, Juan, E-mail: jdu@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-02-12

    Primate SAMHD1 proteins are potent inhibitors of viruses, including retroviruses such as HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Vpx, a distinctive viral protein expressed by HIV-2 and some SIVs, induces SAMHD1 degradation by forming a Vpx-DCAF1-based ubiquitin ligase complex. Either the N- or the C-terminus of SAMHD1 is critical for Vpx-induced degradation, depending on the types of SAMHD1 and Vpx proteins. However, it was not fully understood whether other regions of SAMHD1 also contribute to its depletion by Vpx. In the present study, we report that SAMHD1 from chicken (SAMHD1{sub GG}) was not degraded by SIVmac Vpx, in contrast with results for human SAMHD1 (SAMHD1{sub HS}). Results regarding to SAMHD1{sub HS} and SAMHD1{sub GG} fusion proteins supported previous findings that the C-terminus of SAMHD1{sub HS} is essential for Vpx-induced degradation. Internal domain substitution, however, revealed that the HD domain also contributes to Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Interestingly, the HD domain influenced Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation without affecting Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction. Therefore, our findings revealed that factors in addition to Vpx-SAMHD1 binding influence the efficiency of Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. - Highlights: • SAMHD1{sub GG} from chicken could not be depleted by SIVmac Vpx. • The C-terminus of human SAMHD1{sub HS} is critical for its degradation by Vpx. • The HD domain is essential for Vpx-induced degradation of SAMHD1{sub HS}. • Altering the HD domain does not affect Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction.

  17. Reduced endothelial thioredoxin-interacting protein protects arteries from damage induced by metabolic stress in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Domingues, Alison; Baron, Stephanie; Ferreira, Chrystophe; Vibert, Francoise; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Paul, Jean-Louis; Escriou, Virginie; Bigey, Pascal; Gaussem, Pascale; Leguillier, Teddy; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2018-06-01

    Although thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is involved in a variety of biologic functions, the contribution of endothelial TXNIP has not been well defined. To investigate the endothelial function of TXNIP, we generated a TXNIP knockout mouse on the Cdh5-cre background (TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre ). Control (TXNIP fl/fl ) and TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice were fed a high protein-low carbohydrate (HP-LC) diet for 3 mo to induce metabolic stress. We found that TXNIP fl/fl and TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice on an HP-LC diet displayed impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia concretizing the metabolic stress induced. We evaluated the impact of this metabolic stress on mice with reduced endothelial TXNIP expression with regard to arterial structure and function. TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice on an HP-LC diet exhibited less endothelial dysfunction than littermate mice on an HP-LC diet. These mice were protected from decreased aortic medial cell content, impaired aortic distensibility, and increased plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 secretion. This protective effect came with lower oxidative stress and lower inflammation, with a reduced NLRP3 inflammasome expression, leading to a decrease in cleaved IL-1β. We also show the major role of TXNIP in inflammation with a knockdown model, using a TXNIP-specific, small interfering RNA included in a lipoplex. These findings demonstrate a key role for endothelial TXNIP in arterial impairments induced by metabolic stress, making endothelial TXNIP a potential therapeutic target.-Bedarida, T., Domingues, A., Baron, S., Ferreira, C., Vibert, F., Cottart, C.-H., Paul, J.-L., Escriou, V., Bigey, P., Gaussem, P., Leguillier, T., Nivet-Antoine, V. Reduced endothelial thioredoxin-interacting protein protects arteries from damage induced by metabolic stress in vivo.

  18. QED effects induced harmonics generation in extreme intense laser foil interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. Y.; Yuan, T.; Liu, W. Y.; Chen, M.; Luo, W.; Weng, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2018-04-01

    A new mechanism of harmonics generation (HG) induced by quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in extreme intense laser foil interaction is found and investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. When two laser pulses with identical intensities of 1.6× {10}24 {{W}} {{{cm}}}-2 are counter-incident on a thin foil target, harmonics emission is observed in their reflected electromagnetic waves. Such harmonics radiation is excited due to transversely oscillating electric currents coming from the vibration of QED effect generated {e}-{e}+ pairs. The effects of laser intensity and polarization were studied. By distinguishing the cascade depth of generated photons and pairs, the influence of QED cascades on HG was analyzed. Although the current HG is not an efficient way for radiation source applications, it may provide a unique way to detect the QED processes in the near future ultra-relativistic laser solid interactions.

  19. Interactions of acetylated histones with DNA as revealed by UV laser induced histone-DNA crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovsky, V.Yu.; Dimitrov, S.I.; Angelov, D.; Pashev, I.G.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of acetylated histones with DNA in chromatin has been studied by UV laser-induced crosslinking histones to DNA. After irradiation of the nuclei, the covalently linked protein-DNA complexes were isolated and the presence of histones in them demonstrated immunochemically. When chromatin from irradiated nuclei was treated with clostripain, which selectively cleaved the N-terminal tails of core histones, no one of them was found covalently linked to DNA, thus showing that crosslinking proceeded solely via the N-terminal regions. However, the crosslinking ability of the laser was preserved both upon physiological acetylation of histones, known to be restricted to the N-terminal tails, and with chemically acetylated chromatin. This finding is direct evidence that the postsynthetic histone acetylation does not release the N-terminal tails from interaction with DNA

  20. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  1. DART model for irradiation-induced swelling of dispersion fuel elements including aluminum-fuel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART) contains models for fission-gas-induced fuel swelling, interaction of fuel with the matrix aluminum, for the resultant reaction-product swelling, and for the calculation of the stress gradient within the fuel particle. The effects of an aluminide shell on fuel particle swelling are evaluated. Validation of the model is demonstrated by a comparison of DART calculations of fuel swelling of U 3 SiAl-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al for various dispersion fuel element designs with the data

  2. Vortical structures for nanomagnetic memory induced by dipole-dipole interaction in monolayer disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaosen; Ciftja, Orion; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ian, Hou

    2018-05-01

    It is well known that magnetic domains in nanodisks can be used as storage units for computer memory. Using two quantum simulation approaches, we show here that spin vortices on magnetic monolayer nanodisks, which are chirality-free, can be induced by dipole-dipole interaction (DDI) on the disk-plane. When DDI is sufficiently strong, vortical and anti-vortical multi-domain textures can be generated simultaneously. Especially, a spin vortex can be easily created and deleted through either external magnetic or electrical signals, making them ideal to be used in nanomagnetic memory and logical devices. We demonstrate these properties in our simulations.

  3. Nonlinear optical properties of an electromagnetically induced transparency medium interacting with two quantized fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kuang-Leman; Wu Yong Shi

    2003-01-01

    We study linear and nonlinear optical properties of an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium interacting with two quantized laser fields in the adiabatic EIT case. We show that the EIT medium exhibits normal dispersion. Kerr and higher-order nonlinear refractive index coefficients are also calculated in a completely analytical form. It is indicated that the EIT medium exhibits giant resonantly enhanced nonlinearities. We discuss the response of the EIT medium to nonclassical light fields and find that the polarization vanishes when the probe laser is initially in a nonclassical state of no single-photon coherence.

  4. Flow-induced decentering and tube support interaction for steam generator tubes: experiment and physical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, N.; Granger, S.

    1992-11-01

    Maintaining PWR components under reliable operating conditions requires a complex design to prevent various damaging processes including flow-induced vibration and wear mechanisms. To improve the prediction of tube/support interaction and wear in PWR components, EDF has undertaken a comprehensive program oriented to both experimental and computational studies. The present paper illustrates one aspect of this program, related to the determination of contact forces between steam generator tubes and anti-vibration bars (AVBs). The dynamic, nonlinear behavior of a U-tube excited by an air cross-flow is investigated on the CLAVECIN experiment. Interesting and rather unexpected results have been obtained, by varying clearances and flow velocities. The paper is focused on four main points: (i) the originality of the experiment with a force measurement device located in flow; (ii) the importance of a refined data processing for accurately measuring contact forces; (iii) the presentation of the unexpected phenomena revealed in the CLAVECIN experiment, i.e. a flow-induced decentering of the tube which changed the initial tube/AVB clearance, and the consequences on tube/support interaction; (iv) the influence of the actual tube/support clearance in flow on wear mechanisms. The work, presented in the second part of this paper, concentrates exclusively on the physical interpretation of the flow-induced decentering phenomenon and on the theoretical analysis of its consequences on dynamic tube/support interaction. We show that the flow-induced decentering phenomenon can be generated by an unstable quasi-static coupling between the flexible tube and the confined flow, in the vicinity of the support system. This phenomenon is not specific to the CLAVECIN tests and it can be expected every time that a movable obstacle is subjected to confined flow. Moreover, in single-sided impacting conditions, the theoretical analysis confirms the linear relation, found in the CLAVECIN tests

  5. The hydroxyflavone, fisetin, suppresses mast cell activation induced by interaction with activated T cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, K; Takahashi, Y; Mikami, I; Fukusima, T; Oike, H; Kobori, M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cell-to-cell interactions between mast cells and activated T cells are increasingly recognized as a possible mechanism in the aetiology of allergic or non-allergic inflammatory disorders. To determine the anti-allergic effect of fisetin, we examined the ability of fisetin to suppress activation of the human mast cell line, HMC-1, induced by activated Jurkat T cell membranes. Experimental approach: HMC-1 cells were incubated with or without fisetin for 15 min and then co-cultured with Jurkat T cell membranes activated by phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate for 16 h. We determined gene expression in activated HMC-1 cells by DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis. We also examined activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and MAP kinases (MAPKs) in activated HMC-1 cells. Key results: Fisetin suppresses cell spreading and gene expression in HMC-1 cells stimulated by activated T cell membranes. Additionally, we show that these stimulated HMC-1 cells expressed granzyme B. The stimulatory interaction also induced activation of NF-κB and MAPKs; these activations were suppressed by fisetin. Fisetin also reduced the amount of cell surface antigen CD40 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on activated HMC-1 cells. Conclusions and implications: Fisetin suppressed activation of HMC-1 cells by activated T cell membranes by interfering with cell-to-cell interaction and inhibiting the activity of NF-κB and MAPKs and thereby suppressing gene expression. Fisetin may protect against the progression of inflammatory diseases by limiting interactions between mast cells and activated T cells. PMID:19702784

  6. Electric-field-induced modification in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction of Co monolayer on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohji; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori; Ono, Teruo; Weinert, Michael

    Magnetism induced by an external electric field (E-field) has received much attention as a potential approach for controlling magnetism at the nano-scale with the promise of ultra-low energy power consumption. Here, the E-field-induced modification of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) for a prototypical transition-metal thin layer of a Co monolayer on Pt(111) is investigated by first-principles calculations by using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method that treats spin-spiral structures in an E-field. With inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) by the second variational method for commensurate spin-spiral structures, the DMI constants were estimated from an asymmetric contribution in the total energy with respect to the spin-spiral wavevector. The results predicted that the DMI is modified by the E-field, but the change is found to be small compared to that in the exchange interaction (a symmetric contribution in the total energy) by a factor of ten.

  7. Grazer Functional Roles, Induced Defenses, and Indirect Interactions: Implications for Eelgrass Restoration in San Francisco Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T. Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the individual and interactive roles of consumer species is more than academic when the host plant is a subject of intense conservation interest. In a mesocosm experiment, we compared effects of common invertebrate grazers in San Francisco Bay seagrass (Zostera marina, eelgrass beds, finding that some species (a native opisthobranch, Phyllaplysia taylori; a native isopod, Idotea resecata; and an introduced gastropod, Ilyanassa obsoleta enhanced eelgrass growth through removal of epiphytic algae, as is often predicted for small invertebrate grazers on seagrasses, while one (an introduced caprellid amphipod, Caprella cf. drepanochir had neutral effects. In contrast, the putatively-introduced gammaridean amphipod, Ampithoe valida, had strong negative effects on eelgrass (in addition to epiphytes through consumption, as we had previously observed in the field during restoration programs. We tested whether other common grazer species could influence the effects of the eelgrass-grazing Ampithoe, and found that Idotea induced production of phenolic compounds and limited eelgrass damage by Ampithoe, without affecting Ampithoe abundance. These results have implications for restoration strategies, and contribute to a growing awareness of the importance of trait-mediated indirect grazer interactions through grazer-induced changes in plant traits, providing the first example in a seagrass system.

  8. Folic acid and safflower oil supplementation interacts and protects embryos from maternal diabetes-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, R; Kurtz, M; Mazzucco, M B; Musikant, D; White, V; Jawerbaum, A

    2012-05-01

    Maternal diabetes increases the risk of embryo malformations. Folic acid and safflower oil supplementations have been shown to reduce embryo malformations in experimental models of diabetes. In this study we here tested whether folic acid and safflower oil supplementations interact to prevent embryo malformations in diabetic rats, and analyzed whether they act through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs), and nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species production. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin administration prior to mating. From Day 0.5 of pregnancy, rats did or did not receive folic acid (15 mg/kg) and/or a 6% safflower oil-supplemented diet. Embryos and decidua were explanted on Day 10.5 of gestation for further analysis of embryo resorptions and malformations, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels, NO production and lipid peroxidation. Maternal diabetes induced resorptions and malformations that were prevented by folic acid and safflower oil supplementation. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were increased in embryos and decidua from diabetic rats and decreased with safflower oil and folic acid supplementations. In diabetic animals, the embryonic and decidual TIMPs were increased mainly with safflower oil supplementation in decidua and with folic acid in embryos. NO overproduction was decreased in decidua from diabetic rats treated with folic acid alone and in combination with safflower oil. These treatments also prevented increases in embryonic and decidual lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, folic acid and safflower oil supplementations interact and protect the embryos from diabetes-induced damage through several pathways related to a decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators.

  9. Wnt/Yes-Associated Protein Interactions During Neural Tissue Patterning of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejoy, Julie; Song, Liqing; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2018-04-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have special ability to self-assemble into neural spheroids or mini-brain-like structures. During the self-assembly process, Wnt signaling plays an important role in regional patterning and establishing positional identity of hiPSC-derived neural progenitors. Recently, the role of Wnt signaling in regulating Yes-associated protein (YAP) expression (nuclear or cytoplasmic), the pivotal regulator during organ growth and tissue generation, has attracted increasing interests. However, the interactions between Wnt and YAP expression for neural lineage commitment of hiPSCs remain poorly explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of Wnt signaling and YAP expression on the cellular population in three-dimensional (3D) neural spheroids derived from hiPSCs. In this study, Wnt signaling was activated using CHIR99021 for 3D neural spheroids derived from human iPSK3 cells through embryoid body formation. Our results indicate that Wnt activation induces nuclear localization of YAP and upregulates the expression of HOXB4, the marker for hindbrain/spinal cord. By contrast, the cells exhibit more rostral forebrain neural identity (expression of TBR1) without Wnt activation. Cytochalasin D was then used to induce cytoplasmic YAP and the results showed the decreased HOXB4 expression. In addition, the incorporation of microparticles in the neural spheroids was investigated for the perturbation of neural patterning. This study may indicate the bidirectional interactions of Wnt signaling and YAP expression during neural tissue patterning, which have the significance in neurological disease modeling, drug screening, and neural tissue regeneration.

  10. The use of radiolabelled milk proteins to study thermally-induced interactions in milk systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat induced complexes between milk proteins are of considerable importance in determining the heat stability and rennin clottability of milk products. Thiol-disulfide interchange reactions have been suggested as the principal reaction mechanism for complex formation. Studies to data have not adequately established the mechanism and stoichiometry of complex formation in situ in total milk system. Tracer amounts of 14 C-β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin were heated under various conditions. After clotting with rennet, radioactivity retained in the curd was counted to estimate extent of interaction of β-lactoglobulin with casein. 14 C- and 3 H-Methyl labelled proteins were used for the preparation of radiolabelled artificial casein micelles. These micelles with radiolabelled whey proteins were heated and heat-induced complexes were separated on Sephacryl S-300 eluting with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride to break all non-covalent bonds. Further separation of the protein complexes was obtained using CPG-10 or Sephacryl S-1000. The ratios of 3 H to 14 C labelled proteins in the protein complexes suggested that the stoichiometries of k-, α s2 -casein, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the heat-induced complexes varied as a function of the heat treatment

  11. First interactions between hydrogen and stress-induced reverse transformation of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2017-11-01

    The first dynamic interactions between hydrogen and the stress-induced reverse transformation have been investigated by performing an unloading test on a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy subjected to hydrogen charging under a constant applied strain in the elastic deformation region of the martensite phase. Upon unloading the specimen, charged with a small amount of hydrogen, no change in the behaviour of the stress-induced reverse transformation is observed in the stress-strain curve, although the behaviour of the stress-induced martensite transformation changes. With increasing amount of hydrogen charging, the critical stress for the reverse transformation markedly decreases. Eventually, for a larger amount of hydrogen charging, the reverse transformation does not occur, i.e. there is no recovery of the superelastic strain. The residual martensite phase on the side surface of the unloaded specimen is confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Upon training before the unloading test, the properties of the reverse transformation slightly recover after ageing in air at room temperature. The present study indicates that to change the behaviour of the reverse transformation a larger amount of hydrogen than that for the martensite transformation is necessary. In addition, it is likely that a substantial amount of hydrogen in solid solution more strongly suppresses the reverse transformation than hydrogen trapped at defects, thereby stabilising the martensite phase.

  12. Persistent genetic instability induced by synergistic interaction between x-irradiation and 6-thioguanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Nelson, S.L.; Smith, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    Clonal karyotypic analysis was performed using G-banding on four groups of clones derived from TK6 human lymphoblasts: 25 HPRT - total gene deletion mutants induced by exposure to 2 Gy of x-rays; 8 spontaneous HPRT - total gene deletion mutants; 25 clones irradiated with 2 Gy, not selected with 6-thioguanine. Ten to twenty metaphases were examined for each clone. Extensive karyotypic heterogeneity was observed among x-ray induced HPRT - mutants involving translocations, deletions, duplications and aneuploidy; recovery of chromosomal aberrations and karyotypic heterogeneity was greater than the additive effects of clones treated with x-irradiation or 6-thioguanine alone. This synergistic interaction between x-irradiation and 6-thioguanine was observed despite a 7 day phenotypic expression interval between exposure to the two agents. Thus, x-irradiated TK6 cells appear to be persistently hypersensitive to the induction of genetic instability. Several mutants appeared to exhibit evidence of clonal evolution since aberrant chromosomes observed in one metaphase, were found to be further modified in other metaphases. In order to determine if genetic instability, identified by clonal karyotypic heterogeneity, affected specific locus mutation rates, we utilized the heterozygous thymidine kinase (tk) locus as a genetic marker. Four x-ray induced HPRT - mutants with extensive karyotypic heterogeneity, exhibited mutation rates at tk ranging from 5 to 8 fold higher than the parental TK6 cells. Further analysis, using fractionated low dose radiation exposure, is currently in progress

  13. Electronic charge rearrangement at metal/organic interfaces induced by weak van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Ambrosetti, Alberto; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Electronic charge rearrangements at interfaces between organic molecules and solid surfaces play a key role in a wide range of applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. It is common to utilize electrostatics and Pauli pushback to control the interface electronic properties, while the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions are often considered to have a negligible direct contribution (beyond the obvious structural relaxation). Here, we apply a fully self-consistent Tkatchenko-Scheffler vdW density functional to demonstrate that the weak vdW interactions can induce sizable charge rearrangements at hybrid metal/organic systems (HMOS). The complex vdW correlation potential smears out the interfacial electronic density, thereby reducing the charge transfer in HMOS, changes the interface work functions by up to 0.2 eV, and increases the interface dipole moment by up to 0.3 Debye. Our results suggest that vdW interactions should be considered as an additional control parameter in the design of hybrid interfaces with the desired electronic properties.

  14. Protein misfolding, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and guanabenz: protocol for a phase II RCT with futility design (ProMISe trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Eleonora Dalla; Tramacere, Irene; Antonini, Giovanni; Borghero, Giuseppe; Capasso, Margherita; Caponnetto, Claudia; Chiò, Adriano; Corbo, Massimo; Eleopra, Roberto; Filosto, Massimiliano; Giannini, Fabio; Granieri, Enrico; Bella, Vincenzo La; Lunetta, Christian; Mandrioli, Jessica; Mazzini, Letizia; Messina, Sonia; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Mora, Gabriele; Riva, Nilo; Rizzi, Romana; Siciliano, Gabriele; Silani, Vincenzo; Simone, Isabella; Sorarù, Gianni; Volanti, Paolo; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2017-08-11

    Recent studies suggest that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through an altered regulation of the proteostasis, the cellular pathway-balancing protein synthesis and degradation. A key mechanism is thought to be the dephosphorylation of eIF2α, a factor involved in the initiation of protein translation. Guanabenz is an alpha-2-adrenergic receptor agonist safely used in past to treat mild hypertension and is now an orphan drug. A pharmacological action recently discovered is its ability to modulate the synthesis of proteins by the activation of translational factors preventing misfolded protein accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum overload. Guanabenz proved to rescue motoneurons from misfolding protein stress both in in vitro and in vivo ALS models, making it a potential disease-modifying drug in patients. It is conceivable investigating whether its neuroprotective effects based on the inhibition of eIF2α dephosphorylation can change the progression of ALS. Protocolised Management In Sepsis is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial with futility design. We will investigate clinical outcomes, safety, tolerability and biomarkers of neurodegeneration in patients with ALS treated with guanabenz or riluzole alone for 6 months. The primary aim is to test if guanabenz can reduce the proportion of patients progressed to a higher stage of disease at 6 months compared with their baseline stage as measured by the ALS Milano-Torino Staging (ALS-MITOS) system and to the placebo group. Secondary aims are safety, tolerability and change in at least one biomarker of neurodegeneration in the guanabenz arm compared with the placebo group. Findings will provide reliable data on the likelihood that guanabenz can slow the course of ALS in a phase III trial. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of IRCCS 'Carlo Besta Foundation' of Milan

  15. Alpha Particles and X Rays Interact in Inducing DNA Damage in U2OS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollazzo, Alice; Brzozowska, Beata; Cheng, Lei; Lundholm, Lovisa; Haghdoost, Siamak; Scherthan, Harry; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are monitored for health effects within the Life Span Study (LSS). The LSS results represent the most important source of data about cancer effects from ionizing radiation exposure, which forms the foundation for the radiation protection system. One uncertainty connected to deriving universal risk factors from these results is related to the problem of mixed radiation qualities. The A-bomb explosions generated a mixed beam of the sparsely ionizing gamma radiation and densely ionizing neutrons. However, until now the possible interaction of the two radiation types of inducing biological effects has not been taken into consideration. The existence of such interaction would suggest that the application of risk factors derived from the LSS to predict cancer effects after pure gamma-ray irradiation (such as in the Fukushima prefecture) leads to an overestimation of risk. To analyze the possible interaction of radiation types, a mixed-beam exposure facility was constructed where cells can be exposed to sparsely ionizing X rays and densely ionizing alpha particles. U2OS cells were used, which are stably transfected with a plasmid coding for the DNA repair gene 53BP1 coupled to a gene coding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The induction and repair of DNA damage, which are known to be related to cancer induction, were analyzed. The results suggest that alpha particles and X rays interact, leading to cellular and possibly cancer effects, which cannot be accurately predicted based on assuming simple additivity of the individual mixed-beam components.

  16. Conformation and activity alteration of horseradish peroxidase induced by the interaction with gene carrier polyethyleneimines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aimin; Wei, Bangzhi; Mo, Junyong; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) has long been considered as "golden standard" for polymeric gene delivery carriers. However the molecular basis of the cytotoxicity of PEI is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy were conducted to investigate the influence of PEI of average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa (denoted as PEI25k, PEI10k and PEI1.8k) on the conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its catalytic efficiency. Zeta-potential measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to reveal the mechanism of the interaction between PEIs and HRP. PEIs were found to bind onto the surface of HRP predominantly via hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond or van der Waals interaction. The complex formation between HRP and PEI induced a more compact conformation of the enzyme and an increased hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding heme pocket. The conformational change of HRP had little impact on the affinity towards H2O2 and phenol. However, the increase in the non-planarity of porphyrin ring in the heme group led to an increase in the exposure degree of the active center and thus an enhancement of catalytic efficiency of HRP in the presence of high molecular weight PEIs (PEI25k and PEI10k). The polymer size played an important role in PEI-HRP interaction. PEI of low molecular weight (PEI1.8k) was less efficient to alter the conformation and catalytic activity of HRP in aqueous solutions.

  17. Collision-induced spectroscopy with long-range intermolecular interactions: A diagrammatic representation and the invariant form of the induced properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzov, A. P.; Chrysos, M.; Rachet, F.; Egorova, N. I.

    2006-01-01

    Collision-induced properties of two interacting molecules a and b are derived by means of a general diagrammatic method involving M molecule-molecule and N photon-molecule couplings. The method is an extension of previous graphical treatments of nonlinear optics because it exhaustively determines interaction-induced polarization mechanisms in a trustworthy and handy fashion. Here we focus on long-range intermolecular interactions. Retardation effects are neglected. A fully quantum-mechanical treatment of the molecules is made whereas second quantization for the electromagnetic field, in the nonrelativistic approximation, is implicitly applied. The collision-induced absorption, Raman, and hyper-Raman processes are viewed and studied, through guiding examples, as specific cases N=1, 2, and 3, respectively. In Raman (N=2), the standard first-order (M=1) dipole-induced dipole term of the incremental polarizability, Δα, is the result of a coupling of the two photons with distinct molecules, a and b, which perturb each other via a dipole-dipole mechanism. Rather, when the two photons interact with the same molecule, a or b, the (N=2, M=1) graphs predict the occurrence of a nonlinear polarization mechanism. The latter is expected to contribute substantially to the collision-induced Raman bands by certain molecular gases

  18. Hydrogen-induced crack interaction and coalescence: the role of local crystallographic texture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M.; Venegas, V. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Baudin, T. [Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay, (France)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) is a big concern in pipeline industry specialized in sour service. The strategies to improve HIC resistance of pipeline steel have not been completely efficient. This study investigated the role of grain orientation in the interaction and coalescence of non-coplanar HIC cracks through experimental analysis. HIC samples of pipeline steels (API 5L X46 and ASME-A106) were studied using automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The results showed that the microtexture can play a significant role in the coalescence of closely spaced non-coplanar HIC cracks. It was also found that the presence of cleavage planes and slip systems correctly oriented to the mixed-mode stresses can activate low-resistance transgranular paths along in which cracks can merge. It is demonstrated that crystallographic texture must be considered in developing predictive models for the study of the stepwise propagation of HIC cracking in pipeline steels.

  19. In vitro interactions of lymphocytes and cultured cells from beagles with plutonium-induced bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, M.E.; Lund, J.E.; Busch, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Cell cultures have been prepared from lung and bone tumors arising in beagle dogs following exposure to inhaled plutonium. Evaluation of the cultured cells by commonly applied criteria (i.e., cell morphology, lack of contact inhibitory mechanisms, cloning efficiency, growth in soft agar, and tumor production in vivo) indicated that tumor cells were being grown in culture. Blood leukocytes and peripheral lymphocytes from beagle dogs were tested for cytotoxic effects against several cell cultures. Lymphocytes from normal dogs or dogs with unrelated tumors would not kill the bone tumor cells unless monocytes (macrophage) were present, in which case the leukocyte preparation was capable of mounting de novo cytotoxic immune reactions after 3 to 5 days in culture. In contrast, the dogs with plutonium-induced bone tumors had circulating lymphocytes that appeared to have undergone presensitization to bone-tumor-distinctive antigens in vivo. Consequently these lymphocytes interacted with cultured cells promptly after encounter in vitro

  20. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic effects on the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe2 system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular...... interaction-induced binary chemical shift d, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor ?s, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis ?ll are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full...... is obtained for d and ?s in Xe2. For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other...

  1. Stress-induced cognitive dysfunction: hormone-neurotransmitter interactions in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Shansky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms and neural circuits that drive emotion and cognition are inextricably linked. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis as a result of stress or other causes of arousal initiates a flood of hormone and neurotransmitter release throughout the brain, affecting the way we think, decide, and behave. This review will focus on factors that influence the function of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, a brain region that governs higher-level cognitive processes and executive function. The PFC becomes markedly impaired by stress, producing measurable deficits in working memory. These deficits arise from the interaction of multiple neuromodulators, including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and gonadal hormones; here we will discuss the non- human primate and rodent literature that has furthered our understanding of the circuitry, receptors, and signaling cascades responsible for stress-induced prefrontal dysfunction.

  2. Curvature-Induced Bunch Self-Interaction for an Energy-Chirped Bunch in Magnetic Bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Li

    2008-01-01

    Within the realm of classical electrodynamics, the curvature-induced bunch collective interaction in magnetic bends can be studied using effective forces in the canonical formulation of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect. As an application of this canonical formulation, in this paper, for an electron distribution moving ultrarelativistically in a bending system, the dynamics of the particles in the distribution is derived from the Hamiltonian of the particles in terms of the bunch internal coordinates. The consequent Vlasov equation manifests explicitly how the phase-space distribution is perturbed by the effective CSR forces. In particular, we study the impact of an initial linear energy chirp of the bunch on the behavior of the effective longitudinal CSR force, which arises due to the modification of the retardation relation as a result of the energy-chirping-induced longitudinal-horizontal correlation of the bunch distribution (bunch tilt) in dispersive regions. Our study demonstrates clearly the time delay (or retardation) of the behavior of the effective longitudinal CSR force on a bunch in responding to the change of the bunch length in a magnetic bend. Our result also shows that the effective longitudinal CSR force for a bunch under full compression can have sensitive dependence on the transverse position of the test particle in the bunch for certain parameter regimes

  3. Antinociceptive interaction between benfotiamine and resveratrol in capsaicin-induced licking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Reyes-García, Gerardo; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco; Déciga-Campos, Myrna

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to provide more direct evidence concerning the possible antinociceptive effect of resveratrol-benfotiamine combination on neurogenic pain, we investigated whether resveratrol and benfotiamine administered alone or in combination decrease capsaicin induced nociception in mice. Before testing, the animals were placed individually in transparent glass cylinders, 20 cm in diameter, serving as observation chambers. After the adaptation period, 20 microL of capsaicin (1.6 microg/paw) were injected under the skin of the dorsal of the right hind paw. Animals were observed individually for 5 min after capsaicin injection. The amount of time spent licking the injected paw was timed with a chronometer and was considered as indicative of nociception. Animals were pretreated with resveratrol (56.2-177 mg/kg, i.p.), benfotiamine (100-1000 mg/kg, p.o.) and their combinations (11:1, 22:2, 44:4; 88:8 mg/kg benfotiamine:resveratrol). It was observed that resveratrol (ED50 = 104 +/- 8.2 mg/kg) was able to produce more important decrement of capsaicin-induced licking than benfotiamine (ED50 = 529.4 +/- 85.2 mg/kg). In addition, a synergistic interaction was observed between benfotiamine and resveratrol, suggesting that this combination could be useful in neurogenic nociception.

  4. Investigating the potassium interactions with the palytoxin induced channels in Na+/K+ pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Antônio M; Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Infantosi, Antonio F C; Teixeira, Hewerson Z; Duarte, Mário A

    2009-02-01

    K(+) has been appointed as the main physiological inhibitor of the palytoxin (PTX) effect on the Na(+)/K(+) pump. This toxin acts opening monovalent cationic channels through the Na(+)/K(+) pump. We investigate, by means of computational modeling, the kinetic mechanisms related with K(+) interacting with the complex PTX-Na(+)/K(+) pump. First, a reaction model, with structure similar to Albers-Post model, describing the functional cycle of the pump, was proposed for describing K(+) interference on the complex PTX-Na(+)/K(+) pump in the presence of intracellular ATP. A mathematic model was derived from the reaction model and it was possible to solve numerically the associated differential equations and to simulate experimental maneuvers about the PTX induced currents in the presence of K(+) in the intra- and extracellular space as well as ATP in the intracellular. After the model adjusting to the experimental data, a Monte Carlo method for sensitivity analysis was used to analyze how each reaction parameter acts during each experimental maneuver involving PTX. For ATP and K(+) concentrations conditions, the simulations suggest that the enzyme substate with ATP bound to its high-affinity sites is the main substate for the PTX binding. The activation rate of the induced current is limited by the K(+) deocclusion from the PTX-Na(+)/K(+) pump complex. The K(+) occlusion in the PTX induced channels in the enzymes with ATP bound to its low-affinity sites is the main mechanism responsible for the reduction of the enzyme affinity to PTX.

  5. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles and tritrophic interactions across spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma, Yavanna; Bianchi, Felix J J A; van der Werf, Wopke; Poelman, Erik H; Dicke, Marcel

    2017-12-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are an important cue used in herbivore location by carnivorous arthropods such as parasitoids. The effects of plant volatiles on parasitoids have been well characterised at small spatial scales, but little research has been done on their effects at larger spatial scales. The spatial matrix of volatiles ('volatile mosaic') within which parasitoids locate their hosts is dynamic and heterogeneous. It is shaped by the spatial pattern of HIPV-emitting plants, the concentration, chemical composition and breakdown of the emitted HIPV blends, and by environmental factors such as wind, turbulence and vegetation that affect transport and mixing of odour plumes. The volatile mosaic may be exploited differentially by different parasitoid species, in relation to species traits such as sensory ability to perceive volatiles and the physical ability to move towards the source. Understanding how HIPVs influence parasitoids at larger spatial scales is crucial for our understanding of tritrophic interactions and sustainable pest management in agriculture. However, there is a large gap in our knowledge on how volatiles influence the process of host location by parasitoids at the landscape scale. Future studies should bridge the gap between the chemical and behavioural ecology of tritrophic interactions and landscape ecology. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Oxidative stress/damage induces multimerization and interaction of Fanconi anemia proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Jung; Ciccone, Samantha L M; Beck, Brian D; Hwang, Byounghoon; Freie, Brian; Clapp, D Wade; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2004-07-16

    Fanconi anemia (FANC) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by a hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, chromosomal instability, and defective DNA repair. Eight FANC genes have been identified so far, and five of them (FANCA, -C, -E, -F, and -G) assemble in a multinuclear complex and function at least in part in a complex to activate FANCD2 by monoubiquitination. Here we show that FANCA and FANCG are redox-sensitive proteins that are multimerized and/or form a nuclear complex in response to oxidative stress/damage. Both FANCA and FANCG proteins exist as monomers under non-oxidizing conditions, whereas they become multimers following H2O2 treatment. Treatment of cells with oxidizing agent not only triggers the multimeric complex of FANCA and FANCG in vivo but also induces the interaction between FANCA and FANCG. N-Ethylmaleimide treatment abolishes multimerization and interaction of FANCA and FANCG in vitro. Taken together, our results lead us to conclude that FANCA and FANCG uniquely respond to oxidative damage by forming complex(es) via intermolecular disulfide linkage(s), which may be crucial in forming such complexes and in determining their function.

  7. Human stefin B role in cell's response to misfolded proteins and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Polajnar

    Full Text Available Alternative functions, apart from cathepsins inhibition, are being discovered for stefin B. Here, we investigate its role in vesicular trafficking and autophagy. Astrocytes isolated from stefin B knock-out (KO mice exhibited an increased level of protein aggregates scattered throughout the cytoplasm. Addition of stefin B monomers or small oligomers to the cell medium reverted this phenotype, as imaged by confocal microscopy. To monitor the identity of proteins embedded within aggregates in wild type (wt and KO cells, the insoluble cell lysate fractions were isolated and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Chaperones, tubulins, dyneins, and proteosomal components were detected in the insoluble fraction of wt cells but not in KO aggregates. In contrast, the insoluble fraction of KO cells exhibited increased levels of apolipoprotein E, fibronectin, clusterin, major prion protein, and serpins H1 and I2 and some proteins of lysosomal origin, such as cathepsin D and CD63, relative to wt astrocytes. Analysis of autophagy activity demonstrated that this pathway was less functional in KO astrocytes. In addition, synthetic dosage lethality (SDL gene interactions analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing human stefin B suggests a role in transport of vesicles and vacuoles These activities would contribute, directly or indirectly to completion of autophagy in wt astrocytes and would account for the accumulation of protein aggregates in KO cells, since autophagy is a key pathway for the clearance of intracellular protein aggregates.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Adnan

    Full Text Available Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD, to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon, to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail A subunit can, within 2-4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF mutant (5-10x, F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (<10x, cell surface expression (20x and chloride transport (2x in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x, another ERAD-exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Humaira; Zhang, Zhenbo; Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth; Lingwood, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2-4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD-exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases.

  10. Pregabalin- and azithromycin-induced rhabdomyolysis with purpura: An unrecognized interaction: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Onodera, Kazuhiko; Higuchi, Mineko; Kato, Kimitaka; Kato, Yurina; Tsutsui, Masato; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis associated with the use of pregabalin or azithromycin has been demonstrated to be a rare but potentially life-threatening adverse event. Here, we report an extremely rare case of rhabdomyolysis with purpura in a patient who had used pregabalin and azithromycin. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman with a history of fibromyalgia who was admitted with mild limb weakness and lower abdominal purpura. She was prescribed pregabalin (75mg, twice daily) for almost 3 months to treat chronic back pain. Her medical history revealed that 3days before admission, she began experiencing acute bronchitis and was treated with a single dose of azithromycin (500mg). She had developed rapid onset severe myalgia, mild whole body edema, muscle weakness leading to gait instability, abdominal purpura and tender purpura on the lower extremities. Laboratory values included a white blood cell count of 25,400/mL and a creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) concentration of 1250 IU/L. Based on these findings and the patient's clinical history, a diagnosis of pregabalin- and azithromycin-induced rhabdomyolysis was made. The long-term use of pregabalin and the initiation azithromycin therapy followed by a rapid onset of rhabdomyolysis is indicative of a drug interaction between pregabalin and azithromycin. We report an extremely rare case of rhabdomyolysis with purpura caused by a drug interaction between pregabalin and azithromycin. However, the mechanisms of the interactions between azithromycin on the pregabalin are still unknown. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Collision-induced absorption with exchange effects and anisotropic interactions: theory and application to H2 - H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karman, Tijs; van der Avoird, Ad; Groenenboom, Gerrit C

    2015-02-28

    We discuss three quantum mechanical formalisms for calculating collision-induced absorption spectra. First, we revisit the established theory of collision-induced absorption, assuming distinguishable molecules which interact isotropically. Then, the theory is rederived incorporating exchange effects between indistinguishable molecules. It is shown that the spectrum can no longer be written as an incoherent sum of the contributions of the different spherical components of the dipole moment. Finally, we derive an efficient method to include the effects of anisotropic interactions in the computation of the absorption spectrum. This method calculates the dipole coupling on-the-fly, which allows for the uncoupled treatment of the initial and final states without the explicit reconstruction of the many-component wave functions. The three formalisms are applied to the collision-induced rotation-translation spectra of hydrogen molecules in the far-infrared. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained. Significant effects of anisotropic interactions are observed in the far wing.

  12. No interaction between X-ray induced lesions in maternal and paternal chromosomes in inseminated eggs of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuergler, F.E.; Graf, U.; Jeanneret, P.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray induced premutational lesions persist in mature gametes of drosophila until fertilization. Repairable lesions in sperm and oocyte chromosomes are repaired exclusively by maternal repair systems in the inseminated egg. Interactions between irradiated genomes in inseminated eggs might result in additional lethality if breaks induced in separate nuclei, which would normally be repaired, could interact to form dicentric chromosomes. Adult drosophila flies were X-irradiated (up to 5 kR), individual females crossed to three or four males, and the dose-response curves for dominant lethals (embryonic lethality) compared. The results indicate thet the potentially lethal damage present in irradiated sperm chromosomes was expressed independently of whether or not the oocyte was also irradiated. There were no (or only very few) interactions between maternal and paternal chromosome complements, and the maternal repair systems acting on radiation-induced chromosome breaks in sperm were resistant to X-rays. (U.K.)

  13. Interaction of processes may explain induced seismicity after shut-in in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Silvia; Carrera, Jesus; Vilarrasa, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Deep fluid injection is a necessary operation in several engineering sectors, like geothermal energy production, natural gas storage, CO2 storage, etc. The seismicity associated to these activities has, in some occasions, reached unexpected magnitude, raising public concern. Moreover, the occurrence of such seismicity after the injection shut-in pointed out the incompleteness of the knowledge and the inability of fully managing these processes. On the other hand, the growing attention toward clean energy makes it clear that we cannot abandon these procedures, which have a huge potential. Therefore, deeply understanding the mechanisms that induce seismicity is crucial. In this study we consider hydraulic stimulation of deep geothermal systems and analyze the mechanisms that may induce or trigger seismicity. Given that the basic mechanism is fluid pressure increase, secondary triggering processes have been studied. In detail, we attempt to identify the potential mechanisms that may trigger seismicity in the post-injection phase, when the overpressure decreases. These mechanisms have been investigated with a coupled and uncoupled approach, in order to understand the individual effects of each one and the effects of the interactions between them on the reservoir stability. Besides fluid overpressure, another relevant process is the temperature variation. Indeed, in the case of enhanced geothermal systems, the temperature contrast between the injected cold fluid and the deep hot reservoir is great and induces thermal stress, which sensibly affects the in-situ stress field. Therefore, we have studied overpressure and temperature effects by means of analytic solutions and by means of hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-mechanical numerical simulations. Results show that in fractured rocks the spatial variability of hydraulic and mechanic parameters provokes no isotropic variation of the tensional field, in response to pressure and temperature perturbations. Another

  14. Wolbachia-induced paternal defect in Drosophila is likely by interaction with the juvenile hormone pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Xiong, En-Juan; Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Lin-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many insect species. They can manipulate the host's reproduction to increase their own maternal transmission. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, which is expressed as embryonic lethality when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females. However, matings between males and females carrying the same Wolbachia strain result in viable progeny. The molecular mechanisms of CI are currently not clear. We have previously reported that the gene Juvenile hormone-inducible protein 26 (JhI-26) exhibited the highest upregulation in the 3rd instar larval testes of Drosophila melanogaster when infected by Wolbachia. This is reminiscent of an interaction between Wolbachia and juvenile hormone (JH) pathway in flies. Considering that Jhamt gene encodes JH acid methyltransferase, a key regulatory enzyme of JH biosynthesis, and that methoprene-tolerant (Met) has been regarded as the best JH receptor candidate, we first compared the expression of Jhamt and Met between Wolbachia-infected and uninfected fly testes to investigate whether Wolbachia infection influence the JH signaling pathway. We found that the expressions of Jhamt and Met were significantly increased in the presence of Wolbachia, suggesting an interaction of Wolbachia with the JH signaling pathway. Then, we found that overexpression of JhI-26 in Wolbachia-free transgenic male flies caused paternal-effect lethality that mimics the defects associated with CI. JhI-26 overexpressing males resulted in significantly decrease in hatch rate. Surprisingly, Wolbachia-infected females could rescue the egg hatch. In addition, we showed that overexpression of JhI-26 caused upregulation of the male accessory gland protein (Acp) gene CG10433, but not vice versa. This result suggests that JhI-26 may function at the upstream of CG10433. Likewise, overexpression of CG10433 also resulted in paternal-effect lethality. Both JhI-26 and CG10433 overexpressing males

  15. Synthesis of N-(Methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas and Evaluation of Their Interaction with Inducible and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Threadgill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two isomeric N-(methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas were synthesised by a sequence of radical bromination of methylthiophenecarboxylic esters, substitution with trifluoroacetamide anion, deprotection, formation of the corresponding isothiocyanates and addition of ammonia. The interaction of these new thiophene-based thioureas with inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase was evaluauted. These novel thienylmethylthioureas stimulated the activity of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS.

  16. Functional Rescue of a Misfolded Drosophila melanogaster Dopamine Transporter Mutant Associated with a Sleepless Phenotype by Pharmacological Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasture, Ameya; El-Kasaby, Ali; Szöllősi, Daniel; Asjad, H M Mazhar; Grimm, Alexandra; Stockner, Thomas; Hummel, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2016-09-30

    Folding-defective mutants of the human dopamine transporter (DAT) cause a syndrome of infantile dystonia/parkinsonism. Here, we provide a proof-of-principle that the folding deficit is amenable to correction in vivo by two means, the cognate DAT ligand noribogaine and the HSP70 inhibitor, pifithrin-μ. We examined the Drosophila melanogaster (d) mutant dDAT-G108Q, which leads to a sleepless phenotype in flies harboring this mutation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested an unstable structure of dDAT-G108Q consistent with a folding defect. This conjecture was verified; heterologously expressed dDAT-G108Q and the human (h) equivalent hDAT-G140Q were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum in a complex with endogenous folding sensors (calnexin and HSP70-1A). Incubation of the cells with noribogaine (a DAT ligand selective for the inward-facing state) and/or pifithrin-μ (an HSP70 inhibitor) restored folding of, and hence dopamine transport by, dDAT-G108Q and hDAT-G140Q. The mutated versions of DAT were confined to the cell bodies of the dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain and failed to reach the axonal compartments. Axonal delivery was restored, and sleep time was increased to normal length (from 300 to 1000 min/day) if the dDAT-G108Q-expressing flies were treated with noribogaine and/or pifithrin-μ. Rescuing misfolded versions of DAT by pharmacochaperoning is of therapeutic interest; it may provide opportunities to remedy disorders arising from folding-defective mutants of human DAT and of other related SLC6 transporters. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The Bcl-2-Beclin 1 interaction in (-)-gossypol-induced autophagy versus apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiqin; Karnak, David; Xu, Liang

    2010-11-01

    Bcl-2 is a key dual regulator of autophagy and apoptosis, but how the level of Bcl-2 influences the cellular decision between autophagy and apoptosis is unclear. The natural BH3-mimetic (-)-gossypol preferentially induces autophagy in androgen-independent (AI) prostate cancer cells that have high levels of Bcl-2 and are resistant to apoptosis, whereas apoptosis is preferentially induced in androgen-dependent or -independent cells with low Bcl-2. (-)-Gossypol induces autophagy via blocking Bcl-2-Beclin 1 interaction at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), together with downregulating Bcl-2, upregulating Beclin 1 and activating the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, (-)-gossypol-induced autophagy is Beclin 1- and Atg5-dependent. These results provide new insights into the mode of cell death induced by Bcl-2 inhibitors, which could facilitate the rational design of clinical trials by selecting patients who are most likely to benefit from the Bcl-2-targeted molecular therapy.

  18. Comparison of electromagnetically induced transparency schemes in semiconductor quantum dot structures: Impact of many-body interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmark-Nielsen, Jakob; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    an important impact on the slow light properties. In the case of the Lambda and V schemes, the minimum required coupling power to achieve slow light is significantly reduced by many-body interactions. V type schemes are found to be generally preferable due to a favorable redistribution of carriers in energy......We investigate the impact of many-body interactions on group-velocity slowdown achieved via electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum dots using three different coupling-probe schemes (ladder, V, and Lambda, respectively). We find that for all schemes many-body interactions have...

  19. Cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the central amygdala induces antinociception in the guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite-Panissi C.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA in the modulation of defensive behavior and in antinociceptive regulation. In a previous study, we demonstrated the existence of a cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the CEA, modulating the defensive response of tonic immobility in guinea pigs. In the present study, we investigated a similar interaction in the CEA, but now involved in the regulation of the nociceptive response. Microinjection of carbachol (2.7 nmol and morphine (2.2 nmol into the CEA promoted antinociception up to 45 min after microinjection in guinea pigs as determined by a decrease in the vocalization index in the vocalization test. This test consists of the application of a peripheral noxious stimulus (electric shock into the subcutaneous region of the thigh that provokes the emission of a vocalization response by the animal. Furthermore, the present results demonstrated that the antinociceptive effect of carbachol (2.7 nmol; N = 10 was blocked by previous administration of atropine (0.7 nmol; N = 7 or naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 7 into the same site. In addition, the decrease in the vocalization index induced by the microinjection of morphine (2.2 nmol; N = 9 into the CEA was prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 11. All sites of injection were confirmed by histology. These results indicate the involvement of the cholinergic and opioidergic systems of the CEA in the modulation of antinociception in guinea pigs. In addition, the present study suggests that cholinergic transmission may activate the release of endorphins/enkephalins from interneurons of the CEA, resulting in antinociception.

  20. A direct pedestrian-structure interaction model to characterize the human induced vibrations on slender footbridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Alonso, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the scientific community had knowledge of the human induced vibration problems in structures since the end of the 19th century, it was not until the occurrence of the vibration phenomenon happened in the Millennium Bridge (London, 2000 that the importance of the problem revealed and a higher level of attention devoted. Despite the large advances achieved in the determination of the human-structure interaction force, one of the main deficiencies of the existing models is the exclusion of the effect of changes in the footbridge dynamic properties due to the presence of pedestrians. In this paper, the formulation of a human-structure interaction model, addresses these limitations, is carried out and its reliability is verified from previously published experimental results.Aunque la comunidad científica tenía conocimiento de los problemas vibratorios inducidos por peatones en estructuras desde finales del siglo xix, no fue hasta la ocurrencia de los eventos vibratorios acontecidos en la pasarela del Milenio (Londres, 2000, cuando la importancia del problema se puso de manifiesto y se le comenzó a dedicar un mayor nivel de atención. A pesar de los grandes avances alcanzados en la caracterización de la fuerza de interacción peatón-estructura una de las principales deficiencias de los modelos existentes es la exclusión del cambio en las propiedades dinámicas de la pasarela por la presencia de peatones. En este artículo, se presenta la formulación de un modelo de interacción peatón-estructura que intenta dar respuesta a dichas limitaciones, y su validación a partir de resultados experimentales previamente publicados por otros autores.

  1. Interaction-induced light scattering in a fullerene surrounded by an ultrathin argon 'atmosphere': Molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawid, A.; Gburski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Using the molecular dynamics method, we have calculated the interaction-induced polarizability correlation functions and spectra of the depolarized light scattering in a C 60 fullerene molecule surrounded by an argon atmosphere. The liquid phase of (C 60 )Ar n (n=36, 40, 44) system has been studied

  2. Continuum contribution to excitonic four-wave mixing due to interaction-induced nonlinearities: A numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, Karim El; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1997-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of ultrafast transient four-wave mixing (FWM) of GaAs quantum wells for coherent excitation of excitons and a large number of continuum states. It is shown that in this case the line shape of the FWM signal is drastically altered due to an interaction-induce...

  3. Seismic induced nonlinear rotor-bearing-casing interaction of rotating nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, F.K.; Padovan, J.; Li, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    The study of the dynamics of turbomachinery during seismic events has been of continuous interest to both researchers and designers of large rotating equipment. Failure in such equipment, especially those associated with nuclear power generation, can lead to catastrophic consequences. Hence, there is a general trend for corporations to overdesign the equipment without any indepth understanding of the dynamical performance of the machine under extreme operating conditions. The overall objective of this paper are fourfold, namely: (1) To study the nonlinear dynamics of rotor-bearing casing system during rub interactions; (2) To examine the effects of suddenly induced imbalance and base motion in the global dynamical behavior of the system; (3) To develop engineering insights through the modal parameters in both time and frequency domain; (4) To generate signature analysis on rub forces for pattern recognition. These goals are achieved through the development of a modal impact model. Accuracy and efficiency of this transient model are maintained using a self-adaptive integration scheme

  4. Interacting Effects Induced by Two Neighboring Pits Considering Relative Position Parameters and Pit Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfang Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For pre-corroded aluminum alloy 7075-T6, the interacting effects of two neighboring pits on the stress concentration are comprehensively analyzed by considering various relative position parameters (inclination angle θ and dimensionless spacing parameter λ and pit depth (d with the finite element method. According to the severity of the stress concentration, the critical corrosion regions, bearing high susceptibility to fatigue damage, are determined for intersecting and adjacent pits, respectively. A straightforward approach is accordingly proposed to conservatively estimate the combined stress concentration factor induced by two neighboring pits, and a concrete application example is presented. It is found that for intersecting pits, the normalized stress concentration factor Ktnor increases with the increase of θ and λ and always reaches its maximum at θ = 90°, yet for adjacent pits, Ktnor decreases with the increase of λ and the maximum value appears at a slight asymmetric location. The simulations reveal that Ktnor follows a linear and an exponential relationship with the dimensionless depth parameter Rd for intersecting and adjacent cases, respectively.

  5. Analysis of Pressure Pulsation Induced by Rotor-Stator Interaction in Nuclear Reactor Coolant Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal flow of reactor coolant pump (RCP is much more complex than the flow of a general mixed-flow pump due to high temperature, high pressure, and large flow rate. The pressure pulsation that is induced by rotor-stator interaction (RSI has significant effects on the performance of pump; therefore, it is necessary to figure out the distribution and propagation characteristics of pressure pulsation in the pump. The study uses CFD method to calculate the behavior of the flow. Results show that the amplitudes of pressure pulsation get the maximum between the rotor and stator, and the dissipation rate of pressure pulsation in impellers passage is larger than that in guide vanes passage. The behavior is associated with the frequency of pressure wave in different regions. The flow rate distribution is influenced by the operating conditions. The study finds that, at nominal flow, the flow rate distribution in guide vanes is relatively uniform and the pressure pulsation amplitude is the smallest. Besides, the vortex shedding or backflow from the impeller blade exit has the same frequency as pressure pulsation but there are phase differences, and it has been confirmed that the absolute value of phase differences reflects the vorticity intensity.

  6. Propagation of the state change induced by external forces in local interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianjun; Tokinaga, Shozo

    2016-10-01

    This paper analyses the propagation of the state changes of agents that are induced by external forces applied to a plane. In addition, we propose two models for the behavior of the agents placed on a lattice plane, both of which are affected by local interactions. We first assume that agents are allowed to move to another site to maximise their satisfaction. Second, we utilise a model in which the agents choose activities on each site. The results show that the migration (activity) patterns of agents in both models achieve stability without any external forces. However, when we apply an impulsive external force to the state of the agents, we then observe the propagation of the changes in the agents' states. Using simulation studies, we show the conditions for the propagation of the state changes of the agents. We also show the propagation of the state changes of the agents allocated in scale-free networks and discuss the estimation of the agents' decisions in real state changes. Finally, we discuss the estimation of the agents' decisions in real state temporal changes using economic and social data from Japan and the United States.

  7. The Pathogenesis of Human Cervical Epithelium Cells Induced by Interacting with Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Chen; Chang, Wei-Ting; Chang, Tsuey-Yu; Shin, Jyh-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in the urogenital-vaginal tract and is the primary causative agent of trichomoniasis, a common sexually transmitted disease in humans. The aggregation of this protozoan tends to destroy epithelial cells and induce pathogenesis. Principal Findings This study cultured T. vaginalis and human cervical epithelial cells (Z172) under the same conditions in the experiments. Following co-culturing for ten hours, the protozoans became attached to Z172, such that the cells presented a round shape and underwent shrinkage. Time-lapse recording and flow cytometry on interacted Z172 revealed that 70% had been disrupted, 18% presented a necrosis-like morphology and 8% showed signs of apoptosis. Gene expression profiling revealed in the seven inflammatory Z172 genes as well as in T. vaginalis genes that code for adhesion proteins 65 and 65-1. Significance These results suggest that cytopathogenic effects progress while Z172 is in contact with T. vaginalis, and the resulting morphological changes can be categorized as disruption. PMID:25901354

  8. Production of slow particle in 1.7 AGeV 84Kr induced emulsion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiling; Zhang Donghai; Li Xueqin; Jia Huiming

    2008-01-01

    The production of slow particle in 1.7 AGeV 84 Kr induced emulsion interaction was studied. The experimental results show that the average multiplicity of black, grey and heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of impact centrality and target size. The average multiplicity of grey track particle and heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of the number of black track particle. The average multiplicity of heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of the number of grey track particle, but average multiplicity of black track particle increases with the increase of the number of grey track particle and then saturated. The average multiplicity of grey track particle increases with the increase of the number of heavily ionized track particle, but average multiplicity of black track particle increases with the increase of the number of heavily ionized track particle and then saturated. Those experimental results can be well explained by using the nuclear impact geometry model. (authors)

  9. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  10. Resonance energy transfer (RET)-Induced intermolecular pairing force: a tunable weak interaction and its application in SWNT separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Chen, Hui; Wang, Wei Zhi; Ng, Siu Choon; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2011-07-21

    This paper explores evidence of an optically mediated interaction that is active in the separation mechanism of certain selective agents through consideration of the contrasting selective behaviors of two conjugated polymers with distinct optical properties. The involvement of a RET-induced intermolecular pairing force is implied by the different illumination response behaviors. The magnitude of this interaction scales with the external stimulus parameter, the illumination irradiance (I), and thus is tunable. This suggests a facile technique to modify the selectivity of polymers toward specific SWNT species by altering the polymer structure to adjust the corresponding intermolecular interaction. This is the first experimental verification and application of a RET-induced intermolecular pairing force to SWNT separation. With this kind of interaction taken into account, reasonable interpretation of some conflicting data, especially PLE maps, can be easily made. The above conclusion can be applied to other substances as long as they are electrically neutral and there is photon-induced RET between them. The significant magnitude of this interaction makes direct manipulation of molecules/particles possible and is expected to have applications in molecular engineering. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Topology of surfaces for molecular Stark energy, alignment, and orientation generated by combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Burkhard; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2014-02-14

    We show that combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions of linear polar and polarizable molecules with collinear electric fields lead to a sui generis topology of the corresponding Stark energy surfaces and of other observables - such as alignment and orientation cosines - in the plane spanned by the permanent and induced dipole interaction parameters. We find that the loci of the intersections of the surfaces can be traced analytically and that the eigenstates as well as the number of their intersections can be characterized by a single integer index. The value of the index, distinctive for a particular ratio of the interaction parameters, brings out a close kinship with the eigenproperties obtained previously for a class of Stark states via the apparatus of supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  12. Topology of surfaces for molecular Stark energy, alignment, and orientation generated by combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Burkhard, E-mail: burkhard.schmidt@fu-berlin.de [Institute for Mathematics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Friedrich, Bretislav, E-mail: brich@fhi-berlin.mpg.de [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-14

    We show that combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions of linear polar and polarizable molecules with collinear electric fields lead to a sui generis topology of the corresponding Stark energy surfaces and of other observables – such as alignment and orientation cosines – in the plane spanned by the permanent and induced dipole interaction parameters. We find that the loci of the intersections of the surfaces can be traced analytically and that the eigenstates as well as the number of their intersections can be characterized by a single integer index. The value of the index, distinctive for a particular ratio of the interaction parameters, brings out a close kinship with the eigenproperties obtained previously for a class of Stark states via the apparatus of supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  13. Gas-water-rock interactions induced by reservoir exploitation, CO2 sequestration, and other geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecourtier, J.

    2005-01-01

    Here is given a summary of the opening address of the IFP International Workshop: 'gas-water-rock interactions induced by reservoir exploitation, CO 2 sequestration, and other geological storage' (18-20 November 2003). 'This broad topic is of major interest to the exploitation of geological sites since gas-water-mineral interactions determine the physicochemical characteristics of these sites, the strategies to adopt to protect the environment, and finally, the operational costs. Modelling the phenomena is a prerequisite for the engineering of a geological storage, either for disposal efficiency or for risk assessment and environmental protection. During the various sessions, several papers focus on the great achievements that have been made in the last ten years in understanding and modelling the coupled reaction and transport processes occurring in geological systems, from borehole to reservoir scale. Remaining challenges such as the coupling of mechanical processes of deformation with chemical reactions, or the influence of microbiological environments on mineral reactions will also be discussed. A large part of the conference programme will address the problem of mitigating CO 2 emissions, one of the most important issues that our society must solve in the coming years. From both a technical and an economic point of view, CO 2 geological sequestration is the most realistic solution proposed by the experts today. The results of ongoing pilot operations conducted in Europe and in the United States are strongly encouraging, but geological storage will be developed on a large scale in the future only if it becomes possible to predict the long term behaviour of stored CO 2 underground. In order to reach this objective, numerous issues must be solved: - thermodynamics of CO 2 in brines; - mechanisms of CO 2 trapping inside the host rock; - geochemical modelling of CO 2 behaviour in various types of geological formations; - compatibility of CO 2 with oil-well cements

  14. Offspring reaction norms shaped by parental environment: interaction between within- and trans-generational plasticity of inducible defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquet, Emilien; Tariel, Juliette

    2016-10-12

    Within-generational plasticity (WGP) and transgenerational plasticity (TGP) are mechanisms allowing rapid adaptive responses to fluctuating environments without genetic change. These forms of plasticity have often been viewed as independent processes. Recent evidence suggests that WGP is altered by the environmental conditions experienced by previous generations (i.e., TGP). In the context of inducible defenses, one of the most studied cases of plasticity, the WGP x TGP interaction has been poorly investigated. We provide evidence that TGP can alter the reaction norms of inducible defenses in a freshwater snail. The WGP x TGP interaction patterns are trait-specific and lead to decreased slope of reaction norms (behaviour and shell thickness). Offspring from induced parents showed a higher predator avoidance behaviour and a thicker shell than snails from non-induced parents in no predator-cue environment while they reached similar defenses in predator-cue environment. The WGP x TGP interaction further lead to a switch from a plastic towards a constitutive expression of defenses for shell dimensions (flat reaction norm). WGP-alteration by TGP may shape the adaptive responses to environmental change and then has a substantial importance to understand the evolution of plasticity.

  15. BISPHENOL A EXPOSURE DURING EARLY DEVELOPMENT INDUCES SEX-SPECIFIC CHANGES IN ADULT ZEBRAFISH SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniel N.; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Hoke, Elizabeth S.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental bisphenol A (BPA) exposure is associated with adverse behavioral effects, although underlying modes of action remain unclear. Because BPA is a suspected xenoestrogen, the objective was to identify sex-based changes in adult zebrafish social behavior developmentally exposed to BPA (0.0, 0.1 or 1 μM) or one of two control compounds (0.1μM 17β-estradiol [E2], and 0.1 μM GSK4716, a synthetic estrogen-related receptor γ ligand). A test chamber was divided lengthwise so each arena held one fish unable to detect the presence of the other fish. A mirror was inserted at one end of each arena; baseline activity levels were determined without mirror. Arenas were divided into 3, computer-generated zones to represent different distances from mirror image. Circadian rhythm patterns were evaluated at 1–3 (= AM) and 5–8 (= PM) hr postprandial. Adult zebrafish were placed into arenas and monitored by digital camera for 5 min. Total distance traveled, % time spent at mirror image, and number of attacks on mirror image were quantified. E2, GSK4716, and all BPA treatments dampened male activity and altered male circadian activity patterns; there was no marked effect on female activity. BPA induced non-monotonic effects (response curve changes direction within range of concentrations examined) on male % time at mirror only in AM. All treatments produced increased % time at the mirror during PM. Male attacks on the mirror were reduced by BPA exposure only during AM. There were sex-specific effects of developmental BPA on social interactions and time-of-day of observation affected results. PMID:25424546

  16. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, KM [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Steefel, Carl I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Sharon, I [University of California, Berkeley; Williams, Ken [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Miller, CS [University of California, Berkeley; Frischkorn, Kyle C [University of California, Berkeley; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Thomas, Brian [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Long, Phil [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used community proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer. Genomic sequences from the community recovered during microbial sulfate reduction were used to econstruct, de novo, near-complete genomes for Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria) and relatives of Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas (Epsilonproteobacteria), and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen-fixation (Nif) and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results suggest less abundant Desulfuromonadales and Bacteroidetes also actively contributed to CO2 production via the TCA cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. Modeling shows that this reaction was thermodynamically possible, and kinetically favorable relative to acetate-dependent denitrification. We conclude that high-levels of carbon amendment aimed to stimulate anaerobic heterotrophy led to carbon fixation in co-dependent chemoautotrophs. These results have implications for understanding complex ecosystem behavior, and show that high levels of organic carbon supplementation can expand the range of microbial functionalities accessible for ecosystem manipulation.

  17. Bifidobacterium breve - HT-29 cell line interaction: modulation of TNF-α induced gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, R J; Schuren, F H J; Willemsen, L E M; Vriesema, A; Knol, J; De Vos, W M

    2011-06-01

    To provide insight in the molecular basis for intestinal host-microbe interactions, we determined the genome-wide transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells following exposure to cells of Bifidobacterium breve. To select an appropriate test system reflecting inflammatory conditions, the responsiveness to TNF-α was compared in T84, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. The highest TNF-α response was observed in HT-29 cells and this cell line was selected for exposure to the B. breve strains M-16V, NR246 and UCC2003. After one hour of bacterial pre-incubation followed by two hours of additional TNF-α stimulation, B. breve M-16V (86%), but to a much lesser extent strains NR246 (50%) or UCC2003 (32%), showed a strain-specific reduction of the HT-29 transcriptional response to the inflammatory treatment. The most important functional groups of genes that were transcriptionally suppressed by the presence of B. breve M-16V, were found to be involved in immune regulation and apoptotic processes. About 54% of the TNF-α induced genes were solely suppressed by the presence of B. breve M-16V. These included apoptosis-related cysteine protease caspase 7 (CASP7), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), amyloid beta (A4) precursor proteinbinding family A member 1 (APBA1), NADPH oxidase (NOX5), and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). The extracellular IL-8 concentration was determined by an immunological assay but did not change significantly, indicating that B. breve M-16V only partially modulates the TNF-α pathway. In conclusion, this study shows that B. breve strains modulate gene expression in HT-29 cells under inflammatory conditions in a strain-specific way.

  18. Radiation-induced structural transitions in composite materials with strong interaction of polymer components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaikin, Yu.A.; Koztaeva, U.P.

    2002-01-01

    In earlier papers the internal friction (IF) method was applied to studies of structural relaxation in different types of polymer-based composite materials (glass-cloth, paper-based and foiled laminates impregnated by epoxy and phenolic resins) irradiated by 2 MeV electrons in the dose range of 0.1-50.0 MGy. Selectivity and high sensibility of the internal friction method allowed to distinguish glassy transitions in different structural components of the composites. The relaxation processes observed were identified and attributed to structural alterations in the polymer filler, the binder and the boundary layers. It was shown that changes in the parameters of relaxation maximums during irradiation can be considered as quantitative characteristics for the degree of radiation-induced degradation or cross-linking of polymer molecules. This paper deals with specific features of IF spectra in paper-based laminates where both the filler fibers and the binder are strongly interacting polymers. Anisotropy of viscous and elastic properties is very weak for this kind of materials, so that IF measurements give nearly the same result independently on the filler fiber orientation in the sample. The main reasons for it are the rigid chain structure of fillers (polyethylene-terephthalate and cellulose) and the good adhesion strengthened by diffusion of the epoxy or phenolic binder to defect regions of the filler.The IF temperature dependence observed in paper-based laminates is represented by superposition of two very broad relaxation maximums associated with transitions from glassy to high-elastic state in structural components, each based on one of the polymers. The inflection points characteristic for IF temperature dependence in paper-based laminates give a reason to treat them as a superposition of α-peaks associated with transitions from glassy to high-elastic state in structural components of a composite based on the binder and the filler, respectively. Another

  19. "Interaction of different doses of Aspartame with Morphine-induced antinociception in the presence of MK-801, a NMDA antagonist "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the relative role of sweetness and comparative effects of different taste sensation of the non - caloric sweetener , aspartame on pain and its interaction with MK - 80] as a non - selective MMDA antagonist by formalin - test in mice. The formalin - test was chosen because it measures the response to a long - lasting nociceptive stimulus and closely resembles to the clinical pain. Morphine induced a dose dependent antinociception in the early and late phases of formalin test. Twelve days pretreatment of animals by aspartame ( 0.08% , 0.16% , 0.32% significantly potentiated morphine - induced (1.5-9 mg/kg analgesia in the early phase but significantly antagonized its analgesic effect in the late phase, dose dependently. Aspartame (0.16% alone showed a reduction in pain response . Naloxone (0.4 mg/kg significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effect of morphine in the presence of aspartame (0-0.32% in the early phase. Increasing the dose of aspartame decreased effects of naloxone. MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg as an N- Methyl - D - Aspartate (NMDA antagonist significantly potentiated the effect of aspartame on morphine - induced antinociception in the early phase. In the late phase, naloxone (0.4 mg/kg increased pain response but MK- 801 (0.1 mg/kg induced anti-inflammatory effect significantly. Treatment of animals with MK- 801 alone, significantly induced analgesia in both phases of formalin - test. This effect was potentiated with aspartame dose - dependently. Possible interaction of aspartame with NMDA receptors and its role to facilitate endogenous opioid system are proposed mechanisms of aspartame in modulating morphine - induced antinociception. Furthermore, the resulting association between morphine and aspartame chronic consumption may be explained as an interactive action rather than simple dose combination of both drugs.

  20. Pregabalin- and azithromycin-induced rhabdomyolysis with purpura: An unrecognized interaction: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kato, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We report an extremely rare case of rhabdomyolysis with purpura caused by a drug interaction between pregabalin and azithromycin. However, the mechanisms of the interactions between azithromycin on the pregabalin are still unknown.

  1. Pulse interactions in a quantum dot waveguide in the regime of electromagnetically Induced transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per; Nielsen, Henri; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of optical pulses in a quantum dot waveguide in the slow-light regime is investigated. Dipole oscillations lead to strong interactions between the two pulses, implying a minimum pulse separation for optical buffer applications.......The interaction of optical pulses in a quantum dot waveguide in the slow-light regime is investigated. Dipole oscillations lead to strong interactions between the two pulses, implying a minimum pulse separation for optical buffer applications....

  2. Do induced responses mediate the ecological interactions between the specialist herbivores and phytopathogens of an alpine plant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Gregory; Rahier, Martine; Naisbit, Russell E

    2011-05-04

    Plants are not passive victims of the myriad attackers that rely on them for nutrition. They have a suite of physical and chemical defences, and are even able to take advantage of the enemies of their enemies. These strategies are often only deployed upon attack, so may lead to indirect interactions between herbivores and phytopathogens. In this study we test for induced responses in wild populations of an alpine plant (Adenostyles alliariae) that possesses constitutive chemical defence (pyrrolizidine alkaloids) and specialist natural enemies (two species of leaf beetle, Oreina elongata and Oreina cacaliae, and the phytopathogenic rust Uromyces cacaliae). Plants were induced in the field using chemical elicitors of the jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathways and monitored for one month under natural conditions. There was evidence for induced resistance, with lower probability and later incidence of attack by beetles in JA-induced plants and of rust infection in SA-induced plants. We also demonstrate ecological cross-effects, with reduced fungal attack following JA-induction, and a cost of SA-induction arising from increased beetle attack. As a result, there is the potential for negative indirect effects of the beetles on the rust, while in the field the positive indirect effect of the rust on the beetles appears to be over-ridden by direct effects on plant nutritional quality. Such interactions resulting from induced susceptibility and resistance must be considered if we are to exploit plant defences for crop protection using hormone elicitors or constitutive expression. More generally, the fact that induced defences are even found in species that possess constitutively-expressed chemical defence suggests that they may be ubiquitous in higher plants.

  3. Do induced responses mediate the ecological interactions between the specialist herbivores and phytopathogens of an alpine plant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Röder

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants are not passive victims of the myriad attackers that rely on them for nutrition. They have a suite of physical and chemical defences, and are even able to take advantage of the enemies of their enemies. These strategies are often only deployed upon attack, so may lead to indirect interactions between herbivores and phytopathogens. In this study we test for induced responses in wild populations of an alpine plant (Adenostyles alliariae that possesses constitutive chemical defence (pyrrolizidine alkaloids and specialist natural enemies (two species of leaf beetle, Oreina elongata and Oreina cacaliae, and the phytopathogenic rust Uromyces cacaliae. Plants were induced in the field using chemical elicitors of the jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA pathways and monitored for one month under natural conditions. There was evidence for induced resistance, with lower probability and later incidence of attack by beetles in JA-induced plants and of rust infection in SA-induced plants. We also demonstrate ecological cross-effects, with reduced fungal attack following JA-induction, and a cost of SA-induction arising from increased beetle attack. As a result, there is the potential for negative indirect effects of the beetles on the rust, while in the field the positive indirect effect of the rust on the beetles appears to be over-ridden by direct effects on plant nutritional quality. Such interactions resulting from induced susceptibility and resistance must be considered if we are to exploit plant defences for crop protection using hormone elicitors or constitutive expression. More generally, the fact that induced defences are even found in species that possess constitutively-expressed chemical defence suggests that they may be ubiquitous in higher plants.

  4. State-dependent interaction in the antihistamine-induced disruption of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1982-01-01

    Two experiments were run to evaluate the possibility that injection of antihistamine can produce a state-dependent acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion. In the first experiment, pretreating rats with the antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate prior to their initial exposure to sucrose and to low-level irradiation on the conditioning day did not prevent the acquisition of a taste aversion to sucrose when the antihistamine was also administered prior to a subsequent preference test. In the second experiment, rats were both conditioned and tested for a radiation-induced aversion in a drug-free state. Under these condtions, the rats continued to show an aversion to sucrose despite pretreating them with chlorpheniramine prior to irradiation. Since rats conditioned under the antihistamine do not show the radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion when tested for sucrose preference in a nondrug state, it would seem that pretreating rats with an antihistamine prior to conditioning affects only the retrieval of the previously learned response and not its acquisition

  5. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  6. A versatile interaction chamber for laser-based spectroscopic applications, with the emphasis on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotný, J.; Brada, M.; Petrilak, M.; Prochazka, D.; Novotný, K.; Hrdička, A.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-01-01

    The technical note describes the interaction chamber developed particularly for the laser spectroscopy technique applications, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Raman Spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Fluorescence. The chamber was designed in order to provide advanced possibilities for the research in mentioned fields and to facilitate routine research procedures. Parameters and the main benefits of the chamber are described, such as the built-in module for automatic 2D chemical mapping and the possibility to set different ambient gas conditions (pressure value and gas type). Together with the chamber description, selected LIBS application examples benefiting from chamber properties are described. - Highlights: • Development of the interaction chamber for LIBS applications • Example of automated chemical mapping of lead in a chalcopyrite sample • Example of LIBS measurement of fluorine in underpressure • Overview of chamber benefits

  7. Offspring reaction norms shaped by parental environment: interaction between within- and trans-generational plasticity of inducible defenses

    OpenAIRE

    Luquet, Emilien; Tariel, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Background Within-generational plasticity (WGP) and transgenerational plasticity (TGP) are mechanisms allowing rapid adaptive responses to fluctuating environments without genetic change. These forms of plasticity have often been viewed as independent processes. Recent evidence suggests that WGP is altered by the environmental conditions experienced by previous generations (i.e., TGP). In the context of inducible defenses, one of the most studied cases of plasticity, the WGP x TGP interaction...

  8. Energy, target, projectile and multiplicity dependences of intermittency behaviour in high energy O(Si,S) induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, M.I.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Chernyavski, M.M.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Larionova, V.G.; Maslennikova, N.V.; Orlova, G.I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Salmanova, N.A.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Ameeva, Z.U.; Andreeva, N.P.; Anzon, Z.V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Eligbaeva, G.Z.; Eremenko, G.Z.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Kalyachkina, G.S.; Kanygina, E.K.; Skakhova, C.I.; Bhalla, K.B.; Kumar, V.; Lal, P.; Lokanathan, S.; Mookerjee, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Burnett, T.H.; Grote, J.; Koss, T.; Lord, J.; Skelding, D.; Strausz, S.C.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cai, X.; Huang, H.; Liu, L.S.; Qian, W.Y.; Wang, H.Q.; Zhou, D.C.; Zhou, J.C.; Chernova, L.P.; Gadzhieva, S.I.; Gulamov, K.G.; Kadyrov, F.G.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Navotny, V.S.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Friedlander, E.M.; Heckman, H.H.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Garpman, S.; Jakobsson, B.; Otterlund, I.; Persson, S.; Soederstroem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Judek, B.; Nasyrov, S.H.; Petrov, N.V.; Xu, G.F.; Zheng, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Fluctuations of charged particles in high energy oxygen, silicon and sulphur induced interactions are investigated with the method of scaled factorial moments. It is found that for decreasing bin size down to δη∝0.1 the EMU01 data exhibits intermittent behaviour. The intermittency indexes are found to decrease with increasing incident energy and multiplicity and to increase with increasing target mass. It seems also to increase as the projectile mass increases. (orig.)

  9. Glucose Metabolism and AMPK Signaling Regulate Dopaminergic Cell Death Induced by Gene (α-Synuclein)-Environment (Paraquat) Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Lei, Shulei; Levytskyy, Roman; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Cerny, Ronald L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    While environmental exposures are not the single cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), their interaction with genetic alterations is thought to contribute to neuronal dopaminergic degeneration. However, the mechanisms involved in dopaminergic cell death induced by gene-environment interactions remain unclear. In this work, we have revealed for the first time the role of central carbon metabolism and metabolic dysfunction in dopaminergic cell death induced by the paraquat (PQ)-α-synuclein interaction. The toxicity of PQ in dopaminergic N27 cells was significantly reduced by glucose deprivation, inhibition of hexokinase with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), or equimolar substitution of glucose with galactose, which evidenced the contribution of glucose metabolism to PQ-induced cell death. PQ also stimulated an increase in glucose uptake, and in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and Na + -glucose transporters isoform 1 (SGLT1) proteins, but only inhibition of GLUT-like transport with STF-31 or ascorbic acid reduced PQ-induced cell death. Importantly, while autophagy protein 5 (ATG5)/unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1)-dependent autophagy protected against PQ toxicity, the inhibitory effect of glucose deprivation on cell death progression was largely independent of autophagy or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. PQ selectively induced metabolomic alterations and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in the midbrain and striatum of mice chronically treated with PQ. Inhibition of AMPK signaling led to metabolic dysfunction and an enhanced sensitivity of dopaminergic cells to PQ. In addition, activation of AMPK by PQ was prevented by inhibition of the inducible nitric oxide syntase (iNOS) with 1400W, but PQ had no effect on iNOS levels. Overexpression of wild type or A53T mutant α-synuclein stimulated glucose accumulation and PQ toxicity, and this toxic synergism was reduced by inhibition of glucose metabolism

  10. Treadmill exercise alleviates stress-induced impairment of social interaction through 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Kijeong; Seo, Jin-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase B (trkB), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) have been suggested as the neurobiological risk factors causing depressive disorder. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We in-vestigated the effect of treadmill exercise on social interaction in relation with BDNF and 5-HT expressions following stress in rats. Stress was induced by applying inescapable 0.2 mA electric foot shock to the rats for 7 days. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. Social interaction test and western blot for BDNF, TrkB, pCREB, and 5-HT1A in the hippocampus were performed. The results indicate that the spend time with unfamiliar partner was decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise increased the spending time in the stress-induced rats. Expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB were decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB in the stress-induced rats. In addition, 5-HT1A receptor expression was de-creased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced 5-HT1A expression in the stress-induced rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise alleviated stress-induced social interaction impairment through enhancing hippocampal plasticity and serotonergic function in the hippocampus. These effects of treadmill exercise are achieved through 5-HT1A receptor activation.

  11. Pulsed laser-induced liquid jet: evolution from shock/bubble interaction to neurosurgical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A.; Kumabe, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Hirano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Ohtani, K.; Nakano, T.; Sato, C.; Yamada, M.; Washio, T.; Arafune, T.; Teppei, T.; Atsushi, K.; Satomi, S.; Takayama, K.; Tominaga, T.

    2017-01-01

    The high-speed liquid (water) jet has distinctive characteristics in surgical applications, such as tissue dissection without thermal damage and small blood vessel preservation, that make it advantageous over more conventional instruments. The continuous pressurized jet has been used since the first medical application of water jets to liver surgery in the 1980s, but exhibited drawbacks partly related to the excess water supply required and unsuitability for application to microsurgical instruments intended for deep, narrow lesions (endoscopic instrumentation and catheters) due to limitations in miniaturization of the device. To solve these issues, we initiated work on the pulsed micro-liquid jet. The idea of the pulsed micro-liquid jet originated from the observation of tissue damage by shock/bubble interactions during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and evolved into experimental application for recanalization of cerebral embolisms in the 1990s. The original method of generating the liquid jet was based on air bubble formation and microexplosives as the shock wave source, and as such could not be applied clinically. The air bubble was replaced by a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser-induced bubble. Finally, the system was simplified and the liquid jet was generated via irradiation from the Ho:YAG laser within a liquid-filled tubular structure. A series of investigations revealed that this pulsed laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) system has equivalent dissection and blood vessel preservation characteristics, but the amount of liquid usage has been reduced to less than 2 μ l per shot and can easily be incorporated into microsurgical, endoscopic, and catheter devices. As a first step in human clinical studies, we have applied the LILJ system for the treatment of skull base tumors through the transsphenoidal approach in 9 patients (7 pituitary adenomas and 2 chordomas), supratentorial glioma (all high grade glioma) in 8 patients, including one with

  12. Interaction of the antiemetics ondansetron and granisetron with the cytotoxicity induced by irradiation, epirubicin, bleomycin, estramustine, and cisplatin in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnam Motlagh, P. [Dept. of Oncology, Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Henriksson, R. [Dept. of Oncology, Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Grankvist, K. [Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    At cancer treatment, the use of antiemetics are often needed due to induction of nausea and vomiting. Some antiemetics have been shown to interact with the direct cytotoxic effects. The newly developed antiemetics have, so far as we know, not been studied in this respect. In the present study, the effects of the 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists ondansetron and granisetron were evaluated on the cytotoxicity, induced by irradiation, bleomycin, epirubicin, estramustine, and cisplatin using fibroblasts (V79) and lung cancer cells (P31) in vitro. Ondansetron or granisetron (10{sup -5} mol/l) had no effect on the survival of irradiated cells. Granisetron (10{sup -5} mol/l) significantly potentiated cytoxocity of 2.5 mg/l epirubicin on fibroblasts whereas the effect of granisetron (10{sup -7} mol/l) on the cytotoxic effect of 25 mg/l bleomycin, and estramustine (80 mg/l) seemed additive to lung cancer cells. Ondansetron was non-interactive with the cytotoxicity induced by any of the anti-cancer drugs. Although the encountered observation with an enhancing effect of granisetron on the epirubicin-induced cytotoxicity is seen in a specific experimental situation in vitro, the fact that 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists are routinely used during cancer treatment indicate that attention should be given to a possible interaction with the antineoplastic action of cancer treatment. (orig.).

  13. Interaction of the antiemetics ondansetron and granisetron with the cytotoxicity induced by irradiation, epirubicin, bleomycin, estramustine, and cisplatin in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnam Motlagh, P.; Henriksson, R.; Grankvist, K.

    1995-01-01

    At cancer treatment, the use of antiemetics are often needed due to induction of nausea and vomiting. Some antiemetics have been shown to interact with the direct cytotoxic effects. The newly developed antiemetics have, so far as we know, not been studied in this respect. In the present study, the effects of the 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists ondansetron and granisetron were evaluated on the cytotoxicity, induced by irradiation, bleomycin, epirubicin, estramustine, and cisplatin using fibroblasts (V79) and lung cancer cells (P31) in vitro. Ondansetron or granisetron (10 -5 mol/l) had no effect on the survival of irradiated cells. Granisetron (10 -5 mol/l) significantly potentiated cytoxocity of 2.5 mg/l epirubicin on fibroblasts whereas the effect of granisetron (10 -7 mol/l) on the cytotoxic effect of 25 mg/l bleomycin, and estramustine (80 mg/l) seemed additive to lung cancer cells. Ondansetron was non-interactive with the cytotoxicity induced by any of the anti-cancer drugs. Although the encountered observation with an enhancing effect of granisetron on the epirubicin-induced cytotoxicity is seen in a specific experimental situation in vitro, the fact that 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists are routinely used during cancer treatment indicate that attention should be given to a possible interaction with the antineoplastic action of cancer treatment. (orig.)

  14. Dietary fat and gut microbiota interactions determine diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübeck, Raphaela; Bonet-Ripoll, Catalina; Hoffmann, Christina; Walker, Alesia; Müller, Veronika Maria; Schüppel, Valentina Luise; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Scholz, Birgit; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Daniel, Hannelore; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas; Klingenspor, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Gut microbiota may promote positive energy balance; however, germfree mice can be either resistant or susceptible to diet-induced obesity (DIO) depending on the type of dietary intervention. We here sought to identify the dietary constituents that determine the susceptibility to body fat accretion in germfree (GF) mice. GF and specific pathogen free (SPF) male C57BL/6N mice were fed high-fat diets either based on lard or palm oil for 4 wks. Mice were metabolically characterized at the end of the feeding trial. FT-ICR-MS and UPLC-TOF-MS were used for cecal as well as hepatic metabolite profiling and cecal bile acids quantification, respectively. Hepatic gene expression was examined by qRT-PCR and cecal gut microbiota of SPF mice was analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. GF mice, but not SPF mice, were completely DIO resistant when fed a cholesterol-rich lard-based high-fat diet, whereas on a cholesterol-free palm oil-based high-fat diet, DIO was independent of gut microbiota. In GF lard-fed mice, DIO resistance was conveyed by increased energy expenditure, preferential carbohydrate oxidation, and increased fecal fat and energy excretion. Cecal metabolite profiling revealed a shift in bile acid and steroid metabolites in these lean mice, with a significant rise in 17β-estradiol, which is known to stimulate energy expenditure and interfere with bile acid metabolism. Decreased cecal bile acid levels were associated with decreased hepatic expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis. These metabolic adaptations were largely attenuated in GF mice fed the palm-oil based high-fat diet. We propose that an interaction of gut microbiota and cholesterol metabolism is essential for fat accretion in normal SPF mice fed cholesterol-rich lard as the main dietary fat source. This is supported by a positive correlation between bile acid levels and specific bacteria of the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes ) as a characteristic feature of normal SPF mice

  15. Early-life viral infection and allergen exposure interact to induce an asthmatic phenotype in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asquith Kelly L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early-life respiratory viral infections, notably with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, increase the risk of subsequent development of childhood asthma. The purpose of this study was to assess whether early-life infection with a species-specific model of RSV and subsequent allergen exposure predisposed to the development of features of asthma. Methods We employed a unique combination of animal models in which BALB/c mice were neonatally infected with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM, which replicates severe RSV disease in human infants and following recovery, were intranasally sensitised with ovalbumin. Animals received low-level challenge with aerosolised antigen for 4 weeks to elicit changes of chronic asthma, followed by a single moderate-level challenge to induce an exacerbation of inflammation. We then assessed airway inflammation, epithelial changes characteristic of remodelling, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and host immunological responses. Results Allergic airway inflammation, including recruitment of eosinophils, was prominent only in animals that had recovered from neonatal infection with PVM and then been sensitised and chronically challenged with antigen. Furthermore, only these mice exhibited an augmented Th2-biased immune response, including elevated serum levels of anti-ovalbumin IgE and IgG1 as well as increased relative expression of Th2-associated cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. By comparison, development of AHR and mucous cell change were associated with recovery from PVM infection, regardless of subsequent allergen challenge. Increased expression of IL-25, which could contribute to induction of a Th2 response, was demonstrable in the lung following PVM infection. Signalling via the IL-4 receptor α chain was crucial to the development of allergic inflammation, mucous cell change and AHR, because all of these were absent in receptor-deficient mice. In contrast, changes of remodelling were evident in mice

  16. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  17. The tissue-specific Rep8/UBXD6 tethers p97 to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for degradation of misfolded proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Madsen

    Full Text Available The protein known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast is a versatile ATPase complex involved in several biological functions including membrane fusion, protein folding, and activation of membrane-bound transcription factors. In addition, p97 plays a central role in degradation of misfolded secretory proteins via the ER-associated degradation pathway. This functional diversity of p97 depends on its association with various cofactors, and to further our understanding of p97 function it is important that these cofactors are identified and analyzed. Here, we isolate and characterize the human protein named Rep8 or Ubxd6 as a new cofactor of p97. Mouse Rep8 is highly tissue-specific and abundant in gonads. In testes, Rep8 is expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids, whereas in ovaries Rep8 is expressed in granulosa cells. Rep8 associates directly with p97 via its UBX domain. We show that Rep8 is a transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane with its UBX domain facing the cytoplasm. Knock-down of Rep8 expression in human cells leads to a decreased association of p97 with the ER membrane and concomitantly a retarded degradation of misfolded ER-derived proteasome substrates. Thus, Rep8 tethers p97 to the ER membrane for efficient ER-associated degradation.

  18. Phenylketonuria as a model for protein misfolding diseases and for the development of next generation orphan drugs for patients with inborn errors of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntau, Ania C; Gersting, Søren W

    2010-12-01

    The lecture dedicated to Professor Horst Bickel describes the advances, successes, and opportunities concerning the understanding of the biochemical and molecular basis of phenylketonuria and the innovative treatment strategies introduced for these patients during the last 60 years. These concepts were transferred to other inborn errors of metabolism and led to significant reduction in morbidity and to an improvement in quality of life. Important milestones were the successful development of a low-phenylalanine diet for phenylketonuria patients, the recognition of tetrahydrobiopterin as an option to treat these individuals pharmacologically, and finally market approval of this drug. The work related to the discovery of a pharmacological treatment led metabolic researchers and pediatricians to new insights into the molecular processes linked to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene at the cellular and structural level. Again, phenylketonuria became a prototype disorder for a previously underestimated but now rapidly expanding group of diseases: protein misfolding disorders with loss of function. Due to potential general biological mechanisms underlying these disorders, the door may soon open to a systematic development of a new class of pharmaceutical products. These pharmacological chaperones are likely to correct misfolding of proteins involved in numerous genetic and nongenetic diseases.

  19. Enhancing mitochondrial calcium buffering capacity reduces aggregation of misfolded SOD1 and motor neuron cell death without extending survival in mouse models of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Han, Joo Seok; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Vetto, Anne P; Lee, Sandra K; Tseng, Eva; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-03-13

    Mitochondria have been proposed as targets for toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, fatal adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons. A decrease in the capacity of spinal cord mitochondria to buffer calcium (Ca(2+)) has been observed in mice expressing ALS-linked mutants of SOD1 that develop motor neuron disease with many of the key pathological hallmarks seen in ALS patients. In mice expressing three different ALS-causing SOD1 mutants, we now test the contribution of the loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+)-buffering capacity to disease mechanism(s) by eliminating ubiquitous expression of cyclophilin D, a critical regulator of Ca(2+)-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore that determines mitochondrial Ca(2+) content. A chronic increase in mitochondrial buffering of Ca(2+) in the absence of cyclophilin D was maintained throughout disease course and was associated with improved mitochondrial ATP synthesis, reduced mitochondrial swelling, and retention of normal morphology. This was accompanied by an attenuation of glial activation, reduction in levels of misfolded SOD1 aggregates in the spinal cord, and a significant suppression of motor neuron death throughout disease. Despite this, muscle denervation, motor axon degeneration, and disease progression and survival were unaffected, thereby eliminating mutant SOD1-mediated loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering capacity, altered mitochondrial morphology, motor neuron death, and misfolded SOD1 aggregates, as primary contributors to disease mechanism for fatal paralysis in these models of familial ALS.

  20. The tissue-specific Rep8/UBXD6 tethers p97 to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for degradation of misfolded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise; Kriegenburg, Franziska; Lages Lino Vala, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    is a transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane with its UBX domain facing the cytoplasm. Knock-down of Rep8 expression in human cells leads to a decreased association of p97 with the ER membrane and concomitantly a retarded degradation of misfolded ER-derived proteasome substrates. Thus, Rep8 tethers p......The protein known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast is a versatile ATPase complex involved in several biological functions including membrane fusion, protein folding, and activation of membrane-bound transcription factors. In addition, p97 plays a central role in degradation of misfolded...... protein named Rep8 or Ubxd6 as a new cofactor of p97. Mouse Rep8 is highly tissue-specific and abundant in gonads. In testes, Rep8 is expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids, whereas in ovaries Rep8 is expressed in granulosa cells. Rep8 associates directly with p97 via its UBX domain. We show that Rep8...

  1. Salt bridge interactions within the β2 integrin α7 helix mediate force-induced binding and shear resistance ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Linda; Li, Ning; Shu, Xinyu; Zhou, Lüwen; Lü, Shouqin; Chen, Shenbao; Mao, Debin; Long, Mian

    2018-01-01

    The functional performance of the αI domain α 7 helix in β 2 integrin activation depends on the allostery of the α 7 helix, which axially slides down; therefore, it is critical to elucidate what factors regulate the allostery. In this study, we determined that there were two conservative salt bridge interaction pairs that constrain both the upper and bottom ends of the α 7 helix. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for three β 2 integrin members, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; α L β 2 ), macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1; α M β 2 ) and α x β 2 , indicated that the magnitude of the salt bridge interaction is related to the stability of the αI domain and the strength of the corresponding force-induced allostery. The disruption of the salt bridge interaction, especially with double mutations in both salt bridges, significantly reduced the force-induced allostery time for all three members. The effects of salt bridge interactions of the αI domain α 7 helix on β 2 integrin conformational stability and allostery were experimentally validated using Mac-1 constructs. The results demonstrated that salt bridge mutations did not alter the conformational state of Mac-1, but they did increase the force-induced ligand binding and shear resistance ability, which was consistent with MD simulations. This study offers new insight into the importance of salt bridge interaction constraints of the αI domain α 7 helix and external force for β 2 integrin function. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate acts as a chemical chaperone on misfolded myocilin to rescue cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Gaplovska-Kysela, Katarina; Zuber, Christian; Roth, Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of chemical chaperones on the trafficking of secretion-incompetent primary open-angle glaucoma-associated mutant myocilin and the possibility to rescue cells coexpressing mutant and wild-type myocilin from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. CHO-K1, HEK293 and human trabecular meshwork cells were transfected to express wild-type or mutant (C245Y, G364V, P370L, Y437H) myocilin-green fluorescent protein fusion protein and were treated or not with various chemical chaperones (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide, or sodium 4-phenylbutyrate) for different time periods. The secretion, Triton X-100 solubility, and intracellular distribution of wild-type and mutant myocilin were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and confocal double immunofluorescence. The effect of sodium 4-phenylbutyrate on ER stress proteins and apoptosis was examined in cells coexpressing mutant and wild-type myocilin. Treatment with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, but not with glycerol or dimethylsulfoxide, reduced the amount of detergent-insoluble myocilin aggregates, diminished myocilin interaction with calreticulin, and restored the secretion of mutant myocilin. Heteromeric complexes formed by mutant and wild-type myocilin induced the ER stress-associated phosphorylated form of ER-localized eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)-2alpha kinase and the active form of caspase 3, which resulted in an increased rate of apoptosis. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate treatment of cells coexpressing mutant and wild-type myocilin relieved ER stress and significantly reduced the rate of apoptosis. These findings indicate that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate protects cells from the deleterious effects of ER-retained aggregated mutant myocilin. These data point to the possibility of a chemical chaperone treatment for myocilin-caused primary open-angle glaucoma.

  3. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bi-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Jeng [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Huei-Sheng, E-mail: huanghs@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF

  4. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Huei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21 WAF1/CIP1 ) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF mediates

  5. On the systematic behaviour of the intermittency-induces in nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Anson, Z.V.; Arora, R.; Avetyan, F.A.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bogdanov, V.G.; Bubnov, V.I.; Burnett, T.H.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavski, M.M.; Dressel, B.; Eligbaeva, G.Z.; Eremenko, L.E.; Friedlander, E.M.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.; Heckman, H.H.; Huang, H.; Jakobsson, B.; Judek, B.; Kachroo, S.; Kadyrov, F.G.; Kalyachkina, G.S.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kaul, G.L.; Kaur, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Koss, T.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Lal, P.; Larionova, V.G.; Lepetan, V.N.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Marutyan, N.A.; Maslennikova, N.V.; Mittra, I.S.; Mookerjee, S.; Mueller, C.; Nasrulaeva, H.; Nasyrov, S.H.; Navotny, V.S.; Orlova, G.I.; Otterlund, I.; Palsania, H.S.; Peresadko, N.G.; Petrov, N.V.; Plyushchev, V.A.; Qian, W.Y.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Rappoport, V.M.; Rhee, J.T.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Sarkisova, L.G.; Sarkisyan, V.R.; Schulz, W.; Shabratova, G.S.; Shakhova, T.I.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soederstroem, K.; Solovjeva, Z.I.; Stenlund, E.; Strausz, S.C.; Sun, J.F.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Tolstov, K.D.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.; Vokal, S.; Wang, H.Q.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Xu, G.F.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhochova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C.; Zhou, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The non-statistical fluctuations observed in nuclear interactions, as described by the intermittency-indices from scaled factorial moment analyses, are found to follow a systematic behaviour. The heaviest systems studied, i.e. interactions with sulfur projectiles, are found to have fluctuations which are larger than expected from simple scaling rules. (orig.)

  6. Improving analytical methods for protein-protein interaction through implementation of chemically inducible dimerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tonni Grube; Nintemann, Sebastian; Marek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    When investigating interactions between two proteins with complementary reporter tags in yeast two-hybrid or split GFP assays, it remains troublesome to discriminate true-from false-negative results and challenging to compare the level of interaction across experiments. This leads to decreased se...

  7. On the systematic behaviour of the intermittency-induces in nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, M I; Aggarwal, M M; Alexandrov, Y A; Andreeva, N P; Anson, Z V; Arora, R; Avetyan, F A; Badyal, S K; Basova, E; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bogdanov, V G; Bubnov, V I; Burnett, T H; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Y; Chernova, L P; Chernyavski, M M; Dressel, B; Eligbaeva, G Z; Eremenko, L E; Friedlander, E M; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V; Heckman, H H; Huang, H; Jakobsson, B; Judek, B; Kachroo, S; Kadyrov, F G; Kalyachkina, G S; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kaul, G L; Kaur, M; Kharlamov, S P; Koss, T; Krasnov, S A; Kumar, V; Lal, P; Larionova, V G; Lepetan, V N; Lindstrom, P J; Liu, L S; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J; Lukicheva, N S; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Marutyan, N A; Maslennikova, N V; Mittra, I S; Mookerjee, S; Mueller, C; Nasrulaeva, H; Nasyrov, S H; Navotny, V S; Orlova, G I; Otterlund, I; Palsania, H S; Peresadko, N G; Petrov, N V; EMU01 Collaboration

    1991-07-18

    The non-statistical fluctuations observed in nuclear interactions, as described by the intermittency-indices from scaled factorial moment analyses, are found to follow a systematic behaviour. The heaviest systems studied, i.e. interactions with sulfur projectiles, are found to have fluctuations which are larger than expected from simple scaling rules. (orig.).

  8. Cytoskeleton-interacting LIM-domain protein CRP1 suppresses cell proliferation and protects from stress-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latonen, Leena; Jaervinen, Paeivi M.; Laiho, Marikki

    2008-01-01

    Members of the cysteine-rich protein (CRP) family are actin cytoskeleton-interacting LIM-domain proteins known to act in muscle cell differentiation. We have earlier found that CRP1, a founding member of this family, is transcriptionally induced by UV radiation in human diploid fibroblasts [M. Gentile, L. Latonen, M. Laiho, Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis provoked by UV radiation-induced DNA damage are transcriptionally highly divergent responses, Nucleic Acids Res. 31 (2003) 4779-4790]. Here we show that CRP1 is induced by growth-inhibitory signals, such as increased cellular density, and cytotoxic stress induced by UV radiation or staurosporine. We found that high levels of CRP1 correlate with differentiation-associated morphology towards the myofibroblast lineage and that expression of ectopic CRP1 suppresses cell proliferation. Following UV- and staurosporine-induced stresses, expression of CRP1 provides a survival advantage evidenced by decreased cellular death and increased cellular metabolic activity and attachment. Our studies identify that CRP1 is a novel stress response factor, and provide evidence for its growth-inhibitory and cytoprotective functions

  9. Ebselen induces mitochondrial permeability transition because of its interaction with adenine nucleotide translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Natalia; Correa, Francisco; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Chávez, Edmundo

    2015-10-15

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is a process established through massive Ca(2+) load in addition to an inducer reagent. Ebselen (Ebs), an antioxidant seleno compound, has been introduced as a reagent which inhibits mitochondrial dysfunction induced by permeability transition. Paradoxically enough, it has been shown that Ebs may also be able to induce the opening of the mitochondrial non-selective pores. This study was performed with the purpose of establishing the membrane system involved in Ebs-induced pore opening. Permeability transition was appraised by analyzing the following: i) matrix Ca(2+) release, and mitochondrial swelling, ii) efflux of cytochrome c, and iii) the inhibition of superoxide dismutase. All of these adverse reactions were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and cyclosporin A. At concentrations from 5 to 20 μM, we found that Ebs induces non-specific membrane permeability. Remarkably, Ebs blocks the binding of the fluorescent reagent eosin-5-maleimide to the thiol groups of the adenine nucleotide translocase. Based on the above, it is tempting to hypothesize that Ebs induces pore opening through its binding to the ADP/ATP carrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction between -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt A. Jellinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a common characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders, and the interaction between pathological/toxic proteins to cause neurodegeneration is a hot topic of current neuroscience research. Despite clinical, genetic, and experimental differences, evidence increasingly indicates considerable overlap between synucleinopathies and tauopathies or other protein-misfolding diseases. Inclusions, characteristics of these disorders, also occurring in other neurodegenerative diseases, suggest interactions of pathological proteins engaging common downstream pathways. Novel findings that have shifted our understanding in the role of pathologic proteins in the pathogenesis of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases have confirmed correlations/overlaps between these and other neurodegenerative disorders. The synergistic effects of α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β, and other pathologic proteins, and the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms, including induction and spread of protein aggregates, are critically reviewed, suggesting a dualism or triad of neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disorders, although the etiology of most of these processes is still mysterious.

  11. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiu-Qin; Liu Ni; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. (paper)

  12. Novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction in wheat (Triticum aestivum) induces vigorous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interspecific hybridization can be considered an accelerator of evolution, otherwise a slow process, solely dependent on mutation and recombination. Upon interspecific hybridization, several novel interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes emerge which provide additional sources of diversi...

  13. Receptor Interacting Protein 3-Mediated Necroptosis Promotes Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Wang

    Full Text Available Necrosis amplifies inflammation and plays important roles in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Necroptosis is a newly identified programmed necrosis that is mediated by receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3. However, the potential involvement and impact of necroptosis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced ARDS remains unknown. We therefore explored the role and mechanism of RIP3-mediated necroptosis in LPS-induced ARDS. Mice were instilled with increasing doses of LPS intratracheally to induce different degrees of ARDS. Lung tissues were harvested for histological and TUNEL staining and western blot for RIP3, p-RIP3, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL, total and cleaved caspases-3/8. Then, wild-type and RIP3 knock-out mice were induced ARDS with 30 mg/kg LPS. Pulmonary cellular necrosis was labeled by the propidium Iodide (PI staining. Levels of TNF-a, Interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1α, IL-10 and HMGB1, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, neutrophil counts and total protein concentration were measured. Results showed that in high dose LPS (30mg/kg and 40mg/kg -induced severe ARDS, RIP3 protein was increased significantly, accompanied by increases of p-RIP3 and MLKL, while in low dose LPS (10mg/kg and 20mg/kg -induced mild ARDS, apoptosis was remarkably increased. In LPS-induced severe ARDS, RIP3 knock-out alleviated the hypothermia symptom, increased survival rate and ameliorated the lung tissue injury RIP3 depletion also attenuated LPS-induced increase in IL-1α/β, IL-6 and HMGB1 release, decreased tissue MPO activity, and reduced neutrophil influx and total protein concentration in BALF in severe ARDS. Further, RIP3 depletion reduced the necrotic cells in the lung and decreased the expression of MLKL, but had no impact on cleaved caspase-3 in LPS-induced ARDS. It is concluded that RIP3-mediated necroptosis is a major mechanism of enhanced inflammation and lung tissue injury in

  14. Hydrodynamic interactions induce movement against an external load in a ratchet dimer Brownian motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornés, José A

    2010-01-15

    We use the Brownian dynamics with hydrodynamic interactions simulation in order to describe the movement of a elastically coupled dimer Brownian motor in a ratchet potential. The only external forces considered in our system were the load, the random thermal noise and an unbiased thermal fluctuation. For a given set of parameters we observe direct movement against the load force if hydrodynamic interactions were considered.

  15. Asymptotics of the bound state induced by delta-interaction supported on a weakly deformed plane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Kondej, S.; Lotoreichik, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2018), č. článku 013501. ISSN 0022-2488 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Schrodinger operator * interactions Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics ( physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.077, year: 2016

  16. Langevin dynamics of conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Gorria, C.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2009-01-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations in the conformational dynamics of a single closed filament is studied. It is shown that, due to the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom, initially circular chains may undergo transformation to polygonal shape.......The role of thermal fluctuations in the conformational dynamics of a single closed filament is studied. It is shown that, due to the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom, initially circular chains may undergo transformation to polygonal shape....

  17. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues

  18. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Chan-Gi, E-mail: changipack@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sang-Gun [Dept. of Pathology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  19. Disruption of PCNA-lamins A/C interactions by prelamin A induces DNA replication fork stalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Andrew M; Murray, Thomas V; Warren, Derek T; Liu, Yiwen; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-09-02

    The accumulation of prelamin A is linked to disruption of cellular homeostasis, tissue degeneration and aging. Its expression is implicated in compromised genome stability and increased levels of DNA damage, but to date there is no complete explanation for how prelamin A exerts its toxic effects. As the nuclear lamina is important for DNA replication we wanted to investigate the relationship between prelamin A expression and DNA replication fork stability. In this study we report that the expression of prelamin A in U2OS cells induced both mono-ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and subsequent induction of Pol η, two hallmarks of DNA replication fork stalling. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that cells expressing prelamin A presented with high levels of colocalisation between PCNA and γH2AX, indicating collapse of stalled DNA replication forks into DNA double-strand breaks. Subsequent protein-protein interaction assays showed prelamin A interacted with PCNA and that its presence mitigated interactions between PCNA and the mature nuclear lamina. Thus, we propose that the cytotoxicity of prelamin A arises in part, from it actively competing against mature lamin A to bind PCNA and that this destabilises DNA replication to induce fork stalling which in turn contributes to genomic instability.

  20. The γ-ε martensitic transformation: a model for stress induced variant and its interaction with grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenin, G.

    1995-01-01

    The γ (f.c.c.) to ε (h.c.p.) martensitic transformation occurs through the Shockley a/6 left angle 211 right angle faulting every second {111} plane of the f.c.c. structure. A stress induced thin single variant corresponds to a single a/6 left angle 211 right angle faulting vector and leads to a large homogeneous shear (0.35) in amplitude. The tip of such a plate is composed of a set of identical Shockley partial dislocations with large mutual interactions. This work is a presentation of a model which describes the martensite morphology of stress induced ε martensite in shape memory Fe-Mn-Si based alloys. The model includes the formation mechanism of the plate (Seeger's like) and its growth inside a limited grain. The mutual interaction of Shockley dislocations and their interaction with the grain boundary is semi quantitatively described; it leads to a lenticular shape of ε martensite thin plates. The model is able to explain the behaviour of this kind of alloys concerning the superelastic effect and the shape memory. (orig.)

  1. Cardenolides, induced responses, and interactions between above- and belowground herbivores of milkweed (Asclepias spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmann, Sergio; Agrawal, Anurag A; Cook, Susan C; Erwin, Alexis C

    2009-09-01

    Theory has long predicted allocation patterns for plant defense against herbivory, but only recently have both above- and belowground plant defenses been considered simultaneously. Milkweeds in the genus Asclepias are a classic chemically defended clade of plants with toxic cardenolides (cardiac glycosides) and pressurized latex employed as anti-herbivore weapons. Here we combine a comparative approach to investigate broadscale patterns in allocation to root vs. shoot defenses across species with a species-specific experimental approach to identify the consequences of defense allocational shifts on a specialist herbivore. Our results show phylogenetic conservatism for inducibility of shoot cardenolides by an aboveground herbivore, with only four closely related tropical species showing significant induction; the eight temperate species examined were not inducible. Allocation to root and shoot cardenolides was positively correlated across species, and this relationship was maintained after accounting for phylogenetic nonindependence. In contrast to long-standing theoretical predictions, we found no evidence for a trade-off between constitutive and induced cardenolides; indeed the two were positively correlated across species in both roots and shoots. Finally, specialist root and shoot herbivores of common milkweed (A. syriaca) had opposing effects on latex production, and these effects had consequences for caterpillar growth consistent with latex providing resistance. Although cardenolides were not affected by our treatments, A. syriaca allocated 40% more cardenolides to shoots over roots. We conclude that constitutive and inducible defenses are not trading off across plant species, and shoots of Asclepias are more inducible than roots. Phylogenetic conservatism cannot explain the observed patterns of cardenolide levels across species, but inducibility per se was conserved in a tropical clade. Finally, given that above- and belowground herbivores can systemically

  2. Interactions between TGF-β1, canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway and PPAR γ in radiation-induced fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves; Guillevin, Rémy; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2017-10-27

    Radiation therapy induces DNA damage and inflammation leading to fibrosis. Fibrosis can occur 4 to 12 months after radiation therapy. This process worsens with time and years. Radiation-induced fibrosis is characterized by fibroblasts proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation, and synthesis of collagen, proteoglycans and extracellular matrix. Myofibroblasts are non-muscle cells that can contract and relax. Myofibroblasts evolve towards irreversible retraction during fibrosis process. In this review, we discussed the interplays between transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ) in regulating the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced fibrosis, and the potential role of PPAR γ agonists. Overexpression of TGF-β and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway stimulate fibroblasts accumulation and myofibroblast differentiation whereas PPAR γ expression decreases due to the opposite interplay of canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway. Both TGF-β1 and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway stimulate each other through the Smad pathway and non-Smad pathways such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/serine/threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) signaling. WNT/β-catenin pathway and PPAR γ interact in an opposite manner. PPAR γ agonists decrease β-catenin levels through activation of inhibitors of the WNT pathway such as Smad7, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 β) and dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1). PPAR γ agonists also stimulate phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, which decreases both TGF-β1 and PI3K/Akt pathways. PPAR γ agonists by activating Smad7 decrease Smads pathway and then TGF-β signaling leading to decrease radiation-induced fibrosis. TGF-β1 and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway promote radiation-induced fibrosis whereas PPAR γ agonists can prevent radiation-induced fibrosis.

  3. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jane Y.C., E-mail: jym1@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Ma, Joseph K. [School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Castranova, Vincent [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO{sub 2} on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO{sub 2} and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO{sub 2} were significantly larger than CeO{sub 2} or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO{sub 2} reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO{sub 2}-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2} in the combined exposure. Using CeO{sub 2} as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. - Highlights: • DEP induced acute lung inflammation and switched immune response from Th1 to Th2. • DEP induced lung granulomas were not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}. • CeO{sub 2} induced sustained lung

  4. Synergistic Interactions with PI3K Inhibition that Induce Apoptosis. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating mutations involving the PI3K pathway occur frequently in human cancers. However, PI3K inhibitors primarily induce cell cycle arrest, leaving a significant reservoir of tumor cells that may acquire or exhibit resistance. We searched for genes that are required for the survival of PI3K mutant cancer cells in the presence of PI3K inhibition by conducting a genome scale shRNA-based apoptosis screen in a PIK3CA mutant human breast cancer cell. We identified 5 genes (PIM2, ZAK, TACC1, ZFR, ZNF565) whose suppression induced cell death upon PI3K inhibition.

  5. Specular Andreev reflection in graphene-based superconducting junction with substate-induced spin orbit interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Chunxu, E-mail: chunxu_bai@semi.ac.cn [School of Physics, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Yang, Yanling [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Physics, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China)

    2016-08-26

    Based on the Dirac–Bogoliubov–de Gennes equation, the chirality-resolved transport properties through a ballistic graphene-based superconducting heterojunction with both the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin orbit interaction have been investigated. Our results show that, in contrast to the retro-Andreev reflection suppressed by the spin orbit interaction (SOI), the specular Andreev reflection (SAR) can be enhanced largely by the SOI. Moreover, the Fabry–Perot interferences in the barrier region lead to the oscillating feature of the tunneling conductance. It is anticipated to apply the qualitative different results to diagnose the SAR in single layer graphene in the presence of both kinds of the SOI. - Highlights: • The retro-Andreev reflection in graphene is suppressed by the spin orbit interaction. • The specular Andreev reflection in graphene can be enhanced largely by the spin orbit interaction. • The Fabry–Perot interferences in the graphene-based barrier lead to the oscillating feature of the tunneling conductance. • The spin orbit interaction is also vital in diagnosing the specular Andreev reflection in graphene.

  6. Competing growth processes induced by next-nearest-neighbor interactions: Effects on meandering wavelength and stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blel, Sonia; Hamouda, Ajmi BH.; Mahjoub, B.; Einstein, T. L.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we explore the meandering instability of vicinal steps with a kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (kMC) model including the attractive next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) interactions. kMC simulations show that increase of the NNN interaction strength leads to considerable reduction of the meandering wavelength and to weaker dependence of the wavelength on the deposition rate F. The dependences of the meandering wavelength on the temperature and the deposition rate obtained with simulations are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental result on the meandering instability of Cu(0 2 24) [T. Maroutian et al., Phys. Rev. B 64, 165401 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevB.64.165401]. The effective step stiffness is found to depend not only on the strength of NNN interactions and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier, but also on F. We argue that attractive NNN interactions intensify the incorporation of adatoms at step edges and enhance step roughening. Competition between NNN and nearest-neighbor interactions results in an alternative form of meandering instability which we call "roughening-limited" growth, rather than attachment-detachment-limited growth that governs the Bales-Zangwill instability. The computed effective wavelength and the effective stiffness behave as λeff˜F-q and β˜eff˜F-p , respectively, with q ≈p /2 .

  7. Specular Andreev reflection in graphene-based superconducting junction with substate-induced spin orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Chunxu; Yang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Dirac–Bogoliubov–de Gennes equation, the chirality-resolved transport properties through a ballistic graphene-based superconducting heterojunction with both the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin orbit interaction have been investigated. Our results show that, in contrast to the retro-Andreev reflection suppressed by the spin orbit interaction (SOI), the specular Andreev reflection (SAR) can be enhanced largely by the SOI. Moreover, the Fabry–Perot interferences in the barrier region lead to the oscillating feature of the tunneling conductance. It is anticipated to apply the qualitative different results to diagnose the SAR in single layer graphene in the presence of both kinds of the SOI. - Highlights: • The retro-Andreev reflection in graphene is suppressed by the spin orbit interaction. • The specular Andreev reflection in graphene can be enhanced largely by the spin orbit interaction. • The Fabry–Perot interferences in the graphene-based barrier lead to the oscillating feature of the tunneling conductance. • The spin orbit interaction is also vital in diagnosing the specular Andreev reflection in graphene.

  8. A model for predicting pellet-cladding interaction induced fuel rod failure, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, L.O.

    1993-01-01

    A model for predicting pellet-cladding mechanical interaction induced fuel rod failure, suitable for implementation in finite element fuel-performance codes, is presented. Cladding failure is predicted by explicitly modelling the propagation of radial cracks under varying load conditions. Propagation is assumed to be due to either iodine induced stress corrosion cracking or ductile fracture. Nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts are utilized in modelling these two mechanisms of crack growth. The novelty of this approach is that the development of cracks, which may ultimately lead to fuel rod failure, can be treated as a dynamic and time-dependent process. The influence of cyclic loading, ramp rates and material creep on the failure mechanism can thereby be investigated. Results of numerical calculations, in which the failure model has been used to study the dependence of cladding creep rate on crack propagation velocity, are presented. (author)

  9. Temperature induced syllable breaking unveils nonlinearly interacting timescales in birdsong motor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías A Goldin

    Full Text Available The nature of telencephalic control over premotor and motor circuits is debated. Hypotheses range from complete usurping of downstream circuitry to highly interactive mechanisms of control. We show theoretically and experimentally, that telencephalic song motor control in canaries is consistent with a highly interactive strategy. As predicted from a theoretical model of respiratory control, mild cooling of a forebrain nucleus (HVC led to song stretching, but further cooling caused progressive restructuring of song, consistent with the hypothesis that respiratory gestures are subharmonic responses to a timescale present in the output of HVC. This interaction between a life-sustaining motor function (respiration and telencephalic song motor control suggests a more general mechanism of how nonlinear integration of evolutionarily new brain structures into existing circuitry gives rise to diverse, new behavior.

  10. Methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine interact with central nicotinic receptors and induce their up-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rates, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi; Escubedo, Elena; Pubill, David

    2007-01-01

    Previous work from our group indicated that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) potentially play a role in methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) neurotoxicity. The aims of the present study were two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the interaction of METH and MDMA with homomeric α7 nAChR ([ 3 H]methyllycaconitine binding) and other heteromeric subtypes ([ 3 H]epibatidine binding); and (2) to show the effects of amphetamine derivative pretreatment on the density of binding sites. METH and MDMA displaced [ 3 H]methyllycaconitine and [ 3 H]epibatidine binding in membranes from NGF-differentiated PC 12 cells and mouse brain, with K i values in the micromolar range, MDMA revealing a greater affinity than METH. In addition, METH and MDMA induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in [ 3 H]methyllycaconitine and [ 3 H]epibatidine binding; which had already been apparent after 6 h of pretreatment, and which peaked in differentiated PC 12 cells after 48 h. The highest increases were found in [ 3 H]epibatidine binding, with MDMA inducing higher increases than METH. Treatment with METH and MDMA increased B max of high-affinity sites for both radioligands without affecting K d . The heightened binding was inhibited by pretreatment with cycloheximide, suggesting the participation of newly synthesised proteins while inhibition of protein trafficking to plasma membrane did not block up-regulation. The effects of protein kinase and cyclophilin inhibitors on such up-regulation were explored, revealing a rapid, differential and complex regulation, similar to that described for nicotinic ligands. All of these results demonstrate that METH and MDMA have affinity for, and can interact with, nAChR, inducing their up-regulation, specially when higher doses are used. Such effects may have a role in METH- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, cholinergic neurotransmission, and in processes related to addiction and dependence

  11. Role of Cytokine-Induced Glycosylation Changes in Regulating Cell Interactions and Cell Signaling in Inflammatory Diseases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine H. Dewald

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is one of the most important modifications of proteins and lipids, and cell surface glycoconjugates are thought to play important roles in a variety of biological functions including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, bacterial adhesion, cell immunogenicity and cell signaling. Alterations of glycosylation are observed in number of diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. In that context, pro-inflammatory cytokines have been shown to modulate cell surface glycosylation by regulating the expression of glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of carbohydrate chains. These changes in cell surface glycosylation are also known to regulate cell signaling and could contribute to disease pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the glycosylation changes induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines, with a particular focus on cancer and cystic fibrosis, and their consequences on cell interactions and signaling.

  12. Multi-core events in cosmic-ray induced interactions with lead at around 10 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, N.; Arata, N.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis is made on the cosmic-ray induced interactions with lead at around 10 TeV on the basis of emulsion chamber data at Chacaltaya. A special attention is paid to the events detected as multi-cores under the spatial resolution of a few tens of microns. The observation of six double-core events and two triple-core events with the average invariant mass of 1.8 GeV/c 2 leads to the estimation on production frequency of such multicores as about 5% at 10 TeV at the atmospheric depth 540 gr/cm 2 . (author)

  13. Anisotropy of the nuclear magnetic relaxation times induced in solid 3He by modulation of the dipolar interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, G.

    1976-01-01

    Anisotropic nuclear relaxation times have been measured in solid 3 He samples grown at constant pressure, in the Larmor frequency range 1.5MHz-5MHz where the main relaxation mechanism is the modulation of the dipolar interaction by exchange or by motion of the vacancies. The second order calculation made by Harris for the exchange induced relaxation regime is extended to the regime where vacancy motion dominates. The theory is further refined by considering the fourth moment anisotropy effect on the spectral densities. This latter calculation yields a frequency dependent anisotropic contribution to T 1 which agrees qualitatively with the data, unlike the simpler results by Harris [fr

  14. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles and tritrophic interactions across spatial scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsma, Y.S.Y.; Bianchi, F.J.J.A.; Werf, van der W.; Poelman, E.H.; Dicke, M.

    2017-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are an important cue used in herbivore location by carnivorous arthropods such as parasitoids. The effects of plant volatiles on parasitoids have been well characterised at small spatial scales, but little research has been done on their effects at larger

  15. Maternal-pup interaction disturbances induce long-lasting changes in the newborn rat pulmonary vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrin, Yulia; Sadeghi, Sina; Pan, Jingyi; Jain, Amish; Fajardo, Andres F; McNamara, Patrick J; Belik, Jaques

    2015-11-15

    The factors accounting for the pathological maintenance of a high pulmonary vascular (PV) resistance postnatally remain elusive, but neonatal stressors may play a role in this process. Cross-fostering in the immediate neonatal period is associated with adult-onset vascular and behavioral changes, likely triggered by early-in-life stressors. In hypothesizing that fostering newborn rats induces long-lasting PV changes, we evaluated them at 14 days of age during adulthood and compared the findings with animals raised by their biological mothers. Fostering resulted in reduced maternal-pup contact time when compared with control newborns. At 2 wk of age, fostered rats exhibited reduced pulmonary arterial endothelium-dependent relaxation secondary to downregulation of tissue endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency-induced uncoupling. These changes were associated with neonatal onset-increased ANG II receptor type 1 expression, PV remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy that persisted into adulthood. The pulmonary arteries of adult-fostered rats exhibited a higher contraction dose response to ANG II and thromboxane A2, the latter of which was abrogated by the oxidant scavenger Tempol. In conclusion, fostering-induced neonatal stress induces long-standing PV changes modulated via the renin-angiotensin system. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Synchronisation Induced by Repulsive Interactions in a System of van der Pol Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, T. V.; Toral, R.

    2011-09-01

    We consider a system of identical van der Pol oscillators, globally coupled through their velocities, and study how the presence of competitive interactions affects its synchronisation properties. We will address the question from two points of view. Firstly, we will investigate the role of competitive interactions on the synchronisation among identical oscillators. Then, we will show that the presence of a fraction of repulsive links results in the appearance of macroscopic oscillations at that signal's rhythm, in regions where the individual oscillator is unable to synchronise with a weak external signal.

  17. Electron-electron interactions in graphene field-induced quantum dots in a high magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlof, A.; Shylau, Artsem; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of electron-electron interaction in graphene quantum dots defined by an external electrostatic potential and a high magnetic field. To account for the electron-electron interaction, we use the Thomas-Fermi approximation and find that electron screening causes the formation...... of compressible strips in the potential profile and the electron density. We numerically solve the Dirac equations describing the electron dynamics in quantum dots, and we demonstrate that compressible strips lead to the appearance of plateaus in the electron energies as a function of the magnetic field. Finally...

  18. Dynamically induced spin-dependent interaction in the elastic scattering of heavy-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, B.; Oertzen, W. von.

    1982-02-01

    Dynamical polarization effect in heavy-ion elastic scattering is investigated in the framework of the coupled-reaction-channel theory. By using the adiabatic approximation at low incident energies, this effect is expressed as a spin-orbit (L vector.S vector) interaction with a L vector and S vector independent radial function. The strength of the (L vector.S vector) interaction calculated for the 12 C + 13 C system is in the same order of magnitude as deduced from experiments and is about two orders of magnitude larger than that obtained from the folding model calculation. (author)

  19. Interactome of Obesity: Obesidome : Genetic Obesity, Stress Induced Obesity, Pathogenic Obesity Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronikolou, Styliani A; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Cokkinos, Dennis; Chrousos, George

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of increasing prevalence reaching epidemic proportions. Genetic defects as well as epigenetic effects contribute to the obesity phenotype. Investigating gene (e.g. MC4R defects)-environment (behavior, infectious agents, stress) interactions is a relative new field of great research interest. In this study, we have made an effort to create an interactome (henceforth referred to as "obesidome"), where extrinsic stressors response, intrinsic predisposition, immunity response to inflammation and autonomous nervous system implications are integrated. These pathways are presented in one interactome network for the first time. In our study, obesity-related genes/gene products were found to form a complex interactions network.

  20. Study on interaction between induced and natural fractures by extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, DanDan; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo; Zeng, QingLei; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Fracking is one of the kernel technologies in the remarkable shale gas revolution. The extended finite element method is used in this paper to numerically investigate the interaction between hydraulic and natural fractures, which is an important issue of the enigmatic fracture network formation in fracking. The criteria which control the opening of natural fracture and crossing of hydraulic fracture are tentatively presented. Influence factors on the interaction process are systematically analyzed, which include the approach angle, anisotropy of in-situ stress and fluid pressure profile.

  1. Stress Sensitization of Ethanol Withdrawal-Induced Reduction in Social Interaction: Inhibition by CRF-1 and Benzodiazepine Receptor Antagonists and a 5-HT1A-Receptor Agonist

    OpenAIRE

    Breese, George R; Knapp, Darin J; Overstreet, David H

    2004-01-01

    Repeated withdrawals from chronic ethanol sensitize the withdrawal-induced reduction in social interaction behaviors. This study determined whether stress might substitute for repeated withdrawals to facilitate withdrawal-induced anxiety-like behavior. When two 1-h periods of restraint stress were applied at 1-week intervals to rats fed control diet, social interaction was reduced upon withdrawal from a subsequent 5-day exposure to ethanol diet. Neither this ethanol exposure alone nor exposur...

  2. Plasma parameters and electromagnetic forces induced by the magneto hydro dynamic interaction in a hypersonic argon flow experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Neretti, Gabriele; Borghi, Carlo A.

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes an experimental analysis on the magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) interaction induced by a magnetic test body immersed into a hypersonic argon flow. The characteristic plasma parameters are measured. They are related to the voltages arising in the Hall direction and to the variation of the fluid dynamic properties induced by the interaction. The tests have been performed in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 6 and Mach 15. The plasma parameters are measured in the stagnation region in front of the nozzle of the wind tunnel and in the free stream region at the nozzle exit. The test body has a conical shape with the cone axis in the gas flow direction and the cone vertex against the flow. It is placed at the nozzle exit and is equipped with three permanent magnets. In the configuration adopted, the Faraday current flows in a closed loop completely immersed into the plasma of the shock layer. The electric field and the pressure variation due to MHD interaction have been measured on the test body walls. Microwave adsorption measurements have been used for the determination of the electron number density and the electron collision frequency. Continuum recombination radiation and line radiation emissions have been detected. The electron temperature has been determined by means of the spectroscopic data by using different methods. The electron number density has been also determined by means of the Stark broadening of H α and the H β lines. Optical imaging has been utilized to visualize the pattern of the electric current distribution in the shock layer around the test body. The experiments show a considerable effect of the electromagnetic forces produced by the MHD interaction acting on the plasma flow around the test body. A comparison of the experimental data with simulation results shows a good agreement.

  3. Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-04-28

    The evolution of the interaction and the resultant structure in the mixed system of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactant decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10), undergoing phase separation, have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. The measurements have been carried out for a fixed concentration of nanoparticle (1 wt. %) with varying concentration of surfactant (0 to 1 wt. %), in the absence and presence of an electrolyte. It is found that the micelles of non-ionic surfactant adsorb on the nanoparticle in the absence of electrolyte (form stable system), whereas these micelles become non-adsorbing in the presence of electrolyte (show phase separation). The phase separation arises because of C12E10 micelles, causing depletion interaction between nanoparticles and leading to their aggregation. The interaction is modeled by double Yukawa potential accounting for attractive depletion as well as repulsive electrostatic forces. Both the interactions (attraction and repulsion) are found to be of long-range. The nanoparticle aggregation (phase separation) is governed by the increase in the magnitude and the range of the depletion attraction with the increase in the surfactant concentration. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are quite large in size (order of micron) and are characterized by the surface fractal having simple cubic packing of nanoparticles within the aggregates.

  4. The effect of instanton-induced interaction on P-wave meson spectra ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    possible to reproduce the observed spectra as the tensor and spin-orbit terms of. OGEP are attractive, and hence naturally triplet states masses will be lower than the corresponding singlet states. Hence, to reproduce the full P-wave spectra it is essential to include the hyperfine interaction term of III to have a consistent. 76.

  5. Metastable decoherence-free subspaces and electromagnetically induced transparency in interacting many-body systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Yanli; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    to stationarity this leads to a slow dynamics, which renders the typical assumption of fast relaxation invalid. We derive analytically the effective nonequilibrium dynamics in the decoherence-free subspace, which features coherent and dissipative two-body interactions. We discuss the use of this scenario...

  6. Frequencies in the Vibration Induced by the Rotor Stator Interaction in a Centrifugal Pump Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Cristian; Egusquiza, Eduard; Santos, Ilmar

    2007-01-01

    The highest vibration levels in large pump turbines are, in general, originated in the rotor stator interaction (RSI). This vibration has specific characteristics that can be clearly observed in the frequency domain: harmonics of the moving blade passing frequency and a particular relationship am...

  7. Interaction between stress induced by competition, predation, and an insecticide on the response of aquatic invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Van den Paul J.; Klein, Sylvan L.; Rico, Andreu

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of species interactions like competition and (intraguild) predation on the sensitivity of aquatic organisms to the insecticide chlorpyrifos. In the first experiment, combined effects of chlorpyrifos and different levels of intraspecific and interspecific

  8. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Tinne

    Full Text Available The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  9. Bifidobacterium breve - HT-29 cell line interaction: modulation of TNF-a induced gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, R.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Willemsen, L.E.M.; Knol, J.

    2011-01-01

    To provide insight in the molecular basis for intestinal host-microbe interactions, we determined the genome-wide transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells following exposure to cells of Bifidobacterium breve. To select an appropriate test system reflecting inflammatory

  10. Bifidobacterium breve-HT-29 cell line interaction: Modulation of TNF-a induced gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, R.J.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Willemsen, L.E.M.; Vriesema, A.; Knol, J.; Vos, W.M. de

    2011-01-01

    To provide insight in the molecular basis for intestinal host-microbe interactions, we determined the genome-wide transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells following exposure to cells of Bifidobacterium breve. To select an appropriate test system reflecting inflammatory

  11. Acute nicotine induced pressor response is in part due to interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arterial baro-reception is regarded as one of the most powerful rapidly acting homeostatic mechanism regulating blood pressure. Investigation had suggested that nicotine may interact with aortic baro-receptors to produce its sustained presser response, an effect that had received little attention. Anaesthetized Wister albino ...

  12. Human vaccination against RH5 induces neutralizing antimalarial antibodies that inhibit RH5 invasion complex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Ruth O; Silk, Sarah E; Elias, Sean C

    2017-01-01

    serum antibodies exhibited cross-strain functional growth inhibition activity (GIA) in vitro, targeted linear and conformational epitopes within RH5, and inhibited key interactions within the RH5 invasion complex. This is the first time to our knowledge that substantial RH5-specific responses have been...

  13. Syntaxin 1A interaction with the dopamine transporter promotes amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binda, Francesca; Dipace, Concetta; Bowton, Erica

    2008-01-01

    of the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) as the site of direct interaction with SYN1A. Amphetamine (AMPH) increases the association of SYN1A with human DAT (hDAT) in a heterologous expression system (hDAT cells) and with native DAT in murine striatal synaptosomes. Immunoprecipitation of DAT from the biotinylated...

  14. Conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction at finite temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Gorria, Carlos; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2008-01-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations on the conformational dynamics of a single closed filament is studied. It is shown that, due to the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom, initially circular aggregates may undergo transformation to polygonal shape. The transition occurs both...

  15. Adherence to drug label recommendations for avoiding drug interactions causing statin-induced myopathy--a nationwide register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Settergren

    Full Text Available To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions that cause statin-induced myopathy. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining erythromycin or verapamil/diltiazem respectively with atorvastatin or simvastatin. In patients with statin-fibrate combination therapy, we hypothesised that gemfibrozil was avoided to the preference of bezafibrate or fenofibrate. When combined with verapamil/diltiazem or fibrates, we hypothesized that the dispensed doses of atorvastatin/simvastatin would be decreased.Cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data. Odds ratios of interacting erythromycin, verapamil/diltiazem versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs doxycycline, amlodipine/felodipine in patients co-dispensed interacting statins simvastatin/atorvastatin versus patients unexposed (pravastatin/fluvastatin/rosuvastatin was calculated. For fibrates, OR of gemfibrozil versus fenofibrate/bezafibrate in patients co-dispensed any statin was assessed.OR of interacting erythromycin versus comparator doxycycline did not differ between patients on interacting and comparator statins either in patients dispensed high or low statin doses (adjusted OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.60-1.25 and 0.92; 95% CI 0.69-1.23. Interacting statins were less common among patients dispensed verapamil/diltiazem as compared to patients on amlodipine/felodipine (OR high dose 0.62; CI 0.56-0.68 and low dose 0.63; CI 0.58-0.68. Patients on any statin were to a lesser extent dispensed gemfibrozil compared to patients not dispensed a statin (OR high dose 0.65; CI 0.55-0.76 and low dose 0.70; CI 0.63-0.78. Mean DDD (SD for any statin was substantially higher in patients co-dispensed gemfibrozil 178 (149 compared to patients on statin monotherapy 127 (93, (p<0.001.Prescribers may to some extent avoid co-prescription of statins with calcium blockers and fibrates with an increased risk of myopathy. We found no evidence for avoiding co

  16. Simulating fluorescence light-canopy interaction in support of laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosema, A.; Verhoef, W.; Schroote, J.; Snel, J.F.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the Netherlands an operational field instrument for the measurement of laser induced fluorescence of vegetation (LEAF) is developed. In addition, plant physiological and remote sensing research is done to support this new remote sensing instrument. This paper presents a general introduction on the subject of laser-induced fluorescence, including the relation between chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis, spectral characteristics, and previous research. Also the LEAF system is briefly described. Subsequently, the development of a leaf fluorescence model (KMF) and a canopy fluorescence model (FLSAIL) are reported. With these simulation models a sensitivity study is carried out. Fluorescence of 685 nm appears to be most suitable to obtain information on photosynthesis and stress, but is also influenced by canopy structure. Separation of these two effects is studied

  17. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C.; Ray, D.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

    2015-07-01

    We show using numerical simulations that pronounced ratchet effects can occur for ac driven skyrmions moving over asymmetric quasi-one-dimensional substrates. We find a new type of ratchet effect called a Magnus-induced transverse ratchet that arises when the ac driving force is applied perpendicular rather than parallel to the asymmetry direction of the substrate. This transverse ratchet effect only occurs when the Magnus term is finite, and the threshold ac amplitude needed to induce it decreases as the Magnus term becomes more prominent. Ratcheting skyrmions follow ordered orbits in which the net displacement parallel to the substrate asymmetry direction is quantized. Skyrmion ratchets represent a new ac current-based method for controlling skyrmion positions and motion for spintronic applications.

  18. Honest signaling in trust interactions: smiles rated as genuine induce trust and signal higher earning opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Centorrino, S.; Djemai, E.; Hopfensitz, A.; Milinski, M.; Seabright, P.

    2015-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that smiles perceived as honest serve as a signal that has evolved to induce cooperation in situations requiring mutual trust. Potential trustees (84 participants from Toulouse, France) made two video clips averaging around 15 seconds for viewing by potential senders before the latter decided whether to ‘send’ or ‘keep’ a lower stake (4 euros) or higher stake (8 euros). Senders (198 participants from Lyon, France) made trust decisions with respect to the recorded clips....

  19. Resolution of PMA-Induced Skin Inflammation Involves Interaction of IFN-γ and ALOX15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute inflammation and its timely resolution play important roles in the body’s responses to the environmental stimulation. Although IFN-γ is well known for the induction of inflammation, its role in the inflammation resolution is still poorly understood. Methodology and Principal Findings. In this study, we investigated the function of interferon gamma (IFN-γ during the resolution of PMA-induced skin inflammation in vivo. The results revealed that the expression levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 in skin decreased during the resolution stage of PMA-induced inflammation, while IFN-γ is still maintained at a relatively high level. Neutralization of endogenous IFN-γ led to accelerated reduction of epidermal thickness and decreased epithelial cell proliferation. Similarly, decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells (Gr1+ or CD11b+ cells and a significant reduction of proinflammatory cytokines were also observed upon the blockade of IFN-γ. Furthermore, neutralization of IFN-γ boosted ALOX15 expression of the skin during inflammation resolution. In accordance, application of lipoxin A4 (LXA4, a product of ALOX15 obtained a proresolution effect similar to neutralization of IFN-γ. These results demonstrated that through upregulating ALOX15-LXA4 pathway, blockage of IFN-γ can promote the resolution of PMA-induced skin inflammation.

  20. Light-pressure-induced nonlinear dispersion of a laser field interacting with an atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, R.; Mlynek, J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on detailed studies of the effect of resonant light pressure on the optical response of an atomic gas to a single monochromatic laser field. In this very elementary situation of laser spectroscopy, the redistribution of atomic velocities that is induced by spontaneous light pressure leads to a novel contribution to the optical dispersion curve of the medium. This light-pressure-induced dispersion phenomenon displays a pronounced nonlinear dependence on the laser intensity. Moreover, for a given intensity, its strength is closely related to the laser beam diameter. As most important feature, this light-pressure-induced dispersion displays an even symmetry with respect to the optical detuning from line center. As a result, the total Doppler-broadened dispersion curve of the gas can become asymmetric, and a significant shift of the dispersion line center can occur. In addition to a detailed theoretical description of the phenomenon, we report on its experimental investigation on the λ=555.6 nm 1 S 0 - 3 P 1 transition in atomic ytterbium vapor with the use of frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The experimental findings are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions

  1. Positive interaction between prebiotics and thiazolidinedione treatment on adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligier, Maud; Dewulf, Evelyne M; Salazar, Nuria; Mairal, Aline; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Cani, Patrice D; Langin, Dominique; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2014-07-01

    To investigate whether inulin-type fructan (ITF) prebiotics could counteract the thiazolidinedione (TZD, PPARγ activator) induced-fat mass gain, without affecting its beneficial effect on glucose homeostasis, in high-fat (HF) diet fed mice. Male C57bl6/J mice were fed a HF diet alone or supplemented with ITF prebiotics (0.2 g/day × mouse) or TZD (30 mg pioglitazone (PIO)/kg body weight × day) or both during 4 weeks. An insulin tolerance test was performed after 3 weeks of treatment. As expected, PIO improved glucose homeostasis and increased adiponectinaemia. Furthermore, it induced an over-expression of several PPARγ target genes in white adipose tissues. ITF prebiotics modulated the PIO-induced PPARγ activation in a tissue-dependent manner. The co-treatment with ITF prebiotics and PIO maintained the beneficial impact of TZD on glucose homeostasis and adiponectinaemia. Moreover, the combination of both treatments reduced fat mass accumulation, circulating lipids and hepatic triglyceride content, suggesting an overall improvement of metabolism. Finally, the co-treatment favored induction of white-to-brown fat conversion in subcutaneous adipose tissue, thereby leading to the development of brite adipocytes that could increase the oxidative capacity of the tissue. ITF prebiotics decrease adiposity and improve the metabolic response in HF fed mice treated with TZD. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  2. Systemic virus-induced gene silencing allows functional characterization of maize genes during biotrophic interaction with Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kahmann, Regine; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Infection of maize (Zea mays) plants with the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on the stem, leaves and inflorescences. In this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed massive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression. To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) for maize. Conditions were established that allowed successful U. maydis infection of BMV-preinfected maize plants. This set-up enabled quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based readout. In proof-of-principle experiments, an U. maydis-induced terpene synthase was shown to negatively regulate disease development while a protein involved in cell death inhibition was required for full virulence of U. maydis. The results suggest that this system is a versatile tool for the rapid identification of maize genes that determine compatibility with U. maydis. © (2010) Max Planck Society. Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  3. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Blood Type Transmutation Induced by Multiple Ultrashort Wavelength Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multi laser beams with the flowing blood thin films leads to the transmutation of the blood types A, B, and AB into O type. This is a novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine. Laser radiation is in resonance with the eigen-frequency modes of the antigen proteins and forces the proteins to parametrically oscillate until they get kicked out from the surface. The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation), upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. The scanning laser beam is partially reflected as long as the antigen(s) is not eliminated. The process of the protein detachment can last a few minutes. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  4. Experimental evidence for amplitude death induced by a time-varying interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, K. [Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Shrimali, M.D. [Department of Physics, Central University of Rajasthan, NH-8, Bandar Sindri, Ajmer 305 801 (India); Prasad, Awadhesh [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Thamilmaran, K., E-mail: maran.cnld@gmail.com [Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we study the time-varying interaction in coupled oscillatory systems. For this purpose, we have designed a novel time-varying resistive network using an analog switch and inverter circuits. We have applied this time-varying resistive network to mutually coupled identical Chua's oscillators. When the resistances are varied in time, we find that amplitude death arises in coupled identical oscillators. This has been observed numerically as well as verified through hardware experiments. - Highlights: • We have implemented the time-varying interaction in coupled oscillatory systems. • We have designed a novel time-varying resistive network using an analog switch and inverter circuits. • When the resistances are varied in time, we find that amplitude death arises in coupled identical oscillators.

  5. Study on the characteristics of interaction flowfields induced by supersonic jet on a revolution body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Luo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the triple jets interaction with a hypersonic external flow on a revolution body. The experimental model is a ogive-cylinder body with three supersonic nozzles, which are aligned along the flow direction. The freestream Mach numbers are 5 and 6. The spatial and surface flow characteristics are illustrated by the schlieren photographs and the typical pressure distribution. The results show that there are multi-wave system, separation, reattachment, multi-peak pressure, high-pressure and low-pressure zone boundaries obvious distinction in tri-jets interference flowfield. The present paper also analyzes how do the pressure ratio, the angle of attack, and Mach number effect on tri-jets interaction characteristics.

  6. Interaction-induced shift of the cyclotron resonance of graphene using infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E A; Cadden-Zimansky, P; Jiang, Z; Li, Z Q; Tung, L-C; Schwartz, M E; Takita, M; Wang, Y-J; Kim, P; Stormer, H L

    2010-02-12

    We report a study of the cyclotron resonance (CR) transitions to and from the unusual n=0 Landau level (LL) in monolayer graphene. Unexpectedly, we find the CR transition energy exhibits large (up to 10%) and nonmonotonic shifts as a function of the LL filling factor, with the energy being largest at half filling of the n=0 level. The magnitude of these shifts, and their magnetic field dependence, suggests that an interaction-enhanced energy gap opens in the n=0 level at high magnetic fields. Such interaction effects normally have a limited impact on the CR due to Kohn's theorem [W. Kohn, Phys. Rev. 123, 1242 (1961)], which does not apply in graphene as a consequence of the underlying linear band structure.

  7. Inelastic transitions of atoms and molecules induced by van der Waals interaction with a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudon, J.; Hamamda, M.; Boustimi, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Taillandier-Loize, T.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic processes occuring in thermal-velocity metastable atoms and molecules passing at a mean distance (1–100 nm) are investigated. These processes are caused by the quadrupolar part of the van der Waals interaction: fine-structure transitions in atoms (Ar ∗ , Kr ∗ ), rovibrational transitions in N 2 ∗ ( 3 Σ u + ), transitions among magnetic sub-levels in the presence of a magnetic field.

  8. Factorial moments of $^{28}Si$ induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Andreeva, N P; Badyal, S K; Bakich, A M; Basova, E S; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bradnova, V; Bubnov, V I; Cai, X; Chen, G M; El-Chenawi, K F; Chernyavsky, M M; Dhamija, S; Felea, D; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Gulamov, K G; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Haiduc, M; Hasegan, D; Jakobsson, B; Just, L; Kanygina, E K; Kharlamov, S P; Kim, I C; Kovalenko, A D; Krasnov, S A; Kravcakova, A; Kumar, V; Larionova, V G; Lepekhin, F G; Lebedev, I A; Lee, C G; Lee, Y L; Levitskaya, O V; Li, Y X; Liu, H; Liu, L S; Liu, Z G; Lokanatan, S; Lord, J J; Lu, Y; Lukicheva, N S; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Manhas, I; Mittra, I S; Musaeva, A K; Nasyrov, S Z; Navontny, V S; Nystrand, J; Orlova, G I; Otterlund, I; Peak, L S; Peresadko, N G; Philippova, L N; Plyushchev, V A; Qian, W Y; Qin, Y M; Raniwala, R; Rao, N K; Rhee, J T; Rusakova, V V; Saidkhanov, N; Salmanova, N A; Seitimbetov, A M; Sethi, R; Simonov, B B; Singh, B; Skelding, D; Söderström, K; Stenlund, E; Tawfik, A M; Tretyakova, M I; Trofimova, T P; Vashisht, V; Vokal, S; Vrláková, J; Wang, H Q; Wang, H S; Wang, X R; Wang, J G; Weng, Z Q; Wilkes, R J; Yang, C B; Yang, H Y; Yin, Z B; Yu, L Z; Yung, S Y; Zarubin, P I; Zgura, I S; Zhang, D H; Zheng, P Y; Zhokhova, S I; Zhou, D C; Zhou Dai Mei

    2001-01-01

    Scaled factorial moment analysis for the multiplicity distributions of shower particles in the pseudorapidity phase space has been done. An evidence for the presence of dynamical fluctuations has been shown for the non-peripheral interactions of /sup 28/Si+Ag(Br) at 14.6 A Ge V/c and 4.5 A GeV/c. The results have been compared with the values obtained from data sample calculated by cascade-evaporation model. (9 refs).

  9. Velocity gradient induced line splitting in x-ray emission accompanying plasma-wall interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Michal; Renner, Oldřich; Liska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 125, Aug (2013), s. 38-44 ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0814; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasmas * x-ray spectroscopy * plasma-wall interaction * spectral line profiles * Doppler shift * ion velocity gradients Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2013

  10. Modeling of fatigue crack induced nonlinear ultrasonics using a highly parallelized explicit local interaction simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parallelized modeling technique for the efficient simulation of nonlinear ultrasonics introduced by the wave interaction with fatigue cracks. The elastodynamic wave equations with contact effects are formulated using an explicit Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA). The LISA formulation is extended to capture the contact-impact phenomena during the wave damage interaction based on the penalty method. A Coulomb friction model is integrated into the computation procedure to capture the stick-slip contact shear motion. The LISA procedure is coded using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which enables the highly parallelized supercomputing on powerful graphic cards. Both the explicit contact formulation and the parallel feature facilitates LISA's superb computational efficiency over the conventional finite element method (FEM). The theoretical formulations based on the penalty method is introduced and a guideline for the proper choice of the contact stiffness is given. The convergence behavior of the solution under various contact stiffness values is examined. A numerical benchmark problem is used to investigate the new LISA formulation and results are compared with a conventional contact finite element solution. Various nonlinear ultrasonic phenomena are successfully captured using this contact LISA formulation, including the generation of nonlinear higher harmonic responses. Nonlinear mode conversion of guided waves at fatigue cracks is also studied.

  11. Species interactions slow warming-induced upward shifts of treelines on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Eryuan; Wang, Yafeng; Piao, Shilong; Lu, Xiaoming; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Zhu, Haifeng; Zhu, Liping; Ellison, Aaron M; Ciais, Philippe; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-04-19

    The alpine treeline is commonly regarded as being sensitive to climatic warming because regeneration and growth of trees at treeline generally are limited by low temperature. The alpine treelines of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) occur at the highest elevations (4,900 m above sea level) in the Northern Hemisphere. Ongoing climatic warming is expected to shift treelines upward. Studies of treeline dynamics at regional and local scales, however, have yielded conflicting results, indicating either unchanging treeline elevations or upward shifts. To reconcile this conflict, we reconstructed in detail a century of treeline structure and tree recruitment at sites along a climatic gradient of 4 °C and mean annual rainfall of 650 mm on the eastern TP. Species interactions interacted with effects of warming on treeline and could outweigh them. Densification of shrubs just above treeline inhibited tree establishment, and slowed upward movement of treelines on a time scale of decades. Interspecific interactions are major processes controlling treeline dynamics that may account for the absence of an upward shift at some TP treelines despite continued climatic warming.

  12. Species interactions slow warming-induced upward shifts of treelines on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Eryuan; Wang, Yafeng; Piao, Shilong; Lu, Xiaoming; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Zhu, Haifeng; Zhu, Liping; Ciais, Philippe; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The alpine treeline is commonly regarded as being sensitive to climatic warming because regeneration and growth of trees at treeline generally are limited by low temperature. The alpine treelines of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) occur at the highest elevations (4,900 m above sea level) in the Northern Hemisphere. Ongoing climatic warming is expected to shift treelines upward. Studies of treeline dynamics at regional and local scales, however, have yielded conflicting results, indicating either unchanging treeline elevations or upward shifts. To reconcile this conflict, we reconstructed in detail a century of treeline structure and tree recruitment at sites along a climatic gradient of 4 °C and mean annual rainfall of 650 mm on the eastern TP. Species interactions interacted with effects of warming on treeline and could outweigh them. Densification of shrubs just above treeline inhibited tree establishment, and slowed upward movement of treelines on a time scale of decades. Interspecific interactions are major processes controlling treeline dynamics that may account for the absence of an upward shift at some TP treelines despite continued climatic warming. PMID:27044083

  13. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  14. Thermo-optically induced interactions in photon Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Bartels, Clara; Weitz, Martin

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), a new state of matter, emerges when the de Broglie wavelength of bosons becomes larger than the particle separation, leading to a macroscopic occupation of the system ground state. Followed by the first experimental demonstrations of BEC in cold atomic gases, this phase transition has been observed in other bosonic gases, as polaritons and phonons. The most recent one, photon BEC, is a promising candidate for a new generation of coherent photon sources. Due to their infancy, however, many of their properties are still unknown or only partly explored. In this talk I will present my latest results on the implications of photon interactions in photon BECs. In particular, I will investigate the effect of a thermo-optic non-linearity, leading to spatially non-local and delayed interactions. Starting from the steady state behavior, I will explore the spectrum of elementary excitations as a small perturbation. Moreover, I will discuss the resulting effective photon dispersion, manifesting various properties including possible superfluidity, as well as roton and maxon modes. The implications of physical parameters as absorption, number of photons in the condensate, and cavity trap on the dispersion will be discussed. The results of this study shed new light on the implication of interactions in photonic many-body systems. Hadiseh Alaeian acknowledges the generous support from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  15. Interaction of a gibberellin-induced factor with the upstream region of an alpha-amylase gene in rice aleurone tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Ou-Lee, T M; Turgeon, R; Wu, R

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between the DNA sequences of an alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) gene and a tissue-specific factor induced in rice (Oryza sativa L.) aleurone tissue by gibberellin was studied. DNA mobility-shift during electrophoresis indicated that a 500-base-pair sequence (HS500) of a rice alpha-amylase genomic clone (OSamy-a) specifically interacted with a factor from gibberellin-induced rice aleurone tissue. The amount of complex formed between the HS500 DNA fragment and the gibberellin-induced...

  16. Interaction between Mu and Delta Opioid Receptor Agonists in an Assay of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Allodynia in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stevens Negus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta opioid agonists enhance antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists in many preclinical assays of acute nociception, but delta/mu interactions in preclinical models of inflammation-associated pain have not been examined. This study examined interactions between the delta agonist SNC80 [(+-4-[(αR-α-((2S,5R-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] and the mu agonist analgesics methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine in an assay of capsaicin-induced thermal allodynia in rhesus monkeys. Thermal allodynia was produced by topical application of capsaicin to the tail. Antiallodynic effects of methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine were evaluated alone or in combination with fixed proportions of SNC80 identical to proportions previously shown to enhance acute thermal antinociceptive effects of these mu agonists in rhesus monkeys (0.9 : 1 SNC80/methadone; 0.29 : 1 SNC80/morphine; 3.6 : 1 SNC80/nalbuphine. Methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine each produced dose-dependent antiallodynia. SNC80 produced partial antiallodynia up to the highest dose tested (5.6 mg/kg. SNC80 produced a modest, enantioselective, and naltrindole-reversible enhancement of methadone-induced antiallodynia. However, SNC80 did not enhance morphine antiallodynia and only weakly enhanced nalbuphine antiallodynia. Overall, SNC80 produced modest or no enhancement of the antiallodynic effects of the three mu agonists evaluated. These results suggest that delta agonist-induced enhancement of mu agonist antiallodynia may be weaker and less reliable than previously demonstrated enhancement of mu agonist acute thermal nociception.

  17. Effects of Social Interaction and Warm Ambient Temperature on Brain Hyperthermia Induced by the Designer Drugs Methylone and MDPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) are new drugs of abuse that have gained worldwide popularity. These drugs are structurally similar to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and share many of its physiological and behavioral effects in humans, including the development of hyperthermia during acute intoxication. Here, we examined the effects of methylone (1–9 mg/kg, s.c.) or MDPV (0.1–1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on brain temperature homeostasis in rats maintained in a standard laboratory environment (single-housed in a quiet rest at 22 °C) and under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and 29 °C ambient temperature). By simultaneously monitoring temperatures in the nucleus accumbens, temporal muscle, and facial skin, we assessed the effects of methylone and MDPV on intra-brain heat production and cutaneous vascular tone, two critical factors that control brain temperature responses. Both methylone and MDPV dose-dependently increased brain temperature, but even at high doses that induced robust locomotor activation, hyperthermia was modest in magnitude (up to ∼2 °C). Both drugs also induced dose-dependent peripheral vasoconstriction, which appears to be a primary mechanism determining the brain hyperthermic responses. In contrast to the powerful potentiation of MDMA-induced hyperthermia by social interaction and warm ambient temperature, such potentiation was absent for methylone and minimal for MDPV. Taken together, despite structural similarities to MDMA, exposure to methylone or MDPV under conditions commonly associated with human drug use does not lead to profound elevations in brain temperature and sustained vasoconstriction, two critical factors associated with MDMA toxicity. PMID:25074640

  18. Energy budgets of mining-induced earthquakes and their interactions with nearby stopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1960's, N.G.W. Cook, using an underground network of geophones, demonstrated that most Witwatersrand tremors are closely associated with deep level gold mining operations. He also showed that the energy released by the closure of the tabular stopes at depths of the order of 2 km was more than sufficient to account for the mining-induced earthquakes. I report here updated versions of these two results based on more modern underground data acquired in the Witwatersrand gold fields. Firstly, an extensive suite of in situ stress data indicate that the ambient state of crustal stress here is close to the failure state in the absence of mining even though the tectonic setting is thoroughly stable. Mining initially stabilizes the rock mass by reducing the pore fluid pressure from its initial hydrostatic state to nearly zero. The extensive mine excavations, as Cook showed, concentrate the deviatoric stresses, in localized regions of the abutments, back into a failure state resulting in seismicity. Secondly, there appears to be two distinct types of mining-induced earthquakes: the first is strongly coupled to the mining and involves shear failure plus a coseismic volume reduction; the second type is not evidently coupled to any particular mine face, shows purely deviatoric failure, and is presumably caused by more regional changes in the state of stress due to mining. Thirdly, energy budgets for mining induced earthquakes of both types indicate that, of the available released energy, only a few per cent is radiated by the seismic waves with the majority being consumed in overcoming fault friction. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.In the early 1960's, N.G.W. Cook, using an underground network of geophones, demonstrated that most Witwatersrand tremors are closely associated with deep level gold mining operations. He also showed that the energy released by the closure of the tabular stopes at depths of the order of 2 km was more than sufficient to account for the

  19. Quantum-induced interactions in the moduli space of degenerate BPS domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2014-01-01

    In this paper quantum effects are investigated in a very special two-scalar field model having a moduli space of BPS topological defects. In a (1+1)-dimensional space-time the defects are classically degenerate in mass kinks, but in (3+1) dimensions the kinks become BPS domain walls, all of them sharing the same surface tension at the classical level. The heat kernel/zeta function regularization method will be used to control the divergences induced by the quantum kink and domain wall fluctuations. A generalization of the Gilkey-DeWitt-Avramidi heat kernel expansion will be developed in order to accommodate the infrared divergences due to zero modes in the spectra of the second-order kink and domain wall fluctuation operators, which are respectively N=2×N=2 matrix ordinary or partial differential operators. Use of these tools in the spectral zeta function associated with the Hessian operators paves the way to obtain general formulas for the one-loop kink mass and domain wall tension shifts in any (1+1)- or (3+1)-dimensional N-component scalar field theory model. Application of these formulae to the BPS kinks or domain walls of the N=2 model mentioned above reveals the breaking of the classical mass or surface tension degeneracy at the quantum level. Because the main parameter distinguishing each member in the BPS kink or domain wall moduli space is essentially the distance between the centers of two basic kinks or walls, the breaking of the degeneracy amounts to the surge in quantum-induced forces between the two constituent topological defects. The differences in surface tension induced by one-loop fluctuations of BPS walls give rise mainly to attractive forces between the constituent walls except if the two basic walls are very far apart. Repulsive forces between two close walls only arise if the coupling approaches the critical value from below

  20. Wave-induced current considering wave-tide interaction in Haeundae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hak Soo

    2017-04-01

    The Haeundae, located at the south eastern end of the Korean Peninsula, is a famous beach, which has an approximately 1.6 km long and 70 m wide coastline. The beach has been repeatedly eroded by the swell waves caused by typhoons in summer and high waves originating in the East Sea in winter. The Korean government conducted beach restoration projects including beach nourishment (620,000 m3) and construction of two submerged breakwaters near both ends of the beach. To prevent the beach erosion and to support the beach restoration project, the Korean government initiated a R&D project, the development of coastal erosion control technology since 2013. As a part of the project, we have been measuring waves and currents at a water depth of 22 m, 1.8 km away from the beach using an acoustic wave and current meter (AWAC) continuously for more than three years; we have also measured waves and currents intensively near the surf-zone in summer and winter. In this study, a numerical simulation using a wave and current coupled model (ROMS-SWAN) was conducted for determining the wave-induced current considering seasonal swell waves (Hs : 2.5 m, Tp: 12 s) and for better understanding of the coastal process near the surf-zone in Haeundae. By comparing the measured and simulated results, we found that cross-shore current during summer is mainly caused by the eddy produced by the wave-induced current near the beach, which in turn, is generated by the strong waves coming from the SSW and S directions. During other seasons, longshore wave-induced current is produced by the swell waves coming from the E and ESE directions. The longshore current heading west toward Dong-Back Island, west end of the beach, during all the seasons and eddy current toward Mipo-Port, east end of the beach, in summer which is well matched with the observed residual current. The wave-induced current with long-term measurement data is incorporated in simulation of sediment transport modeling for developing

  1. Phase separation and d-wave superconductivity induced by extended electron-exciton interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Ming [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)], E-mail: cheng896@hotmail.com; Su Wupei [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Using an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method, we have studied a two-dimensional tight-binding model in which the conduction electrons can polarize an adjacent layer of molecules through electron-electron repulsion. Calculated average conduction electron density as a function of chemical potential exhibits a clear break characteristic of phase separation. Compared to the noninteracting system, the d-wave pair-field correlation function shows significant enhancement. The simultaneous presence of phase separation and d-wave superconductivity suggests that an effective extended pairing force is induced by the electron-exciton coupling.

  2. Phase separation and d-wave superconductivity induced by extended electron-exciton interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Ming; Su Wupei

    2008-01-01

    Using an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method, we have studied a two-dimensional tight-binding model in which the conduction electrons can polarize an adjacent layer of molecules through electron-electron repulsion. Calculated average conduction electron density as a function of chemical potential exhibits a clear break characteristic of phase separation. Compared to the noninteracting system, the d-wave pair-field correlation function shows significant enhancement. The simultaneous presence of phase separation and d-wave superconductivity suggests that an effective extended pairing force is induced by the electron-exciton coupling

  3. Research of fluid-induced pressure fluctuation due to impeller-volute interaction in a centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q Z; Yang, K; Li, D Y; Gong, R Z

    2013-01-01

    The fluid pressure fluctuation generated by unsteady flow is a very important factor to induce vibration of the centrifugal pump. The relative movement between impeller and volute generates an unsteady interaction which affects not only the overall pump performance, but is also responsible for pressure fluctuations. Pressure fluctuations interact with the volute casing or even with the circuit and give rise to dynamic effects over the mechanical parts, which are one of the most important sources of vibration and hydraulic noise. To investigate the flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump, the unsteady flow is simulated by CFD methods in this paper. Unsteady flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump is obtained considering the impeller-volute interaction in the whole flow field. Based on the unsteady flow simulation, amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pressure fluctuation in the centrifugal pump are obtained through setting up monitoring point at the impeller outlet. The research shows that the frequency component include the blade passing frequency as the main component, the multiplication of blade passing frequency, and the harmonic interference due to the unsteady flow

  4. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal; Li, Jianguo; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2011-01-01

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP's indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine's preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine's interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  5. A novel interaction between plant-beneficial rhizobacteria and roots: colonization induces corn resistance against the root herbivore Diabrotica speciosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Santos

    Full Text Available A number of soil-borne microorganisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria, establish mutualistic interactions with plants, which can indirectly affect other organisms. Knowledge of the plant-mediated effects of mutualistic microorganisms is limited to aboveground insects, whereas there is little understanding of what role beneficial soil bacteria may play in plant defense against root herbivory. Here, we establish that colonization by the beneficial rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense affects the host selection and performance of the insect Diabrotica speciosa. Root larvae preferentially orient toward the roots of non-inoculated plants versus inoculated roots and gain less weight when feeding on inoculated plants. As inoculation by A. brasilense induces higher emissions of (E-β-caryophyllene compared with non-inoculated plants, it is plausible that the non-preference of D. speciosa for inoculated plants is related to this sesquiterpene, which is well known to mediate belowground insect-plant interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a beneficial rhizobacterium inoculant indirectly alters belowground plant-insect interactions. The role of A. brasilense as part of an integrative pest management (IPM program for the protection of corn against the South American corn rootworm, D. speciosa, is considered.

  6. Supramolecular Assembly of Comb-like Macromolecules Induced by Chemical Reactions that Modulate the Macromolecular Interactions In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongwei; Fu, Hailin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shih, Kuo-Chih; Ren, Yuan; Anuganti, Murali; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Cheng, Jianjun; Lin, Yao

    2017-08-16

    Supramolecular polymerization or assembly of proteins or large macromolecular units by a homogeneous nucleation mechanism can be quite slow and require specific solution conditions. In nature, protein assembly is often regulated by molecules that modulate the electrostatic interactions of the protein subunits for various association strengths. The key to this regulation is the coupling of the assembly process with a reversible or irreversible chemical reaction that occurs within the constituent subunits. However, realizing this complex process by the rational design of synthetic molecules or macromolecules remains a challenge. Herein, we use a synthetic polypeptide-grafted comb macromolecule to demonstrate how the in situ modulation of interactions between the charged macromolecules affects their resulting supramolecular structures. The kinetics of structural formation was studied and can be described by a generalized model of nucleated polymerization containing secondary pathways. Basic thermodynamic analysis indicated the delicate role of the electrostatic interactions between the charged subunits in the reaction-induced assembly process. This approach may be applicable for assembling a variety of ionic soft matters that are amenable to chemical reactions in situ.

  7. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal

    2011-09-21

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP\\'s indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine\\'s preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine\\'s interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  8. A novel interaction between plant-beneficial rhizobacteria and roots: colonization induces corn resistance against the root herbivore Diabrotica speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Franciele; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G V; Paré, Paul W; Sanches, Patrícia A; Kamiya, Aline C; Tonelli, Mateus; Nardi, Cristiane; Bento, José Mauricio S

    2014-01-01

    A number of soil-borne microorganisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria, establish mutualistic interactions with plants, which can indirectly affect other organisms. Knowledge of the plant-mediated effects of mutualistic microorganisms is limited to aboveground insects, whereas there is little understanding of what role beneficial soil bacteria may play in plant defense against root herbivory. Here, we establish that colonization by the beneficial rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense affects the host selection and performance of the insect Diabrotica speciosa. Root larvae preferentially orient toward the roots of non-inoculated plants versus inoculated roots and gain less weight when feeding on inoculated plants. As inoculation by A. brasilense induces higher emissions of (E)-β-caryophyllene compared with non-inoculated plants, it is plausible that the non-preference of D. speciosa for inoculated plants is related to this sesquiterpene, which is well known to mediate belowground insect-plant interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a beneficial rhizobacterium inoculant indirectly alters belowground plant-insect interactions. The role of A. brasilense as part of an integrative pest management (IPM) program for the protection of corn against the South American corn rootworm, D. speciosa, is considered.

  9. Heart rate responses induced by acoustic tempo and its interaction with basal heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2017-03-07

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Since previous studies focused on the effects of acoustic tempo on the ANS, and humans have their own physiological oscillations such as the heart rate (HR), the effects of acoustic tempo might depend on the HR. Here we show the relationship between HR elevation induced by acoustic tempo and individual basal HR. Since high tempo-induced HR elevation requires fast respiration, which is based on sympatho-respiratory coupling, we controlled the participants' respiration at a faster rate (20 CPM) than usual (15 CPM). We found that sound stimuli with a faster tempo than the individual basal HR increased the HR. However, the HR increased following a gradual increase in the acoustic tempo only when the extent of the gradual increase in tempo was within a specific range (around + 2%/min). The HR did not follow the increase in acoustic tempo when the rate of the increase in the acoustic tempo exceeded 3% per minute. These results suggest that the effect of the sympatho-respiratory coupling underlying the HR elevation caused by a high acoustic tempo depends on the basal HR, and the strength and the temporal dynamics of the tempo.

  10. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vy, Nguyen Duy, E-mail: nguyenduyvy@tdt.edu.vn [Theoretical Physics Research Group, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 756636 (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 756636 (Viet Nam); Tri Dat, Le [Faculty of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Science, Ho Chi Minh City 748355 (Viet Nam); Iida, Takuya [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5–10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  11. Dipolar interaction induced band gaps and flat modes in surface-modulated magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, R. A.; Schneider, T.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Langer, M.; Fassbender, J.; Lenz, K.; Lindner, J.; Landeros, P.

    2018-04-01

    Theoretical results for the magnetization dynamics of a magnonic crystal formed by grooves on the surface of a ferromagnetic film, called a surface-modulated magnonic crystal, are presented. For such a system, the role of the periodic dipolar field induced by the geometrical modulation is addressed by using the plane-wave method. The results reveal that, under the increasing of the depth of the grooves, zones with magnetizing and demagnetizing fields act on the system in such a way that magnonic band gaps are observed in both Damon-Eshbach and backward volume geometries. Particularly, in the backward volume configuration, high-frequency band gaps and low-frequency flat modes are obtained. By taking into account the properties of the internal field induced by the grooves, the flattening of the modes and their shift towards low frequencies are discussed and explained. To test the validity of the model, the theoretical results of this work are confirmed by micromagnetic simulations, and good agreement between both methods is achieved. The theoretical model allows for a detailed understanding of the physics underlying these kinds of systems, thereby providing an outlook for potential applications on magnonic devices.

  12. Fast feedback in active sensing: touch-induced changes to whisker-object interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudi Deutsch

    Full Text Available Whisking mediated touch is an active sense whereby whisker movements are modulated by sensory input and behavioral context. Here we studied the effects of touching an object on whisking in head-fixed rats. Simultaneous movements of whiskers C1, C2, and D1 were tracked bilaterally and their movements compared. During free-air whisking, whisker protractions were typically characterized by a single acceleration-deceleration event, whisking amplitude and velocity were correlated, and whisk duration correlated with neither amplitude nor velocity. Upon contact with an object, a second acceleration-deceleration event occurred in about 25% of whisk cycles, involving both contacting (C2 and non-contacting (C1, D1 whiskers ipsilateral to the object. In these cases, the rostral whisker (C2 remained in contact with the object throughout the double-peak phase, which effectively prolonged the duration of C2 contact. These "touch-induced pumps" (TIPs were detected, on average, 17.9 ms after contact. On a slower time scale, starting at the cycle following first touch, contralateral amplitude increased while ipsilateral amplitude decreased. Our results demonstrate that sensory-induced motor modulations occur at various timescales, and directly affect object palpation.

  13. Transitions induced by speed in self-propelled particles system with attractive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambui, Dorilson. S.; Rosas, Alexandre

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we consider a system of self-propelled particles with attractive interactions in two dimensions. The model presents an order-disorder transition with the speed playing the role of the control parameter. In order to characterize the transition, we investigate the behavior of the order parameter and the Binder cumulant as a function of the speed. Our main finding is that the transition can be either continuous or discontinuous depending on two parameter of the model: the strength of the noise and the radius of attraction.

  14. Interaction of the superconducting domains induced by external electric field with electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a superconductor in time-independent electric field perpendicular to the surface and in the external electromagnetic wave is theoretically investigated. A new type of the resonance interaction between superconducting domains localized along the magnetic field (if the superconducting phase transition takes place in the external magnetic field perpendicular to the surface) and electromagnetic waves is predicted. The surface impedance of the superconductor with domains is calculated. It is shown that the real part of the impedance has a saturation if the skin length equals the domain size. (orig.)

  15. Th17 Cells Induce Dopaminergic Neuronal Death via LFA-1/ICAM-1 Interaction in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Huang, Yan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2017-12-01

    T helper (Th)17 cells, a subset of CD4 + T lymphocytes, have strong pro-inflammatory property and appear to be essential in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. However, the involvement of Th17 cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the nigrostriatal system is unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and induce neuroinflammation and DAergic neuronal death in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + )-induced PD models. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the substantia nigra (SN) was assessed by the signal of FITC-labeled albumin that was injected into blood circulation via the ascending aorta. Live cell imaging system was used to observe a direct contact of Th17 cells with neurons by staining these cells using the two adhesion molecules, leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, respectively. Th17 cells invaded into the SN where BBB was disrupted in MPTP-induced PD mice. Th17 cells exacerbated DAergic neuronal loss and pro-inflammatory/neurotrophic factor disorders in MPP + -treated ventral mesencephalic (VM) cell cultures. A direct contact of LFA-1-stained Th17 cells with ICAM-1-stained VM neurons was dynamically captured. Either blocking LFA-1 in Th17 cells or blocking ICAM-1 in VM neurons with neutralizing antibodies abolished Th17-induced DAergic neuronal death. These results establish that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma of PD mice through lesioned BBB and exert neurotoxic property by promoting glial activation and importantly by a direct damage to neurons depending on LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  16. Adsorption of Antibiotics on Graphene and Biochar in Aqueous Solutions Induced by π-π Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bingquan; Chen, Liang; Que, Chenjing; Yang, Ke; Deng, Fei; Deng, Xiaoyong; Shi, Guosheng; Xu, Gang; Wu, Minghong

    2016-08-01

    The use of carbon based materials on the removal of antibiotics with high concentrations has been well studied, however the effect of this removal method is not clear on the actual concentration of environments, such as the hospital wastewater, sewage treatment plants and aquaculture wastewater. In this study, experimental studies on the adsorption of 7 antibiotics in environmental concentration of aqueous solutions by carbon based materials have been observed. Three kinds of carbon materials have shown very fast adsorption to antibiotics by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) detection, and the highest removal efficiency of antibiotics could reach to 100% within the range of detection limit. Surprisedly, the adsorption rate of graphene with small specific surface area was stronger than other two biochar, and adsorption rate of the two biochar which have approximate specific surface and different carbonization degree, was significantly different. The key point to the present observation were the π-π interactions between aromatic rings on adsorbed substance and carbon based materials by confocal laser scanning microscope observation. Moreover, adsorption energy markedly increased with increasing number of the π rings by using the density functional theory (DFT), showing the particular importance of π-π interactions in the adsorption process.

  17. Explosive vaporization induced by high-power CO2-laser target interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.; Vollrath, K.

    1976-01-01

    The interactions of high-power laser pulses with targets such as metals or dielectric materials causes a series of optical, thermal, and mechanical processes. Thereby, heating, melting, and vaporization can take place in a short time. At power densities of about 10 7 to several 10 8 W/cm 2 this can even be produced explosively. As compared to continuous ablation, this type of interaction can remove greater masses from the bulk of material. The investigations are performed by using an electron-beam preionized CO 2 -laser acting on different target materials. The energy of the laser pulses is about 30 J, the pulse-half-widths of the long-tail pulses 4 to 6 μs. Optical measurements yield some information on threshold values for these processes, for the formation and expansion of plasmas, and for the ejection of material in form of greater particles. High speed photographic techniques include a rotating mirror- and an image converter camera. Starting from shock-wave theory, gas dynamic equations (in unidimensional approximation) allow for a quantitative determination of the specific internal energies and pressures in the case of optical detonation. (orig.) [de

  18. Probing Induced Structural Changes in Biomimetic Bacterial Cell Membrane Interactions with Divalent Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Allison M [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL; Jubb, Aaron M [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes, formed primarily by the self-assembly of complex mixtures of phospholipids, provide a structured scaffold for compartmentalization and structural processes in living cells. The specific physical properties of phospholipid species present in a given membrane play a key role in mediating these processes. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a zwitterionic lipid present in bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cell membranes, is exceptional. In addition to undergoing the standard lipid polymorphic transition between the gel and liquid-crystalline phase, it can also assume an unusual polymorphic state, the inverse hexagonal phase (HII). Divalent cations are among the factors that drive the formation of the HII phase, wherein the lipid molecules form stacked tubular structures by burying the hydrophilic head groups and exposing the hydrophobic tails to the bulk solvent. Most biological membranes contain a lipid species capable of forming the HII state suggesting that such lipid polymorphic structural states play an important role in structural biological processes such as membrane fusion. In this study, the interactions between Mg2+ and biomimetic bacterial cell membranes composed of PE and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) were probed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The lipid phase transitions were examined at varying ratios of PE to PG and upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of Mg2+. An understanding of these basic interactions enhances our understanding of membrane dynamics and how membrane-mediated structural changes may occur in vivo.

  19. Perturbation of the γ angular distribution due to vacancy-induced quadrupole interaction in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abromeit, C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the influence of diffusing vacancies on the results of PAC/PAD experiments. The fluctuating hyperfine interaction process, caused by thermal hopping of the vacancies, is described by a stochastic model, and the mean value of the density matrix time development operator of the probe nucleus. First, the nuclear perturbation factors, containing all information about the interaction of the nuclear spin system with the environment, are defined. The stochastic process of vacancy diffusion in a discrete lattice is presented, and approximation methods are given leading to a significant simplification and in some cases even make possible an evaluation at all. The problem of vacancy preparation at the initial stage of the PAC/PAD-experiment is studied. For the electric field gradients produced by the vacancies at the position of the probe nucleus, an empirical ansatz is given. For different lattice structures, numerical results for integral and differential measurements with and without an applied external magnetic field are presentd. These results are discussed in view of the approximations made and compared with the experiment. Also, the influence of the initial vacancy distribution on the calculated perturbation factors is investigated. The results show good agreement with experimental data. (orig./HPOE) [de

  20. Dietary fat interacts with PCBs to induce changes in lipid metabolism in LDL receptor deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, B.; Reiterer, G.; Toborek, M.; Matveev, S.V.; Daugherty, A.; Smart, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Robertson, L.W. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2004-09-15

    From epidemiological studies, there is substantial evidence that cardiovascular diseases are linked to environmental pollution and that exposure to polycyclic and/or polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons can lead to human cardiovascular toxicity. A major route of exposure to PCBs in humans is via oral ingestion of contaminated food products. Therefore, circulating environmental contaminants derived from diets, such as PCBs, are in intimate contact with the vascular endothelium. Endothelial activation and dysfunction is an important factor in the overall regulation of vascular lesion pathology. In addition to endothelial barrier dysfunction, another functional change in atherosclerosis is the activation of the endothelium that is manifested as an increase in the expression of specific cytokines and adhesion molecules. These cytokines and adhesion molecules are proposed to mediate the inflammatory aspects of the disease by regulating the vascular entry of leukocytes. Alterations in lipid profile and lipid metabolism as a result of exposure to PCBs may be important components of endothelial cell dysfunction. Little is known about the interaction of dietary fats and PCBs in the pathology of atherosclerosis. We have reported a significant disruption in endothelial barrier function when cells were exposed to linoleic acid. In the current study we aimed to demonstrate the PCB-fatty acid interaction in vivo and hypothesized that PCB toxicity can be modulated by the type of fat consumed.

  1. Global Proteomics Revealed Klebsiella pneumoniae Induced Autophagy and Oxidative Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans by Inhibiting PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway during Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Kamaladevi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The enterobacterium, Klebsiella pneumoniae invades the intestinal epithelium of humans by interfering with multiple host cell response. To uncover a system-level overview of host response during infection, we analyzed the global dynamics of protein profiling in Caenorhabditis elegans using quantitative proteomics approach. Comparison of protein samples of nematodes exposed to K. pneumoniae for 12, 24, and 36 h by 2DE revealed several changes in host proteome. A total of 266 host-encoded proteins were identified by 2DE MALDI-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS and the interacting partners of the identified proteins were predicted by STRING 10.0 analysis. In order to understand the interacting partners of regulatory proteins with similar or close pI ranges, a liquid IEF was performed and the isolated fractions containing proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. Functional bioinformatics analysis on identified proteins deciphered that they were mostly related to the metabolism, dauer formation, apoptosis, endocytosis, signal transduction, translation, developmental, and reproduction process. Gene enrichment analysis suggested that the metabolic process as the most overrepresented pathway regulated against K. pneumoniae infection. The dauer-like formation in infected C. elegans along with intestinal atrophy and ROS during the physiological analysis indicated that the regulation of metabolic pathway is probably through the involvement of mTOR. Immunoblot analysis supported the above notion that the K. pneumoniae infection induced protein mis-folding in host by involving PI3Kinase/AKT-1/mTOR mediated pathway. Furthermore, the susceptibility of pdi-2, akt-1, and mTOR C. elegans mutants confirmed the role and involvement of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in mediating protein mis-folding which appear to be translating the vulnerability of host defense toward K. pneumoniae infection.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  3. Androgen interacts with exercise through the mTOR pathway to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanxing; Zhao, Hua; Liao, Jingwen

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of exogenous androgen and resistance exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy and the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling during the process. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham operation and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) implantation groups with subgroups subjected to sedentary conditions or resistance exercise (SHAM+SED, SHAM+EX, DHT+SED, and DHT+EX). The experimental procedure lasted for 10 days. The mRNA expression of androgen receptor (AR) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC), as well as the phosphorylation statuses of AR, mTOR, p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6K ), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) were determined in the white gastrocnemius muscle. The cross sectional area and wet mass of the muscle were also measured. The cross sectional area and MHC expression were significantly higher in SHAM+EX, DHT+SED, and DHT+EX than in SHAM+SED. There was no significant difference among groups in muscle mass. The mRNA expression of AR and IGF-I and the phosphorylation of mTOR, p70 S6K , and 4EBP1 were significantly increased in DHT+SED and SHAM+EX and were significantly enhanced in DHT+EX compared with either DHT or exercise alone. These data show that DHT causes hypertrophy in skeletal muscle and that exercise has a synergistic effect on DHT-induced hypertrophy. Exercise enhances androgen-induced rapid anabolic action, which involves activation of the mTOR pathway.

  4. Theoretical and computational studies of disorder-induced scattering and nonlinear optical interactions in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nishan Singh

    Photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) are nano-scale devices offering an exciting platform for exploring and exploiting enhanced linear and nonlinear light-matter interactions, aided in-part by slowing down the group velocity (vg) of on-chip photons. However, with potential applications in telecommunications, bio-sensing and quantum computing, the road to commercialization and practical devices is hindered by our limited understanding of the influence of structural disorder on linear and nonlinear light propagation. This thesis refines and develops state-of-the-art mathematical and numerical models for understanding the important role of disorder-related optical phenomena for PCWs in the linear and optical nonlinear regime. The importance of Bloch modes is demonstrated by computing the power loss caused by disorder-induced scattering for various dispersion engineered PCWs. The theoretical results are found to be in very good agreement with related experiments and it is shown how dispersion engineered designs can minimize the Bloch fields around spatial imperfections resulting in a radical departure from the usual assumed scaling vg. -2 of backscatteringlosses. We also conduct a systematic investigation of the influence of intra-hole correlation length, a parameter characterizing disorder on backscattering losses and find the loss behaviour to be qualitatively dependent on waveguide design and frequency. We then model disorder-induced resonance shifts to compute the ensemble averaged disordered density of states, accounting for important local field effects which are crucial in achieving good qualitative agreement with experiments. Lastly, motivated by emerging experiments examining enhanced nonlinear interactions, we develop an intuitive time dependent coupled mode formalism to derive propagation equations describing nonlinear pulse propagation in the presence of disorder-induced multiple scattering. The framework establishes a natural length scale for each physical

  5. Cationic Amphiphilic Tris-Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes Induce Cancer Cell Death via Interaction with Ca2+-Calmodulin Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamatsu, Yosuke; Suzuki, Nozomi; Masum, Abdullah-Al; Shibuya, Ai; Abe, Ryo; Sato, Akira; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Aoki, Shin

    2017-02-15

    In our previous paper, we reported on the preparation of some cationic amphiphilic Ir complexes (2c, 2d) containing KKGG peptides that induce and detect cell death of Jurkat cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that 2c interacts with anionic molecules and/or membrane receptors on the cell surface to trigger an intracellular Ca 2+ response, resulting in the induction of cell death, accompanied by membrane disruption. We have continued the studies of cell death of Jurkat cells induced by 2c and found that xestospongin C, a selective inhibitor of an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), reduces the cytotoxicity of 2c, suggesting that 2c triggers the release of Ca 2+ from the ER, leading to an increase in the concentration of cytosolic Ca 2+ , thus inducing cell death. Moreover, we synthesized a series of new amphiphilic cationic Ir complexes 5a-c containing photoreactive 3-trifluoromethyl-3-phenyldiazirine (TFPD) groups, in an attempt to identify the target molecules of 2c. Interestingly, it was discovered that a TFPD group functions as a triplet quencher of Ir complexes. It was also found that 5b is useful as a turn-on phosphorescent probe of acidic proteins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) (pI = 4.7) and their complexation was confirmed by luminescence titrations and SDS-PAGE of photochemical products between them. These successful results allowed us to carry out photoaffinity labeling of the target biomolecules of 5b (2c and analogues thereof) in Jurkat cells. A proteomic analysis of the products obtained by the photoirradiation of 5b with Jurkat cells suggests that the Ca 2+ -binding protein "calmodulin (CaM)" is one of target proteins of the Ir complexes. Indeed, 5b was found to interact with the Ca 2+ -CaM complex, as evidenced by luminescence titrations and the results of photochemical reactions of 5b with CaM in the presence of Ca 2+ (SDS-PAGE). A plausible mechanism for cell death induced by a cationic amphiphilic Ir

  6. Biflorin induces cytotoxicity by DNA interaction in genetically different human melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Ana Carolina Lima; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; da Silva Souza, Luciana Gregório; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; de Vasconcellos, Marne Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a public health problem and the second leading cause of death worldwide. The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has been notably increasing, resulting in high aggressiveness and poor survival rates. Taking into account the antitumor activity of biflorin, a substance isolated from Capraria biflora L. roots that is cytotoxic in vitro and in vivo, this study aimed to demonstrate the action of biflorin against three established human melanoma cell lines that recapitulate the molecular landscape of the disease in terms of genetic alterations and mutations, such as the TP53, NRAS and BRAF genes. The results presented here indicate that biflorin reduces the viability of melanoma cell lines by DNA interactions. Biflorin causes single and double DNA strand breaks, consequently inhibiting cell cycle progression, replication and DNA repair and promoting apoptosis. Our data suggest that biflorin could be considered as a future therapeutic option for managing melanoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction-induced decay of a heteronuclear two-atom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Jiaheng; Liu, Min; He, Xiaodong; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Kunpeng; Wang, Jin; Papoular, D. J.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two-atom systems in small traps are of fundamental interest for understanding the role of interactions in degenerate cold gases and for the creation of quantum gates in quantum information processing with single-atom traps. One of the key quantities is the inelastic relaxation (decay) time when one of the atoms or both are in a higher hyperfine state. Here we measure this quantity in a heteronuclear system of 87Rb and 85Rb in a micro optical trap and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the presence of both fast and slow relaxation processes, depending on the choice of the initial hyperfine states. This experimental method allows us to single out a particular relaxation process thus provides an extremely clean platform for collisional physics studies. Our results have also implications for engineering of quantum states via controlled collisions and creation of two-qubit quantum gates. PMID:26199051

  8. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. c-Fos expression in the paternal mouse brain induced by communicative interaction with maternal mates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2014-09-11

    Appropriate parental care by fathers greatly facilitates health in human family life. Much less is known from animal studies regarding the factors and neural circuitry that affect paternal behavior compared with those affecting maternal behavior. We recently reported that ICR mouse sires displayed maternal-like retrieval behavior when they were separated from pups and caged with their mates (co-housing) because the sires receive communicative interactions via ultrasonic and pheromone signals from the dams. We investigated the brain structures involved in regulating this activity by quantifying c-Fos-immunoreactive cells as neuronal activation markers in the neural pathway of male parental behavior. c-Fos expression in the medial preoptic area (mPOA) was significantly higher in sires that exhibited retrieval behavior (retrievers) than those with no such behavior (non-retrievers). Identical increased expression was found in the mPOA region in the retrievers stimulated by ultrasonic vocalizations or pheromones from their mates. Such increases in expression were not observed in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) or ventral palladium (VP). On the following day that we identified the families of the retrievers or non-retrievers, c-Fos expression in neuronal subsets in the mPOA, VTA, NAcc and VP was much higher in the retriever sires when they isolated together with their mates in new cages. This difference was not observed in the singly isolated retriever sires in new cages. The non-retriever sires did not display expression changes in the four brain regions that were assessed. The mPOA neurons appeared to be activated by direct communicative interactions with mate dams, including ultrasonic vocalizations and pheromones. The mPOA-VTA-NAcc-VP neural circuit appears to be involved in paternal retrieval behavior.

  10. Interaction of the 106-126 prion peptide with lipid membranes and potential implication for neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupiereux, Ingrid; Zorzi, Willy; Lins, Laurence; Brasseur, Robert; Colson, Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Elmoualij, Benaissa

    2005-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation in the brain of an abnormally misfolded, protease-resistant, and β-sheet rich pathogenic isoform (PrP sc ) of the cellular prion protein (PrP c ). In the present work, we were interested to study the mode of prion protein interaction with the membrane using the 106-126 peptide and small unilamellar lipid vesicles as model. As previously demonstrated, we showed by MTS assay that PrP 106-126 induces alterations in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We demonstrated for the first time by lipid-mixing assay and by the liposome vesicle leakage test that PrP 106-126, a non-tilted peptide, induces liposome fusion thus a potential cell membrane destabilization, as supported by membrane integrity assay (LDH). By circular dichroism (CD) analysis we showed that the fusogenic property of PrP 106-126 in the presence of liposome is associated with a predominantly β-sheet structure. These data suggest that the fusogenic property associated with a predominant β-sheet structure exhibited by the prion peptides contributes to the neurotoxicity of these peptides by destabilizing cellular membranes. The latter might be attached at the membrane surface in a parallel orientation as shown by molecular modeling

  11. Correlation between drug–drug interaction-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and related deaths in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jen Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant use of some drugs can lead to interactions between them resulting in severe adverse effects. To date, there are few reports of incidences of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS associated with combination drug administration. Therefore, we studied the relationship between drug combinations and SJS-related mortality, with the hope that a retrospective study of this nature would provide information crucial for the prevention of future drug-drug interaction related deaths attributable to SJS. This retrospective longitudinal study used mortality cases from 1999 to 2008 that were diagnosed as erythema multiforme (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification 695.1 from the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan. Statistical comparisons of the results were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA, independent sample t-tests, and odds ratio (OR. In this way, the relationship between combinations of SJS-inducing drugs and mortality could be determined. A total of 111 patients who had died, including 63 males and 48 females (66.0 ± 20 and 70.0 ± 17.7 years, respectively, were suspected of having experienced drug-drug interaction-related adverse effects. The associated drug combinations included allopurinol and ampicillin (p = 0.049, carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (TMP (p < 0.0001, carbamazepine and phenytoin (p < 0.0001, sulfamethoxazole/TMP and phenytoin (p = 0.015, sulfadoxine and piroxicam (p = 0.045, phenobarbital and cephalexin (p < 0.0001, ampicillin and erythromycin (p < 0.0001, erythromycin and minocycline (p < 0.0001, and vancomycin and ethambutol (p < 0.0001 administered 1 month before the patients' deaths. Caution should be exercised when administering any drugs that may possibly induce SJS. In addition, attention should be paid to ensure prompt identification of possible drug-drug interactions, and patients should be closely monitored. Furthermore

  12. Neuroligin-1 induces neurite outgrowth through interaction with neurexin-1ß and activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørlund, Michelle D; Nielsen, Janne; Pankratova, Stanislava

    2012-01-01

    Neurexin-1 (NRXN1) and neuroligin-1 (NLGN1) are synaptic cell adhesion molecules that connect pre- and postsynaptic neurons at synapses and mediate signaling across the synapse, which modulates synaptic activity and determines the properties of neuronal networks. Defects in the genes encoding NLGN1...... have been linked to cognitive diseases such as autism. The roles of both NRXN1 and NLGN1 during synaptogenesis have been studied extensively, but little is known about the role of these molecules in neuritogenesis, which eventually results in neuronal circuitry formation. The present study investigated...... the neuritogenic effect of NLGN1 in cultures of hippocampal neurons. Our results show that NLGN1, both in soluble and membrane-bound forms, induces neurite outgrowth that depends on the interaction with NRXN1ß and on activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1. In addition, we demonstrate that a synthetic...

  13. Extensional Strain Hardening Induced by π -π Interactions in Barely Entangled Polymer Chains: The Curious Case of Poly(4-vinylbiphenyl)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrón, Carlos R.; Zhou, Huaxing

    2017-12-01

    Aromatic π -π interactions between phenyl groups of adjacent chains in poly(4-vinylbiphenyl) (PVBP) have profound effects on the dynamics of this polymer. We report two unexpected nonlinear viscoelastic responses of PVBP when subjected to uniaxial flow. One is the unprecedented observation of extensional strain hardening (SH) in a barely entangled polymer melt. An even more intriguing finding is that SH of lightly (or even barely) entangled melts occurs at strain rates one order of magnitude below the coil-stretch transition predicted by Rouse theory (ɛ˙ H=0.5 /τR ).We postulate that this behavior is due to a molecular rearrangement mechanism (supported by x-ray diffraction measurements) that involves flow-induced π -π stacking of the phenyl groups, which results in an enhancement of the friction coefficient between polymer chains.

  14. Study of interaction among silicon, lithium, oxygen and radiation-induced defects for radiation-hardened solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    In order to improve reliability and the useful lifetime of solar cell arrays for space use, a program was undertaken to develop radiation-hardened lithium-doped silicon solar cells. These cells were shown to be significantly more resistant to degradation by ionized particles than the presently used n-p nonlithium-doped silicon solar cells. The results of various analyses performed to develop a more complete understanding of the physics of the interaction among lithium, silicon, oxygen, and radiation-induced defects are presented. A discussion is given of those portions of the previous model of radiation damage annealing which were found to be in error and those portions which were upheld by these extensive investigations.

  15. Molecular dynamics study on the interaction of a dislocation and radiation induced defect clusters in Fcc crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo, Kaburaki; Tomoko, Kadoyoshi; Futoshi, Shimizu; Hajime; Kimizuka; Shiro, Jitsukawa

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of high-energy neutrons and charged particles into solids is known to cause a significant change in mechanical properties, in particular, hardening of metals. Hardening of solids arises as a result of interactions of dislocations with irradiation induced defect clusters. Molecular dynamics method combined with the visualization method has been used to elucidate these complex pinning structures in details. In particular, we have successfully observed the transient process for the formation of a super-jog from an edge dislocation and interstitial and vacancy clusters under irradiation cascade conditions. Parallel molecular dynamics programs, called as Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil (PMDS), have been developed in order to perform these large scale simulations for materials simulations. The contents of the program and its parallel performance are also reported. (authors)

  16. Mechanisms and Consequences of Dopamine Depletion-Induced Attenuation of the Spinophilin/Neurofilament Medium Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Hiday

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling changes that occur in the striatum following the loss of dopamine neurons in the Parkinson disease (PD are poorly understood. While increases in the activity of kinases and decreases in the activity of phosphatases have been observed, the specific consequences of these changes are less well understood. Phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1, are highly promiscuous and obtain substrate selectivity via targeting proteins. Spinophilin is the major PP1-targeting protein enriched in the postsynaptic density of striatal dendritic spines. Spinophilin association with PP1 is increased concurrent with decreases in PP1 activity in an animal model of PD. Using proteomic-based approaches, we observed dopamine depletion-induced decreases in spinophilin binding to multiple protein classes in the striatum. Specifically, there was a decrease in the association of spinophilin with neurofilament medium (NF-M in dopamine-depleted striatum. Using a heterologous cell line, we determined that spinophilin binding to NF-M required overexpression of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and was decreased by cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5. Functionally, we demonstrate that spinophilin can decrease NF-M phosphorylation. Our data determine mechanisms that regulate, and putative consequences of, pathological changes in the association of spinophilin with NF-M that are observed in animal models of PD.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency in the case of elliptic polarization of interacting fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshkov, Oleg M.

    2018-04-01

    The theoretical investigation results of disintegration effect of elliptic polarized shot probe pulses of electromagnetically induced transparency in the counterintuitive superposed elliptic polarized control field and in weak probe field approximation are presented. It is shown that this disintegration occurs because the probe field in the medium is the sum of two normal modes, which correspond to elliptic polarized pulses with different speeds of propagation. The polarization ellipses of normal modes have equal eccentricities and mutually perpendicular major axes. Major axis of polarization ellipse of one normal mode is parallel to polarization ellipse major axis of control field, and electric vector of this mode rotates in the opposite direction, than electric vector of the control field. The electric vector other normal mode rotates in the same direction that the control field electric vector. The normal mode speed of the first type aforementioned is less than that of the second type. The polarization characteristics of the normal mode depend uniquely on the polarization characteristics of elliptic polarized control field and remain changeless in the propagation process. The theoretical investigation is performed for Λ-scheme of degenerated quantum transitions between 3P0, 3P10 and 3P2 energy levels of 208Pb isotope.

  18. Interaction between graviception and carotid baroreflex function in humans during parabolic flight-induced microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Marais, Michaël; Lericollais, Romain; Denise, Pierre; Raven, Peter B; Normand, Hervé

    2018-05-10

    The aim of the present study was to assess carotid baroreflex (CBR) during acute changes in otolithic activity in humans. To address this question, we designed a set of experiments to identify the modulatory effects of microgravity on CBR function at a tilt angle of -2{degree sign}, which was identified to minimize changes in central blood volume during parabolic flight. During parabolic flight at 0g and 1g, CBR function curves were modelled from the heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to rapid pulse trains of neck pressure (NP) and neck suction (NS) ranging from +40 to -80 Torr; CBR control of HR (carotid-HR) and MAP (carotid-MAP) baroreflex function curves, respectively. The maximal gain (G max ) of both carotid-HR and carotid-MAP baroreflex function curves were augmented during microgravity compared to 1g (carotid-HR, -0.53 to -0.80 beats/min/mmHg, Pflight-induced acute change of otolithic activity may modify CBR function and identifies that the vestibular system contributes to blood pressure regulation under fluctuations in gravitational forces.

  19. Induced Double-Beta Processes in Electron Fluxes as Resonance Reactions in Weak Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of induced double-beta processes in electron beams is developed. It is shown that a resonance mechanism of the excitation of the ground state of an intermediate nucleus is realized in them, this mechanism being described in the single-state-dominance approximation, where the process in question is broken down into two stages, the excitation of a dominant state and its decay. This approximation is valid irrespective of the features of this state, both for allowed (for a 1 + state of the intermediate nucleus) and for forbidden transitions. An analysis of the resonance mechanism reveals that its inclusion in double-beta-decay processes requires introducing additional diagrams that describe the gamma decay of virtual intermediate states. The inclusion of such corrections may lead to a decrease in the expected half-life and to a change in the beta spectrum. Effects associated with the interference between the two stages of a double-beta process are estimated, and it is shown that their influence can be significant if the time interval between these stages is less than or on the order of the lifetime of the dominant state

  20. Optimization of the LHC interaction region with respect to beam-induced energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Strait, J.B.

    1996-06-01

    Energy deposition in the superconducting magnets by particles from p- p collisions is a significant challenge for the design of the LHC high luminosity insertions. We have studies the dependence of the energy deposition on the apertures and strengths of insertion magnets and on the placement of absorbers in front of and within the quadrupoles. Monte Carlo simulations were made using the code DTUJET to generate 7x7 TeV p-p events and the code MARS to follow hadronic and electromagnetic cascades induced in the insertion components. The 3D geometry and magnetic field descriptions of the LHC-4.1 lattice were used. With a quadrupole coil aperture ≥70 mm, absorbers can be placed within the magnet bore which reduce the peak power density, at full luminosity, below 0.5 mW/g, a level that should allow the magnets to operate at their design field. The total heat load can be removed by a cooling system similar to that used in the main magnets

  1. INTERACTION BETWEEN DELTA OPIOID RECEPTORS AND BENZODIAZEPINES IN CO2- INDUCED RESPIRATORY RESPONSES IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Anne H.; Barnes, Dylan C.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Klein, Donald F.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    The false-suffocation hypothesis of panic disorder (Klein, 1993) suggested δ-opioid receptors as a possible source of the respiratory dysfunction manifested in panic attacks occurring in panic disorder (Preter and Klein, 2008). This study sought to determine if a lack of δ-opioid receptors in a mouse model affects respiratory response to elevated CO2, and whether the response is modulated by benzodiazepines, which are widely used to treat panic disorder. In a whole-body plethysmograph, respiratory responses to 5% CO2 were compared between δ-opioid receptor knockout mice and wild-type mice after saline, diazepam (1 mg/kg), and alprazolam (0.3 mg/kg) injection. The results show that lack of δ-opioid receptors does not affect normal response to elevated CO2, but does prevent benzodiazepines from modulating that response. Thus, in the presence of benzodiazepine agonists, respiratory responses to elevated CO2 were enhanced in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. This suggests an interplay between benzodiazepine receptors and δ-opioid receptors in regulating the respiratory effects of elevated CO2, which might be related to CO2 induced panic. PMID:21561601

  2. The evolution of interaction between grain boundary and irradiation-induced point defects: Symmetric tilt GB in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Yingying; Yao, Man; Wang, Xudong; Xu, Haixuan; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics method is used and scheme of calculational tests is designed. The atomic evolution view of the interaction between grain boundary (GB) and irradiation-induced point defects is given in six symmetric tilt GB structures of bcc tungsten with the energy of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) EPKA of 3 and 5 keV and the simulated temperature of 300 K. During the collision cascade with GB structure there are synergistic mechanisms to reduce the number of point defects: one is vacancies recombine with interstitials, and another is interstitials diffuse towards the GB with vacancies almost not move. The larger the ratio of the peak defect zone of the cascades overlaps with the GB region, the statistically relative smaller the number of surviving point defects in the grain interior (GI); and when the two almost do not overlap, vacancy-intensive area generally exists nearby GBs, and has a tendency to move toward GB with the increase of EPKA. In contrast, the distribution of interstitials is relatively uniform nearby GBs and is affected by the EPKA far less than the vacancy. The GB has a bias-absorption effect on the interstitials compared with vacancies. It shows that the number of surviving vacancies statistically has increasing trend with the increase of the distance between PKA and GB. While the number of surviving interstitials does not change much, and is less than the number of interstitials in the single crystal at the same conditions. The number of surviving vacancies in the GI is always larger than that of interstitials. The GB local extension after irradiation is observed for which the interstitials absorbed by the GB may be responsible. The designed scheme of calculational tests in the paper is completely applicable to the investigation of the interaction between other types of GBs and irradiation-induced point defects.

  3. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  4. Drug–drug interaction of microdose and regular-dose omeprazole with a CYP2C19 inhibitor and inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gab-jin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Seok-Ho; Shin, Young G; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A microdose drug–drug interaction (DDI) study may be a valuable tool for anticipating drug interaction at therapeutic doses. This study aimed to compare the magnitude of DDIs at microdoses and regular doses to explore the applicability of a microdose DDI study. Patients and methods Six healthy male volunteer subjects were enrolled into each DDI study of omeprazole (victim) and known perpetrators: fluconazole (inhibitor) and rifampin (inducer). For both studies, the microdose (100 μg, cold compound) and the regular dose (20 mg) of omeprazole were given at days 0 and 1, respectively. On days 2–9, the inhibitor or inducer was given daily, and the microdose and regular dose of omeprazole were repeated at days 8 and 9, respectively. Full omeprazole pharmacokinetic samplings were performed at days 0, 1, 8, and 9 of both studies for noncompartmental analysis. Results The magnitude of the DDI, the geometric mean ratios (with perpetrator/omeprazole only) of maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve to the last measurement (AUCt) of the microdose and the regular dose were compared. The geometric mean ratios in the inhibition study were: 2.17 (micro) and 2.68 (regular) for Cmax, and 4.07 (micro), 4.33 (regular) for AUCt. For the induction study, they were 0.26 (micro) and 0.21 (regular) for Cmax, and 0.16 (micro) and 0.15 (regular) for AUCt. There were no significant statistical differences in the magnitudes of DDIs between microdose and regular-dose conditions, regardless of induction or inhibition. Conclusion Our results may be used as partial evidence that microdose DDI studies may replace regular-dose studies, or at least be used for DDI-screening purposes. PMID:28408803

  5. Drug-drug interaction of microdose and regular-dose omeprazole with a CYP2C19 inhibitor and inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gab-Jin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Seok-Ho; Shin, Young G; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    A microdose drug-drug interaction (DDI) study may be a valuable tool for anticipating drug interaction at therapeutic doses. This study aimed to compare the magnitude of DDIs at microdoses and regular doses to explore the applicability of a microdose DDI study. Six healthy male volunteer subjects were enrolled into each DDI study of omeprazole (victim) and known perpetrators: fluconazole (inhibitor) and rifampin (inducer). For both studies, the microdose (100 μg, cold compound) and the regular dose (20 mg) of omeprazole were given at days 0 and 1, respectively. On days 2-9, the inhibitor or inducer was given daily, and the microdose and regular dose of omeprazole were repeated at days 8 and 9, respectively. Full omeprazole pharmacokinetic samplings were performed at days 0, 1, 8, and 9 of both studies for noncompartmental analysis. The magnitude of the DDI, the geometric mean ratios (with perpetrator/omeprazole only) of maximum concentration (C max ) and area under the curve to the last measurement (AUC t ) of the microdose and the regular dose were compared. The geometric mean ratios in the inhibition study were: 2.17 (micro) and 2.68 (regular) for C max , and 4.07 (micro), 4.33 (regular) for AUC t . For the induction study, they were 0.26 (micro) and 0.21 (regular) for C max , and 0.16 (micro) and 0.15 (regular) for AUC t . There were no significant statistical differences in the magnitudes of DDIs between microdose and regular-dose conditions, regardless of induction or inhibition. Our results may be used as partial evidence that microdose DDI studies may replace regular-dose studies, or at least be used for DDI-screening purposes.

  6. The Antifungal Plant Defensin HsAFP1 Is a Phosphatidic Acid-Interacting Peptide Inducing Membrane Permeabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanne L. Cools

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HsAFP1, a plant defensin isolated from coral bells (Heuchera sanguinea, is characterized by broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Previous studies indicated that HsAFP1 binds to specific fungal membrane components, which had hitherto not been identified, and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we show that HsAFP1 reversibly interacts with the membrane phospholipid phosphatidic acid (PA, which is a precursor for the biosynthesis of other phospholipids, and to a lesser extent with various phosphatidyl inositol phosphates (PtdInsP’s. Moreover, via reverse ELISA assays we identified two basic amino acids in HsAFP1, namely histidine at position 32 and arginine at position 52, as well as the phosphate group in PA as important features enabling this interaction. Using a HsAFP1 variant, lacking both amino acids (HsAFP1[H32A][R52A], we showed that, as compared to the native peptide, the ability of this variant to bind to PA and PtdInsP’s is reduced (≥74% and the antifungal activity of the variant is reduced (≥2-fold, highlighting the link between PA/PtdInsP binding and antifungal activity. Using fluorescently labelled HsAFP1 in confocal microscopy and flow cytometry assays, we showed that HsAFP1 accumulates at the cell surface of yeast cells with intact membranes, most notably at the buds and septa. The resulting HsAFP1-induced membrane permeabilization is likely to occur after HsAFP1’s internalization. These data provide novel mechanistic insights in the mode of action of the HsAFP1 plant defensin.

  7. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  8. Interaction between the dopaminergic and opioidergic systems in dorsal hippocampus in modulation of formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi, Zahra; Haghparast, Amir; Pahlevani, Pouyan; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus is a region of the brain that serves several functions. The dopaminergic system acts through D1- and D2-like receptors to interfere in pain modulation and the opioid receptors play major roles in analgesic processes and there are obvious overlaps between these two systems. The present study investigated the interaction between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems in the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) region for formalin-induced orofacial pain. Two guide cannulae were stereotaxically implanted in the CA1 region and morphine (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 μg/0.5 μl saline) and naloxone (0.3, 1 and 3 μg/0.5 μl saline) were used as the opioid receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively. SKF-38393 (1 μg/0.5 μl saline) was used as a D1-like receptor agonist, quinpirole (2 μg/0.5 μl saline) as a D2-like receptor agonist, SCH-23390 (0.5 μg/0.5 μl saline) as a D1-like receptor antagonist and sulpiride (3 μg/0.5 μl DMSO) as a D2-like receptor antagonist. To induce orofacial pain, 50 μl of 1% formalin was subcutaneously injected into the left side of the upper lip. Our results showed that different doses of morphine significantly reduced orofacial pain in both phases induced by formalin. Naloxone (1 and 3 μg) reversed morphine induced analgesia in CA1. SKF-38393 and quinpirole with naloxone (1 μg) significantly decreased formalin-induced orofacial pain in both phases. SCH-23390 had no effect on the antinociceptive response of morphine in both phases of orofacial pain. Sulpiride reversed the antinociceptive effects of morphine only in the first phase, but this result was not significant. Our findings suggest that there is cross-talk between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems. Opioidergic neurons also exerted antinociceptive effects by modulation of the dopaminergic system in the CA1 region of the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  10. Electrically and mechanically induced macroscopic body couple, a newly recognized phenomenon of electromechanical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Microscopically, when the molecules of certain materials are under the influence of external stimuli such as mechanical and electrical forces, several processes can happen. In particular, the centers of charge of the positive and negative ions of a molecule may displace with respect to each other. This notion leads to the macroscopic concept of polarization which has been exploited in the classical studies of piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials. In addition, the ions of the molecule may also rotate angularly relative to one another. Here an entirely new macroscopic concept of body couple which differs from the classical concept is introduced. It is shown that the simplest representations of the proposed constitutive relations lead to an equation within the context of the classical bending theory of thin plates whose solution is in remarkable agreement with recent experimental results concerning the bending of thin virgin ferroelectric ceramic discs under the action of small d.c. voltages. These experimental results cannot be explained by the classical notion of polarization. Therefore, the concept of macroscopic body couple introduced here is a fundamental feature which must be taken into account in the considerations of electromechanical interactions

  11. Heparin Interaction with the Primed Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte CD11b Induces Apoptosis and Prevents Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meital Cohen-Mazor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparin is known to have anti-inflammatory effects, yet the mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that heparin has a direct effect on activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, changing their activation state, and can explain its anti-inflammatory effect. To test our hypothesis, we designed both in vitro and ex vivo studies to elucidate the mechanism by which heparin modulates PMNL functions and therefore the inflammatory response. We specifically tested the hypothesis that priming of PMNLs renders them more susceptible to heparin. Amplified levels of CD11b and increased rate of superoxide release manifested PMNL priming. Increase in cell priming resulted in a dose-dependent increase in heparin binding to PMNLs followed by augmented apoptosis. Blocking antibodies to CD11b inhibited heparin binding and abolished the apoptotic response. Moreover, heparin caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the rate of superoxide release from PMNLs, which was blunted by blocking antibodies to CD11b. Altogether, this study shows that the interaction of heparin with the PMNL CD11b results in cell apoptosis and explains heparin’s anti-inflammatory effects.

  12. Probing the interactions of charmed mesons with nuclei in anti p-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubeva, Ye.S.; Cassing, W.; Kondratyuk, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    We study the perspectives of resonant and nonresonant charmed-meson production in anti p+A reactions within the Multiple Scattering Monte Carlo (MSMC) approach. We calculate the production of the resonances Ψ(3770), Ψ(4040) and Ψ(4160) on various nuclei, their propagation and decay to D, anti D, D * , anti DD * , D s , anti D s in the medium and vacuum, respectively. The modifications of the open charm vector mesons in the nuclear medium are found to be rather moderate or even small such that dilepton spectroscopy will require an invariant mass resolution of a few MeV. Furthermore, the elastic and inelastic interactions of the open charm mesons in the medium are taken into account, which can be related to (u, d)-, s- or c-quark exchange with nucleons. It is found that by studying the D/ anti D ratio for low momenta in the laboratory (≤2-2.2 GeV/c) as a function of the target mass A stringent constraints on the c-quark exchange cross-section can be obtained. On the other hand, the ratios D - s /D + s as well as D/D - s and D/D + s at low momenta as a function of A will permit to fix independently the strength of the s-quark exchange reaction in D - s N scattering. (orig.)

  13. Top quark rare decays via loop-induced FCNC interactions in extended mirror fermion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, P. Q.; Lin, Yu-Xiang; Nugroho, Chrisna Setyo; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2018-02-01

    Flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions for a top quark t decays into Xq with X represents a neutral gauge or Higgs boson, and q a up- or charm-quark are highly suppressed in the Standard Model (SM) due to the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Miami mechanism. Whilst current limits on the branching ratios of these processes have been established at the order of 10-4 from the Large Hadron Collider experiments, SM predictions are at least nine orders of magnitude below. In this work, we study some of these FCNC processes in the context of an extended mirror fermion model, originally proposed to implement the electroweak scale seesaw mechanism for non-sterile right-handed neutrinos. We show that one can probe the process t → Zc for a wide range of parameter space with branching ratios varying from 10-6 to 10-8, comparable with various new physics models including the general two Higgs doublet model with or without flavor violations at tree level, minimal supersymmetric standard model with or without R-parity, and extra dimension model.

  14. Interaction of DNA-lesions induced by sodium fluoride and radiation and its influence in apoptotic induction in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is an essential trace element but also an environmental contaminant with major sources of exposure being drinking water, food and pesticides. Previous studies showed that sodium fluoride (NaF at 5 mM or more is required to induce apoptosis and chromosome aberrations and proposed that DNA damage and apoptosis play an important role in toxicity of excessive fluoride. The aim of this study is directed to understand the nature of DNA-lesions induced by NaF by allowing its interaction with radiation induced DNA-lesions. NaF 5 mM was used after observing inability to induce DNA damages and apoptosis by single exposure with 50 μM or 1 mM NaF. Co-exposure to NaF and radiation significantly increased the frequency of aberrant metaphases and exchange aberrations in human lymphocytes and arrested the cells in G1 stage instead of apoptotic death. Flow cytometric analysis, DNA fragmentation and PARP-cleavage analysis clearly indicated that 5 mM NaF together with radiation (1 Gy induced apoptosis in both U87 and K562 cells due to down regulation of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, like Bcl2 in U87 and inhibitors of apoptotic proteins like survivin and cIAP in K562 cells. This study herein suggested that single exposure with extremely low concentration of NaF unable to induce DNA lesions whereas higher concentration induced DNA lesions interact with the radiation-induced DNA lesions. Both are probably repaired rapidly thus showed increased interactive effect. Coexposure to NaF and radiation induces more apoptosis in cancer cell lines which could be due to increased exchange aberrations through lesions interaction and downregulating anti-apoptotic genes.

  15. Kinetics of the inhibitory interaction of organophosphorus neuropathy inducers and non-inducers in soluble esterases in the avian nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estevez, Jorge, E-mail: jorge.estevez@umh.es

    2011-11-15

    Some published studies suggest that low level exposure to organophosphorus esters (OPs) may cause neurological and neurobehavioral effects at long term exposure. These effects cannot be explained by action on known targets. In this work, the interactions (inhibition, spontaneous reactivation and 'ongoing inhibition') of two model OPs (paraoxon, non neuropathy-inducer, and mipafox, neuropathy-inducer) with the chicken brain soluble esterases were evaluated. The best-fitting kinetic model with both inhibitors was compatible with three enzymatic components. The amplitudes (proportions) of the components detected with mipafox were similar to those obtained with paraoxon. These observations confirm the consistency of the results and the model applied and may be considered an external validation. The most sensitive component (E{alpha}) for paraoxon (11-23% of activity, I{sub 50} (30 min) = 9-11 nM) is also the most sensitive for mipafox (I{sub 50} (30 min) = 4 nM). This component is spontaneously reactivated after inhibition with paraoxon. The second sensitive component to paraoxon (E{beta}, 71-84% of activity; I{sub 50} (30 min) = 1216 nM) is practically resistant to mipafox. The third component (E{gamma}, 5-8% of activity) is paraoxon resistant and has I{sub 50} (30 min) of 3.4 {mu}M with mipafox, similar to NTE (neuropathy target esterase). The role of these esterases remains unknown. Their high sensitivity suggests that they may either play a role in toxicity in low-level long-term exposure of organophosphate compounds or have a protective effect related with the spontaneous reactivation. They will have to be considered in further metabolic and toxicological studies. -- Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paraoxon and mipafox interactions have been evaluated with chicken soluble brain esterases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paraoxon inhibition was analyzed considering the simultaneous spontaneous reactivation. Black

  16. Kinetics of the inhibitory interaction of organophosphorus neuropathy inducers and non-inducers in soluble esterases in the avian nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Some published studies suggest that low level exposure to organophosphorus esters (OPs) may cause neurological and neurobehavioral effects at long term exposure. These effects cannot be explained by action on known targets. In this work, the interactions (inhibition, spontaneous reactivation and “ongoing inhibition”) of two model OPs (paraoxon, non neuropathy-inducer, and mipafox, neuropathy-inducer) with the chicken brain soluble esterases were evaluated. The best-fitting kinetic model with both inhibitors was compatible with three enzymatic components. The amplitudes (proportions) of the components detected with mipafox were similar to those obtained with paraoxon. These observations confirm the consistency of the results and the model applied and may be considered an external validation. The most sensitive component (Eα) for paraoxon (11–23% of activity, I 50 (30 min) = 9–11 nM) is also the most sensitive for mipafox (I 50 (30 min) = 4 nM). This component is spontaneously reactivated after inhibition with paraoxon. The second sensitive component to paraoxon (Eβ, 71–84% of activity; I 50 (30 min) = 1216 nM) is practically resistant to mipafox. The third component (Eγ, 5–8% of activity) is paraoxon resistant and has I 50 (30 min) of 3.4 μM with mipafox, similar to NTE (neuropathy target esterase). The role of these esterases remains unknown. Their high sensitivity suggests that they may either play a role in toxicity in low-level long-term exposure of organophosphate compounds or have a protective effect related with the spontaneous reactivation. They will have to be considered in further metabolic and toxicological studies. -- Research Highlights: ► Paraoxon and mipafox interactions have been evaluated with chicken soluble brain esterases. ► The paraoxon inhibition was analyzed considering the simultaneous spontaneous reactivation. ► The best-fitting kinetic models were compatible with a three enzymatic components. ► The amplitudes of the

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Red Wine Extracts on Endothelial-Dependent Adhesive Interactions with Monocytes Induced by Oxysterols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Naito

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Red wine polyphenolic compounds have been demonstrated to possess antioxidant properties, and several studies have suggested that they might constitute a relevant dietary factor in the protection from coronary heart disease. The aim of the present study is to examine whether red wine extracts (RWE can ameliorate oxysterol-induced endothelial response, and whether inhibition of adhesion molecule expression is involved in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Surface expression and mRNA levels of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 were determined by ELISA and RT-PCR performed on human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC monolayers stimulated with 7b-hydroxycholesterol or 25-hydroxycholesterol. Incubation of HAEC with oxysterols (10 muM increased expression of adhesion molecules in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment of HAEC with RWE at final concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml significantly inhibited the increase of surface protein expression and mRNA levels. Adherence of monocytes to oxysterol-stimulated HAEC was increased compared to that of unstimulated cells. Treatment of HAEC with RWE significantly inhibited adherence of monocytes. These results suggest that RWE works as an anti-atherogenic agent through the inhibition of endothelial-dependent adhesive interactions with monocytes induced by oxysterols

  18. Cyclophilin B induces chemoresistance by degrading wild type p53 via interaction with MDM2 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae Gyu; Nguyen, Minh Nam; Kim, Jieun; Jo, Yong Hwa; Jang, Miran; Nguyen, Ngoc Ngo Yen; Yun, Hyeong Rok; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Tang, Dean G; Kim, Sung Soo

    2018-06-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Chemoresistance is a major problem for effective therapy in CRC. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which peptidylprolyl isomerase B (PPIB; cyclophilin B, CypB) regulates chemoresistance in CRC. We found that CypB is a novel wild type p53 (p53WT)-inducible gene but a negative regulator of p53WT in response to oxaliplatin treatment. Overexpression of CypB shortens the half-life of p53WT and inhibits oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis in CRC cells, whereas knockdown of CypB lengthens the half-life of p53WT and stimulates p53WT dependent apoptosis. CypB interacts directly with MDM2, and enhances MDM2-dependent p53WT ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, we firmly validated using bioinformatics analyses that overexpression of CypB is associated with poor prognosis in CRC progression and chemoresistance. Hence, we suggest a novel mechanism of chemoresistance caused by overexpressed CypB, which may help to develop new anti-cancer drugs. We also propose that CypB may be utilized as a predictive biomarker in CRC patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The mitosis-regulating and protein-protein interaction activities of astrin are controlled by aurora-A-induced phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Chen, Jo-Mei Maureen; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Cheng, Tai-Shan; Wang, Ya-Hui Candice; Ku, Chia-Feng; Lian, Chiao-Hsuan; Liu, Chun-Chih Jared; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Yu, Chang-Tze Ricky

    2014-09-01

    Cells display dramatic morphological changes in mitosis, where numerous factors form regulatory networks to orchestrate the complicated process, resulting in extreme fidelity of the segregation of duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Astrin regulates several aspects of mitosis, such as maintaining the cohesion of sister chromatids by inactivating Separase and stabilizing spindle, aligning and segregating chromosomes, and silencing spindle assembly checkpoint by interacting with Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein (SKAP) and cytoplasmic linker-associated protein-1α (CLASP-1α). To understand how Astrin is regulated in mitosis, we report here that Astrin acts as a mitotic phosphoprotein, and Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin at Ser(115). The phosphorylation-deficient mutant Astrin S115A abnormally activates spindle assembly checkpoint and delays mitosis progression, decreases spindle stability, and induces chromosome misalignment. Mechanistic analyses reveal that Astrin phosphorylation mimicking mutant S115D, instead of S115A, binds and induces ubiquitination and degradation of securin, which sequentially activates Separase, an enzyme required for the separation of sister chromatids. Moreover, S115A fails to bind mitosis regulators, including SKAP and CLASP-1α, which results in the mitotic defects observed in Astrin S115A-transfected cells. In conclusion, Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin and guides the binding of Astrin to its cellular partners, which ensures proper progression of mitosis. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Particle emission induced by the interaction of highly charged slow Xe-ions with a SiO2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Skogvall, B.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.; DeWitt, D.; McDonald, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sputtering of surface atoms by low energy (a few keV) heavy ions is a commonly used technique in material science and applied physics. In general, sputtering occurs via nuclear energy transfer processes and is determined mainly by the atom-atom interaction potentials. In the energy range of interest these potentials depend only slightly on the charge state of one collision partner if the other is neutral. The development of new ion-sources, however, allows for the use of ions with charged states of q > 50. For these highly charged ions it is conceivable that electronic processes come into play as well. If, for example, the density of charged surface atoms exceeds a certain limit, then particle emission can occur via the electrostatic repulsion of target atoms, the so-called Coulomb explosion. Indications for such electronic effects have been found in a few investigations of ion-induced sputtering Si (q q+ ). However, the order of magnitude of this effect is not clear until now. In this work we present preliminary data on sputtering, ion backscattering, electron and photon emission from SiO 2 surface induced by incident Xe ions of very high charge states (q=30--50). The experiment was performed at the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a time-of-flight (TOF) ion analyzer-system from the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin

  1. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health.

  2. Oligofructose protects against arsenic-induced liver injury in a model of environment/obesity interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, Veronica L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Stocke, Kendall S. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Schmidt, Robin H.; Tan, Min [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Ajami, Nadim [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Neal, Rachel E. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Petrosino, Joseph F. [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Arteel, Gavin E., E-mail: gavin.arteel@louisville.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic (As) tops the ATSDR list of hazardous environmental chemicals and is known to cause liver injury. Although the concentrations of As found in the US water supply are generally too low to directly damage the liver, subhepatotoxic doses of As sensitize the liver to experimental NAFLD. It is now suspected that GI microbiome dysbiosis plays an important role in development of NALFD. Importantly, arsenic has also been shown to alter the microbiome. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the prebiotic oligofructose (OFC) protects against enhanced liver injury caused by As in experimental NAFLD. Male C57Bl6/J mice were fed low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD), or HFD containing oligofructose (OFC) during concomitant exposure to either tap water or As-containing water (4.9 ppm as sodium arsenite) for 10 weeks. HFD significantly increased body mass and caused fatty liver injury, as characterized by an increased liver weight-to-body weight ratio, histologic changes and transaminases. As observed previously, As enhanced HFD-induced liver damage, which was characterized by enhanced inflammation. OFC supplementation protected against the enhanced liver damage caused by As in the presence of HFD. Interestingly, arsenic, HFD and OFC all caused unique changes to the gut flora. These data support previous findings that low concentrations of As enhance liver damage caused by high fat diet. Furthermore, these results indicate that these effects of arsenic may be mediated, at least in part, by GI tract dysbiosis and that prebiotic supplementation may confer significant protective effects. - Highlights: • Arsenic (As) enhances liver damage caused by a high-fat (HFD) diet in mice. • Oligofructose protects against As-enhanced liver damage caused by HFD. • As causes dysbiosis in the GI tract and exacerbates the dysbiosis caused by HFD. • OFC prevents the dysbiosis caused by HFD and As, increasing commensal bacteria.

  3. Oligofructose protects against arsenic-induced liver injury in a model of environment/obesity interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, Veronica L.; Stocke, Kendall S.; Schmidt, Robin H.; Tan, Min; Ajami, Nadim; Neal, Rachel E.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Barve, Shirish; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) tops the ATSDR list of hazardous environmental chemicals and is known to cause liver injury. Although the concentrations of As found in the US water supply are generally too low to directly damage the liver, subhepatotoxic doses of As sensitize the liver to experimental NAFLD. It is now suspected that GI microbiome dysbiosis plays an important role in development of NALFD. Importantly, arsenic has also been shown to alter the microbiome. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the prebiotic oligofructose (OFC) protects against enhanced liver injury caused by As in experimental NAFLD. Male C57Bl6/J mice were fed low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD), or HFD containing oligofructose (OFC) during concomitant exposure to either tap water or As-containing water (4.9 ppm as sodium arsenite) for 10 weeks. HFD significantly increased body mass and caused fatty liver injury, as characterized by an increased liver weight-to-body weight ratio, histologic changes and transaminases. As observed previously, As enhanced HFD-induced liver damage, which was characterized by enhanced inflammation. OFC supplementation protected against the enhanced liver damage caused by As in the presence of HFD. Interestingly, arsenic, HFD and OFC all caused unique changes to the gut flora. These data support previous findings that low concentrations of As enhance liver damage caused by high fat diet. Furthermore, these results indicate that these effects of arsenic may be mediated, at least in part, by GI tract dysbiosis and that prebiotic supplementation may confer significant protective effects. - Highlights: • Arsenic (As) enhances liver damage caused by a high-fat (HFD) diet in mice. • Oligofructose protects against As-enhanced liver damage caused by HFD. • As causes dysbiosis in the GI tract and exacerbates the dysbiosis caused by HFD. • OFC prevents the dysbiosis caused by HFD and As, increasing commensal bacteria

  4. Toxic cocaine- and convulsant-induced modification of forced swimming behaviors and their interaction with ethanol: comparison with immobilization stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, Tamaki; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2002-01-01

    Background Swimming behaviors in the forced swimming test have been reported to be depressed by stressors. Since toxic convulsion-inducing drugs related to dopamine [cocaine (COC)], benzodiazepine [methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-carboxylate (DMCM)], γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) [bicuculline (BIC)], and glutamate [N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)] receptors can function as stressors, the present study compared their effects on the forced swimming behaviors with the effects of immobilization stress (IM) in rats. Their interactions with ethanol (EtOH), the most frequently coabused drug with COC which also induces convulsions as withdrawal symptoms but interferes with the convulsions caused by other drugs, were also investigated. Results Similar to the IM (10 min) group, depressed swimming behaviors (attenuated time until immobility and activity counts) were observed in the BIC (5 mg/kg IP) and DMCM (10 mg/kg IP) groups at the 5 h time point, after which no toxic behavioral symptoms were observed. However, they were normalized to the control levels at the 12 h point, with or without EtOH (1.5 g/kg IP). In the COC (60 mg/kg IP) and NMDA (200 mg/kg IP) groups, the depression occurred late (12 h point), and was normalized by the EtOH cotreatment. At the 5 h point, the COC treatment enhanced the swimming behaviors above the control level. Conclusions Although the physiological stress (IM), BIC, and DMCM also depressed the swimming behaviors, a delayed occurrence and EtOH-induced recovery of depressed swimming were observed only in the COC and NMDA groups. This might be correlated with the previously-reported delayed responses of DA and NMDA neurons rather than direct effects of the drugs, which could be suppressed by EtOH. Furthermore, the characteristic psychostimulant effects of COC seemed to be correlated with an early enhancement of swimming behaviors. PMID:12425723

  5. Thermally induced magnonic spin current, thermomagnonic torques, and domain-wall dynamics in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-G.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Guo, G.-H.; Sukhov, A.; Dugaev, V.; Barnaś, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-09-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion in magnetic insulators has been considered theoretically, with a particular focus on the role of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and thermomagnonic torques. The thermally assisted DW motion is a consequence of the magnonic spin current due to the applied thermal bias. In addition to the exchange magnonic spin current and the exchange adiabatic and the entropic spin transfer torques, we also consider the DMI-induced magnonic spin current, thermomagnonic DMI fieldlike torque, and the DMI entropic torque. Analytical estimations are supported by numerical calculations. We found that the DMI has a substantial influence on the size and the geometry of DWs, and that the DWs become oriented parallel to the long axis of the nanostrip. Increasing the temperature smoothes the DWs. Moreover, the thermally induced magnonic current generates a torque on the DWs, which is responsible for their motion. From our analysis it follows that for a large enough DMI the influence of DMI-induced fieldlike torque is much stronger than that of the DMI and the exchange entropic torques. By manipulating the strength of the DMI constant, one can control the speed of the DW motion, and the direction of the DW motion can be switched, as well. We also found that DMI not only contributes to the total magnonic current, but also it modifies the exchange magnonic spin current, and this modification depends on the orientation of the steady-state magnetization. The observed phenomenon can be utilized in spin caloritronics devices, for example in the DMI based thermal diodes. By switching the magnetization direction, one can rectify the total magnonic spin current.

  6. Quantifying microbe-mineral interactions leading to remotely detectable induced polarization signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Moysey, Stephen; Dean, Delphine

    2013-11-14

    The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column-scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain-scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high-quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process-based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for

  7. Quantifying Microbe-Mineral Interactions Leading to Remotely Detectable Induced Polarization Signals (Final Project Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moysey, Stephen [Clemson University; Dean, Delphine [Clemson University; Dimitrios, Ntarlagiannis [Rutgers University

    2013-11-13

    The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column-scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain-scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high-quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process-based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for

  8. Isobolographic analysis of the opioid-opioid interactions in a tonic and a phasic mouse model of induced nociceptive pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Zanetta, Pilar; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Prieto-Rayo, Juan Carlos; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2014-07-15

    Opioids have been used for the management of pain and coadministration of two opioids may induce synergism. In a model of tonic pain, the acetic acid writhing test and in a phasic model, the hot plate, the antinociceptive interaction between fentanyl, methadone, morphine, and tramadol was evaluated. The potency of opioids in the writhing test compared to the hot plate assay was from 2.5 (fentanyl) to 15.5 (morphine) times, respectively. The ED50 was used in a fixed ratio for each of the six pairs of opioid combinations, which, resulted in a synergistic antinociception except for methadone/tramadol and fentanyl/tramadol which were additive, in the hot plate. The opioid antagonists naltrexone, naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, suggests that the synergism of morphine combinations are due to the activation of MOR subtypes with partially contribution of DOR and KOR, however fentanyl and methadone combinations are partially due to the activation of MOR and DOR subtypes and KOR lack of participation. The antinociceptive effects of tramadol combinations, are partially due to the activation of MOR, DOR and KOR opioid subtypes. These results suggets that effectiveness and magnitude of the interactions between opioids are dependent on pain stimulus intensity.

  9. Soluble extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, EMN) regulates cancer-related cellular functions by homotypic interactions with surface CD147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutti, Nadine; Kuepper, Michael; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer) is a widely expressed glycoprotein and a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which exists in both a membrane-spanning and a soluble form. Homotypic interactions of EMMPRIN underlie its multiple roles in normal development and pathological situations such as viral infections, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. This study employed a recombinant soluble, fully glycosylated EMMPRIN domain (rhsEMN) as a tool to characterize the structural basis of EMMPRIN-EMMPRIN receptor (EMNR) contacts and their functional effects on MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. rhsEMN did not form dimers in solution but bound to surface EMMPRIN (EMN) on MCF-7 cells with high affinity and was readily internalized. The interaction interface for the homotypic contact was localized to the N-terminal Ig domain. rhsEMN exerted a stimulatory effect on proliferation of MCF-7 cells whereas it reduced cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were accompanied by an upregulation of endogenous EMMPRIN as well as of matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), a membrane-bound protease involved in the extracellular release of soluble EMMPRIN, indicating a regulatory feedback mechanism. The proliferation-promoting activity of rhsEMN was mimicked by a novel functional antibody directed to EMMPRIN, underscoring that crosslinking of cell surface EMMPRIN (EMNR) is crucial for eliciting intracellular signalling. Addressing malignancy-related signal transduction in HEK-293 cells, we could show that rhsEMN triggers the oncogenic Wnt pathway. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of megavoltage x-ray interaction-induced signal and noise in detectors for container inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinwoo; Park, Jiwoong; Kim, Junwoo; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chang Hwy [Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In a scanner system, a scintillation crystal is the first stage in the cascaded imaging chain transferring x-ray interaction information in cargo to be investigated to the final user who investigates x-ray images. On the other hand, the signal and noise is irreversibly transferred through the cascaded imaging chain. Therefore, the imaging performance of the first stage scintillator mainly governs the ultimate imaging performance of the system. In MV imaging, it is generally accepted that high-density scintillators, because of their sufficient optical yield, and low optical self-absorption and scattering coefficients. We chose the CdWO{sub 4} as the scintillation material. CdWO{sub 4} has a high density (7.9 g/cm{sup 3}), high atomic number (64), resistance to radiation, high optical yield, and low optical self-absorption. For the given MV spectrum, the improvement of QE from a detector with a thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm is 27% whereas the improvement from 30 mm to 50 mm is only 7%. On the other hand, the Swank noise is almost independent of the detector thickness. Consequently, the improvement of DQE from a detector with a thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm is 46% whereas the improvement from 30 mm to 50 mm is only 11%. In conclusion, the detector thickness of 30 mm would be the best for x-ray interaction-induced signal and noise performance as well as cost.

  11. Rab39a interacts with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and negatively regulates autophagy induced by lipopolysaccharide stimulation in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Seto

    Full Text Available Rab39a has pleiotropic functions in phagosome maturation, inflammatory activation and neuritogenesis. Here, we characterized Rab39a function in membrane trafficking of phagocytosis and autophagy induction in macrophages. Rab39a localized to the periphery of LAMP2-positive vesicles and showed the similar kinetics on the phagosome to that of LAMP1. The depletion of Rab39a did not influence the localization of LAMP2 to the phagosome, but it augments the autophagosome formation and LC3 processing by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation. The augmentation of autophagosome formation in Rab39a-knockdown macrophages was suppressed by Atg5 depletion or an inhibitor for phosphatidylinostol 3-kinase (PI3K. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rab39a interacts with PI3K and that the amino acid residues from 34(th to 41(st in Rab39a were indispensable for this interaction. These results suggest that Rab39a negatively regulates the LPS-induced autophagy in macrophages.

  12. Continuum contribution to excitonic four-wave mixing due to interaction-induced nonlinearities: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, K.; Birkedal, D.; Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of ultrafast transient four-wave mixing (FWM) of GaAs quantum wells for coherent excitation of excitons and a large number of continuum states. It is shown that in this case the line shape of the FWM signal is drastically altered due to an interaction-induced coupling of the exciton to all the excited continuum states. The signal is dominantly emitted at the spectral position of the exciton and decays, as a function of delay, on a time scale set by the duration of the laser pulse rather than by the intrinsic dephasing time. Nevertheless, the spectral width of the exciton line in the FWM spectrum and in the decay of the time-resolved FWM signal in real time are governed by the intrinsic excitonic dephasing rate. It is shown that for pulse durations of ~ 100 fs (for GaAs quantum wells) this behavior can be explained as the influence of the Coulomb exchange interaction, while for even shorter pulses this behavior is dominantly caused by nonlinear polarization decay.

  13. Synaptotagmin 11 interacts with components of the RNA-induced silencing complex RISC in clonal pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milochau, Alexandra; Lagrée, Valérie; Benassy, Marie-Noëlle; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Papin, Julien; Garcia-Arcos, Itsaso; Lajoix, Anne; Monterrat, Carole; Coudert, Laetitia; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Ochoa, Begoña; Lang, Jochen

    2014-06-27

    Synaptotagmins are two C2 domain-containing transmembrane proteins. The function of calcium-sensitive members in the regulation of post-Golgi traffic has been well established whereas little is known about the calcium-insensitive isoforms constituting half of the protein family. Novel binding partners of synaptotagmin 11 were identified in β-cells. A number of them had been assigned previously to ER/Golgi derived-vesicles or linked to RNA synthesis, translation and processing. Whereas the C2A domain interacted with the Q-SNARE Vti1a, the C2B domain of syt11 interacted with the SND1, Ago2 and FMRP, components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Binding to SND was direct via its N-terminal tandem repeats. Our data indicate that syt11 may provide a link between gene regulation by microRNAs and membrane traffic. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Embryological exposure to valproic acid induces social interaction deficits in zebrafish (Danio rerio): A developmental behavior analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Fernanda Francine; Gaspary, Karina Vidarte; Leite, Carlos Eduardo; De Paula Cognato, Giana; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-01-01

    Changes in social behavior are associated with brain disorders, including mood disorders, stress, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, anxiety, hyperactivity, and the presence of restricted interests. Zebrafish is one of the most social vertebrates used as a model in biomedical research, contributing to an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie social behavior. Valproic acid (VPA) is used as an anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer; however, prenatal VPA exposure in humans has been associated with an increased incidence of autism and it can also affect fetal brain development. Therefore, we conducted a behavioral screening at different periods of zebrafish development at 6, 30, 70, and 120dpf (days postfertilization) after VPA exposure in the early development stage to investigate social behavior, locomotion, aggression, and anxiety. VPA (48μM) exposure during the first 48hpf (hours postfertilization) did not promote changes on survival, morphology, and hatching rate at 24hpf, 48hpf, and 72hpf. The behavioral patterns suggest that VPA exposure induces changes in locomotor activity and anxiety at different developmental periods in zebrafish. Furthermore, a social interaction deficit is present at 70dpf and 120dpf. VPA exposure did not affect aggression in the adult stage at 70dpf and 120dpf. This is the first study that demonstrated zebrafish exposed to VPA during the first 48h of development exhibit deficits in social interaction, anxiety, and hyperactivity at different developmental periods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of Coenzyme Q10 with Liposomes and its Impact on Suppression of Selenite – Induced Experimental Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat Wahba Shafaa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To stress the influence of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 on the structural properties of liposomes as model membranes and to investigate the possible role of CoQ10 or CoQ10 doped in liposomes when topically instilled as eye drops, in preventing cataract. Methods: The molecular interaction between liposomes and Coenzyme Q10 was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Rat pups were randomly divided into six groups comprising 15 pups. Group (1, control group. Group (2, untreated model of cataract, received a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite. Instillation of pure CoQ10 (Group 3, CoQ10 encapsulated into neutral (Group 4, positive (Group 5 and negative (Group 6 Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC liposomes on the opacification of lenses in rat pups after sodium selenite injection was topically received. Results: The incorporated CoQ10 is probably associated with lipid bilayers where it interacts to a large extent and perturbs them. This results in strong broadening and shift to lower temperature (94°C of the major characteristic endothermic peak of pure DPPC at 105°C. FTIR showed that the incorporation of CoQ10 into DPPC induces a conformational change in the polar region of DPPC. Ophthalmological and Biochemical studies revealed that CoQ10 alone followed by negatively charged liposomes doped with CoQ10 are more effective in reducing the progress of cataract as well as improving the lens soluble proteins levels and total antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: The interactions of CoQ10 with membrane systems may contribute to a better understanding of CoQ10 physiological properties and the development of therapeutically advanced systems.

  16. Turbulence modulation induced by interaction between a bubble swarm and decaying turbulence in oscillating-grid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Ryota; Morikawa, Koichi; Higuchi, Masamori; Saito, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the interaction between a bubble swarm and homogeneous isotropic turbulence was experimentally investigated. The objective is to clarify the turbulence modulation induced by interaction between the bubble swarm and the homogeneous isotropic turbulence without mean flow. In order to generate simultaneously ideally homogeneous isotropic turbulence and a sufficiently controlled bubble swarm, we employed both oscillating grid and bubble generators equipped with audio speakers. First, the homogeneous isotropic turbulence was formed by operating the oscillating grid cylindrical acrylic pipe (height: 600 mm, inner diameter: 149 mm) filled with ion-exchanged and degassed water. Second, we stopped the oscillating-grid in arbitrary time after the homogeneous isotropic turbulence was achieved. A few moments later, the controlled bubble swarm (number of bubbles: 3, average equivalent diameter of bubble: 3 mm, bubble Reynolds number: 859, Weber number: 3.48) was launched into the decaying turbulence described above, using the bubble generators. The bubble formation, bubble size and bubble-launch timing are controlled arbitrarily and precisely by this device. In this study, we conducted the following experiments: 1) measurement of the motion of bubbles in rest water and oscillating grid turbulence via high-speed visualization, 2) measurement of the liquid phase motion around the bubbles in rest water via PIV system with LIF method, 3) measurement of the liquid phase motion around the bubbles in oscillating-grid turbulence via PIV system with LIF method. In the vitalization of the liquid-phase motion of both experiments, two high speed video cameras were employed in order to simultaneously film large- and small-scale interrogation areas. The liquid-phase ambient turbulence hastened the change of the bubble motion from zigzag mode to spiral mode. The interaction between the bubble swarm and liquid-phase turbulence increased decay-rate of the turbulence. (author)

  17. Drug–drug interaction of microdose and regular-dose omeprazole with a CYP2C19 inhibitor and inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park G

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gab-jin Park,1 Soo Hyeon Bae,1 Wan-Su Park,1 Seunghoon Han,1 Min-Ho Park,2 Seok-Ho Shin,2 Young G Shin,2 Dong-Seok Yim1,2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, PIPET (Pharmacometrics Institute for Practical Education and Training, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea Purpose: A microdose drug–drug interaction (DDI study may be a valuable tool for anticipating drug interaction at therapeutic doses. This study aimed to compare the magnitude of DDIs at microdoses and regular doses to explore the applicability of a microdose DDI study. Patients and methods: Six healthy male volunteer subjects were enrolled into each DDI study of omeprazole (victim and known perpetrators: fluconazole (inhibitor and rifampin (inducer. For both studies, the microdose (100 µg, cold compound and the regular dose (20 mg of omeprazole were given at days 0 and 1, respectively. On days 2–9, the inhibitor or inducer was given daily, and the microdose and regular dose of omeprazole were repeated at days 8 and 9, respectively. Full omeprazole pharmacokinetic samplings were performed at days 0, 1, 8, and 9 of both studies for noncompartmental analysis. Results: The magnitude of the DDI, the geometric mean ratios (with perpetrator/omeprazole only of maximum concentration (Cmax and area under the curve to the last measurement (AUCt of the microdose and the regular dose were compared. The geometric mean ratios in the inhibition study were: 2.17 (micro and 2.68 (regular for Cmax, and 4.07 (micro, 4.33 (regular for AUCt. For the induction study, they were 0.26 (micro and 0.21 (regular for Cmax, and 0.16 (micro and 0.15 (regular for AUCt. There were no significant statistical differences in the magnitudes of DDIs between microdose and regular-dose conditions, regardless of induction or inhibition. Conclusion: Our results may be

  18. Effect of Withania somnifera on forced swimming test induced immobility in mice and its interaction with various drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P C; Trivedi, N A; Bhatt, J D; Hemavathi, K G

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant action of Withania somnifera (WS) as well as its interaction with the conventional antidepressant drugs and to delineate the possible mechanism of its antidepressant action using forced swimming model in mice. Effect of different doses of WS, fluoxetine and imipramine were studied on forced swimming test induced mean immobility time (MIT). Moreover effect of WS 100 mg/kg, i.p. was observed at different time intervals. Effect produced by combination of sub therapeutic doses of WS with imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were also observed. Effect of WS (100 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as combination of WS (37.5 mg/kg, i.p.) with either imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were observed in mice pretreated with reserpine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and clonidine (0.15 mg/kg, i.p.). Effects of prazosin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) pre-treatment were also observed on WS induced decrease in MIT. WS produced dose dependent decrease in MIT. Maximum effect in MIT was observed after 30 min of treatment with WS 100 mg/kg, i.p. Combination of WS (37.5 mg/kg, i.p.) with imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) also produced significant decrease in the MIT. Clonidine and reserpine induced increase in MIT, was significantly reversed by treatment with WS (100 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as combination of WS (37.5 mg/kg, i.p.) with either imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-treatment with prazosin but not haloperidol, significantly antagonized the WS (100 mg/kg, i.p.) induced decrease in MIT. It is concluded that, WS produced significant decrease in MIT in mice which could be mediated partly through a adrenoceptor as well as alteration in the level of central biogenic amines.

  19. A comparative study on pathological features of transgenic rat lines expressing either three or four repeat misfolded tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valachova, Bernadeta; Brezovakova, Veronika; Bugos, Ondrej; Jadhav, Santosh; Smolek, Tomas; Novak, Petr; Zilka, Norbert

    2018-08-01

    Human tauopathies represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by distinct clinical features, typical histopathological structures, and defined ratio(s) of three-repeat and four-repeat tau isoforms within pathological aggregates. How the optional microtubule-binding repeat of tau influences this differentiation of pathologies is understudied. We have previously generated and characterized transgenic rodent models expressing human truncated tau aa151-391 with either three (SHR24) or four microtubule-binding repeats (SHR72). Here, we compare the behavioral and neuropathological hallmarks of these two transgenic lines using a battery of tests for sensorimotor, cognitive, and neurological functions over the age range of 3.5-15 months. Progression of sensorimotor and neurological deficits was similar in both transgenic lines; however, the lifespan of transgenic line SHR72 expressing truncated four-repeat tau was markedly shorter than SHR24. Moreover, the expression of three or four-repeat tau induced distinct neurofibrillary pathology in these lines. Transgenic lines displayed different distribution of tau pathology and different type of neurofibrillary tangles. Our results suggest that three- and four-repeat isoforms of tau may display different modes of action in the diseased brain. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Development of isothermal-isobaric replica-permutation method for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations and its application to reveal temperature and pressure dependence of folded, misfolded, and unfolded states of chignolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masataka; Okumura, Hisashi

    2017-11-01

    We developed a two-dimensional replica-permutation molecular dynamics method in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. The replica-permutation method is a better alternative to the replica-exchange method. It was originally developed in the canonical ensemble. This method employs the Suwa-Todo algorithm, instead of the Metropolis algorithm, to perform permutations of temperatures and pressures among more than two replicas so that the rejection ratio can be minimized. We showed that the isothermal-isobaric replica-permutation method performs better sampling efficiency than the isothermal-isobaric replica-exchange method and infinite swapping method. We applied this method to a β-hairpin mini protein, chignolin. In this simulation, we observed not only the folded state but also the misfolded state. We calculated the temperature and pressure dependence of the fractions on the folded, misfolded, and unfolded states. Differences in partial molar enthalpy, internal energy, entropy, partial molar volume, and heat capacity were also determined and agreed well with experimental data. We observed a new phenomenon that misfolded chignolin becomes more stable under high-pressure conditions. We also revealed this mechanism of the stability as follows: TYR2 and TRP9 side chains cover the hydrogen bonds that form a β-hairpin structure. The hydrogen bonds are protected from the water molecules that approach the protein as the pressure increases.

  1. Fasitibant chloride, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone interact to inhibit carrageenan-induced inflammatory arthritis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Claudio; Giuliani, Sandro; Cialdai, Cecilia; Tramontana, Manuela; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bradykinin, through the kinin B2 receptor, is involved in inflammatory processes related to arthropathies. B2 receptor antagonists inhibited carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats in synergy with anti-inflammatory steroids. The mechanism(s) underlying this drug interaction was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Drugs inhibiting inflammatory mediators released by carrageenan were injected, alone or in combination, into the knee joint of pentobarbital anaesthetized rats 30 min before intra-articular administration of carrageenan. Their effects on the carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses (joint pain, oedema and neutrophil recruitment) and release of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandins, IL-1β, IL-6 and the chemokine GRO/CINC-1), were assessed after 6 h. KEY RESULTS The combination of fasitibant chloride (MEN16132) and dexamethasone was more effective than each drug administered alone in inhibiting knee joint inflammation and release of inflammatory mediators. Fasitibant chloride, MK571, atenolol, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin (B2 receptor, leukotriene, catecholamine and B1 receptor antagonists, respectively) and dexketoprofen (COX inhibitor), reduced joint pain and, except for the latter, also diminished joint oedema. A combination of drugs inhibiting joint pain (fasitibant chloride, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin, dexketoprofen, MK571 and atenolol) and oedema (fasitibant chloride, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin, MK571 and atenolol) abolished the respective inflammatory response, producing inhibition comparable with that achieved with the combination of fasitibant chloride and dexamethasone. MK571 alone was able to block neutrophil recruitment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Bradykinin-mediated inflammatory responses to intra-articular carrageenan were not controlled by steroids, which were not capable of preventing bradykinin effects either by direct activation of the B2 receptor, or through the indirect effects mediated by release of eicosanoids

  2. Attenuation of radiation-induced DNA damage due to paracrine interactions between normal human epithelial and stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, V.A.; Nakazawa, Yu.; Rogounovitch, T.I.; Suzuki, K.; Mitsutake, N.; Matsuse, M.; Yamashita, S.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Developmentally, every tissue accommodates different types of cells, such as epitheliocytes and stromal cells in parenchymal organs. To better understand the complexity of radiation response, it is necessary to evaluate possible cross-talk between different tissue components. This work was set out to investigate reciprocal influence of normal human epithelial cells and fibroblasts on the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage. Methods: Model cultures of primary human thyrocytes (PT), normal diploid fibroblasts (BJ), PT/BJ cell co-culture and conditioned medium transfer were used to examine DNA damage in terms of γ-H2AX foci number per cell or by Comet assay after exposure to different doses of γ-rays. Results: In co-cultures, the kinetics of γ-H2AX foci number change was dose-dependent and similar to that in individual PT and BJ cultures. The number of γ-H2AX foci in co-cultures was significantly lower (∼25%) in both types of cells comparing to individual cultures. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual counterpart cells prior to irradiation resulted in approximately 35% reduction in the number γ-H2AX foci at 1 Gy and lower doses in both PT and BJ demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. Comet assay corroborated the results of γ-H2AX foci counting in conditioned medium transfer experiments. In contrast to medium conditioned on PT cells, conditioned medium collected from several human thyroid cancer cell lines failed to establish DNA-protected state in BJ fibroblasts. In its turn, medium conditioned on BJ cells did not change the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in cancer cell lines tested. Conclusion: The results imply the existence of a network of soluble factor-mediated paracrine interactions between normal epithelial and stromal cells that could be a part of natural mechanism by which cells protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  3. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie S A Palmnäs

    Full Text Available Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat and further into ad libitum water control (W or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment. Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05. Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  4. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (Paspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  5. Synergistic interaction between total glucosides and total flavonoids on chronic constriction injury induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Lv, Chen; Wang, Hai-na; Cao, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Shaoyao Gancao Decoction (SGD), a famous herbal medicine, consists of two herbs (Paeoniae Radix and Glycyrrhizae Radix) and is traditionally used for the treatment of pain. To investigate the synergistic potential of total glucosides of Paeoniae Radix (TGP) and total flavonoids of Glycyrrhizae Radix (TFL). Oral administration of TGP and TFL alone at the doses of 60,120 and 240 mg/kg or in combination were given only one time to the neuropathic pain rat induced by chronic constriction injury. Paw pressure and heat immersion tests were performed to assess degrees of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Synergistic interactions between TGP and TFL were characterized using isobolographic analysis. Expressions of Sirt1 protein were detected by immunohistochemistry. On day 14 after surgery, single oral administration of TGP and TFL both produced significant anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners. The ED(50) value of TGP was 249.4 ± 10.8 mg/kg while TFL was 871.4 ± 30.5 mg/kg. Isobolographic analysis revealed that the combination of TGP with TFL at the fixed ratios of 3:1 exerted the highest sub-additive (synergistic) interaction, of which the experimental ED(50) value was 95.1 ± 9.0 mg/kg. SGD could also downregulate Sirt1 protein expression, which was 4.2-fold higher than that of model rats in dorsal root ganglion. Analgesic effects of SGD may contribute to simultaneous inhibition of Sirt1 overexpression and could warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. Prostaglandin E synthase interacts with inducible heat shock protein 70 after heat stress in bovine primary dermal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Constanze; Viergutz, Torsten; Schwerin, Manfred; Weitzel, Joachim M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress in dairy cows leads to undesired side effects that are reflected by complex alterations in endocrine parameters, such as reduced progesterone, estradiol, and thyroid hormone concentrations. These endocrine maladaptation leads to failure to resume cyclicity, a poor uterine environment and inappropriate immune responses in postpartum dairy cows. Prostaglandins (PG's) are lipid mediators, which serve as signal molecules in response to various external stimuli as well as to cell-specific internal signal molecules. A central role in PG synthesis plays prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) that catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2 to PGE2 .The present study was conducted to investigate heat stress associated PGES expression. Expression of PGES and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), as a putative chaperonic protein, was studied in bovine primary fibroblasts under different heat shock conditions. Bovine primary fibroblasts produce PGE2 at homoiothermical norm temperature (38.5°C in bovine), but reduce PGE2 production rates under extreme heat stress (at 45°C for 6 h). By contrast, PGE2 production rates are maintained after a milder heat stress (at 41.5°C for 6 h). PGE2 synthesis is abolished by application of cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating de novo synthesis. Heat stress increases HSP70 but not PGES protein concentrations. HSP70 physically interacts with PGES and the PGES-HSP70 complex did not dissociate upon heat stress at 45°C even after returning the cells to 37°C. The PGE2 production negatively correlates with the portion of PGES-HSP70 complex. These results suggest a protein interaction between HSP70 and PGES in dermal fibroblast cells. Blockage of PGES protein by HSP70 seems to interfere with the regulatory processes essential for cellular adaptive protection. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Interactive effects of dietary restraint and adiposity on stress-induced eating and the food choice of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, James N; Lambiase, Maya J; Lobarinas, Christina L; Balantekin, Katherine N

    2011-12-01

    The Individual Differences Model posits that individual differences in physiological and psychological factors explain eating behaviors in response to stress. The purpose was to determine the effects of individual differences in adiposity, dietary restraint and stress reactivity on children's energy intake and food choices. A total of 40 boys and girls, age 8-12 years, with wide ranges of dietary restraint, adiposity, and stress reactivity were measured for total energy intake and choice of energy dense 'comfort' and lower density 'healthy' foods following reading and speech stressor manipulations. When exploring the interaction of dietary restraint and stress reactivity, lower restraint/lower reactivity and lower restraint/higher reactivity were associated with reductions in energy intake (37-62 kcal) and comfort food (33-89 kcal). Higher restraint/lower reactivity was associated with consuming 86 fewer total kcal and 45 fewer kcal of comfort food. Only higher restraint/higher reactivity predicted increased energy intake (104 kcal) and comfort food (131 kcal). The interaction of dietary restraint and percentage body fat revealed that lower restraint/lower adiposity was associated with consuming 123 fewer kcal after being stressed with the entire reduction due to a decrease in comfort food. Lower restraint/higher adiposity was associated with consuming 116 kcal more after being stressed with 70% (81 kcal) of the increase in the form of comfort foods. Higher restraint/lower adiposity and higher restraint/higher adiposity were associated with smaller changes in total energy intake of 22 kcal and 1 kcal; respectively. Both restraint and adiposity moderated the effect of stress on energy intake and food choice. Children with greater adiposity may be at risk for stress-induced eating to contribute to their obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An insight into the complex prion-prion interaction network in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiqiang; Valtierra, Stephanie; Li, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model system for studying prion-prion interactions as it contains multiple prion proteins. A recent study from our laboratory showed that the existence of Swi1 prion ([SWI(+)]) and overproduction of Swi1 can have strong impacts on the formation of 2 other extensively studied yeast prions, [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)] ([RNQ(+)]) (Genetics, Vol. 197, 685-700). We showed that a single yeast cell is capable of harboring at least 3 heterologous prion elements and these prions can influence each other's appearance positively and/or negatively. We also showed that during the de novo [PSI(+)] formation process upon Sup35 overproduction, the aggregation patterns of a preexisting inducer ([RNQ(+)] or [SWI(+)]) can undergo significant remodeling from stably transmitted dot-shaped aggregates to aggregates that co-localize with the newly formed Sup35 aggregates that are ring/ribbon/rod- shaped. Such co-localization disappears once the newly formed [PSI(+)] prion stabilizes. Our finding provides strong evidence supporting the "cross-seeding" model for prion-prion interactions and confirms earlier reports that the interactions among different prions and their prion proteins mostly occur at the initiation stages of prionogenesis. Our results also highlight a complex prion interaction network in yeast. We believe that elucidating the mechanism underlying the yeast prion-prion interaction network will not only provide insight into the process of prion de novo generation and propagation in yeast but also shed light on the mechanisms that govern protein misfolding, aggregation, and amyloidogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  9. New Method Based on Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection (CE-LIF) to Monitor Interaction between Nanoparticles and the Amyloid-β Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Taverna, Myriam; de Kimpe, Line; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin; Nicolas, Julien; Canovi, Mara; Gobbi, Marco; Mantegazza, Francesco; Salmona, Mario; Nicolas, Valérie; Scheper, Wiep; Couvreur, Patrick; Andrieux, Karine

    2010-01-01

    A novel application of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) was proposed to efficiently detect and monitor the interaction between polymeric nanoparticles and the β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ(1-42)), a biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), at concentrations close

  10. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaix Morand du Puch, Ch

    2010-10-01

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  11. Interactive Sensor-Based Balance Training in Older Cancer Patients with Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Michael; Grewal, Gurtej S; Holloway, Dustin; Muchna, Amy; Garland, Linda; Najafi, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) have deficits in sensory and motor skills leading to inappropriate proprioceptive feedback, impaired postural control, and fall risk. Balance training programs specifically developed for CIPN patients are lacking. This pilot study investigated the effect of an interactive motor adaptation balance training program based on wearable sensors for improving balance in older cancer patients with CIPN. Twenty-two patients (age: 70.3 ± 8.7 years) with objectively confirmed CIPN [vibration perception threshold (VPT) >25 V] were randomized to either an intervention (IG) or a control (CG) group. The IG received interactive game-based balance training including repetitive weight shifting and virtual obstacle crossing tasks. Wearable sensors provided real-time visual/auditory feedback from the lower limb trajectory and allowed the perception of motor errors during each motor action. The CG received no exercise intervention and continued their normal activity. Outcome measures were changes in sway of ankle, hip, and center of mass (CoM) in both mediolateral and anteroposterior (AP) directions during 30-second balance tests with increasing task difficulty [i.e. standing in feet-closed position with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC), and in semi-tandem position with EO] at baseline and after the intervention. Additionally, gait performance (speed, variability) and fear of falling [Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I)] were measured. Training was safe despite the participants' impaired health status, great severity of CIPN (VPT 49.6 ± 26.7 V), and great fear of falling (FES-I score 31.37 ± 11.20). After the intervention, sway of hip, ankle, and CoM was significantly reduced in the IG compared to the CG while standing in feet-closed position with EO (p = 0.010-0.022, except AP CoM sway) and in semi-tandem position (p = 0.008-0.035, except ankle sway). No significant effects were found for balance with

  12. Modelling low Reynolds number vortex-induced vibration problems with a fixed mesh fluid-solid interaction formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Cornejo, Felipe A.; Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Celentano, Diego J.

    2017-11-01

    The present work reports a fluid-rigid solid interaction formulation described within the framework of a fixed-mesh technique. The numerical analysis is focussed on the study of a vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a circular cylinder at low Reynolds number. The proposed numerical scheme encompasses the fluid dynamics computation in an Eulerian domain where the body is embedded using a collection of markers to describe its shape, and the rigid solid's motion is obtained with the well-known Newton's law. The body's velocity is imposed on the fluid domain through a penalty technique on the embedded fluid-solid interface. The fluid tractions acting on the solid are computed from the fluid dynamic solution of the flow around the body. The resulting forces are considered to solve the solid motion. The numerical code is validated by contrasting the obtained results with those reported in the literature using different approaches for simulating the flow past a fixed circular cylinder as a benchmark problem. Moreover, a mesh convergence analysis is also done providing a satisfactory response. In particular, a VIV problem is analyzed, emphasizing the description of the synchronization phenomenon.

  13. Structural changes induced by lattice-electron interactions: SiO2 stishovite and FeTiO3 ilmenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takamitsu

    2005-09-01

    The bright source and highly collimated beam of synchrotron radiation offers many advantages for single-crystal structure analysis under non-ambient conditions. The structure changes induced by the lattice-electron interaction under high pressure have been investigated using a diamond anvil pressure cell. The pressure dependence of electron density distributions around atoms is elucidated by a single-crystal diffraction study using deformation electron density analysis and the maximum entropy method. In order to understand the bonding electrons under pressure, diffraction intensity measurements of FeTiO3 ilmenite and gamma-SiO2 stishovite single crystals at high pressures were made using synchrotron radiation. Both diffraction studies describe the electron density distribution including bonding electrons and provide the effective charge of the cations. In both cases the valence electrons are more localized around the cations with increasing pressure. This is consistent with molecular orbital calculations, proving that the bonding electron density becomes smaller with pressure. The thermal displacement parameters of both samples are reduced with increasing pressure.

  14. Gene by cognition interaction on stress-induced attention bias for food: Effects of 5-HTTLPR and ruminative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Robbie; Markus, C Rob

    2017-09-01

    Stress is often found to increase the preference and intake of high caloric foods. This effect is known as emotional eating and is influenced by cognitive as well as biological stress vulnerabilities. An S-allele of the 5-HTTLPR gene has been linked to decreased (brain) serotonin efficiency, leading to decreased stress resilience and increased risks for negative affect and eating related disturbances. Recently it has been proposed that a cognitive ruminative thinking style can further exacerbate the effect of this gene by prolonging the already increased stress response, thereby potentially increasing the risk of compensating by overeating high palatable foods. This study was aimed at investigating whether there is an increased risk for emotional eating in high ruminative S/S-allele carriers reflected by an increased attention bias for high caloric foods during stress. From a large (N=827) DNA database, participants (N=100) were selected based on genotype (S/S or L/L) and ruminative thinking style and performed an eye-tracking visual food-picture probe task before and after acute stress exposure. A significant Genotype x Rumination x Stress-interaction was found on attention bias for savory food; indicating that a stress-induced attention bias for specifically high-caloric foods is moderated by a gene x cognitive risk factor. Both a genetic (5-HTTLPR) and cognitive (ruminative thinking) stress vulnerability may mutually increase the risk for stress-related abnormal eating patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mephedrone interactions with cocaine: prior exposure to the 'bath salt' constituent enhances cocaine-induced locomotor activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Ryan A; Tallarida, Christopher S; Reitz, Allen B; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    Concurrent use of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; MEPH) and established drugs of abuse is now commonplace, but knowledge about interactions between these drugs is sparse. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that prior MEPH exposure enhances the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine (METH). For cocaine experiments, rats pretreated with saline, cocaine (15 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) for 5 days were injected with cocaine after 10 days of drug absence. For METH experiments, rats pretreated with saline, METH (2 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) were injected with METH after 10 days of drug absence. Cocaine challenge produced greater locomotor activity after pretreatment with cocaine or MEPH than after pretreatment with saline. METH challenge produced greater locomotor activity after METH pretreatment than after saline pretreatment; however, locomotor activity in rats pretreated with MEPH or saline and then challenged with METH was not significantly different. The locomotor response to MEPH (15 mg/kg) was not significantly affected by pretreatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or METH (0.5, 2 mg/kg). The present demonstration that cocaine-induced locomotor activation is enhanced by prior MEPH exposure suggests that MEPH cross-sensitizes to cocaine and increases cocaine efficacy. Interestingly, MEPH cross-sensitization was not bidirectional and did not extend to METH, suggesting that the phenomenon is sensitive to specific psychostimulants.

  16. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  17. Kidney-on-a-Chip: a New Technology for Predicting Drug Efficacy, Interactions, and Drug-induced Nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeonghwan; Kim, Sejoong

    2018-03-08

    The kidneys play a pivotal role in most drug-removal processes and are important when evaluating drug safety. Kidney dysfunction resulting from various drugs is an important issue in clinical practice and during the drug development process. Traditional in vivo animal experiments are limited with respect to evaluating drug efficacy and nephrotoxicity due to discrepancies in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics between humans and animals, and static cell culture experiments cannot fully reflect the actual microphysiological environment in humans. A kidney-on-a-chip is a microfluidic device that allows the culture of living renal cells in 3-dimensional channels and mimics the human microphysiological environment, thus simulating the actual drug filtering, absorption, and secretion process.. In this review, we discuss recent developments in microfluidic culturing technique and describe current and future kidney-on-a-chip applications. We focus on pharmacological interactions and drug-induced nephrotoxicity, and additionally discuss the development of multi-organ chips and their possible applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. I. A model for the magnetic equation of state of liquid 3He. II. An induced interaction model for a two-component Fermi liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Castro, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation is divided in six chapters. Chapter 1 is an introduction to the rest of the dissertation. In it, the author presents the different models for the magnetic equation state of liquid 3 He, a derivation of the induced interaction equations for a one component Fermi liquid, and discuss the basic hamiltonian describing the heavy fermion compounds. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, he presents a complete discussion of the thermodynamics and Landau theory of a spin polarized Fermi liquid. A phenomenological model is then developed to predict the polarization dependence of the longitudinal Landau parameters in liquid 3 He. This model predicts a new magnetic equation of state and the possibility of liquid 3 He being 'nearly metamagnetic' at high pressures. Chapter 4 contains a microscopic calculation of the magnetic field dependence of the Landau parameters in a strongly correlated Fermi system using the induced interaction model. The system he studied consists of a single component Fermi liquid with parabolic energy bands, and a large on-site repulsive interaction. In Chapter 5, he presents a complete discussion of the Landau theory of a two component Fermi liquid. Then, he generalizes the induced interaction equations to calculate Landau parameters and scattering amplitudes for an arbitrary, spin polarized, two component Fermi liquid. The resulting equations are used to study a model for the heavy fermion Fermi liquid state: a two band electronic system with an antiferromagnetic interaction between the two bands. Chapter 6 contains the concluding remarks of the dissertation

  19. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Belondrade

    Full Text Available The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA. This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10-8 brain dilution of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions.

  20. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  1. Ginsenoside Re protects against phencyclidine-induced behavioral changes and mitochondrial dysfunction via interactive modulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 and NADPH oxidase in the dorsolateral cortex of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, The-Vinh; Shin, Eun-Joo; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Ko, Sung Kwon; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Jang, Choon-Gon; Lee, Yu Jeung; Toriumi, Kazuya; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2017-12-01

    We investigated whether ginsenoside Re (Re) modulates phencyclidine (PCP)-induced sociability deficits and recognition memory impairments to extend our recent finding. We examined the role of GPx-1 gene in the pharmacological activity of Re against mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PCP in the dorsolateral cortex of mice. Since mitochondrial oxidative stress activates NADPH oxidase (PHOX), we applied PHOX inhibitor apocynin for evaluating interactive modulation between GPx-1 and PHOX against PCP neurotoxicity. Sociability deficits and recognition memory impairments induced by PCP were more pronounced in GPx-1 knockout (KO) than in wild type (WT) mice. PCP-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and membrane translocation of p47phox were more evident in GPx-1 KO than in WT. Re treatment significantly attenuated PCP-induced neurotoxic changes. Re also significantly attenuated PCP-induced sociability deficits and recognition memory impairments. The attenuation by Re was comparable to that by apocynin. The attenuation was more obvious in GPx-1 KO than in WT. Importantly, apocynin did not show any additional positive effects on the neuroprotective activity of Re, indicating that PHOX is a molecular target for therapeutic activity of Re. Our results suggest that Re requires interactive modulation between GPx activity and PHOX (p47phox) to exhibit neuroprotective potentials against PCP insult. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EFP1 is an ER stress-induced glycoprotein which interacts with the pro-apoptotic protein Par-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Appel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Appel1,2,6, Susanne Vetterkind1,2,6, Ansgar Koplin1,3, Barbara Maertens1,4, Meike Boosen1,5, Ute Preuss11The Institute of Genetics, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 2Department of Health Sciences, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center for Molecular Biology Heidelberg (ZMBH, Heidelberg, Germany; 4Institute of Biochemistry II, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Hospital of Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; 6These authors contributed equally to this work.Abstract: We have isolated the rat ortholog of EFP1 (EF-hand binding protein 1 as a novel interaction partner of the pro-apoptotic protein Par-4 (prostate apoptosis response-4. Rat EFP1 contains two thioredoxin domains, the COOH-terminal one harboring a CGFC motif, and has a similar protein domain structure as members of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI family. In REF52.2 and CHO cells, EFP1 colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER marker PDI. Furthermore, EFP1 possesses catalytic activity as demonstrated by an insulin disulfide reduction assay. Western blot analysis revealed two EFP1 protein bands of approximately 136 and 155 kDa, representing different glycosylation states of the protein. Complex formation between EFP1 and Par-4 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation, dot blot overlay and pull-down experiments. In CHO cells, coexpression of EFP1 and Par-4 resulted in enhanced Par-4-mediated apoptosis, which required the catalytic activity of EFP1. Interestingly, EFP1 was specifically upregulated in NIH3T3 cells after induction of ER stress by thapsigargin, tunicamycin, and brefeldin A, but not by agents that induce oxidative stress or ER-independent apoptosis. Furthermore, we could show that the induction of apoptosis by Ca2+ stress-inducing agents was significantly decreased after si

  3. HSP27 phosphorylation modulates TRAIL-induced activation of Src-Akt/ERK signaling through interaction with β-arrestin2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shimei; Xin, Yinqiang; Qi, Zhilin; Xu, Yimiao; Diao, Ying; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2014-03-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) regulates critical cellular functions such as development, differentiation, cell growth and apoptosis. A variety of stimuli induce the phosphorylation of HSP27, which affects its cellular functions. However, most previous studies focused on the role of HSP27 protein itself in apoptosis, the particular role of its phosphorylation state in signaling transduction remains largely unclear. In the present study, we reported that HSP27 phosphorylation modulated TRAIL-triggered pro-survival signaling transduction. In HeLa cells, suppression of HSP27 phosphorylation by specific inhibitor KRIBB3 or MAPKAPK2 (MK2) knockdown and by overexpression of non-phosphorylatable HSP27(3A) mutant demonstrated that hindered HSP27 phosphorylation enhanced the TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In addition, reduced HSP27 phosphorylation by KRIBB3 treatment or MK2 knockdown attenuated the TRAIL-induced activation of Akt and ERK survival signaling through suppressing the phosphorylation of Src. By overexpression of HSP27(15A) or HSP27(78/82A) phosphorylation mutant, we further showed that phosphorylation of HSP27 at serine 78/82 residues was essential to TRAIL-triggered Src-Akt/ERK signaling transduction. Co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy showed that HSP27 interacted with Src and scaffolding protein β-arrestin2 in response of TRAIL stimulation and suppression of HSP27 phosphorylation apparently disrupted the TRAIL-induced interaction of HSP27 and Src or interaction of HSP27 and β-arrestin2. We further demonstrated that β-arrestin2 mediated HSP27 action on TRAIL-induced Src activation, which was achieved by recruiting signaling complex of HSP27/β-arrestin2/Src in response to TRAIL. Taken together, our study revealed that HSP27 phosphorylation modulates TRAIL-triggered activation of Src-Akt/ERK pro-survival signaling via interacting with β-arrestin2 in HeLa cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Equivalence of Electron-Vibration Interaction and Charge-Induced Force Variations: A New O(1 Approach to an Old Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunna Baruah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Calculating electron-vibration (vibronic interaction constants is computationally expensive. For molecules containing N nuclei it involves solving the Schrödinger equation for Ο(3N nuclear configurations in addition to the cost of determining the vibrational modes. We show that quantum vibronic interactions are proportional to the classical atomic forces induced when the total charge of the system is varied. This enables the calculation of vibronic interaction constants from O(1 solutions of the Schrödinger equation. We demonstrate that the O(1 approach produces numerically accurate results by calculating the vibronic interaction constants for several molecules. We investigate the role of molecular vibrations in the Mott transition in κ-(BEDT-TTF2Cu[N(CN2]Br.

  5. Rare sugar D-allose strongly induces thioredoxin-interacting protein and inhibits osteoclast differentiation in Raw264 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kana; Noguchi, Chisato; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Dong, Youyi; Hirata, Yuko; Hossain, Mohammad A; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Tokuda, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Fuminori

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress modulates the osteoclast differentiation via redox systems, and thioredoxin 1 (Trx) promotes the osteoclast formation by regulating the activity of transcription factors. The function of Trx is known to be regulated by its binding partner, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). We previously reported that the expression of TXNIP gene is strongly induced by a rare sugar D-allose. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that D-allose could inhibit the osteoclast differentiation by regulating the Trx function. We used a murine Raw264 cell line that differentiates to the osteoclast by the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) treatment. The effect of sugars was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The expression and localization of TXNIP and Trx protein were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemisty. The activity of the nuclear factor-κB, nuclear factor of activated T cells, and activator protein 1 transcription factors was measured by the luciferase reporter assay. The addition of D-allose (25 mmol/L) inhibited the osteoclast differentiation down to 9.53% ± 1.27% of a receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-only treatment. During the osteoclast differentiation, a significant increase of TNXIP was observed by D-allose treatment. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that both Trx and TXNIP existed in the nucleus in preosteoclasts and osteoclasts. Overexpression of TXNIP by plasmid transfection also inhibited the osteoclast formation, indicating the functional importance of TXNIP for the osteoclast differentiation. Transcriptional activity of the activator protein 1, nuclear factor-κB, and nuclear factor of activated T cells, known to be modulated by Trx, were inhibited by D-allose. In conclusion, our data indicate that D-allose is a strong inhibitor of the osteoclast differentiation, and this effect could be caused by TXNIP induction and a resulting inhibition of the Trx function

  6. Apigenin induces apoptosis by targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and Ku70–Bax interaction in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sanjeev; Fu, Pingfu; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the apoptotic pathway in prostate cancer cells confers apoptosis resistance towards various therapies. A novel strategy to overcome resistance is to directly target the apoptotic pathway in cancer cells. Apigenin, an anticancer agent, selectively toxic to cancer cells induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through mechanisms which are not fully explored. In the present study we provide novel insight into the mechanisms of apoptosis induction by apigenin. Treatment of androgen-refractory human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells with apigenin resulted in dose-dependent suppression of XIAP, c-IAP1, c-IAP2 and survivin protein levels. Apigenin treatment resulted in significant decrease in cell viability and apoptosis induction with the increase of cytochrome C in time-dependent manner. These effects of apigenin were accompanied by decrease in Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 and increase in the active form of Bax protein. The apigenin-mediated increase in Bax was due to dissociation of Bax from Ku70 which is essential for apoptotic activity of Bax. Apigenin treatment resulted in the inhibition of class I histone deacetylases and HDAC1 protein expression, thereby increasing the acetylation of Ku70 and the dissociation of Bax resulting in apoptosis of cancer cells. Furthermore, apigenin significantly reduced HDAC1 occupancy at the XIAP promoter, suggesting that histone deacetylation might be critical for XIAP downregulation. These results suggest that apigenin targets inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and Ku70–Bax interaction in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells and in athymic nude mouse xenograft model endorsing its in vivo efficacy. PMID:24563225

  7. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mu [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ruan Yuxia [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Cai Jiye, E-mail: tjycai@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. > We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. > Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. > The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 {+-} 4.62 nm to 129.70 {+-} 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 {+-} 0.16% to 75.14 {+-} 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 {mu}M curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 {mu}M curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  8. Towards Augmented Human Memory: Retrieval-Induced Forgetting and Retrieval Practice in an Interactive, End-of-Day Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The authors report 6 experiments that examined the contention that an end-of-day review could lead to augmentation in human memory. In Experiment 1, participants in the study phase were presented with a campus tour of different to-be-remembered objects in different university locations. Each to-be-remembered object was presented with an associated specific comment. Participants were then shown the location name and photographs of half of the objects from half of the locations, and they were asked to try to name the object and recall the associated comment specific to each item. Following a filled delay, participants were presented with the name of each campus location and were asked to free recall the to-be-remembered objects. Relative to the recall from the unpracticed location categories, participants recalled the names of significantly more objects that they practiced (retrieval practice) and significantly fewer unpracticed objects from the practiced locations (retrieval-induced forgetting, RIF). These findings were replicated in Experiment 2 using a campus scavenger hunt in which participants selected their own stimuli from experimenter’s categories. Following an examination of factors that maximized the effects of RIF and retrieval practice in the laboratory (Experiment 3), the authors applied these findings to the campus scavenger hunt task to create different retrieval practice schedules to maximize and minimize recall of items based on experimenter-selected (Experiment 4) and participant-selected items using both category-cued free recall (Experiment 5) and item-specific cues (Experiment 6). Their findings support the claim that an interactive, end-of-day review could lead to augmentation in human memory. PMID:29745709

  9. The glycine reuptake inhibitor org 25935 interacts with basal and ethanol-induced dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Stomberg, Rosita; Fagerberg, Anne; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2009-07-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) projection from the ventral tegmental area to nucleus accumbens (nAc), a central part of the reward system, is activated by ethanol (EtOH) and other drugs of abuse. We have previously demonstrated that the glycine receptor in the nAc and its amino acid agonists may be implicated in the DA activation and reinforcing properties of EtOH. We have also reported that the glycine transporter 1 inhibitor, Org 25935, produces a robust and dose-dependent decrease in EtOH consumption in Wistar rats. The present study explores the interaction between EtOH and Org 25935 with respect to DA levels in the rat nAc. The effects of Org 25935 (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and/or EtOH (2.5 g/kg, i.p.) on accumbal DA levels were examined by means of in vivo microdialysis (coupled to HPLC-ED) in freely moving male Wistar rats. The effect of Org 25935 on accumbal glycine output was also investigated. Systemic Org 25935 increased DA output in a subpopulation of rats (52% in Experiment 1 and 38% in Experiment 2). In Experiment 2, EtOH produced a significant increase in DA levels in vehicles (35%) and in Org 25935 nonresponders (19%), whereas EtOH did not further increase the DA level in rats responding to Org 25935 (2%). The same dose of Org 25935 increased glycine levels by 87% in nAc. This study demonstrates that Org 25935, probably via increased glycine levels, (i) counteracts EtOH-induced increases of accumbal DA levels and (ii) increases basal DA levels in a subpopulation of rats. The results are in line with previous findings and it is suggested that the effects observed involve interference with accumbal GlyRs and are related to the alcohol consumption modulating effect of Org 25935.

  10. Recent Insights in Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Disruption and Its Role in β-Cell Death in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Khemtémourian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans is thought to be related to death of the insulin-producing islet β-cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2. The mechanism of hIAPP-induced β-cell death is not understood. However, there is growing evidence that hIAPP-induced disruption of β-cell membranes is the cause of hIAPP cytotoxicity. Amyloid cytotoxicity by membrane damage has not only been suggested for hIAPP, but also for peptides and proteins related to other misfolding diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and prion diseases. Here we review the interaction of hIAPP with membranes, and discuss recent progress in the field, with a focus on hIAPP structure and on the proposed mechanisms of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to β-cell death in DM2.

  11. Hsp104 suppresses polyglutamine-induced degeneration post onset in a drosophila MJD/SCA3 model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Cushman-Nick

    Full Text Available There are no effective therapeutics that antagonize or reverse the protein-misfolding events underpinning polyglutamine (PolyQ disorders, including Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-3 (SCA3. Here, we augment the proteostasis network of Drosophila SCA3 models with Hsp104, a powerful protein disaggregase from yeast, which is bafflingly absent from metazoa. Hsp104 suppressed eye degeneration caused by a C-terminal ataxin-3 (MJD fragment containing the pathogenic expanded PolyQ tract, but unexpectedly enhanced aggregation and toxicity of full-length pathogenic MJD. Hsp104 suppressed toxicity of MJD variants lacking a portion of the N-terminal deubiquitylase domain and full-length MJD variants unable to engage polyubiquitin, indicating that MJD-ubiquitin interactions hinder protective Hsp104 modalities. Importantly, in staging experiments, Hsp104 suppressed toxicity of a C-terminal MJD fragment when expressed after the onset of PolyQ-induced degeneration, whereas Hsp70 was ineffective. Thus, we establish the first disaggregase or chaperone treatment administered after the onset of pathogenic protein-induced degeneration that mitigates disease progression.

  12. Phorbol ester and hydrogen peroxide synergistically induce the interaction of diacylglycerol kinase gamma with the Src homology 2 and C1 domains of beta2-chimaerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Kai, Masahiro; Imai, Shin-ichi; Kanoh, Hideo; Sakane, Fumio

    2008-01-01

    DGKgamma (diacylglycerol kinase gamma) was reported to interact with beta2-chimaerin, a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) for Rac, in response to epidermal growth factor. Here we found that PMA and H2O2 also induced the interaction of DGKgamma with beta2-chimaerin. It is noteworthy that simultaneous addition of PMA and H2O2 synergistically enhanced the interaction. In this case, PMA was replaceable by DAG (diacylglycerol). The beta2-chimaerin translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane caused by PMA plus H2O2 was further enhanced by the expression of DGKgamma. Moreover, DGKgamma apparently enhanced the beta2-chimaerin GAP activity upon cell stimulation with PMA. PMA was found to be mainly required for a conversion of beta2-chimaerin into an active form. On the other hand, H2O2 was suggested to induce a release of Zn2+ from the C1 domain of beta2-chimaerin. By stepwise deletion analysis, we demonstrated that the SH2 (Src homology 2) and C1 domains of beta2-chimaerin interacted with the N-terminal half of catalytic region of DGKgamma. Unexpectedly, the SH2 domain of beta2-chimaerin contributes to the interaction independently of phosphotyrosine. Taken together, these results suggest that the functional link between DGKgamma and beta2-chimaerin has a broad significance in response to a wide range of cell stimuli. Our work offers a novel mechanism of protein-protein interaction, that is, the phosphotyrosine-independent interaction of the SH2 domain acting in co-operation with the C1 domain.

  13. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed

  15. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-08-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed.

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of radiation induced in vitro tumor cell/endothelium cell interactions and in vivo metastasis processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of endothelial cells with ionizing radiation (IR) or treatment with inflammatory cytokines (e. g. TNFα) induces a Rho-GTPase and NF-κB dependent activation of the expression of various cell adhesion molecules, including E-selectin. E-selectin mediates the adhesion of tumor cells (TC) to endothelial cells and is probably involved in the extravasation step of circulating tumor cells. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (e. g. lovastatin) inhibit the function of Rho-GTPases and thus are anticipated to attenuate Rho-regulated cell-cell-adhesion as well. This study focuses on the influence of IR and TNFα on the expression of endothelial- and/or tumor cell-specific pro-adhesive factors and whether these effects are influenced by lovastatin. To this end, the effect of IR and TNFα on cell-cell-interactions between human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated using an ELISA-based cell adhesion-assay. Moreover, the influence of pre-treatment with lovastatin and other types of inhibitors on HUVEC-HT29 adhesion was monitored. Additionally, we investigated the effect of lovastatin on mRNA expression level of different cell adhesion molecules, metastatic factors and DNA-repair genes upon radiation exposure by qRT-PCR. To scrutinize the in vivo relevance of the data obtained, we investigated the effect of total body irradiation (TBI) on the mRNA expression of pro-adhesive factors in BALB/c mice. To analyze tumor cell extravasation, tumor cells were injected into the lateral tail vein of immundeficient mice, followed by total body irradiation (TBI, 4 Gy). After four weeks a large increase of lung metastases was monitored, which could be blocked by preatreatment of the mice with lovastatin, the Rac1-specific small-molecule inhibitor NSC23766 as well as the sLe x -mimetic glycyrrhizin. Summarizing, we provide evidence, that irradiation promotes upregulation of different cell adhesion molecules in vitro and stimulates

  17. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mu; Ruan Yuxia; Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan; Cai Jiye

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. → We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. → Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. → The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 ± 4.62 nm to 129.70 ± 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 ± 0.16% to 75.14 ± 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 μM curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 μM curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  18. In Silico Identification of Proteins Associated with Drug-induced Liver Injury Based on the Prediction of Drug-target Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey; Semin, Maxim; Lagunin, Alexey; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure as well as one of the major reasons for drug withdrawal from clinical trials and the market. Elucidation of molecular interactions associated with DILI may help to detect potentially hazardous pharmacological agents at the early stages of drug development. The purpose of our study is to investigate which interactions with specific human protein targets may cause DILI. Prediction of interactions with 1534 human proteins was performed for the dataset with information about 699 drugs, which were divided into three categories of DILI: severe (178 drugs), moderate (310 drugs) and without DILI (211 drugs). Based on the comparison of drug-target interactions predicted for different drugs' categories and interpretation of those results using clustering, Gene Ontology, pathway and gene expression analysis, we identified 61 protein targets associated with DILI. Most of the revealed proteins were linked with hepatocytes' death caused by disruption of vital cellular processes, as well as the emergence of inflammation in the liver. It was found that interaction of a drug with the identified targets is the essential molecular mechanism of the severe DILI for the most of the considered pharmaceuticals. Thus, pharmaceutical agents interacting with many of the identified targets may be considered as candidates for filtering out at the early stages of drug research. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Senescence-associated barley NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC) transcription factor interacts with radical-induced cell death 1 through a disordered regulatory domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Trine; Jensen, Michael K; Christiansen, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    as a transcriptional activator suggesting that an involvement of HvNAC013 and HvNAC005 in senescence will be different. HvNAC013 interacted with barley radical-induced cell death 1 (RCD1) via the very C-terminal part of its TRD, outside of the region containing the LP motif. No significant secondary structure...... (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC) TF family are up-regulated during senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Both HvNAC005 and HvNAC013 bound the conserved NAC DNA target sequence. Computational and biophysical analyses showed that both proteins are intrinsically disordered in their large C-terminal domains, which...... was induced in the HvNAC013 TRD upon interaction with RCD1. RCD1 also interacted with regions dominated by intrinsic disorder in TFs of the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix families. We propose that RCD1 is a regulatory protein capable of interacting with many different TFs by exploiting their intrinsic...

  20. The effect of combined treatment with risperidone and antidepressants on the MK-801-induced deficits in the social interaction test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Katarzyna; Rogóż, Zofia

    2015-12-01

    Several clinical reports have suggested that augmentation of atypical antipsychotics' activity by antidepressants may efficiently improve the treatment of negative and some cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of antidepressant mirtazapine or escitalopram and risperidone (an atypical antipsychotic), given separately or jointly, on the MK-801-induced deficits in the social interaction test in rats. Antidepressants and risperidone were given 60 and 30 min before the test, respectively. The social interaction of male Wistar rats was measured for 10 min, starting 4 h after MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) administration. In the social interaction test, MK-801-induced deficits in the parameters studied, i.e. the number of episodes and the time of interactions. Risperidone at a higher dose (0.1 mg/kg) reversed that effect. Co-treatment with an ineffective dose of risperidone (0.01 mg/kg) and mirtazapine (2.5 or 5 mg/kg) or escitalopram only at a dose of 5 mg/kg (but not 2.5 and 10 mg/kg) abolished the deficits evoked by MK-801. The obtained results suggest that especially mirtazapine, and to a smaller degree escitalopram may enhance the antipsychotic-like effect of risperidone in the animal test modeling some negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Major neutron-induced interactions (Z less than or equal to 55): graphical, experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; MacGregor, M.H.; Perkins, S.T.

    1976-01-01

    This report (vol. 7) presents graphs of major neutron-induced interaction cross sections in the Experimental Cross Section Information Library (ECSIL) as of July 4, 1976. It consists primarily of interactions where a single data set contains enough points to show cross-section behavior. In contrast, vol. 8 of this UCRL-50400 series consists of interactions where more than one data set is needed to show cross section behavior. Thus, you can find the total, elastic, capture, and fission cross sections (along with the parameters anti ν, α, and eta) in vol. 7 and all other reactions in vol. 8. Data are plotted with associated cross section error bars (when given) and compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) as of July 4, 1976. The plots are arranged in ascending order of atomic number (Z) and atomic weight (A). Part A contains the plots for Z = 1 to 55; Part B contains the plots for Z greater than 55

  2. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Major neutron-induced interactions (Z less than or equal to 55): graphical, experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; MacGregor, M.H.; Perkins, S.T.

    1976-07-04

    This report (vol. 7) presents graphs of major neutron-induced interaction cross sections in the Experimental Cross Section Information Library (ECSIL) as of July 4, 1976. It consists primarily of interactions where a single data set contains enough points to show cross-section behavior. In contrast, vol. 8 of this UCRL-50400 series consists of interactions where more than one data set is needed to show cross section behavior. Thus, you can find the total, elastic, capture, and fission cross sections (along with the parameters anti ..nu.., ..cap alpha.., and eta) in vol. 7 and all other reactions in vol. 8. Data are plotted with associated cross section error bars (when given) and compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) as of July 4, 1976. The plots are arranged in ascending order of atomic number (Z) and atomic weight (A). Part A contains the plots for Z = 1 to 55; Part B contains the plots for Z greater than 55.

  3. Interaction Between 2 Nutraceutical Treatments and Host Immune Status in the Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression Comparative Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcillo, Joseph A; Dean, J Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Burr, Jeri; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol; Bell, Michael J; Berg, Robert A; Shanley, Thomas P; Heidemann, Sabrina M; Dalton, Heidi; Jenkins, Tammara L; Doctor, Allan; Webster, Angie; Tamburro, Robert F

    2017-11-01

    The pediatric Critical Illness Stress-induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) trial compared the effectiveness of 2 nutraceutical supplementation strategies and found no difference in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis in the overall population. We performed an exploratory post hoc analysis of interaction between nutraceutical treatments and host immune status related to the development of nosocomial infection/sepsis. Children from the CRISIS trial were analyzed according to 3 admission immune status categories marked by decreasing immune competence: immune competent without lymphopenia, immune competent with lymphopenia, and previously immunocompromised. The comparative effectiveness of the 2 treatments was analyzed for interaction with immune status category. There were 134 immune-competent children without lymphopenia, 79 previously immune-competent children with lymphopenia, and 27 immunocompromised children who received 1 of the 2 treatments. A significant interaction was found between treatment arms and immune status on the time to development of nosocomial infection and sepsis ( P patient characteristic.

  4. Laser-induced plasmas as an analytical source for quantitative analysis of gaseous and aerosol systems: Fundamentals of plasma-particle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Prasoon K.

    2009-11-01

    Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a relatively new analytical diagnostic technique which has gained serious attention in recent past due to its simplicity, robustness, and portability and multi-element analysis capabilities. LIBS has been used successfully for analysis of elements in different media including solids, liquids and gases. Since 1963, when the first breakdown study was reported, to 1983, when the first LIBS experiments were reported, the technique has come a long way, but the majority of fundamental understanding of the processes that occur has taken place in last few years, which has propelled LIBS in the direction of being a well established analytical technique. This study, which mostly focuses on LIBS involving aerosols, has been able to unravel some of the mysteries and provide knowledge that will be valuable to LIBS community as a whole. LIBS processes can be broken down to three basic steps, namely, plasma formation, analyte introduction, and plasma-analyte interactions. In this study, these three steps have been investigated in laser-induced plasma, focusing mainly on the plasma-particle interactions. Understanding plasma-particle interactions and the fundamental processes involved is important in advancing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy as a reliable and accurate analytical technique. Critical understanding of plasma-particle interactions includes study of the plasma evolution, analyte atomization, and the particle dissociation and diffusion. In this dissertation, temporal and spatial studies have been done to understand the fundamentals of the LIBS processes including the breakdown of gases by the laser pulse, plasma inception mechanisms, plasma evolution, analyte introduction and plasma-particle interactions and their influence on LIBS signal. Spectral measurements were performed in a laser-induced plasma and the results reveal localized perturbations in the plasma properties in the vicinity of the analyte species, for

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a plasmonic system comprising of three metal-dielectric-metal parallel slabs: Plasmon- Plasmon interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Moradbeigi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT in a system consisting of associated arrays of parallel slabs (metal-dielectric-metal is studied. The transmission coefficient, the reflection coefficient and the absorption coefficient as function of the incident light frequency by using the transfer matrix method is calculated and numerically discussed. Influence of the thickness of slab and the type of plasmonic metal on the induced transparency has been investigated. It is shown with decreasing the thickness of intermediate slab of length  (dielectric slab, the induced transparency increases due to the strong plasmon–plasmon couplings.

  6. Viral-mediated Zif268 expression in the prefrontal cortex protects against gonadectomy-induced working memory, long-term memory, and social interaction deficits in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossat, Amanda M; Jourdi, Hussam; Wright, Katherine N; Strong, Caroline E; Sarkar, Ambalika; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2017-01-06

    In humans, some males experience reductions in testosterone levels, as a natural consequence of aging or in the clinical condition termed hypogonadism, which are associated with impaired cognitive performance and mood disorder(s). Some of these behavioral deficits can be reversed by testosterone treatment. Our previous work in rats reported that sex differences in the expression of the transcription factor Zif268, a downstream target of testosterone, within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) mediates sex differences in social interaction. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of gonadectomy (GNX) in male rats on mPFC Zif268 expression, mood and cognitive behaviors. We also examined whether reinstitution of Zif268 in GNX rats will correct some of the behavioral deficits observed following GNX. Our results show that GNX induced a downregulation of Zif268 protein in the mPFC, which was concomitant with impaired memory in the y-maze and spontaneous object recognition test, reduced social interaction time, and depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test. Reinstitution of mPFC Zif268, using a novel adeno-associated-viral (AAV) construct, abrogated GNX-induced working memory and long-term memory impairments, and reductions in social interaction time, but not GNX-induced depression-like behaviors. These findings suggest that mPFC Zif268 exerts beneficial effects on memory and social interaction, and could be a potential target for novel treatments for behavioral impairments observed in hypogonadal and aged men with declining levels of gonadal hormones. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrès, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organization in fibroblastic cells. Because actin rearrangement is important for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (Glut 4) translocation, we studied the potential involvement of Enigma in insulin-induced glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Enigma mRNA was expressed in differentiated adipocytes and APS and Enigma were colocalized with cortical actin. Expression of an APS mutant unable to bind Enigma increased the insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation to the plasma membrane. By contrast, overexpression of Enigma inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin-induced actin rearrangements, whereas the expression of Enigma without its LIM domains was without effect. A physiological link between increased expression of Enigma and an alteration in insulin-induced glucose uptake was suggested by the increase in Enigma mRNA expression in adipose tissue of diabetic obese patients. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between APS and Enigma is involved in insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation by regulating cortical actin remodeling and raise the possibility that modification of APS/Enigma ratio could participate in the alteration of insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipose tissue.

  8. Cascaded interactions between Raman induced solitons and dispersive waves in photonic crystal fibers at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driben, Rodislav; Mitschke, Fedor; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai

    2010-12-06

    The complex mechanism of multiple interactions between solitary and dispersive waves at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber is studied in experiment and numerical simulations. Injection of high power negatively chirped pulses near zero dispersion frequency results in an effective soliton fission process with multiple interactions between red shifted Raman solitons and dispersive waves. These interactions may result in relative acceleration of solitons with further collisions between them of quasi-elastic or quasi-plastic kinds. In the spectral domain these processes result in enhancement of certain wavelength regions within the spectrum or development of a new significant band at the long wavelength side of the spectrum.

  9. Interaction in endothelium of non-muscular myosin light-chain kinase and the NF-κB pathway is critical to lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular hyporeactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recoquillon, Sylvain; Carusio, Nunzia; Lagrue-Lakhal, Anne-Hélène; Tual-Chalot, Simon; Filippelli, Amelia; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Martinez, M Carmen

    2015-10-01

    During sepsis, endothelial barrier dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular failure, mainly through the release of oxidative metabolites by penetrant leukocytes. We reported the non-muscular isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) playing a pivotal role in endotoxin shock injury associated with oxidative and nitrative stresses, and vascular hyporeactivity. The present study was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular alterations as well as studying a probable functional association of nmMLCK with nuclear factor κ-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). Aortic rings from mice were exposed in vitro to LPS and, then, vascular reactivity was measured. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAoECs) were incubated with LPS, and interaction of nmMLCK with NF-κB was analysed. We provide evidence that nmMLCK deletion prevents vascular hyporeactivity induced by in vitro LPS treatment but not endothelial dysfunction in the aorta. Deletion of nmMLCK inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB activation and increases nitric oxide (NO) release via induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) within the vascular wall. Also, removal of endothelium prevented both NF-κB and iNOS expression in aortic rings. Among the proinflammatory factors released by LPS-treated endothelial cells, interleukin-6 accounts for the induction of iNOS on smooth muscle cells in response to LPS. Of particular interest is the demonstration that, in HAoECs, LPS-induced NF-κB activation occurs via increased MLCK activity sensitive to the MLCK inhibitor, ML-7, and physical interactions between nmMLCK and NF-κB. We report for the first time on NF-κB as a novel partner of nmMLCK within endothelial cells. The present study demonstrates a pivotal role of nmMLCK in vascular inflammatory pathologies. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. Dynamic Morphological Changes Induced By GM1 and Protein Interactions on the Surface of Cell-Sized Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Takagi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the morphological changes in the cell membrane in the presence of various stimuli such as osmotic pressure. Lipid rafts are believed to play a crucial role in various cellular processes. It is well established that Ctb (Cholera toxin B subunit recognizes and binds to GM1 (monosialotetrahexosylganglioside on the cell surface with high specificity and affinity. Taking advantage of Ctb-GM1 interaction, we examined how Ctb and GM1 molecules affect the dynamic movement of liposomes. GM1 a natural ligand for cholera toxin, was incorporated into liposome and the interaction between fluorescent Ctb and the liposome was analyzed. The interaction plays an important role in determining the various surface interaction phenomena. Incorporation of GM1 into membrane leads to an increase of the line tension leading to either rupture of liposome membrane or change in the morphology of the membrane. This change in morphology was found to be GM1 concentration specific. The interaction between Ctb-GM1 leads to fast and easy rupture or to morphological changes of the liposome. The interactions of Ctb and the glycosyl chain are believed to affect the surface and the curvature of the membrane. Thus, the results are highly beneficial in the study of signal transduction processes.

  11. Investigation of the interaction dynamics of a pair of laser-induced bubbles generated at the same time through double-exposure strobe method and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Liu; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the interaction dynamics of a pair of laser-induced bubbles, a double-exposure strobe photography experimental setup is build up to study the temporal evolution of the bubble pairs and to measure the transient bubble-interface moving speed. The interaction mechanisms of the bubble pairs are discussed together with the numerical results obtained through OpenFOAM. It is shown that the direction and the velocity of the jetting could be controlled by the relative size and the relative initiation distance of the bubble pair, when the bubbles are generated at the same time, i.e., in-phase. The liquid jet is considered to be a penetrating jet. The jet is originated from the smaller bubble and clearly protruding outside of the bigger bubble. The parameter space of the relative size and the initiation distance of the bubble pair allowing the formation of the penetrating jet are very narrow. It is concluded that the liquid jet induced by the bubble interactions resulted from the collapse and the rebound of the smaller bubble nearby the bigger bubble. This is defined as the "catapult effect." Such a directional liquid transportation is a promising tool as a micro-injector or a micro-pump. The investigation results could be also supplementary to the understandings of the bubble dynamics.

  12. Electric-field-induced modification of the magnon energy, exchange interaction, and curie temperature of transition-metal thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, M; Nakamura, K; Akiyama, T; Ito, T; Weinert, M; Freeman, A J

    2015-03-13

    The electric-field-induced modification in the Curie temperature of prototypical transition-metal thin films with the perpendicular magnetic easy axis, a freestanding Fe(001) monolayer and a Co monolayer on Pt(111), is investigated by first-principles calculations of spin-spiral structures in an external electric field (E field). An applied E field is found to modify the magnon (spin-spiral formation) energy; the change arises from the E-field-induced screening charge density in the spin-spiral states due to p-d hybridizations. The Heisenberg exchange parameters obtained from the magnon energy suggest an E-field-induced modification of the Curie temperature, which is demonstrated via Monte Carlo simulations that take the magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account.

  13. Azadirachtin interacts with the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binding domain of its receptors and inhibits TNF-induced biological responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Thoh, Maikho; Kumar, Pankaj; Nagarajaram, Hampathalu A.; Manna, Sunil K.

    2013-01-01

    The role of azadirachtin, an active component of a medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica), on TNF-induced cell signaling in human cell lines was investigated. Azadirachtin blocks TNF-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and also expression of NF-κB-dependent genes such as adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase 2. Azadirachtin inhibits the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB (IκBα) phosphorylation and thereby its degradation and RelA (p65) nuclear translocation. It blocks IκBα kinase (IKK...

  14. Bee's honey attenuates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-induced hepatic injury through the regulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jia; Liu, Yingxia; Xing, Feiyue; Leung, Tung Ming; Liong, Emily C; Tipoe, George L

    2016-06-01

    We aim to examine whether honey ameliorates hepatic injury in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) animal and cell line steatosis models. NASH was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rat by 8-week feeding with a high-fat diet. During the experiment, 5 g/kg honey was intragastrically fed daily. Rat normal hepatocyte BRL-3A cell was treated with sodium palmitate (SP) to induce steatosis in the absence or presence of honey pre-treatment or specific siRNA/overexpress plasmid of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) or antagonist/agonist of Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3). Honey significantly improved the high-fat-diet-induced hepatic injury, steatosis, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in rats. Honey also inhibited the overexpression of TXNIP and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. These effects were replicated in BRL-3A cell line which showed that the down-regulation of TXNIP or inhibition of NLRP3 contributed to the suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, inflammation, and re-balanced lipid metabolism. In contrast, overexpression of TXNIP or agonism of NLRP3 exacerbated the cellular damage induced by SP. Suppression of the TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway may partly contribute to the amelioration of hepatic injury during the progression of NASH by honey. Targeting hepatic TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway is a potential therapeutic way for the prevention and treatment of NASH.

  15. Magnetic chirality induced from Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction at an interface of a ferromagnet/heavy metal heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Taira; Matsuura, Hiroyasu; Ogata, Masao

    2016-01-01

    We study a microscopic derivation and the properties of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) between local magnetic moments in ferromagnet/heavy metal heterostructures. First, we derive DMI by Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction through electrons in a heavy metal with Rashba spin orbit interaction (SOI). Next, we study the dependences of the DMI on the Rashba SOI, lattice constant, and chemical potential. We find that the DMI amplitude increases linearly when the Rashba SOI is small, has a maximum when the Rashba SOI is comparable to the hopping integral, and decreases when the Rashba SOI is large. The sign of the DMI not only changes depending on the sign of the Rashba SOI but also the lattice constants and the chemical potential of the heavy metal. The implications of the obtained results for experiments are discussed. (author)

  16. Zero-Magnetic-Field Spin Splitting of Polaron's Ground State Energy Induced by Rashba Spin-Orbit Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jia; Xiao Jingling

    2006-01-01

    We study theoretically the ground state energy of a polaron near the interface of a polar-polar semiconductor by considering the Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling with the Lee-Low-Pines intermediate coupling method. Our numerical results show that the Rashba SO interaction originating from the inversion asymmetry in the heterostructure splits the ground state energy of the polaron. The electron areal density and vector dependence of the ratio of the SO interaction to the total ground state energy or other energy composition are obvious. One can see that even without any external magnetic field, the ground state energy can be split by the Rashba SO interaction, and this split is not a single but a complex one. Since the presents of the phonons, whose energy gives negative contribution to the polaron's, the spin-splitting states of the polaron are more stable than electron's.

  17. CCR9 interactions support ovarian cancer cell survival and resistance to cisplatin-induced apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Erica L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is more often used to treat ovarian cancer (OvCa, which provides modest survival advantage primarily due to chemo-resistance and up regulated anti-apoptotic machineries in OvCa cells. Therefore, targeting the mechanisms responsible for cisplatin resistance in OvCa cell may improve therapeutic outcomes. We have shown that ovarian cancer cells express CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9. Others have also shown that CCL25, the only natural ligand for CCR9, up regulates anti-apoptotic proteins in immature T lymphocytes. Hence, it is plausible that CCR9-mediated cell signals might be involved in OvCa cell survival and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the potential role and molecular mechanisms of CCR9-mediated inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis in OvCa cells. Methods Cell proliferation, vibrant apoptosis, and TUNEL assays were performed with or without cisplatin treatment in presence or absence of CCL25 to determine the role of the CCR9-CCL25 axis in cisplatin resistance. In situ Fast Activated cell-based ELISA (FACE assays were performed to determine anti-apoptotic signaling molecules responsible for CCL25-CCR9 mediated survival. Results Our results show interactions between CCR9 and CCL25 increased anti-apoptotic signaling cascades in OvCa cells, which rescued cells from cisplatin-induced cell death. Specifically, CCL25-CCR9 interactions mediated Akt, activation as well as GSK-3β and FKHR phosphorylation in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest the CCR9-CCL25 axis plays an important role in reducing cisplatin-induced apoptosis of OvCa cells.

  18. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Supplemental neutron-induced interactions (Z less than or equal to 35): graphical, experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; MacGregor, M.H.; Perkins, S.T.

    1976-01-01

    This report (Vol. 8) presents graphs of supplemental neutron-induced cross sections in the Experimental Cross Section Information Library (ECSIL) as of July 4, 1976. It consists of interactions where more than one data set is needed to show cross-section behavior. In contrast, Vol. 7 of this UCRL-50400 series consists primarily of interactions where a single data set contains enough points to show cross-section behavior. In Vol. 7 can be found the total, elastic, capture, and fission cross sections (along with the parameters anti ν, α, and eta). Volume 8 contains all other reactions. Data are plotted with associated cross-section error bars (when given) and compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) as of July 4, 1976. The plots are arranged in ascending order of atomic number (Z) and atomic weight (A). Part A contains the plots for Z = 1 to 35; Part B contains the plots for Z greater than 35

  19. Nuclear interaction of Smac/DIABLO with Survivin at G2/M arrest prompts docetaxel-induced apoptosis in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Chung, Jin-Yong; Lee, Seung Gee; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Ji-Eun; Yoo, Ki Soo; Yoo, Young Hyun; Park, Young Chul; Kim, Byeong Gee; Kim, Jong-Min

    2006-01-01

    Smac/DIABLO is released by mitochondria in response to apoptotic stimuli and is thought to antagonize the function of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins. Recently, it has been shown that, like XIAP, Survivin can potentially interact with Smac/DIABLO. However, the precise mechanisms and cellular location of their action have not been determined. We report for the first time that Smac/DIABLO translocates to the nucleus and is colocalized with Survivin at mitotic spindles during apoptosis resulting from G2/M arrest due to docetaxel treatment of DU145 prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that the nuclear interaction of Smac/DIABLO with Survivin is an important step for suppressing the anti-apoptotic function of Survivin in Doc-induced apoptosis. This suggests that the balance between cellular Smac/DIABLO and Survivin levels could be critical for cellular destiny in taxane-treated cancer cells

  20. Interaction of Mycoplasma hominis PG21 with Human Dendritic Cells: Interleukin-23-Inducing Mycoplasmal Lipoproteins and Inflammasome Activation of the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goret, J; Béven, L; Faustin, B; Contin-Bordes, C; Le Roy, C; Claverol, S; Renaudin, H; Bébéar, C; Pereyre, S

    2017-08-01

    Mycoplasma hominis lacks a cell wall, and lipoproteins anchored to the extracellular side of the plasma membrane are in direct contact with the host components. A Triton X-114 extract of M. hominis enriched with lipoproteins was shown to stimulate the production of interleukin-23 (IL-23) by human dendritic cells (hDCs). The inflammasome activation of the host cell has never been reported upon M. hominis infection. We studied here the interaction between M. hominis PG21 and hDCs by analyzing both the inflammation-inducing mycoplasmal lipoproteins and the inflammasome activation of the host cell. IL-23-inducing lipoproteins were determined using a sequential extraction strategy with two nondenaturing detergents, Sarkosyl and Triton X-114, followed by SDS-PAGE separation and mass spectrometry identification. The activation of the hDC inflammasome was assessed using PCR array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We defined a list of 24 lipoproteins that could induce the secretion of IL-23 by hDCs, 5 with a molecular mass between 20 and 35 kDa and 19 with a molecular mass between 40 and 100 kDa. Among them, lipoprotein MHO_4720 was identified as potentially bioactive, and a synthetic lipopeptide corresponding to the N-terminal part of the lipoprotein was subsequently shown to induce IL-23 release by hDCs. Regarding the hDC innate immune response, inflammasome activation with caspase-dependent production of IL-1β was observed. After 24 h of coincubation of hDCs with M. homini s, downregulation of the NLRP3-encoding gene and of the adaptor PYCARD-encoding gene was noticed. Overall, this study provides insight into both protagonists of the interaction of M. hominis and hDCs. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma hominis is a human urogenital pathogen involved in gynecologic and opportunistic infections. M. hominis lacks a cell wall, and its membrane contains many lipoproteins that are anchored to the extracellular side of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we focused on

  1. Novelty-Induced Arousal Enhances Memory for Cued Classical Fear Conditioning: Interactions between Peripheral Adrenergic and Brainstem Glutamatergic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stanley O., II; Williams, Cedric L.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to novel contexts produce heightened states of arousal and biochemical changes in the brain to consolidate memory. However, processes permitting simple exposure to unfamiliar contexts to elevate sympathetic output and to improve memory are poorly understood. This shortcoming was addressed by examining how novelty-induced changes in…

  2. Azadirachtin Interacts with the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Binding Domain of Its Receptors and Inhibits TNF-induced Biological Responses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoh, Maikho