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Sample records for interaction enhances recruitment

  1. Self-Evaluation and Recruitment of Feedback for Enhanced Social Interaction by a Student with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2005-01-01

    A student who is visually impaired was trained to evaluate his social behavior and to recruit feedback from his sighted peers, who were trained by him to provide the feedback. The self-recruitment of feedback improved the student's accuracy in evaluating social skills requiring visual cues. In addition, the peers extended their feedback to other…

  2. Interactions between multiple recruitment drivers: post-settlement predation mortality and flow-mediated recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony M Knights

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dispersal is a primary driver in shaping the future distribution of species in both terrestrial and marine systems. Physical transport by advection can regulate the distance travelled and rate of propagule supply to a habitat but post-settlement processes such as predation can decouple supply from recruitment. The effect of flow-mediated recruitment and predation on the recruitment success of an intertidal species, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica was evaluated in two-replicated field experiments. Two key crab species were manipulated to test predator identity effects on oyster mortality. FINDINGS: Recruitment was ∼58% higher in high flow compared to low flow, but predation masked those differences. Predation mortality was primarily attributed to the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, whilst the mud crab Panopeus herbstii had no effect on recruit mortality. Recruit mortality from predation was high when recruit densities were high, but when recruit density was low, predation effects were not seen. Under high recruitment (supply, predation determined maximum population size and in low flow environments, recruitment success is likely determined by a combination of recruitment and resource limitation but not predation. CONCLUSIONS: Four processes are demonstrated: (1 Increases in flow rate positively affect recruitment success; (2 In high flow (recruitment environments, resource availability is less important than predation; (3 predation is an important source of recruit mortality, but is dependent upon recruit density; and (4 recruitment and/or resource limitation is likely a major driver of population structure and functioning, modifying the interaction between predators and prey. Simultaneous testing of flow-mediated recruitment and predation was required to differentiate between the role of each process in determining population size. Our results reinforce the importance of propagule pressure, predation and post

  3. Desert ants achieve reliable recruitment across noisy interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, Nitzan; Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Feinerman, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    We study how desert ants, Cataglyphis niger, a species that lacks pheromone-based recruitment mechanisms, inform each other about the presence of food. Our results are based on automated tracking that allows us to collect a large database of ant trajectories and interactions. We find that interactions affect an ant's speed within the nest. Fast ants tend to slow down, whereas slow ones increase their speed when encountering a faster ant. Faster ants tend to exit the nest more frequently than slower ones. So, if an ant gains enough speed through encounters with others, then she tends to leave the nest and look for food. On the other hand, we find that the probability for her to leave the nest depends only on her speed, but not on whether she had recently interacted with a recruiter that has found the food. This suggests a recruitment system in which ants communicate their state by very simple interactions. Based on this assumption, we estimate the information-theoretical channel capacity of the ants’ pairwise interactions. We find that the response to the speed of an interacting nest-mate is very noisy. The question is then how random interactions with ants within the nest can be distinguished from those interactions with a recruiter who has found food. Our measurements and model suggest that this distinction does not depend on reliable communication but on behavioural differences between ants that have found the food and those that have not. Recruiters retain high speeds throughout the experiment, regardless of the ants they interact with; non-recruiters communicate with a limited number of nest-mates and adjust their speed following these interactions. These simple rules lead to the formation of a bistable switch on the level of the group that allows the distinction between recruitment and random noise in the nest. A consequence of the mechanism we propose is a negative effect of ant density on exit rates and recruitment success. This is, indeed, confirmed by

  4. Desert ants achieve reliable recruitment across noisy interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, Nitzan; Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Feinerman, Ofer

    2013-05-06

    We study how desert ants, Cataglyphis niger, a species that lacks pheromone-based recruitment mechanisms, inform each other about the presence of food. Our results are based on automated tracking that allows us to collect a large database of ant trajectories and interactions. We find that interactions affect an ant's speed within the nest. Fast ants tend to slow down, whereas slow ones increase their speed when encountering a faster ant. Faster ants tend to exit the nest more frequently than slower ones. So, if an ant gains enough speed through encounters with others, then she tends to leave the nest and look for food. On the other hand, we find that the probability for her to leave the nest depends only on her speed, but not on whether she had recently interacted with a recruiter that has found the food. This suggests a recruitment system in which ants communicate their state by very simple interactions. Based on this assumption, we estimate the information-theoretical channel capacity of the ants' pairwise interactions. We find that the response to the speed of an interacting nest-mate is very noisy. The question is then how random interactions with ants within the nest can be distinguished from those interactions with a recruiter who has found food. Our measurements and model suggest that this distinction does not depend on reliable communication but on behavioural differences between ants that have found the food and those that have not. Recruiters retain high speeds throughout the experiment, regardless of the ants they interact with; non-recruiters communicate with a limited number of nest-mates and adjust their speed following these interactions. These simple rules lead to the formation of a bistable switch on the level of the group that allows the distinction between recruitment and random noise in the nest. A consequence of the mechanism we propose is a negative effect of ant density on exit rates and recruitment success. This is, indeed, confirmed by our

  5. Enhancement of Marine Corps’ Recruiting and Retention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    and reputation. The Corps has good marketing techniques due to enhancements in its marketing strategy since 2004. The Corps’ understaffing of Career...year than it has in the past to grow the Corps from 186,490 to 202,000 by fiscal year 2011. An analysis of the Corps’ environment and marketing ... strategy reveals strengths and weaknesses that can be exploited or mitigated to enhance recruiting and retention. The Corps’ execution of its mission and

  6. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Kirti V; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-14

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury.

  7. Biotic interactions at hydrothermal vents: Recruitment inhibition by the mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenihan, H. S.; Mills, S. W.; Mullineaux, L. S.; Peterson, C. H.; Fisher, C. R.; Micheli, F.

    2008-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of marine communities are regulated in part by variation in recruitment. As in other ecosystems, recruitment at deep-sea hydrothermal vents is controlled by the interplay of propagule supply and behavior, gradients in physical-chemical conditions, and biotic interactions during pre- and post-settlement periods. Recent research along the East Pacific Rise indicates that inhibition of recently settled larvae by mobile predators (mainly limpets) influences patterns of recruitment and subsequent community succession. We conducted a manipulative experiment at the same sites (˜2510 m water depth) to test whether high-density assemblages of the mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus also inhibit recruitment. In a preliminary study, recruitment of vent invertebrates within the faunal zone dominated by B. thermophilus was strikingly different at two sites, East Wall and Worm Hole. East Wall had high densities of mussels but very low total recruitment. In contrast, Worm Hole had few mussels but high recruitment. Using the submersible Alvin, we transplanted a large number of mussels from East Wall to Worm Hole and quantified recruitment on basalt blocks placed in three treatments: (1) naturally high densities of mussels at East Wall; (2) naturally low densities of mussels at Worm Hole; and (3) high densities of transplanted mussels at Worm Hole. After 11 months, a total of 24 taxa had recruited to the basalt blocks. Recruitment was 44-60% lower in the transplanted high-density mussel patch at Worm Hole and the natural high-density patch at East Wall than within the natural low-density patch at Worm Hole. Biotic processes that may have caused the pattern of recruitment observed included predation of larvae via water filtration by mussels, larval avoidance of superior competitors, interference competition, and enhanced predation by species within the mussel-bed community. Our results indicate that biotic interactions affecting recruitment must be

  8. Electronically Enhanced Classroom Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Stephen; Cargill, Julie; Cutts, Quintin

    A design rationale for introducing electronic equipment (a group response system) for student interaction in lecture theaters is presented, linking the instructional design to theory. The effectiveness of the equipment for learning depends mostly on what pedagogic method is employed. Various alternative types are introduced, including: assessment;…

  9. Waterlogging and canopy interact to control species recruitment in floodplains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotowski, Wiktor; Beauchard, Olivier; Opdekamp, Wout; Meire, Patrick; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2010-01-01

    P>1. The extent to which seedling recruitment contributes to local functional diversity depends on the environmental filters operating in a plant community. Classical community assembly models assume that habitat constraints and competition act like hierarchical filters with habitat filtering as the

  10. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  11. Interaction Enhanced Imperialist Competitive Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Shiou Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Imperialist Competitive Algorithm (ICA is a new population-based evolutionary algorithm. It divides its population of solutions into several sub-populations, and then searches for the optimal solution through two operations: assimilation and competition. The assimilation operation moves each non-best solution (called colony in a sub-population toward the best solution (called imperialist in the same sub-population. The competition operation removes a colony from the weakest sub-population and adds it to another sub-population. Previous work on ICA focuses mostly on improving the assimilation operation or replacing the assimilation operation with more powerful meta-heuristics, but none focuses on the improvement of the competition operation. Since the competition operation simply moves a colony (i.e., an inferior solution from one sub-population to another sub-population, it incurs weak interaction among these sub-populations. This work proposes Interaction Enhanced ICA that strengthens the interaction among the imperialists of all sub-populations. The performance of Interaction Enhanced ICA is validated on a set of benchmark functions for global optimization. The results indicate that the performance of Interaction Enhanced ICA is superior to that of ICA and its existing variants.

  12. Lateral interactions and enhanced adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Deakin, Mark R.

    1991-06-01

    We extend earlier work on the effects of lateral adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in systems with two different adsorbate species to consider in detail enhanced adsorption phenomena. We give a detailed explanation of the enhancement mechanism for a lattice-gas model in thermodynamic equilibrium, and provide explicit quantitative criteria which must be satisfied by the effective lateral interactions in systems exhibiting strong, intermediate, or weak enhancement behavior. It is the examination and understanding of the topological details of the ground-state and phase diagrams of the model that allow the formulation of these criteria. The theoretically obtained criteria are supported by precise numerical calculations (transfer-matrix with strip width six) of adsorption isotherms for a three-state lattice-gas model with nearest-neighbor interactions on a triangular lattice. The applicability of this theoretical framework is illustrated by an analysis of experimental adsorption isotherms for the electrochemical adsorption of naphthalene on copper and n-decylamine on nickel, previously obtained by Bockris et al. As suggested by Damaskin et al. we attribute the potential dependence of the organic coverage to the influence of coadsorbed hydrogen. We find that nonlinear least-squares fits of numerical lattice-gas isotherms to the experimental data produce good agreement between the experimental and numerical adsorption isotherms, as well as effective lattice-gas interaction energies consistent with independent estimates from the literature.

  13. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  14. Optimal recruitment strategies for groups of interacting walkers with leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Ricardo; López, Cristóbal; Vazquez, Federico

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a model of interacting random walkers on a finite one-dimensional chain with absorbing boundaries or targets at the ends. Walkers are of two types: informed particles that move ballistically towards a given target and diffusing uninformed particles that are biased towards close informed individuals. This model mimics the dynamics of hierarchical groups of animals, where an informed individual tries to persuade and lead the movement of its conspecifics. We characterize the success of this persuasion by the first-passage probability of the uninformed particle to the target, and we interpret the speed of the informed particle as a strategic parameter that the particle can tune to maximize its success. We find that the success probability is nonmonotonic, reaching its maximum at an intermediate speed whose value increases with the diffusing rate of the uninformed particle. When two different groups of informed leaders traveling in opposite directions compete, usually the largest group is the most successful. However, the minority can reverse this situation and become the most probable winner by following two different strategies: increasing its attraction strength or adjusting its speed to an optimal value relative to the majority's speed.

  15. Enhanced Bone Repair by Guided Osteoblast Recruitment Using Topographically Defined Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Kee; Kim, Hong Nam; Bhang, Suk Ho; Shin, Jung-Youn; Han, Jin; La, Wan-Geun; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Kang, Seokyung; Lee, Ju-Ro; Oh, Jaesur; Kim, Min Sung; Jeon, Noo Li; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2016-04-01

    The rapid recruitment of osteoblasts in bone defects is an essential prerequisite for efficient bone repair. Conventionally, osteoblast recruitment to bone defects and subsequent bone repair has been achieved using growth factors. Here, we present a methodology that can guide the recruitment of osteoblasts to bone defects with topographically defined implants (TIs) for efficient in vivo bone repair. We compared circular TIs that had microgrooves in parallel or radial arrangements with nonpatterned implants for osteoblast migration and in vivo bone formation. In vitro, the microgrooves in the TIs enhanced both the migration and proliferation of osteoblasts. Especially, the microgrooves with radial arrangement demonstrated a much higher efficiency of osteoblast recruitment to the implants than did the other types of implants, which may be due to the efficient guidance of cell migration toward the cell-free area of the implants. The expression of the intracellular signaling molecules responsible for the cell migration was also upregulated in osteoblasts on the microgrooved TIs. In vivo, the TI with radially defined topography demonstrated much greater bone repair in mouse calvarial defect models than in the other types of implants. Taken together, these results indicate that implants with physical guidance can enhance tissue repair by rapid cell recruitment.

  16. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper,S.E.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Occhogrosso, D.M.; Lockwood, D.; Carroll, C.J.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Fankhauser, J.

    2009-07-12

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards October 22 and 23, 2008. The workshop was sponsored by DOE/NA-243 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). Placing well-qualified Americans in sufficient number and in key safeguards positions within the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) Department of Safeguards is an important U.S. non-proliferation objective. The goal of the NGSI Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards was to improve U.S. efforts to recruit U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. BNL’s International Safeguards Project Office invited participants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the IAEA, U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who are either experts in international safeguards or who understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. A final report for the workshop will be finalized and distributed in early 2009. The main finding of the workshop was the need for an integrated recruitment plan to take into account pools of potential candidates, various government and private agency stakeholders, the needs of the IAEA, and the NGSI human capital development plan. There were numerous findings related to and recommendations for maximizing the placement of U.S. experts in IAEA Safeguards positions. The workshop participants offered many ideas for increasing the pool of candidates and increasing the placement rate. This paper will provide details on these findings and recommendations

  17. Interactive Teaching as a Recruitment and Training Tool for K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Teacher Preparation (STEMTP) program at the University of Colorado has been designed to recruit and train prospective K-12 science teachers while improving student learning through interactive teaching. The program has four key goals: (1) recruit undergraduate students into K-12 science education, (2) provide these prospective teachers with hands-on experience in an interactive teaching pedagogy, (3) create an intergrated program designed to support (educationally, socially, and financially) and engage these prospective science teachers up until they obtain liscensure and/or their masters degree in education, and (4) improve student learning in large introductory science classes. Currently there are 31 students involved in the program and a total of 72 students have been involved in the year and a half it has been in existence. I will discuss the design of the STEMTP program, the success in recruiting K-12 science teachers, and the affect on student learning in a large lecture class of implementing interactive learning pedagogies by involving these prospective K-12 science teachers. J. L. Rosenberg would like to acknowledge the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship for support for this work. The course transformation project is also supported by grants from the National Science Foundation.

  18. Pin1 promotes GR transactivation by enhancing recruitment to target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolman, Toryn M; Farrow, Stuart N; Matthews, Laura; Loudon, Andrew S; Ray, David W

    2013-10-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand activated transcription factor, serving to regulate both energy metabolism and immune functions. Factors that influence cellular sensitivity to glucocorticoids (GC) are therefore of great interest. The N-terminal of the GR contains numerous potential proline-directed phosphorylation sites, some of which can regulate GR transactivation. Unrestricted proline isomerisation can be inhibited by adjacent serine phosphorylation and requires a prolyl isomerise, Pin1. Pin1 therefore determines the functional outcome of proline-directed kinases acting on the GR, as cis/trans isomers are distinct pools with different interacting proteins. We show that Pin1 mediates GR transactivation, but not GR trans-repression. Two N-terminal GR serines, S203 and S211, are targets for Pin1 potentiation of GR transactivation, establishing a direct link between Pin1 and the GR. We also demonstrate GC-activated co-recruitment of GR and Pin1 to the GILZ gene promoter. The Pin1 effect required both its WW and catalytic domains, and GR recruitment to its GRE was Pin1-dependent. Therefore, Pin1 is a selective regulator of GR transactivation, acting through N-terminal phospho-serine residues to regulate GR recruitment to its target sites in the genome. As Pin1 is dysregulated in disease states, this interaction may contribute to altered GC action in inflammatory conditions.

  19. HTLV-1 Tax protein recruitment into IKKε and TBK1 kinase complexes enhances IFN-I expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Erica; Avesani, Francesca; Bergamo, Elisa; Cremonese, Giorgia; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2015-02-01

    The Tax protein expressed by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) plays a pivotal role in the deregulation of cellular pathways involved in the immune response, inflammation, cell survival, and cancer. Many of these effects derive from Tax multiple interactions with host factors, including the subunits of the IKK-complex that are required for NF-κB activation. IKKɛ and TBK1 are two IKK-related kinases that allow the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factors that trigger IFN type I gene expression. We observed that IKKɛ and TBK1 recruit Tax into cellular immunocomplexes. We also found that TRAF3, which regulates cell receptor signaling effectors, forms complexes with Tax. Transactivation analyses revealed that expression of Tax, in presence of IKKɛ and TBK1, enhances IFN-β promoter activity, whereas the activation of NF-κB promoter is not modified. We propose that Tax may be recruited into the TBK1/IKKɛ complexes as a scaffolding-adaptor protein that enhances IFN-I gene expression.

  20. Interactive Image Enhancement by Fuzzy Relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang-Ming Zhou; John Q.Can; Li-Da Xu; Robert John

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an interactive image enhancement (HE) technique based on fuzzy relaxation is presented, which allows the user to select different intensity levels for enhancement and intermit the enhancement process according to his/her preference in applications. First, based on an analysis of the convergence of a fuzzy relaxation algorithm for image contrast enhancement, an improved version of this algorithm, which is called FuzzIIE Method 1, is suggested by deriving a relationship between the convergence regions and the parameters in the transformations defined in the algorithm. Then a method called FuzzIIE Method 2 is introduced by using a different fuzzy relaxation function, in which there is no need to re-select the parameter values for interactive image enhancement. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the enhancement capabilities of the proposed methods under different conditions.

  1. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper,S.; Rosenthal, M.; Fishbone, L.; Occhiogrosso, D.; Carroll, C.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Rankhauser, J.

    2008-10-22

    In 2007, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a yearlong review of the challenges facing the international safeguards system today and over the next 25 years. The study found that without new investment in international safeguards, the U.S. safeguards technology base, and our ability to support International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, will continue to erode and soon may be at risk. To reverse this trend, the then U.S. Secretary of Energy, Samuel Bodman, announced at the 2007 IAEA General Conference that the Department of Energy (DOE) would launch the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). He stated 'IAEA safeguards must be robust and capable of addressing proliferation threats. Full confidence in IAEA safeguards is essential for nuclear power to grow safely and securely. To this end, the U.S. Department of Energy will seek to ensure that modern technology, the best scientific expertise, and adequate resources are available to keep pace with expanding IAEA responsibilities.' To meet this goal, the NGSI objectives include the recruitment of international safeguards experts to work at the U.S. national laboratories and to serve at the IAEA's headquarters. Part of the latter effort will involve enhancing our existing efforts to place well-qualified Americans in a sufficient number of key safeguards positions within the IAEA's Department of Safeguards. Accordingly, the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards (ERIS) on October 22 and 23, 2008. The ISPO used a workshop format developed earlier with Sonalysts, Inc., that was followed at the U.S. Support Program's (USSP's) technology road-mapping sessions. ISPO invited participants from the U.S. DOE, the IAEA, the U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and

  2. Nanoplasmonic renormalization and enhancement of Coulomb interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durach, M; Rusina, A; Stockman, M I [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Klimov, V I [Chemistry Division, C-PCS, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)], E-mail: mstockman@gsu.edu

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, we propose a general and powerful theory of the plasmonic enhancement of the many-body phenomena resulting in a closed expression for the surface plasmon-dressed Coulomb interaction. We illustrate this theory by computing the dressed interaction explicitly for an important example of metal-dielectric nanoshells which exhibits a rich resonant behavior in magnitude and phase. This interaction is used to describe the nanoplasmonic-enhanced Foerster resonant energy transfer (FRET) between nanocrystal quantum dots near a nanoshell.

  3. Nanoplasmonic renormalization and enhancement of Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durach, M.; Rusina, A.; Klimov, V. I.; Stockman, M. I.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a general and powerful theory of the plasmonic enhancement of the many-body phenomena resulting in a closed expression for the surface plasmon-dressed Coulomb interaction. We illustrate this theory by computing the dressed interaction explicitly for an important example of metal-dielectric nanoshells which exhibits a rich resonant behavior in magnitude and phase. This interaction is used to describe the nanoplasmonic-enhanced Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) between nanocrystal quantum dots near a nanoshell.

  4. Disrupted trophic interactions affect recruitment of boreal deciduous and coniferous trees in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelstam, Per; Manton, Michael; Pedersen, Simen; Elbakidze, Marine

    2017-06-01

    Loss of large carnivore populations may lead to increased population densities of large herbivores, and subsequent cascading effects on the composition, structure, and function of ecosystems. Using a macroecological approach based on studies in multiple boreal forest landscapes in the Baltic Sea region and Russia, we tested the hypothesis that disrupted trophic interactions among large carnivores and large herbivores affect the recruitment of both ecologically and economically valuable tree species. We measured damage levels on young trees and large herbivore density in 10 local landscapes representing a gradient from extinct to extant populations of both large carnivores and large herbivores. We also tested the alternative hypothesis that forest management intensity is correlated to reduced recruitment of these tree species. At the macroecological scale there was an inverse relationship between the number of large carnivores and large herbivores. This coincided with a steep gradient in browsing damage on the ecologically important aspen, rowan and sallow as hosts for specialized species, as well as the economically important Scots pine. In one landscape hunting had replaced the presence of carnivores. Mean damage levels of these four tree species were correlated with large herbivore abundance, but not with forest management intensity. We discuss the pros and cons of this macroecological approach, as well as the challenge of governing and managing trophic interactions at multiple scales. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. CXCL1-Triggered Interaction of LFA1 and ICAM1 Control Glucose-Induced Leukocyte Recruitment during Inflammation In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Buschmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well acknowledged that proinflammatory stimulation during acute hyperglycemia is able to aggravate inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms of proinflammatory effects of glucose are controversially discussed. We investigated leukocyte recruitment after intravenous injection of glucose in different inflammatory models using intravital microscopy. Flow chamber experiments, expression analysis, functional depletion, and knockout of key adhesion molecules gave mechanistic insight in involved pathways. We demonstrated that a single injection of glucose rapidly increased blood glucose levels in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, during tumor necrosis factor (TNF α-induced inflammation leukocyte recruitment was not further enhanced by glucose administration, whereas glucose injection profoundly augmented leukocyte adhesion and transmigration into inflamed tissue in the trauma model, indicating that proinflammatory properties of glucose are stimulus dependent. Experiments with functional or genetic inhibition of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1, and lymphocyte function antigen 1 (LFA1 suggest that keratino-derived-chemokine CXCL1-triggered interactions of ICAM1 and LFA1 are crucially involved in the trauma model of inflammation. The lacking effect of glucose on β2 integrin expression and on leukocyte adhesion in dynamic flow chamber experiments argues against leukocyte-driven underlying mechanisms and favours an endothelial pathway since endothelial ICAM1 expression was significantly upregulated in response to glucose.

  6. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria in resting cells. Interestingly, upon induction of mitophagy, CHDH accumulates on the outer membrane in a mitochondrial potential-dependent manner. We found that CHDH is not a substrate of PARK2 but interacts with SQSTM1 independently of PARK2 to recruit SQSTM1 into depolarized mitochondria. The FB1 domain of CHDH is exposed to the cytosol and is required for the interaction with SQSTM1, and overexpression of the FB1 domain only in cytosol reduces CCCP-induced mitochondrial degradation via competitive interaction with SQSTM1. In addition, CHDH, but not the CHDH FB1 deletion mutant, forms a ternary protein complex with SQSTM1 and MAP1LC3 (LC3), leading to loading of LC3 onto the damaged mitochondria via SQSTM1. Further, CHDH is crucial to the mitophagy induced by MPP+ in SN4741 cells. Overall, our results suggest that CHDH is required for PARK2-mediated mitophagy for the recruitment of SQSTM1 and LC3 onto the mitochondria for cargo recognition.

  7. Ocean acidification reduces coral recruitment by disrupting intimate larval-algal settlement interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doropoulos, Christopher; Ward, Selina; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Mumby, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Ecology Letters (2012) 15: 338-346 ABSTRACT: Successful recruitment in shallow reef ecosystems often involves specific cues that connect planktonic invertebrate larvae with particular crustose coralline algae (CCA) during settlement. While ocean acidification (OA) can reduce larval settlement and the abundance of CCA, the impact of OA on the interactions between planktonic larvae and their preferred settlement substrate are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CO2 concentrations (800 and 1300 μatm) predicted to occur by the end of this century significantly reduce coral (Acropora millepora) settlement and CCA cover by ≥ 45%. The CCA important for inducing coral settlement (Titanoderma spp., Hydrolithon spp.) were the most deleteriously affected by OA. Surprisingly, the only preferred settlement substrate (Titanoderma) in the experimental controls was avoided by coral larvae as pCO2 increased, and other substrata selected. Our results suggest OA may reduce coral population recovery by reducing coral settlement rates, disrupting larval settlement behaviour, and reducing the availability of the most desirable coralline algal species for successful coral recruitment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  8. Omega-3 Fatty acids and inflammation: novel interactions reveal a new step in neutrophil recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha P Tull

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a physiological response to tissue trauma or infection, but leukocytes, which are the effector cells of the inflammatory process, have powerful tissue remodelling capabilities. Thus, to ensure their precise localisation, passage of leukocytes from the blood into inflamed tissue is tightly regulated. Recruitment of blood borne neutrophils to the tissue stroma occurs during early inflammation. In this process, peptide agonists of the chemokine family are assumed to provide a chemotactic stimulus capable of supporting the migration of neutrophils across vascular endothelial cells, through the basement membrane of the vessel wall, and out into the tissue stroma. Here, we show that, although an initial chemokine stimulus is essential for the recruitment of flowing neutrophils by endothelial cells stimulated with the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transit of the endothelial monolayer is regulated by an additional and downstream stimulus. This signal is supplied by the metabolism of the omega-6-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6-PUFA, arachidonic acid, into the eicosanoid prostaglandin-D(2 (PGD(2 by cyclooxygenase (COX enzymes. This new step in the neutrophil recruitment process was revealed when the dietary n-3-PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, was utilised as an alternative substrate for COX enzymes, leading to the generation of PGD(3. This alternative series eicosanoid inhibited the migration of neutrophils across endothelial cells by antagonising the PGD(2 receptor. Here, we describe a new step in the neutrophil recruitment process that relies upon a lipid-mediated signal to regulate the migration of neutrophils across endothelial cells. PGD(2 signalling is subordinate to the chemokine-mediated activation of neutrophils, but without the sequential delivery of this signal, neutrophils fail to penetrate the endothelial cell monolayer. Importantly, the ability of the dietary n-3-PUFA, EPA, to inhibit this process not

  9. Signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5 is recruited to c-Myc super-enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, Sophia; Unser, Samy; Rascle, Anne

    2016-04-14

    c-Myc has been proposed as a putative target gene of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). No functional STAT5 binding site has been identified so far within the c-Myc gene locus, therefore a direct transcriptional regulation by STAT5 remains uncertain. c-Myc super-enhancer, located 1.7 Mb downstream of the c-Myc gene locus, was recently reported as essential for the regulation of c-Myc gene expression by hematopoietic transcription factors and bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins and for leukemia maintenance. c-Myc super-enhancer is composed of five regulatory regions (E1-E5) which recruit transcription and chromatin-associated factors, mediating chromatin looping and interaction with the c-Myc promoter. We now show that STAT5 strongly binds to c-Myc super-enhancer regions E3 and E4, both in normal and transformed Ba/F3 cells. We also found that the BET protein bromodomain-containing protein 2 (BRD2), a co-factor of STAT5, co-localizes with STAT5 at E3/E4 in Ba/F3 cells transformed by the constitutively active STAT5-1*6 mutant, but not in non-transformed Ba/F3 cells. BRD2 binding at E3/E4 coincides with c-Myc transcriptional activation and is lost upon treatment with deacetylase and BET inhibitors, both of which inhibit STAT5 transcriptional activity and c-Myc gene expression. Our data suggest that constitutive STAT5 binding to c-Myc super-enhancer might contribute to BRD2 maintenance and thus allow sustained expression of c-Myc in Ba/F3 cells transformed by STAT5-1*6.

  10. Supplementary Material for: Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of

  11. Paracrine factors of mesenchymal stem cells recruit macrophages and endothelial lineage cells and enhance wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Chen

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs have been shown to enhance wound healing; however, the mechanisms involved are barely understood. In this study, we examined paracrine factors released by BM-MSCs and their effects on the cells participating in wound healing compared to those released by dermal fibroblasts. Analyses of BM-MSCs with Real-Time PCR and of BM-MSC-conditioned medium by antibody-based protein array and ELISA indicated that BM-MSCs secreted distinctively different cytokines and chemokines, such as greater amounts of VEGF-alpha, IGF-1, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, angiopoietin-1, stromal derived factor-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and beta and erythropoietin, compared to dermal fibroblasts. These molecules are known to be important in normal wound healing. BM-MSC-conditioned medium significantly enhanced migration of macrophages, keratinocytes and endothelial cells and proliferation of keratinocytes and endothelial cells compared to fibroblast-conditioned medium. Moreover, in a mouse model of excisional wound healing, where concentrated BM-MSC-conditioned medium was applied, accelerated wound healing occurred compared to administration of pre-conditioned or fibroblast-conditioned medium. Analysis of cell suspensions derived from the wound by FACS showed that wounds treated with BM-MSC-conditioned medium had increased proportions of CD4/80-positive macrophages and Flk-1-, CD34- or c-kit-positive endothelial (progenitor cells compared to wounds treated with pre-conditioned medium or fibroblast-conditioned medium. Consistent with the above findings, immunohistochemical analysis of wound sections showed that wounds treated with BM-MSC-conditioned medium had increased abundance of macrophages. Our results suggest that factors released by BM-MSCs recruit macrophages and endothelial lineage cells into the wound thus enhancing wound healing.

  12. Macrophage interactions with polylactic acid and chitosan scaffolds lead to improved recruitment of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a comprehensive study with different immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Hugo R; Esteves, Tiago; Quelhas, Pedro; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba; Almeida, Catarina R

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of immune cell-biomaterial interactions for the regenerative outcome, few studies have investigated how distinct three-dimensional biomaterials modulate the immune cell-mediated mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) recruitment and function. Thus, this work compares the response of varied primary human immune cell populations triggered by different model scaffolds and describes its functional consequence on recruitment and motility of bone marrow MSC. It was found that polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan scaffolds lead to an increase in the metabolic activity of macrophages but not of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), natural killer (NK) cells or monocytes. PBMC and NK cells increase their cell number in PLA scaffolds and express a secretion profile that does not promote MSC recruitment. Importantly, chitosan increases IL-8, MIP-1, MCP-1 and RANTES secretion by macrophages while PLA stimulates IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 production, all chemokines that can lead to MSC recruitment. This secretion profile of macrophages in contact with biomaterials correlates with the highest MSC invasion. Furthermore, macrophages enhance stem cell motility within chitosan scaffolds by 44% but not in PLA scaffolds. Thus, macrophages are the cells that in contact with engineered biomaterials become activated to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate MSC recruitment.

  13. The Stat3/GR interaction code: predictive value of direct/indirect DNA recruitment for transcription outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, David; Couture, Catherine; Balsalobre, Aurélio; Drouin, Jacques

    2012-07-13

    Transcription factor recruitment to genomic sites of action is primarily due to direct protein:DNA interactions. The subsequent recruitment of coregulatory complexes leads to either transcriptional activation or repression. In contrast to this canonical scheme, some transcription factors, such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), behave as transcriptional repressors when recruited to target genes through protein tethering. We have investigated the genome-wide prevalence of tethering between GR and Stat3 and found nonreciprocal interactions, namely that GR tethering to DNA-bound Stat3 results in transcriptional repression, whereas Stat3 tethering to GR results in synergism. Further, other schemes of GR and Stat3 corecruitment to regulatory modules result in transcriptional synergism, including neighboring and composite binding sites. The results indicate extensive transcriptional interactions between Stat3 and GR; further, they provide a genome-wide assessment of transcriptional regulation by tethering and a molecular basis for integration of signals mediated by GR and Stats in health and disease.

  14. High population density enhances recruitment and survival of a harvested coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormald, Clare L; Steele, Mark A; Forrester, Graham E

    2013-03-01

    A negative relationship between population growth and population density (direct density dependence) is necessary for population regulation and is assumed in most models of harvested populations. Experimental tests for density dependence are lacking for large-bodied, harvested fish because of the difficulty of manipulating population density over large areas. We studied a harvested coral reef fish, Lutjanus apodus (schoolmaster snapper), using eight large, isolated natural reefs (0.4-1.6 ha) in the Bahamas as replicates. An initial observational test for density dependence was followed by a manipulation of population density. The manipulation weakened an association between density and shelter-providing habitat features and revealed a positive effect of population density on recruitment and survival (inverse density dependence), but no effect of density on somatic growth. The snappers on an individual reef were organized into a few shoals, and we hypothesize that large shoals on high-density reefs were less vulnerable to large piscivores (groupers and barracudas) than the small shoals on low-density reefs. Reductions in predation risk for individuals in large social groups are well documented, but because snapper shoals occupied reefs the size of small marine reserves, these ecological interactions may influence the outcome of management actions.

  15. Enhancing recruitment of African-American families into genetic research: lessons learned from Project SuGar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruill, Ida J

    2010-09-01

    Despite some recruitment success in biomedical research among minorities, participation by African-American families into research, specifically genetic research, is lower than Caucasian families (Bowen and Penchaszadeh Community Genet 11:189-190, 2008). Such low participation rates by African-Americans prevent the exploration of specific ethnic differences in patterns of diseases and diminish the identification of specific disease risks among ethnic groups (Bowen and Penchaszadeh Community Genet 11:189-190, 2008). Although African-Americans are heterogeneous, few studies exist to describe effective recruitment strategies across diverse African-American populations, and even fewer studies share effective strategies for the enrollment of African-American families into genetic research. A process evaluation of recruitment strategies used by Project SuGar (a community-based genetic research study focusing on families affected by type 2 diabetes) to enroll African-American families into genetic research was conducted. Our goal was to enroll 400 affected African-American families, and our results yielded 672 families, (n=672). Our success can be attributed to the formation of a Citizen Advisory Committee, recruitment style, flexible protocol, and formal agreement with community health centers. We found that African-American families will participate in research and that providing tangible benefits to the community and utilizing a sense of patience can enhance positive recruitment results. Data from this study may be used to recruit geographically isolated families into genetic research.

  16. The Histone Lysine Demethylase JMJD3/KDM6B Is Recruited to p53 Bound Promoters and Enhancer Elements in a p53 Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Rappsilber, Juri;

    2014-01-01

    find that the interaction is dependent on the p53 tetramerization domain. Following DNA damage, JMJD3 is transcriptionally upregulated and by performing genome-wide mapping of JMJD3, we demonstrate that it binds genes involved in basic cellular processes, as well as genes regulating cell cycle......, response to stress and apoptosis. Moreover, we find that JMJD3 binding sites show significant overlap with p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements. The binding of JMJD3 to p53 target sites is increased in response to DNA damage, and we demonstrate that the recruitment of JMJD3 to these sites is dependent...

  17. Intravascular clearance of disseminating Cryptococcus neoformans in the brain can be improved by enhancing neutrophil recruitment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Li, Chang; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Xiquan; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-07-01

    Extrapulmonary dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is one of the most critical steps in the development of meningoencephalitis. Here, we report that clearance of the disseminating C. neoformans occurs within the brain microvasculature. Interestingly, the efficiency of the intravascular clearance in the brain is reduced compared to that in the lung. Intravascular clearance is mainly mediated by neutrophils, and complement C5a receptor signaling is crucial for mediating neutrophil recruitment in the vasculature. C. neoformans stimulated actin polymerization of neutrophils is critically involved in their recruitment to the lung, which is associated with the unique vascular structure detected in the lung. The relatively lower efficiency of fungal clearance in the brain vasculature correlates with less efficient recruitment of neutrophils. Accordingly, intravascular clearance of C. neoformans in the brain could be remarkably improved by increasing the recruitment of neutrophils. We conclude that neutrophils have the ability to eliminate C. neoformans arrested in the vasculature. However, insufficient recruitment of neutrophils limited the optimal clearance of this microorganism in the brain. These results imply that a therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing the accumulation of neutrophils could help prevent cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

  18. Spatially localized recruitment of anti-inflammatory monocytes by SDF-1α-releasing hydrogels enhances microvascular network remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, J R; Ogle, M E; McFaline-Figueroa, J; Segar, C E; Temenoff, J S; Botchwey, E A

    2016-01-01

    Tissue repair processes are characterized by the biphasic recruitment of distinct subpopulations of blood monocytes, including classical ("inflammatory") monocytes (IMs, Ly6C(hi)Gr1(+)CX3CR1(lo)) and non-classical anti-inflammatory monocytes (AMs, Ly6C(lo)Gr1(-)CX3CR1(hi)). Drug-eluting biomaterial implants can be used to tune the endogenous repair process by the preferential recruitment of pro-regenerative cells. To enhance recruitment of AMs during inflammatory injury, a novel N-desulfated heparin-containing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogel was engineered to deliver exogenous stromal derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), utilizing the natural capacity of heparin to sequester and release growth factors. SDF-1α released from the hydrogels maintained its bioactivity and stimulated chemotaxis of bone marrow cells in vitro. Intravital microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated that SDF-1α hydrogels implanted in a murine dorsal skinfold window chamber promoted spatially-localized recruitment of AMs relative to unloaded internal control hydrogels. SDF-1α delivery stimulated arteriolar remodeling that was correlated with AM enrichment in the injury niche. SDF-1α, but not unloaded control hydrogels, supported sustained arteriogenesis and microvascular network growth through 7 days. The recruitment of AMs correlated with parameters of vascular remodeling suggesting that tuning the innate immune response by biomaterial SDF-1α release is a promising strategy for promoting vascular remodeling in a spatially controlled manner.

  19. Interference with glycosaminoglycan-chemokine interactions with a probe to alter leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Li

    Full Text Available In vivo leukocyte recruitment is not fully understood and may result from interactions of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans/GAGs. We previously showed that chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose/COAM binds the neutrophil chemokine GCP-2/CXCL6. Here, mouse chemokine binding by COAM was studied systematically and binding affinities of chemokines to COAM versus GAGs were compared. COAM and heparan sulphate bound the mouse CXC chemokines KC/CXCL1, MIP-2/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10 and I-TAC/CXCL11 and the CC chemokine RANTES/CCL5 with affinities in the nanomolar range, whereas no binding interactions were observed for mouse MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and MIP-1β/CCL4. The affinities of COAM-interacting chemokines were similar to or higher than those observed for heparan sulphate. Although COAM did not display chemotactic activity by itself, its co-administration with mouse GCP-2/CXCL6 and MIP-2/CXCL2 or its binding of endogenous chemokines resulted in fast and cooperative peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and in extravasation into the cremaster muscle in vivo. These local GAG mimetic features by COAM within tissues superseded systemic effects and were sufficient and applicable to reduce LPS-induced liver-specific neutrophil recruitment and activation. COAM mimics glycosaminoglycans and is a nontoxic probe for the study of leukocyte recruitment and inflammation in vivo.

  20. Combinatorial interactions are required for the efficient recruitment of pho repressive complex (PhoRC to polycomb response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana G Kahn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb Group (PcG proteins are epigenetic repressors that control metazoan development and cell differentiation. In Drosophila, PcG proteins form five distinct complexes targeted to genes by Polycomb Response Elements (PREs. Of all PcG complexes PhoRC is the only one that contains a sequence-specific DNA binding subunit (PHO or PHOL, which led to a model that places PhoRC at the base of the recruitment hierarchy. Here we demonstrate that in vivo PHO is preferred to PHOL as a subunit of PhoRC and that PHO and PHOL associate with PREs and a subset of transcriptionally active promoters. Although the binding to the promoter sites depends on the quality of recognition sequences, the binding to PREs does not. Instead, the efficient recruitment of PhoRC to PREs requires the SFMBT subunit and crosstalk with Polycomb Repressive Complex 1. We find that human YY1 protein, the ortholog of PHO, binds sites at active promoters in the human genome but does not bind most PcG target genes, presumably because the interactions involved in the targeting to Drosophila PREs are lost in the mammalian lineage. We conclude that the recruitment of PhoRC to PREs is based on combinatorial interactions and propose that such a recruitment strategy is important to attenuate the binding of PcG proteins when the target genes are transcriptionally active. Our findings allow the appropriate placement of PhoRC in the PcG recruitment hierarchy and provide a rationale to explain why YY1 is unlikely to serve as a general recruiter of mammalian Polycomb complexes despite its reported ability to participate in PcG repression in flies.

  1. Enhancing Gifted Education for Underrepresented Students: Promising Recruitment and Programming Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker-Lyster, Meghan; Niileksela, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    For decades, our educational system has been criticized for the limited recruitment and retention of minority students in gifted education programs. Unfortunately, relatively little progress has been made to alleviate these concerns. An examination of the literature on gifted education for underrepresented students reveals a dearth of information…

  2. Enhancing Gifted Education for Underrepresented Students: Promising Recruitment and Programming Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker-Lyster, Meghan; Niileksela, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    For decades, our educational system has been criticized for the limited recruitment and retention of minority students in gifted education programs. Unfortunately, relatively little progress has been made to alleviate these concerns. An examination of the literature on gifted education for underrepresented students reveals a dearth of information…

  3. Phytohormones in plant-endophyte interactions: investigating the role of these compounds in the recruitment of tomato root fungal endophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzotti, Andrea; Jørgensen, Hans Jørgen Lyngs; Collinge, David B.

    (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants impaired in synthesis of specific phytohormones (specifically ethylene and jasmonic acid) was the first step taken to elucidate these complex mechanisms. The isolation of endophytes was performed from roots and it resulted in the selection of fungal isolates whose root...... in this interaction, but little is known about the specific way by which they influence the recruitment and the colonization of the host tissues. The aim of the current project is to go deeper into the role of these signalling compounds in plant-endophyte interactions. The isolation of endophytic fungi from tomato...... whose colonization rate is critically affected by the phytohormones of interest. A transcriptomic analysis of tomato plants inoculated with the isolates selected from the screening will provide further clues as to which physiological mechanisms, associated with endophyte recruitment, are influenced...

  4. Interactive computer-enhanced remote viewing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourtellott, J.A.; Wagner, J.F. [Mechanical Technology Incorporated, Latham, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Remediation activities such as decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) typically involve materials and activities hazardous to humans. Robots are an attractive way to conduct such remediation, but for efficiency they need a good three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the task space where they are to function. This model can be created from engineering plans and architectural drawings and from empirical data gathered by various sensors at the site. The model is used to plan robotic tasks and verify that selected paths are clear of obstacles. This report describes the development of an Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS), a software system to provide a reliable geometric description of a robotic task space, and enable robotic remediation to be conducted more effectively and more economically.

  5. Communications between volunteers and health researchers during recruitment and informed consent: qualitative content analysis of email interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Anne; Amarsi, Zubin; Backman, Catherine L; Cox, Susan M; Li, Linda C

    2011-10-13

    While use of the Internet is increasingly widespread in research, little is known about the role of routine electronic mail (email) correspondence during recruitment and early volunteer-researcher interactions. To gain insight into the standpoint of volunteers we analyzed email communications in an early rheumatoid arthritis qualitative interview study. The objectives of our study were (1) to understand the perspectives and motivations of individuals who volunteered for an interview study about the experiences of early rheumatoid arthritis, and (2) to investigate the role of emails in volunteer-researcher interactions during recruitment. Between December 2007 and December 2008 we recruited 38 individuals with early rheumatoid arthritis through rheumatologist and family physician offices, arthritis Internet sites, and the Arthritis Research Centre of Canada for a (face-to-face) qualitative interview study. Interested individuals were invited to contact us via email or telephone. In this paper, we report on email communications from 12 of 29 volunteers who used email as their primary communication mode. Emails offered insights into the perspective of study volunteers. They provided evidence prospectively about recruitment and informed consent in the context of early rheumatoid arthritis. First, some individuals anticipated that participating would have mutual benefits, for themselves and the research, suggesting a reciprocal quality to volunteering. Second, volunteering for the study was strongly motivated by a need to access health services and was both a help-seeking and self-managing strategy. Third, volunteers expressed ambivalence around participation, such as how far participating would benefit them, versus more general benefits for research. Fourth, practical difficulties of negotiating symptom impact, medical appointments, and research tasks were revealed. We also reflect on how emails documented volunteer-researcher interactions, illustrating typically

  6. Developing Baltic cod recruitment models II : Incorporation of environmental variability and species interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, Fritz; Hinrichsen, H.H.; St. John, Michael

    2001-01-01

    affecting survival of eggs, predation by clupeids on eggs, larval transport, and cannibalism. Results showed that recruitment in the most important spawning area, the Bornholm Basin, during 1976-1995 was related to egg production; however, other factors affecting survival of the eggs (oxygen conditions...

  7. Using recruitment source timing and diagnosticity to enhance applicants' occupation-specific human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Michael C; Ployhart, Robert E; Campion, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 102(5) of Journal of Applied Psychology (see record 2017-14296-001). In the article, the following headings were inadvertently set at the wrong level: Method, Participants and Procedure, Measures, Occupation specific human capital, Symbolic jobs, Relevant majors, Occupation-specific capital hotspots, Source timing, Source diagnosticity, Results, and Discussion. All versions of this article have been corrected.] This study proposes that reaching applicants through more diagnostic recruitment sources earlier in their educational development (e.g., in high school) can lead them to invest more in their occupation-specific human capital (OSHC), thereby making them higher quality candidates. Using a sample of 78,157 applicants applying for jobs within a desirable professional occupation in the public sector, results indicate that applicants who report hearing about the occupation earlier, and applicants who report hearing about the occupation through more diagnostic sources, have higher levels of OSHC upon application. Additionally, source timing and diagnosticity affect the likelihood of candidates applying for jobs symbolic of the occupation, selecting relevant majors, and attending educational institutions with top programs related to the occupation. These findings suggest a firm's recruiting efforts may influence applicants' OSHC investment strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Timing of favorable conditions, competition and fertility interact to govern recruitment of invasive Chinese tallow tree in stressful environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Gabler

    Full Text Available The rate of new exotic recruitment following removal of adult invaders (reinvasion pressure influences restoration outcomes and costs but is highly variable and poorly understood. We hypothesize that broad variation in average reinvasion pressure of Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree, a major invader arises from differences among habitats in spatiotemporal availability of realized recruitment windows. These windows are periods of variable duration long enough to permit establishment given local environmental conditions. We tested this hypothesis via a greenhouse mesocosm experiment that quantified how the duration of favorable moisture conditions prior to flood or drought stress (window duration, competition and nutrient availability influenced Triadica success in high stress environments. Window duration influenced pre-stress seedling abundance and size, growth during stress and final abundance; it interacted with other factors to affect final biomass and germination during stress. Stress type and competition impacted final size and biomass, plus germination, mortality and changes in size during stress. Final abundance also depended on competition and the interaction of window duration, stress type and competition. Fertilization interacted with competition and stress to influence biomass and changes in height, respectively, but did not affect Triadica abundance. Overall, longer window durations promoted Triadica establishment, competition and drought (relative to flood suppressed establishment, and fertilization had weak effects. Interactions among factors frequently produced different effects in specific contexts. Results support our 'outgrow the stress' hypothesis and show that temporal availability of abiotic windows and factors that influence growth rates govern Triadica recruitment in stressful environments. These findings suggest that native seed addition can effectively suppress superior competitors in stressful environments. We also

  9. Timing of favorable conditions, competition and fertility interact to govern recruitment of invasive Chinese tallow tree in stressful environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Christopher A; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    The rate of new exotic recruitment following removal of adult invaders (reinvasion pressure) influences restoration outcomes and costs but is highly variable and poorly understood. We hypothesize that broad variation in average reinvasion pressure of Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow tree, a major invader) arises from differences among habitats in spatiotemporal availability of realized recruitment windows. These windows are periods of variable duration long enough to permit establishment given local environmental conditions. We tested this hypothesis via a greenhouse mesocosm experiment that quantified how the duration of favorable moisture conditions prior to flood or drought stress (window duration), competition and nutrient availability influenced Triadica success in high stress environments. Window duration influenced pre-stress seedling abundance and size, growth during stress and final abundance; it interacted with other factors to affect final biomass and germination during stress. Stress type and competition impacted final size and biomass, plus germination, mortality and changes in size during stress. Final abundance also depended on competition and the interaction of window duration, stress type and competition. Fertilization interacted with competition and stress to influence biomass and changes in height, respectively, but did not affect Triadica abundance. Overall, longer window durations promoted Triadica establishment, competition and drought (relative to flood) suppressed establishment, and fertilization had weak effects. Interactions among factors frequently produced different effects in specific contexts. Results support our 'outgrow the stress' hypothesis and show that temporal availability of abiotic windows and factors that influence growth rates govern Triadica recruitment in stressful environments. These findings suggest that native seed addition can effectively suppress superior competitors in stressful environments. We also describe

  10. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J.; Previs, Rebecca A.; Jennings, Nicholas B.; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M.; Arevalo, Jesusa M.G.; Cole, Steve W.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Sood, Anil K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production. PMID:25738355

  11. Delivery of bioactive lipids from composite microgel-microsphere injectable scaffolds enhances stem cell recruitment and skeletal repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusuya Das

    Full Text Available In this study, a microgel composed of chitosan and inorganic phosphates was used to deliver poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA microspheres loaded with sphingolipid growth factor FTY720 to critical size cranial defects in Sprague Dawley rats. We show that sustained release of FTY720 from injected microspheres used alone or in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP2 improves defect vascularization and bone formation in the presence and absence of rhBMP2 as evaluated by quantitative microCT and histological measurements. Moreover, sustained delivery of FTY720 from PLAGA and local targeting of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P receptors reduces CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltration, promotes endogenous recruitment of CD29+CD90+ bone progenitor cells and enhances the efficacy of rhBMP2 from chitosan microgels. Companion in vitro studies suggest that selective activation of sphingosine receptor subtype-3 (S1P3 via FTY720 treatment induces smad-1 phosphorylation in bone-marrow stromal cells. Additionally, FTY720 enhances stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 mediated chemotaxis of CD90+CD11B-CD45- bone progenitor cells in vitro after stimulation with rhBMP2. We believe that use of such small molecule delivery formulations to recruit endogenous bone progenitors may be an attractive alternative to exogenous cell-based therapy.

  12. Delivery of bioactive lipids from composite microgel-microsphere injectable scaffolds enhances stem cell recruitment and skeletal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Barker, Daniel A; Wang, Tiffany; Lau, Cheryl M; Lin, Yong; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microgel composed of chitosan and inorganic phosphates was used to deliver poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) microspheres loaded with sphingolipid growth factor FTY720 to critical size cranial defects in Sprague Dawley rats. We show that sustained release of FTY720 from injected microspheres used alone or in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP2) improves defect vascularization and bone formation in the presence and absence of rhBMP2 as evaluated by quantitative microCT and histological measurements. Moreover, sustained delivery of FTY720 from PLAGA and local targeting of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors reduces CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltration, promotes endogenous recruitment of CD29+CD90+ bone progenitor cells and enhances the efficacy of rhBMP2 from chitosan microgels. Companion in vitro studies suggest that selective activation of sphingosine receptor subtype-3 (S1P3) via FTY720 treatment induces smad-1 phosphorylation in bone-marrow stromal cells. Additionally, FTY720 enhances stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) mediated chemotaxis of CD90+CD11B-CD45- bone progenitor cells in vitro after stimulation with rhBMP2. We believe that use of such small molecule delivery formulations to recruit endogenous bone progenitors may be an attractive alternative to exogenous cell-based therapy.

  13. Seed trait-mediated selection by rodents affects mutualistic interactions and seedling recruitment of co-occurring tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmao; Yan, Chuan; Chang, Gang; Zhang, Zhibin

    2016-02-01

    As mutualists, seed dispersers may significantly affect mutualistic interactions and seedling recruitment of sympatric plants that share similar seed dispersers, but studies are rare. Here, we compared seed dispersal fitness in two co-occurring plant species (Armeniaca sibirica and Amygdalus davidiana) that inhabit warm temperate deciduous forest in northern China. We tested the hypothesis that seed trait-mediated selection by rodents may influence mutualistic interactions with rodents and then seedling establishment of co-occurring plant species. A. davidiana seeds are larger and harder (thick endocarps) than A. sibirica seeds, but they have similar levels of nutrients (crude fat, crude protein), caloric value and tannin. More A. sibirica seedlings are found in the field. Semi-natural enclosure tests indicated that the two seed species were both harvested by the same six rodent species, but that A. sibirica had mutualistic interactions (scatter hoarding) with four rodent species (Apodemus peninsulae, A. agrarius, Sciurotamias davidianus, Tamias sibiricus), and A. davidiana with only one (S. davidianus). Tagged seed dispersal experiments in the field indicated that more A. sibirica seeds were scatter-hoarded by rodents, and more A. sibirica seeds survived to the next spring and became seedlings. A. sibirica seeds derive more benefit from seed dispersal by rodents than A. davidiana seeds, particularly in years with limited seed dispersers, which well explained the higher seedling recruitment of A. sibirica compared with that of A. davidiana under natural conditions. Our results suggest that seed dispersers may play a significant role in seedling recruitment and indirect competition between co-occurring plant species.

  14. Soundscape manipulation enhances larval recruitment of a reef-building mollusk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee Lillis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine seafloor ecosystems, and efforts to restore them, depend critically on the influx and settlement of larvae following their pelagic dispersal period. Larval dispersal and settlement patterns are driven by a combination of physical oceanography and behavioral responses of larvae to a suite of sensory cues both in the water column and at settlement sites. There is growing evidence that the biological and physical sounds associated with adult habitats (i.e., the “soundscape” influence larval settlement and habitat selection; however, the significance of acoustic cues is rarely tested. Here we show in a field experiment that the free-swimming larvae of an estuarine invertebrate, the eastern oyster, respond to the addition of replayed habitat-related sounds. Oyster larval recruitment was significantly higher on larval collectors exposed to oyster reef sounds compared to no-sound controls. These results provide the first field evidence that soundscape cues may attract the larval settlers of a reef-building estuarine invertebrate.

  15. How a faculty group's peer mentoring of each other's scholarship can enhance retention and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T; Oberleitner, Melinda G

    2012-01-01

    At a time when schools of nursing seek to retain and recruit faculty ready to meet promotion and tenure requirements, many faculty are less than able to fulfill scholarly expectations. As senior scholars begin to retire, today's faculty groups are a mix of master's-prepared clinicians and recent graduates with professional (doctor of nursing practice) or research doctorates. This means that novice and midcareer faculty often lack the educational preparation for and/or a proper introduction into the scholarly role. A transition that can take 5 years or more, internalizing a scholarly identity is a process that unfolds over time in the course of presenting, publishing, and conducting research with the support of scholarly colleagues. With an eye toward easing this developmental/relational transition, chairs and deans search for professional development approaches to meet the diverse scholarly learning needs of a mixed faculty group. Given a dearth of scholar-mentors, professional development approaches that engage faculty groups in making scholarship a cooperative venture and a collective responsibility are appealing. This article explores whether a project that systematically prepared a faculty group to peer-mentor each other's scholarly success from hire to retire holds promise for fostering academic workplaces productive and pleasurable enough to attract and retain the best and the brightest.

  16. The histone lysine demethylase JMJD3/KDM6B is recruited to p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements in a p53 dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Williams

    Full Text Available The JmjC domain-containing protein JMJD3/KDM6B catalyses the demethylation of H3K27me3 and H3K27me2. JMJD3 appears to be highly regulated at the transcriptional level and is upregulated in response to diverse stimuli such as differentiation inducers and stress signals. Accordingly, JMJD3 has been linked to the regulation of different biological processes such as differentiation of embryonic stem cells, inflammatory responses in macrophages, and induction of cellular senescence via regulation of the INK4A-ARF locus. Here we show here that JMJD3 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein p53. We find that the interaction is dependent on the p53 tetramerization domain. Following DNA damage, JMJD3 is transcriptionally upregulated and by performing genome-wide mapping of JMJD3, we demonstrate that it binds genes involved in basic cellular processes, as well as genes regulating cell cycle, response to stress and apoptosis. Moreover, we find that JMJD3 binding sites show significant overlap with p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements. The binding of JMJD3 to p53 target sites is increased in response to DNA damage, and we demonstrate that the recruitment of JMJD3 to these sites is dependent on p53 expression. Therefore, we propose a model in which JMJD3 is recruited to p53 responsive elements via its interaction with p53 and speculate that JMJD3 could act as a fail-safe mechanism to remove low levels of H3K27me3 and H3K27me2 to allow for efficient acetylation of H3K27.

  17. Nootropic agents enhance the recruitment of fast GABAA inhibition in rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Douglas S F; Benardo, Larry S

    2005-07-01

    It is widely believed that nootropic (cognition-enhancing) agents produce their therapeutic effects by augmenting excitatory synaptic transmission in cortical circuits, primarily through positive modulation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs). However, GABA-mediated inhibition is also critical for cognition, and enhanced GABA function may be likewise therapeutic for cognitive disorders. Could nootropics act through such a mechanism as well? To address this question, we examined the effects of nootropic agents on excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and IPSCs) recorded from layer V pyramidal cells in acute slices of somatosensory cortex. Aniracetam, a positive modulator of AMPA/kainate receptors, increased the peak amplitude of evoked EPSCs and the amplitude and duration of polysynaptic fast IPSCs, manifested as a greater total charge carried by IPSCs. As a result, the EPSC/IPSC ratio of total charge was decreased, representing a shift in the excitation-inhibition balance that favors inhibition. Aniracetam did not affect the magnitude of either monosynaptic IPSCs (mono-IPSCs) recorded in the presence of excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists, or miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. However, the duration of both mono-IPSCs and mIPSCs was prolonged, suggesting that aniracetam also directly modulates GABAergic transmission. Cyclothiazide, a preferential modulator of AMPAR function, enhanced the magnitude and duration of polysynaptic IPSCs, similar to aniracetam, but did not affect mono-IPSCs. Concanavalin A, a kainate receptor modulator, had little effect on EPSCs or IPSCs, suggesting there was no contribution from kainate receptor activity. These findings indicate that AMPAR modulators strengthen inhibition in neocortical pyramidal cells, most likely by altering the kinetics of AMPARs on synaptically connected interneurons and possibly by modulating GABA(A) receptor responses

  18. Scales of benthic–pelagic coupling and the intensity of species interactions: From recruitment limitation to top-down control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Sergio A.; Wieters, Evie A.; Broitman, Bernardo R.; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Large and usually unpredictable variation in species interaction strength has been a major roadblock to applying local experimental results to large-scale management and conservation issues. Recent studies explicitly considering benthic-pelagic coupling are starting to shed light on, and find regularities in, the causes of such large-scale variation in coastal ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the effects of variation in wind-driven upwelling on community regulation along 900 km of coastline of the southeastern Pacific, between 29°S and 35°S during 72 months. Variability in the intensity of upwelling occurring over tens of km produced predictable variation in recruitment of intertidal mussels, but not barnacles, and did not affect patterns of community structure. In contrast, sharp discontinuities in upwelling regimes produced abrupt and persistent breaks in the dynamics of benthic and pelagic communities over hundreds of km (regional) scales. Rates of mussel and barnacle recruitment changed sharply at ≈32°-33°S, determining a geographic break in adult abundance of these competitively dominant species. Analysis of satellite images demonstrates that regional-scale discontinuities in oceanographic regimes can couple benthic and pelagic systems, as evidenced by coincident breaks in dynamics and concentration of offshore surface chlorophyll-a. Field experiments showed that the paradigm of top-down control of intertidal benthic communities holds only south of the discontinuity. To the north, populations seem recruitment-limited, and predators have negligible effects, despite attaining similarly high abundances and potential predation effects across the region. Thus, geographically discontinuous oceanographic regimes set bounds to the strength of species interactions and define distinct regions for the design and implementation of sustainable management and conservation policies. PMID:16332959

  19. Scales of benthic-pelagic coupling and the intensity of species interactions: from recruitment limitation to top-down control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Sergio A; Wieters, Evie A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2005-12-13

    Large and usually unpredictable variation in species interaction strength has been a major roadblock to applying local experimental results to large-scale management and conservation issues. Recent studies explicitly considering benthic-pelagic coupling are starting to shed light on, and find regularities in, the causes of such large-scale variation in coastal ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the effects of variation in wind-driven upwelling on community regulation along 900 km of coastline of the southeastern Pacific, between 29 degrees S and 35 degrees S during 72 months. Variability in the intensity of upwelling occurring over tens of km produced predictable variation in recruitment of intertidal mussels, but not barnacles, and did not affect patterns of community structure. In contrast, sharp discontinuities in upwelling regimes produced abrupt and persistent breaks in the dynamics of benthic and pelagic communities over hundreds of km (regional) scales. Rates of mussel and barnacle recruitment changed sharply at approximately 32 degrees -33 degrees S, determining a geographic break in adult abundance of these competitively dominant species. Analysis of satellite images demonstrates that regional-scale discontinuities in oceanographic regimes can couple benthic and pelagic systems, as evidenced by coincident breaks in dynamics and concentration of offshore surface chlorophyll-a. Field experiments showed that the paradigm of top-down control of intertidal benthic communities holds only south of the discontinuity. To the north, populations seem recruitment-limited, and predators have negligible effects, despite attaining similarly high abundances and potential predation effects across the region. Thus, geographically discontinuous oceanographic regimes set bounds to the strength of species interactions and define distinct regions for the design and implementation of sustainable management and conservation policies.

  20. Rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages by anti-Gal/α-Gal liposome interaction accelerates wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Kim M; Racki, Waldemar J; Mishra, Rabinarayan; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva; Greiner, Dale L; Galili, Uri

    2011-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal in promoting wound healing. We hypothesized that topical application of liposomes with glycolipids that carry Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R epitopes (α-gal liposomes) on wounds may accelerate the healing process by rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages in wounds. Immune complexes of the natural anti-Gal Ab (constituting ∼1% of Ig in humans) bound to its ligand, the α-gal epitope on α-gal liposomes would induce local activation of complement and generation of complement chemotactic factors that rapidly recruit macrophages. Subsequent binding of the Fc portion of anti-Gal coating α-gal liposomes to FcγRs on recruited macrophages may activate macrophage genes encoding cytokines that mediate wound healing. We documented the efficacy of this treatment in α1,3galactosyltrasferase knockout mice. In contrast to wild-type mice, these knockout mice lack α-gal epitopes and can produce the anti-Gal Ab. The healing time of excisional skin wounds treated with α-gal liposomes in these mice is twice as fast as that of control wounds. Moreover, scar formation in α-gal liposome-treated wounds is much lower than in physiologic healing. Additional sonication of α-gal liposomes resulted in their conversion into submicroscopic α-gal nanoparticles. These α-gal nanoparticles diffused more efficiently in wounds and further increased the efficacy of the treatment, resulting in 95-100% regeneration of the epidermis in wounds within 6 d. The study suggests that α-gal liposome and α-gal nanoparticle treatment may enhance wound healing in the clinic because of the presence of high complement activity and high anti-Gal Ab titers in humans.

  1. Cooperative recruitment of HMGB1 during V(D)J recombination through interactions with RAG1 and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alicia J; Corbett, Elizabeth; Ortega, Fabian; Schatz, David G

    2013-03-01

    During V(D)J recombination, recombination activating gene (RAG)1 and RAG2 bind and cleave recombination signal sequences (RSSs), aided by the ubiquitous DNA-binding/-bending proteins high-mobility group box protein (HMGB)1 or HMGB2. HMGB1/2 play a critical, although poorly understood, role in vitro in the assembly of functional RAG-RSS complexes, into which HMGB1/2 stably incorporate. The mechanism of HMGB1/2 recruitment is unknown, although an interaction with RAG1 has been suggested. Here, we report data demonstrating only a weak HMGB1-RAG1 interaction in the absence of DNA in several assays, including fluorescence anisotropy experiments using a novel Alexa488-labeled HMGB1 protein. Addition of DNA to RAG1 and HMGB1 in fluorescence anisotropy experiments, however, results in a substantial increase in complex formation, indicating a synergistic binding effect. Pulldown experiments confirmed these results, as HMGB1 was recruited to a RAG1-DNA complex in a RAG1 concentration-dependent manner and, interestingly, without strict RSS sequence specificity. Our finding that HMGB1 binds more tightly to a RAG1-DNA complex over RAG1 or DNA alone provides an explanation for the stable integration of this typically transient architectural protein in the V(D)J recombinase complex throughout recombination. These findings also have implications for the order of events during RAG-DNA complex assembly and for the stabilization of sequence-specific and non-specific RAG1-DNA interactions.

  2. Pigment cell interactions and differential xanthophore recruitment underlying zebrafish stripe reiteration and Danio pattern evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Larissa B; Bain, Emily J; Parichy, David M

    2014-11-06

    Fishes have diverse pigment patterns, yet mechanisms of pattern evolution remain poorly understood. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, pigment-cell autonomous interactions generate dark stripes of melanophores that alternate with light interstripes of xanthophores and iridophores. Here, we identify mechanisms underlying the evolution of a uniform pattern in D. albolineatus in which all three pigment cell classes are intermingled. We show that in this species xanthophores differentiate precociously over a wider area, and that cis regulatory evolution has increased expression of xanthogenic Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (Csf1). Expressing Csf1 similarly in D. rerio has cascading effects, driving the intermingling of all three pigment cell classes and resulting in the loss of stripes, as in D. albolineatus. Our results identify novel mechanisms of pattern development and illustrate how pattern diversity can be generated when a core network of pigment-cell autonomous interactions is coupled with changes in pigment cell differentiation.

  3. Cooperative Recovery Initiative Annual Report: Enhancement of Razorback Sucker Recruitment through Restoration of Sheppard Bottom, Ouray National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Recovery of endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) requires consistent recruitment of wild fish into adulthood. To successfully recruit, the species...

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Enhanced The Recruitment of Progenitor Cells and Myelin Repair in Experimental Demyelination of Rat Hippocampal Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Azin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hippocampal insults have been observed in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2 induces neurogenesis in the hippocampus and enhances the proliferation, migration and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. In the current study, we have investigated the effect of FGF2 on the processes of gliotoxin induced demyelination and subsequent remyelination in the hippocampus. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received either saline or lysolecithin (LPC injections to the right hippocampi. Animals received intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of FGF2 (5 ng/g on days 0, 5, 12 and 26 post-LPC. Expressions of myelin basic protein (Mbp as a marker of myelination, Olig2 as a marker of OPC proliferation, Nestin as a marker of neural progenitor cells, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap as a marker of reactive astrocytes were investigated in the right hippocampi by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: There was reduced Mbp expression at seven days after LPC injection, increased expressions of Olig2 and Nestin, and the level of Gfap did not change. FGF2 treatment reversed the expression level of Mbp to the control, significantly enhanced the levels of Olig2 and Nestin, but did not change the level of Gfap. At day-28 post- LPC, the expression level of Mbp was higher than the control in LPC-treated animals that received FGF2. The levels of Olig2, Nestin and Gfap were at the control level in the non-treated LPC group but significantly higher in the FGF2-t reated LPC group. Conclusion: FGF2 enhanced hippocampal myelination and potentiated the recruitment of OPCs and neural stem cells (NSCs to the lesion area. Long-term application of FGF2 might also enhance astrogliosis in the lesion site.

  5. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  6. Small-scale barriers mitigate desertification processes and enhance plant recruitment in a degraded semiarid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Stephen E; Decker, Cheryl E.; Duniway, Michael C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    potentially, natural regeneration) often is contingent on many interacting factors.

  7. Enhancing User Interaction on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulantelli, G.; Corrao, R.; Munna, G.

    This paper reports on the design strategies and technical solutions that the authors have adopted to increase interaction in a World Wide Web-Based Instruction (WBI) system aimed at supporting new didactic approaches to the subjects of urban planning and architecture through the activation of online modules at the university level. Specifically,…

  8. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  9. Exploring Conditions to Enhance Student/Host Family Interaction Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Susan M.; Schmidt-Rinehart, Barbara C.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of task-based learning in the study abroad experience in order to enhance interaction with the host family. Tasks were incorporated into a Family Interaction Journal and implemented under four evolving, though different, conditions over a 5-year period. The conditions were: (1) home campus administered/student…

  10. Hypothesizing Music Intervention Enhances Brain Functional Connectivity Involving Dopaminergic Recruitment: Common Neuro-correlates to Abusable Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Simpatico, Thomas; Febo, Marcelo; Rodriquez, Chris; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Braverman, Eric R; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this review is to explore the clinical significance of music listening on neuroplasticity and dopaminergic activation by understanding the role of music therapy in addictive behavior treatment. fMRI data has shown that music listening intensely modifies mesolimbic structural changes responsible for reward processing (e.g., nucleus accumbens [NAc]) and may control the emotional stimuli's effect on autonomic and physiological responses (e.g., hypothalamus). Music listening has been proven to induce the endorphinergic response blocked by naloxone, a common opioid antagonist. NAc opioid transmission is linked to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine release. There are remarkable commonalities between listening to music and the effect of drugs on mesolimbic dopaminergic activation. It has been found that musical training before the age of 7 results in changes in white-matter connectivity, protecting carriers with low dopaminergic function (DRD2A1 allele, etc.) from poor decision-making, reward dependence, and impulsivity. In this article, we briefly review a few studies on the neurochemical effects of music and propose that these findings are relevant to the positive clinical findings observed in the literature. We hypothesize that music intervention enhances brain white matter plasticity through dopaminergic recruitment and that more research is needed to explore the efficacy of these therapies.

  11. PKC enhances the capacity for secretion by rapidly recruiting covert voltage-gated Ca2+ channels to the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Christopher J; Magoski, Neil S

    2015-02-11

    It is unknown whether neurons can dynamically control the capacity for secretion by promptly changing the number of plasma membrane voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. To address this, we studied peptide release from the bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica, which initiate reproduction by secreting hormone during an afterdischarge. This burst engages protein kinase C (PKC) to trigger the insertion of a covert Ca(2+) channel, Apl Cav2, alongside a basal channel, Apl Cav1. The significance of Apl Cav2 recruitment to secretion remains undetermined; therefore, we used capacitance tracking to assay secretion, along with Ca(2+) imaging and Ca(2+) current measurements, from cultured bag cell neurons under whole-cell voltage-clamp. Activating PKC with the phorbol ester, PMA, enhanced Ca(2+) entry, and potentiated stimulus-evoked secretion. This relied on channel insertion, as it was occluded by preventing Apl Cav2 engagement with prior whole-cell dialysis or the cytoskeletal toxin, latrunculin B. Channel insertion reduced the stimulus duration and/or frequency required to initiate secretion and strengthened excitation-secretion coupling, indicating that Apl Cav2 accesses peptide release more readily than Apl Cav1. The coupling of Apl Cav2 to secretion also changed with behavioral state, as Apl Cav2 failed to evoke secretion in silent neurons from reproductively inactive animals. Finally, PKC also acted secondarily to enhance prolonged exocytosis triggered by mitochondrial Ca(2+) release. Collectively, our results suggest that bag cell neurons dynamically elevate Ca(2+) channel abundance in the membrane to ensure adequate secretion during the afterdischarge.

  12. The Histone Lysine Demethylase JMJD3/KDM6B Is Recruited to p53 Bound Promoters and Enhancer Elements in a p53 Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    The JmjC domain-containing protein JMJD3/KDM6B catalyses the demethylation of H3K27me3 and H3K27me2. JMJD3 appears to be highly regulated at the transcriptional level and is upregulated in response to diverse stimuli such as differentiation inducers and stress signals. Accordingly, JMJD3 has been...... linked to the regulation of different biological processes such as differentiation of embryonic stem cells, inflammatory responses in macrophages, and induction of cellular senescence via regulation of the INK4A-ARF locus. Here we show here that JMJD3 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein p53. We......, response to stress and apoptosis. Moreover, we find that JMJD3 binding sites show significant overlap with p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements. The binding of JMJD3 to p53 target sites is increased in response to DNA damage, and we demonstrate that the recruitment of JMJD3 to these sites is dependent...

  13. Alveolar macrophage-epithelial cell interaction following exposure to atmospheric particles induces the release of mediators involved in monocyte mobilization and recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukae Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies from our laboratory have shown that human alveolar macrophages (AM and bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC exposed to ambient particles (PM10 in vitro increase their production of inflammatory mediators and that supernatants from PM10-exposed cells shorten the transit time of monocytes through the bone marrow and promote their release into the circulation. Methods The present study concerns co-culture of AM and HBEC exposed to PM10 (EHC-93 and the production of mediators involved in monocyte kinetics measured at both the mRNA and protein levels. The experiments were also designed to determine the role of the adhesive interaction between these cells via the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 in the production of these mediators. Results AM/HBEC co-cultures exposed to 100 μg/ml of PM10 for 2 or 24 h increased their levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, M-CSF, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-6 and ICAM-1 mRNA, compared to exposed AM or HBEC mono-cultures, or control non-exposed co-cultures. The levels of GM-CSF, M-CSF, MIP-1β and IL-6 increased in co-cultured supernatants collected after 24 h exposure compared to control cells (p 10-induced increase in co-culture mRNA expression. Conclusion We conclude that an ICAM-1 independent interaction between AM and HBEC, lung cells that process inhaled particles, increases the production and release of mediators that enhance bone marrow turnover of monocytes and their recruitment into tissues. We speculate that this interaction amplifies PM10-induced lung inflammation and contributes to both the pulmonary and systemic morbidity associated with exposure to air pollution.

  14. The SOCS-box of HIV-1 Vif interacts with ElonginBC by induced-folding to recruit its Cul5-containing ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien R C Bergeron

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif protein recruits an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, comprising the cellular proteins elongin B and C (EloBC, cullin 5 (Cul5 and RING-box 2 (Rbx2, to the anti-viral proteins APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F and induces their polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In this study, we used purified proteins and direct in vitro binding assays, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy to describe the molecular mechanism for assembly of the Vif-EloBC ternary complex. We demonstrate that Vif binds to EloBC in two locations, and that both interactions induce structural changes in the SOCS box of Vif as well as EloBC. In particular, in addition to the previously established binding of Vif's BC box to EloC, we report a novel interaction between the conserved Pro-Pro-Leu-Pro motif of Vif and the C-terminal domain of EloB. Using cell-based assays, we further show that this interaction is necessary for the formation of a functional ligase complex, thus establishing a role of this motif. We conclude that HIV-1 Vif engages EloBC via an induced-folding mechanism that does not require additional co-factors, and speculate that these features distinguish Vif from other EloBC specificity factors such as cellular SOCS proteins, and may enhance the prospects of obtaining therapeutic inhibitors of Vif function.

  15. Patterns and plasticity in RNA-protein interactions enable recruitment of multiple proteins through a single site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valley, Cary T.; Porter, Douglas F.; Qiu, Chen; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin (NIEHS); (UW)

    2012-06-28

    mRNA control hinges on the specificity and affinity of proteins for their RNA binding sites. Regulatory proteins must bind their own sites and reject even closely related noncognate sites. In the PUF [Pumilio and fem-3 binding factor (FBF)] family of RNA binding proteins, individual proteins discriminate differences in the length and sequence of binding sites, allowing each PUF to bind a distinct battery of mRNAs. Here, we show that despite these differences, the pattern of RNA interactions is conserved among PUF proteins: the two ends of the PUF protein make critical contacts with the two ends of the RNA sites. Despite this conserved 'two-handed' pattern of recognition, the RNA sequence is flexible. Among the binding sites of yeast Puf4p, RNA sequence dictates the pattern in which RNA bases are flipped away from the binding surface of the protein. Small differences in RNA sequence allow new modes of control, recruiting Puf5p in addition to Puf4p to a single site. This embedded information adds a new layer of biological meaning to the connections between RNA targets and PUF proteins.

  16. Tpz1-Ccq1 and Tpz1-Poz1 interactions within fission yeast shelterin modulate Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Harland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In both fission yeast and humans, the shelterin complex plays central roles in regulation of telomerase recruitment, protection of telomeres against DNA damage response factors, and formation of heterochromatin at telomeres. While shelterin is essential for limiting activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATR and ATM at telomeres, these kinases are required for stable maintenance of telomeres. In fission yeast, Rad3ATR and Tel1ATM kinases are redundantly required for telomerase recruitment, since Rad3ATR/Tel1ATM-dependent phosphorylation of the shelterin subunit Ccq1 at Thr93 promotes interaction between Ccq1 and the telomerase subunit Est1. However, it remained unclear how protein-protein interactions within the shelterin complex (consisting of Taz1, Rap1, Poz1, Tpz1, Pot1 and Ccq1 contribute to the regulation of Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment. In this study, we identify domains and amino acid residues that are critical for mediating Tpz1-Ccq1 and Tpz1-Poz1 interaction within the fission yeast shelterin complex. Using separation of function Tpz1 mutants that maintain Tpz1-Pot1 interaction but specifically disrupt either Tpz1-Ccq1 or Tpz1-Poz1 interaction, we then establish that Tpz1-Ccq1 interaction promotes Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation, telomerase recruitment, checkpoint inhibition and telomeric heterochromatin formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Tpz1-Poz1 interaction promotes telomere association of Poz1, and loss of Poz1 from telomeres leads to increases in Ccq1 Thr93 phosphorylation and telomerase recruitment, and telomeric heterochromatin formation defect. In addition, our studies establish that Tpz1-Poz1 and Tpz1-Ccq1 interactions redundantly fulfill the essential telomere protection function of the shelterin complex, since simultaneous loss of both interactions caused immediate loss of cell viability for the majority of cells and generation of survivors with circular chromosomes. Based on these

  17. Transcription factors mediate long-range enhancer-promoter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolis, Ilias K; McKay, Daniel J; Mantouvalou, Eva; Lomvardas, Stavros; Merika, Menie; Thanos, Dimitris

    2009-12-01

    We examined how remote enhancers establish physical communication with target promoters to activate gene transcription in response to environmental signals. Although the natural IFN-beta enhancer is located immediately upstream of the core promoter, it also can function as a classical enhancer element conferring virus infection-dependent activation of heterologous promoters, even when it is placed several kilobases away from these promoters. We demonstrated that the remote IFN-beta enhancer "loops out" the intervening DNA to reach the target promoter. These chromatin loops depend on sequence-specific transcription factors bound to the enhancer and the promoter and thus can explain the specificity observed in enhancer-promoter interactions, especially in complex genetic loci. Transcription factor binding sites scattered between an enhancer and a promoter can work as decoys trapping the enhancer in nonproductive loops, thus resembling insulator elements. Finally, replacement of the transcription factor binding sites involved in DNA looping with those of a heterologous prokaryotic protein, the lambda repressor, which is capable of loop formation, rescues enhancer function from a distance by re-establishing enhancer-promoter loop formation.

  18. Enhancing Metagenomics Investigations of Microbial Interactions with Biofilm Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita S. Kakirde

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of microbial ecology and diversity have been greatly enhanced by the application of culture-independent techniques. One such approach, metagenomics, involves sample collections from soil, water, and other environments. Extracted nucleic acids from bulk environmental samples are sequenced and analyzed, which allows microbial interactions to be inferred on the basis of bioinformatics calculations. In most environments, microbial interactions occur predominately in surface-adherent, biofilm communities. In this review, we address metagenomics sampling and biofilm biology, and propose an experimental strategy whereby the resolving power of metagenomics can be enhanced by incorporating a biofilm-enrichment step during sample acquisition.

  19. Enhancing metagenomics investigations of microbial interactions with biofilm technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert J C; Kakirde, Kavita S

    2013-11-11

    Investigations of microbial ecology and diversity have been greatly enhanced by the application of culture-independent techniques. One such approach, metagenomics, involves sample collections from soil, water, and other environments. Extracted nucleic acids from bulk environmental samples are sequenced and analyzed, which allows microbial interactions to be inferred on the basis of bioinformatics calculations. In most environments, microbial interactions occur predominately in surface-adherent, biofilm communities. In this review, we address metagenomics sampling and biofilm biology, and propose an experimental strategy whereby the resolving power of metagenomics can be enhanced by incorporating a biofilm-enrichment step during sample acquisition.

  20. Thromboxane A{sub 2} receptor signaling promotes liver tissue repair after toxic injury through the enhancement of macrophage recruitment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamino, Tsutomu [Departments of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Departments of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Ito, Yoshiya [Departments of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Ohkubo, Hirotoki [Departments of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Departments of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Hosono, Kanako; Suzuki, Tatsunori [Departments of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Sato, Takehito [Departments of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Departments of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Ae, Takako; Shibuya, Akitaka [Departments of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Sakagami, Hiroyuki [Departments of Anatomy, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Narumiya, Shuh [Department of Pharmacology, Kyoto University School of Medicine, Kyoto, 606-8315 (Japan); Koizumi, Wasaburo [Departments of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan); Majima, Masataka, E-mail: mmajima@med.kitasato-u.ac.jp [Departments of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 252-0374 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    It is thought that thromboxane A{sub 2} (TxA{sub 2}) contributes to the progression of inflammation during acute hepatic injury; however, it is still unknown whether TxA{sub 2} is involved in liver repair. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of TxA{sub 2} receptor (TP) signaling in liver injury and repair in response to toxic injury. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was used to induce liver injury in TP knockout (TP{sup −/−}) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. In WT mice, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and the size of the necrotic area peaked at 24 and 48 h, respectively, and then declined. In TP{sup −/−} mice, the changes in ALT levels were similar to WT mice, but liver regeneration was impaired as evidenced by remained elevated levels of hepatic necrosis and by delayed hepatocyte proliferation, which was associated with the reduced expression of growth factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In TP{sup −/−} mice, the accumulation of hepatic CD11b{sup +}/F4/80{sup +} macrophages in injured livers was attenuated, and the hepatic expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and its receptor, the C―C chemokine receptor (CCR2), was reduced compared to WT. Additionally, the application of the TP receptor agonist, U-46619, enhanced the expression of MCP-1/CCL2 and CCR2 in peritoneal macrophages, which was associated with increased levels of IL-6, TNFα and HGF. These results suggested that TP receptor signaling facilitates liver recovery following CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatotoxicity by affecting the expression of hepatotrophic growth factors, and through the recruitment of macrophages mediated by MCP-1/CCL2-CCR2 expression. -- Highlights: ► TP enhances liver regeneration by CCl{sub 4}. ► TP accumulates macrophages. ► TP up-regulates MCP-1.

  1. Compressibility enhancement in an almost staggered interacting Harper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bat-el; Berkovits, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the compressibility in the almost staggered fermionic Harper model with repulsive interactions in the vicinity of half-filling. It has been shown by Kraus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161106(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161106 that for spinless electrons and nearest neighbors electron-electron interactions the compressibility in the central band is enhanced by repulsive interactions. Here we would like to investigate the sensitivity of this conclusion to the spin degree of freedom and longer range interactions. We use the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation, as well as the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculation to evaluate the compressibility. In the almost staggered Harper model, the central energy band is essentially flat and separated from the other bands by a large gap and therefore, the HF approximation is rather accurate. In both cases the compressibility of the system is enhanced compared to the noninteracting case, although the enhancement is weaker due to the inclusion of Hubbard and longer ranged interactions. We also show that the entanglement entropy is suppressed when the compressibility of the system is enhanced.

  2. Enhanced solar light absorption of graphene by interaction with anisole

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay

    2014-10-01

    We study suspended graphene in contact with the organic molecule anisole to analyse the implications of the interaction for the optical absorption, using first principle calculations. Because of a weak interaction multiple orientations of the molecule with respect to the graphene sheet are possible. A substantial enhancement of the optical absorption independent of the specific orientation is observed, which is promising for energy harvesting. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Habitat selection and adult-recruit interactions in Pectinaria koreni (Malmgren) (Annelida: Polychaeta) post-larval populations: Results of flume experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Frédéric; Desroy, Nicolas; Retière, Christian

    1996-12-01

    The fate of recently settled populations of soft-bottom invertebrates depends not only on dispersal of pelagic larvae by tidal currents but also on other physical ( e. g. resuspension) and biological mechanisms ( e.g. habitat selection and adult-recruit interactions) acting at the water-substratum interface. To assess the relative importance of such processes under megatidal conditions in the Abra alba community of the eastern Baie de Seine (English Channel), flume experiments were conducted on post-larvae of the dominant polychaete species, Pectinaria koreni. Habitat selection by post-larvae of P. koreni was determined in a first set of experiments, where individuals were sowed either on a suitable or on an unsuitable substratum. Once resuspended, post-larvae were given a choice between two highly contrasting treatments with a natural organic-rich muddy sand and a bare flat PVC surface. P. koreni post-larvae were able to leave an unfavourable substratum into which they had initially burrowed and reach a more suitable substrate by drifting (induced by the secretion of mucus) before final settlement. The influence of adults on habitat selection and survival of P. koreni post-larvae was analysed in a second set of experiments, where individuals were sowed onto a suitable sediment with adults (test treatment) or without (control treatment). The presence of conspecific adults induced a high resuspension rate of the post-larvae. Drifting occurred mainly just after the introduction of the current and affected the whole experimental population, regardless of size. Such a response seems to be related to the intense bioturbation caused by the sub-surface deposit-feeding habit of the adults, which alters the boundary-layer flow. In contrast, the presence of adults of Owenia fusiformis, another dominant polychaete of the Abra alba community, led to an enhanced recruitment by a reduction in post-larvae resuspension. In fact, at low shear velocities, dense aggregates of tubes

  4. Natural recruitment, density-dependent juvenile survival, and the potential for additive effects of stock enhancement: an experimental evaluation of stocking northern pike (Esox lucius) fry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hühn, Daniel; Lübke, Kay; Skov, Christian

    2014-01-01

    in self-sustaining stocks. However, limited data based on replicated and controlled experiments are available to support this prediction. We performed a pond experiment (N = 4 per treatment) to compare the stock enhancing outcome of stocking hatchery-reared northern pike (Esox lucius) fry and the natural...... production of young in self-recruiting pike populations. We also added a treatment where pike fry were stocked into ponds that otherwise did not have pike to mimic the absence of natural recruitment. Fry stocking into self-reproducing stocks did not elevate year class strength over unstocked controls......Density-dependent mortality in young life stages should strongly limit the potential for additive effects caused by stocking of fish sizes that are smaller than size at recruitment into the fishery. Indeed, stocking models have suggested that stocking of fry should not elevate year class strength...

  5. Phosphorylation of the mitochondrial autophagy receptor Nix enhances its interaction with LC3 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogov, Vladimir V; Suzuki, Hironori; Marinković, Mija; Lang, Verena; Kato, Ryuichi; Kawasaki, Masato; Buljubašić, Maja; Šprung, Matilda; Rogova, Natalia; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Dötsch, Volker; Dikic, Ivan; Brady, Nathan R; Novak, Ivana

    2017-04-25

    The mitophagy receptor Nix interacts with LC3/GABARAP proteins, targeting mitochondria into autophagosomes for degradation. Here we present evidence for phosphorylation-driven regulation of the Nix:LC3B interaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR indicate a ~100 fold enhanced affinity of the serine 34/35-phosphorylated Nix LC3-interacting region (LIR) to LC3B and formation of a very rigid complex compared to the non-phosphorylated sequence. Moreover, the crystal structure of LC3B in complex with the Nix LIR peptide containing glutamic acids as phosphomimetic residues and NMR experiments revealed that LIR phosphorylation stabilizes the Nix:LC3B complex via formation of two additional hydrogen bonds between phosphorylated serines of Nix LIR and Arg11, Lys49 and Lys51 in LC3B. Substitution of Lys51 to Ala in LC3B abrogates binding of a phosphomimetic Nix mutant. Functionally, serine 34/35 phosphorylation enhances autophagosome recruitment to mitochondria in HeLa cells. Together, this study provides cellular, biochemical and biophysical evidence that phosphorylation of the LIR domain of Nix enhances mitophagy receptor engagement.

  6. Interactive Video Technology: Enhancing Professional Learning in Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Brian; Mitchell, Nick; Adamczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The University of Sussex In-School Teacher Education Project (InSTEP) uses interactive video technologies to enhance initial teacher education programmes for science trainee teachers. With four Internet Protocol cameras and mounted microphones in both school laboratories and the university teaching room, trainees and their tutors have access to…

  7. Using Interactive Videodisc Technology To Enhance Assessor Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Larry; Hafner, Laurin P.

    The first of two sections of this paper describes a pilot program that used interactive video (IAV) technology to enhance the scripting skills of teacher certification assessors in the administration of a classroom observation technique. A comparative analysis was drawn between three groups of assessors: those who received IAV programed…

  8. Reed-Sternberg cell-derived lymphotoxin-α activates endothelial cells to enhance T-cell recruitment in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fhu, Chee Wai; Graham, Anne M; Yap, Celestial T; Al-Salam, Suhail; Castella, Antonio; Chong, Siew Meng; Lim, Yaw-Chyn

    2014-11-06

    It is known that cells within the inflammatory background in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) provide signals essential for the continual survival of the neoplastic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the recruitment of this inflammatory infiltrate into the involved lymph nodes are less well understood. In this study, we show in vitro that HRS cells secrete lymphotoxin-α (LTα) which acts on endothelial cells to upregulate the expression of adhesion molecules that are important for T cell recruitment. LTα also enhances the expression of hyaluronan which preferentially contributes to the recruitment of CD4(+) CD45RA(+) naïve T cells under in vitro defined flow conditions. Enhanced expression of LTα in HRS cells and tissue stroma; and hyaluronan on endothelial cells are readily detected in involved lymph nodes from cHL patients. Our study also shows that although NF-κB and AP-1 are involved, the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway is the dominant regulator of LTα production in HRS cells. Using pharmacological inhibitors, our data suggest that activity of COX1, but not of COX2, directly regulates the expression of nuclear c-Fos in HRS cells. Our findings suggest that HRS cell-derived LTα is an important mediator that contributes to T cell recruitment into lesional lymph nodes in cHL. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions of Recruiting Macrophages (TAMs and Eosinophils (Eos with Host Mast Cells (MCs and Tumorigenesis in CALTs. M-CSF, Suitable Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Khatami

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction in the direction of tumorigenesis. Activated MFs (TAMs or M2 and Eos that are recruited by tissues (e.g., conjunctiva or perhaps lung airways whose principal resident immune cells are MCs and lymphocytes are suggested to play crucial synergistic roles in enhancing growth promoting capacities of host toward tumorigenesis. Under oxidative stress, M-CSF may produce signals that are cumulative/synergistic with host mediators (e.g., low levels of histamine, facilitating tumor-directed expression of decoy receptors and immune suppressive factors (e.g., dTNFR, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-b, PGE2. M-CSF, possessing superior sensitivity and specificity, compared with conventional markers (e.g., CA-125, CA-19-9 is potentially a suitable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and technology development. Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin and tumorigenic (Yang properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

  10. Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions of Recruiting Macrophages (TAMs) and Eosinophils (Eos) with Host Mast Cells (MCs) and Tumorigenesis in CALTs. M-CSF, Suitable Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Mahin

    2014-01-27

    tumorigenesis. Activated MFs (TAMs or M2) and Eos that are recruited by tissues (e.g., conjunctiva or perhaps lung airways) whose principal resident immune cells are MCs and lymphocytes are suggested to play crucial synergistic roles in enhancing growth promoting capacities of host toward tumorigenesis. Under oxidative stress, M-CSF may produce signals that are cumulative/synergistic with host mediators (e.g., low levels of histamine), facilitating tumor-directed expression of decoy receptors and immune suppressive factors (e.g., dTNFR, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-b, PGE2). M-CSF, possessing superior sensitivity and specificity, compared with conventional markers (e.g., CA-125, CA-19-9) is potentially a suitable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and technology development. Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin) and tumorigenic (Yang) properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

  11. Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions of Recruiting Macrophages (TAMs) and Eosinophils (Eos) with Host Mast Cells (MCs) and Tumorigenesis in CALTs. M-CSF, Suitable Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatami, Mahin [Inflammation and Cancer Biology, National Cancer Institute (Ret), the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20817 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    dysfunction in the direction of tumorigenesis. Activated MFs (TAMs or M2) and Eos that are recruited by tissues (e.g., conjunctiva or perhaps lung airways) whose principal resident immune cells are MCs and lymphocytes are suggested to play crucial synergistic roles in enhancing growth promoting capacities of host toward tumorigenesis. Under oxidative stress, M-CSF may produce signals that are cumulative/synergistic with host mediators (e.g., low levels of histamine), facilitating tumor-directed expression of decoy receptors and immune suppressive factors (e.g., dTNFR, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-β, PGE2). M-CSF, possessing superior sensitivity and specificity, compared with conventional markers (e.g., CA-125, CA-19-9) is potentially a suitable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and technology development. Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin) and tumorigenic (Yang) properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

  12. Cooperation enhanced by moderate tolerance ranges in myopically selective interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojie; Wang, Long

    2009-10-01

    We present a mode of myopically selective interaction to study the evolutionary prisoner’s dilemma game in scale-free networks. Each individual has a reputation-based tolerance range and only tends to interact with the neighbors whose reputation is within its tolerance range. Moreover, its reputation is assessed in response to the interactions in the neighborhood. Interestingly, we show that moderate values of tolerance range can result in the best promotion of cooperation due to the emergence of group selection mechanism. Furthermore, we study the effects of weighting factor in the assessment rule of reputation on the evolution of cooperation. We also show how cooperation evolves in some extended situations, where an interaction stimulus payment is considered for individuals, and where the strategy and reputation of individuals can spread simultaneously. Our results may enhance the understanding of evolutionary dynamics in graph-structured populations where individuals conditionally play with their neighbors according to some myopic selection criteria.

  13. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  14. Enhanced Noradrenergic Activity Potentiates Fear Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation by Differentially Recruiting alpha1- and beta-Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarini, Lucas; Stern, Cristina A. Jark; Carobrez, Antonio P.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2013-01-01

    Consolidation and reconsolidation are phases of memory stabilization that diverge slightly. Noradrenaline is known to influence both processes, but the relative contribution of alpha1- and beta-adrenoceptors is unclear. The present study sought to investigate this matter by comparing their recruitment to consolidate and/or reconsolidate a…

  15. Engaging older adults in high impact volunteering that enhances health: recruitment and retention in The Experience Corps Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Iveris L; Frick, Kevin; Glass, Thomas A; Carlson, Michelle; Tanner, Elizabeth; Ricks, Michelle; Fried, Linda P

    2006-09-01

    Engagement in social and generative activities has benefits for the well-being of older adults; hence, methods for broadly engaging them in such activities are desired. Experience Corps Baltimore, a social model for health promotion for older adult volunteers in public schools, offers insight to such successful recruitment and retention. We report on data over a 4-year period in Baltimore City, Maryland, and describe a five-stage screening process implemented to recruit a diverse group of senior volunteers who would remain in the program for at least 1 year. The sample consisted of 443 older adults expressing an interest in and screened for volunteering. Comparisons were made with Chi-square and Fisher's t-test between those who entered the program and those who did not and those who were retained in the program. Gender, race, age group, and prior volunteering were significant in ultimate volunteer service in the schools. Overall, 38% of 443 persons recruited entered the schools; 94% of participants were over 60 years (p = 0.05) with a mean age of 69 years; 90% were women (p = 0.03), and 93% African-American (p = 0.005); 57% had not volunteered in the past year (p = 0.004). Ninety-two percent were retained in the first year; 80% returned a second year. Among the latter, 83% had volunteering regardless of baseline MMSE score, self-reported health, and motivation for volunteering. In conclusion, it is possible to recruit and retain a diverse pool of older adults to participate in a high-intensity volunteer program, including non-traditional volunteers. Of special note is the success in recruiting African-American women and those with lower education, who may particularly benefit from health promotion.

  16. Enhancement of Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren

    This thesis reports research on enhancement of light-matter interaction in semi- conductor quantum nanostructures by means of nanostructure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. Photonic crystal membranes of very high quality and samples for studies of quantum dots...... coupling between quantum dot excitons and a photonic crystal waveguide. We show theoretically that the dipole approximation is not valid a priori for quantum dots and wells in nanostructures. A many-particle exciton formalism is developed by which the Wigner-Weisskopf result for spontaneous emission......-matter interaction is investigated. For the rst time the vacuum Rabi splitting is observed in an electrically tunable device....

  17. Optical field enhancement by strong plasmon interaction in graphene nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2013-05-01

    The ability of plasmons to enhance the electromagnetic field intensity in the gap between metallic nanoparticles derives from their strong optical confinement relative to the light wavelength. The spatial extension of plasmons in doped graphene has recently been shown to be boldly reduced with respect to conventional plasmonic metals. Here, we show that graphene nanostructures are capable of capitalizing such strong confinement to yield unprecedented levels of field enhancement, well beyond what is found in noble metals of similar dimensions (~ tens of nanometers). We perform realistic, quantum-mechanical calculations of the optical response of graphene dimers formed by nanodisks and nanotriangles, showing a strong sensitivity of the level of enhancement to the type of carbon edges near the gap region, with armchair edges favoring stronger interactions than zigzag edges. Our quantum-mechanical description automatically incorporates nonlocal effects that are absent in classical electromagnetic theory, leading to over an order of magnitude higher enhancement in armchair structures. The classical limit is recovered for large structures. We predict giant levels of light concentration for dimers ~200 nm, leading to infrared-absorption enhancement factors ~10(8). This extreme light enhancement and confinement in nanostructured graphene has great potential for optical sensing and nonlinear devices.

  18. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human-Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aĺvaro; Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez de Gorostiza; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-07-03

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human-robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human-robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications.

  19. TGFβ-induced deptor suppression recruits mTORC1 and not mTORC2 to enhance collagen I (α2 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falguni Das

    Full Text Available Enhanced TGFβ activity contributes to the accumulation of matrix proteins including collagen I (α2 by proximal tubular epithelial cells in progressive kidney disease. Although TGFβ rapidly activates its canonical Smad signaling pathway, it also recruits noncanonical pathway involving mTOR kinase to regulate renal matrix expansion. The mechanism by which chronic TGFβ treatment maintains increased mTOR activity to induce the matrix protein collagen I (α2 expression is not known. Deptor is an mTOR interacting protein that suppresses mTOR activity in both mTORC1 and mTORC2. In proximal tubular epithelial cells, TGFβ reduced deptor levels in a time-dependent manner with concomitant increase in both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activities. Expression of deptor abrogated activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2, resulting in inhibition of collagen I (α2 mRNA and protein expression via transcriptional mechanism. In contrast, neutralization of endogenous deptor by shRNAs increased activity of both mTOR complexes and expression of collagen I (α2 similar to TGFβ treatment. Importantly, downregulation of deptor by TGFβ increased the expression of Hif1α by increasing translation of its mRNA. TGFβ-induced deptor downregulation promotes Hif1α binding to its cognate hypoxia responsive element in the collagen I (α2 gene to control its protein expression via direct transcriptional mechanism. Interestingly, knockdown of raptor to specifically block mTORC1 activity significantly inhibited expression of collagen I (α2 and Hif1α while inhibition of rictor to prevent selectively mTORC2 activation did not have any effect. Critically, our data provide evidence for the requirement of TGFβ-activated mTORC1 only by deptor downregulation, which dominates upon the bystander mTORC2 activity for enhanced expression of collagen I (α2. Our results also suggest the presence of a safeguard mechanism involving deptor-mediated suppression of mTORC1 activity against developing TGF

  20. N-acetyl-L-cysteine increases MnSOD activity and enhances the recruitment of quiescent human fibroblasts to the proliferation cycle during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Gaowei; Goswami, Monali; Kalen, Amanda L; Goswami, Prabhat C; Sarsour, Ehab H

    2016-01-01

    The rebuilding of the connective tissue during wound healing requires the recruitment of fibroblasts to the wound area as well as reentry of quiescent fibroblasts to the proliferative cycle. Whether this process can be modulated by a small molecular weight thiol antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was tested in normal human skin fibroblasts (NHFs) using a uni-directional wound healing assay. NAC treated cells demonstrated a decreased migration rate but increased number of proliferating cells recruited into the wound area post wounding. Fifteen day quiescent control and NAC treated NHFs were re-plated at a lower density and cell numbers counted at different days post-plating. Interestingly, NAC treated cells exhibited increased cellular proliferation indicated by both decreased cell population doubling time and increased S phase cells. NAC treated cells demonstrated decreased steady state levels of reactive oxygen species as well as increased protein and activity levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). NAC treatment failed to induce proliferation in quiescent cells lacking MnSOD expression. These results demonstrate that NAC enhanced the recruitment of quiescent NHFs into proliferation cycle during wound healing. Our results also suggest that the wound healing properties of NAC might be due to its ability to induce and enhance MnSOD expression and activity. Altogether, these findings suggest NAC might be potentially developed as a dietary intervention to improve tissue injury in animals and humans.

  1. Soil-vegetation-climate interactions in arid landscapes: Effects of the North American monsoon on grass recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used a daily time step, multi-layer simulation model of soil water dynamics to integrate effects of soils, vegetation, and climate on the recruitment of Bouteloua eriopoda (black grama), the historically dominant grass in the Chihuahuan Desert. We simulated landscapes at the Jornada ARS-LTER site...

  2. Enhancing recruitment of African-American families into genetic research: lessons learned from Project SuGar

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Despite some recruitment success in biomedical research among minorities, participation by African-American families into research, specifically genetic research, is lower than Caucasian families (Bowen and Penchaszadeh Community Genet 11:189–190, 2008). Such low participation rates by African-Americans prevent the exploration of specific ethnic differences in patterns of diseases and diminish the identification of specific disease risks among ethnic groups (Bowen and Penchaszadeh Community G...

  3. Signaling of Prostaglandin E Receptors, EP3 and EP4 Facilitates Wound Healing and Lymphangiogenesis with Enhanced Recruitment of M2 Macrophages in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Kanako; Isonaka, Risa; Kawakami, Tadashi; Narumiya, Shuh; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in homeostasis, metabolism, and immunity, and also occurs during wound-healing. Here, we examined the roles of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP) signaling in enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in wound healing processes. The hole-punch was made in the ears of male C57BL/6 mice using a metal ear punch. Healing process and lymphangiogenesis together with macrophage recruitment were analyzed in EP knockout mice. Lymphangiogenesis was up-regulated in the granulation tissues at the margins of punched-hole wounds in mouse ears, and this increase was accompanied by increased expression levels of COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Administration of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, suppressed lymphangiogenesis in the granulation tissues and reduced the induction of the pro-lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and VEGF-D. Topical applications of selective EP receptor agonists enhanced the expressions of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 and VEGF receptor-3. The wound-healing processes and recruitment of CD11b-positive macrophages, which produced VEGF-C and VEGF-D, were suppressed under COX-2 inhibition. Mice lacking either EP3 or EP4 exhibited reduced wound-healing, lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages, compared with wild type mice. Proliferation of cultured human lymphatic endothelial cells was not detected under PGE2 stimulation. Lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages that produced VEGF-C/D were suppressed in mice treated with a COX-2 inhibitor or lacking either EP3 or EP4 during wound healing. COX-2 and EP3/EP4 signaling may be novel targets to control lymphangiogenesis in vivo.

  4. Signaling of Prostaglandin E Receptors, EP3 and EP4 Facilitates Wound Healing and Lymphangiogenesis with Enhanced Recruitment of M2 Macrophages in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Kanako; Isonaka, Risa; Kawakami, Tadashi; Narumiya, Shuh; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in homeostasis, metabolism, and immunity, and also occurs during wound-healing. Here, we examined the roles of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP) signaling in enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in wound healing processes. The hole-punch was made in the ears of male C57BL/6 mice using a metal ear punch. Healing process and lymphangiogenesis together with macrophage recruitment were analyzed in EP knockout mice. Lymphangiogenesis was up-regulated in the granulation tissues at the margins of punched-hole wounds in mouse ears, and this increase was accompanied by increased expression levels of COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Administration of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, suppressed lymphangiogenesis in the granulation tissues and reduced the induction of the pro-lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and VEGF-D. Topical applications of selective EP receptor agonists enhanced the expressions of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 and VEGF receptor-3. The wound-healing processes and recruitment of CD11b-positive macrophages, which produced VEGF-C and VEGF-D, were suppressed under COX-2 inhibition. Mice lacking either EP3 or EP4 exhibited reduced wound-healing, lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages, compared with wild type mice. Proliferation of cultured human lymphatic endothelial cells was not detected under PGE2 stimulation. Lymphangiogenesis and recruitment of M2 macrophages that produced VEGF-C/D were suppressed in mice treated with a COX-2 inhibitor or lacking either EP3 or EP4 during wound healing. COX-2 and EP3/EP4 signaling may be novel targets to control lymphangiogenesis in vivo. PMID:27711210

  5. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  6. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  7. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  8. Surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy using interacting gold nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubrech, Frank; Weber, Daniel; Pucci, Annemarie [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Shen, Hong [Universite Troyes, Troyes (France); Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc [Universite Paris 13, Bobigny (France)

    2009-07-01

    We performed surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy (SEIRS) of molecules adsorbed on gold nanowires using synchrotron light of the ANKA IR-beamline at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Arrays of gold nanowires with interparticle spacings down to 30nm were prepared by electron beam lithography. The interparticle distance was reduced further by wet-chemically increasing the size of the gold nanowires. The growth of the wires was proofed using IR spectroscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy. After this preparation step, appropriate arrays of nanowires with an interparticle distance down to a few nanometers were selected to demonstrate the surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy of one monolayer octadecanthiol (ODT). As know from SEIRS studies using single gold nanowires, the spectral position of the antenna-like resonance in relation to the absorption bands of ODT (2850cm-1 and 2919cm-1) is crucial for both, the lineshape of the molecular vibration and the signal enhancement. In contrast to single nanowires studies, a further increase of the enhanced signals is expected due to the interaction of the electromagnetic fields of the close-by nanowires.

  9. Hydroxyapatite nucleated and grown on nano titania particles enhances recruitment of Escherichia coli for subsequent photocatalytic elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Hua, E-mail: lihua@nimte.ac.cn

    2015-02-01

    Titania-hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocomposites were fabricated by wet chemical synthesis approach. HA exhibited crystallographic orientation of nucleation on nano titania particle, forming the composite particles with titania being partially enwrapped with HA. Microstructural characterization by high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed coherent interfacial bond of (110) and (222) planes of HA crystal with (101) plane of anatase. The HA layer promoted significantly recruitment of Escherichia coli bacteria onto the titania-based particles for subsequent photocatalytic killing. Less extent of enwrapping of HA on titania particle, as accomplished by increasing the aging time of HA suspension, gave rise to better capability of photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and sterilization of the bacteria. The novel HA-enwrapped titania powder shows great potential for environmental applications. - Highlights: • Titania-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite powder was fabricated with cladding structure. • Hydroxyapatite nucleated and grew on titania particle with preferred orientation. • Hydroxyapatite layer promotes recruitment of Escherichia coli onto titania-based particles. • The titania-hydroxyapatite particles show excellent antibacterial performances. • The nanocomposite powder exhibits excellent photocatalytic performances.

  10. Harnessing plant-microbe interactions for enhancing farm productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Catriona; Singh, Brajesh

    2014-01-01

    Declining soil fertility and farm productivity is a major global concern in order to achieve food security for a burgeoning world population. It is reported that improving soil health alone can increase productivity by 10-15% and in combination with efficient plant traits, farm productivity can be increased up to 50-60%. In this article we explore the emerging microbial and bioengineering technologies, which can be employed to achieve the transformational increase in farm productivity and can simultaneously enhance environmental outcomes i.e., low green house gas (GHG) emissions. We argue that metagenomics, meta-transcriptomics and metabolomics have potential to provide fundamental knowledge on plant-microbes interactions necessary for new innovations to increase farm productivity. Further, these approaches provide tools to identify and select novel microbial/gene resources which can be harnessed in transgenic and designer plant technologies for enhanced resource use efficiencies.

  11. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human–Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aívaro; de Gorostiza Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human–robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human–robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications. PMID:26151202

  12. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human–Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alonso-Martín

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human–robot interaction (HRI, to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS, which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written text; and (ii a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot’s pro-activeness during a human–robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction. Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications.

  13. "Using recruitment source timing and diagnosticity to enhance applicants' occupation-specific human capital": Correction to Campion, Ployhart, and Campion (2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Reports an error in "Using Recruitment Source Timing and Diagnosticity to Enhance Applicants' Occupation-Specific Human Capital" by Michael C. Campion, Robert E. Ployhart and Michael A. Campion (Journal of Applied Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Feb 02, 2017, np). In the article, the following headings were inadvertently set at the wrong level: Method, Participants and Procedure, Measures, Occupation specific human capital, Symbolic jobs, Relevant majors, Occupation-specific capital hotspots, Source timing, Source diagnosticity, Results, and Discussion. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2017-04566-001.) This study proposes that reaching applicants through more diagnostic recruitment sources earlier in their educational development (e.g., in high school) can lead them to invest more in their occupation-specific human capital (OSHC), thereby making them higher quality candidates. Using a sample of 78,157 applicants applying for jobs within a desirable professional occupation in the public sector, results indicate that applicants who report hearing about the occupation earlier, and applicants who report hearing about the occupation through more diagnostic sources, have higher levels of OSHC upon application. Additionally, source timing and diagnosticity affect the likelihood of candidates applying for jobs symbolic of the occupation, selecting relevant majors, and attending educational institutions with top programs related to the occupation. These findings suggest a firm's recruiting efforts may influence applicants' OSHC investment strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Interaction-Enhanced Imaging of Rydberg P states

    CERN Document Server

    Gavryusev, Vladislav; Kekić, Armin; Zürn, Gerhard; Signoles, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    The Interaction Enhanced Imaging technique allows to detect the spatial distribution of strongly interacting impurities embedded within a gas of background atoms used as a contrast medium. Here we present a detailed study of this technique, applied to detect Rydberg $P$ states. We experimentally realize fast and efficient three-photon excitation of $P$ states, optimized according to the results of a theoretical effective two-level model. Few Rydberg $P$-state atoms, prepared in a small cloud with dimensions comparable to the blockade radius, are detected with a good sensitivity by averaging over 50 shots. The main aspects of the technique are described with a hard-sphere model, finding good agreement with experimental data. This work paves the way to a non-destructive optical detection of single Rydberg atoms with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  15. Enhancing the functional content of eukaryotic protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Pandey

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks are a promising type of data for studying complex biological systems. However, despite the rich information embedded in these networks, these networks face important data quality challenges of noise and incompleteness that adversely affect the results obtained from their analysis. Here, we apply a robust measure of local network structure called common neighborhood similarity (CNS to address these challenges. Although several CNS measures have been proposed in the literature, an understanding of their relative efficacies for the analysis of interaction networks has been lacking. We follow the framework of graph transformation to convert the given interaction network into a transformed network corresponding to a variety of CNS measures evaluated. The effectiveness of each measure is then estimated by comparing the quality of protein function predictions obtained from its corresponding transformed network with those from the original network. Using a large set of human and fly protein interactions, and a set of over 100 GO terms for both, we find that several of the transformed networks produce more accurate predictions than those obtained from the original network. In particular, the HC.cont measure and other continuous CNS measures perform well this task, especially for large networks. Further investigation reveals that the two major factors contributing to this improvement are the abilities of CNS measures to prune out noisy edges and enhance functional coherence in the transformed networks.

  16. Chromosome thripsis by DNA double strand break clusters causes enhanced cell lethality, chromosomal translocations and 53BP1-recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipler, Agnes; Mladenova, Veronika; Soni, Aashish; Nikolov, Vladimir; Saha, Janapriya; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-09-19

    Chromosome translocations are hallmark of cancer and of radiation-induced cell killing, reflecting joining of incongruent DNA-ends that alter the genome. Translocation-formation requires DNA end-joining mechanisms and incompletely characterized, permissive chromatin conditions. We show that chromatin destabilization by clusters of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) generated by the I-SceI meganuclease at multiple, appropriately engineered genomic sites, compromises c-NHEJ and markedly increases cell killing and translocation-formation compared to single-DSBs. Translocation-formation from DSB-clusters utilizes Parp1 activity, implicating alt-EJ in their formation. Immunofluorescence experiments show that single-DSBs and DSB-clusters uniformly provoke the formation of single γ-H2AX foci, suggesting similar activation of early DNA damage response (DDR). Live-cell imaging also shows similar single-focus recruitment of the early-response protein MDC1, to single-DSBs and DSB-clusters. Notably, the late DDR protein, 53BP1 shows in live-cell imaging strikingly stronger recruitment to DSB-clusters as compared to single-DSBs. This is the first report that chromatin thripsis, in the form of engineered DSB-clusters, compromises first-line DSB-repair pathways, allowing alt-EJ to function as rescuing-backup. DSB-cluster-formation is indirectly linked to the increased biological effectiveness of high ionization-density radiations, such as the alpha-particles emitted by radon gas or the heavy-ions utilized in cancer therapy. Our observations provide the first direct mechanistic explanation for this long-known effect.

  17. Nuclear enhancement of the photon yield in cosmic ray interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, Michael; Ostapchenko, Sergey S

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the nuclear enhancement factor has been used since the beginning of gamma-ray astronomy. It provides a simple and convenient way to account for the contribution of nuclei (A>1) in cosmic rays (CRs) and in the interstellar medium (ISM) to the diffuse gamma-ray emission. An accurate treatment of the dominant emission process, such as hadronic interactions of CRs with the ISM, enables one to study CR acceleration processes, CR propagation in the ISM, and provides a reliable background model for searches of new phenomena. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) launched in 2008 provides excellent quality data in a wide energy range 30 MeV - 1 TeV where the diffuse emission accounts for the majority of photons. Exploiting its data to the fullest requires a new study of the processes of gamma-ray production in hadronic interactions. In this paper we point out that several commonly used studies of the nuclear enhancement factor miss to account for the spectrally averaged energy loss fraction which ...

  18. The value of trophic interactions for ecosystem function: dung beetle communities influence seed burial and seedling recruitment in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Hannah M; Bardgett, Richard D; Louzada, Julio; Barlow, Jos

    2016-12-14

    Anthropogenic activities are causing species extinctions, raising concerns about the consequences of changing biological communities for ecosystem functioning. To address this, we investigated how dung beetle communities influence seed burial and seedling recruitment in the Brazilian Amazon. First, we conducted a burial and retrieval experiment using seed mimics. We found that dung beetle biomass had a stronger positive effect on the burial of large than small beads, suggesting that anthropogenic reductions in large-bodied beetles will have the greatest effect on the secondary dispersal of large-seeded plant species. Second, we established mesocosm experiments in which dung beetle communities buried Myrciaria dubia seeds to examine plant emergence and survival. Contrary to expectations, we found that beetle diversity and biomass negatively influenced seedling emergence, but positively affected the survival of seedlings that emerged. Finally, we conducted germination trials to establish the optimum burial depth of experimental seeds, revealing a negative relationship between burial depth and seedling emergence success. Our results provide novel evidence that seed burial by dung beetles may be detrimental for the emergence of some seed species. However, we also detected positive impacts of beetle activity on seedling recruitment, which are probably because of their influence on soil properties. Overall, this study provides new evidence that anthropogenic impacts on dung beetle communities could influence the structure of tropical forests; in particular, their capacity to regenerate and continue to provide valuable functions and services.

  19. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  20. Deoxycholate interacts with IpaD of Shigella flexneri in inducing the recruitment of IpaB to the type III secretion apparatus needle tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensrud, Kenneth F; Adam, Philip R; La Mar, Cassandra D; Olive, Andrew J; Lushington, Gerald H; Sudharsan, Raghavi; Shelton, Naomi L; Givens, Richard S; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D

    2008-07-04

    Type III secretion (TTS) is an essential virulence function for Shigella flexneri that delivers effector proteins that are responsible for bacterial invasion of intestinal epithelial cells. The Shigella TTS apparatus (TTSA) consists of a basal body that spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and a needle exposed at the pathogen surface. At the distal end of the needle is a "tip complex" composed of invasion plasmid antigen D (IpaD). IpaD not only regulates TTS, but is required for the recruitment and stable association of the translocator protein IpaB at the TTSA needle tip in the presence of deoxycholate or other bile salts. This phenomenon is not accompanied by induction of TTS or the recruitment of IpaC to the Shigella surface. We now show that IpaD specifically binds fluorescein-labeled deoxycholate and, based on energy transfer measurements and docking simulations, this interaction appears to occur where the N-terminal domain of IpaD meets its central coiled-coil, a region that may also be involved in needle-tip interactions. TTS is initiated as a series of distinct steps and that small molecules present in the bacterial milieu are capable of inducing the first step of TSS through interactions with the needle tip protein IpaD. Furthermore, the amino acids proposed to be important for deoxycholate binding by IpaD appear to have significant roles in regulating tip complex composition and pathogen entry into host cells.

  1. Nicotine enhancement and reinforcer devaluation: Interaction with opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshenbaum, Ari P; Suhaka, Jesse A; Phillips, Jessie L; Voltolini de Souza Pinto, Maiary

    In rats, nicotine enhances responding maintained by non-pharmacological reinforcers, and discontinuation of nicotine devalues those same reinforcers. The goal of this study was to assess the interaction of nicotine and opioid receptors and to evaluate the degree to which nicotine enhancement and nicotine-induced devaluation are related to opioid activation. Nicotine (0.4mg/kg), or nicotine plus naloxone (0.3 or 3.0mg/kg), was delivered to rats prior to progressive ratio (PR) schedule sessions in which sucrose was used as a reinforcer. PR-schedule responding was assessed during ten daily sessions of drug delivery, and for three post-dosing days/sessions. Control groups for this investigation included a saline-only condition, and naloxone-only (0.3 or 3.0mg/kg) conditions. When administered in conjunction with nicotine, both naloxone doses attenuated nicotine enhancement of the sucrose reinforcer, and the combination of the larger dose of naloxone (3.0mg/kg) with nicotine produced significant impairments in sucrose reinforced responding. When administered alone, neither dose of naloxone (0.3 & 3.0mg/kg) significantly altered responding in comparison to saline. Furthermore, when dosing was discontinued after ten once-daily doses, all nicotine groups (nicotine-only and nicotine+naloxone combination) demonstrated significant decreases in sucrose reinforcement compared to the saline group. Although opioid antagonism attenuated reinforcement enhancement by nicotine, it did not prevent reinforcer devaluation upon discontinuation of nicotine dosing, and the higher dose of naloxone (3.0mg/kg) produced decrements upon discontinuation on its own in the absence of nicotine.

  2. Recruitment of Minority Adolescents and Young Adults into Randomised Clinical Trials: Testing the Design of the Technology Enhanced Community Health Nursing (TECH-N) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Maria; Chung, Shang-en; Gaydos, Charlotte; Frick, Kevin D.; Anders, Jennifer; Huettner, Steven; Rothman, Richard; Butz, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) disproportionately affects adolescent and young adult (AYA) women and can negatively influence reproductive health trajectories. Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have focused on strategies to improve outpatient adherence or to reduce reproductive morbidity in this population. This paper describes the research methods and preliminary effectiveness of recruitment, retention, and intervention strategies employed in a novel RCT designed to test a technology-enhanced community-health nursing (TECH-N) intervention among urban AYA with PID. Methods AYA women aged 13–25 years were recruited during acute PID visits in outpatient clinics and emergency departments (ED) to participate in this IRB-approved trial. Participants completed an audio-computerized self-interview (ACASI), provided vaginal specimens, and were randomized to standard treatment or the intervention. Intervention participants received text-messaging support for 30 days and a community health nurse (CHN) interventionist performed a home visit with clinical assessment within 5 days after enrollment. All patients received a full course of medications and completed research visits at 14-days (adherence), 30 days and 90 days with by an outreach worker. STI testing performed at the 30-and 90-day visits. Exploratory analyses using descriptive statistics were conducted to examine recruitment, retention, and follow-up data to test the overall design of the intervention. Results In the first 48 months, 64% of 463 patients were eligible for the study and 81.2% of 293 eligible patients were recruited for the study (63.3%); 238 (81.2%) of eligible patients were enrolled. Most participants were African American (95.6%) with a mean age of 18.6 (2.3). Ninety-four percent of individuals assigned to the TECH-N intervention completed the nursing visits. All completed visits have been within the 5-day window and over 90% of patients in both arms have been retained over the 3

  3. Dimuon enhancement in nucleus-nucleus ultrarelativistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, Paula; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Bohrani, A.; Boldea, V.; Bussiere, A.; Capelli, L.; Caponi, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constans, N.; Constantinescu, S.; Contardo, D.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Ducroux, L.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Ferreira, R.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanyan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Kurepin, A.B.; Landau, G.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Luquin, L.; Macciotta, P.; Mac Cormick, M.; Mandry, R.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Monteno, M.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Ropotar, I.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Sitta, M.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.L.; Varela, J.; Vercellin, E.; Villatte, L

    1999-12-27

    The study of muon pairs in the mass region 1.5 < M{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}} < 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} in 450 GeV/c p-A, 200 GeV/nucleon S-U and 158 GeV/nucleon Pb-Pb collisions is presented. In p-A interactions, the dimuon signal mass spectra are well described by a superposition of Drell-Yan and charmed meson semi-leptonic decay contributions, in agreement with previous experiments when considering a linear A dependence. In nucleus-nucleus reactions, taking only into account these two physical ingredients, a dimuon enhancement both with increasing A{center_dot}B and centrality is observed.

  4. Plasmonic nanoantennas: enhancing light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Shobhit K

    2015-01-01

    The research area of plasmonics promises devices with ultrasmall footprint operating at ultrafast speeds and with lower energy consumption compared to conventional electronics. These devices will operate with light and bridge the gap between microscale dielectric photonic systems and nanoscale electronics. Recent research advancements in nanotechnology and optics have led to the creation of a plethora of new plasmonic designs. Among the most promising are nanoscale antennas operating at optical frequencies, called nanoantennas. Plasmonic nanoantennas can provide enhanced and controllable light-matter interactions and strong coupling between far-field radiation and localized sources at the nanoscale. After a brief introduction of several plasmonic nanoantenna designs and their well-established radio-frequency antenna counterparts, we review several linear and nonlinear applications of different nanoantenna configurations. In particular, the possibility to tune the scattering response of linear nanoantennas and...

  5. E-recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna

    2012-01-01

    -recruitment is viewed as a case of virtual organizing- the organization of processes and activities which, via technology and human agents, facilitate time- and space-independent interaction and collaboration. In closure I offer a brief discussion of implications of the findings for HR managers and professionals...

  6. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    The adipose tissue metabolism is dependent on its blood perfusion. During lipid mobilization e.g. during exercise and during lipid deposition e.g. postprandial, adipose tissue blood flow is increased. This increase in blood flow may involve capillary recruitment in the tissue. We investigated...... the basic and postprandial microvascular volume in adipose tissue using real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging in healthy normal weight subjects. In nine subjects, CEU was performed in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the underlying skeletal muscle after a bolus injection...... of ultrasound contrast agent to establish the reproducibility of the technique. In nine subjects, the effect of an oral glucose load on blood flow and microvascular volume was measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and forearm skeletal muscle. ¹³³Xe washout and venous occlusion strain...

  7. Using tablet computers compared to interactive voice response to improve subject recruitment in osteoporosis pragmatic clinical trials: feasibility, satisfaction, and sample size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudano AS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amy S Mudano,1,2,3 Lisa C Gary,1,2,3 Ana L Oliveira,1,2,3 Mary Melton,1,2,3 Nicole C Wright,1,2,3 Jeffrey R Curtis,1,2,3 Elizabeth Delzell,1,2,3 T Michael Harrington,1,2,3 Meredith L Kilgore,1,2,3 Cora Elizabeth Lewis,1,2,3 Jasvinder A Singh,1,2,3,4 Amy H Warriner,1,2,3 Wilson D Pace,5 Kenneth G Saag1,2,31Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERTs, 2Center for Outcomes Effectiveness Research and Education (COERE, and 3Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences (CCTS, (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 4Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA; 5Distributed Ambulatory Research in Therapeutics Network (DARTNet, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USAIntroduction: Pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs provide large sample sizes and enhanced generalizability to assess therapeutic effectiveness, but efficient patient enrollment procedures are a challenge, especially for community physicians. Advances in technology may improve methods of patient recruitment and screening in PCTs. Our study looked at a tablet computer versus an integrated voice response system (IVRS for patient recruitment and screening for an osteoporosis PCT in community physician offices.Materials and methods: We recruited women ≥ 65 years of age from community physician offices to answer screening questions for a hypothetical osteoporosis active comparator PCT using a tablet computer or IVRS. We assessed the feasibility of these technologies for patient recruitment as well as for patient, physician, and office staff satisfaction with the process. We also evaluated the implications of these novel recruitment processes in determining the number of primary care practices and screened patients needed to conduct the proposed trial.Results: A total of 160 women (80% of those approached agreed to complete the osteoporosis screening questions in ten family physicians’ offices. Women using the

  8. DMSO Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting the Type II TGF-β Receptor From Intracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Huang, Jung San

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is used to treat many diseases/symptoms. The molecular basis of the pharmacological actions of DMSO has been unclear. We hypothesized that DMSO exerts some of these actions by enhancing TGF-β activity. Here we show that DMSO enhances TGF-β activity by ∼3-4-fold in Mv1Lu and NMuMG cells expressing Smad-dependent luciferase reporters. In Mv1Lu cells, DMSO enhances TGF-β-stimulated expression of P-Smad2 and PAI-1. It increases cell-surface expression of TGF-β receptors (TβR-I and/or TβR-II) by ∼3-4-fold without altering their cellular levels as determined by (125) I-labeled TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis, suggesting the presence of large intracellular pools in these cells. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation/Western blot analysis reveals that DMSO induces recruitment of TβR-II (but not TβR-I) from its intracellular pool to plasma-membrane microdomains. It induces more recruitment of TβR-II to non-lipid raft microdomains than to lipid rafts/caveolae. Mv1Lu cells transiently transfected with TβR-II-HA plasmid were treated with DMSO and analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence staining using anti-HA antibody. In these cells, TβR-II-HA is present as a vesicle-like network in the cytoplasm as well as in the plasma membrane. DMSO causes depletion of TβR-II-HA-containing vesicles from the cytoplasm and co-localization of TβR-II-HA and cveolin-1 at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that DMSO, a fusogenic substance, enhances TGF-β activity presumably by inducing fusion of cytoplasmic vesicles (containing TβR-II) and the plasma membrane, resulting in increased localization of TβR-II to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. Fusogenic activity of DMSO may play a pivotal role in its pharmacological actions involving membrane proteins with large cytoplasmic pools. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1568-1579, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The immune system GTPase GIMAP6 interacts with the Atg8 homologue GABARAPL2 and is recruited to autophagosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Pascall

    Full Text Available The GIMAPs (GTPases of the immunity-associated proteins are a family of small GTPases expressed prominently in the immune systems of mammals and other vertebrates. In mammals, studies of mutant or genetically-modified rodents have indicated important roles for the GIMAP GTPases in the development and survival of lymphocytes. No clear picture has yet emerged, however, of the molecular mechanisms by which they perform their function(s. Using biotin tag-affinity purification we identified a major, and highly specific, interaction between the human cytosolic family member GIMAP6 and GABARAPL2, one of the mammalian homologues of the yeast autophagy protein Atg8. Chemical cross-linking studies performed on Jurkat T cells, which express both GIMAP6 and GABARAPL2 endogenously, indicated that the two proteins in these cells readily associate with one another in the cytosol under normal conditions. The GIMAP6-GABARAPL2 interaction was disrupted by deletion of the last 10 amino acids of GIMAP6. The N-terminal region of GIMAP6, however, which includes a putative Atg8-family interacting motif, was not required. Over-expression of GIMAP6 resulted in increased levels of endogenous GABARAPL2 in cells. After culture of cells in starvation medium, GIMAP6 was found to localise in punctate structures with both GABARAPL2 and the autophagosomal marker MAP1LC3B, indicating that GIMAP6 re-locates to autophagosomes on starvation. Consistent with this finding, we have demonstrated that starvation of Jurkat T cells results in the degradation of GIMAP6. Whilst these findings raise the possibility that the GIMAPs play roles in the regulation of autophagy, we have been unable to demonstrate an effect of GIMAP6 over-expression on autophagic flux.

  10. Tripartite Motif-Containing Protein 22 Interacts with Class II Transactivator and Orchestrates Its Recruitment in Nuclear Bodies Containing TRIM19/PML and Cyclin T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Forlani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Among interferon (IFN inducible antiviral factors both tripartite motif-containing protein 22 (TRIM22 and class II transactivator (CIITA share the capacity of repressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 proviral transcription. TRIM22 is constitutively expressed in a subset of U937 cell clones poorly permissive to HIV-1 replication, whereas CIITA has been shown to inhibit virus multiplication in both T lymphocytic and myeloid cells, including poorly HIV-1 permissive U937 cells, by suppressing Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 transcription. Therefore, we tested whether TRIM22 and CIITA could form a nuclear complex potentially endowed with HIV-1 repressive functions. Indeed, we observed that TRIM22, independent of its E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, interacts with CIITA and promotes its recruitment into nuclear bodies. Importantly, TRIM19/promyelocytic leukemia (PML protein, another repressor of HIV-1 transcription also acting before proviral integration, colocalize in these nuclear bodies upon TRIM22 expression induced by IFN-γ. Finally, tTRIM22 nuclear bodies also contained CyclinT1, a crucial elongation factor of HIV-1 primary transcripts. These findings show that TRIM22 nuclear bodies are a site of recruitment of factors crucial for the regulation of HIV-1 transcription and highlight the potential existence of a concerted action between TRIM22, CIITA, and TRIM19/PML to maintain a state of proviral latency, at least in myeloid cells.

  11. Enhancing food engineering education with interactive web-based simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Koulouris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional deductive approach in teaching any engineering topic, teachers would first expose students to the derivation of the equations that govern the behavior of a physical system and then demonstrate the use of equations through a limited number of textbook examples. This methodology, however, is rarely adequate to unmask the cause-effect and quantitative relationships between the system variables that the equations embody. Web-based simulation, which is the integration of simulation and internet technologies, has the potential to enhance the learning experience by offering an interactive and easily accessible platform for quick and effortless experimentation with physical phenomena.This paper presents the design and development of a web-based platform for teaching basic food engineering phenomena to food technology students. The platform contains a variety of modules (“virtual experiments” covering the topics of mass and energy balances, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. In this paper, the design and development of three modules for mass balances and heat transfer is presented. Each webpage representing an educational module has the following features: visualization of the studied phenomenon through graphs, charts or videos, computation through a mathematical model and experimentation.  The student is allowed to edit key parameters of the phenomenon and observe the effect of these changes on the outputs. Experimentation can be done in a free or guided fashion with a set of prefabricated examples that students can run and self-test their knowledge by answering multiple-choice questions.

  12. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Enhancing Parent-Child Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Urquiza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Disruptive child behavior problems are common problems for parents and can be associated with serious delinquent behaviors and aggressive/violent behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. Parenting interventions to address disruptive child behavior problems has gained widespread acceptance. One of these parenting interventions is Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT. PCIT is a 14- to 20-week, founded on social learning and attachment theories, designed for children between 2 and 7 years of age with disruptive, or externalizing, behavior problems. This article will provide a brief review of the history of PCIT, a description of the basic components of PCIT, and an overview of recent developments that highlight the promise of PCIT with maltreating parent-child relationships, traumatized children, and in developing resilience in young children. In addressing the three basic treatment objectives for PCIT (i.e., reduction in child behavior problems, improving parenting skills, enhancing the quality of parent-child relationships, there is an abundance of research demonstrating very strong treatment effects and therefore, its value to the field. Recent research has also demonstrated the value of PCIT in reducing trauma symptoms in young children.

  13. Plasmonic nanoantennas: enhancing light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Shobhit K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research area of plasmonics promises devices with ultrasmall footprint operating at ultrafast speeds and with lower energy consumption compared to conventional electronics. These devices will operate with light and bridge the gap between microscale dielectric photonic systems and nanoscale electronics. Recent research advancements in nanotechnology and optics have led to the creation of a plethora of new plasmonic designs. Among the most promising are nanoscale antennas operating at optical frequencies, called nanoantennas. Plasmonic nanoantennas can provide enhanced and controllable light-matter interactions and strong coupling between far-field radiation and localized sources at the nanoscale. After a brief introduction of several plasmonic nanoantenna designs and their well-established radio-frequency antenna counterparts, we review several linear and nonlinear applications of different nanoantenna configurations. In particular, the possibility to tune the scattering response of linear nanoantennas and create robust optical wireless links is presented. In addition, the nonlinear and photodynamic responses of different linear and nonlinear nanoantenna systems are reported. Several future optical devices are envisioned based on these plasmonic nanoantenna configurations, such as low-power nanoswitches, compact ultrafast light sources, nanosensors and efficient energy harvesting systems.

  14. Interest enhancements to science experiments: Interactions with student gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    Males are more likely than females to aspire to and enter scientific careers, a pattern that might be attributed to gender differences in the appeal of school science. Differences might arise, in part, from gender-related interactions with the interest value of school science experiments. If modifiable, the interest value of experiments could influence attitudes toward science and subsequent choices concerning science involvement. In this study, middle school students carried out versions of science experiments designed to vary in their interest value. Experiment modifications, guided by a three-component model of interest, ranged from introduction of fantasy scenarios to manipulation of the difficulty and social context of the experiments. Subjects were 101 middle school students, 46 males and 55 females. Of primary interest were MANOVA comparisons of self-reported interest in the experiments, by gender and experimental condition. In general, interest enhancements were more effective for girls than boys. Boys were more attentive to aspects of the experiments that elicit perceptions of control, whereas girls were more attentive to social aspects.

  15. Developing and evaluating a technology enhanced interaction framework and method that can enhance the accessibility of mobile learning

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development and evaluation of a Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework and Method that can help with designing accessible mobile learning interactions involving disabled people. This new framework and method were developed to help design technological support for communication and interactions between people, technology, and objects particularly when disabled people are involved. A review of existing interaction frameworks showed that none of them helped technolog...

  16. Intramolecular Interactions and Regulation of Cofactor Binding by the Four Repressive Elements in the Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Inhibitory Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jattani, Rakhi P; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-04-15

    The CARD11 signaling scaffold transmits signaling between antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and the transcription factor NF-κB during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 activity is controlled by an inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions and prevents cofactor binding prior to receptor triggering. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations associated with the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma somehow perturb ID-mediated autoinhibition to confer CARD11 with the dysregulated spontaneous signaling to NF-κB that is required for the proliferation and survival of the lymphoma. Here, we investigate how the four repressive elements (REs) we have discovered in the CARD11 ID function to inhibit CARD11 activity with cooperativity and redundancy. We find that each RE contributes to the maintenance of the closed inactive state of CARD11 that predominates in the absence of receptor engagement. Each RE also contributes to the prevention of Bcl10 binding in the basal unstimulated state. RE1, RE2, and RE3 participate in intramolecular interactions with other CARD11 domains and share domain targets for binding. Remarkably, diffuse large B cell lymphoma-associated gain-of-function mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, LATCH, or coiled coil can perturb intramolecular interactions mediated by multiple REs, suggesting how single amino acid oncogenic CARD11 mutations can perturb or bypass the action of redundant inhibitory REs to achieve the level of hyperactive CARD11 signaling required to support lymphoma growth.

  17. Technology-enhanced storytelling stimulating parent-child interaction and preschool children's vocabulary knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, R.C.; Molenaar, I.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool children's vocabulary mainly develops verbal through interaction. Therefore, the technology-enhanced storytelling (TES) activity Jeffy's Journey is developed to support parent-child interaction and vocabulary in preschool children. TES entails shared verbal storytelling supported by a

  18. Interaction of the retinoblastoma protein with Orc1 and its recruitment to human origins of DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Mendoza-Maldonado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma protein (Rb is a crucial regulator of cell cycle progression by binding with E2F transcription factor and repressing the expression of a variety of genes required for the G1-S phase transition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Rb and E2F1 directly participate in the control of initiation of DNA replication in human HeLa, U2OS and T98G cells by specifically binding to origins of DNA replication in a cell cycle regulated manner. We show that, both in vitro and inside the cells, the largest subunit of the origin recognition complex (Orc1 specifically binds hypo-phosphorylated Rb and that this interaction is competitive with the binding of Rb to E2F1. The displacement of Rb-bound Orc1 by E2F1 at origins of DNA replication marks the progression of the G1 phase of the cell cycle toward the G1-S border. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The participation of Rb and E2F1 in the formation of the multiprotein complex that binds origins of DNA replication in mammalian cells appears to represent an effective mechanism to couple the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression to the activation of DNA replication.

  19. Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1 and recruits the LSD1/NuRD complex to epigenetically co-repress CYP7A1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huafang; Qin, Yi; Liu, Yanfeng; Xie, Youhua; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the classical pathway of bile acids synthesis in liver and is crucial for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and α1-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF) are two major transcription factors driving CYP7A1 promoter activity in hepatocytes. Previous researches have shown that Prospero-related homeobox (Prox1) directly interacts with both HNF4α and FTF and potently co-represses CYP7A1 transcription and bile acid synthesis through unidentified mechanisms. In this work, mechanisms involved in Prox1-mediated co-repression were explored by identifying Prox1-associated proteins using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS) methodology. Multiple components of the epigenetically repressive lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, most notably LSD1 and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), were found to be associated with Prox1 and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Prox1 co-localizes with HNF4α, LSD1 and HDAC2 on CYP7A1 promoter in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, by using ChIP assay on HepG2 cells with endogenous Prox1 knocked down by RNA interference, Prox1 was shown to recruit LSD1 and HDAC2 onto CYP7A1 promoter and cause increased H3K4 demethylation. Finally, bile acids treatment of HepG2 cells, which significantly repressed CYP7A1 transcription, resulted in increased Prox1 and LSD1/NuRD complex occupancy on CYP7A1 promoter with a concurrent increase in H3K4 demethylation and H3/H4 deacetylation. These results showed that Prox1 interacts with LSD1 to recruit the repressive LSD1/NuRD complex to CYP7A1 promoter and co-represses transcription through epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, such Prox1-mediated epigenetic repression is involved in the physiologically essential negative feedback

  20. Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1 and recruits the LSD1/NuRD complex to epigenetically co-repress CYP7A1 transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Ouyang

    Full Text Available Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the classical pathway of bile acids synthesis in liver and is crucial for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α and α1-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF are two major transcription factors driving CYP7A1 promoter activity in hepatocytes. Previous researches have shown that Prospero-related homeobox (Prox1 directly interacts with both HNF4α and FTF and potently co-represses CYP7A1 transcription and bile acid synthesis through unidentified mechanisms. In this work, mechanisms involved in Prox1-mediated co-repression were explored by identifying Prox1-associated proteins using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS methodology. Multiple components of the epigenetically repressive lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD complex, most notably LSD1 and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, were found to be associated with Prox1 and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed that Prox1 co-localizes with HNF4α, LSD1 and HDAC2 on CYP7A1 promoter in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, by using ChIP assay on HepG2 cells with endogenous Prox1 knocked down by RNA interference, Prox1 was shown to recruit LSD1 and HDAC2 onto CYP7A1 promoter and cause increased H3K4 demethylation. Finally, bile acids treatment of HepG2 cells, which significantly repressed CYP7A1 transcription, resulted in increased Prox1 and LSD1/NuRD complex occupancy on CYP7A1 promoter with a concurrent increase in H3K4 demethylation and H3/H4 deacetylation. These results showed that Prox1 interacts with LSD1 to recruit the repressive LSD1/NuRD complex to CYP7A1 promoter and co-represses transcription through epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, such Prox1-mediated epigenetic repression is involved in the physiologically essential negative

  1. Rice stripe tenuivirus p2 may recruit or manipulate nucleolar functions through an interaction with fibrillarin to promote virus systemic movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Luping; Du, Zhenguo; Lin, Chen; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wu, Kangcheng; Wu, Jianguo; Wei, Taiyun; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2015-12-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) is the type species of the genus Tenuivirus and represents a major viral pathogen affecting rice production in East Asia. In this study, RSV p2 was fused to yellow fluorescent protein (p2-YFP) and expressed in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. p2-YFP fluorescence was found to move to the nucleolus initially, but to leave the nucleolus for the cytoplasm forming numerous distinct bright spots there at later time points. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay showed that p2 interacted with fibrillarin and that the interaction occurred in the nucleus. Both the nucleolar localization and cytoplasmic distribution of p2-YFP fluorescence were affected in fibrillarin-silenced N. benthamiana. Fibrillarin depletion abolished the systemic movement of RSV, but not that of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method was used to diminish RSV NS2 (encoding p2) or NS3 (encoding p3) during RSV infection. Silencing of NS3 alleviated symptom severity and reduced RSV accumulation, but had no obvious effects on virus movement and the timing of symptom development. However, silencing of NS2 abolished the systemic movement of RSV. The possibility that RSV p2 may recruit or manipulate nucleolar functions to promote virus systemic infection is discussed.

  2. Schizosaccharomyces pombe centromere protein Mis19 links Mis16 and Mis18 to recruit CENP-A through interacting with NMD factors and the SWI/SNF complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Ebe, Masahiro; Nagao, Koji; Kokubu, Aya; Sajiki, Kenichi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-07-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific variant of histone H3 that is required for accurate chromosome segregation. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian Mis16 and Mis18 form a complex essential for CENP-A recruitment to centromeres. It is unclear, however, how the Mis16-Mis18 complex achieves this function. Here, we identified, by mass spectrometry, novel fission yeast centromere proteins Mis19 and Mis20 that directly interact with Mis16 and Mis18. Like Mis18, Mis19 and Mis20 are localized at the centromeres during interphase, but not in mitosis. Inactivation of Mis19 in a newly isolated temperature-sensitive mutant resulted in CENP-A delocalization and massive chromosome missegregation, whereas Mis20 was dispensable for proper chromosome segregation. Mis19 might be a bridge component for Mis16 and Mis18. We isolated extragenic suppressor mutants for temperature-sensitive mis18 and mis19 mutants and used whole-genome sequencing to determine the mutated sites. We identified two groups of loss-of-function suppressor mutations in non-sense-mediated mRNA decay factors (upf2 and ebs1), and in SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling components (snf5, snf22 and sol1). Our results suggest that the Mis16-Mis18-Mis19-Mis20 CENP-A-recruiting complex, which is functional in the G1-S phase, may be counteracted by the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and non-sense-mediated mRNA decay, which may prevent CENP-A deposition at the centromere.

  3. Piezoelectric resonance enhanced microwave and optoelectronic interactive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert

    Electro-optic (EO) devices that modulate optical signals by electric fields are an integrative part of the photonics industry and device optimization is an important area of research. As applications move to large bandwidth and higher frequency, low electro-optic effects and the requirement for large dimension become restrictive for microwave-optical devices. Both experimental and computational evaluations indicate that strain and polarization distribution have a significant impact on electromagnetic wave propagation resulting from a resonant structure; however, no systematic study or fundamental understandings are available. This dissertation research has been carried out to study and further develop the subject of piezoelectric resonance enhanced electro-acoustic-optic process, in order to improve the sensitivity and efficiency of electro-optic sensors and to explore novel applications. Many finite element models have been constructed for evaluating the mechanisms of the phenomena and the effectiveness of the device structure. The enhancement in transmission is found to be directly related to the strain-coupled local polarization. At piezoelectric resonance oscillating dipoles or local polarizations become periodic in the material and have the greatest impact on transmission. Results suggest that the induced charge distribution by a piezoelectric material at certain resonant frequencies is effective for aiding or impeding the transmission of a propagating wave. The behavior of both piezoelectric-defined (or intrinsic piezoelectric materials) and engineered periodic structures are reported. The piezoelectric response of the surface displacement of samples is investigated using an ultra-high frequency laser Doppler vibrometer. A two dimensional view of the surface is obtained and the surface displacement, velocity and acceleration are compared to the electro-optic response under the resonant condition. A study of the acousto-optic (AO) effect in a family of oxide

  4. Enhanced Quantum Reflection of Ultracold Atoms with Strong Interatomic Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the reflection probability for ultracold alkali atoms incident on a solid surface. By considering the interatomic interaction and using the WKB method, it is shown that the repulsive interaction between atoms has the effect of increasing the reflection probability. The increasing amplitude is related with the interatomic interaction and the depth of atom-surface potential. In addition, we also perform a numerical calculation to testify the effect of the interatomic interaction, and the analytic result is proven by the numerical result.

  5. Enhancing the Social Interaction Skills of Preschoolers with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Allura, Tana

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 9 preschool children with visual impairments found that following a cooperative learning strategy intervention in an integrated preschool, the children with visual impairments interacted with peers at levels comparable to those of sighted children, while those in the self-contained class maintained the same rate of interactions.…

  6. Improving healthcare recruitment: the jupiter medical center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uomo, Paul Dell; Schwieters, Jill

    2009-04-01

    Hospitals that want to improve their recruitment efforts should: Make recruitment a priority within the organization. Take steps to reduce high vacancy rates and turnover among first-year employees. Develop a recruitment marketing plan for key positions. Establish human resources metrics to track costs and effectiveness of recruiting efforts. Enhance the recruitment process for hiring managers and job candidates.

  7. Enhancing detailed haptic relief for real-time interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Theoktisto, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The present document exposes a different approach for haptic rendering, defined as the simulation of force interactions to reproduce the sensation of surface relief in dense models. Current research shows open issues in timely haptic interaction involving large meshes, with several problems affecting performance and fidelity, and without a dominant technique to treat these issues properly. Relying in pure geometric collisions when rendering highly dense mesh models (hundreds of thousands ...

  8. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  9. Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain triggers necrotic lung pathology associated with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils in resistant C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fabrício M.; Ventura, Thatiana L. B.; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Ribeiro, Simone C. M.; Calixto, Sanderson D.; Manhães, Marcelle R.; Rezende, Andreza L.; Souzal, Giliane S.; de Carvalho, Igor S.; Silva, Elisangela C.; da Silva, Juliana Azevedo; Carvalho, Eulógio C. Q.; Kritski, Afranio L.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that in most cases induces irreversible necrosis of lung tissue as a result of excessive inflammatory reactions. The murine model of TB in resistant C57BL/6 mice infected with reference Mtb strains is widely used in TB studies; however, these mice do not show a necrotic pathology, which restricts their use in studies of irreversible tissue damage. Recently, we demonstrated that necrotic lung lesions could be induced in the C57BL/6 mice by highly virulent Mtb strains belonging to the modern Beijing sublineage. However, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to necrosis in this model were not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of lung lesions in mice infected with highly virulent Beijing Mtb strain M299, compared with those infected with laboratory Mtb strain H37Rv. The data demonstrate that necrotic lung lesions in mice infected by the strain M299 were associated with enhanced recruitment of myeloid cells, especially neutrophils, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, consistent with exacerbated inflammation. High levels of IFN-γ production contributed to the control of bacterial growth. Further progression to chronic disease was associated with a reduction in the levels of inflammatory mediators in the lungs, the accumulation of foamy macrophages and partial healing of the necrotic tissue by fibrosis. At a late stage of disease, degradation of foamy cells resulted in the liberation of accumulated lipids and persisting bacilli and further activation of inflammation, which promoted lung consolidation. Overall, our studies show that C57BL/6 mice infected with highly virulent Mtb strain may serve as a TB model reproducing an exacerbated inflammatory response in a resistant host to hypervirulent mycobacteria, leading to irreversible necrotic lung lesions. PMID:28306733

  10. Barriers and opportunities for enhancing patient recruitment and retention in clinical research: findings from an interview study in an NHS academic health science centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mary; Caffrey, Louise; McKevitt, Christopher

    2015-03-12

    In the UK, the recruitment of patients into clinical research is a national health research and development policy priority. There has been limited investigation of how national level factors operate as barriers or facilitators to recruitment work, particularly from the perspective of staff undertaking patient recruitment work. The aim of this study is to identify and examine staff views of the key organisational barriers and facilitators to patient recruitment work in one clinical research group located in an NHS Academic Health Science Centre. A qualitative study utilizing in-depth, one-to-one semi-structured interviews with 11 purposively selected staff with particular responsibilities to recruit and retain patients as clinical research subjects. Thematic analysis classified interview data by recurring themes, concepts, and emergent categories for the purposes of establishing explanatory accounts. The findings highlight four key factors that staff perceived to be most significant for the successful recruitment and retention of patients in research and identify how staff located these factors within patients, studies, the research centre, the trust, and beyond the trust. Firstly, competition for research participants at an organisational and national level was perceived to undermine recruitment success. Secondly, the tension between clinical and clinical research workloads was seen to interrupt patient recruitment into studies, despite national funding arrangements to manage excess treatment costs. Thirdly, staff perceived an imbalance between personal patient burden and benefit. Ethical committee regulation, designed to protect patients, was perceived by some staff to detract from clarification and systematisation of incentivisation strategies. Finally, the structure and relationships within clinical research teams, in particular the low tacit status of recruitment skills, was seen as influential. The results of this case-study, conducted in an exemplary NHS

  11. Teaching Strategies for Enhancing Peer Interaction among Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Helena Hing Wa

    2012-01-01

    Hong Kong's universities have been attracting non-local students to diversify the overall student mix and enhance internationalism in higher education. Mainland Chinese students have become the largest non-local student source in this Western-style higher education sector. The diversity of student body together with the promotion of multicultural…

  12. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Enhanced Light-Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong

    the spontaneous emission of emitters by exciting plasmonic modes. An enhancement of photoemission up to 30 times is observed, leading to a 4 times broader emission spectrum. Next, we mainly discuss the LMIs in metal-graphene hybrid plasmonic structures. We introduce two novel hybrid systems for studying light...

  13. Enhanced compressibility due to repulsive interaction in the Harper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Yaacov E.; Zilberberg, Oded; Berkovits, Richard

    2014-04-01

    We study the interplay between a repulsive interaction and an almost staggered on-site potential in one dimension. Specifically, we address the Harper model for spinless fermions with nearest-neighbor repulsion, close to half filling. Using the density matrix renormalization group, we find that, in contrast to standard behavior, the system becomes more compressible as the repulsive interaction is increased. By deriving a low-energy effective model, we unveil the effect of interactions using mean-field analysis: The density of a narrow band around half filling is anticorrelated with the on-site potential, whereas the density of lower occupied bands follows the potential and strengthens it. As a result, the states around half filling are squeezed by the background density, their band becomes flatter, and the compressibility increases.

  14. "Is Your Man Stepping Out?" An Online Pilot Study to Evaluate Acceptability of a Guide-Enhanced HIV Prevention Soap Opera Video Series and Feasibility of Recruitment by Facebook Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide-Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook ads targeted high-HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook ads generated 230 screening interviews: 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week, compared to seven per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices.

  15. Interactive Training Model: Enhancing Beginning Counseling Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, Derrick A.; Minton, Casey A. Barrio; Kern, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose the Interactive Training Model (ITM), a full classroom role play experience, as a method for helping student counselors develop essential interviewing and counseling skills and self-awareness as required by the 2009 Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs "Standards." This pre-post,…

  16. Learning through Multimedia: Speech Recognition Enhancing Accessibility and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Lectures can present barriers to learning for many students and although online multimedia materials have become technically easier to create and offer many benefits for learning and teaching, they can be difficult to access, manage, and exploit. This article considers how research on interacting with multimedia can inform developments in using…

  17. Father-Infant Interactions Are Enhanced by Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Christy; Field, Tiffany; Escalona, Angelica; Hartshorn, Kristin

    2000-01-01

    Examined the impact of fathers giving massages to their infants, ages 3 to 14 months, for 15 minutes prior to their daily bedtime for 1 month. Found that fathers who had massaged their infants were more expressive and showed more enjoyment and more warmth during floor-play interactions with their infants than did fathers in the wait-list control…

  18. The Development and Implementation of Career Information and Guidance Systems to Enhance Recruitment and Retention of ROTC Cadets for Army Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    recruitment efforts using both pencil and paper testing and physiological measurement technology to examine experimentally manipulated variables such as type...Testing of Recruitment Programs Prior to Large-Scale Iiplementation With current paper and pencil testing and physiological measurement technology, it is...eight years while holding another job. another job. Very Mocrately Netter Moderately Very VoY Mod6.ly Nedhwr &oWo rfiny V" Urnesiabi. Urnaesaole

  19. ANSIBLE: A Network of Social Interactions for Bilateral Life Enhancement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ANSIBLE (A Network of Social Interactions for Bilateral Life Enhancement) can be used pre, during, and post flight to connect the flight crew with their family,...

  20. Developing Students’ EFL Writing Skills by Enhancing their Oral Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Al-Roomy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between composition exercises and oral interaction amongst Saudi university students while working in groups, with a particular focus on the methods that develop writing skills. The participants, 50 in all, were Saudi university EFL first year students belonging to three different groups according to their English proficiency. The data came from two research instruments: 1 written responses to open-ended questions regarding students’ experiences and attitudes towards writing, and 2 transcripts of audiotaped interactions between students. The findings suggested that integrating writing and oral interaction enabled students to realize the way writing works, and that there are, in the first place, many different strategies available to aid in the process of composition. Students were able to look at the process of writing more comprehensively rather than focusing on particular points of grammar, spelling, or punctuation. In addition to this, by building on the structure of group work, students acquired interpersonal skills vital for learning: listening, speaking, personal organization, and providing constructive feedback. Teachers should note some problems associated with oral discussions, including the quality of discussion, the time consumed in talking, and intermittent lapses into the mother tongue. This study concludes with some implications for pedagogy and further study.

  1. Vector interaction enhanced bag model for astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klahn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For quark matter studies in astrophysics the thermodynamic bag model (tdBAG) has been widely used. Despite its success it fails to account for various phenomena expected from Quantum-Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). We suggest a straightforward extension of tdBAG in order to take the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry and the influence of vector interactions explicitly into account. As for tdBAG the model mimics confinement in a phenomenological approach. It is based on an analysis of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model at finite density. Furthermore, we demonstrate how NJL and bag models in this regime follow from the more general and QCD based framework of Dyson-Schwinger (DS) equations in medium by assuming a simple gluon contact interaction. Based on our simple and novel model, we construct quark hadron hybrid equations of state (EoS) and study systematically chiral and deconfinement phase transitions, the appearance of $s$-quarks and the role of vector interaction. We further study these aspects for matter in b...

  2. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ashish Kadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. Objective: To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. Methods: We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Results: Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%, lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%, and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%. About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%, and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6% would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6% would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject′s fear for study procedures (47% and side effects (44% were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Conclusion: Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India.

  3. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Rashmi Ashish; Borde, Sanghratna Umakant; Madas, Sapna Amol; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Limaye, Sneha Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%), lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%), and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%). About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%), and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject's fear for study procedures (47%) and side effects (44%) were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India.

  4. Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: a model of tumor-host interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Scarlett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are characterised by extensive stellate cell mediated fibrosis, and current therapeutic development includes targeting pancreatic cancer stroma and tumor-host interactions. Recent evidence has suggested that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDC contribute to solid organs. We aimed to define the role of circulating haematopoietic cells in the normal and diseased pancreas. METHODS: Whole bone marrow was harvested from male β-actin-EGFP donor mice and transplanted into irradiated female recipient C57/BL6 mice. Chronic pancreatitis was induced with repeat injections of caerulein, while carcinogenesis was induced with an intrapancreatic injection of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA. Phenotype of engrafted donor-derived cells within the pancreas was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: GFP positive cells were visible in the exocrine pancreatic epithelia from 3 months post transplantation. These exhibited acinar morphology and were positive for amylase and peanut agglutinin. Mice administered caerulein developed chronic pancreatitis while DMBA mice exhibited precursor lesions and pancreatic cancer. No acinar cells were identified to be donor-derived upon cessation of cerulein treatment, however rare occurrences of bone marrow-derived acinar cells were observed during pancreatic regeneration. Increased recruitment of BMDC was observed within the desmoplastic stroma, contributing to the activated pancreatic stellate cell (PaSC population in both diseases. Expression of stellate cell markers CELSR3, PBX1 and GFAP was observed in BMD cancer-associated PaSCs, however cancer-associated, but not pancreatitis-associated BMD PaSCs, expressed the cancer PaSC specific marker CELSR3. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that BMDC can incorporate into the pancreas and adopt the differentiated state of the exocrine compartment. BMDC that

  5. Strategy-Enhanced Interactive Proving and Arithmetic Simplification for PVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    diVito, Ben L.

    2003-01-01

    We describe an approach to strategy-based proving for improved interactive deduction in specialized domains. An experimental package of strategies (tactics) and support functions called Manip has been developed for PVS to reduce the tedium of arithmetic manipulation. Included are strategies aimed at algebraic simplification of real-valued expressions. A general deduction architecture is described in which domain-specific strategies, such as those for algebraic manipulation, are supported by more generic features, such as term-access techniques applicable in arbitrary settings. An extended expression language provides access to subterms within a sequent.

  6. Do work relationships matter? Characteristics of workplace interactions that enhance or detract from employee perceptions of well-being and health behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Karen; Storberg-Walker, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study adopted the position that health and health behaviors are complex social constructs influenced by multiple factors. Framed by the social ecological model, the study explored how work interactions enhanced or detracted from the perceptions of well-being and health behaviors. Despite the fact that previous studies indicated that the social workplace environment contributed to employee health, there was little information regarding the characteristics. Specifically, little was known about how employees perceived the connections between workplace interactions and health, or how social interactions enhanced or detracted from well-being and health behaviors. The participants included 19 volunteers recruited from four companies, who shared their experiences of workplace interactions through interviews and journaling assignments. The findings indicated that feelings of well-being were enhanced by work interactions, which were trusting, collaborative, and positive, as well as when participants felt valued and respected. The study also found that interactions detracted from well-being and health behaviors when interactions lacked the aforementioned characteristics, and also included lack of justice and empathy. The enhancing and detracting relationships generated physical symptoms, and influenced sleeping and eating patterns, socializing, exercise, personal relations, careers, and energy. Surprisingly, the study found that regardless of how broadly participants defined health, when they were asked to rate their health, participants uniformly rated theirs on physical attributes alone. The exclusive consideration of physical attributes suggests that participants may have unconsciously adopted the typical western medical view of health – an individually determined and physiologic characteristic. Despite research suggesting health is more than biology, and despite defining health broadly, participants uniformly adopted this traditional view. The

  7. Nanoscale chemical interaction enhances the physical properties of bioglass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravarian, Roya; Zhong, Xia; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Murphy, Ciara M; Schindeler, Aaron; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Dehghani, Fariba

    2013-10-22

    Bioglasses are favorable biomaterials for bone tissue engineering; however, their applications are limited due to their brittleness. In addition, the early failure in the interface is a common problem of composites of bioglass and a polymer with high mechanical strength. This effect is due to the phase separation, nonhomogeneous mixture, nonuniform mechanical strength, and different degradation properties of two compounds. To address these issues, in this study a nanoscale interaction between poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and bioactive glass was formed via silane coupling agent (3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPMA). A monolith was produced at optimum composition from this hybrid by the sol-gel method at 50 °C with a rapid gelation time (hybrid. The in vivo studies in mice demonstrated that the integrity of the hybrids was maintained in subcutaneous implantation. They induced mainly a mononuclear phagocytic tissue reaction with a low level of inflammation, while bioglass provoked a tissue reaction with TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells. These results demonstrated that the presence of a nanoscale interaction between bioglass and PMMA affects the properties of bioglass and broadens its potential applications for bone replacement.

  8. Investigation of the interaction of polyamidoamine dendrimers with nicotinic acid as solubility enhancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective Polyamidoamine(PAMAM) dendrimers enhance the solubility of nicotinic acid. Methods PAMAM dendrimers of generation 1 to 6 were prepared and the effect of pH and concentration of the dendrimers on the solubility enhancement of nicotinic acid was investigated. Results The pH and concentration of the dendrimers influence the solubility enhancement of nicotinic acid. Conclusions Electrostatic interaction between the carboxyl group of the nicotinic acid and the amine groups of the dendrimers is involved.

  9. Plant-microbes interactions in enhanced fertilizer-use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesemoye, Anthony O; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2009-11-01

    The continued use of chemical fertilizers and manures for enhanced soil fertility and crop productivity often results in unexpected harmful environmental effects, including leaching of nitrate into ground water, surface run-off of phosphorus and nitrogen run-off, and eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. Integrated nutrient management systems are needed to maintain agricultural productivity and protect the environment. Microbial inoculants are promising components of such management systems. This review is a critical summary of the efforts in using microbial inoculants, including plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for increasing the use efficiency of fertilizers. Studies with microbial inoculants and nutrients have demonstrated that some inoculants can improve plant uptake of nutrients and thereby increase the use efficiency of applied chemical fertilizers and manures. These proofs of concept studies will serve as the basis for vigorous future research into integrated nutrient management in agriculture.

  10. Regimes of enhanced electromagnetic emission in beam-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V.; Arzhannikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The ways to improve the efficiency of electromagnetic waves generation in laboratory experiments with high-current relativistic electron beams injected into a magnetized plasma are discussed. It is known that such a beam can lose, in a plasma, a significant part of its energy by exciting a high level of turbulence and heating plasma electrons. Beam-excited plasma oscillations may simultaneously participate in nonlinear processes resulting in a fundamental and second harmonic emissions. It is obvious, however, that in the developed plasma turbulence the role of these emissions in the total energy balance is always negligible. In this paper, we investigate whether electromagnetic radiation generated in the beam-plasma system can be sufficiently enhanced by the direct linear conversion of resonant beam-driven modes into electromagnetic ones on preformed regular inhomogeneities of plasma density. Due to the high power of relativistic electron beams, the mechanism discussed may become the basis for the generator of powerful sub-terahertz radiation.

  11. Regimes of enhanced electromagnetic emission in beam-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V.; Arzhannikov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The ways to improve the efficiency of electromagnetic waves generation in laboratory experiments with high-current relativistic electron beams injected into a magnetized plasma are discussed. It is known that such a beam can lose, in a plasma, a significant part of its energy by exciting a high level of turbulence and heating plasma electrons. Beam-excited plasma oscillations may simultaneously participate in nonlinear processes resulting in a fundamental and second harmonic emissions. It is obvious, however, that in the developed plasma turbulence the role of these emissions in the total energy balance is always negligible. In this paper, we investigate whether electromagnetic radiation generated in the beam-plasma system can be sufficiently enhanced by the direct linear conversion of resonant beam-driven modes into electromagnetic ones on preformed regular inhomogeneities of plasma density. Due to the high power of relativistic electron beams, the mechanism discussed may become the basis for the generator of powerful sub-terahertz radiation.

  12. Technology-Enhanced Storytelling Stimulating Parent-Child Interaction and Preschool Children's Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teepe, R. C.; Molenaar, I.; Verhoeven, L.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool children's vocabulary mainly develops verbal through interaction. Therefore, the technology-enhanced storytelling (TES) activity Jeffy's Journey is developed to support parent-child interaction and vocabulary in preschool children. TES entails shared verbal storytelling supported by a story structure and real-time visual, auditory and…

  13. Interactive 3D audio: Enhancing awareness of details in immersive soundscapes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Schwartz, Stephen; Larsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Spatial audio and the possibility of interacting with the audio environment is thought to increase listeners' attention to details in a soundscape. This work examines if interactive 3D audio enhances listeners' ability to recall details in a soundscape. Nine different soundscapes were constructed...

  14. In search of the determinants of enhancer-promoter interaction specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Arensbergen, Joris; van Steensel, Bas; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2014-11-01

    Although it was originally believed that enhancers activate only the nearest promoter, recent global analyses enabled by high-throughput technology suggest that the network of enhancer-promoter interactions is far more complex. The mechanisms that determine the specificity of enhancer-promoter interactions are still poorly understood, but they are thought to include biochemical compatibility, constraints imposed by the three-dimensional architecture of chromosomes, insulator elements, and possibly the effects of local chromatin composition. In this review, we assess the current insights into these determinants, and highlight the functional genomic approaches that will lead the way towards better mechanistic understanding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Collaborative interactions to enhance gas binding energy in porous metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rui-Biao; Chen, Banglin

    2017-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are potentially useful materials for hydrogen and methane storage. However, the weak interactions between the MOF host and gas guest molecules have limited their storage capacities at elevated temperatures. In this issue, Alkordi et al. [IUCrJ (2017), 4, 131-135] illustrate an example of a porous MOF with a suitable pore size and unique pore surface for enhanced interaction with hydrogen molecules, providing the promise of further increasing the gas binding affinity through collaborative interactions.

  16. Characterization of genome-wide enhancer-promoter interactions reveals co-expression of interacting genes and modes of higher order chromatin organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iouri Chepelev; Gang Wei; Dara Wangsa; Qingsong Tang; Keji Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Recent epigenomic studies have predicted thousands of potential enhancers in the human genome.However,there has not been systematic characterization of target promoters for these potential enhancers.Using H3K4me2 as a mark for active enhancers,we identified genome-wide EP interactions in human CD4+ T cells.Among the 6 520 longdistance chromatin interactions,we identify 2 067 enhancers that interact with 1 619 promoters and enhance their expression.These enhancers exist in accessible chromatin regions and are associated with various histone modifications and polymerase Ⅱ binding.The promoters with interacting enhancers are expressed at higher levels than those without interacting enhancers,and their expression levels are positively correlated with the number of interacting enhancers.Interestingly,interacting promoters are co-expressed in a tissue-specific manner.We also find that chromosomes are organized into multiple levels of interacting domains.Our results define a global view of EP interactions and provide a data set to further understand mechanisms of enhancer targeting and long-range chromatin organization.The Gene Expression Omnibus accession number for the raw and analyzed chromatin interaction data is GSE32677.

  17. Enhancing the geometric quantum discord in the Heisenberg XX chain by Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jia-Min, E-mail: jmgong@yeah.net [School of Electronic Engineering, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China); Tang, Qi [School of Electronic Engineering, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China); Sun, Yu-Hang [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China); Qiao, Lin [School of Electronic Engineering, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China)

    2015-03-15

    We studied the trace distance, the Hellinger distance, and the Bures distance geometric quantum discords (GQDs) for a two-spin Heisenberg XX chain with the Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya (DM) interaction and the external magnetic fields. We found that considerable enhancement of the GQDs can be achieved by introducing the DM interaction, and their maxima were obtained when the strength of the DM interaction approaches infinity. The external magnetic fields and the increase of the temperature can also enhance the GQDs to some extent during certain specific parameter regions.

  18. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles the reso......In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  19. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Artiola, Janick F.; Maier, Raina M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  20. Kin interaction enhances morphine analgesia in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, F R

    1998-07-01

    The additive effect of social and pharmacological treatments was evaluated in pairs of male mice. Ineffective and effective doses of morphine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested on pain threshold in dyads of males at different times after pair formation and drug treatment. During the second hour of social interaction after reunion, saline-injected adult sibling male mice showed a decrease in nociception as measured by the tail-flick test. Pairs of unrelated, unfamiliar control mice showed no changes in pain sensitivity during a 2-h social session. An ineffective dose of 2.5 mg/kg of morphine in non-sibling males, significantly increased tail-flick latencies in sibling pairs, before the effect of the social environment (sibling) reached statistical significance. The higher dose of morphine (5.0 mg/kg) produced analgesia in sibling as well as in non-sibling males, but the effect in the latter disappeared 60 min after drug treatment, whereas siblings were still analgesic. These results indicate that an ineffective dose of morphine, combined with the activation of the endogenous opioid system by social factors, can affect nociception.

  1. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation and decision-making, and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with contaminated sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites.

  2. "Help Me Pull That Cursor" A Collaborative Interactive Floor Enhancing Community Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Krogh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the development, experiments and evaluation of the iFloor, an interactive floor prototype installed at the local central municipality library. The primary purpose of the iFloor prototype is to support and stimulate community interaction between collocated people. The context of the library demands that any user can walk up and use the prototype without any devices or prior introduction. To achieve this, the iFloor proposes innovative interaction (modes/paradigms/patterns for floor surfaces through the means of video tracking. Browsing and selecting content is done in a collaborative process and mobile phones are used for posting messages onto the floor. The iFloor highlights topics on social issues of ubiquitous computing environments in public spaces, and provides an example of how to exploit human spatial movements, positions and arrangements in interaction with computers.

  3. USAR recruiting success factors

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, George W.; Kocher, Kathryn M.; Gandolfo, Robin Ragsdale

    1987-01-01

    This study attempts to identify attributes associated with successful recruiters, to evaluate existing data on recruiter performance and characteristics, and to develop a model to aid in the selection of personnel who are likely to become successful recruiters. Conventional multivariate statistical techniques have not proved adequate in identifying successful recruiters, largely because of the absence of reliable and valid measures of recruiter success. This study applies a relatively new met...

  4. RECRUITMENT AND RECRUITMENT MODELS IN FISHERY SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merica Slišković

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Recruitment and growth of individuals bring the most to enlargement of fish stock biomass. Recruitment can be independent on stock size during the development of the fishery, but experience has showed that many fisheries have come to the point when recruitment decreases due to over fishing. Large parental stock does not give large number of juveniles because large number of individuals influences survival of juveniles (competition for food. In period between 1984 and 1987 this phenomenon was recorded in sardine population in the Adriatic Sea, when large biomass of parental stock resulted in twice less recruitment. In the period between 1993 and 2000 there was no significant recruitment of the sardine population in the Adriatic Sea and it reflected on biomass of the sardine. Large recruitment was recorded in 2001 and 2002. There are numerous mathematical models which give relation between stock and recruitment. Beverton–Holt’s and Ricker’s models are usually used. Beverton–Holt’s model assumes that recruitment depends on the density of population. Ricker’s model is based on assumption that all resources are evenly distributed among the individuals; therefore the rise in density causes the exhaustion of resources. This model is suitable for species as the sardine, which migrates in the breeding area.

  5. Membrane Recruitment of the Non-receptor Protein GIV/Girdin (Gα-interacting, Vesicle-associated Protein/Girdin) Is Sufficient for Activating Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; Leyme, Anthony; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Marivin, Arthur; Broselid, Stefan; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-12-30

    GIV (aka Girdin) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates heterotrimeric G protein signaling downstream of RTKs and integrins, thereby serving as a platform for signaling cascade cross-talk. GIV is recruited to the cytoplasmic tail of receptors upon stimulation, but the mechanism of activation of its G protein regulatory function is not well understood. Here we used assays in humanized yeast models and G protein activity biosensors in mammalian cells to investigate the role of GIV subcellular compartmentalization in regulating its ability to promote G protein signaling. We found that in unstimulated cells GIV does not co-fractionate with its substrate G protein Gαi3 on cell membranes and that constitutive membrane anchoring of GIV in yeast cells or rapid membrane translocation in mammalian cells via chemically induced dimerization leads to robust G protein activation. We show that membrane recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif alone is sufficient for G protein activation and that it does not require phosphomodification. Furthermore, we engineered a synthetic protein to show that recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif to membranes via association with active RTKs, instead of via chemically induced dimerization, is also sufficient for G protein activation. These results reveal that recruitment of GIV to membranes in close proximity to its substrate G protein is a major mechanism responsible for the activation of its G protein regulatory function.

  6. Increased learning observed in redesigned introductory biology course that employed web-enhanced, interactive pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Carl N; Lister, Bradford C; Hanna, Michael H; Roy, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Our Introduction to Biology course (BIOL 1010) changed in 2004 from a standard instructor-centered, lecture-homework-exam format to a student-centered format that used Web-enhanced, interactive pedagogy. To measure and compare conceptual learning gains in the traditional course in fall 2003 with a section of the interactive course in fall 2004, we created concept inventories for both evolution and ecology. Both classes were taught by the same instructor who had taught BIOL 1010 since 1976, and each had a similar student composition with comparable biological knowledge. A significant increase in learning gain was observed with the Web-enhanced, interactive pedagogy in evolution (traditional, 0.10; interactive, 0.19; p = 0.024) and ecology (traditional, -0.05; interactive, 0.14; p = 0.000009) when assessment was made unannounced and for no credit in the last week of classes. These results strengthen the case for augmenting or replacing instructor-centered teaching with Web-enhanced, interactive, student-centered teaching. When assessment was made using the final exam in the interactive course, for credit and after studying, significantly greater learning gains were made in evolution (95%, 0.37, p = 0.0001) and ecology (143%, 0.34, p = 0.000003) when compared with learning gains measured without credit or study in the last week of classes.

  7. E-recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna

    2012-01-01

    E-recruitment, also known as online or web-based recruitment, is little discussed in research from an organizational perspective. The purpose of this chapter is therefore to analyze and discuss the process of e-recruitment, its key constituents and organizing principles. In doing so I draw...... on the results of a qualitative study conducted in 2008-2009, and on data stemming from industrial reports, articles from practitioner magazines, and in-depth interviews. The chapter provides a summary of e-recruitment properties and a composite matrix of the overall elements of e-recruitment organizing. E-recruitment...

  8. Enhancing the Jacquez k nearest neighbor test for space-time interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malizia, Nicholas; Mack, Elizabeth A

    2012-09-20

    The Jacquez k nearest neighbor test, originally developed to improve upon shortcomings of existing tests for space-time interaction, has been shown to be a robust and powerful method of detecting interaction. Despite its flexibility and power, however, the test has three main shortcomings: (i) it discards important information regarding the spatial and temporal scales at which the detected interaction takes place; (ii) the results of the test have not been visualized; and (iii) recent research demonstrates the test to be susceptible to population shift bias. This study presents enhancements to the Jacquez k nearest neighbors test with the goal of addressing each of these three shortcomings and of improving the utility of the test. Data on Burkitt's lymphoma cases in Uganda between 1961 and 1975 are used to illustrate the modifications and enhanced visual output of the test. Output from the enhanced test is compared with that provided by alternative tests of space-time interaction. Results show the enhancements presented in this study transform the Jacquez test into a complete, descriptive, and informative metric that can be used as a stand-alone measure of global space-time interaction. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 3D interactive augmented reality-enhanced digital learning systems for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai-Ten; Tseng, Po-Hsuan; Chiu, Pei-Shuan; Yang, Jia-Lin; Chiu, Chun-Jie

    2013-03-01

    With enhanced processing capability of mobile platforms, augmented reality (AR) has been considered a promising technology for achieving enhanced user experiences (UX). Augmented reality is to impose virtual information, e.g., videos and images, onto a live-view digital display. UX on real-world environment via the display can be e ectively enhanced with the adoption of interactive AR technology. Enhancement on UX can be bene cial for digital learning systems. There are existing research works based on AR targeting for the design of e-learning systems. However, none of these work focuses on providing three-dimensional (3-D) object modeling for en- hanced UX based on interactive AR techniques. In this paper, the 3-D interactive augmented reality-enhanced learning (IARL) systems will be proposed to provide enhanced UX for digital learning. The proposed IARL systems consist of two major components, including the markerless pattern recognition (MPR) for 3-D models and velocity-based object tracking (VOT) algorithms. Realistic implementation of proposed IARL system is conducted on Android-based mobile platforms. UX on digital learning can be greatly improved with the adoption of proposed IARL systems.

  10. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  11. E-recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna B.

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, there has been little research on the impact of e-recruitment on the recruitment process as a whole. The present study fills part of this gap by investigating the effect of e-recruitment on the design of the recruitment process. Three explorative case studies were carried out in three...... large organisations in Denmark in 2008-2010. The findings indicate that e-recruitment transforms the traditional recruitment process into a time- and space-independent, collaborative hiring process. The most significant changes are recorded in the sequence and increased divisibility of main recruitment...... tasks and subtasks. For management, the main task is now that of communicating with candidates. In addition, a new on-going task of maintaining a corporate career website has become an integral part of the new recruitment process. The new design is presented in the following, and its implications...

  12. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore......, it was observed that muscle contractions increased muscle perfusion rapidly by 3-4 fold and by 1-2 fold compared to basal and insulin, respectively, in both rat and human skeletal muscle (study I). The real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound method was applied to investigate the vaso-active effect of the incretin...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  13. Interactivity And Mental Arithmetic: Coupling Mind And World Transforms And Enhances Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthrie Lisa G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactivity has been linked to better performance in problem solving, due in part to a more efficient allocation of attentional resources, a better distribution of cognitive load, but perhaps more important by enabling the reasoner to shape and reshape the physical problem presentation to promote the development of the problem solution. Interactivity in solving quotidian arithmetic problems involves gestures, pointing, and the recruitment of artefacts to facilitate computation and augment efficiency. In the experiment reported here, different types of interactivity were examined with a series of mental arithmetic problems. Using a repeated-measures design, participants solved series of five 11-digit sums in four conditions that varied in the type of interactivity: (i no interactivity (participants solved the problems with their hands on the table top, (ii pointing (participants could point at the numbers, (iii pen and paper (participants could note interim totals with a pen, and (iv tokens (the sums were presented as 11 numbered tokens the arrangement of which participants were free to modify as they proceeded to the solution. Performance in the four conditions was measured in terms of accuracy, calculation error, and efficiency (a ratio composed of the proportion correct over the proportion of time invested in working on the sums. These quantitative analyses were supplemented by a detailed qualitative examination of a participant’s actions in the different conditions. The integration of artefacts, such as tokens or a pen, offered reasoners the opportunity to reconfigure the physical presentation of the problem, enacting different arithmetic strategies: the affordance landscape shifts as the problem trajectory is enacted through interactivity, and this generally produced better “mental” arithmetic performance. Participants also felt more positive about and better engaged with the task when they could reconfigure the problem presentation

  14. Uncover the recruiter in you!

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    2013 saw the launch of the one-day training course "Selecting the best person for CERN". So far, 10 courses have taken place and over 100 participants have taken part in this interactive, hands on experience.   The course has been met with much enthusiasm and positive feedback, with participants not only feeling better prepared and organised for the recruitment boards, but also equipped with concrete tools on how to prepare and conduct an effective selection interview. Following on from this success, further sessions are planned in 2014: we look forward to welcoming recruiting supervisors and board members who are likely to take part in a recruitment process, whether for LD or LD2IC, and who are interested in finding out more about how to get the most out of this important process! To enrol to this course, please follow this link: "Selecting the best person for CERN".

  15. Interactive Learning to Stimulate the Brain's Visual Center and to Enhance Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yang H.; Allen, Philip A.; Chaumpanich, Kritsakorn; Xiao, Yingcai

    2014-01-01

    This short paper describes an ongoing NSF-funded project on enhancing science and engineering education using the latest technology. More specifically, the project aims at developing an interactive learning system with Microsoft Kinect™ and Unity3D game engine. This system promotes active, rather than passive, learning by employing embodied…

  16. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  17. Music and Sign Language to Promote Infant and Toddler Communication and Enhance Parent-Child Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Cynthia; Memmott, Jenny; Meeker-Miller, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of using music and/or sign language to promote early communication in infants and toddlers (6-20 months) and to enhance parent-child interactions. Three groups used for this study were pairs of participants (care-giver(s) and child) assigned to each group: 1) Music Alone 2) Sign Language…

  18. The Use of Interactive Whiteboards: Enhancing the Nature of Teaching Young Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannikas, Christina Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Language teaching can be enhanced by effective uses of technology; nonetheless, there are teachers who are reluctant to integrate technology in their practice. The debated issue has resulted in a number of Ministries of Education worldwide, including the Greek Ministry, to support a transition through the introduction of Interactive Whiteboards…

  19. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  20. Enhancing EFL Students' Social Strategy Awareness and Use Through Interactive Learning Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高珍

    2011-01-01

    Based on prior studies and a questionnaire survey,this paper is seeking to demonstrate that interactive activities will facilitate EFL learners' social strategy awareness and use,and thus enhance their linguistic development.A sample lesson plan is also p

  1. Leveraging Computer-Mediated Communication Technologies to Enhance Interactions in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication (CMC) technologies have been an integral part of distance education for many years. They are found in both synchronous and asynchronous platforms and are intended to enhance the learning experience for students. CMC technologies add an interactive element to the online learning environment. The findings from this…

  2. “Is Your Man Stepping Out?” An online pilot study to evaluate acceptability of a guide-enhanced HIV prevention soap opera video series and feasibility of recruitment by Facebook© advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Lacroix, Lorraine J.; Nolte, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Love, Sex, and Choices (LSC) is a 12-episode soap opera video series developed to reduce HIV risk among at-risk Black urban women. We added a video guide commentator to offer insights at critical dramatic moments. An online pilot study evaluated acceptability of the Guide Enhanced LSC (GELSC) and feasibility of Facebook© advertising, streaming to smartphones, and retention. Facebook© ads targeted high HIV-prevalence areas. In 30 days, Facebook© ads generated 230 screening interviews; 84 were high risk, 40 watched GELSC, and 39 followed up at 30 days. Recruitment of high-risk participants was 10 per week compared to 7 per week in previous field recruitment. Half the sample was Black; 12% were Latina. Findings suggest GELSC influenced sex scripts and behaviors. It was feasible to recruit young urban women from a large geographic area via Facebook© and to retain the sample. We extended the reach to at-risk women by streaming to mobile devices. PMID:26066692

  3. The Recruitment Process:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna

    The aim of this research was to determine whether the introduction of e-recruitment has an impact on the process and underlying tasks, subtasks and activities of recruitment. Three large organizations with well-established e-recruitment practices were included in the study. The three case studies......, which were carried out in Denmark in 2008-2009 using qualitative research methods, revealed changes in the sequence, divisibility and repetitiveness of a number of recruitment tasks and subtasks. The new recruitment process design was identified and presented in the paper. The study concluded...

  4. Age of first breeding interacts with pre- and post-recruitment experience in shaping breeding phenology in a long-lived gull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Davy S; Vercruijsse, Harry J P; Stienen, Eric W M; Vincx, Magda; Lens, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Individual variation in timing of breeding is a key factor affecting adaptation to environmental change, yet our basic understanding of the causes of such individual variation is incomplete. This study tests several hypotheses for age-related variation in the breeding timing of Lesser Black-backed Gulls, based on a 13 year longitudinal data set that allows to decouple effects of age, previous prospecting behavior, and years of breeding experience on arrival timing at the colony. At the population level, age of first breeding was significantly associated with timing of arrival and survival, i.e. individuals tended to arrive later if they postponed their recruitment, and individuals recruiting at the age of 4 years survived best. However, up to 81% of the temporal variation in arrival dates was explained by within-individual effects. When excluding the pre-recruitment period, the effect of increasing age on advanced arrival was estimated at 11 days, with prior breeding experience accounting for a 7 days advance and postponed breeding for a 4 days delay. Overall, results of this study show that delayed age of first breeding can serve to advance arrival date (days after December 1(st)) in successive breeding seasons throughout an individual's lifetime, in large part due to the benefits of learning or experience gained during prospecting. However, prospecting and the associated delay in breeding also bear a survival cost, possibly because prospectors have been forced to delay through competition with breeders. More generally, results of this study set the stage for exploring integrated temporal shifts in phenology, resource allocation and reproductive strategies during individual lifecycles of long-lived migratory species.

  5. Interaction Enhanced Imaging of Rydberg P states. Preparation and detection of Rydberg atoms for engineering long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavryusev, Vladislav; Ferreira-Cao, Miguel; Kekić, Armin; Zürn, Gerhard; Signoles, Adrien

    2016-12-01

    The Interaction Enhanced Imaging technique allows to detect the spatial distribution of strongly interacting impurities embedded within a gas of background atoms used as a contrast medium [1]. Here we present a detailed study of this technique, applied to detect Rydberg P states. We experimentally realize fast and efficient three-photon excitation of P states, optimized according to the results of a theoretical effective two-level model. Few Rydberg P-state atoms, prepared in a small cloud with dimensions comparable to the blockade radius, are detected with a good sensitivity by averaging over 50 shots. The main aspects of the technique are described with a hard-sphere model, finding good agreement with experimental data. This work paves the way to a non-destructive optical detection of single Rydberg atoms with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  6. Enhancement of carotenoid-to-chlorophyll singlet energy transfer by carotenoid-carotenoid interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdo, J; Fernández-Cabrera, C; Ramírez, J M

    1992-06-01

    The apparent quantum yield of singlet-singlet spirilloxanthin-to-bacteriochlorophyll a energy transfer increases linearly with the residual spirilloxanthin content in Rhodospirillum rubrum membrane vesicles from which this carotenoid has been partially removed. Since it has been previously shown that carotenoid-carotenoid interaction is a linear function of the residual spirilloxanthin level in the major pigment-protein complex of those vesicles (Zurdo, J., R. M. Lozano, C. Fernandez-Cabrera, and J. M. Ramirez. 1991. Biochem. J. 274:881-884), it appears that such degenerate interaction enhances singlet energy transfer. Part of the enhancement may be explained if the energy donor is the spirilloxanthin 1Bu----1Ag (S2----S0) transition, because exciton coupling probably brings its energy closer to that of the Qx (S2----S0) transition of bacteriochlorophyll. In contrast, it seems that the possible stabilization of the spirilloxanthin 2Ag (S1) state would hardly improve energy transfer, because this hidden state probably lies below the S1 bacteriochlorophyll state. In any case, the stabilizing effects of carotenoid-carotenoid interactions seem insufficient to explain the enhancement of energy transfer. Direct or indirect effects of carotenoid dimerization on the three-dimensional structure of the pigment cluster appear to be required to account for such enhancement.

  7. Interaction Design Beyond the Product : Creating Technology-Enhanced Activity Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptelinin, Victor; Bannon, Liam J.

    2012-01-01

    The field of interaction design to date has been predominantly concerned with designing products, that is, devices, systems, and more recently services. A growing body of theoretical and empirical analyses suggests that the scope of interaction design needs to be expanded: An explicit concern...... of the field should include not only helping designers create better products but also helping people themselves create better environments for their work, learning, and leisure activities. In this article we argue that expanding the scope of interaction design beyond products requires a revision of some...... between intrinsic and extrinsic technology-enabled practice transformation, and foreground the need for interaction design research and practice to more directly deal with analysis and construction of technology-enhanced activity spaces. The implications of these notions for the research agenda...

  8. Inducible DNA - protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hromas, R.; Pauli, U.; Marcuzzi, A.; Lafrenz, D.; Nick, H.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.; Ness, B.V.

    1988-02-11

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expressions of the gene. The authors have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. They have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full, protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. They have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. They demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin they also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer.

  9. Inducible DNA-protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Pauli, U; Marcuzzi, A; Lafrenz, D; Nick, H; Stein, J; Stein, G; Van Ness, B

    1988-01-01

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expression of the gene. We have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. We have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. We have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. We demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin we also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer. Images PMID:2830597

  10. Enhanced optoelastic interaction range in liquid crystals with negative dielectric anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoni, F.; Lalli, S.; Lucchetti, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Ingegneria della Materia, dell' Ambiente ed Urbanistica and CNISM, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona (Italy); Criante, L. [Center for Nano Science and Technology-PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Brasselet, E. [Univ. Bordeaux and CNRS, Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d' Aquitaine, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2014-01-06

    We demonstrate that the long-range interaction between surface-functionalized microparticles immersed a nematic liquid crystal—a “nematic colloid”—and a laser-induced “ghost colloid” can be enhanced by a low-voltage quasistatic electric field when the nematic mesophase has a negative dielectric anisotropy. The optoelastic trapping distance is shown to be enhanced by a factor up to 2.5 in presence of an electric field. Experimental data are quantitatively described with a theoretical model accounting for the spatial overlap between the orientational distortions around the microparticle and those induced by the trapping light beam itself.

  11. Promoting Active Learning in Calculus and General Physics through Interactive and Media-Enhanced Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Tang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an approach of incorporating interactive and media-enhanced lectures to promote active learning in Calculus and General Physics courses. The pedagogical practice of using interactive techniques in lectures to require "heads-on" and "hands-on" learning, and involve students more as active participants than passive receivers is a part of academic curricular reform efforts undertaken currently by the mathematics, physics and chemistry departments at North Carolina A&T State University under the NSF funded project "Talent-21: Gateway for Advancing Science and Mathematics Talents."

  12. Promoting Active Learning in Calculus and General Physics through Interactive and Media-Enhanced Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Tang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an approach of incorporating interactive and media-enhanced lectures to promote active learning in Calculus and General Physics courses. The pedagogical practice of using interactive techniques in lectures to require "heads-on" and "hands-on" learning, and involve students more as active participants than passive receivers is a part of academic curricular reform efforts undertaken currently by the mathematics, physics and chemistry departments at North Carolina A&T State University under the NSF funded project "Talent-21: Gateway for Advancing Science and Mathematics Talents."

  13. Development of an interactive module to enhance and understand cavity navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Newball, Andrés A; Roviello, Franco; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Herrera, Francisco J; Marin, Cesar A

    2007-01-01

    The Interactive Module for Cavity Navigation (IMCA) was created in order to enhance the Web Environment for Surgical Skills Training in Otolaryngology (WESST--OT); later, it was found that it could be used as an independent module which allowed the practice of path navigation in any medical cavity, and its potential use with patients was evidenced. This paper describes the making of IMCA and the potential use of genetic algorithms in path generation.

  14. Enhancement of mobility in an interacting colloidal system under feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernert, Robert; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-08-01

    Feedback control schemes are a promising way to manipulate transport properties of driven colloidal suspensions. In the present article, we suggest a feedback scheme to enhance the collective transport of colloidal particles with repulsive interactions through a one-dimensional tilted washboard potential. The control is modeled by a harmonic confining potential, mimicking an optical "trap," with the center of this trap moving with the (instantaneous) mean particle position. Our theoretical analysis is based on the Smoluchowski equation combined with dynamical density functional theory for systems with hard-core or ultrasoft (Gaussian) interactions. For either type of interaction, we find that the feedback control can lead to an enhancement of the mobility by several orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The largest effects occur for intermediate stiffness of the trap and large particle numbers. Moreover, in some regions of the parameter space the feedback control induces oscillations of the mean velocity. Finally, we show that the enhancement of mobility is robust against a small time delay in implementing the feedback control.

  15. MoS2 monolayers on nanocavities: enhancement in light-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janisch, Corey; Song, Haomin; Zhou, Chanjing; Lin, Zhong; Elías, Ana Laura; Ji, Dengxin; Terrones, Mauricio; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Liu, Zhiwen

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals and van der Waals heterostructures constitute an emerging platform for developing new functional ultra-thin electronic and optoelectronic materials for novel energy-efficient devices. However, in most thin-film optical applications, there is a long-existing trade-off between the effectiveness of light-matter interactions and the thickness of semiconductor materials, especially when the materials are scaled down to atom thick dimensions. Consequently, enhancement strategies can introduce significant advances to these atomically thick materials and devices. Here we demonstrate enhanced absorption and photoluminescence generation from MoS2 monolayers coupled with a planar nanocavity. This nanocavity consists of an alumina nanolayer spacer sandwiched between monolayer MoS2 and an aluminum reflector, and can strongly enhance the light-matter interaction within the MoS2, increasing the exclusive absorption of monolayer MoS2 to nearly 70% at a wavelength of 450 nm. The nanocavity also modifies the spontaneous emission rate, providing an additional design freedom to control the interaction between light and 2D materials.

  16. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Thomas F.; Dannatt, Hugh R. W.; Barrow, Nathan S.; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P.; Newton, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to 1H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90 K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90 K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement.

  17. Surface mediated cooperative interactions of drugs enhance mechanical forces for antibiotic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Bailey, Joe; Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Cooper, Matthew A.; Abell, Chris; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    The alarming increase of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics is now recognized as a major health issue fuelling demand for new drugs. Bacterial resistance is often caused by molecular changes at the bacterial surface, which alter the nature of specific drug-target interactions. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which drug-target interactions in resistant bacteria can be enhanced. We examined the surface forces generated by four antibiotics; vancomycin, ristomycin, chloroeremomycin and oritavancin against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant targets on a cantilever and demonstrated significant differences in mechanical response when drug-resistant targets are challenged with different antibiotics although no significant differences were observed when using susceptible targets. Remarkably, the binding affinity for oritavancin against drug-resistant targets (70 nM) was found to be 11,000 times stronger than for vancomycin (800 μM), a powerful antibiotic used as the last resort treatment for streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using an exactly solvable model, which takes into account the solvent and membrane effects, we demonstrate that drug-target interactions are strengthened by pronounced polyvalent interactions catalyzed by the surface itself. These findings further enhance our understanding of antibiotic mode of action and will enable development of more effective therapies.

  18. Surface mediated cooperative interactions of drugs enhance mechanical forces for antibiotic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Bailey, Joe; Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Cooper, Matthew A.; Abell, Chris; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The alarming increase of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics is now recognized as a major health issue fuelling demand for new drugs. Bacterial resistance is often caused by molecular changes at the bacterial surface, which alter the nature of specific drug-target interactions. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which drug-target interactions in resistant bacteria can be enhanced. We examined the surface forces generated by four antibiotics; vancomycin, ristomycin, chloroeremomycin and oritavancin against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant targets on a cantilever and demonstrated significant differences in mechanical response when drug-resistant targets are challenged with different antibiotics although no significant differences were observed when using susceptible targets. Remarkably, the binding affinity for oritavancin against drug-resistant targets (70 nM) was found to be 11,000 times stronger than for vancomycin (800 μM), a powerful antibiotic used as the last resort treatment for streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using an exactly solvable model, which takes into account the solvent and membrane effects, we demonstrate that drug-target interactions are strengthened by pronounced polyvalent interactions catalyzed by the surface itself. These findings further enhance our understanding of antibiotic mode of action and will enable development of more effective therapies. PMID:28155918

  19. Electrostatically enhanced FF interactions through hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding and metal coordination: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-07-27

    In this manuscript the ability of hydrogen and halogen bonding interactions, as well as metal coordination to enhance FF interactions involving fluorine substituted aromatic rings has been studied at the RI-MP2/def2-TZVPD level of theory. We have used 4-fluoropyridine, 4-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-(4-fluorophenyl)propiolonitrile and their respective meta derivatives as aromatic compounds. In addition, we have used HF and IF as hydrogen and halogen bond donors, respectively, and Ag(i) as the coordination metal. Furthermore, we have also used HF as an electron rich fluorine donor entity, thus establishing FF interactions with the above mentioned aromatic systems. Moreover, a CSD (Cambridge Structural Database) search has been carried out and some interesting examples have been found, highlighting the impact of FF interactions involving aromatic fluorine atoms in solid state chemistry. Finally, cooperativity effects between FF interactions and both hydrogen and halogen bonding interactions have been analyzed and compared. We have also used Bader's theory of "atoms in molecules" to further describe the cooperative effects.

  20. Stabilization and enhancement of traffic flow by the next-nearest-neighbor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, T

    1999-12-01

    The car-following model of traffic is extended to take into account the car interaction before the next car ahead (the next-nearest-neighbor interaction). The traffic behavior of the extended car-following model is investigated numerically and analytically. It is shown that the next-nearest-neighbor interaction stabilizes the traffic flow. The jamming transition between the freely moving and jammed phases occurs at a higher density than the threshold of the original car-following model. By increasing the maximal velocity, the traffic current is enhanced without jam by the stabilization effect. The jamming transition is analyzed with the use of the linear stability and nonlinear perturbation methods. The traffic jam is described by the kink solution of the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. The theoretical coexisting curve is in good agreement with the simulation result.

  1. A biomimetic approach to enhancing interfacial interactions: polydopamine-coated clay as reinforcement for epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Phua, Si Lei; Teo, Jun Kai Herman; Toh, Cher Ling; Lau, Soo Khim; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong

    2011-08-01

    A facile biomimetic method was developed to enhance the interfacial interaction in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was constructed on clay surface by a controllable coating method. The modified clay (D-clay) was incorporated into an epoxy resin, it is found that the strong interfacial interactions brought by the polydopamine benefits not only the dispersion of the D-clay in the epoxy but also the effective interfacial stress transfer, leading to greatly improved thermomechanical properties at very low inorganic loadings. Rheological and infrared spectroscopic studies show that the interfacial interactions between the D-clay and epoxy are dominated by the hydrogen bonds between the catechol-enriched polydopamine and the epoxy.

  2. Paracrine Interactions between Adipocytes and Tumor Cells Recruit and Modify Macrophages to the Mammary Tumor Microenvironment: The Role of Obesity and Inflammation in Breast Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Santander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between obesity and breast cancer (BC has focused on serum factors. However, the mammary gland contains adipose tissue (AT which may enable the crosstalk between adipocytes and tumor cells contributing to tumor macrophage recruitment. We hypothesize that the breast AT (bAT is inflamed in obese females and plays a major role in breast cancer development. The effects of this interplay on macrophage chemotaxis were examined in vitro, using co-cultures of mouse macrophages, mammary tumor cells and adipocytes. Macrophages were exposed to the adipocyte and tumor paracrine factors leptin, CCL2 and lauric acid (alone or in combinations. In cell supernatants Luminex identified additional molecules with chemotactic and other pro-tumor functions. Focus on the adipokine leptin, which has been shown to have a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis, indicated it modulates macrophage phenotypes and functions. In vivo experiments demonstrate that mammary tumors from obese mice are larger and that bAT from obese tumor-bearers contains higher numbers of macrophages/CLS and hypertrophic adipocytes than bAT from lean tumor-bearers, thus confirming it is more inflamed. Also, bAT distal from the tumor is more inflamed in obese than in lean mice. Our results reveal that bAT plays a role in breast cancer development in obesity.

  3. Paracrine Interactions between Adipocytes and Tumor Cells Recruit and Modify Macrophages to the Mammary Tumor Microenvironment: The Role of Obesity and Inflammation in Breast Adipose Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santander, Ana M.; Lopez-Ocejo, Omar; Casas, Olivia; Agostini, Thais; Sanchez, Lidia; Lamas-Basulto, Eduardo; Carrio, Roberto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Cleary, Margot P. [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R. [Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Torroella-Kouri, Marta, E-mail: mtorroella@med.miami.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The relationship between obesity and breast cancer (BC) has focused on serum factors. However, the mammary gland contains adipose tissue (AT) which may enable the crosstalk between adipocytes and tumor cells contributing to tumor macrophage recruitment. We hypothesize that the breast AT (bAT) is inflamed in obese females and plays a major role in breast cancer development. The effects of this interplay on macrophage chemotaxis were examined in vitro, using co-cultures of mouse macrophages, mammary tumor cells and adipocytes. Macrophages were exposed to the adipocyte and tumor paracrine factors leptin, CCL2 and lauric acid (alone or in combinations). In cell supernatants Luminex identified additional molecules with chemotactic and other pro-tumor functions. Focus on the adipokine leptin, which has been shown to have a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis, indicated it modulates macrophage phenotypes and functions. In vivo experiments demonstrate that mammary tumors from obese mice are larger and that bAT from obese tumor-bearers contains higher numbers of macrophages/CLS and hypertrophic adipocytes than bAT from lean tumor-bearers, thus confirming it is more inflamed. Also, bAT distal from the tumor is more inflamed in obese than in lean mice. Our results reveal that bAT plays a role in breast cancer development in obesity.

  4. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues.

  5. Insights into synergistic interactions in binary mixtures of chemical permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Pankaj; Jain, Amit; Mitragotri, Samir

    2006-09-28

    Chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) are known to increase skin permeability to therapeutic drugs. Single chemicals, however, offer limited enhancements of skin permeability. Mixtures of chemicals can overcome this limitation owing to their synergistic interactions. However, identification of potent mixtures of chemicals requires screening of a large number of formulations. Discovery of CPE mixtures can be significantly accelerated by identifying patterns that occur in the existing data on CPEs. In this study, we systematically mine through a huge database on skin permeabilizing effect of over 4000 binary formulations generated by high throughput screening and extract general principles that govern the effect of binary combinations of chemicals on skin's barrier properties. Potencies and synergies of these formulations are analyzed to identify the role played by the formulation composition and chemistry. The analysis reveals several intuitive but some largely non-intuitive trends. For example, formulations made from enhancer mixtures are most potent when participating moieties are present in nearly equal fractions. Methyl pyrrolidone, a small molecule, is particularly effective in forming potent and synergistic enhancer formulations, and zwitterionic surfactants are more likely to feature in potent enhancers. Simple but invaluable rules like these will provide guiding principles for designing libraries to further speed up the formulation discovery process.

  6. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    the basic and postprandial microvascular volume in adipose tissue using real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging in healthy normal weight subjects. In nine subjects, CEU was performed in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the underlying skeletal muscle after a bolus injection...... of ultrasound contrast agent to establish the reproducibility of the technique. In nine subjects, the effect of an oral glucose load on blood flow and microvascular volume was measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and forearm skeletal muscle. ¹³³Xe washout and venous occlusion strain......-gauge plethysmography was used to measure the adipose tissue and forearm blood flow, respectively. Ultrasound signal intensity of the first plateau phases was 27 ± dB in the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and 18 ± 2 dB (P muscle. The reproducibility of the measurements was good...

  7. A discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical method for simulating surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, John L; Morton, Seth M; Moore, Justin E; Jensen, Lasse

    2012-06-07

    We have derived and implemented analytical gradients for the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method. DIM/QM combines an atomistic electrodynamics model with time-dependent density functional theory and thus enables modeling of the optical properties for a molecule while taking into account the local environment of a nanoparticle's surface. The DIM/QM analytical gradients allow for geometry optimizations, vibrational frequencies, and Raman spectra to be simulated for molecules interacting with metal nanoparticles. We have simulated the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra for pyridine adsorbed on different sites of icosahedral nanoparticles with diameters between 1 and 8 nm. To describe the adsorption of the pyridine molecule onto the metal surface, we have implemented a coordination-dependent force field to differentiate the various local surface environments. We find that the DIM/QM method predicts geometries and frequencies that are in good agreement with full QM simulations and experiments. For the simulated SERS spectra of pyridine, we find a significant dependence on the adsorption site and the size of the metal nanoparticle. This illustrates the importance of accounting for the local environment around the molecule. The Raman enhancement factors are shown to roughly mirror the magnitude of the nanoparticle's local field about the molecule. Because the simulated nanoparticles are small, the plasmon peaks are quite broad which results in weak local electric fields and thus modest Raman enhancement factors.

  8. Achieving enhanced ionic mobility in nanoporous silica by controlled surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaga, Mounesha Nagendrachar; Aguilera, Luis; Yaghini, Negin; Matic, Aleksandar; Persson, Michael; Martinelli, Anna

    2017-02-22

    We report a strategy to enhance the ionic mobility in an emerging class of gels, based on robust nanoporous silica micro-particles, by chemical functionalization of the silica surface. Two very different ionic liquids are used to fill the nano-pores of silica at varying pore filling factors, namely one aprotic imidazolium based (1-methyl-3-hexylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, C6C1ImTFSI), and one protic ammonium based (diethylmethylammonium methanesulfonate, DEMAOMs) ionic liquid. Both these ionic liquids display higher ionic mobility when confined in functionalized silica as compared to untreated silica nano-pores, an improvement that is more pronounced at low pore filling factors (i.e. in the nano-sized pore domains) and observed in the whole temperature window investigated (i.e. from -10 to 140 °C). Solid-state NMR, diffusion NMR and dielectric spectroscopy concomitantly demonstrate this effect. The origin of this enhancement is explained in terms of weaker intermolecular interactions and a consequent flipped-ion effect at the silica interface strongly supported by 2D solid-state NMR experiments. The possibility to significantly enhance the ionic mobility by controlling the nature of surface interactions is extremely important in the field of materials science and highlights these structurally tunable gels as promising solid-like electrolytes for use in energy relevant devices. These include, but are not limited to, Li-ion batteries and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

  9. Recruiter Selection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    interests include feature selection, statistical learning, multivariate statistics, market research, and classification. He may be contacted at...current youth market , and reducing barriers to Army enlistment. Part of the Army Recruiting Initiatives was the creation of a recruiter selection...Selection Model DevelPed by the Openuier Reseach Crate of E...lneSstm Erapseeeng Depce-teo, WViitd Ntt. siliec Academy, NW..t Point, 271 Weau/’itt 21M

  10. Electronic Recruitment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Human Resources Department switches to electronic recruitment. From now on whenever you are involved in a recruitment action you will receive an e-mail giving you access to a Web folder. Inside you will find a shortlist of applications drawn up by the Human Resources Department. This will allow you to consult the folder, at the same time as everyone else involved in the recruitment process, for the vacancy you are interested in. This new electronic recruitment system, known as e-RT, will be introduced in a presentation given at 10 a.m. on 11 February in the Main Auditorium. Implemented by AIS (Administrative Information Services) and the Human Resources Department, e-RT will cover vacancies open in all of CERN's recruitment programmes. The electronic application system was initially made available to technical students in July 2003. By December it was extended to summer students, fellows, associates and Local Staff. Geraldine Ballet from the Recruitment Service prefers e-RT to mountains of paper! The Hu...

  11. Using "human state aware" robots to enhance physical human-robot interaction in a cooperative scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlos Rodriguez; Fraile Marinero, Juan Carlos; Turiel, Javier Perez; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Human motor performance, speed and variability are highly susceptible to emotional states. This paper reviews the impact of the emotions on the motor control performance, and studies the possibility of improving the perceived skill/challenge relation on a multimodal neural rehabilitation scenario, by means of a biocybernetic controller that modulates the assistance provided by a haptic controlled robot in reaction to undesirable physical and mental states. Results from psychophysiological, performance and self assessment data for closed loop experiments in contrast with their open loop counterparts, suggest that the proposed method had a positive impact on the overall challenge/skill relation leading to an enhanced physical human-robot interaction experience.

  12. Enhanced health E-decision literacy via interactive multi-criterial support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Almeida, J.; Moncho Mas, Vicent

    Healthcare lacks a generic language for decisional communication. We aim to enhance health decision literacy via specific e-decision support. Given the multi-criterial, preference-sensitive nature of decision-making, we implement the Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) technique online...... in an interactive and visual template (Annalisa), developing decision-specific tools at the clinical/personal and group/policy levels. Our current nationally funded project on bone health caters for home-prepared, informed and preference-based consent and taps into existing e-health infrastructures towards person...

  13. Enhanced interaction between a mechanical oscillator and two coupled resonant electrical circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports result of calculation and experimental realization of an electromechanical system that consists of a high-Q mechanical oscillator parametrically coupled in the manner of a capacitive transducer with a RF circuit, which is in turn inductively coupled with another RF circuit. The system operates in the resolved sideband regime when the mechanical oscillator's frequency is larger than the electrical circuits' bandwidths. Using two coupled RF circuits allowed one to enhance the interaction between them and the mechanical oscillator which is one of flexural vibrational modes of a free-edge circular silicon wafer. Such a coupled electromechanical system can be used as a high-sensitive capacitive vibration sensor.

  14. Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji; Goh, Chee S.; Set, Sze Y.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel passive mode-locking scheme for pulsed lasers enhanced by the interaction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the evanescent field of propagating light in a D-shaped optical fiber. The scheme features all-fiber operation as well as a long lateral interaction length, which guarantees a strong nonlinear effect from the nanotubes. Mode locking is achieved with less than 30% of the CNTs compared with the amount of nanotubes used for conventional schemes. Our method also ensures the preservation of the original morphology of the individual CNTs. The demonstrated pulsed laser with our CNT mode locker has a repetition rate of 5.88 MHz and a temporal pulse width of 470 fs.

  15. Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji; Goh, Chee S; Set, Sze Y

    2007-01-15

    We demonstrate a novel passive mode-locking scheme for pulsed lasers enhanced by the interaction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the evanescent field of propagating light in a D-shaped optical fiber. The scheme features all-fiber operation as well as a long lateral interaction length, which guarantees a strong nonlinear effect from the nanotubes. Mode locking is achieved with less than 30% of the CNTs compared with the amount of nanotubes used for conventional schemes. Our method also ensures the preservation of the original morphology of the individual CNTs. The demonstrated pulsed laser with our CNT mode locker has a repetition rate of 5.88 MHz and a temporal pulse width of 470 fs.

  16. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: A quantum heat engine picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, N; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2015-10-21

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations may contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle and quantifies its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's relevance in parameter regimes connected to natural light-harvesting structures.

  17. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: A quantum heat engine picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killoran, N.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-10-21

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations may contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system’s power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle and quantifies its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle’s relevance in parameter regimes connected to natural light-harvesting structures.

  18. Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: a quantum heat engine picture

    CERN Document Server

    Killoran, Nathan; Plenio, Martin B

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle, and quantify its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's applicability for realistic biological structures.

  19. Foam-oil interaction in porous media: implications for foam assisted enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Andrianov, A; Krastev, R; Hirasaki, G J; Rossen, W R

    2012-11-15

    The efficiency of a foam displacement process in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) depends largely on the stability of foam films in the presence of oil. Experimental studies have demonstrated the detrimental impact of oil on foam stability. This paper reviews the mechanisms and theories (disjoining pressure, coalescence and drainage, entering and spreading of oil, oil emulsification, pinch-off, etc.) suggested in the literature to explain the impact of oil on foam stability in the bulk and porous media. Moreover, we describe the existing approaches to foam modeling in porous media and the ways these models describe the oil effect on foam propagation in porous media. Further, we present various ideas on an improvement of foam stability and longevity in the presence of oil. The outstanding questions regarding foam-oil interactions and modeling of these interactions are pointed out. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of Interacting Cyclones in Modifying Tropical Cyclone Landfall Threat: Fujiwhara vs. enhanced Beta drift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    historic impacts in the region. Thus, the question raised here is: Is it necessary to account for the above cyclone interactions to accurately quantify TC risk for subregions of the U.S. coastline? This presentation will address this question by examining the distribution of TC motion vector across the basin, within subregions, and for the subset where TCs are within 1500km of each other (the threshold where interaction generally begins; Lander and Holland 1993) or less to determine if there is a systematic shift in motion (compared to single TC occurrences) that alters TC landfall threat regionally. Preliminary results show a statistically significant shift in TC motion when interaction is occurring -- a shift from bimodal motion (toward W or NE) to a unimodal motion (toward the N or NNW). This shift is not due to the Fujiwhara interaction itself (given the offsetting nature of the motion by one TC on the other), but instead is argued to be a consequence of enhanced Beta-drift resulting from the effective larger cyclonic circulation resulting from the two circulations interacting. The hypothesis is tested by reexamining shallow water model simulations of multiple TCs from prior work (Hart and Evans 1999). Potential implications of these results on the risk of midlatitude landfalls will be discussed.

  1. Increasing membrane interactions of local anaesthetics as hypothetic mechanism for their cardiotoxicity enhanced by myocardial ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki; Shigemi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    While myocardial ischaemia enhances the cardiotoxicity of local anaesthetics, the pharmacological background remains unclear. Cardiolipin (CL) localized in mitochondrial membranes is possibly the site of cardiotoxic action of local anaesthetics and peroxynitrite is produced by cardiac ischaemia and reperfusion. We verified the hypothetic mechanism that local anaesthetics may interact with CL-containing biomembranes to change the membrane biophysical property and their membrane interactions may be increased by peroxynitrite. Biomimetic membranes were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying compositions. The membrane preparations were reacted with peroxynitrite of pathologically relevant concentrations and local anaesthetics (bupivacaine and lidocaine) of a cardiotoxic concentration separately or in combination. Changes in membrane fluidity were determined by measuring fluorescence polarization. Peroxynitrite decreased the fluidity of biomimetic membranes at 0.1-10 μM with the relative potency being CL>1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoylphosphatidylcholine>1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-constituting membranes, indicating the lipid peroxidation-induced membrane rigidification determined by the unsaturation degree of membrane lipids. When treated with 0.1-10 μM peroxynitrite, biomimetic membranes were more rigid with elevating the CL content from 0% to 30 mol%, suggesting that CL is a primary target of peroxynitrite. Bupivacaine and lidocaine fluidized at 200 μM biomimetic membranes containing 10 mol% CL and their effects were increased by pre-treating the membranes with 0.1 and 1 μM peroxynitrite. Cardiotoxic bupivacaine and lidocaine increasingly interact with CL-containing mitochondria model membranes which are relatively rigidified by peroxynitrite. Such an increasing membrane interaction may be, at least in part, responsible for the local anaesthetic cardiotoxicity enhanced by myocardial ischaemia.

  2. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94. M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water–metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrAA90) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone–gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94 cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge–enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone–enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrAA90V and GyrAD94G. 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug–enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis. PMID:26792518

  3. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Blower, Tim R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-02-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrA(A90) and GyrA(D94). M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water-metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrA(A90)) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone-gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrA(A90) and GyrA(D94) cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge-enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone-enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrA(A90V) and GyrA(D94G). 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug-enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis.

  4. Social and emotional relevance in face processing: Happy faces of future interaction partners enhance the LPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eBublatzky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human face perception is modulated by both emotional valence and social relevance, but their interaction has rarely been examined. Event-related brain potentials (ERP to happy, neutral, and angry facial expressions with different degrees of social relevance were recorded. Social relevance was manipulated by presenting pictures of two specific face actors as future interaction partners (meet condition, whereas two other face actors remained non-relevant. As a further control condition all stimuli were presented without specific task instructions (passive viewing condition. A within-subject design (Facial Expression x Relevance x Task was implemented, where randomly ordered face stimuli of four actors (2 women, from the KDEF were presented for 1s to 26 participants (16 female. Results showed an augmented N170, early posterior negativity (EPN, and late positive potential (LPP for emotional in contrast to neutral facial expressions. Of particular interest, face processing varied as a function of instructed social relevance. Whereas the meet condition was accompanied with unspecific effects regardless of relevance (P1, EPN, viewing potential interaction partners was associated with increased LPP amplitudes. The LPP was specifically enhanced for happy facial expressions of the future interaction partners. This underscores that social relevance can impact face processing already at an early stage of visual processing. These findings are discussed within the framework of motivated attention and face processing theories.

  5. Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS): Final report, November 1994--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS) is a software tool for complex three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and modeling. Its primary purpose is to facilitate the use of robotic and telerobotic systems in remote and/or hazardous environments, where spatial information is provided by 3-D mapping sensors. ICERVS provides a robust, interactive system for viewing sensor data in 3-D and combines this with interactive geometric modeling capabilities that allow an operator to construct CAD models to match the remote environment. Part I of this report traces the development of ICERVS through three evolutionary phases: (1) development of first-generation software to render orthogonal view displays and wireframe models; (2) expansion of this software to include interactive viewpoint control, surface-shaded graphics, material (scalar and nonscalar) property data, cut/slice planes, color and visibility mapping, and generalized object models; (3) demonstration of ICERVS as a tool for the remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) and the dismantlement of contaminated processing facilities. Part II of this report details the software design of ICERVS, with particular emphasis on its object-oriented architecture and user interface.

  6. Enhancing bioplastic-substrate interaction via pore induction and directed migration of enzyme location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Bhalchandra S; Papworth, Glenn; Katsemi, Vicky; Rüterjans, Heinz; Martyano, Igor; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Russell, Alan J

    2004-06-20

    We demonstrate two novel approaches to enhance interactions of polymer-immobilized biomolecules with their substrates. In the first approach, diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase) containing poly(urethane) (PU) coatings were made microporous by incorporating, then extracting, poly(ethylene glycol)-based diesters as porogens. Incorporation of 2% w/w porogen increased the effective diffusion coefficient of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) through the coatings by 30% and increased the apparent turnover number of immobilized DFPase 3-fold. In the second approach, prior to immobilization, hydrophobic modification of DFPase was achieved through its conjugation with a dimer/trimer mixture of a uretdione based on 1,6-diisocyanatohexane. When the hydrophobically modified DFPase was immobilized in coatings, catalytic activity was 4-fold higher than that of the equivalent, immobilized, native DFPase. This activity enhancement was independent of the presence or absence of pores. Confocal microscopy images of coatings containing fluorescently labeled lysozyme show that the native enzyme is distributed uniformly over the entire thickness of the coatings. Hydrophobically modified and fluorescently labeled lysozyme is accumulated only in the upper 10 microm cross-sectional layer of a 100 microm-thick coating. Interactions of bioplastics with their substrates are tunable either by pore induction in a polymer or by directed migration of the hydrophobically modified biomolecule to the desired location. The latter approach has broad implications, including overcoming mass transfer limitations experienced by immobilized biocatalysts.

  7. The human enhancer blocker CTC-binding factor interacts with the transcription factor Kaiso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Kelly, Kevin F; Filion, Guillaume J P; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Magdinier, Frédérique; Menoni, Hervé; Nordgaard, Curtis L; Daniel, Juliet M; Gilson, Eric

    2005-12-30

    CTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein of vertebrates that plays essential roles in regulating genome activity through its capacity to act as an enhancer blocker. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify protein partners of CTCF that could regulate its activity. Using full-length CTCF as bait we recovered Kaiso, a POZ-zinc finger transcription factor, as a specific binding partner. The interaction occurs through a C-terminal region of CTCF and the POZ domain of Kaiso. CTCF and Kaiso are co-expressed in many tissues, and CTCF was specifically co-immunoprecipitated by several Kaiso monoclonal antibodies from nuclear lysates. Kaiso is a bimodal transcription factor that recognizes methylated CpG dinucleotides or a conserved unmethylated sequence (TNGCAGGA, the Kaiso binding site). We identified one consensus unmethylated Kaiso binding site in close proximity to the CTCF binding site in the human 5' beta-globin insulator. We found, in an insulation assay, that the presence of this Kaiso binding site reduced the enhancer-blocking activity of CTCF. These data suggest that the Kaiso-CTCF interaction negatively regulates CTCF insulator activity.

  8. Modulation of graft architectures for enhancing hydrophobic interaction of biomolecules with thermoresponsive polymer-grafted surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, Naokazu; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Jun; Sakai, Kiyotaka; Okano, Teruo

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the effects of graft architecture of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) brush surfaces on thermoresponsive aqueous wettability changes and the temperature-dependent hydrophobic interaction of steroids in silica capillaries (I.D.: 50 μm). PIPAAm brushes were grafted onto glass substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) that is one of the living radical polymerization techniques. Increases in the graft density and chain length of PIPAAm brushes increased the hydration of polymer brushes, resulting in the increased hydrophilic properties of the surface below the transition temperature of PIPAAm at 32 °C. More hydrophobic surface properties were also observed on surfaces modified with the block copolymers of IPAAm and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) than that with IPAAm homopolymer-grafted surfaces over the transition temperature. Using PBMA-b-PIPAAm-grafted silica capillaries, the baseline separation of steroids was successfully achieved by only changing temperature. The incorporation of hydrophobic PBMA chains in grafted PIPAAm enhanced the hydrophobic interaction with testosterone above the transition temperature. The surface modification of hydrophobicity-enhanced thermoresponsive polymers is a promising method for the preparation of thermoresponsive biointerfaces that can effectively modulated their biomolecule and cell adsorption with the wide dynamic range of hydrophilic/hydrophobic property change across the transition temperature.

  9. Strategies to enhance epithelial-mesenchymal interactions for human hair follicle bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Manabu; Veraitch, Ophelia

    2013-05-01

    Hair follicle morphogenesis and regeneration depend on intensive but well-orchestrated interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal components. Accordingly, the enhancement of this crosstalk represents a promising approach to achieve successful bioengineering of human hair follicles. The present article summarizes the techniques, both currently available and potentially feasible, to promote epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) necessary for human hair follicle regeneration. The strategies include the preparation of epithelial components with high receptivity to trichogenic dermal signals and/or mesenchymal cell populations with potent hair inductive capacity. In this regard, bulge epithelial stem cells, keratinocytes predisposed to hair follicle fate or keratinocyte precursor cells with plasticity may provide favorable epithelial cell populations. Dermal papilla cells sustaining intrinsic hair inductive capacity, putative dermal papilla precursor cells in the dermal sheath/neonatal dermis or trichogenic dermal cells derived from undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates as hair inductive dermal cells. The most established protocol for in vivo hair follicle reconstitution is co-grafting of epithelial and mesenchymal components into immunodeficient mice. In theory, combination of individually optimized cellular components of respective lineages should elicit most intensive EMIs to form hair follicles. Still, EMIs can be further ameliorated by the modulation of non-cell autonomous conditions, including cell compartmentalization to replicate the positional relationship in vivo and humanization of host environment by preparing human stromal bed. These approaches may not always synergistically intensify EMIs, however, step-by-step investigation probing optimal combinations should maximally enhance EMIs to achieve successful human hair follicle bioengineering.

  10. Enhanced Human Memory Consolidation With Post-Learning Stress: Interaction With the Degree of Arousal at Encoding

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Larry; Gorski, Lukasz; Le, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Abundant evidence indicates that endogenous stress hormones such as epinephrine and corticosterone modulate memory consolidation in animals. We recently provided the first demonstration that an endogenous stress hormone (epinephrine) can enhance human memory consolidation. However, these findings also suggested that post-learning stress hormone activation does not uniformly enhance memory for all recently acquired information; rather, that it interacts with the degree ...

  11. Fluorescence enhancement of warfarin induced by interaction with beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Jacob M; Vu, Andrew; Schultz, Jerome S; Vullev, Valentine I

    2009-01-01

    Warfarin is the most common agent used for control and prevention of venous as well as arterial thromboembolism (blood clots). In aqueous media, warfarin forms inclusion complexes with a family of cyclic oligosaccharides, alpha, beta, gamma-cyclodextrins (CD). The formation of these complexes results in enhancement of the fluorescence of warfarin. Such spectroscopic changes offer a venue for the development of bioanalytical methodologies for warfarin quantification in biological liquids. We characterized the photophysical properties of warfarin in solvents with varying polarity and viscosity. The fluorescence quantum yield of warfarin correlated: (1) strongly with the solvent viscosity (R = 0.979) and (2) weakly with the solvent polarity (R = 0.118). These findings indicate that it is the change of the viscosity, rather than polarity, of the microenvironment that causes the fluorescence enhancement of warfarin upon binding to beta-CD. Utilizing the observed fluorescence enhancement in fluorescence titration measurements, the binding constants of warfarin to beta-CD were obtained (2.6 x 10(2) M(-1)-3.7 x 10(2) M(-1)). Using multivariable linear analysis, we extracted the stoichiometry of warfarin-beta-CD interaction (1:1).

  12. Molecular insights into seed dispersal mutualisms driving plant population recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Cristina; Grivet, Delphine

    2011-11-01

    Most plant species require mutualistic interactions with animals to fulfil their demographic cycle. In this regard frugivory (i.e., the intake of fruits by animals) enhances natural regeneration by mobilizing a large amount of seeds from source trees to deposition sites across the landscape. By doing so, frugivores move propagules, and the genotypes they harbour creating the spatial, ecological, and genetic environment under which subsequent recruitment proceeds. Recruitment patterns can be envisioned as the result of two density- and distance-dependent processes: seed dispersal and seed/seedling survival (the Janzen-Connell model). Population genetic studies add another layer of complexity for understanding the fate of dispersed propagules: the genetic relatedness among neighbouring seeds within a seed clump, a major outcome of frugivore activity, modifies their chances of germinating and surviving. Yet, we virtually ignore how the spatial distribution of maternal progenies and recruitment patterns relate with each other in frugivore-generated seed rains. Here we focus on the critical role of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal in shaping the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in the seed rain. We first examine which genetic mechanisms underlying recruitment are influenced by the spatial distribution of maternal progenies. Next, we examine those studies depicting the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in a frugivore-generated seed rain. In doing so, we briefly review the most suitable analytical approaches applied to track the contribution of fruiting trees to the seed rain based on molecular data. Then we look more specifically at the role of distinct frugivore guilds in determining maternal genetic correlations and their expected consequences for recruitment patterns. Finally we posit some general conclusions and suggest future research directions that would provide a more comprehensive understanding of the ecological and evolutionary consequences

  13. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. SpUSP, an annexin-interacting universal stress protein, enhances drought tolerance in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukehaich, Rachid; Wang, Taotao; Ouyang, Bo; Ziaf, Khurram; Li, Hanxia; Zhang, Junhong; Lu, Yongen; Ye, Zhibiao

    2012-09-01

    Universal stress protein (USP) appears to play an active role in the abiotic stress response, but their functions remain largely unknown in plants. A USP gene (SpUSP) was cloned from wild tomato (Solanum pennellii) and functionally characterized in cultivated tomato in the present study. The SpUSP transcript is abundantly accumulated in leaf stomata and its expression varied with the circadian rhythm. SpUSP was remarkably induced by dehydration, salt stress, oxidative stress, and the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) etc. This protein was predominantly localized in the nucleus and cell membrane. Overexpressing SpUSP increased drought tolerance of tomato in the seedling and adult stages. Under drought stress, the ABA content significantly increased in the SpUSP-overexpressing plants, which induced stomatal closure and reduced water loss, leading to the enhancement of drought tolerance. Based on the microarray data, a large number of chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins and photosystem-related genes were up-regulated in the SpUSP-overexpressing plants under drought conditions, which possibly enhanced the stomatal sensivitity to ABA and maintained the photosynthetic function. SpUSP overexpression also alleviated the oxidative damage accompanied by oxidative stress-responsive gene activation and osmolyte accumulation. Annexin (SGN-U314161) was found to interacte with SpUSP in the yeast two-hybrid method. This interaction was further confirmed by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. The present study demonstrated that the annexin-interacting SpUSP plays important roles in the drought tolerance of tomato by influencing ABA-induced stomatal movement, increasing photosynthesis, and alleviating oxidative stress.

  15. The Effects of Using the Kinect Motion-Sensing Interactive System to Enhance English Learning for Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen Fu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether the Kinect motion-sensing interactive system (KMIS) enhanced students' English vocabulary learning, while also comparing the system's effectiveness against a traditional computer-mouse interface. Both interfaces utilized an interactive game with a questioning strategy. One-hundred and twenty…

  16. Line-Drawing Enhanced Interactive Mural Restoration for Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X. Y.; Han, Y.; Sun, Z. J.; Ma, X. J.; Xu, Y. Q.

    2017-08-01

    Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes in western China is one of the most famous World Cultural Heritage Sites, known for its glorious Chinese Buddhist art spanning a period of 1,000 years. However, it has been suffering from damage and degradation caused by man-made and natural factors. In this article, we present a novel line-drawing enhanced interactive system for digital restoration of damaged murals in Mogao Grottoes. Our system consists of four components, namely data pre-processing, damaged area selection, line-drawing segmentation, and mural restoration. Each component is a hybrid of efficient algorithms and user interactions. We introduce the infrastructure and process of using our system, from data capture and collection, database establishment, to interactive restoration. We conduct a user study with 15 participants who have varied experiences with and skills on repairing murals and editing images. Results and feedback suggest that our system can achieve satisfactory restoration results without overburdening the users. It can benefit both experts trained in restoration and amateurs interested in cultural heritage conservation.

  17. Characterization of the Interactions between Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles and Polymethoxyflavones Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoqiong; Ma, Changchu; Gao, Zili; Zheng, Jinkai; He, Lili; McClements, David Julian; Xiao, Hang

    2016-12-14

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are commonly present in TiO2 food additives (E171) and have been associated with potential adverse effects on health. However, little knowledge is available regarding the interactions between TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) and other food components, such as flavonoids. In this study, we aim to study the molecular interactions between TiO2 anatase NPs and three structurally closely related polymethoxyflavones (PMFs, flavonoids found in citrus fruits), namely, 3',4'-didemethylnobiletin (DDN), 5-demethylnobiletin (5DN), and 5,3',4'-tridemethylnobiletin (TDN), using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometry and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In the UV-vis absorption spectra, bathochromic effects were observed after DDN and TDN conjugated with TiO2 NPs. The results from SERS analysis clearly demonstrated that DDN and TDN could bind TiO2 NPs with the functional groups 3'-OH and 4'-OH on ring B and formed charge-transfer complexes. However, 5DN with functional groups C═O on ring C and 5-OH on ring A could not bind TiO2 NPs. Knowledge on the molecular interactions between TiO2 NPs and food components, such as flavonoids, will facilitate the understanding of the fate of TiO2 NPs during food processing and in the gastrointestinal tract after oral consumption.

  18. Cooperative TPA enhancement via through-space interactions in organic nanodots built from dipolar chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Anne-Claire; Parthasarathy, Venkatakrishnan; Pla-Quintana, Anna; Mongin, Olivier; Terenziani, Francesca; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2010-08-01

    Whereas structure-properties relationships have been widely investigated at the molecular level, supramolecular structure-property relationships have been somewhat overlooked. In many cases, interchromophoric interactions are found to be detrimental (in particular in second-order NLO) and a lot of efforts have been devoted to circumvent and control these effects to achieve efficient NLO materials for electrooptics. At opposite, we have implemented a countermainstream route based on the confinement of push-pull chromophores in close proximity within organic nanodots where both their number and relative position/distance are controlled by covalent attachment onto appropriate organic scaffolds. In such multichromophoric organic superstructures (namely covalent nanoclusters), dipole-dipole interactions can be tuned by playing on the internal architecture (topology, number of chromophoric subunits, length of the covalent linkers) and on the nature and properties (polarity, polarizability) of the chromophoric subunits. Following this strategy, we present the investigation of two series of such organic nanoclusters built from push-pull chromophores where through-space interactions are shown to modify both one-photon (OPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) of each chromophoric subunits leading to cooperative enhancement of TPA properties and improved transparency.

  19. Interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells enhances matrix metalloproteinase-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of MMP-1 by cell-to-cell interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cells) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Collagenolytic activity was determined by fluorescent labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cells produce MMP-1. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs markedly increased the MMP-1 levels and activity of the culture media. MMP-1 levels were maximal when the cellular ratio of THP-1 cells/VSMCs was 1.0. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both types of cells in the coculture produced MMP-1. Separated coculture experiments showed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to MMP-1 production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibodies inhibited coculture conditioned medium-induced MMP-1 production by VSMCs and THP-1 cells. Protein kinase C inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by cocultures. Direct cell-to-cell interaction between THP-1 cells and VSMCs enhanced MMP-1 synthesis in both types of cells. Increased local MMP-1 production and activity induced by monocyte-VSMC interaction play an important pathogenic role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

  20. Recruitment of general practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Allan; Jensen, Cathrine Elgaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health service research often involves the active participation of healthcare professionals. However, their ability and commitment to research varies. This can cause recruitment difficulties and thereby prolong the study period and inflate budgets. Solberg has identified seven R......, which was fewer than planned (100 practices). In this evaluation, five of Solberg’s seven R-factors were successfully addressed and two factors were not. The need to involve (reciprocity) end users in the development of new software and the amount of time needed to conduct recruitment (resolution) were...

  1. Recruitment strategies should not be randomly selected: empirically improving recruitment success and diversity in developmental psychology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Nicole A.; Moulson, Margaret C.

    2015-01-01

    Psychological and developmental research have been critiqued for the lack of diversity of research samples. Because differences in culture, race, and ethnicity can influence participant behavior, limited diversity limits the generalizability of the findings. These differences may also impact how participants behave in response to recruitment attempts, which suggests that recruitment itself may be leveraged to increase sample diversity. The goal of the current study was to determine what factors, within a recruitment interaction, could be leveraged to increase success and diversity when recruiting families with children for developmental research. Study 1 found three factors influenced success: (1) recruitment was more successful when other potential participants were also interested (i.e., recruiters were busy), (2) recruiters of particular races were more successful than recruiters of other races, and (3) differences in success were related to what the recruiter said to engage the potential participant (i.e., the script). The latter two factors interacted, suggesting some recruiters were using less optimal scripts. To improve success rates, study 2 randomly assigned scripts to recruiters and encouraged them to recruit more vigorously during busy periods. Study 2 found that two factors influenced success: (1) some scripts were more successful than others and (2) we were more successful at recruiting non-White potential participants than White participants. These two interacted, with some scripts being more successful with White and other scripts being more successful with non-White families. This intervention significantly increased recruitment success rate by 8.1% and the overall number of families recruited by 15.3%. These findings reveal that empirically evaluating and tailoring recruitment efforts based on the most successful strategies is effective in boosting diversity through increased participation of children from non-White families. PMID:25972829

  2. Recruitment strategies should not be randomly selected: empirically improving recruitment success and diversity in developmental psychology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Nicole A; Moulson, Margaret C

    2015-01-01

    Psychological and developmental research have been critiqued for the lack of diversity of research samples. Because differences in culture, race, and ethnicity can influence participant behavior, limited diversity limits the generalizability of the findings. These differences may also impact how participants behave in response to recruitment attempts, which suggests that recruitment itself may be leveraged to increase sample diversity. The goal of the current study was to determine what factors, within a recruitment interaction, could be leveraged to increase success and diversity when recruiting families with children for developmental research. Study 1 found three factors influenced success: (1) recruitment was more successful when other potential participants were also interested (i.e., recruiters were busy), (2) recruiters of particular races were more successful than recruiters of other races, and (3) differences in success were related to what the recruiter said to engage the potential participant (i.e., the script). The latter two factors interacted, suggesting some recruiters were using less optimal scripts. To improve success rates, study 2 randomly assigned scripts to recruiters and encouraged them to recruit more vigorously during busy periods. Study 2 found that two factors influenced success: (1) some scripts were more successful than others and (2) we were more successful at recruiting non-White potential participants than White participants. These two interacted, with some scripts being more successful with White and other scripts being more successful with non-White families. This intervention significantly increased recruitment success rate by 8.1% and the overall number of families recruited by 15.3%. These findings reveal that empirically evaluating and tailoring recruitment efforts based on the most successful strategies is effective in boosting diversity through increased participation of children from non-White families.

  3. A qualitative analysis of peer recruitment pressures in respondent driven sampling: Are risks above the ethical limit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Heather I; Moorthi, Gayatri; Li, JiangHong; Weeks, Margaret R

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines peer recruitment dynamics through respondent driven sampling (RDS) with a sample of injection drug users in Hartford, CT to understand the strategies participants use to recruit peers into a study and the extent to which these strategies may introduce risks above the ethical limit despite safeguards in RDS. Out of 526 injection drug users who participated in a mixed-method RDS methodology evaluation study, a nested sample of 61 participants completed an in-depth semi-structured interview at a 2-month follow-up to explore their experiences with the recruitment process. Findings revealed that participants used a variety of strategies to recruit peers, ranging from one-time interactions to more persistent strategies to encourage participation (e.g., selecting peers that can easily be found and contacted later, following up with peers to remind them of their appointment, accompanying peers to the study site, etc.). Some participants described the more persistent strategies as helpful, while some others experienced these strategies as minor peer pressure, creating a feeling of obligation to participate. Narratives revealed that overall, the probability of experiencing study-related risks remains relatively low for most participants; however, a disconcerting finding was that higher study-related risks (e.g., relationship conflict, loss of relationship, physical fights, violence) were seen for recruits who participated but switched coupons or for recruits who decided not to participate in the study and did not return the coupon to the recruiter. Findings indicate that peer recruitment practices in RDS generally pose minimal risk, but that peer recruitment may occasionally exceed the ethical limit, and that enhanced safeguards for studies using peer recruitment methods are recommended. Suggestions for possible enhancements are described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-range enhancer-promoter interactions in the Scr-Antp interval of the Drosophila Antennapedia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Vincent C; Levine, Michael

    2003-08-19

    Long-range enhancer-promoter interactions are commonly seen in complex genetic loci such as Hox genes and globin genes. In the case of the Drosophila Antennapedia complex, the T1 enhancer bypasses the neighboring ftz gene and interacts with the distant Scr promoter to activate expression in posterior head segments. Previous studies identified a 450-bp promoter-proximal sequence, the tethering element, which is essential for T1-Scr interactions. To obtain a more comprehensive view of how individual enhancers selectively interact with appropriate target genes, we used bioinformatic methods to identify new cis-regulatory DNAs in the approximately 50-kb Scr-Antp interval. Three previously uncharacterized regulatory elements were identified: a distal T1 tethering sequence mapping >40 kb from the proximal tethering sequence, a repressor element that excludes activation of Scr by inappropriate enhancers, and a new ftz enhancer that directs expression within the limits of stripes 1 and 5. Many of the regulatory DNAs in the Scr-Antp interval are transcribed, including the proximal and distal tethering elements. We suggest that homotypic interactions between the tethering elements stabilize long-range T1-Scr interactions during development.

  5. Recruitment. Hello, goodbye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2008-07-10

    The UK is "moving to a policy of self-sufficiency" according to the Department of Health. The numbers of new overseas entrants into healthcare, including doctors, nurses and midwives has slumped. Several other countries, including Canada, the US and Australia, are aggressively recruiting from overseas, including from the UK. There is an increasing perception the UK does not want overseas staff.

  6. [Recruitment in presbycusis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Legaza, E; Ciges Juan, M; González Pérez, M; Miranda Caravallo, J I

    2006-01-01

    Presbycusis is characterised by a sensorineural hearing loss, mainly in high frequencies, symmetrical and progressive and poor understanding. Recuritment, typical in cochlear hearing loss, would be present in cases of sensorial presbycusis which runs mainly in cochlear pathologies. We analyse variables and their possible interrelations with recruitment in 241 presbycusic patients.

  7. Enhancing Multi-Agent Based Simulation with Human-Agents Interactive Spatial Behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yee Ming; Shiu, Hung-Ming

    2009-01-01

    We are exploring the enhancement of models of agent behaviour with more "human-like" decision making strategies than are presently available. Our motivation is to developed with a view to as the decision analysis and support for electric taxi company under the mission of energy saving and reduction of CO2, in particular car-pool and car-sharing management policies. In order to achieve the object of decision analysis for user, we provide a human-agents interactive spatial behaviour to support user making decision real time. We adopt passenger average waiting time and electric taxi average idle time as the performance measures and decision support fro electric taxi company. Finally, according to the analysis result, we demonstrate that our multi-agent simulation and GUI can help users or companies quickly make a quality and accurate decision to reduce the decision-making cost and time.

  8. Controlled bacteria-gold nanorod interactions for enhancement of optoacoustic contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liopo, Anton; Derry, Paul J.; Ermolinsky, Boris; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Ermilov, Sergey; Zubarev, Eugene R.; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Gold-based contrast agents, gold nanorod (GNR), were designed for the enhancement of optoacoustic signal. After synthesis, the GNR-CTAB complexes were modified by pegylation (PEG), or replacement of CTAB (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) with MTAB (16-mercaptohexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide) for coverage of gold nanorods with heparin (GNR-HP). Modified GNR are purified through centrifugation and filtration. GNRCTAB can be used as a model of positively charged gold surface for quantitative optoacoustic sensing in GNRbacteria interactions, whereas GNR-PEG and GNR-HP can be used as negatively charged gold surface models. We studied controlled agglomeration of contrast agents with the bacteria E.Coli and Vibrio Cholerae. For bacterial sensing, the localized plasmon resonance peak shifts as a function of electrostatic binding, which was detected with two different wavelengths through 3D optoacoustic imaging.

  9. Multi-focal laser surgery: cutting enhancement by hydrodynamic interactions between cavitation bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Toytman, Ilya; Simanovski, Dmitri; Palanker, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Transparent biological tissues can be precisely dissected with ultrafast lasers using optical breakdown in the tight focal zone. Typically, tissues are cut by sequential application of pulses, each of which produces a single cavitation bubble. We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between simultaneous cavitation bubbles originating from multiple laser foci. Simultaneous expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles can enhance the cutting efficiency by increasing the resulting deformations in tissue, and the associated rupture zone. An analytical model of the flow induced by the bubbles is presented and experimentally verified. The threshold strain of the material rupture is measured in a model tissue. Using the computational model and the experimental value of the threshold strain one can compute the shape of the rupture zone in tissue resulting from application of multiple bubbles. With the threshold strain of 0.7 two simultaneous bubbles produce a continuous cut when applied at the distance 1.35 time...

  10. Interacting with target tracking algorithms in a gaze-enhanced motion video analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Jutta; Krüger, Wolfgang; Heinze, Norbert; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Motion video analysis is a challenging task, particularly if real-time analysis is required. It is therefore an important issue how to provide suitable assistance for the human operator. Given that the use of customized video analysis systems is more and more established, one supporting measure is to provide system functions which perform subtasks of the analysis. Recent progress in the development of automated image exploitation algorithms allow, e.g., real-time moving target tracking. Another supporting measure is to provide a user interface which strives to reduce the perceptual, cognitive and motor load of the human operator for example by incorporating the operator's visual focus of attention. A gaze-enhanced user interface is able to help here. This work extends prior work on automated target recognition, segmentation, and tracking algorithms as well as about the benefits of a gaze-enhanced user interface for interaction with moving targets. We also propose a prototypical system design aiming to combine both the qualities of the human observer's perception and the automated algorithms in order to improve the overall performance of a real-time video analysis system. In this contribution, we address two novel issues analyzing gaze-based interaction with target tracking algorithms. The first issue extends the gaze-based triggering of a target tracking process, e.g., investigating how to best relaunch in the case of track loss. The second issue addresses the initialization of tracking algorithms without motion segmentation where the operator has to provide the system with the object's image region in order to start the tracking algorithm.

  11. Extended interaction network of procollagen C-proteinase enhancer-1 in the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salza, Romain; Peysselon, Franck; Chautard, Emilie; Faye, Clément; Moschcovich, Laura; Weiss, Tali; Perrin-Cocon, Laure; Lotteau, Vincent; Kessler, Efrat; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    PCPE-1 (procollagen C-proteinase enhancer-1) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that can stimulate procollagen processing by procollagen C-proteinases such as BMP-1 (bone morphogenetic protein 1). PCPE-1 interacts with several proteins in addition to procollagens and BMP-1, suggesting that it could be involved in biological processes other than collagen maturation. We thus searched for additional partners of PCPE-1 in the extracellular matrix, which could provide new insights into its biological roles. We identified 17 new partners of PCPE-1 by SPR (surface plasmon resonance) imaging. PCPE-1 forms a transient complex with the β-amyloid peptide, whereas it forms high or very high affinity complexes with laminin-111 (KD=58.8 pM), collagen VI (KD=9.5 nM), TSP-1 (thrombospondin-1) (KD1=19.9 pM, KD2=14.5 nM), collagen IV (KD=49.4 nM) and endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII (KD1=0.30 nM, KD2=1.1 nM). Endostatin binds to the NTR (netrin-like) domain of PCPE-1 and decreases the degree of superstimulation of PCPE-1 enhancing activity by heparin. The analysis of the PCPE-1 interaction network based on Gene Ontology terms suggests that, besides its role in collagen deposition, PCPE-1 might be involved in tumour growth, neurodegenerative diseases and angiogenesis. In vitro assays have indeed shown that the CUB1CUB2 (where CUB is complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and BMP-1) fragment of PCPE-1 inhibits angiogenesis.

  12. Interaction of brassinosteroids and polyamines enhances copper stress tolerance in raphanus sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sikander Pal; Oral, H Volkan; Bhardwaj, Renu; Yu, Jing-Quan; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2012-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) and polyamines (PAs) regulate various responses to abiotic stress, but their involvement in the regulation of copper (Cu) homeostasis in plants exposed to toxic levels of Cu is poorly understood. This study provides an analysis of the effects of exogenously applied BRs and PAs on radish (Raphanus sativus) plants exposed to toxic concentrations of Cu. The interaction of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR, an active BR) and spermidine (Spd, an active PA) on gene expression and the physiology of radish plants resulted in enhanced tolerance to Cu stress. Results indicated that the combined application of EBR and Spd modulated the expression of genes encoding PA enzymes and genes that impact the metabolism of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) resulting in enhanced Cu stress tolerance. Altered expression of genes implicated in Cu homeostasis appeared to be the main effect of EBR and Spd leading to Cu stress alleviation in radish. Ion leakage, in vivo imaging of H(2)O(2), comet assay, and improved tolerance of Cu-sensitive yeast strains provided further evidence for the ability of EBR and Spd to improve Cu tolerance significantly. The study indicates that co-application of EBR and Spd is an effective approach for Cu detoxification and the maintenance of Cu homeostasis in plants. Therefore, the use of these compounds in agricultural production systems should be explored.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide interacts with calcium signaling to enhance the chromium tolerance in Setaria italica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huihui; Jing, Tao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Zhuping; Pei, Yanxi

    2014-12-01

    The oscillation of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration is a primary event in numerous biological processes in plants, including stress response. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an emerging gasotransmitter, was found to have positive effects in plants responding to chromium (Cr(6+)) stress through interacting with Ca(2+) signaling. While Ca(2+) resemblances H2S in mediating biotic and abiotic stresses, crosstalk between the two pathways remains unclear. In this study, Ca(2+) signaling interacted with H2S to produce a complex physiological response, which enhanced the Cr(6+) tolerance in foxtail millet (Setaria italica). Results indicate that Cr(6+) stress activated endogenous H2S synthesis as well as Ca(2+) signaling. Moreover, toxic symptoms caused by Cr(6+) stress were strongly moderated by 50μM H2S and 20mM Ca(2+). Conversely, treatments with H2S synthesis inhibitor and Ca(2+) chelators prior to Cr(6+)-exposure aggravated these toxic symptoms. Interestingly, Ca(2+) upregulated expression of two important factors in metal metabolism, MT3A and PCS, which participated in the biosynthesis of heavy metal chelators, in a H2S-dependent manner to cope with Cr(6+) stress. These findings also suggest that the H2S dependent pathway is a component of the Ca(2+) activating antioxidant system and H2S partially contributes Ca(2+)-activating antioxidant system.

  14. Interaction of bombesin and its fragments with gold nanoparticles analyzed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Kim, Younkyoo; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    This work demonstrates the application of commercially available stable surface composed of gold nanograins with diameters ranging from 70 to 226 nm deposited onto silicon wafer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering investigations of biologically active compounds, such as bombesin (BN) and its fragments. BN is an important neurotransmitter involved in a complex signaling pathways and biological responses; for instance, hypertensive action, contractive on uterus, colon or ileum, locomotor activity, stimulation of gastric and insulin secretion as well as growth promotion of various tumor cell lines, including: lung, prostate, stomach, colon, and breast. It has also been shown that 8-14 BN C-terminal fragment partially retains the biological activity of BN. The SERS results for BN and its fragment demonstrated that (1) three amino acids from these peptides sequence; i.e., L-histidine, L-methionine, and L-tryptophan, are involved in the interaction with gold coated silicon wafer and (2) the strength of these interactions depends upon the aforementioned amino acids position in the peptide sequence.

  15. Mobile Mixed-Reality Interfaces That Enhance Human–Robot Interaction in Shared Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A. Frank

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although user interfaces with gesture-based input and augmented graphics have promoted intuitive human–robot interactions (HRI, they are often implemented in remote applications on research-grade platforms requiring significant training and limiting operator mobility. This paper proposes a mobile mixed-reality interface approach to enhance HRI in shared spaces. As a user points a mobile device at the robot’s workspace, a mixed-reality environment is rendered providing a common frame of reference for the user and robot to effectively communicate spatial information for performing object manipulation tasks, improving the user’s situational awareness while interacting with augmented graphics to intuitively command the robot. An evaluation with participants is conducted to examine task performance and user experience associated with the proposed interface strategy in comparison to conventional approaches that utilize egocentric or exocentric views from cameras mounted on the robot or in the environment, respectively. Results indicate that, despite the suitability of the conventional approaches in remote applications, the proposed interface approach provides comparable task performance and user experiences in shared spaces without the need to install operator stations or vision systems on or around the robot. Moreover, the proposed interface approach provides users the flexibility to direct robots from their own visual perspective (at the expense of some physical workload and leverages the sensing capabilities of the tablet to expand the robot’s perceptual range.

  16. Solubility enhancement of simvastatin by arginine: thermodynamics, solute-solvent interactions, and spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meor Mohd Affandi, M M R; Tripathy, Minaketan; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Majeed, A B A

    2016-01-01

    We examined the solubility of simvastatin in water in 0.01 mol·dm(-3), 0.02 mol·dm(-3), 0.04 mol·dm(-3), 0.09 mol·dm(-3), 0.18 mol·dm(-3), 0.36 mol·dm(-3), and 0.73 mol·dm(-3) arginine (ARG) solutions. The investigated drug is termed the solute, whereas ARG the cosolute. Phase solubility studies illustrated a higher extent of solubility enhancement for simvastatin. The aforementioned system was subjected to conductometric and volumetric measurements at temperatures (T) of 298.15 K, 303.15 K, 308.15 K, and 313.15 K to illustrate the thermodynamics involved and related solute-solvent interactions. The conductance values were used to evaluate the limiting molar conductance and association constants. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG (0), ΔH (0), ΔS (0), and E s) for the association process of the solute in the aqueous solutions of ARG were calculated. Limiting partial molar volumes and expansibilities were evaluated from the density values. These values are discussed in terms of the solute-solvent and solute-cosolute interactions. Further, these systems were analyzed using ultraviolet-visible analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and (13)C, (1)H, and two-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance to complement thermophysical explanation.

  17. Depth of interaction detection with enhanced position-sensitive proportional resistor network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Benlloch, J.M. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Pavon, N. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Gimenez, N. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Fernandez, M. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Gimenez, M. [Instituto de Fisisca Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), Apdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Sebastia, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Martinez, J. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Mora, F.J. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-01-21

    A new method of determining the depth of interaction of {gamma}-rays in thick inorganic scintillation crystals was tested experimentally. The method uses the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution within large continuous crystals and the {gamma}-ray's interaction depth. This behavior was successfully reproduced by a theoretical model distribution based on the inverse square law. For the determination of the distribution's width, its standard deviation {sigma} is computed using an enhanced position-sensitive proportional resistor network which is often used in {gamma}-ray-imaging devices. Minor changes of this known resistor network allow the analog and real-time determination of the light distribution's 2nd moment without impairing the measurement of the energy and centroid. First experimental results are presented that confirm that the described method works correctly. Since only some cheap electronic components, but no additional detectors or crystals are required, the main advantage of this method is its low cost.

  18. Folic acid-polydopamine nanofibers show enhanced ordered-stacking via π-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hailong; Yu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Liu, Huihui; Nie, Zongxiu; Wu, Decheng; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2015-06-21

    Recent research has indicated that polydopamine and synthetic eumelanins are optoelectronic biomaterials in which one-dimensional aggregates composed of ordered-stacking oligomers have been proposed as unique organic semiconductors. However, improving the ordered-stacking of oligomers in polydopamine nanostructures is a big challenge. Herein, we first demonstrate how folic acid molecules influence the morphology and nanostructure of polydopamine via tuning the π-π interactions of oligomers. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry reveals that porphyrin-like tetramers are characteristic of folic acid-polydopamine (FA-PDA) nanofibers. X-ray diffraction combined with simulation studies indicate that these oligomers favour aggregation into graphite-like ordered nanostructures via strong π-π interactions. High-resolution TEM characterization of carbonized FA-PDA hybrids show that in FA-PDA nanofibers the size of the graphite-like domains is over 100 nm. The addition of folic acid in polydopamine enhances the ordered stacking of oligomers in its nanostructure. Our study steps forward to discover the mystery of the structure-property relationship of FA-PDA hybrids. It paves a way to optimize the properties of PDA through the design and selection of oligomer structures.

  19. Interaction of manganese(II) complex with apotransferrin and the apotransferrin enhanced anticancer activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Xu, Xiao-Lei; Li, Zan; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Apotransferrin could bind a number of metal ions besides Fe, which makes it an attractive delivery vehicle for metal-based medicines. In order to evaluate whether anticancer Mn(II) complex of [(Adpa)Mn(Cl)(H2O)] Adpa = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amino-2-propionic acid) (AdpaMn) could be transported by apotransferrin, we investigated its interaction with human apotransferrin by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). The association dynamics show that AdpaMn could bind to apotransferrin spontaneously in Hepes buffer. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy show that the conjugation of AdpaMn and apotransferrin by hydrophobic interactions induces the change of the microenvironment and conformation of apotransferrin. The reversible binding and release of AdpaMn was studied with fluorescence titration method. The AdpaMn complex can be released from the AdpaMn-apotransferrin entity in weak acid environments. MTT assay in vitro confirms that apotransferrin can enhance the inhibition rate of AdpaMn on the proliferation of HepG-2 cells, so we deduce that AdpaMn could be transported by apotransferrin in vivo.

  20. RNA:RNA interaction can enhance RNA localization in Drosophila oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartswood, Eve; Brodie, Jim; Vendra, Georgia; Davis, Ilan; Finnegan, David J

    2012-04-01

    RNA localization is a key mechanism for targeting proteins to particular subcellular domains. Sequences necessary and sufficient for localization have been identified, but little is known about factors that affect its kinetics. Transcripts of gurken and the I factor, a non-LTR retrotransposon, colocalize at the nucleus in the dorso-antero corner of the Drosophila oocyte directed by localization signals, the GLS and ILS. I factor RNA localizes faster than gurken after injection into oocytes, due to a difference in the intrinsic localization ability of the GLS and ILS. The kinetics of localization of RNA containing the ILS are enhanced by the presence of a stem-loop, the A loop. This acts as an RNA:RNA interaction element in vivo and in vitro, and stimulates localization of RNA containing other localization signals. RNA:RNA interaction may be a general mechanism for modulating RNA localization and could allow an mRNA that lacks a localization signal to hitchhike on another RNA that has one.

  1. Enhanced PM2.5 pollution in China due to aerosol-cloud interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Gu, Yu; Li, Qinbin; Jiang, Jonathan H; Su, Hui; He, Cenlin; Tseng, Hsien-Liang R; Wang, Shuxiao; Liu, Run; Qi, Ling; Lee, Wei-Liang; Hao, Jiming

    2017-06-30

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (aerosol indirect effects) play an important role in regional meteorological variations, which could further induce feedback on regional air quality. While the impact of aerosol-cloud interactions on meteorology and climate has been extensively studied, their feedback on air quality remains unclear. Using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model, we find that increased aerosol loading due to anthropogenic activities in China substantially increases column cloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path (LWP), which further leads to a reduction in the downward shortwave radiation at surface, surface air temperature and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height. The shallower PBL and accelerated cloud chemistry due to larger LWP in turn enhance the concentrations of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) by up to 33.2 μg m(-3) (25.1%) and 11.0 μg m(-3) (12.5%) in January and July, respectively. Such a positive feedback amplifies the changes in PM2.5 concentrations, indicating an additional air quality benefit under effective pollution control policies but a penalty for a region with a deterioration in PM2.5 pollution. Additionally, we show that the cloud processing of aerosols, including wet scavenging and cloud chemistry, could also have substantial effects on PM2.5 concentrations.

  2. Preferential accumulation and enhanced relative velocity of inertial droplets due to interactions with homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Colin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present results from wind tunnel experiments on the evolution of small inertial (d ~ 10 - 200 μm) water droplets in homogeneous, isotropic, slowly decaying grid turbulence. High-speed imaging and a Particle Tracking algorithm are used to calculate relative velocity distributions. We analyze the preferential concentration, via the 2D Radial Distribution Function, and enhanced relative velocity of droplets resulting from their inertial interactions with the underlying turbulence. The two-dimensional particle velocities, measured from multi-image tracks along a streamwise plane, are conditionally analyzed with respect to the distance from the nearest particle. We focus on the non-normality of the statistics for the particle-particle separation velocity component to examine the influence of the inertial interaction with the turbulence on the dynamics of the droplets. We observe a negative bias (in the mean and mode) in the separation velocity of particles for short separations, signaling a tendency of particles to collide more frequently than a random agitation by turbulence would predict. The tails of the distribution are interpreted in terms of the collision/coalescence process and the probability of collisions that do not lead to coalescence.

  3. Enhancement of the maximum proton energy by funnel-geometry target in laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Dapeng; Li, Yuxiao

    2016-09-01

    Enhancement of the maximum proton energy using a funnel-geometry target is demonstrated through particle simulations of laser-plasma interactions. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminate a thin foil target, the foil electrons are pushed by the laser ponderomotive force, and then form an electron cloud at the target rear surface. The electron cloud generates a strong electrostatic field, which accelerates the protons to high energies. If there is a hole in the rear of target, the shape of the electron cloud and the distribution of the protons will be affected by the protuberant part of the hole. In this paper, a funnel-geometry target is proposed to improve the maximum proton energy. Using particle-in-cell 2-dimensional simulations, the transverse electric field generated by the side wall of four different holes are calculated, and protons inside holes are restricted to specific shapes by these field. In the funnel-geometry target, more protons are restricted near the center of the longitudinal accelerating electric field, thus protons experiencing longer accelerating time and distance in the sheath field compared with that in a traditional cylinder hole target. Accordingly, more and higher energy protons are produced from the funnel-geometry target. The maximum proton energy is improved by about 4 MeV compared with a traditional cylinder-shaped hole target. The funnel-geometry target serves as a new method to improve the maximum proton energy in laser-plasma interactions.

  4. Interactive Hierarchical-Flow Segmentation of Scar Tissue From Late-Enhancement Cardiac MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajchl, Martin; Yuan, Jing; White, James A; Ukwatta, Eranga; Stirrat, John; Nambakhsh, Cyrus M S; Li, Feng P; Peters, Terry M

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel multi-region image segmentation approach to extract myocardial scar tissue from 3-D whole-heart cardiac late-enhancement magnetic resonance images in an interactive manner. For this purpose, we developed a graphical user interface to initialize a fast max-flow-based segmentation algorithm and segment scar accurately with progressive interaction. We propose a partially-ordered Potts (POP) model to multi-region segmentation to properly encode the known spatial consistency of cardiac regions. Its generalization introduces a custom label/region order constraint to Potts model to multi-region segmentation. The combinatorial optimization problem associated with the proposed POP model is solved by means of convex relaxation, for which a novel multi-level continuous max-flow formulation, i.e., the hierarchical continuous max-flow (HMF) model, is proposed and studied. We demonstrate that the proposed HMF model is dual or equivalent to the convex relaxed POP model and introduces a new and efficient hierarchical continuous max-flow based algorithm by modern convex optimization theory. In practice, the introduced hierarchical continuous max-flow based algorithm can be implemented on the parallel GPU to achieve significant acceleration in numerics. Experiments are performed in 50 whole heart 3-D LE datasets, 35 with left-ventricular and 15 with right-ventricular scar. The experimental results are compared to full-width-at-half-maximum and Signal-threshold to reference-mean methods using manual expert myocardial segmentations and operator variabilities and the effect of user interaction are assessed. The results indicate a substantial reduction in image processing time with robust accuracy for detection of myocardial scar. This is achieved without the need for additional region constraints and using a single optimization procedure, substantially reducing the potential for error.

  5. Enhancement of proinflammatory and procoagulant responses to silica particles by monocyte-endothelial cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic particles, such as drug carriers or contrast agents, are often introduced into the vascular system. Many key components of the in vivo vascular environment include monocyte-endothelial cell interactions, which are important in the initiation of cardiovascular disease. To better understand the effect of particles on vascular function, the present study explored the direct biological effects of particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and monocytes (THP-1 cells. In addition, the integrated effects and possible mechanism of particle-mediated monocyte-endothelial cell interactions were investigated using a coculture model of HUVECs and THP-1 cells. Fe3O4 and SiO2 particles were chosen as the test materials in the present study. Results The cell viability data from an MTS assay showed that exposure to Fe3O4 or SiO2 particles at concentrations of 200 μg/mL and above significantly decreased the cell viability of HUVECs, but no significant loss in viability was observed in the THP-1 cells. TEM images indicated that with the accumulation of SiO2 particles in the cells, the size, structure and morphology of the lysosomes significantly changed in HUVECs, whereas the lysosomes of THP-1 cells were not altered. Our results showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS generation; the production of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and IL-1β; and the expression of CD106, CD62E and tissue factor in HUVECs and monocytes were significantly enhanced to a greater degree in the SiO2-particle-activated cocultures compared with the individual cell types alone. In contrast, exposure to Fe3O4 particles had no impact on the activation of monocytes or endothelial cells in monoculture or coculture. Moreover, using treatment with the supernatants of SiO2-particle-stimulated monocytes or HUVECs, we found that the enhancement of proinflammatory response by SiO2

  6. Outsourcing of labour recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Gemrich, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the project is to introduce the reader to the world of possibilities, advantages and disadvantages of current outsourcing, to highlight the factors limiting the use of outsourcing and the risks. Practical example then tries to introduce the reader to the creation and the process of the outsourcing relationship and to define the benefits and limitations resulting from the outsourcing of labour recruitment as part of personnel work.

  7. Apm4, the mu subunit of yeast AP-2 interacts with Pkc1, and mutation of the Pkc1 consensus phosphorylation site Thr176 inhibits AP-2 recruitment to endocytic sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa-y-Lazo, Bernardo; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2014-01-01

    The AP-2 endocytic adaptor has been extensively characterized in mammalian cells and is considered to play a role both in cargo binding and in formation of endocytic sites. However, despite our detailed knowledge of mechanistic aspects of endocytic complex assembly and disassembly in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, no function of AP-2 had been described in wild-type yeast under normal growth conditions. A recent study however revealed that disruption of the complex caused by deletion of the gene encoding its mu subunit (APM4) caused defects in cell polarity such that responses to pheromone, nutritional status and cell wall damage were affected. Furthermore, a homozygous deletion of the mu subunit gene in Candida albicans affected its ability to grow hyphae. Direct binding to the yeast cell wall stress sensor Mid2 was detected, and in an apm4 deletion strain Mid2 showed reduced re-localization to the mother bud neck region following cell wall damage with calcofluor or to the mating projection tip. Here we demonstrate an interaction between Apm4 and the yeast cell wall integrity pathway component Pkc1 and show that mutation of the predicted Pkc1 site in the Apm4 hinge region affects recruitment of the AP-2 complex to endocytic sites. PMID:25346786

  8. Intramanchette transport during primate spermiogenesis:expression of dynein, myosin Va, motor recruiter myosin Va,Ⅶa-Rab27a/b interacting protein, and Rab27b in the manchette during human and monkey spermiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinichi Hayasaka; Yukihiro Terada; Kichiya Suzuki; Haruo Murakawa; Ikuo Tachibana; Tadashi Sankai; Takashi Murakami; Nobuo Yaegashi; Kunihiro Okamura

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To show whether molecular motor dynein on a microtubule track, molecular motor myosin Va, motor recruiter myosin Va, Ⅶa-Rab27a/b interacting protein (MyRIP), and vesicle receptor Rab27b on an F-actin track were present during human and monkey spermiogenesis involving intramanchette transport (IMT). Methods: Spermiogenic cells were obtained from three men with obstructive azoospermia and normal adult cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascieularis). Immunocytochemical detection and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the pro- teins were carried out. Samples were analyzed by light microscope. Results: Using RT-PCR, we found that dynein, myosin Va, MyRIP and Rab27b were expressed in monkey testis. These proteins were localized to the manchette, as shown by immunofluorescence, particularly during human and monkey spermiogenesis. Conclusion: We speculate that during primate spermiogenesis, those proteins that compose microtubule-based and actin-based vesicle transport systems are actually present in the manchette and might possibly be involved in intramanchette transport. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 561-568)

  9. The Mre11 protein interacts with both Rad50 and the HerA bipolar helicase and is recruited to DNA following gamma irradiation in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forterre Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquitous Rad50 and Mre11 proteins play a key role in many processes involved in the maintenance of genome integrity in Bacteria and Eucarya, but their function in the Archaea is presently unknown. We showed previously that in most hyperthermophilic archaea, rad50-mre11 genes are linked to nurA encoding both a single-strand endonuclease and a 5' to 3' exonuclease, and herA, encoding a bipolar DNA helicase which suggests the involvement of the four proteins in common molecular pathway(s. Since genetic tools for hyperthermophilic archaea are just emerging, we utilized immuno-detection approaches to get the first in vivo data on the role(s of these proteins in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Results We first showed that S. acidocaldarius can repair DNA damage induced by high doses of gamma rays, and we performed a time course analysis of the total levels and sub-cellular partitioning of Rad50, Mre11, HerA and NurA along with the RadA recombinase in both control and irradiated cells. We found that during the exponential phase, all proteins are synthesized and display constant levels, but that all of them exhibit a different sub-cellular partitioning. Following gamma irradiation, both Mre11 and RadA are immediately recruited to DNA and remain DNA-bound in the course of DNA repair. Furthermore, we show by immuno-precipitation assays that Rad50, Mre11 and the HerA helicase interact altogether. Conclusion Our analyses strongly support that in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the Mre11 protein and the RadA recombinase might play an active role in the repair of DNA damage introduced by gamma rays and/or may act as DNA damage sensors. Moreover, our results demonstrate the functional interaction between Mre11, Rad50 and the HerA helicase and suggest that each protein play different roles when acting on its own or in association with its partners. This report provides the first in vivo evidence supporting the

  10. Learning communities: the link to recruitment and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Sherry; Polifroni, E Carol

    2005-01-01

    The professional learning community is a strategy to help staff development educators address recruitment and retention and organizational culture. The purpose of this article is to analyze the concept of learning communities and discuss their potential to increase the recruitment and retention of new graduate nurses and returning practitioners to the nursing profession. Incorporating learning communities into the healthcare organization will decrease the number of nurses leaving nursing, foster retention, and thus, enhance recruitment.

  11. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  12. Neuron-astrocyte interaction enhance GABAergic synaptic transmission in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław eKaczor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain and mechanisms of GABAergic inhibition have been intensely investigated in the past decades. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of astrocytes in shaping GABAergic currents. One of the most obvious, but yet poorly understood, mechanisms of the cross-talk between GABAergic currents and astrocytes is metabolism including neurotransmitter homeostasis. In particular, how modulation of GABAergic currents by astrocytes depends on key enzymes involved in cellular metabolism remains largely unknown. To address this issue, we have considered two simple models of neuronal cultures: nominally astrocyte-free neuronal culture (NC and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures (ANCC and miniature Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents (mIPSCs were recorded in control conditions and in the presence of respective enzyme blockers. We report that enrichment of neuronal culture with astrocytes results in a marked increase in mIPSC frequency. This enhancement of GABAergic activity was accompanied by increased number of GAD65 and vGAT puncta, indicating that at least a part of the frequency enhancement was due to increased number of synaptic contacts. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (with MSO strongly reduced mIPSC frequency in ANCC but had no effect in NC. Moreover, treatment of ANCC with inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (BAYU6751 or with selective inhibitor of astrocytic Krebs cycle,fluoroacetate, resulted in a marked reduction of mIPSC frequency in ANCC having no effect in NC. We conclude that GABAergic synaptic transmission strongly depends on neuron-astrocyte interaction in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes as well as on the Krebs cycle.

  13. Recruitment and retention of mental health workers in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Jack

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The lack of trained mental health workers is a primary contributor to the mental health treatment gap worldwide. Despite the great need to recruit and retain mental health workers in low-income countries, little is known about how these workers perceive their jobs and what drives them to work in mental health care. Using qualitative interviews, we aimed to explore factors motivating mental health workers in order to inform interventions to increase recruitment and retention. METHODS: We conducted 28 in-depth, open-ended interviews with staff in Ghana's three public psychiatric hospitals. We used the snowballing method to recruit participants and the constant comparative method for qualitative data analysis, with multiple members of the research team participating in data coding to enhance the validity and reliability of the analysis. The use of qualitative methods allowed us to understand the range and depth of motivating and demotivating factors. RESULTS: Respondents described many factors that influenced their choice to enter and remain in mental health care. Motivating factors included 1 desire to help patients who are vulnerable and in need, 2 positive day-to-day interactions with patients, 3 intellectual or academic interest in psychiatry or behavior, and 4 good relationships with colleagues. Demotivating factors included 1 lack of resources at the hospital, 2 a rigid supervisory hierarchy, 3 lack of positive or negative feedback on work performance, and 4 few opportunities for career advancement within mental health. CONCLUSIONS: Because many of the factors are related to relationships, these findings suggest that strengthening the interpersonal and team dynamics may be a critical and relatively low cost way to increase worker motivation. The data also allowed us to highlight key areas for resource allocation to improve both recruitment and retention, including risk pay, adequate tools for patient care, improved hospital work

  14. Transcriptional reprogramming underpins enhanced plant growth promotion by the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma hamatum GD12 during antagonistic interactions with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sophie; Le Cocq, Kate; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Moore, Karen; Winsbury, Rebecca; de Torres Zabala, Marta; Studholme, David J; Salmon, Deborah; Thornton, Christopher R; Grant, Murray R

    2016-12-01

    The free-living soil fungus Trichoderma hamatum strain GD12 is notable amongst Trichoderma strains in both controlling plant diseases and stimulating plant growth, a property enhanced during its antagonistic interactions with pathogens in soil. These attributes, alongside its markedly expanded genome and proteome compared with other biocontrol and plant growth-promoting Trichoderma strains, imply a rich potential for sustainable alternatives to synthetic pesticides and fertilizers for the control of plant disease and for increasing yields. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transcriptional responses of GD12 underpinning its biocontrol and plant growth promotion capabilities during antagonistic interactions with the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in soil. Using an extensive mRNA-seq study capturing different time points during the pathogen-antagonist interaction in soil, we show that dynamic and biphasic signatures in the GD12 transcriptome underpin its biocontrol and plant (lettuce) growth-promoting activities. Functional predictions of differentially expressed genes demonstrate the enrichment of transcripts encoding proteins involved in transportation and oxidation-reduction reactions during both processes and an over-representation of siderophores. We identify a biphasic response during biocontrol characterized by a significant induction of transcripts encoding small-secreted cysteine-rich proteins, secondary metabolite-producing gene clusters and genes unique to GD12. These data support the hypothesis that Sclerotinia biocontrol is mediated by the synthesis and secretion of antifungal compounds and that GD12's unique reservoir of uncharacterized genes is actively recruited during the effective biological control of a plurivorous plant pathogen. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkla, Anna M., E-mail: a.m.dinkla@amc.uva.nl; Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  16. AMPAKINE enhancement of social interaction in the BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, J L; Oliver, C F; Karras, M N; Gastrell, P T; Crawley, J N

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder in which the first diagnostic symptom is unusual reciprocal social interactions. Approximately half of the children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder also have intellectual impairments. General cognitive abilities may be fundamental to many aspects of social cognition. Cognitive enhancers could conceivably be of significant benefit to children and adults with autism. AMPAKINE compounds are a novel class of pharmacological agents that act as positive modulators of AMPA receptors to enhance excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. This class of compounds was reported to improve learning and memory in several rodent and non-human primate tasks, and to normalize respiratory abnormalities in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Here we evaluate the actions of AMPA compounds in adult male and female BTBR mice, a well characterized mouse model of autism. Acute treatment with CX1837 and CX1739 reversed the deficit in sociability in BTBR mice on the most sensitive parameter, time spent sniffing a novel mouse as compared to time spent sniffing a novel object. The less sensitive parameter, time in the chamber containing the novel mouse versus time in the chamber containing the novel object, was not rescued by CX1837 or CX1739 treatment. Preliminary data with CX546, in which β-cyclodextrin was the vehicle, revealed behavioral effects of the acute intraperitoneal and oral administration of vehicle alone. To circumvent the artifacts introduced by the vehicle administration, we employed a novel treatment regimen using pellets of peanut butter for drug delivery. Absence of vehicle treatment effects when CX1837 and CX1739 were given in the peanut butter pellets, to multiple cohorts of BTBR and B6 control mice, confirmed that the pharmacologically-induced improvements in sociability in BTBR were not confounded by the administration procedures. The highest dose of CX1837 improved the cognitive deficit in novel object recognition in BTBR

  17. Mdm2 RING mutation enhances p53 transcriptional activity and p53-p300 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary V Clegg

    Full Text Available The p53 transcription factor and tumor suppressor is regulated primarily by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates p53 to target it for proteasomal degradation. Aside from its ubiquitin ligase function, Mdm2 has been believed to be capable of suppressing p53's transcriptional activity by binding with and masking the transactivation domain of p53. The ability of Mdm2 to restrain p53 activity by binding alone, without ubiquitination, was challenged by a 2007 study using a knockin mouse harboring a single cysteine-to-alanine point mutation (C462A in Mdm2's RING domain. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with this mutation, which abrogates Mdm2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity without affecting its ability to bind with p53, were unable to suppress p53 activity. In this study, we utilized the Mdm2(C462A mouse model to characterize in further detail the role of Mdm2's RING domain in the control of p53. Here, we show in vivo that the Mdm2(C462A protein not only fails to suppress p53, but compared to the complete absence of Mdm2, Mdm2(C462A actually enhances p53 transcriptional activity toward p53 target genes p21/CDKN1A, MDM2, BAX, NOXA, and 14-3-3σ. In addition, we found that Mdm2(C462A facilitates the interaction between p53 and the acetyltransferase CBP/p300, and it fails to heterodimerize with its homolog and sister regulator of p53, Mdmx, suggesting that a fully intact RING domain is required for Mdm2's inhibition of the p300-p53 interaction and for its interaction with Mdmx. These findings help us to better understand the complex regulation of the Mdm2-p53 pathway and have important implications for chemotherapeutic agents targeting Mdm2, as they suggest that inhibition of Mdm2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity may be sufficient for increasing p53 activity in vivo, without the need to block Mdm2-p53 binding.

  18. Recruitment Practices And Institutional Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anna; Ulhøi, John Parm

    as a theoretical lens in order to understand how shared rules, norms and beliefs guide recruitment professionals in their choice of recruitment tactics and ways of performing recruitment tasks. Our findings suggest that recruitment practices have been strongly influenced by changes in the labour market, technology......Up to now, there has been little research on recruitment practices from an organizational perspective, and in part it lags behind practice. This paper attempts to rectify this by studying recent changes in the recruitment practices of Danish organizations. We employ new institutional theory......, and individuals’ social cognition. Among other things, this is reflected in the use of online recruitment and employer branding. The study concludes that the recruitment field has transformed and reviewed its practices due to institutional changes in how individuals search for employment and expect to be hired....

  19. Recruitment Requires an Informed Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Leon

    1975-01-01

    The personal approach of the Ohio Recruitment Commission for Agricultural Education has been very effective in recruiting potential vocational agriculture teachers from junior and senior high school classes. (EA)

  20. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Miyake, Katsuhide, E-mail: miyake@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Iijima, Shinji [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  1. IQGAP1 Scaffold-MAP Kinase Interactions Enhance Multiple Myeloma Clonogenic Growth and Self-Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocke, Christian B; McMillan, Ross; Wang, Qiuju; Begum, Asma; Penchev, Vesselin R; Ali, Syed A; Borrello, Ivan; Huff, Carol Ann; Matsui, William

    2016-11-01

    Despite improved outcomes in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, virtually all patients relapse and ultimately develop drug-resistant disease. Aberrant RAS/MAPK signaling is activated in the majority of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma patients, but its biological consequences are not fully understood. Self-renewal, as defined by the long-term maintenance of clonogenic growth, is essential for disease relapse, and we examined the role of RAS/MAPK activation on multiple myeloma self-renewal by targeting IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), an intracellular scaffold protein required for mutant RAS signaling. We found that loss of IQGAP1 expression decreased MAPK signaling, cell-cycle progression, and tumor colony formation. Similarly, a peptide mimicking the WW domain of IQGAP1 that interacts with ERK inhibited the clonogenic growth and self-renewal of multiple myeloma cell lines and primary clinical specimens in vitro as well as tumor-initiating cell frequency in immunodeficient mice. During multiple myeloma progression, self-renewal may be enhanced by aberrant RAS/MAPK signaling and inhibited by targeting IQGAP1. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2733-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Reward favours the prepared: incentive and task-informative cues interact to enhance attentional control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Kimberly S.; Braver, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    The dual mechanisms of control account suggests that cognitive control may be implemented through relatively proactive mechanisms in anticipation of stimulus onset, or through reactive mechanisms, triggered in response to changing stimulus demands. Reward incentives and task-informative cues (signaling the presence/absence of upcoming cognitive demand) have both been found to influence cognitive control in a proactive or preparatory fashion; yet, it is currently unclear whether and how such cue effects interact. We investigated this in two experiments using an adapted flanker paradigm, where task-informative and reward incentive cues were orthogonally manipulated on a trial-by-trial basis. In Experiment 1, results indicated that incentives not only speed RTs, but specifically reduce both interference and facilitation effects when combined with task-informative cues, suggesting enhanced proactive attentional control. Experiment 2 manipulated the timing of incentive cue information, demonstrating that such proactive control effects were only replicated with sufficient time to process the incentive cue (Early Incentive); when incentive signals were presented close to target onset (Late Incentive) the primary effect was a speed-accuracy tradeoff. Together, results suggest that advance cueing may trigger differing control strategies, and that these strategies may critically depend on both the timing – and the motivational incentive – to use such cues. PMID:26322689

  3. NRIP enhances HPV gene expression via interaction with either GR or E2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Lu, Pei-Yu; Guo, Jih-Huong [Graduate Institute of Microbiology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Tzung-Chieh [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 600-04, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Yeou-Ping [Department of Ophthalmology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Chen, Show-Li, E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Microbiology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-05

    We previously identified a gene, nuclear receptor-interaction protein (NRIP), which functions as a transcription cofactor in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and human papillomavirus E2 (HPV E2)-driven gene expression. Here, we comprehensively evaluated the role of NRIP in HPV-16 gene expression. NRIP acts as a transcription cofactor to enhance GR-regulated HPV-16 gene expression in the presence of hormone. NRIP also can form complex with E2 that caused NRIP-induced HPV gene expression via E2-binding sites in a hormone-independent manner. Furthermore, NRIP can associate with GR and E2 to form tri-protein complex to activate HPV gene expression via GRE, not the E2-binding site, in a hormone-dependent manner. These results indicate that NRIP and GR are viral E2-binding proteins and that NRIP regulates HPV gene expression via GRE and/or E2 binding site in the HPV promoter in a hormone-dependent or independent manner, respectively.

  4. The use of interactive computer vision and robot hand controllers for enhancing manufacturing safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Jacobus, Charles J.; Peurach, Thomas M.; Mitchell, Brian T.

    1994-01-01

    Current available robotic systems provide limited support for CAD-based model-driven visualization, sensing algorithm development and integration, and automated graphical planning systems. This paper describes ongoing work which provides the functionality necessary to apply advanced robotics to automated manufacturing and assembly operations. An interface has been built which incorporates 6-DOF tactile manipulation, displays for three dimensional graphical models, and automated tracking functions which depend on automated machine vision. A set of tools for single and multiple focal plane sensor image processing and understanding has been demonstrated which utilizes object recognition models. The resulting tool will enable sensing and planning from computationally simple graphical objects. A synergistic interplay between human and operator vision is created from programmable feedback received from the controller. This approach can be used as the basis for implementing enhanced safety in automated robotics manufacturing, assembly, repair and inspection tasks in both ground and space applications. Thus, an interactive capability has been developed to match the modeled environment to the real task environment for safe and predictable task execution.

  5. Analysis of enhanced modal damping ratio in porous materials using an acoustic-structure interaction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghwan Kook

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the enhancement of the damping ratio of a structure with embedded microbeam resonators in air-filled internal cavities. In this context, we discuss theoretical aspects in the framework of the effective modal damping ratio (MDR and derive an approximate relation expressing how an increased damping due to the acoustic medium surrounding the microbeam affect the MDR of the macrobeam. We further analyze the effect of including dissipation of the acoustic medium by using finite element (FE analysis with acoustic-structure interaction (ASI using a simple phenomenological acoustic loss model. An eigenvalue analysis is carried out to demonstrate the improvement of the damping characteristic of the macrobeam with the resonating microbeam in the lossy air and the results are compared to a forced vibration analysis for a macrobeam with one or multiple embedded microbeams. Finally we demonstrate the effect of randomness in terms of position and size of microbeams and discuss the difference between the phenomenological acoustic loss model and a full thermoacoustic model.

  6. Multifocal laser surgery: cutting enhancement by hydrodynamic interactions between cavitation bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toytman, I; Silbergleit, A; Simanovski, D; Palanker, D

    2010-10-01

    Transparent biological tissues can be precisely dissected with ultrafast lasers using optical breakdown in the tight focal zone. Typically, tissues are cut by sequential application of pulses, each of which produces a single cavitation bubble. We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between simultaneous cavitation bubbles originating from multiple laser foci. Simultaneous expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles can enhance the cutting efficiency, by increasing the resulting deformations in tissue, and the associated rupture zone. An analytical model of the flow induced by the bubbles is presented and experimentally verified. The threshold strain of the material rupture is measured in a model tissue. Using the computational model and the experimental value of the threshold strain one can compute the shape of the rupture zone in tissue resulting from application of multiple bubbles. With the threshold strain of 0.7 two simultaneous bubbles produce a continuous cut when applied at the distance 1.35 times greater than that required in sequential approach. Simultaneous focusing of the laser in multiple spots along the line of intended cut can extend this ratio to 1.7. Counterpropagating jets forming during collapse of two bubbles in materials with low viscosity can further extend the cutting zone-up to approximately a factor of 1.5.

  7. The Need for Perceptive Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Recruiters are crucial to their employers, especially with regard to the recruitment of highly paid technical and engineering candidates. A poor recruiter can fail by not having the ability to judge personality traits and spot the things that will spell success for the new hire and his company. (Author)

  8. 10 Ways to Recruit Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daisy

    1999-01-01

    Suggestions for recruiting teachers are as follow: talk to teens, recruit from within, involve counselors, target uncertain students, network, build relationships with tech prep, enlist military personnel, recruit extension agents, contact outplacement and employment services, and use distance-learning methods. (JOW)

  9. 10 Ways to Recruit Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daisy

    1999-01-01

    Suggestions for recruiting teachers are as follow: talk to teens, recruit from within, involve counselors, target uncertain students, network, build relationships with tech prep, enlist military personnel, recruit extension agents, contact outplacement and employment services, and use distance-learning methods. (JOW)

  10. Enhanced human memory consolidation with post-learning stress: interaction with the degree of arousal at encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Larry; Gorski, Lukasz; Le, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Abundant evidence indicates that endogenous stress hormones such as epinephrine and corticosterone modulate memory consolidation in animals. We recently provided the first demonstration that an endogenous stress hormone (epinephrine) can enhance human memory consolidation. However, these findings also suggested that post-learning stress hormone activation does not uniformly enhance memory for all recently acquired information; rather, that it interacts with the degree of arousal at initial encoding of material in modulating memory for the material. Here we tested this hypothesis by administering cold pressor stress (CPS) or a control procedure to subjects after they viewed slides of varying emotional content, and assessing memory for the slides 1 wk later. CPS, which significantly elevated salivary cortisol levels, enhanced memory for emotionally arousing slides compared with the controls, but did not affect memory for relatively neutral slides. These findings further support the view that post-learning stress hormone-related activity interacts with arousal at initial encoding to modulate memory consolidation.

  11. Recruitment Practices Change, but Issues Remain the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Esther

    2012-01-01

    What the author found most surprising about Richard Haines' survey on 1974 recruitment practices was that the major issues are still relevant. His main points about recruitment, college and counselor interaction, and the need for better information still resonate as the profession consistently calls for clarity and transparency in the college…

  12. Interaction of processes may explain induced seismicity after shut-in in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Silvia; Carrera, Jesus; Vilarrasa, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Deep fluid injection is a necessary operation in several engineering sectors, like geothermal energy production, natural gas storage, CO2 storage, etc. The seismicity associated to these activities has, in some occasions, reached unexpected magnitude, raising public concern. Moreover, the occurrence of such seismicity after the injection shut-in pointed out the incompleteness of the knowledge and the inability of fully managing these processes. On the other hand, the growing attention toward clean energy makes it clear that we cannot abandon these procedures, which have a huge potential. Therefore, deeply understanding the mechanisms that induce seismicity is crucial. In this study we consider hydraulic stimulation of deep geothermal systems and analyze the mechanisms that may induce or trigger seismicity. Given that the basic mechanism is fluid pressure increase, secondary triggering processes have been studied. In detail, we attempt to identify the potential mechanisms that may trigger seismicity in the post-injection phase, when the overpressure decreases. These mechanisms have been investigated with a coupled and uncoupled approach, in order to understand the individual effects of each one and the effects of the interactions between them on the reservoir stability. Besides fluid overpressure, another relevant process is the temperature variation. Indeed, in the case of enhanced geothermal systems, the temperature contrast between the injected cold fluid and the deep hot reservoir is great and induces thermal stress, which sensibly affects the in-situ stress field. Therefore, we have studied overpressure and temperature effects by means of analytic solutions and by means of hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-mechanical numerical simulations. Results show that in fractured rocks the spatial variability of hydraulic and mechanic parameters provokes no isotropic variation of the tensional field, in response to pressure and temperature perturbations. Another

  13. Recruiting in remote locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, C. [Enerflex Systems Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation provided details of Enerflex, a leading supplier of products and services to the oil and gas industry, and outlined their personnel hiring policies. Enerflex's core values include community involvement and divisional logo branding. The extensive training that is provided places an emphasis on employee empowerment. The company also places an emphasis on employee safety, diversity, and team building. Competitive salaries are offered along with generous equipment allowances and a flexible benefits program. Benefits include travel and overtime rates; health benefits; retirement savings; scholarship programs; career opportunities; and apprenticeship programs. External technical training is provided. An employee referral program has been developed, and the company's recruitment program also advertises in remote newspapers to develop career streams within remote communities. tabs., figs.

  14. eHealth recruitment challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Canada, Ashanti; Bhatt, Riddhi; Davis, Jennifer; Plesko, Lisa; Baranowski, Tom; Cullen, Karen; Zakeri, Issa

    2006-11-01

    Little is known about effective eHealth recruitment methods. This paper presents recruitment challenges associated with enrolling African-American girls aged 8-10 years in an eHealth obesity prevention program, their effect on the recruitment plan, and potential implications for eHealth research. Although the initial recruitment strategy was literature-informed, it failed to enroll the desired number of girls within a reasonable time period. Therefore, the recruitment strategy was reformulated to incorporate principles of social marketing and traditional marketing techniques. The resulting plan included both targeted, highly specific strategies (e.g., selected churches), and more broad-based approaches (e.g., media exposure, mass mailings, radio advertisements). The revised plan enabled recruitment goals to be attained. Media appeared to be particularly effective at reaching the intended audience. Future research should identify the most effective recruitment strategies for reaching potential eHealth audiences.

  15. Study on the Interaction between Cephalosporin Drugs and Papain by Spectroscopic Method: Equivalence of Fluorescence Quenching and Enhancement Equation%Study on the Interaction between Cephalosporin Drugs and Papain by Spectroscopic Method: Equivalence of Fluorescence Quenching and Enhancement Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨曼曼; 席小莉; 杨频

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between two 4th generation of new cephalosporin drugs and papain was studied through spectroscopy method at different temperatures. Their dissociation constants were calculated by using theoretical formula of fluorescence quenching and fluorescence enhancement, respectively, and their corresponding thermodynamic functions, dipole-dipole non-radiative energy-transfer-efficiency and the action distances of acceptor-substrate etc. were calculated further. Analysis reveals that, the quenching on papain by cefpirome and cefepime is basically due to the dipole-dipole non-radiation energy-transfer and certain dynamic collision between donor and acceptor, the interaction between drug and papain is mainly hydrophobic which may provide useful information for pharmacological and metabolic study on papain. In this paper fluorescence quenching is regarded as negative fluorescence enhancement, and two kinds of theoretical formula of fluorescence quenching and fluorescence enhancement were used to calculate the experimental data of fluorescence quenching of a same batch, and very close results were obtained but with certain difference. The results not only display the equivalence of the two theoretical equations when treating acceptor-substrate action, but also show that the thermodynamic data based on the theoretical formula of fluorescence enhancement (4), which is deduced by us, are more reasonable. So we suggest that even in the process of studying the fluorescence quenching between receptor-substrate, using the theoretical formula of fluorescence enhancement (4) can get more reliable results.

  16. Biomineralized Recombinant Collagen-Based Scaffold Mimicking Native Bone Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gloria Belén; Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2017-08-04

    The need of synthetic bone grafts that recreate from macro- to nanoscale level the biochemical and biophysical cues of bone extracellular matrix has been a major driving force for the development of new generation of biomaterials. In this study, synthetic bone substitutes have been synthesized via biomimetic mineralization of a recombinant collagen type I-derived peptide (RCP), enriched in tri-amino acid sequence arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD). Three-dimensional (3D) isotropic porous scaffolds of three different compositions are developed by freeze-drying: non-mineralized (RCP, as a control), mineralized (Ap/RCP), and mineralized scaffolds in the presence of magnesium (MgAp/RCP) that closely imitate bone composition. The effect of mineral phase on scaffold pore size, porosity, and permeability, as well as on their in vitro kinetic degradation, is evaluated. The ultimate goal is to investigate how chemical (i.e., surface chemistry and ion release from scaffold) together with physical signals (i.e., surface nanotopography) conferred via biomimetic mineralization can persuade and guide mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) interaction and fate. The three scaffold compositions showed optimum pore size and porosity for osteoconduction, without significant differences between them. The degradation tests confirmed that MgAp/RCP scaffolds presented higher reactivity under physiological condition compared to Ap/RCP ones. The in vitro study revealed an enhanced cell growth and proliferation on MgAp/RCP scaffolds at day 7, 14, and 21. Furthermore, MgAp/RCP scaffolds potentially promoted cell migration through the inner areas reaching the bottom of the scaffold after 14 days. MSCs cultured on MgAp/RCP scaffolds displayed higher gene and protein expressions of osteogenic markers when comparing them with the results of those MSCs grown on RCP or Ap/RCP scaffolds. This work highlights that mineralization of recombinant collagen mimicking bone mineral composition and morphology is a

  17. Improved coiled-coil design enhances interaction with Bcr-Abl and induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew S; Miller, Geoffrey D; Bruno, Benjamin J; Constance, Jonathan E; Woessner, David W; Fidler, Trevor P; Robertson, James C; Cheatham, Thomas E; Lim, Carol S

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl drives aberrant downstream activity through trans-autophosphorylation of homo-oligomers in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).(1, 2) The formation of Bcr-Abl oligomers is achieved through the coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus of Bcr.(3, 4) We have previously reported a modified version of this coiled-coil domain, CCmut2, which exhibits disruption of Bcr-Abl oligomeric complexes and results in decreased proliferation of CML cells and induction of apoptosis.(5) A major contributing factor to these enhanced capabilities is the destabilization of the CCmut2 homodimers, increasing the availability to interact with and inhibit Bcr-Abl. Here, we included an additional mutation (K39E) that could in turn further destabilize the mutant homodimer. Incorporation of this modification into CCmut2 (C38A, S41R, L45D, E48R, Q60E) generated what we termed CCmut3, and resulted in further improvements in the binding properties with the wild-type coiled-coil domain representative of Bcr-Abl [corrected]. A separate construct containing one revert mutation, CCmut4, did not demonstrate improved oligomeric properties and indicated the importance of the L45D mutation. CCmut3 demonstrated improved oligomerization via a two-hybrid assay as well as through colocalization studies, in addition to showing similar biologic activity as CCmut2. The improved binding between CCmut3 and the Bcr-Abl coiled-coil may be used to redirect Bcr-Abl to alternative subcellular locations with interesting therapeutic implications.

  18. Interactions among Climate Forcing, Soil Water, and Groundwater for Enhanced Water Management Practices in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J.; Hubbard, K. G.; Chen, X.

    2009-12-01

    Water is one of the most valuable and vulnerable resources. The varying precipitation regimes together with the varying land use and land cover types over the state of Nebraska necessitate continuous monitoring and modeling of soil water, particularly in the root zone. Underlying the irrigated lands is the High Plains Aquifer, one of the largest in the world. The Ogallala Aquifer is hydrologically connected with streams in numerous river valleys and with rainfall/soil water at the surface. To sustain water reserves the net effect of groundwater pumping for irrigation and recharging the ground water system by precipitation/irrigation. If the net effect is zero or positive the reserves will not shrink. The Automated Weather Data Network (AWDN) of Nebraska has intensive soil water observation and critical weather measurements. Nebraska also has ground water wells, co-located with or near some of the AWDN stations. This work was conducted to continuously monitor the soil water and groundwater table and to model the surface and subsurface hydrologic processes as an integrated/linked system. The further task is to quantify the recharge under different initial conditions, land use practices, and to combine the new information with a surface hydrology model over various sites in Nebraska. To accomplish these objectives two weather stations were installed and enhanced at Shelton and Kearney and soil probes were buried directly under the crop lands. The newly installed soil water probes are co-located with the nearby weather stations and ground water wells. All the data recorded from the atmosphere, soil and aquifer will be incorporated into AWDN data archives and will be analyzed to examine the interactions between precipitation, soil moisture and groundwater.

  19. Herbivory and drought interact to enhance spatial patterning and diversity in a savanna understory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porensky, Lauren M; Wittman, Sarah E; Riginos, Corinna; Young, Truman P

    2013-10-01

    The combination of abiotic stress and consumer stress can have complex impacts on plant community structure. Effective conservation and management of semi-arid ecosystems requires an understanding of how different stresses interact to structure plant communities. We explored the separate and combined impacts of episodic drought, livestock grazing, and wild ungulate herbivory on species co-occurrence and diversity patterns in a relatively productive, semi-arid Acacia savanna. Specifically, we analyzed 9 years of biannual plant community data from the Kenya long-term exclosure experiment, a broad-scale manipulative experiment that has excluded different combinations of large mammalian herbivores from 18 4-ha plots since 1995. During droughts, we observed low species diversity and random species co-occurrence patterns. However, when rain followed a major drought, areas exposed to moderate cattle grazing displayed high species diversity and evidence of significant species aggregation. These patterns were not apparent in the absence of cattle, even if other large herbivores were present. To explore possible mechanisms, we examined patterns separately for common and rare species. We found that aggregation patterns were likely driven by rare species responding similarly to the availability of open micro-sites. Our results indicate that in a productive, fire-suppressed savanna, the combination of periodic drought and moderate cattle grazing can enhance plant biodiversity and fine-scale spatial heterogeneity by opening up space for species that are otherwise rare or cryptic. Our findings also emphasize that domestic herbivores can have significantly stronger impacts on plant community dynamics than wild herbivores, even in an ecosystem with a long history of grazing.

  20. Strong field enhancement and light-matter interactions with all-dielectric metamaterials based on split bar resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2014-12-15

    Strong subwavelength field enhancement has often been assumed to be unique to plasmonic nanostructures. Here we propose a type of all-dielectric metamaterials based on split bar resonators. The nano gap at the centre of the resonant elements results in large local field enhancement and light localization in the surrounding medium, which can be employed for strong light-matter interactions. In a Fano-resonant dielectric metamaterial comprising pairs of asymmetric split silicon bars, the enhancement of electric field amplitude in the gap exceeds 120 while the averaged electromagnetic energy density is enhanced by more than 7000 times. An optical refractive index sensor with a potential sensitivity of 525 nm/RIU is designed based on the proposed metamaterials. The proposed concept can be applied to other types of dielectric nanostructures and may stimulate further research of dielectric metamaterials for applications ranging from nonlinear optics and sensing to the realization of new types of active lasing devices.

  1. Specific and nonspecific interactions in ultraweak protein−protein associations revealed by solvent paramagnetic relaxation enhancements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Helle; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Gesmar, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Weak and transient protein–protein interactions underlie numerous biological processes. However, the location of the interaction sites of the specific complexes and the effect of transient, non-specific protein–protein interactions often remain elusive. We have investigated the weak selfassociation...

  2. UNL-French deconversion as transfer & generation from an interlingua with possible quality enhancement through offline human interaction

    CERN Document Server

    sérasset, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    We present the architecture of the UNL-French deconverter, which "generates" from the UNL interlingua by first"localizing" the UNL form for French, within UNL, and then applying slightly adapted but classical transfer and generation techniques, implemented in GETA's Ariane-G5 environment, supplemented by some UNL-specific tools. Online interaction can be used during deconversion to enhance output quality and is now used for development purposes. We show how interaction could be delayed and embedded in the postedition phase, which would then interact not directly with the output text, but indirectly with several components of the deconverter. Interacting online or offline can improve the quality not only of the utterance at hand, but also of the utterances processed later, as various preferences may be automatically changed to let the deconverter "learn".

  3. Vibronic enhancement of excitation energy transport: Interplay between local and non-local exciton-phonon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong H.; Troisi, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    It has been reported in recent years that vibronic resonance between vibrational energy of the intramolecular nuclear mode and excitation-energy difference is crucial to enhance excitation energy transport in light harvesting proteins. Here we investigate how vibronic enhancement induced by vibronic resonance is influenced by the details of local and non-local exciton-phonon interactions. We study a heterodimer model with parameters relevant to the light-harvesting proteins with the surrogate Hamiltonian quantum dynamics method in a vibronic basis. In addition, the impact of field-driven excitation on the efficiency of population transfer is compared with the instantaneous excitation, and the effect of multi-mode vibronic coupling is presented in comparison with the coupling to a single effective vibrational mode. We find that vibronic enhancement of site population transfer is strongly suppressed with the increase of non-local exciton-phonon interaction and increasing the number of strongly coupled high-frequency vibrational modes leads to a further decrease in vibronic enhancement. Our results indicate that vibronic enhancement is present but may be much smaller than previously thought and therefore care needs to be taken when interpreting its role in excitation energy transport. Our results also suggest that non-local exciton-phonon coupling, which is related to the fluctuation of the excitonic coupling, may be as important as local exciton-phonon coupling and should be included in any quantum dynamics model.

  4. From Traditional Recruiting To E-Recruiting in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTENE Adela Suzana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recruiting is the activity that determines, in quantitative and qualitative terms, the structure of the sample of people from which the selection will be made for a specific position and / or public office, for a position that is already created in the organizational structure. The recruitment process is triggered when in the organizational structure of public institutions appear new functions or positions, or when the existing ones become vacant through retirement, death, transfer or dismissal. E-Recruiting represents the process through which the personnel is recruited using electronic resources.

  5. Detecting reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs) significantly enhancing the computational prediction of protein-protein interactions using machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Mazzocco, G; Kel, A; Wyrwicz, L S; Plewczynski, D

    2016-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a vital role in most biological processes. Hence their comprehension can promote a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying living systems. However, besides the cost and the time limitation involved in the detection of experimentally validated PPIs, the noise in the data is still an important issue to overcome. In the last decade several in silico PPI prediction methods using both structural and genomic information were developed for this purpose. Here we introduce a unique validation approach aimed to collect reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs). Thereafter the most relevant protein/protein-pair related features were selected. Finally, the prepared dataset was used for PPI classification, leveraging the prediction capabilities of well-established machine learning methods. Our best classification procedure displayed specificity and sensitivity values of 96.33% and 98.02%, respectively, surpassing the prediction capabilities of other methods, including those trained on gold standard datasets. We showed that the PPI/NIP predictive performances can be considerably improved by focusing on data preparation.

  6. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïna eBRUS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the post-partum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the dentate gyrus the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the dentate gyrus. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor.

  7. The Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX): overview and prominent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, J. R.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Konwar, M.; Deshpande, C. G.; Morwal, S. B.; Padma Kumari, B.; Joshi, R. R.; Pandithurai, G.; Bhalwankar, R. V.; Mujumdar, V. R.; Goswami, B.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2009-12-01

    “Cloud-Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX)”, an Indian national program, funded by Ministry of Earth Sciences, (MoES), Govt. of India is being conducted by Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune during the period 2009-2012. CAIPEEX has two phases. Phase I is devoted for intensive cloud and aerosol observations over different parts of India using an instrumented aircraft. Phase II is devoted for randomized precipitation enhancement experiment. The phase I is being carried out during the period May-September 2009. The main scientific objectives of Phase I are : To measure background concentrations of aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons over different parts of the country. Measurements of the associated differences in convective cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. The important preliminary results from the observational studies are: 1) During the pre-monsoon thick layer of brown haze extends to height of about 5-6 km at the foothills of the Himalaya, but does not normally spill over into the Tibetan Plateau. 2) The deep clouds that form in this layer are typically triggered at the slopes of the Himalaya. The clouds are super-continental microphysically, which means that the cloud drops are very small and prevent any warm rain. However, much ice is formed quickly, probably due to the ice nucleating activity of the aerosols. 3) In the pre-monsoon phase over central and southern India the clouds have similar nature as described for the foothills of the Himalaya, but with lower bases. Still, warm rain is substantially suppressed. During the monsoon, the clouds in the Bangalore-Hyderabad rain shadow area lose quickly their ability to produce warm rain with the increasing levels of CCN eastward away from the west coast. 4) A major finding was the dominance of thick haze in the Arabian Sea during the SW monsoon. It appears to be mostly of Arabian and

  8. Enhanced optical spin current injection in the hexagonal lattice with intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jianfei, E-mail: zoujianfei@hhu.edu.cn; Tang, Chunmei; Zhang, Aimei

    2017-04-04

    We study the photo-induced spin current injection in a hexagonal lattice with both intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions which is irradiated by a polarized light beam. It is found that the spin current injection rate could be enhanced as the graphene lattice is in the topological insulator state. Furthermore, the spin current injection rate could be remarkably modulated by the degree of polarization of light and its frequency. - Highlights: • The optical spin current could be enhanced by the intrinsic spin–orbit interaction. • The optical spin current could be modulated by the degree of polarization of light. • The maximum of the spin current injection rate is obtained.

  9. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  10. Enhanced optical spin current injection in the hexagonal lattice with intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianfei; Tang, Chunmei; Zhang, Aimei

    2017-04-01

    We study the photo-induced spin current injection in a hexagonal lattice with both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions which is irradiated by a polarized light beam. It is found that the spin current injection rate could be enhanced as the graphene lattice is in the topological insulator state. Furthermore, the spin current injection rate could be remarkably modulated by the degree of polarization of light and its frequency.

  11. Recruit and ADVANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  12. Amplitude recruitment of cochlear potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingqi; SUN Wei; SUN Jianhe; YU Ning; JIANG Sichang

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from outer hair cells (OHC) and the cochlear microphonics (CM) were recorded from scala media (SM) in three turn of guinea pig cochlea,the compound action potential (CAP) were recorded at the round window (RW) before and after the animal were exposed to white noise. The results suggest that the nonlinear properties with “saduration” of Input/output (I/O) function of OHC AC recepter potential and CM were founded; the nonlinear properties with “Low”, “Platean” and “high” of CAP also were investigated. After explosion, the threshold shift of CAP has about 10 dB. The I/O of OHC responses and CM were changed in a linearizing (i.e., nonlinearity loss), the “platean” of I/O CAP disappeared and the growth rate of CAP amplitude were larger than before explosion. The response amplitude recruitment of OHC appears to result from reduction in gain (i.e., hearing loss); It was due to the nonlinear growth function of OHC receptor potentials was changed in linearzing that the basilar membrance motion was changed in linearizing. Since intensity coding in the inner ear depends on an interactions of nonlinear basilar membrance and nerve fibers. So that it must lead to a linearizing of CAP as input responses.

  13. Removal of FKBP12 enhances mTOR-Raptor interactions, LTP, memory, and perseverative/repetitive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeffer, Charles A; Tang, Wei; Wong, Helen; Santillan, Arturo; Patterson, Richard J; Martinez, Luis A; Tejada-Simon, Maria V; Paylor, Richard; Hamilton, Susan L; Klann, Eric

    2008-12-10

    FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12) binds the immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and rapamycin and regulates several signaling pathways, including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. We determined whether the brain-specific disruption of the FKBP12 gene in mice altered mTOR signaling, synaptic plasticity, and memory. Biochemically, the FKBP12-deficient mice displayed increases in basal mTOR phosphorylation, mTOR-Raptor interactions, and p70 S6 kinase (S6K) phosphorylation. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that FKBP12 deficiency was associated with an enhancement in long-lasting hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). The LTP enhancement was resistant to rapamycin, but not anisomycin, suggesting that altered translation control is involved in the enhanced synaptic plasticity. Behaviorally, FKBP12 conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed enhanced contextual fear memory and autistic/obsessive-compulsive-like perseveration in several assays including the water maze, Y-maze reversal task, and the novel object recognition test. Our results indicate that FKBP12 plays a critical role in the regulation of mTOR-Raptor interactions, LTP, memory, and perseverative behaviors.

  14. Using Interactive Problem-Solving Techniques to Enhance Control Systems Education for Non English-Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, L. A.; Chaar, L.; Toms, C.

    2010-01-01

    Interactive learning is beneficial to students in that it allows the continual development and testing of many skills. An interactive approach enables students to improve their technical capabilities, as well as developing both verbal and written communicative ability. Problem solving and communication skills are vital for engineering students; in…

  15. Enhancing Human-Computer Interaction Design Education: Teaching Affordance Design for Emerging Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Anthony; Matei, Sorin Adam

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of human-computer interaction design (HCID) over the last 20 years suggests that there is a growing need for educational scholars to consider new and more applicable theoretical models of interactive product design. The authors suggest that such paradigms would call for an approach that would equip HCID students with a better…

  16. Controlling interlayer interactions in vanadium pentoxide-poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites for enhanced magnesium-ion charge transport and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Sanjaya D.; Archer, Randall B.; Damin, Craig A.; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Rhodes, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries provide the potential for lower cost and improved safety compared with lithium-ion batteries, however obtaining cathode materials with highly reversible Mg-ion capacities is hindered by the high polarizability of divalent Mg-ions and slow solid-state Mg-ion diffusion. We report that incorporating poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) between the layers of hydrated vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) xerogels results in significantly improved reversible Mg-ion capacities. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the interlayer spacing between V2O5 layers was increased by PEO incorporation. Vibrational spectroscopy supports that the polymer interacts with the V2O5 lattice. The V2O5-PEO nanocomposite exhibited a 5-fold enhancement in Mg-ion capacity, improved stability, and improved rate capabilities compared with V2O5 xerogels. The Mg-ion diffusion coefficient of the nanocomposite was increased compared with that of V2O5 xerogels which is attributed to enhanced Mg-ion mobility due to the shielding interaction of PEO with the V2O5 lattice. This study shows that beyond only interlayer spacing, the nature of interlayer interactions of Mg-ions with V2O5, PEO, and H2O are key factors that affect Mg-ion charge transport and storage in layered materials. The design of layered materials with controlled interlayer interactions provides a new approach to develop improved cathodes for magnesium batteries.

  17. Molecular insight into the enhancement of benzene-carbon nanotube interactions by surface modification for drug delivery systems (DDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianghao; Liu, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Zhu; Wang, Ning; Sun, Wenjing; Chen, Congmei; He, Zhiwei

    2017-09-01

    Anthracyclines are effective anticancer drugs but have drawbacks including systemic toxicity and drug resistance. Delivering them directly to the tumor may improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can act as excellent drug delivery systems (DDS), but pristine CNTs have inert surfaces, which contributes poor drug loading capacity and limits dispersion. In this study, we designed a series of functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) with anchored hydrophilic groups (OH, COOH, and NH2) by substitutional doping of the CNT lattice (DNT) using N or B atoms or the combination of both. The aromatic compound benzene (Ben) was selected as a model for anthracycline drugs. The effect of CNT curvature, chemical groups (CGs), and doping on the Ben-CNTs interactions was studied using quantum chemistry calculations. Our results show that π-π interactions between Ben and CNTs are influenced by CNT curvature. When the CNTs were functionalized only with CGs and not doped, the system was unstable, resulting in weak Ben-CNT interactions. However, anchoring CGs on DNTs greatly enhanced the Ben-CNT interactions. CNTs with good affinity for drug molecules, improved solubility, and lower tendency to aggregate have potential as DDS for enhancing the efficacy of medicines. We believe that these studies have general applicability and anticipate that our findings will motivate additional theoretical and experimental studies on the biology and chemistry of CNTs as DDS.

  18. Enhancements to the Rosetta Energy Function Enable Improved Identification of Small Molecules that Inhibit Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bazzoli

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are among today's most exciting and promising targets for therapeutic intervention. To date, identifying small-molecules that selectively disrupt these interactions has proven particularly challenging for virtual screening tools, since these have typically been optimized to perform well on more "traditional" drug discovery targets. Here, we test the performance of the Rosetta energy function for identifying compounds that inhibit protein interactions, when these active compounds have been hidden amongst pools of "decoys." Through this virtual screening benchmark, we gauge the effect of two recent enhancements to the functional form of the Rosetta energy function: the new "Talaris" update and the "pwSHO" solvation model. Finally, we conclude by developing and validating a new weight set that maximizes Rosetta's ability to pick out the active compounds in this test set. Looking collectively over the course of these enhancements, we find a marked improvement in Rosetta's ability to identify small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  19. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with free radicals and their role in enhancing the scavenging activity of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Humaira; Saira, Farhat; Yaqub, Azra; Qureshi, Rumana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Saleemi, Samia

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the interaction of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles (12±1.5nm) (GNPs) with free radicals; 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) stable and electrochemically generated superoxide, O2(-). Different experiments were designed to understand the interaction between GNPs and DPPH by employing cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis spectroscopy and computational chemistry using 6-311G basis set. The increase in heterogeneous rate constant, ksh, of DPPH upon addition of GNPs pointed towards possible complex formation, DPPH-GNPs which were further explained by a model assuming surface adsorption of DPPH on GNPs. Further, the model was validated by studying interaction of GNPs with a biologically important free radical, O2(-). Exciting result in terms of disappearance of anodic peak after GNPs addition confirmed that gold nanoparticles interacted with stable as well as unstable free radicals. Also, the stoichiometry of the most stable complex GNP-DPPH was determined from UV-vis spectroscopy by applying Job's method. The GNP-DPPH complex was found to be active with 46.0% reduction of the IC50 value of standard antioxidant, ascorbic acid (AA), indicating its role in enhancing antioxidant activity. Hence, this study presents a simple and potential approach to enhance the efficiency of natural antioxidants without modifying their structure, or involving the complex functionalization of GNPs with antioxidants.

  20. Computational social dynamic modeling of group recruitment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Nina M.; Lee, Marinna; Pickett, Marc; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Smrcka, Julianne D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wu, Benjamin C.

    2004-01-01

    The Seldon software toolkit combines concepts from agent-based modeling and social science to create a computationally social dynamic model for group recruitment. The underlying recruitment model is based on a unique three-level hybrid agent-based architecture that contains simple agents (level one), abstract agents (level two), and cognitive agents (level three). This uniqueness of this architecture begins with abstract agents that permit the model to include social concepts (gang) or institutional concepts (school) into a typical software simulation environment. The future addition of cognitive agents to the recruitment model will provide a unique entity that does not exist in any agent-based modeling toolkits to date. We use social networks to provide an integrated mesh within and between the different levels. This Java based toolkit is used to analyze different social concepts based on initialization input from the user. The input alters a set of parameters used to influence the values associated with the simple agents, abstract agents, and the interactions (simple agent-simple agent or simple agent-abstract agent) between these entities. The results of phase-1 Seldon toolkit provide insight into how certain social concepts apply to different scenario development for inner city gang recruitment.

  1. Benefits and Pitfalls of Multimedia and Interactive Features in Technology-Enhanced Storybooks

    OpenAIRE

    Takacs, Zsofia K.; Swart, Elise K.; Bus, Adriana G.

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted on the effects of technology-enhanced stories for young children’s literacy development when compared to listening to stories in more traditional settings like storybook reading. A small but significant additional benefit of technology was found for story comprehension (g+ = 0.17) and expressive vocabulary (g+ = 0.20), based on data from 2,147 children in 43 studies. When investigating the different characteristics of technology-enhanced stories, multimedia featu...

  2. 6 CFR 17.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 17.310 Section 17.310 Domestic... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  3. 40 CFR 5.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recruitment. 5.310 Section 5.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 5.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  4. 14 CFR 1253.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 1253.310 Section 1253.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1253.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  5. 43 CFR 41.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 41.310 Section 41.310 Public... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 41.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  6. 41 CFR 101-4.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Recruitment. 101-4.310... Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 101-4.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  7. 28 CFR 54.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recruitment. 54.310 Section 54.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  8. 15 CFR 8a.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 8a.310 Section 8a.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 8a.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment efforts...

  9. Increased frequency of social interaction is associated with enjoyment enhancement and reward system activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Sugawara, Sho K; Hamano, Yuki H; Makita, Kai; Kochiyama, Takanori; Sadato, Norihiro

    2016-04-19

    Positive social interactions contribute to the sense that one's life has meaning. Enjoyment of feelings associated through social interaction motivates humans to build social connections according to their personal preferences. Therefore, we hypothesized that social interaction itself activates the reward system in a manner that depends upon individual interaction preferences. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which 38 participants played a virtual ball-toss game in which the number of ball tosses to the participant was either similar to (normal-frequency condition) or higher than (high-frequency condition) the number of tosses to the other players. Participants reported greater-than-anticipated enjoyment during the high-frequency condition, suggesting that receiving a social reward led to unexpected positive feelings. Consistent with this, the high-frequency condition produced stronger activation in the ventral striatum, which is part of the reward system, and the precuneus, representing positive self-image, which might be translated to social reward. Furthermore, ventral striatal activation covaried with individual participants' preference for interactions with others. These findings suggest that an elevated frequency of social interaction is represented as a social reward, which might motivate individuals to promote social interaction in a manner that is modulated by personal preference.

  10. Diversity employment and recruitment sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    Effective human resources management has been identified as one of four critical success factors in the Department of Energy Strategic Plan. The Plan states relative to this factor: ``The Department seeks greater alignment of resources with agency priorities and increased diversification of the workforce, including gender, ethnicity, age, and skills. This diversification will bring new thinking and perspectives that heretofore have not had a voice in departmental decision-making.`` This Guide has been developed as a key tool to assist Department of Energy management and administrative staff in achieving Goal 2 of this critical success factor, which is to ``Ensure a diverse and talented workforce.`` There are numerous sources from which to recruit minorities, women and persons with disabilities. Applying creativity and proactive effort, using traditional and non-traditional approaches, and reaching out to various professional, academic and social communities will increase the reservoir of qualified candidates from which to make selections. In addition, outreach initiatives will undoubtedly yield further benefits such as a richer cultural understanding and diversity awareness. The resource listings presented in this Guide are offered to encourage active participation in the diversity recruitment process. This Guide contains resource listings by state for organizations in the following categories: (1) African American Recruitment Sources; (2) Asian American/Pacific Islander Recruitment Sources; (3) Hispanic Recruitment Sources; (4) Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment Sources; (5) Persons with Disabilities Recruitment Sources; and (6) Women Recruitment Sources.

  11. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  12. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  13. Three Keys to Better Recruiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazington, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Recruitment is an expensive business: In 2010-2011, the median cost to recruit an undergraduate was $2,185 among private colleges and universities, according to Noel-Levitz, an enrollment management consultancy. In these tough fiscal times, admissions departments are under pressure to keep those costs down even as they pursue higher enrollment and…

  14. Annual variation in recruitment of freshwater mussels and its relationship with river discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Patricia R.; Newton, Teresa; Haro, Roger J.; Zigler, Steven J.; Davis, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Vital rates such as mortality, growth, and recruitment are important tools to evaluate the status of threatened populations and identify their vulnerabilities, leading to enhanced conservation strategies.

  15. Enhancement of Laser Power Efficiency by Control of Spatial Hole Burning Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li; Tureci, Hakan E

    2014-01-01

    The laser is an out-of-equilibrium nonlinear wave system where the interplay of the cavity geometry and nonlinear wave interactions, mediated by the gain medium, determines the self-organized oscillation frequencies and the associated spatial field patterns. In the steady state, a constant energy flux flows through the laser from the pump to the far field, with the ratio of the total output power to the input power determining the power-efficiency. While nonlinear wave interactions have been modeled and well understood since the early days of laser theory, their impact on the power-efficiency of a laser system is poorly understood. Here, we show that spatial hole burning interactions generally decrease the power efficiency. We then demonstrate how spatial hole burning interactions can be controlled by a spatially tailored pump profile, thereby boosting the power-efficiency, in some cases by orders of magnitude.

  16. Natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions among prey species: potential for enhancing biocontrol services in agroecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chailleux, A.; Mohl, E.K.; Teixeira Alves, M.; Messelink, G.J.; Desneux, N.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how arthropod pests and their natural enemies interact in complex agroecosystems is essential for pest management programmes. Theory predicts that prey sharing a predator, such as a biological control agent, can indirectly reduce each other's density at equilibrium (apparent

  17. Use of enhancer trapping to identify pathogen-induced regulatory events spatially restricted to plant-microbe interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Mercedes; Tsuchiya, Tokuji; He, Shuilin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Plant genes differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions can be important for host immunity or can contribute to pathogen virulence. Large-scale transcript profiling studies, such as microarray- or mRNA-seq-based analyses, have revealed hundreds of genes that are differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions. However, transcriptional responses limited to a small number of cells at infection sites can be difficult to detect using these approaches, as they are under-represented in the whole-tissue datasets typically generated by such methods. This study examines the interactions between Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and the pathogenic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) by enhancer trapping to uncover novel plant genes involved in local infection responses. We screened a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter-based enhancer-trap population for expression patterns related to Hpa infection. Several independent lines exhibited GUS expression in leaf mesophyll cells surrounding Hpa structures, indicating a regulatory response to pathogen infection. One of these lines contained a single enhancer-trap insertion in an exon of At1g08800 (MyoB1, Myosin Binding Protein 1) and was subsequently found to exhibit reduced susceptibility to Hpa. Two additional Arabidopsis lines with T-DNA insertions in exons of MyoB1 also exhibited approximately 30% fewer spores than wild-type plants. This study demonstrates that our enhancer-trapping strategy can result in the identification of functionally relevant pathogen-responsive genes. Our results further suggest that MyoB1 either positively contributes to Hpa virulence or negatively affects host immunity against this pathogen.

  18. Enhancing the prediction of protein pairings between interacting families using orthology information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazos Florencio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has repeatedly been shown that interacting protein families tend to have similar phylogenetic trees. These similarities can be used to predicting the mapping between two families of interacting proteins (i.e. which proteins from one family interact with which members of the other. The correct mapping will be that which maximizes the similarity between the trees. The two families may eventually comprise orthologs and paralogs, if members of the two families are present in more than one organism. This fact can be exploited to restrict the possible mappings, simply by impeding links between proteins of different organisms. We present here an algorithm to predict the mapping between families of interacting proteins which is able to incorporate information regarding orthologues, or any other assignment of proteins to "classes" that may restrict possible mappings. Results For the first time in methods for predicting mappings, we have tested this new approach on a large number of interacting protein domains in order to statistically assess its performance. The method accurately predicts around 80% in the most favourable cases. We also analysed in detail the results of the method for a well defined case of interacting families, the sensor and kinase components of the Ntr-type two-component system, for which up to 98% of the pairings predicted by the method were correct. Conclusion Based on the well established relationship between tree similarity and interactions we developed a method for predicting the mapping between two interacting families using genomic information alone. The program is available through a web interface.

  19. Enhancing the light-matter interaction using slow light: towards the concept of dense light

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, Luc; Dicaire, Isabelle; Chin, Sang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    A couple of experiments are here presented to clarify the impact of slow light on light-matter interaction. The experiments are designed, so that the process generating slow light and the probed light-matter interaction only present a marginal cross-effect. The impact of slow light on simple molecular absorption could be separately evaluated under either material or structural slow light propagation in the same medium and led to an entirely different response.

  20. Design of a cluster-randomized minority recruitment trial: RECRUIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Barbara C; Mainous, Arch G; Smith, Daniel W; McKee, M Diane; Amorrortu, Rossybelle P; Alvidrez, Jennifer; Diaz, Vanessa; Ford, Marvella E; Fernandez, Maria E; Hauser, Robert A; Singer, Carlos; Landa, Veronica; Trevino, Aron; DeSantis, Stacia M; Zhang, Yefei; Daniels, Elvan; Tabor, Derrick; Vernon, Sally W

    2017-06-01

    Racial/ethnic minority groups remain underrepresented in clinical trials. Many strategies to increase minority recruitment focus on minority communities and emphasize common diseases such as hypertension. Scant literature focuses on minority recruitment to trials of less common conditions, often conducted in specialty clinics and dependent on physician referrals. We identified trust/mistrust of specialist physician investigators and institutions conducting medical research and consequent participant reluctance to participate in clinical trials as key-shared barriers across racial/ethnic groups. We developed a trust-based continuous quality improvement intervention to build trust between specialist physician investigators and community minority-serving physicians and ultimately potential trial participants. To avoid the inherent biases of non-randomized studies, we evaluated the intervention in the national Randomized Recruitment Intervention Trial (RECRUIT). This report presents the design of RECRUIT. Specialty clinic follow-up continues through April 2017. We hypothesized that specialist physician investigators and coordinators trained in the trust-based continuous quality improvement intervention would enroll a greater proportion of minority participants in their specialty clinics than specialist physician investigators in control specialty clinics. Specialty clinic was the unit of randomization. Using continuous quality improvement, the specialist physician investigators and coordinators tailored recruitment approaches to their specialty clinic characteristics and populations. Primary analyses were adjusted for clustering by specialty clinic within parent trial and matching covariates. RECRUIT was implemented in four multi-site clinical trials (parent trials) supported by three National Institutes of Health institutes and included 50 associated specialty clinics from these parent trials. Using current data, we have 88% power or greater to detect a 0.15 or

  1. VE-cadherin trans-interactions modulate Rac activation and enhancement of lung endothelial barrier by iloprost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birukova, Anna A; Tian, Yufeng; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Zebda, Noureddine; Sarich, Nicolene; Tian, Xinyong; Wang, Yingxiao; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2012-10-01

    Small GTPase Rac is important regulator of endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement by prostacyclin characterized by increased peripheral actin cytoskeleton and increased interactions between VE-cadherin and other adherens junction (AJ) proteins. This study utilized complementary approaches including siRNA knockdown, culturing in Ca(2+) -free medium, and VE-cadherin blocking antibody to alter VE-cadherin extracellular interactions to investigate the role of VE-cadherin outside-in signaling in modulation of Rac activation and EC barrier regulation by prostacyclin analog iloprost. Spatial analysis of Rac activation in pulmonary EC by FRET revealed additional spike in iloprost-induced Rac activity at the sites of newly formed cell-cell junctions. In contrast, disruption of VE-cadherin extracellular trans-interactions suppressed iloprost-activated Rac signaling and attenuated EC barrier enhancement and cytoskeletal remodeling. These inhibitory effects were associated with decreased membrane accumulation and activation of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Tiam1 and Vav2. Conversely, plating of pulmonary EC on surfaces coated with extracellular VE-cadherin domain further promoted iloprost-induced Rac signaling. In the model of thrombin-induced EC barrier recovery, blocking of VE-cadherin trans-interactions attenuated activation of Rac pathway during recovery phase and delayed suppression of Rho signaling and restoration of EC barrier properties. These results suggest that VE-cadherin outside-in signaling controls locally Rac activity stimulated by barrier protective agonists. This control is essential for maximal EC barrier enhancement and accelerated barrier recovery. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells and monocytes by soluble factors synergistically enhances IL-6 and MCP-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Frister, Adrian; Wang, Song; Ludwig, Andreas; Behr, Hagen; Pippig, Susanna; Li, Beibei; Simm, Andreas; Hofmann, Britt; Pilowski, Claudia; Koch, Susanne; Buerke, Michael; Rose-John, Stefan; Werdan, Karl; Loppnow, Harald

    2009-04-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms contribute to atherogenesis. Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and IL-6 are potent mediators of inflammation. Both contribute to early atherogenesis by luring monocytes and regulating cell functions in the vessel wall. MCP-1 and IL-6 production resulting from the interaction of invading monocytes with local vessel wall cells may accelerate atherosclerosis. We investigated the influence of the interaction of human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with human mononuclear cells (MNCs) or monocytes on IL-6 and MCP-1 production in a coculture model. Interaction synergistically enhanced IL-6 and MCP-1 production (up to 30- and 10-fold, respectively) compared with separately cultured cells. This enhancement was mediated by CD14-positive monocytes. It was dependent on the SMC-to-MNC/monocyte ratio, and as few as 0.2 monocytes/SMC induced the synergism. Synergistic IL-6 production was observed at the protein, mRNA, and functional level. It was mediated by soluble factors, and simultaneous inhibition of IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 completely blocked the synergism. IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were present in the cultures. Blockade of the synergism by soluble glycoprotein 130Fc/soluble IL-6 receptor, as well as the induction of synergistic IL-6 production by costimulation of SMCs with IL-1, TNF-alpha, and hyper-IL-6, suggested the involvement of IL-6 trans-signaling. The contribution of IL-6 was consistent with enhanced STAT3 phosphorylation. The present data suggest that SMC/monocyte interactions may augment the proinflammatory status in the tissue, contributing to the acceleration of early atherogenesis.

  3. Natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions among prey species: potential for enhancing biocontrol services in agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailleux, Anaïs; Mohl, Emily K; Teixeira Alves, Mickaël; Messelink, Gerben J; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how arthropod pests and their natural enemies interact in complex agroecosystems is essential for pest management programmes. Theory predicts that prey sharing a predator, such as a biological control agent, can indirectly reduce each other's density at equilibrium (apparent competition). From this premise, we (i) discuss the complexity of indirect interactions among pests in agroecosystems and highlight the importance of natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions other than apparent competition, (ii) outline factors that affect the nature of enemy-mediated indirect interactions in the field and (iii) identify the way to manipulate enemy-mediated interactions for biological control. We argue that there is a need to increase the link between community ecology theory and biological control to develop better agroecological methods of crop protection via conservation biological control. In conclusion, we identify (i) interventions to be chosen depending on agroecosystem characteristics and (ii) several lines of research that will improve the potential for enemy-mediated indirect interactions to be applied to biological control. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to Der p 1 allergen enhance the recruitment of Th2 cells: major involvement of the chemokines TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Hamida; Smits, Hermelijn H; Ratajczak, Céline; Nithiananthan, Asokananthan; Wierenga, Eddy A; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Jacquet, Alain; Tonnel, Andre-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen - presenting cells that can orientate the immune response towards a Th1 or a Th2 type. DC produce chemokines that are involved in the recruitment of either Th1 cells, such as IP10 (CXCL10), Th2 cells such as TARC (CCL17) and MDC (CCL22), or non-polarized T cells such as RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-lalpha (CCL3). We investigated whether monocyte-derived DC (MD-DC) generated from healthy donors or from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) and exposed to the cysteine-protease Der p 1(allergen of Dpt), could upregulate the expression of chemokines involved in type 1 or type 2 T cell recruitment. MD-DC were pulsed with either Der p 1 or with LPS as the control and the chemokines produced were evaluated using ELISA and chemotaxis assays. Der p 1-pulsed DC from allergic patients showed increased TARC (CCL17) and MDC (CCL22) production without modifying IP-10 (CXCL10) release. Der p 1-pulsed DC from healthy donors showed only increased IP-10 (CXCL10) secretion. RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-lalpha (CCL3) production were similarly increased when DC were from healthy or allergic donors. The selective Th2 clone recruitment activity of supernatants from Der p 1-pulsed DC of allergic patients was inhibited by anti-TARC (CCL17) and anti-MDC (CCL22) neutralizing Abs. By using anti-IP10 (CXCL10) blocking Abs, supernatants of Der p 1-pulsed DC from healthy donors were shown to be involved in the recruitment of Th1 cells. These results suggest that in allergic patients exposed to house dust mites, DC may favour the exacerbation of the Th2 response via the increase in type 2 chemokine production. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  5. Prevention-enhancing interactions: a Critical Interpretive Synthesis of the evidence about children who sexually abuse other children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Gemma; Humphreys, Cathy; Hamilton, Bridget

    2016-11-01

    There is a growing interest in English-speaking jurisdictions, including Australia, North America, Canada, the United Kingdom and New Zealand, about the prevention of sexual abuse perpetrated by children against other children. The aim of this review was to identify opportunities for research, policy and practice which could enhance the prevention agenda relating to the perpetration of sexual abuse by children through conducting a Critical Interpretive Synthesis. Eleven electronic databases were searched in the period from 22 April to 23 May 2013 and included: SocINDEX, Social Services Abstracts, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Family and Society Studies Worldwide, Project Muse, PsychINFO, Family and Society Plus, Jstor, Expanded Academic ASAP, Web of Science and Google Scholar. Key individual journals were also searched, including Child Abuse and Neglect and the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, as well as the grey literature. The search was guided by the research question: How could the prevention agenda relating to sexual abuse perpetrated by children be enhanced? The systematic literature search yielded 3323 titles, and 34 of these papers were included in the final synthesis. The authors identified five domains operating in the evidence base: characteristics, causes, communications, interventions and treatments. A synthesising construct emerged from the review: prevention-enhancing interactions. This construct referred to the potential for enhancing the prevention agenda which exists as the evidence domains interact with one another, and with the public health model of prevention. The authors consider this review to be a timely contribution to the current agenda pertaining to sexual abuse perpetrated by children. It provides researchers, policy makers and practitioners in the field with an evidence-informed conceptualisation of opportunities for enhancing prevention work. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Salts of hexamethylenetetramine with organic acids: Enhanced anomeric interactions with a lowering of molecular symmetry revealed by crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2015-02-01

    The hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) framework displays interesting stereoelectronic interactions of the anomeric type. In the highly symmetrical parent system, the nitrogen centres act as both donors and acceptors. Protonation lowers symmetry and also leads to an enhancement of the anomeric interaction around the protonated centre. X-ray diffraction crystal structures of four derivatives of HMT - with succinic, (DL)-malic, phthalic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids - reveal significant trends. (The first three form well-defined salts, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid forming a co-crystalline compound.) Each molecular structure is essentially characterised by a major anomeric interaction involving the protonated centre as acceptor. In two cases (succinic and 4-hydroxybenzoic), secondary protonation leads to a weaker anomeric interaction site that apparently competes with the dominant one. Bond length changes indicate that the anomeric interaction decreases as malic > phthalic > succinic > 4-hydroxybenzoic, which correlates with the degree of proton transfer to the nitrogen centre. Along with other bond length and angle changes, the results offer insight into the applicability of the antiperiplanar lone pair hypothesis (ALPH) in a rigid system.

  7. Human Resources Marketing and Recruiting: Essentials of Digital Recruiting

    CERN Document Server

    Purvis, James

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will cover digital recruitment from its definition thru to its history in recruitment and trends. The subject itself could cover an entire book or an entire module at university, so this chapter will broadly touch upon the key elements and considerations. Under cultural perspective, the recruitment life cycle will be broken down into its individual parts, and digital solutions will be examined for each individual part of the process together with the impact this has on the knowledge and challenges for the manager and team. The economic perspective will assist in prioritizing initiatives and building a business case for the introduction of digital recruiting solutions. The risk perspective will raise awareness of the potential pitfalls and the operational perspective on the key considerations for a successful implementation. Finally, the key messages of this chapter are summarized in the Do’s and Don’ts.

  8. A multi-scale continuum model of skeletal muscle mechanics predicting force enhancement based on actin-titin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidlauf, Thomas; Klotz, Thomas; Rode, Christian; Altan, Ekin; Bleiler, Christian; Siebert, Tobias; Röhrle, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Although recent research emphasises the possible role of titin in skeletal muscle force enhancement, this property is commonly ignored in current computational models. This work presents the first biophysically based continuum-mechanical model of skeletal muscle that considers, in addition to actin-myosin interactions, force enhancement based on actin-titin interactions. During activation, titin attaches to actin filaments, which results in a significant reduction in titin's free molecular spring length and therefore results in increased titin forces during a subsequent stretch. The mechanical behaviour of titin is included on the microscopic half-sarcomere level of a multi-scale chemo-electro-mechanical muscle model, which is based on the classic sliding-filament and cross-bridge theories. In addition to titin stress contributions in the muscle fibre direction, the continuum-mechanical constitutive relation accounts for geometrically motivated, titin-induced stresses acting in the muscle's cross-fibre directions. Representative simulations of active stretches under maximal and submaximal activation levels predict realistic magnitudes of force enhancement in fibre direction. For example, stretching the model by 20 % from optimal length increased the isometric force at the target length by about 30 %. Predicted titin-induced stresses in the muscle's cross-fibre directions are rather insignificant. Including the presented development in future continuum-mechanical models of muscle function in dynamic situations will lead to more accurate model predictions during and after lengthening contractions.

  9. Sales Training for Army Recruiter Success: Interviews with Excellent Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    merit of an expert modeling system of the skills and strategies used by excel- lent Army recruiters. Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) was used as the...7. AUTHOR(&) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Steven R. Frieman 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK U.S...Recruiting 2M AUSTIRACT (rcnttm ame r orw am nssry i Identify by block number) s-This report describes a program of research on communication strategies and

  10. Navy Enlisted Recruiting: Alternatives for Improving Recruiter Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    screening process and understanding the differences in cognitive ability, the different cultures of each rating, and their correlation to recruiting...process and understanding the differences in cognitive ability, the different cultures of each rating, and their correlation to recruiting performance...of the seven months that it took to complete this research. A special Bravo Zulu to my advisors, Professor Jeremy Arkes, Professor Steve Mehay, and

  11. Enhanced sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to tetra-alkyl ammonium modified smectites via cation-pi interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize molecular sorptive interactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by organoclays modified with quaternary ammonium cations. Three PAHs, naphthalene (NAPH), phenanthrene (PHEN), and pyrene (PYR), and three chlorobenzenes, 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB), 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB), and pentachlorobenzene (PtCB), were sorbed from aqueous solution to reference montmorillonite clays (SWy-2) exchanged respectively with tetramethyl ammonium (TMA), tetraethyl ammonium (TEA), tetra-n-butyl ammonium (TBA), and hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA) cations. Solute hydrophobicities are compared between PAHs and chlorobenzenes using the solute n-octanol-water partition coefficient, n-hexadecane-water partition coefficient, and polyethylene-water distribution coefficient. The PAHs show several- to more than 10-fold greater sorption than the chlorobenzenes having close hydrophobicities but fewer delocalized pi electrons (NAPH/DCB, PHEN/TeCB, and PYR/ PtCB) by TEA-, TBA-, and HDTMA-clays. Furthermore, the PAHs show greater trends of solubility enhancement than the compared chlorobenzenes by TMA, TEA, and TBA in aqueous solution. The enhanced sorption and aqueous solubility of PAHs are best described by cation-pi interactions between ammonium cations and PAHs relative to chlorobenzenes that are incapable of such interactions. Cation-pi complexation between PAHs and tetra-alkyl ammonium cations in chloroform was verified by ring-current-induced upfield chemical shifts of the alkyl groups of cations in the 1H NMR spectrum.

  12. Simulation study of radiation enhancement through an interaction between periodically aligned carbon nanotubes and an intense laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Toshihiro; Inoue, Masahiko; Antonsen, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Interaction between ultra-intense laser and solid material has a lot of applications. One is an emission of electromagnetic wave in a wide range of wavelength, which is from THz to X-ray. In order to select the wavelength, one of interesting target materials is single-walled carbon nanotube. Huge number of carbon nanotubes can be grown vertically on a substrate and they can be aligned periodically on the substrate. Once an ultra-intense laser is irradiated on the nanotubes, the strong electric field of the laser forcedly oscillates electrons in each nanotube and they irradiate electromagnetic wave. Waves emitted from periodically aligned nanotubes are expected to interfere each other, and then the amplitude of the output radiation is to be enhanced. In order to analyze such radiation processes from the laser-matter interaction, we have been developing an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code including collisional and ionization processes. We will present recent results about an interaction between strong laser and carbon nanotubes analyzed by the PIC code. In the presentation, we will show the radiation spectrum and its enhancement due to the periodic structure.

  13. Texture-taste interactions: Enhancement of taste intensity by structural modifications of the food matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of salt and sugar in food products remains a challenge due to the importance of those ingredients in providing a highly desired taste quality, enhancing flavor, determining the behavior of structuring ingredients, and ensuring microbiological safety. Several technologies have been used

  14. Analysis of enhanced modal damping ratio in porous materials using an acoustic-structure interaction model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, Junghwan; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the enhancement of the damping ratio of a structure with embedded microbeam resonators in air-filled internal cavities. In this context, we discuss theoretical aspects in the framework of the effective modal damping ratio (MDR) and derive an approximate rel...

  15. Texture-taste interactions: Enhancement of taste intensity by structural modifications of the food matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of salt and sugar in food products remains a challenge due to the importance of those ingredients in providing a highly desired taste quality, enhancing flavor, determining the behavior of structuring ingredients, and ensuring microbiological safety. Several technologies have been used

  16. Team formation instruments to enhance learner interactions in open learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Houtmans, Tilly; Sloep, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Open learning environments, such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), often lack adequate learner collaboration possibilities; they are also plagued by high levels of drop-out. Introducing project-based learning (PBL) can enhance learner collaboration and motivation, but PBL does not easily scale

  17. Enhancing Interactions with Children with Autism through Storybook Reading: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Positive results for children with ASD in the areas of language and communication skills have been shown through the use of storybook reading. Shared storybook reading promotes the growth of language and social participation, two core deficits for children with ASD. This article describes strategies that can be implemented to enhance interactions…

  18. Enhancement of selective attention by tDCS: Interaction with interference in a Sternberg task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; Uyl, T. den; Fregni, F.F.; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) enhances performance on working memory tasks. However, such effects may be dependent on modulation of specific aspects of working memory. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tDCS improves selective attention in the context of a Sternberg task. Subje

  19. Enhanced Light–Matter Interactions in Graphene-Covered Gold Nanovoid Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Shi, Lei; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2013-01-01

    of the graphene. These new perspectives enable us to verify the presence of graphene on gold-void arrays, and the enhancement even allows us to accurately quantify the number of layers. Experimental observations are further supported by numerical simulations and perturbation-theory analysis. The graphene gold...

  20. Enhancement of selective attention by tDCS: interaction with interference in a Sternberg task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; den Uyl, T.E.; Fregni, F.F.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) enhances performance on working memory tasks. However, such effects may be dependent on modulation of specific aspects of working memory. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tDCS improves selective attention in the context of a Sternberg task.

  1. Enhancement of selective attention by tDCS: interaction with interference in a Sternberg task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; den Uyl, T.E.; Fregni, F.F.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) enhances performance on working memory tasks. However, such effects may be dependent on modulation of specific aspects of working memory. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tDCS improves selective attention in the context of a Sternberg task. Subje

  2. Team formation instruments to enhance learner interactions in open learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Houtmans, Tilly; Sloep, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Open learning environments, such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), often lack adequate learner collaboration possibilities; they are also plagued by high levels of drop-out. Introducing project-based learning (PBL) can enhance learner collaboration and motivation, but PBL does not easily

  3. Technology-enhanced instruction in learning world languages: The Middlebury interactive learning program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Lake

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Middlebury Interactive Language (MIL programs are designed to teach world language courses using blended and online learning for students in kindergarten through grade 12. Middlebury Interactive courses start with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of world-language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. As students progress through the course levels, they deepen their understanding of the target language, continuing to focus on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. The extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images, or texts is intended to provide a contextualized and interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic structures. In the present paper, we describe the MIL program and the results of a mixed-methods survey and case-study evaluation of its implementation in a broad sample of schools. Technology application is examined with regard to MIL instructional strategies and the present evaluation approach relative to those employed in the literature.

  4. Skeletal stem cell and bone implant interactions are enhanced by LASER titanium modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisti, Karin E., E-mail: karinellensisti@gmail.com [Bone and Joint Research Group, Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Biomaterials Group, Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Box 355, Araraquara (Brazil); Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande (Brazil); Andrés, María C. de; Johnston, David [Bone and Joint Research Group, Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Almeida-Filho, Edson; Guastaldi, Antonio C. [Biomaterials Group, Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Box 355, Araraquara (Brazil); Oreffo, Richard O.C. [Bone and Joint Research Group, Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration, Institute of Developmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-06

    Purpose: To evaluate the osteo-regenerative potential of Titanium (Ti) modified by Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) beam (Yb-YAG) upon culture with human Skeletal Stem Cells (hSSCs{sup 1}). Methods: Human skeletal cell populations were isolated from the bone marrow of haematologically normal patients undergoing primary total hip replacement following appropriate consent. STRO-1{sup +} hSSC{sup 1} function was examined for 10 days across four groups using Ti discs: i) machined Ti surface group in basal media (Mb{sup 2}), ii) machined Ti surface group in osteogenic media (Mo{sup 3}), iii) LASER-modified Ti group in basal media (Lb{sup 4}) and, iv) LASER-modified Ti group in osteogenic media (Lo{sup 5}). Molecular analysis and qRT-PCR as well as functional analysis including biochemistry (DNA, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP{sup 6}) specific activity), live/dead immunostaining (Cell Tracker Green (CTG{sup 7})/Ethidium Homodimer-1 (EH-1{sup 8})), and fluorescence staining (for vinculin and phalloidin) were undertaken. Inverted, confocal and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) approaches were used to characterise cell adherence, proliferation, and phenotype. Results: Enhanced cell spreading and morphological rearrangement, including focal adhesions were observed following culture of hSSCs{sup 1} on LASER surfaces in both basal and osteogenic conditions. Biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced ALP{sup 6} specific activity on the hSSCs{sup 1}-seeded on LASER-modified surface in basal culture media. Molecular analysis demonstrated enhanced ALP{sup 6} and osteopontin expression on titanium LASER treated surfaces in basal conditions. SEM, inverted microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed extensive proliferation and migration of human bone marrow stromal cells on all surfaces evaluated. Conclusions: LASER-modified Ti surfaces modify the behaviour of hSSCs.{sup 1} In particular, SSC{sup 1} adhesion, osteogenic gene expression, cell

  5. Comparing recruitment strategies in a study of acupuncture for chronic back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avins Andrew L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meeting recruitment goals is challenging for many clinical trials conducted in primary care populations. Little is known about how the use of different recruitment strategies affects the types of individuals choosing to participate or the conclusions of the study. Methods A secondary analysis was performed using data from participants recruited to a clinical trial evaluating acupuncture for chronic back pain among primary care patients in a large integrated health care organization. We used two recruitment methods: mailed letters of invitation and an advertisement in the health plan's magazine. For these two recruitment methods, we compared recruitment success (% randomized, treatment completers, drop outs and losses to follow-up, participant characteristics, and primary clinical outcomes. A linear regression model was used to test for interaction between treatment group and recruitment method. Results Participants recruited via mailed letters closely resembled those responding to the advertisement in terms of demographic characteristics, most aspects of their back pain history and current episode and beliefs and expectations about acupuncture. No interaction between method of recruitment and treatment group was seen, suggesting that study outcomes were not affected by recruitment strategy. Conclusion In this trial, the two recruitment strategies yielded similar estimates of treatment effectiveness. However, because this finding may not apply to other recruitment strategies or trial circumstances, trials employing multiple recruitment strategies should evaluate the effect of recruitment strategy on outcome. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT00065585.

  6. Enhancing in-Museum Informal Learning by Augmenting Artworks with Gesture Interactions and AIED Paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchard, Emmanuel G.; Zanciu, Alin-Nicolae; Mahmoud, Haydar

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-supported approach for providing ‘enhanced’ discovery learning in informal settings like museums. It is grounded on a combination of gesture-based interactions and artwork-embedded AIED paradigms, and is implemented through a distributed architecture.......This paper presents a computer-supported approach for providing ‘enhanced’ discovery learning in informal settings like museums. It is grounded on a combination of gesture-based interactions and artwork-embedded AIED paradigms, and is implemented through a distributed architecture....

  7. Control of a Robot Dancer for Enhancing Haptic Human-Robot Interaction in Waltz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongbo Wang; Kosuge, K

    2012-01-01

    Haptic interaction between a human leader and a robot follower in waltz is studied in this paper. An inverted pendulum model is used to approximate the human's body dynamics. With the feedbacks from the force sensor and laser range finders, the robot is able to estimate the human leader's state by using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). To reduce interaction force, two robot controllers, namely, admittance with virtual force controller, and inverted pendulum controller, are proposed and evaluated in experiments. The former controller failed the experiment; reasons for the failure are explained. At the same time, the use of the latter controller is validated by experiment results.

  8. Effects of pulsation rate and viscosity on pulsation-induced taste enhancement: new insights into texture-taste interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burseg, Kerstin Martha Mensien; Camacho, Sara; Bult, Johannes Hendrikus Franciscus

    2011-05-25

    Oral stimulation with high-tastant concentrations that are alternared with low-tastant concentrations or water rinses (pulsatile stimulation) results in taste intensity ratings that are higher than continuous stimulation with the same average tastant concentration. This study tested the combined effects of taste pulsation rate and viscosity on pulsation-induced taste enhancement in apple juice. According to a tastant-kinetics hypothesis, less pulsation-induced taste enhancement is expected at enhanced pulsation rates in the high-viscous proximal stimulus compared to lower viscous stimuli. High-concentration sucrose apple juice pulses and low-concentration sucrose apple juice intervals were alternated at different pulsation periods (pulse + interval in seconds) every 2.5 s (period length = 5 s) or every 1.25 s (period length = 2.5 s). Pulsed stimuli were presented at two viscosity levels by the addition of pectin (0 and 10 g/L). Sweetness intensities of pulsed stimuli were compared to a continuous reference of the same net but nonalternating sucrose concentration. Sweetness ratings were higher for pulsatile stimuli than for continuous stimuli. In low-viscous stimuli, enhancement depended on the pulsation period and peaked at 5 s periods. In high-viscous stimuli, the same enhancement was observed for both pulsation periods. These results contradict a tastant-kinetics hypothesis of viscosity-induced taste suppression because impaired tastant kinetics by viscosity would predict the opposite: lower pulsation-induced taste enhancement for viscous stimuli, especially at higher pulsation rates. Instead, these observations favor an explanation based on perceptual texture-taste interactions, which predict the observed independence between viscosity and pulsation rate.

  9. Using technology for global recruitment: why HR/OB scholars need US knowledge?

    OpenAIRE

    Furtmueller, E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to the Electronic Human Resource Management (e-HRM) literature and specifically aims to enhance our understanding on how to design and innovate e-Recruiting technologies. Despite many organizations that proudly advertise their success with e-Recruiting services, it cannot be denied that many of these organizations – after years of experimenting with it – have already abandoned e-Recruiting, retreating to timeworn routine recruiting techniques such as newspaper ad...

  10. Interactive 3D audio: Enhancing awareness of details in immersive soundscapes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Schwartz, Stephen; Larsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    and presented in either mono, stereo, 3D, or interactive 3D, and performance was evaluated by asking factual questions about details in the audio. Results show that spatial cues can increase attention to background sounds while reducing attention to narrated text, indicating that spatial audio can...

  11. Performing a Course Material Enhancement Process with Asynchronous Interactive Online System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hei-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Online systems have come to be heavily used in education, particularly for online learning and collecting information not otherwise readily available. Most e-learning systems, including interactive learning systems, have been designed to "push" course materials to students but rarely to "collect" or "pull" ideas from them. The interactive…

  12. Phosphomimetic mutations enhance oligomerization of phospholemman and modulate its interaction with the Na/K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiujing; Pallikkuth, Sandeep; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M; Robia, Seth L

    2011-03-18

    Na/K-ATPase (NKA) activity is dynamically regulated by an inhibitory interaction with a small transmembrane protein, phospholemman (PLM). Inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation. Phosphorylation may alter how PLM interacts with NKA and/or itself, but details of these interactions are unknown. To address this, we quantified FRET between PLM and its regulatory target NKA in live cells. Phosphorylation of PLM was mimicked by mutation S63E (PKC site), S68E (PKA/PKC site), or S63E/S68E. The dependence of FRET on protein expression in live cells yielded information about the structure and binding affinity of the PLM-NKA regulatory complex. PLM phosphomimetic mutations altered the quaternary structure of the regulatory complex and reduced the apparent affinity of the PLM-NKA interaction. The latter effect was likely due to increased oligomerization of PLM phosphomimetic mutants, as suggested by PLM-PLM FRET measurements. Distance constraints obtained by FRET suggest that phosphomimetic mutations slightly alter the oligomer quaternary conformation. Photon-counting histogram measurements revealed that the major PLM oligomeric species is a tetramer. We conclude that phosphorylation of PLM increases its oligomerization into tetramers, decreases its binding to NKA, and alters the structures of both the tetramer and NKA regulatory complex.

  13. Enhancing E-Learning with Media-Rich Content and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caladine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Online learning is transcending from the text-rich educational experience of the past to a video- and audio-rich learning transformation. The greater levels of media-rich content and media-rich interaction that are currently prevalent in online leisure experiences will help to increase e-learning's future efficiency and effectiveness. "Enhancing…

  14. Investigating interactional competence using video recordings in ESL classrooms to enhance communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Hariharan N.

    2016-08-01

    Interactional competence, or knowing and using the appropriate skills for interaction in various communication situations within a given speech community and culture is important in the field of business and professional communication [1], [2]. Similar to many developing countries in the world, Malaysia is a growing economy and undergraduates will have to acquire appropriate communication skills. In this study, two aspects of the interactional communicative competence were investigated, that is the linguistic and paralinguistic behaviors in small group communication as well as conflict management in small group communication. Two groups of student participants were given a problem-solving task based on a letter of complaint. The two groups of students were video recorded during class hours for 40 minutes. The videos and transcription of the group discussions were analyzed to examine the use of language and interaction in small groups. The analysis, findings and interpretations were verified with three lecturers in the field of communication. The results showed that students were able to accomplish the given task using verbal and nonverbal communication. However, participation was unevenly distributed with two students talking for less than a minute. Negotiation was based more on alternative views and consensus was easily achieved. In concluding, suggestions are given on ways to improve English language communication.

  15. Using New Interactive Media to Enhance the Teaching of Psychology (and Other Disciplines) in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David G

    2009-01-01

    My idea for improving psychology responds to the challenge of teaching psychology in lower income, developing countries. With new Web-based e-books on the horizon, I suggest harnessing the Internet to deliver state-of-the-art, interactive, low-cost, locally adapted content to students who cannot afford books. © 2009 Association for Psychological Science.

  16. Physical interaction with Yes-associated protein enhances p73 transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, S; Munarriz, E; Rossi, M; Castagnoli, L; Shaul, Y; Sacchi, A; Oren, M; Sudol, M; Cesareni, G; Blandino, G

    2001-05-04

    Specific protein-protein interactions are involved in a large number of cellular processes and are mainly mediated by structurally and functionally defined domains. Here we report that the nuclear phosphoprotein p73 can engage in a physical association with the Yes-associated protein (YAP). This association occurs under physiological conditions as shown by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation of complexes from lysates of P19 cells. The WW domain of YAP and the PPPPY motif of p73 are directly involved in the association. Furthermore, as required for ligands to group I WW domains, the terminal tyrosine (Y) of the PPPPY motif of p73 was shown to be essential for the association with YAP. Unlike p73alpha, p73beta, and p63alpha, which bind to YAP, the endogenous as well as exogenously expressed wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and the p73gamma isoform do not interact with YAP. Indeed, we documented that YAP interacts only with those members of the p53 family that have a well conserved PPXY motif, a target sequence for WW domains. Overexpression of YAP causes an increase of p73alpha transcriptional activity. Differential interaction of YAP with members of the p53 family may provide a molecular explanation for their functional divergence in signaling.

  17. 360° Folio Networking: Enhancing Advising Interactions and Expanding Mentoring Opportunities with ePortfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, G. Alex; Chen, Helen L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how students can use the ePortfolio tool and platform to facilitate and foster increased opportunities for interactions with formal academic advisors and informal mentors. The learning documented within an ePortfolio can be especially useful as a resource for advisors and mentors who are looking not only to connect with their…

  18. Brain computer interfaces as intelligent sensors for enhancing human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, M.; Nijboer, F.; Broek, E.L. van den; Fairclough, S.; Nijholt, A.

    2012-01-01

    BCIs are traditionally conceived as a way to control apparatus, an interface that allows you to act on" external devices as a form of input control. We propose an alternative use of BCIs, that of monitoring users as an additional intelligent sensor to enrich traditional means of interaction. This vi

  19. Phosphomimetic Mutations Enhance Oligomerization of Phospholemman and Modulate Its Interaction with the Na/K-ATPase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiujing; Pallikkuth, Sandeep; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.; Robia, Seth L.

    2011-01-01

    Na/K-ATPase (NKA) activity is dynamically regulated by an inhibitory interaction with a small transmembrane protein, phospholemman (PLM). Inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation. Phosphorylation may alter how PLM interacts with NKA and/or itself, but details of these interactions are unknown. To address this, we quantified FRET between PLM and its regulatory target NKA in live cells. Phosphorylation of PLM was mimicked by mutation S63E (PKC site), S68E (PKA/PKC site), or S63E/S68E. The dependence of FRET on protein expression in live cells yielded information about the structure and binding affinity of the PLM-NKA regulatory complex. PLM phosphomimetic mutations altered the quaternary structure of the regulatory complex and reduced the apparent affinity of the PLM-NKA interaction. The latter effect was likely due to increased oligomerization of PLM phosphomimetic mutants, as suggested by PLM-PLM FRET measurements. Distance constraints obtained by FRET suggest that phosphomimetic mutations slightly alter the oligomer quaternary conformation. Photon-counting histogram measurements revealed that the major PLM oligomeric species is a tetramer. We conclude that phosphorylation of PLM increases its oligomerization into tetramers, decreases its binding to NKA, and alters the structures of both the tetramer and NKA regulatory complex. PMID:21220422

  20. Goal-Setting and Self-Reflection to Enhance Learners' Interaction in an ESP Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Velandia, Sergio Andrés

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative action research study explored the interactions of young-adult learners carrying out self-reflection on their learning processes in an ESP (English for special purposes) course at an airline training-center in Bogotá, Colombia. Needs analysis revealed that learners had poor knowledge of technical English, and lacked strong…

  1. Native/Non-Native Speaker Interactions through Video-Web Communication: A Clue for Enhancing Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregi, Kristi; de Graaff, Rick; van den Bergh, Huub; Kriz, Milan

    2012-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the European Networked Interaction in Foreign Language Acquisition and Research (NIFLAR) project is to make foreign language learning and teaching processes more relevant and rewarding for reaching intercultural communicative competence. This is realized by offering foreign language learners and pre-service teachers…

  2. Using interactive problem-solving techniques to enhance control systems education for non English-speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, L. A.; Chaar, L.; Toms, C.

    2010-03-01

    Interactive learning is beneficial to students in that it allows the continual development and testing of many skills. An interactive approach enables students to improve their technical capabilities, as well as developing both verbal and written communicative ability. Problem solving and communication skills are vital for engineering students; in the workplace they will be required to communicate with people of varying technical abilities and from different linguistic and engineering backgrounds. In this paper, a case study is presented that discusses how the traditional method of teaching control systems can be improved. 'Control systems' is a complex engineering topic requiring students to process an extended amount of mathematical formulae. MATLAB software, which enables students to interactively compare a range of possible combinations and analyse the optimal solution, is used to this end. It was found that students became more enthusiastic and interested when given ownership of their learning objectives. As well as improving the students' technical knowledge, other important engineering skills are also improved by introducing an interactive method of teaching.

  3. Enhancing Children's Language Learning and Cognition Experience through Interactive Kinetic Typography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Newman M. L.; Chu, Veni H. T.

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed at investigating the method of using kinetic typography and interactive approach to conduct a design experiment for children to learn vocabularies. Typography is the unique art and technique of arranging type in order to make language visible. By adding animated movement to characters, kinetic typography expresses language…

  4. Wind-Enhanced Interaction of Radiation and Dust (WEIRD) and the Growth and Maintenance of Local Dust Storms on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Rafkin, Scot C Randell

    2011-01-01

    A radiative-dynamic positive feedback mechanism (Wind Enhanced Interaction of Radiation and Dust: WEIRD) for localized Mars dust disturbances was previously found to operate in highly idealized numerical experiments. Numerical simulations are used to test for the presence and quantitative effect of the radiative-dynamic WEIRD feedback mechanism under more realistic conditions. Comparisons between cases where lifted dust is radiatively active and radiatively passive elucidate the importance of the dust radiative forcing on the thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the atmosphere. The WEIRD feedback mechanism does operate under realistic conditions, although it can be masked and diminished by a variety of other forcing mechanisms. Globally increased dust loading is found to accelerate the local winds while simultaneously diminishing the impact of local physiographical forcing. Local enhancements of dust produce a thermal and dynamical response that resembles many of the essential features seen in the idealiz...

  5. The Conserved Phenylalanine in the Transmembrane Domain Enhances Heteromeric Interactions of Syndecans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mi-Jung; Park, Jisu; Jang, Sinae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane domain (TMD) of the syndecans, a family of transmembrane heparin sulfate proteoglycans, is involved in forming homo- and heterodimers and oligomers that transmit signaling events. Recently, we reported that the unique phenylalanine in TMD positively regulates intramolecular interactions of syndecan-2. Besides the unique phenylalanine, syndecan-2 contains a conserved phenylalanine (SDC2-Phe-169) that is present in all syndecan TMDs, but its function has not been determined. We therefore investigated the structural role of SDC2-Phe-169 in syndecan TMDs. Replacement of SDC2-Phe-169 by tyrosine (S2F169Y) did not affect SDS-resistant homodimer formation but significantly reduced SDS-resistant heterodimer formation between syndecan-2 and -4, suggesting that SDC2-Phe-169 is involved in the heterodimerization/oligomerization of syndecans. Similarly, in an in vitro binding assay, a syndecan-2 mutant (S2(F169Y)) showed a significantly reduced interaction with syndecan-4. FRET assays showed that heteromolecular interactions between syndecan-2 and -4 were reduced in HEK293T cells transfected with S2(F169Y) compared with syndecan-2. Moreover, S2(F169Y) reduced downstream reactions mediated by the heterodimerization of syndecan-2 and -4, including Rac activity, cell migration, membrane localization of PKCα, and focal adhesion formation. The conserved phenylalanine in syndecan-1 and -3 also showed heterodimeric interaction with syndecan-2 and -4. Taken together, these findings suggest that the conserved phenylalanine in the TMD of syndecans is crucial in regulating heteromeric interactions of syndecans.

  6. Information networks and worker recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, A.; Brandts, J.; Gërxhani, K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies experimentally how the existence of social information networks affects the ways in which firms recruit new personnel. Through such networks firms learn about prospective employees' performance in previous jobs. Assuming individualistic preferences social networks are predicted no

  7. Volitional enhancement of firing synchrony and oscillation by neuronal operant conditioning: interaction with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio eSakurai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus on neuronal operant conditioning in which increments in neuronal activities are directly rewarded without behaviors. We discuss the potential of this approach to elucidate neuronal plasticity for enhancing specific brain functions and its interaction with the progress in neurorehabilitation and brain–machine interfaces. The key to-be-conditioned activities that this paper emphasizes are synchronous and oscillatory firings of multiple neurons that reflect activities of cell assemblies. First, we introduce certain well-known studies on neuronal operant conditioning in which conditioned enhancements of neuronal firing were reported in animals and humans. These studies demonstrated the feasibility of volitional control over neuronal activity. Second, we refer to the recent studies on operant conditioning of synchrony and oscillation of neuronal activities. In particular, we introduce a recent study showing volitional enhancement of oscillatory activity in monkey motor cortex and our study showing selective enhancement of firing synchrony of neighboring neurons in rat hippocampus. Third, we discuss the reasons for emphasizing firing synchrony and oscillation in neuronal operant conditioning, the main reason being that they reflect the activities of cell assemblies, which have been suggested to be basic neuronal codes representing information in the brain. Finally, we discuss the interaction of neuronal operant conditioning with neurorehabilitation and brain–machine interface (BMI. We argue that synchrony and oscillation of neuronal firing are the key activities required for developing both reliable neurorehabilitation and high-performance BMI. Further, we conclude that research of neuronal operant conditioning, neurorehabilitation, BMI, and system neuroscience will produce findings applicable to these interrelated fields, and neuronal synchrony and oscillation can be a common important bridge among all of them.

  8. Understanding the Giant Enhancement of Exchange Interaction in Bi2Se3-EuS Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Kim, Kyoung-Whan; Wang, Hui; Sinova, Jairo; Wu, Ruqian

    2017-07-01

    A recent experiment indicated that a ferromagnetic EuS film in contact with a topological insulator Bi2Se3 might show a largely enhanced Curie temperature and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy [F. Katmis et al., Nature (London) 533, 513 (2016)., 10.1038/nature17635]. Through systematic density functional calculations, we demonstrate that in addition to the factor that Bi2Se3 has a strong spin orbit coupling, the topological surface states are crucial to make these unusual behaviors robust as they hybridize with EuS states and extend rather far into the magnetic layers. The magnetic moments of Eu atoms are nevertheless not much enhanced, unlike what was reported in the experiment. Our results and model analyses provide useful insights for how these quantities are linked, and pave a way for the control of properties of magnetic films via contact with topological insulators.

  9. Lift force enhancement and fluid-structure interactions on a self-excited flapping wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curet, Oscar; Swartz, Sharon; Breuer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    We present data from a mechanical model that we have used to explore a physical mechanism that may have aided transition from gliding to flapping flight over fifty million years ago. The model is composed of a cantilevered flat plate with a hinged trailing flap and is tested in a low-speed wind tunnel. For slow wind speeds the model is stationary, but above a critical wind speed the wing starts to oscillate due to an aeroelastic instability. A positive angle of attack on the wing results in a positive lift force. However, this lift force is significantly enhanced once the wing starts to oscillate. We used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to understand the unsteady aerodynamics of the self-excited flapping wing, and to identify and characterize the mechanisms that generate the enhanced lift force. We also discuss the implications of our results on the evolution of powered biological flight. This work was supported by AFOSR-MURI on bioinspired flight.

  10. Enhancing positive parent-child interactions and family functioning in a poverty sample: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão, Mariana; Pereira, Mariana; Soares, Isabel; Mesman, Judi

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the attachment-based intervention program Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) in a randomized controlled trial with poor families of toddlers screened for professional's concerns about the child's caregiving environment. The VIPP-SD is an evidence-based intervention, but has not yet been tested in the context of poverty. The sample included 43 families with 1- to 4-year-old children: mean age at the pretest was 29 months and 51% were boys. At the pretest and posttest, mother-child interactions were observed at home, and mothers reported on family functioning. The VIPP-SD proved to be effective in enhancing positive parent-child interactions and positive family relations in a severely deprived context. Results are discussed in terms of implications for support services provided to such poor families in order to reduce intergenerational risk transmission.

  11. Recruiting for Prior Service Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    perceptions, expectations and issues for re-enlistment • Develop potential marketing and advertising tactics and strategies targeted to the defined...01 JUN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Recruiting for Prior Service Market 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Command First Handshake to First Unit of Assignment An Army of One Proud to Be e e to Serve Recruiting for Prior Service Market MAJ Eric Givens / MAJ Brian

  12. Recruitment potential of a green alga Ulva flexuosa Wulfen dark preserved zoospore and its development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temjensangba Imchen

    Full Text Available The recruitment potential and the ability of Ulva flexuosa Wulfen zoospores to survive darkness were tested under different conditions in the present study. The dark preserved zoospore was cultured under a two-factor experimental design to test the effect of salinity and nitrate, effect of salinity and phosphate, effect of light and salinity, and effect of light and phosphate. The recruitment (germination and growth of zoospores was significantly affected by light and salinity. The nitrate concentration of 20 µmol.l(-1 was found to initiate the process of germination and its subsequent growth and, its effect appeared greatest under 25 psu condition. While nitrate enhances the growth of biomass more than phosphate, both show a positive interactive effect on biomass increase when crossed with salinity. The combined effect of 25 psu salinity and 8 µmol.l(-1 phosphate exhibited higher biomass growth. There was a significant effect of light and salinity on the biomass of zoospore, though there was no significant interaction between the two factors. There was an increase in biomass of growing zoospores to increase in light intensity and 80 µmol.m(-2.s(-1 of light intensity was considered optimal. Similarly, high light intensity condition favored higher biomass growth and there was significant interaction between light (80 µmol. m(-2. s(-1 and phosphate (4 µmol. l(-1 in high salinity (35 psu condition. The result of this study showed that dark preserved zoospores of U. flexuosa have the potential for recruitment and it gives us an understanding how different factors play a role in the process of recruitment.

  13. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs.

  14. Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    Full Text Available Soybean is one of the most important crops grown across the globe. In the United States, approximately 15% of the soybean yield is suppressed due to various pathogen and pests attack. Sudden death syndrome (SDS is an emerging fungal disease caused by Fusarium virguliforme. Although growing SDS resistant soybean cultivars has been the main method of controlling this disease, SDS resistance is partial and controlled by a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL. A proteinacious toxin, FvTox1, produced by the pathogen, causes foliar SDS. Earlier, we demonstrated that expression of an anti-FvTox1 single chain variable fragment antibody resulted in reduced foliar SDS development in transgenic soybean plants. Here, we investigated if synthetic FvTox1-interacting peptides, displayed on M13 phage particles, can be identified for enhancing foliar SDS resistance in soybean. We screened three phage-display peptide libraries and discovered four classes of M13 phage clones displaying FvTox1-interacting peptides. In vitro pull-down assays and in vivo interaction assays in yeast were conducted to confirm the interaction of FvTox1 with these four synthetic peptides and their fusion-combinations. One of these peptides was able to partially neutralize the toxic effect of FvTox1 in vitro. Possible application of the synthetic peptides in engineering SDS resistance soybean cultivars is discussed.

  15. Enhancing mother infant interactions through video feedback enabled interventions in women with schizophrenia: A single subject research design study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashapu Dharma Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that mother infant interactions are often impaired in mothers with schizophrenia. Contributory factors include psychotic symptoms, negative symptoms and surrogate parenting by others. Aim: This study describes the effectiveness of video feedback in enhancing mother-infant interaction in mothers with schizophrenia who have impaired interaction with their infant. Materials and Methods: Two women with schizophrenia who were admitted for persistent psychotic symptoms and poor mothering skills, participated in the intervention. Pre intervention parenting assessment was done using video recording of mother infant interaction. Six sessions of mothering intervention were provided using video feedback and a repeat recording was done. Pre-and post-intervention videos were subsequently rated in a blind fashion by an independent expert in perinatal psychiatry using the pediatric infant parent exam (PIPE scale. Results: Pre and post intervention comparison of PIPE scores indicating significant improvement in several areas of mothering. Conclusions: Video feedback is a simple and inexpensive tool which can be used for improving mothering skills among mothers with postpartum psychosis or schizophrenia even in low resource settings.

  16. Hidden symmetry and enhanced Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction in P-N junctions of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Zhang, Shuhui; Zhu, Jiaji; Chang, Kai

    Correlation between magnetic atoms (spins) in non-magnetic two-dimensional (2D) systems and materials is one of the central issues in condensed matter physics. Engineering this correlation relies heavily on the carrier-mediated Rudermann-Kittel- Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. However, tailoring and direct detection of spin-spin correlation has been limited to spins separated by a few nanometers due to the rapid 1 /R2 decay of RKKY interaction with inter-spin distance R. Here we reveal a hidden symmetry - absent from the Hamiltonian - in planar P-N junctions, which could qualitatively change the spatial scaling of various response functions in a wide range of 2D systems and materials. In particular, it allows RKKY interaction to attain 1 / R decay, the slowest decay in extended systems. This dramatically enhances RKKY interaction and enables long-range correlation between distant spins, with applications in nanoscale magnetism, spintronics, and solid-state quantum computation. This work was supported by the MOST (Grant No. 2015CB921503, and No. 2014CB848700) and NSFC (Grant No. 11434010, No. 11274036, No. 11322542, and No. 11404043).

  17. Inhibition of coral recruitment by macroalgae and cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffner, I.B.; Walters, L.J.; Becerro, M.A.; Paul, V.J.; Ritson-Williams, R.; Beach, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    Coral recruitment is a key process in the maintenance and recovery of coral reef ecosystems. While intense competition between coral and algae is often assumed on reefs that have undergone phase shifts from coral to algal dominance, data examining the competitive interactions involved, particularly during the larval and immediate post-settlement stage, are scarce. Using a series of field and outdoor seawater table experiments, we tested the hypothesis that common species of macroalgae and cyanobacteria inhibit coral recruitment. We examined the effects of Lyngbya spp., Dictyota spp., Lobophora variegata (J. V. Lamouroux) Womersley, and Chondrophycus poiteaui (J. V. Lamouroux) Nam (formerly Laurencia poiteaui) on the recruitment success of Porites astreoides larvae. All species but C. poiteaui caused either recruitment inhibition or avoidance behavior in P. astreoides larvae, while L. confervoides and D. menstrualis significantly increased mortality rates of P. astreoides recruits. We also tested the effect of some of these macrophytes on larvae of the gorgonian octocoral Briareum asbestinum. Exposure to Lyngbya majuscula reduced survival and recruitment in the octocoral larvae. Our results provide evidence that algae and cyanobacteria use tactics beyond space occupation to inhibit coral recruitment. On reefs experiencing phase shifts or temporary algal blooms, the restocking of adult coral populations may be slowed due to recruitment inhibition, thereby perpetuating reduced coral cover and limiting coral community recovery. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  18. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  19. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  20. Minimum curvilinearity to enhance topological prediction of protein interactions by network embedding

    KAUST Repository

    Cannistraci, Carlo

    2013-06-21

    Motivation: Most functions within the cell emerge thanks to protein-protein interactions (PPIs), yet experimental determination of PPIs is both expensive and time-consuming. PPI networks present significant levels of noise and incompleteness. Predicting interactions using only PPI-network topology (topological prediction) is difficult but essential when prior biological knowledge is absent or unreliable.Methods: Network embedding emphasizes the relations between network proteins embedded in a low-dimensional space, in which protein pairs that are closer to each other represent good candidate interactions. To achieve network denoising, which boosts prediction performance, we first applied minimum curvilinear embedding (MCE), and then adopted shortest path (SP) in the reduced space to assign likelihood scores to candidate interactions. Furthermore, we introduce (i) a new valid variation of MCE, named non-centred MCE (ncMCE); (ii) two automatic strategies for selecting the appropriate embedding dimension; and (iii) two new randomized procedures for evaluating predictions.Results: We compared our method against several unsupervised and supervisedly tuned embedding approaches and node neighbourhood techniques. Despite its computational simplicity, ncMCE-SP was the overall leader, outperforming the current methods in topological link prediction.Conclusion: Minimum curvilinearity is a valuable non-linear framework that we successfully applied to the embedding of protein networks for the unsupervised prediction of novel PPIs. The rationale for our approach is that biological and evolutionary information is imprinted in the non-linear patterns hidden behind the protein network topology, and can be exploited for predicting new protein links. The predicted PPIs represent good candidates for testing in high-throughput experiments or for exploitation in systems biology tools such as those used for network-based inference and prediction of disease-related functional modules. The

  1. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eMichael

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius Syndrome (MS to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g. gestures to compensate for their lack of facial expressiveness. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual nonverbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, while verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, while overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact nonverbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment.

  2. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment. PMID:26500605

  3. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment.

  4. 45 CFR 86.23 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 86.23 Section 86.23 Public Welfare... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 86.23 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which this subpart applies shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and...

  5. 22 CFR 146.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recruitment. 146.310 Section 146.310 Foreign... Recruitment Prohibited § 146.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 146.300 through 146.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and admission...

  6. 49 CFR 25.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 25.310 Section 25.310 Transportation... Recruitment Prohibited § 25.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 25.300 through 25.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and admission of...

  7. 22 CFR 229.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recruitment. 229.310 Section 229.310 Foreign... and Recruitment Prohibited § 229.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 229.300 through 229.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and...

  8. 10 CFR 1042.310 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 1042.310 Section 1042.310 Energy DEPARTMENT... Recruitment Prohibited § 1042.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 1042.300 through 1042.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and admission...

  9. 7SK-BAF axis controls pervasive transcription at enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Ryan A; Do, Brian T; Rubin, Adam J; Calo, Eliezer; Lee, Byron; Kuchelmeister, Hannes; Rale, Michael; Chu, Ci; Kool, Eric T; Wysocka, Joanna; Khavari, Paul A; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-03-01

    RNA functions at enhancers remain mysterious. Here we show that the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating nucleosome position. 7SK occupies enhancers and super enhancers genome wide in mouse and human cells, and it is required to limit enhancer-RNA initiation and synthesis in a manner distinct from promoter pausing. Clustered elements at super enhancers uniquely require 7SK to prevent convergent transcription and DNA-damage signaling. 7SK physically interacts with the BAF chromatin-remodeling complex, recruits BAF to enhancers and inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating chromatin structure. In turn, 7SK occupancy at enhancers coincides with that of Brd4 and is exquisitely sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Thus, 7SK uses distinct mechanisms to counteract the diverse consequences of pervasive transcription that distinguish super enhancers, enhancers and promoters.

  10. Researchers' perspectives on pediatric obesity research participant recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Yasha; Mason, Maryann; Williams, Karen

    2016-12-01

    Childhood obesity prevalence has tripled over the last three decades. Pediatric obesity has important implications for both adult health as well as the United States economy. In order to combat pediatric obesity, exploratory studies are necessary to create effective interventions. Recruitment is an essential part of any study, and it has been challenging for all studies, especially pediatric obesity studies. The objective of this study was to understand barriers to pediatric obesity study recruitment and review facilitators to overcome recruitment difficulties. Twenty four childhood obesity researchers were contacted. Complete data for 11 researchers were obtained. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Grounded Theory methodological approach was used, as this was an exploratory study. Investigators YP and MM coded the interviews using 28 codes. Barriers to recruitment included: family and study logistics, family economics, lack of provider interest, invasive protocols, stigma, time restraints of clinicians, lack of patient motivation/interest, groupthink of students in a classroom, and participants who do not accept his or her own weight status. Facilitators to enhance recruitment practices included accommodating participants outside of regular clinic hours, incentivizing participants, cultivating relationships with communities, schools and clinics prior to study recruitment, emphasizing benefits of a study for the patient, and shifting language to focus on health rather than obesity. Pediatric obesity researchers face many standard and some unique challenges to recruitment, reflecting challenges common to clinical research as well as some specific to pediatrics and some specific to obesity research. Both pediatric studies as well as obesity studies are an added challenge to the already-difficult task of general study recruitment. Our findings can be used to make researchers more aware of potential difficulties, approaches and on

  11. Interaction between antitumor drug and silver nanoparticles:combined fluorscence and surface enhanced Raman scattering study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yang; Hong Wang; Zhuyuan Wang; Xuebin Tan; Chunyuan Song; Ruohu Zhang; Jin Li; Yiping Cui

    2009-01-01

    Optical methods and MTT method are used to characterize the antiproliferation effect of antitumor drug 9-aminoacridine (9AA) with and without silver nanoparticles.Intracellular surface enhanced Raman scat tering (SERS) spectra and fluorescent spectra of 9AA indicate the form of 9AA adsorbed on the surface of silver nanoparticles.Although both silver nanoparticles and antitumor drug can inhibit the growth of Hela cells,silver nanoparticles can slow down the antiproliferation effect on Hela cells at low concentration of antitumor drugs.Our experimental results suggest that silver nanoparticles may serve as slow-release drug carriers,which is important in antitumor drug delivery.

  12. Slow-light enhanced light-matter interactions with applications to gas sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Zainal Alam, Muhd Nazrul Hisham; Scherer, B.

    2008-01-01

    perturbation theory to the case of a Bragg stack infiltrated by a spectrally strongly dispersive gas with a narrow and distinct absorption peak. We show that considerable signal enhancement is possible. As an example, we consider a Bragg stack consisting of PMMA infiltrated by O2. Here, the required optical...... path length for visible to near-infrared detection (760 nm) can be reduced by at least a factor of 102, making a path length of 1 mm feasible. By using this technique, optical gas detection can potentially be made possible in microsystems....

  13. Enhanced Proton Acceleration by an Ultrashort Laser Interaction with Structured Dynamic Plasma Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Zigler, A; Botton, M; Nahum, E; Schleifer, E; Baspaly, A; Pomerantz, Y; Abicht, F; Branzel, J; Priebe, G; Steinke, S; Andreev, A; Schnuerer, M; Sandner, W; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P; Ledingham, K W D

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a notably enhanced acceleration of protons to high energy by relatively modest ultrashort laser pulses and structured dynamical plasma targets. Realized by special deposition of snow targets on sapphire substrates and using carefully planned pre-pulses, high proton yield emitted in a narrow solid angle with energy above 21MeV were detected from a 5TW laser. Our simulations predict that using the proposed scheme protons can be accelerated to energies above 150MeV by 100TW laser systems.

  14. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  15. Protein-nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5-40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3-15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag-N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  16. Chlordiazepoxide enhances the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 in the social interaction test: evidence for benzodiazepine withdrawal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Pellow, S

    1985-07-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor 'inverse agonist' CGS 8216 has a specific anxiogenic action in the social interaction test that cannot be reversed by other compounds acting at the benzodiazepine site: Ro 15-1788, FG 7142 or beta-CCE. We tried to reverse the anxiogenic effect with chlordiazepoxide, which is able to antagonise the anxiogenic effects of several other compounds acting at benzodiazepine or related sites. Chlordiazepoxide given acutely (10-20 mg/kg) was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 (5-10 mg/kg); instead there was a tendency to enhance its effects. The effects of chlordiazepoxide after 5 days pretreatment were then assessed, since chronic treatment is necessary to reverse the anxiogenic actions of Ro 15-1788 and Ro 5-4864. At 5 mg/kg chronically, chlordiazepoxide was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic effect of CGS 8216, and at 20 mg/kg there was a significant enhancement of the effects of CGS 8216 on social interaction without an effect on locomotor activity. These results are discussed in terms of withdrawal from benzodiazepine treatment.

  17. Synergistic interactions between grafted hyaluronic acid and lubricin provide enhanced wear protection and lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Banquy, Xavier; Zappone, Bruno; Greene, George W; Jay, Gregory D; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-05-13

    Normal (e.g., adhesion) and lateral (friction) forces were measured between physisorbed and chemically grafted layers of hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polyelectrolyte in the presence of lubricin (Lub), a mucinous glycoprotein, on mica surfaces using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). This work demonstrates that high friction coefficients between the surfaces do not necessarily correlate with surface damage and that chemically grafted HA acts synergistically with Lub to provide friction reduction and enhanced wear protection to the surfaces. Surface immobilization of HA by grafting is necessary for such wear protection. Increasing the concentration of Lub enhances the threshold load that a chemically grafted HA surface can be subjected to before the onset of wear. Addition of Lub does not have any beneficial effect if HA is physisorbed to the mica surfaces. Damage occurs at loads less than 1 mN regardless of the amount of Lub, indicating that the molecules in the bulk play little or no role in protecting the surfaces from damage. Lub penetrates into the chemically bound HA to form a visco-elastic gel that reduces the coefficient of friction as well as boosts the strength of the surface against abrasive wear (damage).

  18. Ag-Pb Interaction and Enhanced Fluorescence Emission of Pb^2+ in Lead Borate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallur, Saisudha; Giri, Prakash; Dc, Mahendra; Babu, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    We carried out Pb^2+ fluorescence measurements in lead borate glasses and studied the effect of adding Ag into the base glass. Lead borate glasses containing Ag (0 and 3 mol%) were prepared by the usual melt quench method. The prepared glasses were then annealed near the glass transition temperature (400 ^oC) at 5, 10, 20 and 30h. Fluorescence spectra of all these samples were obtained using different excitation wavelengths. In general, Pb^2+ monomers are expected to have emission at wavelength less than 400nm. However, no emission in this region was observed due to the base glass absorption. The emission observed at 450nm is attributed to ^3P1->^1S0 transition of Pb^2+ ions in dimer centers. Addition of Ag enhances the Pb^2+ luminescence intensity at 450 nm which also shows an increase with the annealing time. The possible mechanisms for the fluorescence enhancement in the present glass could be the energy transfer from isolated Ag particles and local field effects due to the difference between the dielectric functions of the glass matrix and the silver particles.

  19. Depth of Interaction Enhanced Gamma-Ray Imaging for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Christoph W.

    2006-11-01

    A novel design for an inexpensive depth of interaction capable detector for gamma rays, suitable for nuclear medical applications, especially Positron Emission Tomography, has been developed. The design takes advantage of the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution in continuous crystals and the depth of interaction of the gamma-ray. For measuring the distribution width, an inexpensive modification of the commonly used charge dividing circuits that allows analogue and instantaneous computation of the 2nd moment has been developed and is presented in this work. The method has been tested with a detector made of a continuous LSO-scintillator of dimensions 42x42x10 cubic mm and optically coupled to the compact large area position sensitive photomultiplier H8500 from Hamamatsu. The mean resolution in all non-trivial moments was found to be smaller than 5% but their direct use as estimates for the three-dimensional photoconversion position turned out to be unsuitable. Standard polynomial interpolation in higher dimensions has been adopted to reconstruct the impact positions of the gamma-rays from the measured moments. When using the reconstructed impact positions, the intrinsic mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 1.9 mm for the transverse components and 3.9 mm for the depth of interaction. Using directly the bare moments as position estimate, the intrinsic mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 3.4 mm and 4.9 mm, respectively. The cost for the required detector improvements are essentially negligible.

  20. Enhancing student learning of two-level quantum systems with interactive simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kohnle, Antje; Campbell, Anna; Korolkova, Natalia; Paetkau, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The QuVis Quantum Mechanics Visualization project aims to address challenges of quantum mechanics instruction through the development of interactive simulations for the learning and teaching of quantum mechanics. In this article, we describe evaluation of simulations focusing on two-level systems developed as part of the Institute of Physics Quantum Physics resources. Simulations are research-based and have been iteratively refined using student feedback in individual observation sessions and in-class trials. We give evidence that these simulations are helping students learn quantum mechanics concepts at both the introductory and advanced undergraduate level, and that students perceive simulations to be beneficial to their learning.

  1. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    OpenAIRE

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11,...

  2. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    OpenAIRE

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11,...

  3. Quantifying Parameter Sensitivity, Interaction and Transferability in Hydrologically Enhanced Versions of Noah-LSM over Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero, Enrique; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wagener, Thorsten; Gulden, Lindsey E.; Yatheendradas, Soni; Niu, Guo-Yue

    2009-01-01

    We use sensitivity analysis to identify the parameters that are most responsible for shaping land surface model (LSM) simulations and to understand the complex interactions in three versions of the Noah LSM: the standard version (STD), a version enhanced with a simple groundwater module (GW), and version augmented by a dynamic phenology module (DV). We use warm season, high-frequency, near-surface states and turbulent fluxes collected over nine sites in the US Southern Great Plains. We quantify changes in the pattern of sensitive parameters, the amount and nature of the interaction between parameters, and the covariance structure of the distribution of behavioral parameter sets. Using Sobol s total and first-order sensitivity indexes, we show that very few parameters directly control the variance of the model output. Significant parameter interaction occurs so that not only the optimal parameter values differ between models, but the relationships between parameters change. GW decreases parameter interaction and appears to improve model realism, especially at wetter sites. DV increases parameter interaction and decreases identifiability, implying it is overparameterized and/or underconstrained. A case study at a wet site shows GW has two functional modes: one that mimics STD and a second in which GW improves model function by decoupling direct evaporation and baseflow. Unsupervised classification of the posterior distributions of behavioral parameter sets cannot group similar sites based solely on soil or vegetation type, helping to explain why transferability between sites and models is not straightforward. This evidence suggests a priori assignment of parameters should also consider climatic differences.

  4. Compositing polyetherimide with polyfluorene wrapped carbon nanotubes for enhanced interfacial interaction and conductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2014-06-25

    A novel approach to chemically functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for making superior polyetherimide (PEI) nanocomposites with polyfluorene polymer is presented. In this approach, MWCNTs are non-covalently functionalized with poly(9,9-dioctyfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) through π-π stacking as confirmed by UV-vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectra. Atomic force microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the PFO coated MWCNTs, which provides excellent dispersion of the latter in both solvent and PEI matrix. The strong interaction of PFO with PEI chains, as evidenced from fluorescence spectra, supports the good adhesion of dispersed MWCNTs to PEI leading to stronger interfacial interactions. As a result, the addition of as little as 0.25 wt % of modified MWCNTs to PEI matrix can strongly improve the mechanical properties of the composite (increase of 46% in storage modulus). Increasing the amount of MWCNTs to 2.0 wt % (0.5 wt % PFO loading) affords a great increase of 119% in storage modulus. Furthermore, a sharp decrease of 12 orders of magnitude in volume resistivity of PEI composite is obtained with only 0.5 wt % of PFO modified MWCNT. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  5. Exploring effects of strong interactions in enhancing masses of dynamical origin

    CERN Document Server

    de Oca, Alejandro Cabo Montes

    2010-01-01

    The previous investigation on the question of a dynamical generation of large quark masses in a modified version of PQCD is considered here from another viewpoint. For this purpose the mass parameter of the quarks in QCD (or equivalently, a source in the generating functional for the quark condensate composite operator in massless QCD) is assumed to have a dynamical origin. Examples of this kind are the same Yukawa interaction in the Standard Model (SM) and the case of the masses generated by fluxes within compactified spaces in superstring theories. The simple case of a real scalar field without self-interaction is assumed in this first exploration. The effective action as a function of the scalar "mass" field background is evaluated up to two loops in the minimal substraction (MS) scheme. After substituting the one loop renormalization group (RG) expression for the coupling as a function of \\mu and assuming \\Lambda_{QCD}=217 MeV, the minimum of the effective potential is fixed at a scalar field value which ...

  6. Depth of Interaction Enhanced Gamma-Ray Imaging for Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lerche, C W

    2006-01-01

    A novel design for an inexpensive depth of interaction capable detector for gamma rays, suitable for nuclear medical applications, especially Positron Emission Tomography, has been developed. The design takes advantage of the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution in continuous crystals and the depth of interaction of the gamma-ray. For measuring the distribution width, an inexpensive modification of the commonly used charge dividing circuits that allows analogue and instantaneous computation of the 2nd moment has been developed and is presented in this work. The method has been tested with a detector made of a continuous LSO-scintillator of dimensions 42x42x10 cubic mm and optically coupled to the compact large area position sensitive photomultiplier H8500 from Hamamatsu. The mean resolution in all non-trivial moments was found to be smaller than 5% but their direct use as estimates for the three-dimensional photoconversion position turned out to be unsuitable. Standard ...

  7. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Shanan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria.

  8. Platform for enhanced light-graphene interaction length and miniaturizing fiber stereo-devices

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Fei; Chen, Jin-hui; Chen, Ye; Lu, Yan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Sufficient light-matter interactions are important for waveguide-coupled graphene optoelectronic devices. Using a microfiber-based lab-on-a-rod technique, we present a platform for ultra-long light-graphene interaction and design graphene-integrated helical microfiber (MF) devices. Using this approach, we experimentally demonstrate an in-line stereo polarizer by wrapping an MF on a rod pretreated with a graphene sheet. The device operates as a broadband (450 nm wavelength) polarizer capable of achieving an extinction ratio (ER) as high as ~8 dB/coil in the telecommunication band. Furthermore, we extend this approach to successfully demonstrate a high-Q graphene-based single-polarization resonator, which operates with an ER of ~11 dB with excellent suppression of polarization noise. The fiber-coil resonator shows great potential for sensing applications and gyro-integration. By specializing the rod surface and coil geometry, we believe the preliminary results reported herein could contribute to advancing the r...

  9. Integrating R and Java for Enhancing Interactivity of Algorithmic Data Analysis Software Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Felix FURTUNĂ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Conceiving software solutions for statistical processing and algorithmic data analysis involves handling diverse data, fetched from various sources and in different formats, and presenting the results in a suggestive, tailorable manner. Our ongoing research aims to design programming technics for integrating R developing environment with Java programming language for interoperability at a source code level. The goal is to combine the intensive data processing capabilities of R programing language, along with the multitude of statistical function libraries, with the flexibility offered by Java programming language and platform, in terms of graphical user interface and mathematical function libraries. Both developing environments are multiplatform oriented, and can complement each other through interoperability. R is a comprehensive and concise programming language, benefiting from a continuously expanding and evolving set of packages for statistical analysis, developed by the open source community. While is a very efficient environment for statistical data processing, R platform lacks support for developing user friendly, interactive, graphical user interfaces (GUIs. Java on the other hand, is a high level object oriented programming language, which supports designing and developing performant and interactive frameworks for general purpose software solutions, through Java Foundation Classes, JavaFX and various graphical libraries. In this paper we treat both aspects of integration and interoperability that refer to integrating Java code into R applications, and bringing R processing sequences into Java driven software solutions. Our research has been conducted focusing on case studies concerning pattern recognition and cluster analysis.

  10. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria.

  11. Gammadelta receptor bearing T cells in scleroderma: enhanced interaction with vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaleh, M B; Fan, P S; Otsuka, T

    1999-05-01

    In view of the documented perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in the involved organs in scleroderma (SSc) and the reported accumulation of gammadelta-T cells in SSc skin and lung, we evaluated gammadelta-T cell interaction with endothelial cells (EC) in vitro. gammadelta- and alphabeta-T cells were isolated from BPMN of SSc patients with early diffuse disease and of matched control subjects by an immunomagnetic method after stimulation with mycobacterium lysate and interleukin-2 for 2 weeks. Lymphocyte adhesion, proliferation, and cytotoxicity to EC were investigated. SSc gammadelta-T cells adhered to cultured EC and proliferated at higher rates than control cells. Furthermore, significant EC cytotoxicity by SSc gammadelta was seen. The cytotoxicity was blocked by addition of anti-gammadelta-TCR antibody and by anti-granzyme A antibody but not by anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Expression of granzyme A mRNA was seen in five/five SSc gammadelta-T cells and in one/five control cells. alphabeta-T cells from both SSc and control subjects were significantly less interactive with EC than gammadelta-T cells. The data demonstrate EC recognition by SSc gammadelta-T cells and propose gammadelta-T cells as a possible effector cell type in the immune pathogenesis of SSc.

  12. A sequence upstream of canonical PDZ-binding motif within CFTR COOH-terminus enhances NHERF1 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neeraj; LaRusch, Jessica; Sosnay, Patrick R; Gottschalk, Laura B; Lopez, Andrea P; Pellicore, Matthew J; Evans, Taylor; Davis, Emily; Atalar, Melis; Na, Chan-Hyun; Rosson, Gedge D; Belchis, Deborah; Milewski, Michal; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-12-01

    The development of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) targeted therapy for cystic fibrosis has generated interest in maximizing membrane residence of mutant forms of CFTR by manipulating interactions with scaffold proteins, such as sodium/hydrogen exchange regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1). In this study, we explored whether COOH-terminal sequences in CFTR beyond the PDZ-binding motif influence its interaction with NHERF1. NHERF1 displayed minimal self-association in blot overlays (NHERF1, Kd = 1,382 ± 61.1 nM) at concentrations well above physiological levels, estimated at 240 nM from RNA-sequencing and 260 nM by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in sweat gland, a key site of CFTR function in vivo. However, NHERF1 oligomerized at considerably lower concentrations (10 nM) in the presence of the last 111 amino acids of CFTR (20 nM) in blot overlays and cross-linking assays and in coimmunoprecipitations using differently tagged versions of NHERF1. Deletion and alanine mutagenesis revealed that a six-amino acid sequence (1417)EENKVR(1422) and the terminal (1478)TRL(1480) (PDZ-binding motif) in the COOH-terminus were essential for the enhanced oligomerization of NHERF1. Full-length CFTR stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells fostered NHERF1 oligomerization that was substantially reduced (∼5-fold) on alanine substitution of EEN, KVR, or EENKVR residues or deletion of the TRL motif. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that the EENKVR and TRL sequences contribute to preferential localization of CFTR to the apical membrane. Together, these results indicate that COOH-terminal sequences mediate enhanced NHERF1 interaction and facilitate the localization of CFTR, a property that could be manipulated to stabilize mutant forms of CFTR at the apical surface to maximize the effect of CFTR-targeted therapeutics.

  13. Estrogen Receptor α(ERα) Target Gene LRP16 Interacts with ERα and Enhances Receptor's Transcriptional Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Wei-dong; ZHAO Ya-li; WU Zhi-qing; MENG Yuan-guang; ZANG Li; MU Yi-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: It has been shown that LRP16 is an estrogen-induced gene through its receptor (Erα). Although there is evidence demonstrating that inhibition of LRP16 gene expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells partially attenuates its estrogen-responsiveness, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. Here, the effect of LRP16 expression on the ER( signaling transduction was investigated. Methods: Cotransfection assays were used to measure the effect of LRP16 on ER(-mediated transcriptional activity. GST-pulldown and immunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays were employed to investigate the physical interaction of LRP16 and Erα. The mammalian two-hybrid method was used to map the functional interaction region. Results: the results of cotransfection assays demonstrated that the transcriptional activities of Erα were enhanced in a LRP16 dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 in the presence of estrogen, however, it was abolished in the absence of E2 in MCF-7 cells. The physical interaction of LRP16 and Erα proteins was confirmed by GST-pulldown in vitro and CoIP in vivo assays, which was enhanced by E2 but not dependent on its presence. Furthermore, the results of the mammalian two-hybrid assays indicated that the binding region of Erα to LRP16 located at the A/B AF-1 functional domain and E2 stimulated the binding of LRP16 to the full-length Erα molecule but not to the A/B region alone. Conclusion: These results support a role for estrogenically regulated LRP16 as an Erα coactivator, providing a positive feedback regulatory loop for Erα signal transduction. Based on this function of LRP16, we propose that Erα-positive breast cancer patients with high expression of LRP16 might benefit from targeting LRP16 therapy.

  14. Spatial synchrony in cisco recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jared T.; Yule, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael L.; Ahrenstorff, Tyler D.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Ebener, Mark P.; Berglund, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the spatial scale of recruitment variability for disparate cisco (Coregonus artedi) populations in the Great Lakes (n = 8) and Minnesota inland lakes (n = 4). We found that the scale of synchrony was approximately 400 km when all available data were utilized; much greater than the 50-km scale suggested for freshwater fish populations in an earlier global analysis. The presence of recruitment synchrony between Great Lakes and inland lake cisco populations supports the hypothesis that synchronicity is driven by climate and not dispersal. We also found synchrony in larval densities among three Lake Superior populations separated by 25–275 km, which further supports the hypothesis that broad-scale climatic factors are the cause of spatial synchrony. Among several candidate climate variables measured during the period of larval cisco emergence, maximum wind speeds exhibited the most similar spatial scale of synchrony to that observed for cisco. Other factors, such as average water temperatures, exhibited synchrony on broader spatial scales, which suggests they could also be contributing to recruitment synchrony. Our results provide evidence that abiotic factors can induce synchronous patterns of recruitment for populations of cisco inhabiting waters across a broad geographic range, and show that broad-scale synchrony of recruitment can occur in freshwater fish populations as well as those from marine systems.

  15. The effect of enhanced storybook interaction on signing deaf children's vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, Jessica W; Easterbrooks, Susan R

    2014-07-01

    The link between vocabulary and later literacy is well documented in the research base. One way children gain vocabulary is through incidental learning. Deaf or hard-of-hearing children (D/HH) often struggle with incidental learning and require vocabulary intervention to increase their lexicon. An effective vocabulary intervention is storybook reading. When dialogic methods are added to storybook reading, the gains are greater than with traditional storybook reading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an enhanced storybook reading intervention, which included scripted questions and picture prompts, on the vocabulary of young signing D/HH children. We utilized a multiple baseline across content probe design. We discovered a functional relation between the storybook intervention and picture vocabulary identification for several participants. This outcome offers insight into appropriate interventions to increase vocabulary for signing D/HH children.

  16. Competition between Hydrophilic and Argyrophilic Interactions in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John T; McClellan, Annie K; Joe, Lynn V; Wright, Ashley M; Lloyd, Lawson T; Tschumper, Gregory S; Hammer, Nathan I

    2016-09-19

    The competition for binding and charge-transfer (CT) from the nitrogen containing heterocycle pyrimidine to either silver or to water in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is discussed. The correlation between the shifting observed for vibrational normal modes and CT is analyzed both experimentally using Raman spectroscopy and theoretically using electronic structure theory. Discrete features in the Raman spectrum correspond to the binding of either water or silver to each of pyrimidine's nitrogen atoms with comparable frequency shifts. Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations in each chemical environment reveal that the magnitude of charge transfer from pyrimidine to adjacent silver atoms is only about twice that for water alone. These results suggest that the choice of solvent plays a role in determining the vibrational frequencies of nitrogen containing molecules in SERS experiments.

  17. Synergetic interaction of Dark-Modes and Faraday Rotation for Enhanced Magneto-Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazor, Y; Steinberg, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    We examine the efficacy of Dark-mode plasmonics as a platform for enhanced magneto-optics. Dark-mode of a small particle consists of two co-existing equal-intensity and mutually opposing dipolar excitations. Each of these two opposing dipoles may even resonate intensely at or near the dark-mode frequency, but the net dipole moment of the system vanishes due to the mutual cancelation between the opposing dipoles. We show that application of external magnetic bias may alleviate the intense destructive interference. Furthermore, under external magnetic bias the opposing dark-resonances of a plasmonic particle shift in opposite directions and create a region of extremely sensitive Faraday rotation. We show that the magnetized dark resonance in Ag particle may provide 50 degrees rotation under magnetic fields of the order of 1-2 Tesla, exhibiting magneto-plasmonic activity that is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than that observed in conventional plasmonic particle.

  18. Exciton matter sustained by colossal dispersive interactions due to enhanced polarizability: Possible clue to ball lightning

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, M; Georgiev, Mladen; Singh, Jai

    2005-01-01

    Recently Gilman has pointed out that the material state of a ball lightning is both highly cohesive and flexible. He makes a specific proposal for a cohesive state arising from (colossal) Van-der-Waals attraction between highly polarizable Rydberg atoms produced under a linear lightning. We accept his general suggestions but propose that the colossal Van-der-Waals coupling may also arise from the enhanced polarizability of surrogate molecular clusters, due to the polaron gap narrowing effect. We consider a few illuminating cases and present calculations for the ammonia molecule. Although being unable to identify the exact nature of the surrogate molecules at least for the time-being, we suggest a general scenario of photoexcited vibronic excitons forming a supersaturated surrogate gas phase in which a ball arises as a result of condensation. The orange color of the luminous ball is due to radiative exciton deexcitation and suggests that there may be a unique surrogate material for ball lightning.

  19. Enhanced laser absorption from radiation pressure in intense laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollar, F.; Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; Chvykov, V.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2017-06-01

    The reflectivity of a short-pulse laser at intensities of 2× {10}21 {{Wcm}}-2 with ultra-high contrast ({10}-15) on sub-micrometer silicon nitride foils was studied experimentally using varying polarizations and target thicknesses. The reflected intensity and beam quality were found to be relatively constant with respect to intensity for bulk targets. For submicron targets, the measured reflectivity drops substantially without a corresponding increase in transmission, indicating increased conversion of fundamental to other wavelengths and particle heating. Experimental results and trends observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations emphasize the critical role of ion motion due to radiation pressure on the absorption process. Ion motion during ultra-short pulses enhances the electron heating, which subsequently transfers more energy to the ions.

  20. Social and emotional relevance in face processing: happy faces of future interaction partners enhance the late positive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Gerdes, Antje B M; White, Andrew J; Riemer, Martin; Alpers, Georg W

    2014-01-01

    Human face perception is modulated by both emotional valence and social relevance, but their interaction has rarely been examined. Event-related brain potentials (ERP) to happy, neutral, and angry facial expressions with different degrees of social relevance were recorded. To implement a social anticipation task, relevance was manipulated by presenting faces of two specific actors as future interaction partners (socially relevant), whereas two other face actors remained non-relevant. In a further control task all stimuli were presented without specific relevance instructions (passive viewing). Face stimuli of four actors (2 women, from the KDEF) were randomly presented for 1s to 26 participants (16 female). Results showed an augmented N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and late positive potential (LPP) for emotional in contrast to neutral facial expressions. Of particular interest, face processing varied as a function of experimental tasks. Whereas task effects were observed for P1 and EPN regardless of instructed relevance, LPP amplitudes were modulated by emotional facial expression and relevance manipulation. The LPP was specifically enhanced for happy facial expressions of the anticipated future interaction partners. This underscores that social relevance can impact face processing already at an early stage of visual processing. These findings are discussed within the framework of motivated attention and face processing theories.

  1. Enhanced interaction of Vibrio cholerae virulence regulators TcpP and ToxR under oxygen-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fenxia; Liu, Zhi; Jabeen, Nusrat; Birdwell, L Dillon; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. The ability of V. cholerae to colonize and cause disease requires the intricately regulated expression of a number of virulence factors during infection. One of the signals sensed by V. cholerae is the presence of oxygen-limiting conditions in the gut. It has been shown that the virulence activator AphB plays a key role in sensing low oxygen concentrations and inducing the transcription of another key virulence activator, TcpP. In this study, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system to further examine the effect of oxygen on different virulence regulators. We found that anoxic conditions enhanced the interaction between TcpP and ToxR, identified as the first positive regulator of V. cholerae virulence genes. We further demonstrated that the TcpP-ToxR interaction was dependent on the primary periplasmic protein disulfide formation enzyme DsbA and cysteine residues in the periplasmic domains of both ToxR and TcpP. Furthermore, we showed that in V. cholerae, an interaction between TcpP and ToxR is important for virulence gene induction. Under anaerobic growth conditions, we detected ToxR-TcpP heterodimers, which were abolished in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Our results suggest that V. cholerae may sense intestinal anoxic signals by multiple components to activate virulence.

  2. A potential molecular model for studying apoptosis enhanced by the interaction of BCL-G with JAB1 in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Wang, Xingye; Chen, Xiaolin; Wang, Yaping; Kang, Zhanzhan; Wang, Jingna; Zhang, Deli

    2016-09-27

    BCL-G, an apoptotic factor in Bcl-2 family, is involved in several kinds of diseases by interacting with several proteins. Although many studies on mouse and human BCL-G have been reported, porcine BCL-G (pBCL-G) has been little investigated. In this study, our results showed that pBCL-G was universally expressed in porcine tissues. The BH2 domain affected the subcellular distribution of pBCL-G protein. pBCL-G could interact with porcine JAB1 (pJAB1), by which its subcellular distribution was affected. pBCL-G promoted staurosporine-induced apoptosis that was significantly enhanced by interaction of pBCL-G with pJAB1. The apoptosis at least partially depended on the activated caspase-8, -9 and -3. Owing to the close phylogenetic distance between pigs and humans and their many physiological similarities, our findings may provide a potential molecular model to study human BCL-G and also may have implications in the treatment of diseases relevant with BCL-G.

  3. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius Syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g. gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected......, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual nonverbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, while verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound...... in participants with and without MS, while overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact nonverbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing...

  4. Using interactive simulations to enhance conceptual development and problem solving skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heuvelen, Alan

    1997-03-01

    Research during recent decades indicates that traditional didactic instruction is not producing the student learning that we desire. More importantly, research is helping in the development of new pedagogical strategies and curriculum that are improving student achievement. We describe one effort based on this research. The goals are to help students develop qualitative representations and imagery so that they can reason effectively without math about physical processes; learn to use the symbolic language of physics by linking it to other representations such as words, sketches, diagrams, and graphs; develop the skills needed to solve complex multipart problems; learn to learn; and develop the skills needed to work effectively in groups. Interactive multimedia plays an important role in this learning system.

  5. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  6. Enhancing Extraction of Drug-Drug Interaction from Literature Using Neutral Candidates, Negation, and Clause Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Diaz, Alberto; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Supervised biomedical relation extraction plays an important role in biomedical natural language processing, endeavoring to obtain the relations between biomedical entities. Drug-drug interactions, which are investigated in the present paper, are notably among the critical biomedical relations. Thus far many methods have been developed with the aim of extracting DDI relations. However, unfortunately there has been a scarcity of comprehensive studies on the effects of negation, complex sentences, clause dependency, and neutral candidates in the course of DDI extraction from biomedical articles. Results Our study proposes clause dependency features and a number of features for identifying neutral candidates as well as negation cues and scopes. Furthermore, our experiments indicate that the proposed features significantly improve the performance of the relation extraction task combined with other kernel methods. We characterize the contribution of each category of features and finally conclude that neutral candidate features have the most prominent role among all of the three categories. PMID:27695078

  7. An IBC enhanced DGTD scheme for transient analysis of em interactions with graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ping

    2014-07-01

    A discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method is proposed for analyzing electromagnetic field interactions on graphene from microwave to terahertz frequencies. An impedance boundary condition (IBC) is utilized to model the graphene within the DGTD framework. The numerical flux is reformulated to take into account the IBC. Highly dispersive surface conductivity of graphene present in the resulting flux expression is approximated in terms of rational functions using the fast-relaxation vector-fitting technique. Via inverse Laplace transform, this facilitates the time domain matrix equations into an integral form for time variable t, finite integral technique (FIT) with recursive convolution method is employed to discrete and solve the matrix equations. The accuracy and applicability of the proposed IBC-DGTD is verified by numerical experiments.

  8. Why Robots Should Be Social: Enhancing Machine Learning through Social Human-Robot Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim de Greeff

    Full Text Available Social learning is a powerful method for cultural propagation of knowledge and skills relying on a complex interplay of learning strategies, social ecology and the human propensity for both learning and tutoring. Social learning has the potential to be an equally potent learning strategy for artificial systems and robots in specific. However, given the complexity and unstructured nature of social learning, implementing social machine learning proves to be a challenging problem. We study one particular aspect of social machine learning: that of offering social cues during the learning interaction. Specifically, we study whether people are sensitive to social cues offered by a learning robot, in a similar way to children's social bids for tutoring. We use a child-like social robot and a task in which the robot has to learn the meaning of words. For this a simple turn-based interaction is used, based on language games. Two conditions are tested: one in which the robot uses social means to invite a human teacher to provide information based on what the robot requires to fill gaps in its knowledge (i.e. expression of a learning preference; the other in which the robot does not provide social cues to communicate a learning preference. We observe that conveying a learning preference through the use of social cues results in better and faster learning by the robot. People also seem to form a "mental model" of the robot, tailoring the tutoring to the robot's performance as opposed to using simply random teaching. In addition, the social learning shows a clear gender effect with female participants being responsive to the robot's bids, while male teachers appear to be less receptive. This work shows how additional social cues in social machine learning can result in people offering better quality learning input to artificial systems, resulting in improved learning performance.

  9. Glyco-gold nanoparticle shapes enhance carbohydrate-protein interactions in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Vasudeva Murthy, Raghavendra; Chaudhary, Preeti Madhukar; Surve, Manalee; Banerjee, Anirban; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions.Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03008d

  10. Why Robots Should Be Social: Enhancing Machine Learning through Social Human-Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greeff, Joachim; Belpaeme, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Social learning is a powerful method for cultural propagation of knowledge and skills relying on a complex interplay of learning strategies, social ecology and the human propensity for both learning and tutoring. Social learning has the potential to be an equally potent learning strategy for artificial systems and robots in specific. However, given the complexity and unstructured nature of social learning, implementing social machine learning proves to be a challenging problem. We study one particular aspect of social machine learning: that of offering social cues during the learning interaction. Specifically, we study whether people are sensitive to social cues offered by a learning robot, in a similar way to children's social bids for tutoring. We use a child-like social robot and a task in which the robot has to learn the meaning of words. For this a simple turn-based interaction is used, based on language games. Two conditions are tested: one in which the robot uses social means to invite a human teacher to provide information based on what the robot requires to fill gaps in its knowledge (i.e. expression of a learning preference); the other in which the robot does not provide social cues to communicate a learning preference. We observe that conveying a learning preference through the use of social cues results in better and faster learning by the robot. People also seem to form a "mental model" of the robot, tailoring the tutoring to the robot's performance as opposed to using simply random teaching. In addition, the social learning shows a clear gender effect with female participants being responsive to the robot's bids, while male teachers appear to be less receptive. This work shows how additional social cues in social machine learning can result in people offering better quality learning input to artificial systems, resulting in improved learning performance.

  11. Understanding Millennials to Improve Recruiting Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    to the authors of Generations at Work, when recruiting Millennials one must “be tolerant of their “swiss cheese scheduling”-an hour or two here, a...Recruiting Command, Recruiting Operations, 4-3. 32 Ibid., 6-4. 33 U.S. Army Recruiting Command, The Recruiter Handbook , United States Army Recruiting...6-1. 35 U.S. Army Recruiting Command, The Recruiter Handbook , 1-3. 36 Lynn C. Lancaster and David Stillman, When Generations Collide: Who They Ar

  12. Integrin Regulation during Leukocyte Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Integrins are recognized as vital players in leukocyte recruitment. Integrin malfunction causes severe disease patterns characterized by the inability to fight pathogens. Although inflammatory reactions are beneficial and necessary for host defense, these reactions have to be controlled to prevent tissue destruction and harmful sequelae. In this review, we discuss the different signaling pathways leading to the change of integrin adhesiveness in neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes. We thereby focus on the importance of integrin activation for the different steps of the leukocyte recruitment cascade, including rolling, adhesion, postadhesion strengthening, intravascular crawling, and transmigration, as each step necessitates the proper functioning of a distinct set of integrin molecules that has to be activated specifically. Additionally, we discuss endogenous mechanisms that balance and counteract integrin activation and limit leukocyte recruitment at the site of inflammation. Further insight into these complex mechanisms may provide new approaches for developing new anti-inflammatory therapies.

  13. Human development recruiting and selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Marijana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of trends towards internationalization and globalization, human resource management and, especially, international human resource management, attracted overall theoretical and practical interest. International environment is complex, made of numerous elements like social organization, laws, education, values and attitudes, religion language, politics, material and technological culture. In multicultural environment, strategic activities could be multiplied through economical political, cultural, social and technological spheres of action, making the recruitment, selection and successful resource allocation in the international human resource management a real challenge for top management. In international human resource management practice, several approaches to the recruitment have differentiated, playing the key roles in hiring talented individuals and retaining efficient workforce KW resources, labor force, recruiting, managers, education

  14. Structural and Functional Impacts of ER Coactivator Sequential Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Zhao; Feng, Qin; Chou, Chao-Kai; Pintilie, Grigore D; Shen, Hong; Foulds, Charles E; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina; Ludtke, Steven J; Schmid, Michael F; Hung, Mien-Chie; Chiu, Wah; O'Malley, Bert W

    2017-09-07

    Nuclear receptors recruit multiple coactivators sequentially to activate transcription. This "ordered" recruitment allows different coactivator activities to engage the nuclear receptor complex at different steps of transcription. Estrogen receptor (ER) recruits steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3) primary coactivator and secondary coactivators, p300/CBP and CARM1. CARM1 recruitment lags behind the binding of SRC-3 and p300 to ER. Combining cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure analysis and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that there is a close crosstalk between early- and late-recruited coactivators. The sequential recruitment of CARM1 not only adds a protein arginine methyltransferase activity to the ER-coactivator complex, it also alters the structural organization of the pre-existing ERE/ERα/SRC-3/p300 complex. It induces a p300 conformational change and significantly increases p300 HAT activity on histone H3K18 residues, which, in turn, promotes CARM1 methylation activity on H3R17 residues to enhance transcriptional activity. This study reveals a structural role for a coactivator sequential recruitment and biochemical process in ER-mediated transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Guidelines for research recruitment of underserved populations (EERC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yui; Brooks, Jada L; Beeber, Linda S

    2016-11-01

    Despite concerted efforts to establish health equity, significant disparities persist. One roadblock to eliminating health disparities is the inadequate recruitment of underserved populations, which prevents researchers from creating culturally-tailored interventions. To further develop the science of recruitment, we argue that a systematic approach should be applied to research participant recruitment. Given the lack of practical and comprehensive recruitment conceptual frameworks or guidelines in the literature, the authors propose newly synthesized guidelines for research recruitment of underserved populations: EERC (evaluate, engage, reflect, and carefully match). The EERC guidelines are delineated, and the application of these guidelines is illustrated through a study recently conducted by the authors. The guidelines consist of the following four components: 1. Evaluate the composition of the research team; 2. Engage fully with the community by working with key informants and cultural insiders; 3. Reflect the unique cultural characteristics of the community in the research conduct; and 4. Carefully use a matching technique. The application component of the article demonstrates concrete examples of how the guidelines can enhance research recruitment for an underserved population. The authors intend these guidelines to be broadly applicable for research teams regardless of research design or characteristics of the underserved population. Application of these guidelines in nursing and health science will contribute to increasing research recruitment of underserved populations, with the goal of reducing health disparities and achieving health equity for all persons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Far-Field to Near-Field Coupling for Enhancing Light-Matter Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdar, Alireza

    This thesis reports on theoretical, modeling, and experimental research within the framework of a key scientific question, which is enhancing the coupling between diffraction-limited far-field and sub-wavelength quantum emitter/absorber. A typical optoelectronic device delivers an optical process such as light detection (e.g. photodetector) or light intensity modulation (e.g. electro-absorptive modulator). In conventional devices, optical process is in the form of far-field or guided wave modes. The main aim of this thesis is to show that converting these modes into near-field domain can enhance the performance of the optoelectronic device. Light in the form of far-field can be converted into near-field domain by the optical antenna. Among different optoelectronic devices, this thesis focuses mainly on integrating the optical antenna with infrared photodetectors. The available semiconductors have weak infrared absorption that reduces light detection efficiency. Integration of the optical antenna with infrared absorber (such as quantum wells in quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP)) increases the infrared absorption. Particularly this integration is favorable as the optical antenna has low metallic loss in infrared region. The author of this thesis believes that optical antenna has unique properties in confining light on the scale of deep sub-wavelength, enhancing electric field intensity and delivering optical energy to semiconductor absorbers. These properties are reaching into practical applications only if overall optical performance is low loss, parameter free (independent of optical parameters such a polarization and angle of incident) and broadband. In this thesis, the integration of optical antenna with infrared photodetectors and thermophotovoltaic are researched and developed which satisfy the aforementioned criteria. In addition, several different optical antennas have been designed, fabricated and characterized in order to analyze and demonstrate

  17. Do recruitment ties affect wages?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Folke; Rand, John; Torm, Nina Elisabeth

    This paper examines the extent to which recruitment ties affect individual wage outcomes in small and medium scale manufacturing firms. Based on a unique matched employer-employee dataset from Vietnam we find that there is a significant positive wage premium associated with obtaining a job through...... an informal contact, when controlling for standard determinants of wage compensation. Moreover, we show that the mechanism through which informal contacts affect wages depends on the type of recruitment tie used. The findings are robust across location, firm size categories and different worker types....

  18. Designing interactive consumer products: utility of paper prototypes and effectiveness of enhanced control labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Franke, Holger; Ruettinger, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The studies reported here examined differences in user behaviour when presented with a low-fidelity paper prototype compared to fully operational product, and evaluated the effectiveness of different types of enhanced labelling of controls. In the first study with a paper prototype, 30 users of high-pressure washers were asked to choose the settings of the temperature control for different cleaning objects, comparing standard with information-enriched control labelling. In the second study, 34 users operated a real high-pressure washer with different forms of control labelling. The results of both studies provided evidence for some benefits of an information-enriched control labelling over traditional temperature-centred controls labelling. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of the data of the two studies suggested that low-fidelity paper prototypes may have to be used with caution. Therefore, designers need to be aware that the behavioural effects induced by different design modifications may be overestimated when using paper prototypes. The implications of the findings are discussed within the framework of an enlarged concept of fidelity.

  19. Ikaros can enhance immune activity though the interaction with Autotaxin in LDIR exposed immune cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun; KIm, Cha Soon; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    Ikaros, one of transcription factors, plays major roles in the differentiation and biology of leukocytes, including all classes of lymphocytes (NK, T, and B cells), monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. Ikaros was also shown to regulate early neutrophils differentiation. Therefore, Ikaros appears to be a major determinant in the development and function of immune system. Autotaxin (ATX), which is also called nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 2 (NPP2), is an exo-enzyme originally identified as a tumor cell autocrine motility factor. ATX functions as a lysophospholipase D, converting lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). LPA bind together with specific G protein-coupled receptors, which elicit a wide range of cellular responses including the cell proliferation, migration and neurite remodeling. In the Recent report, ATX stimulate human endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth and cytokine production. In our previous study, we showed that low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) enhanced the cell proliferation cell coupled with Ikaros phosphorylation. In addition, we found that LDIR increased the expression level of cyclin E and cdk2 protein in IM-9 B lymphoblast cells. In this report, therefore, we try to find Ikaros binding proteins after LDIR in IM-9 lymphoblastic cell lines to examine whether the effects of LDIR induced cell proliferation are one of immune activation responses or not.

  20. Half-cycle-like field-enhanced harmonic radiation by femtosecond laser-atom interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shi-Bing; Song, Hai-Ying

    2013-06-01

    A manipulatable half-cycle-like field (HCLF), homochromy with the driving femtosecond laser, is applied to enhance the harmonic emission by optimizing their relative delay time. We find that, by numerical computation, the HCLF can deliver a substantial momentum to the accelerated electrons as they return to their parent ions by a suitable phase delay, and also significantly increase the atomic ionization rate supplementarily. The results show that the harmonic order of the maximum or cut-off photon energy emitted in the presence of a half-cycle manipulating light pulse is risen to the 177th order, which is a significant increase compared with the 53rd order harmonics in the case of a single driving light pulse. To understand the essence from the wave-packet kinetics of the return electrons and their relation to the harmonic emission, we utilize the phase-space analysis of the coordinate momentum of an electronic wave packet by using a Gabor transformation, by which the presented numerical conclusions are further confirmed.

  1. Enhancing the interaction strength and capacities of hydrogen storage via surface adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig

    2008-03-01

    Storing Hydrogen molecules in porous media based on a physisorption mechanism is one possible approach to reach the US Department of Energy targets for on-board hydrogen storage. Although the storage capacities of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have progressed significantly over recent years, some technological obstacles pose challenges for their future improvement. These include the generally low H2 adsorption enthalpy limiting room temperature applications and the lack of understanding of surface packing density hindering the efficient improvement of H2 adsorption uptake. To improve the H2 affinity in MOFs, our previous work has shown that the coordinatively unsaturated metal centers (CUMCs) can greatly enhance the H2 binding strength. Our current study of MOF-74 will be presented, showing that its open Zn^2+ ions bind H2 strongly and are identified as being responsible for the large initial H2 adsorption enthalpy of 8.4 kJ/mol. In all, there are four H2 adsorption sites in MOF-74 identified by neutron powder diffraction. These four hydrogen adsorption sites are closely packed in MOF-74 and form a one dimensional nanoscale tube structure. We also demonstrate an interesting correlation that MOFs with CUMCs generally show larger surface packing densities than that of other MOFs without CUMCs. The implications of this will be addressed.

  2. RNA-guided complex from a bacterial immune system enhances target recognition through seed sequence interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenheft, Blake; van Duijn, Esther; Bultema, Jelle B.; Waghmare, Sakharam P.; Zhou, Kaihong; Barendregt, Arjan; Westphal, Wiebke; Heck, Albert J. R.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Dickman, Mark J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Prokaryotes have evolved multiple versions of an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that targets foreign nucleic acids. In each case, transcripts derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are thought to selectively target invading phage and plasmids in a sequence-specific process involving a variable cassette of CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. The CRISPR locus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) includes four cas genes that are unique to and conserved in microorganisms harboring the Csy-type (CRISPR system yersinia) immune system. Here we show that the Csy proteins (Csy1–4) assemble into a 350 kDa ribonucleoprotein complex that facilitates target recognition by enhancing sequence-specific hybridization between the CRISPR RNA and complementary target sequences. Target recognition is enthalpically driven and localized to a “seed sequence” at the 5′ end of the CRISPR RNA spacer. Structural analysis of the complex by small-angle X-ray scattering and single particle electron microscopy reveals a crescent-shaped particle that bears striking resemblance to the architecture of a large CRISPR-associated complex from Escherichia coli, termed Cascade. Although similarity between these two complexes is not evident at the sequence level, their unequal subunit stoichiometry and quaternary architecture reveal conserved structural features that may be common among diverse CRISPR-mediated defense systems. PMID:21536913

  3. The interactive effects of chelator, fertilizer, and rhizobacteria for enhancing phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Cutright, T.J. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Akron, Akron, OH (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The role of chelator, fertilizer, and enriched rhizobacteria in facilitating Cd, Cr, and Ni accumulation by Helianthus annuus was studied. It was found that by adding a synthetic chelator, EDTA, the shoot concentrations of Cd and Ni were significantly increased from 34.2 mg kg{sup -1} and 14.5 mg kg{sup -1} to 115 mg kg{sup -1} and 117 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. However, the total biomass of plants was drastically decreased by 50 to 60%. Compared with this treatment, inoculating enriched rhizobacteria to plants grown under similar conditions maintained the surged shoot concentrations of Cd and Ni while increasing the plants biomass by more than 1.6-fold. It was also found that introducing a commercial fertilizer, Hydro-Gro trademark, to plants significantly increased the Ni accumulation by 3-fold and the plant biomass by 1.43-fold. These results suggest that combing fertilizers, chelators and/or rhizobacteria might provide a more effective approach for enhancing phytoremediation. (orig.)

  4. Enhanced spectrophotometric determination of Losartan potassium based on its physicochemical interaction with cationic surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Laila; Abdel-Aziz, Lobna; Gaied, Mariam

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of Losartan potassium (LST K), an angiotensin-II receptor (type AT1) antagonist, in presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The physicochemical interaction of LST K with CTAB was investigated. The effect of cationic micelles on the spectroscopic and acid-base properties of LST K was studied at pH 7.4. The binding constant (Kb) and the partition coefficient (Kx) of LST K-CTAB were 1.62 × 105 M-1 and 1.38 × 105; respectively. The binding of LST K to CTAB micelles implied a shift in drug acidity constant (ΔpKa = 0.422). The developed method is linear over the range 0.5-28 μg mL-1. The accuracy was evaluated and was found to be 99.79 ± 0.509% and the relative standard deviation for intraday and interday precision was 0.821 and 0.963; respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine LST K in pharmaceutical formulations.

  5. Improving clicker questions for enhanced learning in the interactive physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, Ertan

    2009-03-01

    Classroom response systems, or clickers, have become widely used in physics classes in the last decade. Physics education research has demonstrated clearly that it is not the clicker as an electronic tool, but the interactive learning that occurs through clickers is what improves student learning. For clickers to work as expected, however, many subtle details need to be addressed. An instructor can start using many questions developed for the purpose of peer instruction. For a particular student population, and for a particular learning environment and constraints of the educational institution, questions used and the instructor's teaching style may need to be altered over time. We will present a systematic way of improving clicker questions and one's own teaching style utilizing data collected during clicker sessions. In addition, by adding a small writing component to some clicker questions, one can simply peek into student reasoning in order to determine preconceptions and misconceptions. Such direct knowledge of student reasoning in one's own class may be very revealing, and help improve learning ultimately.

  6. Exploring effects of strong interactions in enhancing masses of dynamical origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, Alejandro [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Grupo de Fisica Teorica, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2011-04-15

    A previous study of the dynamical generation of masses in massless QCD is considered from another viewpoint. The quark mass is assumed to have a dynamical origin and is substituted for by a scalar field without self-interaction. The potential for the new field background is evaluated up to two loops. Expressing the running coupling in terms of the scale parameter {mu}, the potential minimum is chosen to fix m{sub top}=175 GeV when {mu}{sub 0}=498 MeV. The second derivative of the potential predicts a scalar field mass of 126.76 GeV. This number is close to the value 114 GeV, which preliminary data taken at CERN suggested to be associated with the Higgs particle. However, the simplifying assumptions limit the validity of the calculations done, as indicated by the large value of {alpha}=(g{sup 2})/(4{pi})=1.077 obtained. However, supporting statements about the possibility of improving the scheme come from the necessary inclusion of weak and scalar field couplings and mass counterterms in the renormalization procedure, in common with the seemingly needed consideration of the massive W and Z fields, if the real conditions of the SM model are intended to be approached. (orig.)

  7. Enhancing the prioritization of disease-causing genes through tissue specific protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded Magger

    Full Text Available The prioritization of candidate disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge in the post-genomic era. Current state of the art methods exploit a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for this task. They are based on the observation that genes causing phenotypically-similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a PPI network. However, to date, these methods have used a static picture of human PPIs, while diseases impact specific tissues in which the PPI networks may be dramatically different. Here, for the first time, we perform a large-scale assessment of the contribution of tissue-specific information to gene prioritization. By integrating tissue-specific gene expression data with PPI information, we construct tissue-specific PPI networks for 60 tissues and investigate their prioritization power. We find that tissue-specific PPI networks considerably improve the prioritization results compared to those obtained using a generic PPI network. Furthermore, they allow predicting novel disease-tissue associations, pointing to sub-clinical tissue effects that may escape early detection.

  8. Phosphorylated STAT3 physically interacts with NPM and transcriptionally enhances its expression in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Z; Aerts, J L; Pen, J J; Heirman, C; Breckpot, K; De Grève, J

    2015-03-26

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can be activated by the tyrosine kinase domain of the chimeric protein nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK), and has a pivotal role in mediating NPM/ALK-related malignant cell transformation. Although the role of STAT3 and wild-type NPM in oncogenesis has been extensively investigated, the relationship between both molecules in cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, we first demonstrate that STAT3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 is accompanied by a concomitant increase in the expression level of NPM. Nuclear co-translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 with NPM can be triggered by interferon-alpha (IFN-α) stimulation of Jurkat cells and phosphorylated STAT3 co-localizes with NPM in cancer cells showing constitutive STAT3 activation. We further demonstrate that STAT3 phosphorylation can transcriptionally mediate NPM upregulation in IFN-α-stimulated Jurkat cells and is responsible for maintaining its expression in cancer cells showing constitutive STAT3 activation. Inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation or knockdown of NPM expression abrogates their simultaneous transnuclear movements. Finally, we found evidence for a physical interaction between NPM and STAT3 in conditions of STAT3 activation. In conclusion, NPM is a downstream effector of the STAT3 signaling, and can facilitate the nuclear entry of phosphorylated STAT3. These observations might open novel opportunities for targeting the STAT3 pathway in cancer.

  9. Controlled transportation of mesoscopic particles by enhanced spin orbit interaction of light in an optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev; Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Roy, Soumyajit; Banerjee, Ayan

    2012-01-01

    Optical spin orbit interaction (SOI) causes an intrinsic coupling between the polarization and position of light and is manifested as a sub-wavelength effect in isotropic and inhomogeneous (stratified) media. We investigate the effects of SOI in an optical trap and demonstrate that the SOI for a tightly focused polarized laser beam in stratified media (as is found in an optical trap) depends on the thickness of the media, and can be magnified significantly by choosing slightly thicker cover slips than that used conventionally. A polarization analysis of the stratified media in the sample chamber shows the presence of spatially varying linear diattenuation terms in the Mueller matrix that result in a polarization dependent intensity profile. It is thus possible to controllably transport asymmetric particles having a well-defined optic axis by simply changing the polarization angle of a linearly polarized input beam. Pea-pod shaped single soft oxometalate (SOM) particles of dimension around 1 $\\mu$m have been m...

  10. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H/sup +/ beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10/sup 17/ He cm/sup -2/. The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 ..mu..m at 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/ to 5.5 ..mu..m at 3 x 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/.

  11. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs.

  12. Root ABA Accumulation Enhances Rice Seedling Drought Tolerance under Ammonium Supply: Interaction with Aquaporins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lei; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Ying; Gao, Limin; Wang, Min; Chaumont, François; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated that ammonium nutrition enhances the drought tolerance of rice seedlings compared to nitrate nutrition and contributes to a higher root water uptake ability. It remains unclear why rice seedlings maintain a higher water uptake ability when supplied with ammonium under drought stress. Here, we focused on the effects of nitrogen form and drought stress on root abscisic acid (ABA) concentration and aquaporin expression using hydroponics experiments and stimulating drought stress with 10% PEG6000. Drought stress decreased the leaf photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductivity and increased the leaf temperature of plants supplied with either ammonium or nitrate, but especially under nitrate supply. After 4 h of PEG treatment, the root protoplast water permeability and the expression of root PIP and TIP genes decreased in plants supplied with ammonium or nitrate. After 24 h of PEG treatment, the root hydraulic conductivity, the protoplast water permeability, and the expression of some aquaporin genes increased in plants supplied with ammonium compared to those under non-PEG treatment. Root ABA accumulation was induced by 24 h of PEG treatment, especially in plants supplied with ammonium. The addition of exogenous ABA decreased the expression of PIP and TIP genes under non-PEG treatment but increased the expression of some of them under PEG treatment. We concluded that drought stress induced a down-regulation of aquaporin expression, which appeared earlier than did root ABA accumulation. With continued drought stress, aquaporin expression and activity increased due to root ABA accumulation in plants supplied with ammonium. PMID:27559341

  13. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  14. Enhancing teen pregnancy prevention in local communities: capacity building using the interactive systems framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Jennifer L; Prince, Mary Severson; Johnson, Erin E; Alton, Forrest L; Flynn, Shannon; Faye, Amy Mattison; Padgett, Polly Edwards; Rollison, Chris; Becker, Dana; Hinzey, Angela L

    2012-12-01

    Getting To Outcomes (GTO), an innovative framework for planning, implementing, evaluating, and sustaining interventions has been shown to be effective in helping community-based organizations (CBOs) introduce science-based approaches into their prevention work. However, the Interactive Systems Framework (ISF) suggests that adopting innovations like GTO requires a significant amount of capacity building through training and technical assistance (T/TA). In this study, 11 CBOs and three schools in South Carolina entered into a 3 year program of intense and proactive T/TA based on the ISF to learn how to apply an adaptation of GTO (Promoting Science-Based Approaches-Getting To Outcomes, PSBA-GTO) to their teen pregnancy prevention programs. Using semi-structured interviews, the partnering organizations were assessed at three points in time, pre-T/TA, 12 months, and post T/TA (30 months) for their performance of the steps of GTO in their work. The seven organizations which participated in T/TA until the end of the project received an average of 76 h of TA and 112 h of training per organization. Interview results showed increased performance of all 10 steps of PSBA-GTO by these organizations when conducting their teen pregnancy programs. These results suggest targeted and proactive T/TA can successfully bridge the gap between research and practice by using a three part delivery system, as prescribed in the ISF, which relies on an intermediary prevention support system to ensure accurate and effective translation of research to the everyday work of community-based practitioners.

  15. Towards an Enhanced Understanding of Plant-Microbiome Interactions to Improve Phytoremediation: Engineering the Metaorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Sofie; Sillen, Wouter; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising technology to clean-up contaminated soils based on the synergistic actions of plants and microorganisms. However, to become a widely accepted, and predictable remediation alternative, a deeper understanding of the plant-microbe interactions is needed. A number of studies link the success of phytoremediation to the plant-associated microbiome functioning, though whether the microbiome can exist in alternative, functional states for soil remediation, is incompletely understood. Moreover, current approaches that target the plant host, and environment separately to improve phytoremediation, potentially overlook microbial functions and properties that are part of the multiscale complexity of the plant-environment wherein biodegradation takes place. In contrast, in situ studies of phytoremediation research at the metaorganism level (host and microbiome together) are lacking. Here, we discuss a competition-driven model, based on recent evidence from the metagenomics level, and hypotheses generated by microbial community ecology, to explain the establishment of a catabolic rhizosphere microbiome in a contaminated soil. There is evidence to ground that if the host provides the right level and mix of resources (exudates) over which the microbes can compete, then a competitive catabolic and plant-growth promoting (PGP) microbiome can be selected for as long as it provides a competitive superiority in the niche. The competition-driven model indicates four strategies to interfere with the microbiome. Specifically, the rhizosphere microbiome community can be shifted using treatments that alter the host, resources, environment, and that take advantage of prioritization in inoculation. Our model and suggestions, considering the metaorganism in its natural context, would allow to gain further knowledge on the plant-microbial functions, and facilitate translation to more effective, and predictable phytotechnologies.

  16. Towards an Enhanced Understanding of Plant-Microbiome Interactions to Improve Phytoremediation: Engineering the Metaorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie eThijs

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation is a promising technology to clean-up contaminated soils based on the synergistic actions of plants and microorganisms. However, to become a widely accepted, and predictable remediation alternative, a deeper understanding of the plant-microbe interactions is needed. A number of studies link the success of phytoremediation to the plant-associated microbiome functioning, though whether the microbiome can exist in alternative, functional states for soil remediation, is incompletely understood. Moreover, current approaches that target the plant host, and environment separately to improve phytoremediation, potentially overlook microbial functions and properties that are part of the multiscale complexity of the plant-environment wherein biodegradation takes place. In contrast, in situ studies of phytoremediation research at the metaorganism level (host and microbiome together are lacking. Here, we discuss a competition-driven model, based on recent evidence from the metagenomics level, and hypotheses generated by microbial community ecology, to explain the establishment of a catabolic rhizosphere microbiome in a contaminated soil. There is evidence to ground that if the host provides the right level and mix of resources (exudates over which the microbes can compete, then a competitive catabolic and plant-growth promoting (PGP microbiome can be selected for as long as it provides a competitive superiority in the niche. The competition-driven model indicates four strategies to interfere with the microbiome. Specifically, the rhizosphere microbiome community can be shifted using treatments that alter the host, resources, environment, and that take advantage of prioritization in inoculation. Our model and suggestions, considering the metaorganism in its natural context, would allow to gain further knowledge on the plant-microbial functions, and facilitate translation to more effective, and predictable phytotechnologies.

  17. Enhanced printability of thermoplastic polyurethane substrates by silica particles surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, S., E-mail: s.cruz@dep.uminho.pt [IPC/I3N – Institute of Polymers and Composites/Inst. of Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication, Department Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães (Portugal); Rocha, L.A. [CMEMS, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães (Portugal); Viana, J.C. [IPC/I3N – Institute of Polymers and Composites/Inst. of Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication, Department Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães (Portugal)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new method development for surface treatment of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) substrates. • The proposed method increases TPU surface energy (by 45%) and consequently the TPU wettability. • Great increase of the TPU surface roughness (by 621%). • Inkjet printed conductive ink was applied to the surface treated TPU substrate and significant improvements on the printability were obtained. - Abstract: A new method developed for the surface treatment of thermoplastic polymer substrates that increases their surface energies is introduced in this paper. The method is environmental friendly and low cost. In the proposed surface treatment method, nanoparticles are spread over the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) flexible substrate surface and then thermally fixed. This latter step allows the nanoparticles sinking-in on the polymer surface, resulting in a higher polymer–particle interaction at their interfacial region. The addition of nanoparticles onto the polymer surface increases surface roughness. The extent of the nanoparticles dispersion and sink-in in the substrate was evaluated through microscopy analysis (SEM). The roughness of the surface treated polymeric substrate was evaluated by AFM analysis. Substrate critical surface tension (ST) was measured by contact angle. In general, a homogeneous roughness form is achieved to a certain level. Great increase of the TPU surface roughness (by 621%) was induced by the propose method. The proposed surface treatment method increased significantly the substrate ST (by 45%) and consequently the TPU wettability. This novel surface treatment of thermoplastic polymers was applied to the inkjet printing of TPU substrates with conductive inks, and significant improvements on the printability were obtained.

  18. Towards an Enhanced Understanding of Plant–Microbiome Interactions to Improve Phytoremediation: Engineering the Metaorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Sofie; Sillen, Wouter; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising technology to clean-up contaminated soils based on the synergistic actions of plants and microorganisms. However, to become a widely accepted, and predictable remediation alternative, a deeper understanding of the plant–microbe interactions is needed. A number of studies link the success of phytoremediation to the plant-associated microbiome functioning, though whether the microbiome can exist in alternative, functional states for soil remediation, is incompletely understood. Moreover, current approaches that target the plant host, and environment separately to improve phytoremediation, potentially overlook microbial functions and properties that are part of the multiscale complexity of the plant-environment wherein biodegradation takes place. In contrast, in situ studies of phytoremediation research at the metaorganism level (host and microbiome together) are lacking. Here, we discuss a competition-driven model, based on recent evidence from the metagenomics level, and hypotheses generated by microbial community ecology, to explain the establishment of a catabolic rhizosphere microbiome in a contaminated soil. There is evidence to ground that if the host provides the right level and mix of resources (exudates) over which the microbes can compete, then a competitive catabolic and plant-growth promoting (PGP) microbiome can be selected for as long as it provides a competitive superiority in the niche. The competition-driven model indicates four strategies to interfere with the microbiome. Specifically, the rhizosphere microbiome community can be shifted using treatments that alter the host, resources, environment, and that take advantage of prioritization in inoculation. Our model and suggestions, considering the metaorganism in its natural context, would allow to gain further knowledge on the plant–microbial functions, and facilitate translation to more effective, and predictable phytotechnologies. PMID:27014254

  19. Fas ligand enhances hematopoietic cell engraftment through abrogation of alloimmune responses and nonimmunogenic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Yolcu, Esma S; Stein, Jerry; Kaplan, Ofer; Yaniv, Isaac; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-06-01

    Early after transplantation, donor lineage-negative bone marrow cells (lin(-) BMC) constitutively upregulated their expression of Fas ligand (FasL), suggesting an involvement of the Fas/FasL axis in engraftment. Following the observation of impaired engraftment in the presence of a dysfunctional Fas/FasL axis in FasL-defective (gld) donors or Fas-defective (lpr) recipients, we expressed a noncleavable FasL chimeric protein on the surface of donor lin(-) BMC. Despite a short life span of the protein in vivo, expression of FasL on the surface of all the donor lin(-) BMC improved the efficiency of engraftment twofold. The FasL-coated donor cells efficiently blunted the host alloimmune responses in primary recipients and retained their hematopoietic reconstituting potential in secondary transplants. Surprisingly, FasL protein improved the efficiency of engraftment in syngeneic transplants. The deficient engraftment in lpr recipients was not reversed in chimeric mice with Fas(-) stroma and Fas(+) BMC, demonstrating that the host marrow stroma was also a target of donor cell FasL. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are insensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis and thus can exploit the constitutive expression of FasL to exert potent veto activities in the early stages of engraftment. Manipulation of the donor cells using ectopic FasL protein accentuated the immunogenic and nonimmunogenic interactions between the donor cells and the host, alleviating the requirement for a megadose of transplanted cells to achieve a potent veto effect. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  20. Highly-oriented molecular arrangements and enhanced magnetic interactions in thin films of CoTTDPz using PTCDA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Keitaro; Nanjo, Chihiro; Awaga, Kunio; Tseng, Hsiang-Han; Robaschik, Peter; Heutz, Sandrine

    2016-07-14

    In the present work, the templating effect of thin layers of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on the growth of cobalt tetrakis(thiadiazole)porphyrazine (CoTTDPz) thin films was examined. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption spectra indicate that while CoTTDPz forms amorphous thin films on the bare substrates, it forms crystalline thin films on the PTCDA templates, in which the molecular planes of CoTTDPz are considered to be parallel to the substrates. Magnetic measurements reveal a significantly enhanced antiferromagnetic interaction of CoTTDPz in the templated thin films, with values reaching over 13 K. The ability to generate crystalline films and to control their orientation using molecular templates is an important strategy in the fields of organic electronics and spintronics in order to tailor the physical properties of organic thin films to suit their intended application.