WorldWideScience

Sample records for intensive tracer experiment

  1. Haze in the Grand Canyon: An evaluation of the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of the most spectacular natural sights on earth. Approximately 4 million visitors travel to Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) each year to enjoy its majestic geological formations and intensely colored views. However, visibility in GCNP can be impaired by small increases in concentrations of fine suspended particles that scatter and absorb light; the resulting visibility degradation is perceived as haze. Sulfate particles are a major factor in visibility impairment at Grand Canyon in summer and winter. Many wintertime hazes at GCNP are believed to result from the accumulation of emissions from local sources during conditions of air stagnation, which occur more frequently in winter than in summer. In January and February 1987, the National Park Service (NPS) carried out a large-scale experiment known as the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment (WHITEX) to investigate the causes of wintertime haze in the region of GCNP and Canyonlands National Park. The overall objective of WHITEX was to assess the feasibility of attributing visibility impairment in specific geographic regions to emissions from a single point source. The experiment called for the injection of a tracer, deuterated methane (CD{sub 4}), into one of the stacks of the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), a major coal-fired power plant located 25 km from the GCNP boundary and 110 km northeast of Grand Canyon Village. A network of field stations was established in the vicinity -- mostly to the northeast of GCNP and NGS -- to measure CD{sub 4} concentrations, atmospheric aerosol and optical properties, and other chemical and physical attributes. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Effect of tracer buoyancy on tracer experiments conducted in fractured crystalline bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew W.

    2003-02-01

    Tracer buoyancy has been shown to influence breakthrough from two-well tracer experiments conducted in porous media. Two-well tracer experiments are presented from fractured crystalline bedrock, in which the specific gravity of the tracer injectate varied from 1.0002 to 1.0133. Under the forced hydraulic conditions imposed, no difference in breakthrough was noted for the three experiments. These results show that even relatively dense tracer injectate solutions may have an insignificant effect on breakthrough when imposed gradients are sufficiently large.

  3. CityFlux perfluorocarbon tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, F. K.; Martin, D.; White, I. R.; Henshaw, S. J.; Nickless, G.; Longley, I.; Percival, C. J.; Gallagher, M.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2010-07-01

    In June 2006, two perfluorocarbon tracer experiments were conducted in central Manchester UK as part of the CityFlux campaign. The main aim was to investigate vertical dispersion in an urban area during convective conditions, but dispersion mechanisms within the street network were also studied. Paired receptors were used in most cases where one receptor was located at ground level and one at roof level. One receptor was located on the roof of Portland Tower which is an 80 m high building in central Manchester. Source receptor distances in the two experiments varied between 120 and 600 m. The results reveal that maximum concentration was sometimes found at roof level rather than at ground level implying the effectiveness of convective forces on dispersion. The degree of vertical dispersion was found to be dependent on source receptor distance as well as on building height in proximity to the release site. Evidence of flow channelling in a street canyon was also found. Both a Gaussian profile and a street network model were applied and the results show that the urban topography may lead to highly effective flow channelling which therefore may be a very important dispersion mechanism should the right meteorological conditions prevail. The experimental results from this campaign have also been compared with a simple urban dispersion model that was developed during the DAPPLE framework and show good agreement with this. The results presented here are some of the first published regarding vertical dispersion. More tracer experiments are needed in order to further characterise vertical concentration profiles and their dependence on, for instance, atmospheric stability. The impact of urban topography on pollutant dispersion is important to focus on in future tracer experiments in order to improve performance of models as well as for our understanding of the relationship between air quality and public health.

  4. CityFlux perfluorocarbon tracer experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Petersson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, two perfluorocarbon tracer experiments were conducted in central Manchester UK as part of the CityFlux campaign. The main aim was to investigate vertical dispersion in an urban area during convective conditions, but dispersion mechanisms within the street network were also studied. Paired receptors were used in most cases where one receptor was located at ground level and one at roof level. One receptor was located on the roof of Portland Tower which is an 80 m high building in central Manchester. Source receptor distances in the two experiments varied between 120 and 600 m.

    The results reveal that maximum concentration was sometimes found at roof level rather than at ground level implying the effectiveness of convective forces on dispersion. The degree of vertical dispersion was found to be dependent on source receptor distance as well as on building height in proximity to the release site.

    Evidence of flow channelling in a street canyon was also found. Both a Gaussian profile and a street network model were applied and the results show that the urban topography may lead to highly effective flow channelling which therefore may be a very important dispersion mechanism should the right meteorological conditions prevail.

    The experimental results from this campaign have also been compared with a simple urban dispersion model that was developed during the DAPPLE framework and show good agreement with this.

    The results presented here are some of the first published regarding vertical dispersion. More tracer experiments are needed in order to further characterise vertical concentration profiles and their dependence on, for instance, atmospheric stability. The impact of urban topography on pollutant dispersion is important to focus on in future tracer experiments in order to improve performance of models as well as for our understanding of the relationship between air quality and public health.

  5. CityFlux perfluorocarbon tracer experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Petersson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, two perfluorocarbon tracer experiments were conducted in central Manchester UK as part of the CityFlux campaign. The main aim was to investigate vertical dispersion in an urban area during convective conditions, but dispersion mechanisms within the street network were also studied. Paired receptors were used in most cases where one receptor was located at ground level and one at roof level. One receptor was located on the roof of Portland Tower which is an 80 m high building in central Manchester. Source receptor distances in the two experiments varied between 120 and 600 m.

    The results reveal that maximum concentration was sometimes found at roof level rather than at ground level implying the effectiveness of convective forces on dispersion. The degree of vertical dispersion was found to be dependent on source receptor distance as well as on building height in proximity to the release site.

    Evidence of flow channelling in a street canyon was also found. Both a Gaussian profile and a street network model were applied and the results show that the urban topography may lead to highly effective flow channelling which therefore may be a very important dispersion mechanism should the right meteorological conditions prevail.

    The experimental results from this campaign have also been compared with a simple urban dispersion model that was developed during the DAPPLE framework and show good agreement with this.

    The results presented here are some of the first published regarding vertical dispersion. More tracer experiments are needed in order to further characterise vertical concentration profiles and their dependence on, for instance, atmospheric stability. The impact of urban topography on pollutant dispersion is important to focus on in future tracer experiments in order to improve performance of models as well as for our understanding of the relationship between air quality and public health.

  6. The Copenhagen tracer experiments: Reporting of measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, E.

    2002-01-01

    buoyancy from a tower at a height of 115 meters and then collected 2-3 meters above ground-level at positions in up to three crosswind arcs of tracer sampling units, positioned 2-6 km from the point of release. Three consecutive 20 min averaged tracer concentrations were measured, allowing for a total...

  7. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  8. West Twin Creek Alaska Subsurface Bromide Tracer Experiment, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data was produced as part of a subsurface tracer experiment performed on a boreal hillslope in July, 2015. The data is separated into three files: 'Well...

  9. ARAC results from phase II of the European tracer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, J.C.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    A comparison is provided of the results of calculations by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) during two phases of the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX). In phase I of ETEX, participants generated predictions in real time of the concentration of inert tracer gases released from a site in Western France. Each participating group based their predictions on the meteorological data they had available. In phase II, all participants were required to recalculate predictions based on the same meteorological data, which was generated and supplied by the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). ARAC used ECMWF data and also made additional changes to its model configuration,, with the result that ARAC`s accuracy during phase II was much better than for phase I. Experiments described in this paper examine the effect of each of these changes, and show that each change contributed to the improvement.

  10. Synchrotron Intensity Gradients as Tracers of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, J.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation: using synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic fields that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity data to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the SIGs can reliably trace magnetic fields in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magnetic field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spatial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to the tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single-dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic fields and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently introduced velocity gradient techniques that trace magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.

  11. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heredia, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Noris, Federico [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  12. Stability of isooctane mixtures with 3-pentanone or biacetyl as fluorescence tracers in combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Bohac, Stanislav V.; Sick, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Evidence is presented in the literature that common fluorescence tracer/fuel mixtures used in engine experiments, 3-pentanone/isooctane and biacetyl/isooctane, may decompose during extended use and storage. Investigations presented here show that preferential evaporation of the tracer and not chemical decomposition is responsible for observed decreases in fluorescence signal strength in these experiments.

  13. Data summary of 1985 SF sub 6 tracer experiments at Andorra (Teruel) power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivertsen, B.; Irwin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The results from tracer experiments carried out at the Teruel power plant in Spain are presented. Tracer data have been used to present concentration distributions, SO{sub 2} rates and to indicate future measurement locations. The position, extent and area of high SO{sub 2} concentrations are presented. A follow-up program is also indicated. 13 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Tracer tests - possibilities and limitations. Experience from SKB fieldwork: 1977-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin; Crawford, James; Elert, Mark (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-09-15

    Tracer tests have played, and still play, a central role in investigations relating to the understanding of radionuclide retention processes in the field. At present there is a debate within the scientific community concerning how, and to what extent, tracer tests can be used to evaluate large-scale and long-term transport and retardation of radionuclides and other solutes of interest for Safety Assessment of repositories for spent nuclear fuel. In this report the SKB fieldwork on tracer tests performed at Swedish sites from 1977 to 2007 is described and discussed. Furthermore, the knowledge and process understanding evolved during the decades of radionuclide transport experiments and modelling within the SKB programme is summarised. One of the main objectives of this report is to discuss what data and knowledge can be extracted from different in situ tests in a robust fashion. Given the level of complexity associated with transport processes that may occur over the timescale of a tracer test, the utility of tracer tests is considered in the context of evidence-based interpretations of data which we characterise in the form of a sequence of questions of increasing complexity. The complexity of this sequence ranges from whether connection can be confirmed between injection and withdrawal points to whether quantitative data can be extrapolated from a tracer test to be subsequently used in Safety Assessment. The main findings of this report are that: Field scale tracer tests can confirm flow connectivity. Field scale tracer tests confirm the existence of retention. Field scale tracer tests alone can only broadly substantiate our process understanding. However, if performing extensive Site Characterisation and integrating the tracer test results with the full range of geoscientific information available, much support can be given to our process understanding. Field scale tracer tests can deliver the product of the material property group MPG and the F-factor, valid

  15. Use of rare earth oxides and iron oxides as soil erosion tracers in water erosion experiments at hillslope scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, G.; Cañasveras, J. C.; Barrón, V.; Boulal, H.; Gómez, H.; Conde, E.; Fernández, M.; Gómez, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of the ideal soil erosion have been defined by several authors, for example by Zhang et al. (2001). Despite intensive research on erosion tracers in the last decades there is not a single tracer fulfilling all these characteristics. That is why research on different soil erosion tracers remains as an active field. Two desirable characteristics in erosion tracers are that they should be relatively inexpensive (to purchase and analyze) and that they should be determined with high accuracy in soil or sediment. The availability of multiple tracers is another of the key requirements. In this communication we present our preliminary results on the use of two different sets of erosion tracers. One set are iron oxides with different magnetic and optical properties (Fe3O4, α-Fe2O3 and FeOOH) analyzed by NIRS and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The other set consists of five rare earth oxides (La2O3, Pr6O11, Nd2O3, Sm2O3 and Gd2O3) analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two groups were studied under controlled and natural conditions, through several water erosion experiments, in field plots with different soil management, crops and scale. In one experiment these tracers were used to determine the source of sediment within sprinkle irrigated fields planted with cotton on shoulders. For this purpose, rainfall simulations were performed under controlled conditions at two scales, one with a portable rainfall simulator at small scale (0.81m2) and with the sprinkler irrigation system in the whole cotton field (2450 m2). Furrows were tagged with both groups of tracers, keeping shoulders untagged (where cotton was planted). Soil samples before and after the rainfall simulations were collected as well as sediment samples. In another experiment four olive orchard plots (330 m2) with different soil managements (cover crop and conventional tillage) were also tagged with the two groups of tracers. Soil samples were taken at

  16. Tracer tests and image analysis of biological clogging in a two-dimentsional sandbox experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildsgaard, J.; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional flow experiment on biological clogging was carried out by biostimulating a sandbox packed with sand inoculated with bacteria. Biostimulation. consisted of continuously injecting nutrients (acetate and nitrate). Clogging was visualized by frequently carrying out colored tracer...

  17. Determination of the sediment oxidation capacity by column and field experiments with reactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Bliss, F.; Wachter, T.; Dahmke, A. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Meckenstock, R. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2003-07-01

    The oxidation capacity of ferric iron in column studies was determined by phosphate tracer tests and validated by biodegradation experiments with toluene as a carbon source and the iron(III)-oxide reducing bacterium Geobacter metallireducens as well as with wet chemical extraction. Toluene mass balance, Fe(II) production and tracer test results showed that about 1/3 of the total Fe(III) mass had been reduced during the biodegradation experiment. The redox reactive tracer sulfide is supposed to be more practicable for field purposes, because a sulfide mass or electron balance enables evaluation of the tracer test. In this way, consideration of mineral specific sorption parameters and long residence periods of a sorptive reactive tracer can be avoided. Laboratory column experiments were performed with an artificially composed sediment (quartz sand and ferrihydrite) as well as with natural sediments from the margin of the benzene contaminated RETZINA test site in Zeitz (Germany). Fast reaction kinetics of sulfide with iron(III) minerals allowed the observation of a successive fixation of black iron sulfides in all the glas columns. Depending on the mineral iron content, the sedimentary oxidation capacity of the column material was used up in few days to weeks. Mass of sulfide reacted in the tracer test and sulfide mass recovered by sediment extraction after the experiment were in very good agreement. Evaluation of the column experiments confirmed the calculated ratio that 3 molar equivalents sulfide were used to reduce and fix 2 molar equivalents of Fe(III). Mean Fe(III) content of natural sediment samples (drilling SafZz 28/02 in Zeitz) was 0.35 mg/g sediment determined by laboratory sulfide tracer test and 5 M HCl extractions. Finally, a single well push-pull test was performed at the RETZINA test site Zeitz to test the applicability of the sulfide tracer in a field-scale experiment. (orig.)

  18. Identification of transport processes in Southern Indian fractured crystalline rock using forced-gradient tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Bour, Olivier; Boisson, Alexandre; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Becker, Matthew R.; Nigon, Benoit; Wajiduddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Shakeel; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Understanding dominant transport processes is essential to improve prediction of contaminants transfer in fractured crystalline rocks. In such fractured media, solute transport is characterized by fast advection within open and connected fractures and sometimes by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering. To investigate this phenomenon, we carried out radially convergent and push-pull tracer experiments in the fractured granite of the Experimental Hydrogeological Park of Choutuppal (Southern India). Tracer tests were performed in the same permeable fracture from few meters to several ten meters and from few hours to two weeks to check the consistency of the results at different spatial and temporal scales. These different types of forced gradient tracer experiments allow separation of the effects of advection and diffusion on transport. Breakthrough curves from radially convergent tracer tests display systematically a -2 power law slope on the late time behavior. This tailing can be adequately represented by a transport model that only takes into account heterogeneous advection caused by fluid flow channeling. The negligible impact of matrix diffusion was confirmed by the push-pull tracer tests, at least for the duration of experiments. A push-pull experiment carried out with a cocktail of two conservative tracers having different diffusion coefficients displayed similar breakthrough curves. Increasing the resting phase during the experiments did not lead to a significant decline of peak concentration. All these results suggest a negligible impact of matrix diffusion. However, increasing the scales of investigation during push-pull tracer tests led to a decrease of the power law slope on the late time behavior. This behavior that cannot be modeled with a transport model based on independent flow paths and indicate non-reversible heterogeneous advection. This process could be explained by the convergence of streamlines after a certain distance

  19. An airborne perfluorocarbon tracer system and its first application for a Lagrangian experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y.; Baumann, R.; Schlager, H.

    2015-01-01

    A perfluorocarbon tracer system (PERTRAS), specifically designed for Lagrangian aircraft experiments, has been developed by the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (German Aerospace Center, DLR). It consists of three main parts: a tracer release unit (RU), an adsorption tube sampler (ATS), and a tracer analytical system. The RU was designed for airborne tracer release experiments; meanwhile, it can be used on various platforms for different experimental purposes (here research vessel). PERTRAS was for the first time applied in the field campaign Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA) in November 2011. An amount of 8.8 kg perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP) was released aboard the research vessel Sonne (RV Sonne) near the operational site of this campaign, Miri, Malaysia, on 21 November. The tracer samples collected using the ATS onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon were analyzed in the laboratory using a thermal desorber-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) system. Guided by forecasts calculated with the Lagrangian model Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT), 64 tracer samples were collected onboard the Falcon approximately 5 and 25 h after the release, mostly with a time resolution of 1 min. Enhanced PMCP concentrations relative to ambient PMCP background values (mean: 6.62 fmol mol-1) were detected during three intersects of the fresh tracer plume (age 5 h), with a maximum value of 301.33 fmol mol-1. This indicates that the fresh tracer plume was successfully intercepted at the forecast position. During the second flight, 25 h after the release, the center of tracer plume was not detected by the sampling system due to a faster advection of the plume than forecast. The newly developed PERTRAS system has been successfully deployed for the first time. The instrumental setup and comparisons between the measurements and HYSPLIT simulations are presented in this study.

  20. An airborne perfluorocarbon tracer system and its first application for a Lagrangian experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ren

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A perfluorocarbon tracer system (PERTRAS, specifically designed for Lagrangian aircraft experiments, has been developed by the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (German Aerospace Center, DLR. It consists of three main parts: a tracer release unit (RU, an adsorption tube sampler (ATS and a tracer analytical system. The RU was designed for airborne tracer release experiments; meanwhile, it can be used on various platforms for different experimental purpose (here research vessel. PERTRAS was for the first time applied in the field campaign Stratospheric ozone: halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA in November 2011. An amount of 8.8 kg perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP was released aboard the research vessel Sonne (RV Sonne near the operational site of this campaign, Miri, Malaysia, on 21 November. The tracer samples collected using the ATS on board the DLR research aircraft Falcon were analyzed in the laboratory using a thermal desorber/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS system. Guided by forecasts calculated with the Lagrangian model, Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT, 64 tracer samples were collected onboard the Falcon approximately 5 and 25 h after the release, respectively, mostly with a time resolution of 1 min. Enhanced PMCP concentrations relative to ambient PMCP background values (mean: 6.62 fmol mol−1 were detected during three intersects of the fresh tracer plume (age 5 h, with a maximum value of 301.33 fmol mol−1. This indicates that the fresh tracer plume was successfully intercepted at the forecasted position. During the second flight, 25 h after the release, the center of tracer plume was not detected by the sampling system due to a faster advection of the plume than forecasted. The newly developed PERTRAS system has been successfully deployed for the first time. The instrumental set-up and comparisons between the measurements and HYSPLIT simulations are presented in

  1. Comparative evaluation of two sediment tracers in a rainfall simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Peter; Guzman, Gema; Mentler, Axel

    2015-04-01

    The use of sediment tracers tries to contribute to solving problems of traditional soil erosion measurements such as allocation of erosional and depositional areas. A number of different tracing approaches have already been established however, as none of available techniques are able to fully satisfy all the requirements for being an ideal tracer the search for alternative methods continues. Clays tagged with quaternary ammonium compounds are widely used in industry and are easy to incorporate into soils for sediment tracing experiments. To explore the potential of these clays a laboratory experiment was carried out in order to characterize their behaviour as compared to the well-established sediment tracer magnetic iron oxide. The experiment consisted of a simulated rainfall event of 60 mm/h in a box laboratory flume divided in two ridge-furrow subplots (200 x 57 cm). In order to evaluate transport and redistribution of soil from the ridges to the furrow and to measure the dynamic behaviour of the tracers during the rainfall a dense grid of soil samples was taken before and after the experiment (140 samples in total). Runoff and sediment were collected and all samples were analysed for both tracers. Results indicate the general suitability of organophilic clays to monitor soil redistribution by water erosion. The average relative contributions from shoulders and furrow to total sediment export determined by both tracers were similar and indicated a higher contribution from ridges. A key advantage of using organophilic clays is that the detection limit of organophilic clays is extremely low and the background concentration is zero. Despite the inherent differences between both tracers such as way of bounding, sediment enrichment or analytical technique, this experimental comparison of an established and more novel tracer method underscores the potential suitability of the latter for soil erosion studies.

  2. Atmospheric monitoring of a perfluorocarbon tracer at the 2009 ZERT Center experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekney, Natalie; Wells, Arthur; Rodney Diehl, J.; McNeil, Matthew; Lesko, Natalie; Armstrong, James; Ference, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Field experiments at Montana State University are conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Zero Emissions Research and Technology Center (ZERT) to test and verify monitoring techniques for carbon capture and storage (CCS). A controlled release of CO 2 with an added perfluorocarbon tracer was conducted in July 2009 in a multi-laboratory study of atmospheric transport and detection technologies. Tracer plume dispersion was measured with various meteorological conditions using a tethered balloon system with Multi-Tube Remote Samplers (MTRS) at elevations of 10 m, 20 m, and 40 m above ground level (AGL), as well as a ground-based portable tower with monitors containing sorbent material to collect the tracer at 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, and 4 m AGL. Researchers designed a horizontal grid of sampling locations centered at the tracer plume source, with the tower positioned at 10 m and 30 m in both upwind and downwind directions, and the MTRS spaced at 50 m and 90 m downwind and 90 m upwind. Tracer was consistently detected at elevated concentrations at downwind sampling locations. With very few exceptions, higher tracer concentrations correlated with lower elevations. Researchers observed no statistical difference between sampling at 50 m and 90 m downwind at the same elevation. The US EPA AERMOD model applied using site-specific information predicted transport and dispersion of the tracer. Model results are compared to experimental data from the 2009 ZERT experiment. Successful characterization of the tracer plume simulated by the ZERT experiment is considered a step toward demonstrating the feasibility of remote sampling with unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) at future sequestration sites.

  3. Optimal sampler siting for atmospheric tracer experiments taking into account uncertainties in the wind field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitovranov, Sergei E.; Federov, Valery V.; Edwards, Leslie L.

    The problem of sampling sites for atmospheric tracer experiments were considered in Federov and Pitorvranov (working paper WP-85-65, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria, 1988). There it was assumed that the wind direction during an experimental tracer release could be accurately predetermined and would remain constant for the duration of the experiment. In general, this assumption of a constant wind field is not met. In this work we develop an approach which overcomes this deficiency. The monitoring network design problem is considered for cases which include prior uncertain wind fields during a designed experiment.

  4. Heat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: Field experiment and inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Hermans, Thomas; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Nguyen, Frédéric; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in an injection well and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the pumping well and in measurement intervals. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells closely spaced along three transects were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume is explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with a pilot point approach for inversion of the hydraulic conductivity field, the main preferential flow paths were delineated. The successful application of a field heat tracer test at this site suggests that heat tracer tests is a promising approach to image hydraulic conductivity field. This methodology could be applied in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) projects for assessing future efficiency that is strongly linked to the hydraulic conductivity variability in the considered aquifer.

  5. Heat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: field experiment and inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Hermans, Thomas; Nguyen, Frederic; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the recovery well and in monitoring wells. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells distributed throughout the field site (space-filling arrangement) were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume was explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with the pilot point inverse approach, main preferential flow paths were delineated.

  6. Evaluation of parameter uncertainties obtained from in-situ tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Atsushi; Yoshino, Naoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ijiri, Yuji; Hata, Akihito [Taisei Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Hosono, Kenichi [Geoscience Research Laboratory, Yamato, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Radionuclide transport parameter uncertainty is an important consideration in the safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste disposal. This paper describes the development of a method for the quantitative estimation of transport parameter uncertainties from in-situ tracer experiments. The method utilizes a probabilistic inversion based on the maximum likelihood method. Transport parameters and their uncertainties are derived from a series of conservative and reactive tracer tests conducted in a single fracture at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. These transport parameters and uncertainties are useful for evaluating the influence of parameter uncertainty on safety assessment. (author)

  7. Investigation of Groundwater Flow Variations near a Recharge Pond with Repeat Deliberate Tracer Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan F Clark

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining hydraulic connections and travel times between recharge facilities and production wells has become increasingly important for permitting and operating managed aquifer recharge (MAR sites, a water supply strategy that transfers surface water into aquifers for storage and later extraction. This knowledge is critical for examining water quality changes and assessing the potential for future contamination. Deliberate tracer experiments are the best method for determining travel times and identifying preferential flow paths between recharge sites over the time scales of weeks to a few years. This paper compares the results of two deliberate tracer experiments at Kraemer Basin, Orange County, CA, USA. Results from the first experiment, which was conducted in October 1998, showed that a region of highly transmissive sedimentary material extends down gradient from the basin for more than 3 km [1]. Mean groundwater velocities were determined to be approximately 2 km/year in this region based on the arrival time of the tracer center of mass. A second experiment was initiated in January 2008 to determine if travel times from this basin to monitoring and production wells changed during the past decade in response to new recharge conditions. Results indicate that flow near Kraemer Basin was stable, and travel times to most wells determined during both experiments agree within the experimental uncertainty.

  8. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...... had a triangulated approach and group dynamics were described as the focus group was used to explore agreement and disagreement among the participants. Little is known about the content of intensive care diaries and their usefulness and meaning for the patients. The participants in our study agreed...

  9. Analysis of tracer responses in the BULLION Forced-Gradient Experiment at Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul W. Reimus; Marc J. Haga

    1999-10-01

    This report presents an analysis of the tracer data from the BULLION forced-gradient experiment (FGE) conducted on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site from June 2, 1997 through August 28, 1997, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program. It also serves to document the polystyrene microsphere data from the FGE. The FGE involved the injection of solute and colloid tracers into wells ER-20-6 No. 1 and ER-20-6 No. 2 while ER-20-6 No. 3 was pumped at approximately 116 gallons per minute (gpm). The experimental configuration and test design are described briefly in this report; more details are provided elsewhere (IT, 1996, 1997, 1998). The tracer responses in the various wells yielded valuable information about transport processes such as longitudinal dispersion, matrix diffusion and colloid transport in the hydrogeologic system in the vicinity of the BULLION nuclear test cavity. Parameter values describing these processes are derived from the semi-analytical model interpretations presented in this report. A companion report (IT, 1998) presents more detailed numerical modeling interpretations of the solute tracer responses.

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Final report of the first stage of the tracer retention understanding experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, A. [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Peter [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Grundteknik, Solna (Sweden); Byegaard, Johan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Cvetkovic, V. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Water Resources Engineering; Birgersson, Lars [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-03-15

    The first stage of the Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE) was performed as a SKB funded project. The overall objectives of TRUE are to develop the understanding of radionuclide migration and retention in fractured rock, to evaluate the realism in applied model concepts, and to assess whether the necessary input data to the models can be collected from site characterisation. Further, to evaluate the usefulness and feasibility of different model approaches, and finally to provide in situ data on radionuclide migration and retention. The strive for address with multiple approaches is facilitated through a close collaboration with the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes. The TRUE programme is a staged programme which addresses various scales from laboratory (< 0.5 m), detailed scale (< 10 m) and block scale (10-50 m). The First TRUE Stage was performed in the detailed scale with the specific objectives of providing data and conceptualising the investigated feature using conservative and sorbing tracers. Further, to improve methodologies for performing tracer tests, and to develop and test a methodology for obtaining pore volume/aperture data from epoxy resin injection, excavation and subsequent analyses. The experimental site is located at approximately 400 m depth in the northeastern part of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The identification of conductive fractures and the target feature has benefited from the use of BIPS borehole TV imaging combined with detailed flow logging. The assessment of the conductive geometry has been further sustained by cross-hole pressure interference data. The investigated target feature (Feature A) is a reactivated mylonite which has later undergone brittle deformation. The feature is oriented northwest, along the principal horizontal stress orientation, and is a typical conductor for Aespoe conditions. Hydraulic characterisation shows that the feature is relatively well isolated

  11. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  12. Fast simulations for intensity mapping experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Santos, Mário G

    2014-01-01

    We present a code to generate mock observations of 21 cm intensity mapping experiments. The emphasis of the code is on reducing the computational cost of running a full-blown simulation, trading computational time for accuracy. The code can be used to generate independent realizations of the cosmological signal and foregrounds, which are necessary, for instance, in order to obtain realistic forecasts for future intensity mapping experiments. The code is able to reproduce the correct angular and radial clustering pattern for the cosmological signal, including redshift-space distortions, lightcone evolution and bias. Furthermore, it is possible to simulate a variety of foregrounds, including the potentially problematic polarized synchrotron emission.

  13. Long-term mesocosm experiments to investigate microbial degradation of fluorescent tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pascual, Elena; Zaman, Sameera; Lang, Friederike; Lange, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Uranine (UR) and sulforhodamine B (SRB) are two of the most commonly used fluorescent tracers in hydrology. Their suitability to be used as ideal tracers has been discussed since they might interact with the soil or become degraded. However, these properties have recently served to mimic processes of sorption and degradation of pollutants. The present study attempts to investigate to what extent UR and SRB could be used to imitate such processes in environments where saturation conditions are variable and the presence of plants might play an important role. For this purpose, both tracers were applied to 36 small mesocosms filled with a layer of 10 cm of gravel and 30 cm of sand in which 6 types of treatments, with 3 replicates each, were implemented based on the presence of two species of wetland plants (Typha latifolia and Phalaris arundinacea) and two types of hydrological conditions (saturated and unsaturated). The entire experiment lasted 10 months, during which two injections of equal concentration of tracers were performed. The first months served to ensure the adaptability of the plants and to achieve stationary conditions in the system. Water and sediment samples were collected weekly after the second injection while plants were measured at the end of the experiment distinguishing between roots and aerial parts. Mass balances of the tracers were combined with excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMS) to characterize dissolved organic matter in the water and soil. Degradation was quantified by subtracting the non-degraded tracer fraction (sorption and plant uptake) and the remaining non-degraded mass in the water from the tracer mass injected. Results revealed that most of the SRB accumulated in the sand in agreement with its sorption affinity, while UR was mainly found in the pore water. Both tracers showed more degradation in the treatments with plants than the controls. Overall, UR exhibited higher degradation than SRB. Differences

  14. Simulation of large particle transport near the surface under stable conditions: comparison with the Hanford tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Larson, Timothy

    A plume model is presented describing the downwind transport of large particles (1-100 μm) under stable conditions. The model includes both vertical variations in wind speed and turbulence intensity as well as an algorithm for particle deposition at the surface. Model predictions compare favorably with the Hanford single and dual tracer experiments of crosswind integrated concentration (for particles: relative bias=-0.02 and 0.16, normalized mean square error=0.61 and 0.14, for the single and dual tracer experiments, respectively), whereas the US EPA's fugitive dust model consistently overestimates the observed concentrations at downwind distances beyond several hundred meters (for particles: relative bias=0.31 and 2.26, mean square error=0.42 and 1.71, respectively). For either plume model, the measured ratio of particle to gas concentration is consistently overestimated when using the deposition velocity algorithm of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA). In contrast, these same ratios are predicted with relatively little bias when using the algorithm of Kim et al. (2000. Atmospheric Environment 34 (15), 2387-2397).

  15. An intensive tree-ring experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Hevia, Andrea; Camarero, J.J.; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, Dave; Crivellaro, Alan; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta; Hellman, Lena; Kaczka, Ryszard J.; Kaye, Margot; Akhmetzyanov, Linar; Ashiq, Muhammad Waseem; Bhuyan, Upasana; Bondarenko, Olesia; Camisón, Álvaro; Camps, Sien; García, Vicenta Constante; Vaz, Filipe Costa; Gavrila, Ionela G.; Gulbranson, Erik; Huhtamaa, Heli; Janecka, Karolina; Jeffers, Darren; Jochner, Matthias; Koutecký, Tomáš; Lamrani-Alaoui, Mostafa; Lebreton-Anberrée, Julie; Seijo, María Martín; Matulewski, Pawel; Metslaid, Sandra; Miron, Sergiu; Morrisey, Robert; Opdebeeck, Jorgen; Ovchinnikov, Svyatoslav; Peters, Richard; Petritan, Any M.; Popkova, Margarita; Rehorkova, Stepanka; Ariza, María O.R.; Sánchez-Miranda, Ángela; Linden, Van der Marjolein; Vannoppen, Astrid; Volařík, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The European Dendroecologial Fieldweek (EDF) provides an intensive learning experience in tree-ring research that challenges any participant to explore new multidisciplinary dendro-sciences approaches within the context of field and laboratory settings. Here we present the 25th EDF, held in

  16. Salt tracer experiments in wetland ponds: will density stratification spoil the outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Bernhard H.; Hengl, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Wetland ponds are among the treatment options for peatland flows prior to their discharge into a receiving ambient water course or water body. The removal efficiency and effectiveness of wetland ponds (free water surface or FWS wetlands) is considered to be strongly related to the residence time or travel time distribution in the pond, with a narrow distribution (close to plug flow) being preferable to a wider one. This travel time distribution is, in turn, reflected by a breakthrough curve of an ideal tracer injected instantaneously into the flow (entering the wetland). As the term 'ideal tracer' suggests, such a substance, in real world cases, does not exist and can, at best, be approximated by a real tracer. Among the tracer groups in most widespread use, salt has the advantage of low cost, straightforward detection and analysis as well as low related environmental risk. In contrast, use of radioactive artificial tracers may meet with resistance from authorities and public, and fluorescent dyes are not necessarily devoid of problems, either (as recently discovered, there are two structural isomers of Rhodamin WT, the mixture of which may compromise the validity of breakthrough data analyses). From previous work by the authors it is known that density stratification may result from the injection of a salt tracer into a low Reynolds number free surface flow, which is a frequent characteristic of wetland ponds. As the formation of density layers in the course of a tracer experiment is highly undesirable, it may be useful to judge prior to beginning of the field work, if stratification is to be expected (and the experimental design should, consequently, be adapted suitably). The current work reported here employs an energy argument to extend existing criteria for density stratification in turbulent free surface flows. Vertical mixing is assumed to be sustained by a fraction of the frictional energy loss (expressed by Manning's law, but this can easily be adapted to

  17. Radioisotope tracer studies in the NASA Skylab ethothermic brazing experiment M-552

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braski, D. N.; Adair, H. L.; Kobisk, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first use of radioisotope tracer for mapping flow patterns during brazing of metal components in a space environment (near-zero gravity) proved successful. A nickel ferrule was brazed to a nickel tube with Lithobraze BT (71.8% Ag, 28% Cu, 0.2% Li) which contained a trace amount of radioactive Ag-110. Mapping of the flow of the braze alloy in the annulus formed between the tube and the concentric ferrule was determined by counting the radiation intensity as a function of position in the braze joint. Significant information concerning the thermal history of the braze was determined.

  18. Optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments and (13)C metabolic flux analysis: A new precision and synergy scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-11-01

    (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) is a widely used approach in metabolic engineering for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. The precision of fluxes determined by (13)C-MFA depends largely on the choice of isotopic tracers and the specific set of labeling measurements. A recent advance in the field is the use of parallel labeling experiments for improved flux precision and accuracy. However, as of today, no systemic methods exist for identifying optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments. In this contribution, we have addressed this problem by introducing a new scoring system and evaluating thousands of different isotopic tracer schemes. Based on this extensive analysis we have identified optimal tracers for (13)C-MFA. The best single tracers were doubly (13)C-labeled glucose tracers, including [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose, which consistently produced the highest flux precision independent of the metabolic flux map (here, 100 random flux maps were evaluated). Moreover, we demonstrate that pure glucose tracers perform better overall than mixtures of glucose tracers. For parallel labeling experiments the optimal isotopic tracers were [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose. Combined analysis of [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose labeling data improved the flux precision score by nearly 20-fold compared to widely use tracer mixture 80% [1-(13)C]glucose +20% [U-(13)C]glucose.

  19. Continuous and immediate method for the detection of SF/sub 6/ and other tracer gases by electron capture in atmospheric diffusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, E.L. (Aerosol Lab., Risoe, Denmark); Lovelock, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    In many atmospheric diffusion experiments using tracer gases continuous tracer recording is of decisive importance. The main obstacle to continuous electron capture detection of tracer gases in the atmosphere is presented by the oxygen, which is an electron capturer. A method for removing this difficulty is described. Its practical use in an airborne atmospheric plume diffusion experiment is demonstrated.

  20. Flow Data for Solute Transport Modeling from Tracer Experiments in a Stream Not Continuously Gaining Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2007-12-01

    In-stream tracer experiments are a well-established method for determining flow data to be incorporated in solute transport modeling. For a gaining stream, this method is implemented to provide spatial flow data at scales of minutes and tens of meters without physical disturbance to the flow of water, the streambed, or biota. Of importance for solute transport modeling, solute inflow loading along the stream can be estimated with this spatial data. The tracer information can also be interpreted to characterize hyporheic exchange time-scales for a stream with hyporheic exchange flowpaths (HEFs) that are short relative to the distance over which the stream gains water. The interpretation of tracer data becomes uncertain for a stream that is not gaining water continuously over intended study reach. We demonstrate, with straight-forward mass-balances, uncertainties for solute loading which arise in the analysis of streams locally losing water while predominantly gaining water (and solutes) over a larger scale. With field data from Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado) we illustrate the further uncertainty distinguishing HEFs from (locally) losing segments of the stream. Comparison of bromide tracer with ambient sulfate concentrations suggests that subsurface inflows and outflows, concurrent with likely HEFs, occur in a hydrogeochemical setting of multiple, dispersed and mixed, sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the predominately gaining, but locally losing, stream. To compute stream-reach mass-balances (the simplest of water quality models) there is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Identification of inflow solute mass requires quantifying water gain, loss, and hyporheic exchange in addition to concentration.

  1. Characterization of reactive tracers for C-wells field experiments 1: Electrostatic sorption mechanism, lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.; Newman, B.D.

    1989-11-01

    Lithium (Li{sup +}) was introduced as lithium bromide (LiBr), as a retarded tracer for experiments in the C-wells complex at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The objective was to evaluate the potential of lithium to sorb predominately by physical forces. lithium was selected as a candidate tracer on the basis of high solubility, good chemical and biological stability, and relatively low sorptivity; lack of bioaccumulation and exclusion as a priority pollutant in pertinent federal environmental regulations; good analytical detectability and low natural background concentrations; and a low cost Laboratory experiments were performed with suspensions of Prow Pass cuttings from drill hole UE-25p{number_sign}1 at depths between 549 and 594 m in J-13 water at a pH of approximately 8 and in the temperature range of 25{degree}C to 45{degree}C. Batch equilibrium and kinetics experiments were performed; estimated thermodynamic constants, relative behavior between adsorption and desorption, and potentiometric studies provided information to infer the physical nature of lithium sorption.

  2. Tracer experiment and model evidence for macrofaunal shaping of microbial nitrogen functions along rocky shores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Catherine A.; Altabet, Mark A.; Pather, Santhiska; Dwyer, Greg

    2016-06-01

    Seawater microbes as well as those associated with macrobiota are increasingly recognized as a key feature affecting nutrient cycling. Tidepools are ideal natural mesocosms to test macrofauna and microbe interactions, and we quantified rates of microbial nitrogen processing using tracer enrichment of ammonium (15NNH4) or nitrate (15NNO3) when tidepools were isolated from the ocean during low intertidal periods. Experiments were conducted during both day and night as well as in control tidepools and those from which mussels had been removed, allowing us to determine the role of both mussels and daylight in microbial nitrogen processing. We paired time series observations of 15N enrichment in NH4+, NO2- and NO3- with a differential equation model to quantify multiple, simultaneous nitrogen transformations. Mussel presence and daylight increased remineralization and photosynthetic nitrogen uptake. When we compared ammonium gain or loss that was attributed to any tidepool microbes vs. photosynthetic uptake, microbes accounted for 32 % of this ammonium flux on average. Microbial transformations averaged 61 % of total nitrate use; thus, microbial activity was almost 3 times that of photosynthetic nitrate uptake. Because it accounted for processes that diluted our tracer, our differential equation model assigned higher rates of nitrogen processing compared to prior source-product models. Our in situ experiments showed that animals alone elevate microbial nitrogen transformations by 2 orders of magnitude, suggesting that coastal macrobiota are key players in complex microbial nitrogen transformations.

  3. Rapid transport from the surface to wells in fractured rock: a unique infiltration tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Jana K; Novakowski, Kent S

    2012-04-01

    A unique infiltration tracer experiment was performed whereby a fluorescent dye was applied to the land surface in an agricultural field, near Perth, Ontario, Canada, to simulate the transport of solutes to two pumped monitoring wells drilled into the granitic gneiss aquifer. This experiment, interpreted using the discrete-fracture capability of the numerical model HydroGeoSphere, showed that solute transport from the surface through thin soil (less than 2m) to wells in fractured bedrock can be extremely rapid (on the order of hours). Also, it was demonstrated that maximum concentrations of contaminants originating from the ground surface will not necessarily be the highest in the shallow aquifer horizon. These are important considerations for both private and government-owned drinking water systems that draw water from shallow fractured bedrock aquifers. This research illustrates the extreme importance of protecting drinking water at the source.

  4. Tracer gas experiment to verify the dispersion from a tall stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivertsen, B. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Irwin, J.S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    At the request of the Ministerios de Obras Publicas y Urbanismo (MOPU) in Madrid, the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) planned and carried out a comprehensive field experiment at the Andorra (Teruel) power plant in Spain. All together, eleven releases of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer were carried out at the 1,200 MW electric coal fired power plant. The tracer was emitted into the atmosphere from the 343 m high stack, stack exit diameter of 9 m. The stack gas emission characteristics were nearly constant during the period having an exit temperature of 175.1 C (1.9), exit velocity of 35.5 m/s (0.14) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission rate of 46.1 {times} 10{sup 3} kg/hr (5.15 {times} 10{sup 3}); standard deviations are listed in parentheses. Samples were taken at the surface along sampling arcs located approximately 8, 23, 43 and 75 km downwind. The releases were undertaken during typical late spring daytime conditions. The synoptic weather conditions were dominated by a large high pressure system on the Atlantic, west of Spain. Fronts were passing the area from the north and a low pressure system was developing over central Europe (Germany). Winds at the surface were generally brisk from the northwest at 7 to 12 m/s.

  5. Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model Intercomparison and Evaluation Utilizing Measurements from Controlled Tracer Release Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, J. D.; Draxler, R.; Stein, A. F.; Brioude, J.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Mountain, M.; Nehrkorn, T.; Andrews, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The accuracy of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes estimated using inverse methods is highly dependent on the fidelity of the atmospheric transport model employed. Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) driven by customized meteorological output from mesoscale models have emerged as a powerful tool in inverse GHG estimates at policy-relevant regional and urban scales, for several reasons: 1) Mesoscale meteorology can be available at higher resolution than in most global models, and therefore has the potential to be more realistic, 2) the Lagrangian approach minimizes numerical diffusion present in Eulerian models and is thus better able to represent transport in the near-field of measurement locations, and 3) the Lagrangian approach offers an efficient way to compute the grid-scale adjoint of the transport model ("footprints") by running transport backwards in time. Motivated by these considerations, we intercompare three widely used LPDMs (HYSPLIT, STILT, and FLEXPART) driven by identical meteorological input from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model against measurements from the controlled tracer release experiments (ready-testbed.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT_datem.php). Our analysis includes statistical assessments of each LPDM in terms of its ability to simulate the observed tracer concentrations, reversibility, and sensitivity to the WRF configuration, particularly with regard to the simulation of the planetary boundary layer.

  6. Tracer experiment results during the Long-Term Flow Test of the Fenton Hill reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, N.E.V. (CSM Associates, Rosemanowes, Penryn, Cornwall (United Kingdom)); Robinson, B.A.; Counce, D.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Three chemical tracer experiments and one extended injection of fluid low in concentration of dissolved species have been carried out during the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir. The tracer tests,results illustrate the dynamic nature of the flow system, with more fluid traveling through longer residence time paths as heat is extracted. The total fracture volumes calculated from these tests allow us to determine the fate of unrecovered injection fluid, examine the pressure-dependence of fracture volume, and, through a comparison to the hydraulic performance, postulate a model for the nature of the pressure drops through the system. The Fresh Water Flush (FWF) test showed that while no dissolved specie behavior is truly conservative (no sources or sinks), several breakthrough curves are well explained with a pore fluid displacement model. Other dissolved components are clearly influenced by dissolution or precipitation reactions. Finally, the transient response of the chemistry during the FWF to an increase in production well pressure showed that some fractures connected to the production well preferentially open when pressure is raised.

  7. Coupling heat and chemical tracer experiments for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, S; Jamin, P; Orban, P; Hermans, T; Klepikova, M; Nguyen, F; Brouyère, S; Dassargues, A

    2014-11-15

    Geothermal energy systems, closed or open, are increasingly considered for heating and/or cooling buildings. The efficiency of such systems depends on the thermal properties of the subsurface. Therefore, feasibility and impact studies performed prior to their installation should include a field characterization of thermal properties and a heat transfer model using parameter values measured in situ. However, there is a lack of in situ experiments and methodology for performing such a field characterization, especially for open systems. This study presents an in situ experiment designed for estimating heat transfer parameters in shallow alluvial aquifers with focus on the specific heat capacity. This experiment consists in simultaneously injecting hot water and a chemical tracer into the aquifer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and concentration in the recovery well (and possibly in other piezometers located down gradient). Temperature and concentrations are then used for estimating the specific heat capacity. The first method for estimating this parameter is based on a modeling in series of the chemical tracer and temperature breakthrough curves at the recovery well. The second method is based on an energy balance. The values of specific heat capacity estimated for both methods (2.30 and 2.54MJ/m(3)/K) for the experimental site in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River (Belgium) are almost identical and consistent with values found in the literature. Temperature breakthrough curves in other piezometers are not required for estimating the specific heat capacity. However, they highlight that heat transfer in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River is complex and contrasted with different dominant process depending on the depth leading to significant vertical heat exchange between upper and lower part of the aquifer. Furthermore, these temperature breakthrough curves could be included in the calibration of a complex heat transfer model for

  8. C-13 Tracer experiments and metabolite balancing for metabolic flux analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Marx, A.; de Graaf, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional metabolic flux analysis uses the information gained from determination of measurable fluxes and a steady-state assumption for intracellular metabolites to calculate the metabolic fluxes in a given metabolic network. The determination of intracellular fluxes depends heavily...... on the correctness of the assumed stoichiometry including the presence of all reactions with a noticeable impact on the model metabolite balances. Determination of fluxes in complex metabolic networks often requires the inclusion of NADH and NADPH balances, which are subject: to controversial debate...... through the pentose phosphate pathway. Hence, wrong assumptions on the presence or activity of transhydrogenation reactions will result in wrong estimations of the intracellular flux distribution. Using C-13 tracer experiments and NMR analysis, flux analysis can be performed on the basis of only well...

  9. Feasibility of large scale deliberate tracer release experiments in or below the oceanic thermocline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, J.G.; Broecker, W.S.

    1981-02-01

    The relative importance of lateral and vertical mixing in the interior of the oceans cannot be reliably determined from conventional oceanographic measurements, nor from observations of fallout radionuclides. It is suggested that the problem could be most effectively studied by an experiment in which a large quantity of a suitable tracer was deliberately released in deep water, and its subsequent dispersion was followed for at least one year. The feasibility of such an experiment is examined. It is concluded that it is indeed feasible, and that helium-3 would be the most suitable tracer, with tritium as a possible alternative. About 30 g f Helium-3 would be needed for each release. Such a quantity may be dissoled in about 1 m/sup 3/ of water at pressures greater than 500 dbar, is easily available, and would cost about $100K. Concentrations would have fallen to unmeasurable levels by the time the patch had spread sufficiently to interfere with measurements of natural or radiogenic helium-3. The patch would need to be marked with dusters of neutrally buoyant floats in order that its movement may be followed. It is estimated that it would be around 1000 km across after one year, and anything from a few meters to a few hundred meters thick. Vertically integrating samples would probably be most suitable, used in conjunction with ship-board helium-3 mass spectrometer. Methods of dissolving the helium in situ, and making the release with minimum disturbance are also proposed. The cost would be several million dollars, spread over several years.

  10. The use of synthetic colloids in tracer transport experiments in saturated rock fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Studies of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in saturated, fractured geologic media are of great interest to researchers studying the potential long-term storage of hazardous wastes in or near such media. A popular technique for conducting such studies is to introduce tracers having different chemical and physical properties into a system and then observe the tracers at one or more downstream locations, inferring flow and transport mechanisms from the breakthrough characteristics of the different tracers. Many tracer studies have been conducted in saturated, fractured media to help develop and/or refine models capable of predicting contaminant transport over large scales in such media.

  11. Dual-tracer transport experiments in a physically and chemically heterogeneous porous aquifer: effective transport parameters and spatial variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, T.; Schmid, G.

    1996-08-01

    In order to investigate the effects of reactive transport processes within a heterogeneous porous aquifer, two small-scale forced gradient tracer tests were conducted at the 'Horkheimer Insel' field site. During the experiments, two fluorescent tracers were injected simultaneously in the same fully penetrating groundwater monitoring well, located approximately 10 m from the pumping well. Fluoresceine and Rhodamine WT were used to represent the classes of practically non-sorbing and sorbing solutes, respectively. Multilevel breakthrough curves with a temporal resolution of 1 min were measured for both tracers at different depths within the pumping well using fibre-optic fluorimeters. This paper presents the tracer test design, the fibre-optic fluorimetry instrumentation, the experimental results and the interpretation of the measured multilevel breakthrough curves in terms of temporal moments and effective transport parameters. Significant sorption of Rhodamine WT is apparent from the effective retardation factors. Furthermore, an enhanced tailing of Rhodamine WT breakthrough curves is observed, which is possibly caused by a variability of aquifer sorption properties. The determined effective parameters are spatially variable, suggesting that a complex numerical flow and transport modelling approach within a stochastic framework will be needed to adequately describe the transport behaviour observed in the two experiments. Therefore, the tracer test results will serve in future work for the validation of numerical stochastic transport simulations taking into account the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity and sorption-related aquifer properties.

  12. Numerical Analysis of a Short-Term Tracer Experiment in Fractured Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Sheng Liou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A short-term, pulse injection tracer experiment conducted in fractured quartzitic sandstone at Kukuan, Taiwan was analyzed. Tracer transport at the test site was dominated by advection but a specific attenuation mechanism leading to breakthrough curve (BTC tailing also seemed to exist. Matrix diffusion was hypothesized as the transport mechanism that results in the tailing. This hypothesis was proved by comparing the field BTC with numerical simulation results obtained by the general-purpose flow/transport simulator, TOUGH2, based on a single-fracture conceptual model. Due to the lack of accuracy of estimating the interporosity flux by the conventional double porosity model (DPM, TOUGH2 was incorporated with the multiple interacting continua (MINC scheme to simulate the transient characteristics of the interporosity flux. In MINC, rock matrix is discretized as a series of continua according to the perpendicular distance from the fracture that adjoins the matrix. The closer the rock matrix is to the fracture, the finer the rock matrix is discretized. This concept is fundamentally different from DPM in that rock matrix is no longer treated as a single continuum. Simulation results by TOUGH2-MINC have successfully reproduced the observed BTC tailing even under the dominating advection effect. Sensitivity studies showed that TOUGH2-MINC is sensitive to parameters including fracture aperture (2b, matrix porosity (nm and effective molecular diffusion coefficient in matrix (Dm. If 2b, nm , Dm , are respectively 200 _?¿m, 2%, 10-11 m2 s -1, and if hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D is 1.69 ¡__n10-6 m2 s -1, TOUGH2-MINC result can well fit the field BTC. Furthermore, the importance of matrix diffusion was verified by fitting the field BTC with analytical solutions that either neglect matrix diffusion or consider the mass exchange between mobile and immobile zones within the fracture as the attenuation transport mechanism. It was found that the BTC

  13. Blind foreground subtraction for intensity mapping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, David; Bull, Philip; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santos, Mário G.

    2015-02-01

    We make use of a large set of fast simulations of an intensity mapping experiment with characteristics similar to those expected of the Square Kilometre Array in order to study the viability and limits of blind foreground subtraction techniques. In particular, we consider three different approaches: polynomial fitting, principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). We review the motivations and algorithms for the three methods, and show that they can all be described, using the same mathematical framework, as different approaches to the blind source separation problem. We study the efficiency of foreground subtraction both in the angular and radial (frequency) directions, as well as the dependence of this efficiency on different instrumental and modelling parameters. For well-behaved foregrounds and instrumental effects, we find that foreground subtraction can be successful to a reasonable level on most scales of interest. We also quantify the effect that the cleaning has on the recovered signal and power spectra. Interestingly, we find that the three methods yield quantitatively similar results, with PCA and ICA being almost equivalent.

  14. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bandura, Kevin; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-Francois; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Hofer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Michael; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-01-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beamforming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37\\,m long by 20\\,m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument ...

  15. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their…

  16. The fluorescent tracer experiment on Holiday Beach near Mugu Canyon, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, Nicole; Xu, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    After revisiting sand tracer techniques originally developed in the 1960s, a range of fluorescent coating formulations were tested in the laboratory. Explicit steps are presented for the preparation of the formulation evaluated to have superior attributes, a thermoplastic pigment/dye in a colloidal mixture with a vinyl chloride/vinyl acetate copolymer. In September 2010, 0.59 cubic meters of fluorescent tracer material was injected into the littoral zone about 4 kilometers upcoast of Mugu submarine canyon in California. The movement of tracer was monitored in three dimensions over the course of 4 days using manual and automated techniques. Detailed observations of the tracer's behavior in the coastal zone indicate that this tracer successfully mimicked the native beach sand and similar methods could be used to validate models of tracer movement in this type of environment. Recommendations including how to time successful tracer studies and how to scale the field of view of automated camera systems are presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of the described tracer methodology.

  17. Rainfall simulation experiments to study sediment redistribution using rare earth element oxides as tracers under conventional and conservation agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Adrienn; Jakab, Gergely; Sipos, Péter; Karlik, Máté; Madarász, Balázs; Zacháry, Dóra; Szabó, Judit; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have very favourable characteristics for being ideal sediment tracers as they are characterised by strong binding to soil particles, low mobility, low background concentration in soils, environmental benignity, high analytical sensitivity and they can be detected relatively easily and inexpensively in soils. The group of REEs consist of 16 elements with similar chemical properties, but at the same time, they are clearly distinguishable enabling multiple tracking of sediment deriving from different parts of the studied area, as well as mapping redistribution processes by appropriate designing of subareas marked by different REEs. In this study, rainfall simulation experiments were carried out to compare the loss and redistribution of soil sediments in two plots under conventional and conservation agricultural practices. Five different rainfall intensities (up to 80 mm/h) were applied to both plots. Sources and pathways of sediments within the two plots were studied using REE-oxides as tracers. Approximately 1,000 mg/kg of Er2O3, Ho2O3 and Sm2O3 (calculated to the upper 1 cm of the soil) were dispersed to the soil surface with banded distribution; each transversal band covered the third of the surface are of the plots. Concentration of the REE-oxides in the sediment leaving the plots, and that of the surface soil before and after the experiment were analysed by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Significant sediment losses were found for both plots after the experiments, with slightly different characteristics between the conventional and conservation ones. Highest difference in loss of added REEs was found in the upper third of the plots with 81 ± 19% in the conventional and 71 ± 21% in the conservation ones. These values have been equalized downwards with almost complete losses in the lower third of the plots (99 ± 2% and 97 ± 4%, respectively). Only very small part of the removed sediment has been accumulated in the lower parts of the

  18. Cross-hole tracer experiment reveals rapid fluid flow and low effective porosity in the upper oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, N. M.; Clark, J. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.; Haymon, R. M.; Becker, K.

    2016-09-01

    Numerous field, laboratory, and modeling studies have explored the flows of fluid, heat, and solutes during seafloor hydrothermal circulation, but it has been challenging to determine transport rates and flow directions within natural systems. Here we present results from the first cross-hole tracer experiment in the upper oceanic crust, using four subseafloor borehole observatories equipped with autonomous samplers to track the transport of a dissolved tracer (sulfur hexafluoride, SF6) injected into a ridge-flank hydrothermal system. During the first three years after tracer injection, SF6 was transported both north and south through the basaltic aquifer. The observed tracer transport rate of ∼2-3 m/day is orders of magnitude greater than bulk rates of flow inferred from thermal and chemical observations and calculated with coupled fluid-heat flow simulations. Taken together, these results suggest that the effective porosity of the upper volcanic crust through which much tracer was transported is <1%, with fluid flowing rapidly along a few well-connected channels. This is consistent with the heterogeneous (layered, faulted, and/or fractured) nature of the volcanic upper oceanic crust.

  19. Hydraulic/partitioning tracer tomography for DNAPL source zone characterization: small-scale sandbox experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illman, Walter A; Berg, Steven J; Liu, Xiaoyi; Massi, Antonio

    2010-11-15

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are prevalent at a large number of sites throughout the world. The variable release history, unstable flow, and geologic heterogeneity make the spatial distribution of DNAPLs complex. This causes difficulties in site remediation contributing to long-term groundwater contamination for decades to centuries. We present laboratory experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) algorithm that images DNAPL source zones. The algorithm relies on the fusion of hydraulic and partitioning tracer tomography (HPTT) to derive the best estimate of the K heterogeneity, DNAPL saturation (S(N)) distribution, and their uncertainty. The approach is nondestructive and can be applied repeatedly. Results from our laboratory experiments show that S(N) distributions compare favorably with DNAPL distributions observed in the sandbox but not so with local saturation estimates from core samples. We also found that the delineation of K heterogeneity can have a large impact on computed S(N) distributions emphasizing the importance of accurate delineation of hydraulic heterogeneity.

  20. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sedation practices in the intensive care unit have evolved from deep sedation and paralysis toward lighter sedation and better pain management. The new paradigm of sedation has enabled early mobilization and optimized mechanical ventilator weaning. Intensive care units in the Nordic...... state, where they face the choice of life or death. Caring nurses and family members play an important role in assisting the patient to transition back to life....

  1. Resting Study of Tracer Experiment on Catalytic Wet Oxidation Reactor under Micro-gravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ji; JIA Jin-ping

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station(ISS) employs catalytic wet oxidation carried out in a Volatile Reactor Assembly (VRA) for water recycling. Previous earth gravity experiments show that the VRA is very effective at removing polar,low molecular weight organics. To compare the reactor performance under micro-gravity and Earth gravity conditions,a tracer study was performed on a space shuttle in 1999 by using 0. 2% potassium carbonate as the chemical tracer.In this paper, the experimental data were analyzed and it is indicated that the reactor can be considered as a plug flow one under both micro-gravity and earth gravity experimental conditions. It has also been proved that dispersion is not important in the VRA reactor under the experimental conditions. Tracer retardation was observed in the experiments and it is most likely caused by catalyst adsorption. It is concluded that the following reasons may also have influence on the retardation of mean residence time: (1) the liquid can be held by appurtenances, which will retard the mean residence time; (2) the pores can hold the tracer, which can also retard the mean residence time.

  2. Quantifying Reaeration Rates in Alpine Streams Using Deliberate Gas Tracer Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Benson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gas exchange across the air-water interface is a critical process that maintains adequate dissolved oxygen (DO in the water column to support life. Oxygen reaeration rates can be accurately measured using deliberate gas tracers, like sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 or xenon (Xe. Two continuous release experiments were conducted in different creeks in the Sierra Nevada of California: Sagehen Creek in September, 2009, using SF6 and Martis Creek in August, 2012, using both SF6 and Xe. Measuring gas loss along the creek, which was approximated with the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation, allows for the estimation of the SF6 or Xe reaeration coefficient (KSF6, KXe, which is converted to DO reaeration (KDO or K2 using Schmidt numbers. Mean KSF6 for upper and lower Sagehen and Martis Creeks were, respectively, 34 day−1, 37 day−1 and 33 day−1, with corresponding KDOs of 61 day−1, 66 day−1 and 47 day−1. In Martis Creek, KXe was slightly higher (21% than KSF6, but the calculated KDO from SF6 agreed with the calculated KDO from Xe within about 15%; this difference may be due to bubble-enhanced gas transfer. Established empirical equations of KDO using stream characteristics did a poor job predicting KDO for both creeks.

  3. Iterative ensemble Kalman filter for atmospheric dispersion in nuclear accidents: An application to Kincaid tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Su, G F; Chen, J G; Raskob, W; Yuan, H Y; Huang, Q Y

    2015-10-30

    Information about atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides is vitally important for planning effective countermeasures during nuclear accidents. Results of dispersion models have high spatial and temporal resolutions, but they are not accurate enough due to the uncertain source term and the errors in meteorological data. Environmental measurements are more reliable, but they are scarce and unable to give forecasts. In this study, our newly proposed iterative ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation scheme is used to combine model results and environmental measurements. The system is thoroughly validated against the observations in the Kincaid tracer experiment. The initial first-guess emissions are assumed to be six magnitudes underestimated. The iterative EnKF system rapidly corrects the errors in the emission rate and wind data, thereby significantly improving the model results (>80% reduction of the normalized mean square error, r=0.71). Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the influence of meteorological parameters. The results indicate that the system is sensitive to boundary layer height. When the heights from the numerical weather prediction model are used, only 62.5% of reconstructed emission rates are within a factor two of the actual emissions. This increases to 87.5% when the heights derived from the on-site observations are used.

  4. Vertical diffusivity in the benthic boundary layer of the Oregon shelf from a deliberate tracer release experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, S.; Ho, D. T.; Hales, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    A Fluorescein/SF6 deliberate tracer release experiment was conducted in benthic boundary layer (BBL) waters of the outer shelf of Oregon, as part of a multi-disciplinary research project that aims to study cross-shelf carbon transport and biogeochemical reaction rates within the BBL. The purpose of the tracers release was to examine physical transport processes, the rate of turbulent mixing and to provide a Lagrangian frame of reference for tracking other chemical species (pCO2, O2, CH4, DIC, DOC, POC, NO3-, NH4+, Fe). The tracers were injected on May 2009 during moderate upwelling favorable conditions with weak near-bottom currents, along a 4-km N-S line near the shelf streak at the 150 m isobath. Tracers distribution in the patch were tracked for over 5 days by tow-yo surveys using a winch-controlled pumping profiling vehicle that incorporated several in situ instruments such as CTD sensors, a 1200 kHz ADCP and a dye fluorometer for Fluorescein. Dissolved SF6 concentrations were analyzed on board from the underway water stream pumped from the towed vehicle by using an automated high-resolution chromatographic system equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). The work presented here focuses on the estimation of the effective vertical diffusivity (Kz) in the BBL of the Oregon Shelf from the change in moment of the tracers’ vertical distribution, calculated using a 1D advection-diffusion model.

  5. Recover Act. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Matthew W. [California State University, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    2014-05-16

    The prediction of the geothermal system efficiency is strong linked to the character of the flow system that connects injector and producer wells. If water flow develops channels or “short circuiting” between injection and extraction wells thermal sweep is poor and much of the reservoir is left untapped. The purpose of this project was to understand how channelized flow develops in fracture geothermal reservoirs and how it can be measured in the field. We explored two methods of assessing channelization: hydraulic connectivity tests and tracer tests. These methods were tested at a field site using two verification methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR) images of saline tracer and heat transfer measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). The field site for these studies was the Altona Flat Fractured Rock Research Site located in northeastern New York State. Altona Flat Rock is an experimental site considered a geologic analog for some geothermal reservoirs given its low matrix porosity. Because soil overburden is thin, it provided unique access to saturated bedrock fractures and the ability image using GPR which does not effectively penetrate most soils. Five boreholes were drilled in a “five spot” pattern covering 100 m2 and hydraulically isolated in a single bedding plane fracture. This simple system allowed a complete characterization of the fracture. Nine small diameter boreholes were drilled from the surface to just above the fracture to allow the measurement of heat transfer between the fracture and the rock matrix. The focus of the hydraulic investigation was periodic hydraulic testing. In such tests, rather than pumping or injection in a well at a constant rate, flow is varied to produce an oscillating pressure signal. This pressure signal is sensed in other wells and the attenuation and phase lag between the source and receptor is an indication of hydraulic connection. We found that these tests were much more effective than constant

  6. Recover Act. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Matthew W. [California State University, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    2014-05-16

    The prediction of the geothermal system efficiency is strong linked to the character of the flow system that connects injector and producer wells. If water flow develops channels or “short circuiting” between injection and extraction wells thermal sweep is poor and much of the reservoir is left untapped. The purpose of this project was to understand how channelized flow develops in fracture geothermal reservoirs and how it can be measured in the field. We explored two methods of assessing channelization: hydraulic connectivity tests and tracer tests. These methods were tested at a field site using two verification methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR) images of saline tracer and heat transfer measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). The field site for these studies was the Altona Flat Fractured Rock Research Site located in northeastern New York State. Altona Flat Rock is an experimental site considered a geologic analog for some geothermal reservoirs given its low matrix porosity. Because soil overburden is thin, it provided unique access to saturated bedrock fractures and the ability image using GPR which does not effectively penetrate most soils. Five boreholes were drilled in a “five spot” pattern covering 100 m2 and hydraulically isolated in a single bedding plane fracture. This simple system allowed a complete characterization of the fracture. Nine small diameter boreholes were drilled from the surface to just above the fracture to allow the measurement of heat transfer between the fracture and the rock matrix. The focus of the hydraulic investigation was periodic hydraulic testing. In such tests, rather than pumping or injection in a well at a constant rate, flow is varied to produce an oscillating pressure signal. This pressure signal is sensed in other wells and the attenuation and phase lag between the source and receptor is an indication of hydraulic connection. We found that these tests were much more effective than constant

  7. Transport study in unsaturated porous media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néel M.C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it impacts directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied porous media. Therefore, distribution of water content in porous media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.

  8. Transport study in unsaturated porous media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrille, C.; Néel, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it impacts directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied porous media. Therefore, distribution of water content in porous media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI) were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.

  9. Popularity framework to process dataset tracers and its application on dynamic replica reduction in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Molfetas, A; Tykhonov, A; Garonne, V; Campana, S; Lassnig, M; Barisits, M; Dimitrov, G; Viegas, F

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's data management system is constantly tracing file movement operations that occur on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). Due to the large scale of the WLCG, direct statistical analysis of the traces is impossible in real-time. Factors that contribute to the scalability problems include the capability for users to initiatiate on-demand queries, high dimensionality of tracer entries combined with very low cardinality parameters, the large size of the namespace as well as rapid rate of file transactions occuring on the Grid. These scalability issues are alleviated through the adoption of an incremental model that aggregates data for all combinations occurring in selected tracer fields on a daily basis. Using this model it is possible to query on-demand relevant statistics about system usage. We present an implementation of this popularity model in the experiment's distributed data management system, DQ2, and describe a direct application example of the popularity framework, an automate...

  10. Sustainability of Intensively Exploited Aquifer Systems in the North China Plain:Insights from Multiple Environmental Tracers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aina Su; Zongyu Chen; Jun Liu; Wen Wei

    2014-01-01

    Environmental tracers are proving to be a unique tool for assessing groundwater sustaina-bility, such as characterization of recharge, identification of pathways and sources of contaminants, and prediction of groundwater change in response to excessive abstraction. This paper helps to better under-stand the groundwater sustainability in the Quaternary aquifer from the tracer data in the North China Plain. Relatively modern ground waters occur in the piedmont plain with 3H-3He age less than 40 a with-in a depth 100 m. These ground waters are mainly recharged from the local precipitation and irrigation return. The recharge rate estimated by tracers is in the range of 0.24 to 0.32 m/a. Paleowater which is dated from 10 000 a B.P. to more than 35 000 a B.P. by radiocarbon dating is found in highly-confined portions of Quaternary aquifer systems. This indicates that water recharge took place during the past glacial period. The tracers have suggested a slow natural replenishment rates to the central plain. The aquifer has been overexploited currently. Some strategies that can be implemented to promote a sustain-able groundwater supply are needed to implement in future.

  11. Inter-comparison of Aermod and ISC3 modeling results to the Alaska tracer field experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AERMOD is an advanced plume model that incorporates updated treatments of the boundary layer theory, understanding of turbulence and dispersion, and includes handling of terrain interactions as well as the PRIME downwash algorithm. It was reported that the US EPA approved AERMOD for short-range dispersion modeling. It was the high time that AERMOD would replace ISC3. ISC3 is a traditional Gaussian plume model regarded as the regulatory model of US EPA with the capacity of building downwash similar to that of AERMOD. In this paper, the authors describe the advantages of AERMOD over the regulatory model of ISC3 by comparing their predicted ground level concentrations (GLC) along downwind distance to the Alaska tracer field data. The field experiment features buoyant release of effluent at elevated height over a flat terrain and local flows influenced by building downwash. Three measures to compare the observed and simulated concentration data, such as linear regression, quantile-quantile (QQ) and residual box are utilized. To sum up, AERMOD shows significantly better space-time correlation and probability distribution than the ISC3, which frequently overestimates the GLC for effluent released with significant plume rise under stable atmospheric conditions. The performance of AERMOD is greatly enhanced by introducing the state-of-the-art knowledge of boundary layer meteorology as well as the turbulence parameterization method. In particular, AERMOD takes into account the meander effect on coherent plume in stable condition with current state-of-the-art Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) parameterizations, while ISC3 is not capable of producing such important effect. Generally speaking, 1.17 is the overall predicted-to-observed ratio for short-term averages using AERMOD. 1.94 is the overall predicted-to-observed ratio for short-term averages using ISC3.

  12. Iterative ensemble Kalman filter for atmospheric dispersion in nuclear accidents: An application to Kincaid tracer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.L.; Su, G.F.; Chen, J.G. [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Raskob, W. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, D-76021 (Germany); Yuan, H.Y., E-mail: hy-yuan@outlook.com [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Q.Y. [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • We integrate the iterative EnKF method into the POLYPHEMUS platform. • We thoroughly evaluate the data assimilation system against the Kincaid dataset. • The data assimilation system substantially improves the model predictions. • More than 60% of the retrieved emissions are within a factor two of actual values. • The results reveal that the boundary layer height is the key influential factor. - Abstract: Information about atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides is vitally important for planning effective countermeasures during nuclear accidents. Results of dispersion models have high spatial and temporal resolutions, but they are not accurate enough due to the uncertain source term and the errors in meteorological data. Environmental measurements are more reliable, but they are scarce and unable to give forecasts. In this study, our newly proposed iterative ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation scheme is used to combine model results and environmental measurements. The system is thoroughly validated against the observations in the Kincaid tracer experiment. The initial first-guess emissions are assumed to be six magnitudes underestimated. The iterative EnKF system rapidly corrects the errors in the emission rate and wind data, thereby significantly improving the model results (>80% reduction of the normalized mean square error, r = 0.71). Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the influence of meteorological parameters. The results indicate that the system is sensitive to boundary layer height. When the heights from the numerical weather prediction model are used, only 62.5% of reconstructed emission rates are within a factor two of the actual emissions. This increases to 87.5% when the heights derived from the on-site observations are used.

  13. Determination of Transport Parameters in Unsaturated Zone by Tracer Experiment in the Porous Aquifer located at Ljubljana, Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, S.; Cencur Curk, B.

    2009-04-01

    The gravel sandy aquifer of Ljubljansko polje is the source of drinking water for nearly 300.000 inhabitants of the Ljubljana city and vicinity. There are two main waterworks: Kleče and Hrastje. The plain area of Ljubljansko polje is a tectonic sink and consists of river sediments that can reach in thickness more than 100 m in the deepest part. The bedrock is the impermeable permocarbonic clayey shale, mudstones and sandstones. The hydraulic conductivity of Ljubljansko polje sediments is very good, from 10-2 m/s in the central part to 3.7•10-3 m/s on the borders of the plain. The average groundwater level is 20 m below surface. A numerical groundwater flow model was established for the wider area of the Ljubljansko polje aquifer. The fore mentioned model was not calibrated on solute transport parameters but only on water levels and this lead to unreliability in the transport model and its predictions of pollution scenarios. The transport model needs to calculate reliable scenarios of pollution dispersion, which can only be achieved with the application of real transport parameters. Human activities in the area of the Hrastje waterworks of Ljubljana threaten to degrade groundwater quality. For this reason several tracer experiments were carried out in the past. Despite a great risk, the experiments were performed on the catchment area of the Hrastje waterworks, inside the second water protection zone. During the experiments the water from Hrastje waterworks was still in use for drinking water supply. The tracer experiments were carried out in order to determine the solute transport parameters such as advection, dispersion and sorption. The research proved that the tracers could be used safely on sensitive area and that the researchers are capable and qualified to carry it out with a highest level of security. Since none of the past tracer experiments, carried out in the same area, gave us any detailed information on pollutant spreading in unsaturated zone a new

  14. High intensity specular reflectometry - first experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Stahn, J; Panzner, T

    2011-01-01

    Selene is the attempt to implement a new scheme for high-intensity specular reflectometry. Instead of a highly collimated beam one uses a convergent beam covering a large angular range. The angular resolution is then performed by a position-sensitive detector. Off-specular scattering in this set-up leads to some background, but for screening of wide parameter ranges (e.g. temperature, electric and magnetic fields) the intensity gain of at least one order of magnitude is essential. If necessary, the high precession measurements (even with off-specular components) then are performed with the conventional set-up. The heart of this new set-up is an elliptically focusing guide element of 2\\,m length. Though this guide is optimised for the use on the TOF reflectometer Amor at SINQ, it can be used as stand-alone device to check the possible application also for other neutron scattering techniques. The first measurements on AMOR confirmed the general concept and the various operation modes. A draw-back occurred due t...

  15. An experiment to use medical I-131 as tracer in a city sewer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbrich, Susanne; Fischer, Helmut W. [University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    City sewer systems have to reliably carry residential and industrial wastewater to treatment plants, often mixed with rainwater. Transport in the sewer system is regularly modelled in order to predict sewerage levels, transport velocities and volume discharges. Radioisotopes would be interesting tracers, as they can be detected quickly and without the need of applying wet chemistry. Medical isotopes are released in large quantities (many MBq) by excretion from patients either at the location of administration or from elsewhere, most probably the patient's home. Depending on diagnostic or treatment modality, isotopes of different physical characteristics are used, often bound to compounds of specific metabolic behaviour. Routine environmental surveillance regularly detects the most common diagnostic ({sup 99m}Tc) and therapeutic ({sup 131}I) isotopes in city wastewater samples. Except for {sup 131}I in the case of a nuclear emergency, no contributions from sources other than medical are expected. Medical isotopes therefore might be used for tracing purposes, provided individual inputs can be identified and separated. A field experiment has been designed involving {sup 131}I releases from a single patient who had undergone radioiodine thyroid ablation therapy. This modality is applied after thyroid cancer surgery in order to destroy residual thyroid tissue. Activities up to 5 GBq of {sup 131}I are used which are excreted within few days, as no iodine-retaining thyroid tissue remains. In Germany, about 20,000 of these treatments are performed yearly. For a sewer system of 500,000 inhabitants, about 150 cases would be expected per year, making it quite improbable to have interference between individual patient releases in the same region of the city sewer system. Practically, the radiometric laboratory was informed of the expected release of an (anonymous) patient from the collaborating radiotherapy unit several days in advance, plus the approximate location of

  16. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 2: Gas Tracer Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; Bieringer, Paul E.; Annunzio, Andrew; Bieberbach, George; Meech, Scott

    2016-12-01

    The Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) atmospheric transport, and dispersion modelling, system was evaluated against the Joint Urban 2003 tracer-gas measurements. This was done using the wind and turbulence fields computed by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We compare the simulated and observed plume transport when using WRF-model-simulated wind fields, and local on-site wind measurements. Degradation of the WRF-model-based plume simulations was cased by errors in the simulated wind direction, and limitations in reproducing the small-scale wind-field variability. We explore two methods for importing turbulence from the WRF model simulations into the QUIC system. The first method uses parametrized turbulence profiles computed from WRF-model-computed boundary-layer similarity parameters; and the second method directly imports turbulent kinetic energy from the WRF model. Using the WRF model's Mellor-Yamada-Janjic boundary-layer scheme, the parametrized turbulence profiles and the direct import of turbulent kinetic energy were found to overpredict and underpredict the observed turbulence quantities, respectively. Near-source building effects were found to propagate several km downwind. These building effects and the temporal/spatial variations in the observed wind field were often found to have a stronger influence over the lateral and vertical plume spread than the intensity of turbulence. Correcting the WRF model wind directions using a single observational location improved the performance of the WRF-model-based simulations, but using the spatially-varying flow fields generated from multiple observation profiles generally provided the best performance.

  17. Assessment of electrical conductivity as a surrogate measurement for water samples in a tracer injection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport behavior of solutes in streams depends on chemical, physical, biological, and hydrodynamic processes. Although it is a very complex system, it is known that this behavior is greatly influenced by surface and subsurface flows. For this reason, tracer injection in the water flows is one ...

  18. Determining concentration fields of tracer plumes for layered porous media in flow-tank experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    In the laboratory, computer-assisted image analysis provides an accurate and efficient way to monitor tracer experiments. This paper describes the determination of detailed temporal concentration distributions of tracers in a flow-tank experiment by analyzing photographs of plumes of Rhodamine dye through the glass wall of the tank. The methodology developed for this purpose consists of four steps: (1) digitally scanning black and white negatives obtained from photographs of the flow-tank experiment; (2) calibrating and normalizing each digitized image to a standard optical-density scale by determining the relation between the optical density and pixel value for each image; (3) constructing standard curves relating the concentration in an optical density from five experimental runs with predetermined concentrations (2-97mg/L) and (4) converting the optical density to concentration. The spatial distribution of concentration for two photographs was determined by applying these calibration and conversion procedures to all pixels of the digitized images. This approach provides an efficient way to study patterns of plume evolution and transport mechanisms. Résumé Au laboratoire, l'analyse d'images assistée par ordinateur est un moyen précis et efficace pour suivre certaines expériences de traçage. Ce papier présente comment sont déterminées dans le détail les distributions temporelles de la concentration en traceur au cours d'une expérience d'écoulement en réservoir au moyen de l'analyse de photographies de panaches de rhodamine à travers la paroi de verre du réservoir. La méthodologie développée dans cette expérience suit quatre étapes: (1) digitalisation par balayage des négatifs noir et blanc des prises de vue de l'expérience d'écoulement en réservoir (2) calibration et normalisation de chaque image digitalisée par rapport à une échelle étalon de densité optique en déterminant la relation entre la densité optique et la valeur des pixels

  19. Using thermal tracers to estimate flow velocities of shallow flows: laboratory and field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Rui L.P. de

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of shallow flows is important for hydraulics, hydrology and water resources management. The objective of this paper is to discuss a technique for shallow flow and overland flow velocity estimation that uses infrared thermography. Laboratory flumes and different bare, vegetated and paved field surfaces were used to test the technique. Results show that shallow flow surface velocities estimated using thermal tracers and infrared technology are similar to estimates obtained using the Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter; similar results were also obtained for overland flow velocity estimates using thermography, here comparing with the dye tracer technique. The thermographic approach revealed some potential as a flow visualization technique, and leaves space for future studies and research.

  20. Sediment routing through channel confluences: RFID tracer experiments from a gravel-bed river headwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, K.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Tributary confluences may significantly impact large-scale patterns of sediment transport because of their role in connecting individual streams in a network. These unique locations feature complex flow structures and geomorphic features, and may represent ecological hotspots. Sediment transport across confluences is poorly understood, however. We present research on coarse sediment transport and dispersion through confluences using sediment tracers in the East Fork Bitterroot River, Montana, USA. We tagged a range of gravel (>40 mm) and cobble particles with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and painted smaller (10-40 mm) gravels, and then we traced them through confluences in a montane river's headwaters. We measured the effects of confluences on dispersion, path length, and depositional location and compare properties of sediment routing with a non-confluence control reach. We also measured topographic change through repeat bed surveys and combined topography, hydraulics, and tracer measurements to calculate basal shear and critical Shields stresses for different grain sizes. Field observations suggest that tagged particles in confluences routed along flanks of scour holes in confluences, with sediment depositing further downstream along bank-lateral bars than within the channel thalweg. Travel distances of RFID-tagged particles ranged up to 35 meters from original seeding points, with initial recovery rates of RFID-tagged tracers ranging between 84-89%. In both confluence and control reaches only partial mobility was observed within the entire tracer population, suggesting a hiding effect imposed by the roughness of the bed. Particles seeded in the channel thalweg experienced further travel distances than those seeded towards the banks and on bars. Differences in dispersion between confluence and control reaches are implied by field observation. This study quantified patterns of sediment routing within confluences and provided insight to the importance

  1. Multiresponse modeling of variably saturated flow and isotope tracer transport for a hillslope experiment at the Landscape Evolution Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, Carlotta; Pangle, Luke; Pasetto, Damiano; Niu, Guo-Yue; Volkmann, Till; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario; Troch, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores the challenges of model parameterization and process representation when simulating multiple hydrologic responses from a highly controlled unsaturated flow and transport experiment with a physically based model. The experiment, conducted at the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO), involved alternate injections of water and deuterium-enriched water into an initially very dry hillslope. The multivariate observations included point measures of water content and tracer concentration in the soil, total storage within the hillslope, and integrated fluxes of water and tracer through the seepage face. The simulations were performed with a three-dimensional finite element model that solves the Richards and advection-dispersion equations. Integrated flow, integrated transport, distributed flow, and distributed transport responses were successively analyzed, with parameterization choices at each step supported by standard model performance metrics. In the first steps of our analysis, where seepage face flow, water storage, and average concentration at the seepage face were the target responses, an adequate match between measured and simulated variables was obtained using a simple parameterization consistent with that from a prior flow-only experiment at LEO. When passing to the distributed responses, it was necessary to introduce complexity to additional soil hydraulic parameters to obtain an adequate match for the point-scale flow response. This also improved the match against point measures of tracer concentration, although model performance here was considerably poorer. This suggests that still greater complexity is needed in the model parameterization, or that there may be gaps in process representation for simulating solute transport phenomena in very dry soils.

  2. Numerical simulation of a natural gradient tracer experiment for the natural attenuation study: flow and physical transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, H E; Boggs, J M; Zheng, C; Feehley, C E

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented for numerical simulations of ground water flow and physical transport associated with a natural gradient tracer experiment conducted within a heterogeneous alluvial aquifer of the Natural Attenuation Study (NATS) site near Columbus, Mississippi. A principal goal of NATS is to evaluate biogeochemical models that predict the rate and extent of natural biodegradation under field conditions. This paper describes the initial phase in the model evaluation process, i.e., calibration of flow and physical transport models that simulate conservative bromide tracer plume evolution during NATS. An initial large-scale flow model (LSM) is developed encompassing the experimental site and surrounding region. This model is subsequently scaled down in telescopic fashion to an intermediate-scale ground water flow model (ISM) covering the tracer-monitoring network, followed by a small-scale transport model (SSM) focused on the small region of hydrocarbon plume migration observed during NATS. The LSM uses inferred depositional features of the site in conjunction with hydraulic conductivity (K) data from aquifer tests and borehole flowmeter tests to establish large-scale K and flow field trends in and around the experimental site. The subsequent ISM incorporates specified flux boundary conditions and large-scale K trends obtained from the calibrated LSM, while preserving small-scale K structure based on some 4000 flowmeter data for solute transport modeling. The configuration of the ISM-predicted potentiometric surface approximates that of the observed surface within a root mean squared error of 0.15 m. The SSM is based on the dual-domain mass-transfer approach. Despite the well-recognized difficulties in modeling solute transport in extremely heterogeneous media as found at the NATS site, the dual-domain model adequately reproduced the observed bromide concentration distributions. Differences in observed and predicted bromide concentration distributions are

  3. How We Remember the Emotional Intensity of Past Musical Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSchäfer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Listening to music usually elicits emotions that can vary considerably in their intensity over the course of listening. Yet, after listening to a piece of music, people are easily able to evaluate the music’s overall emotional intensity. There are two different hypotheses about how affective experiences are temporally processed and integrated: (1 all moments’ intensities are integrated, resulting in an averaged value; (2 the overall evaluation is built from specific single moments, such as the moments of highest emotional intensity (peaks, the end, or a combination of these. Here we investigated what listeners do when building an overall evaluation of a musical experience. Participants listened to unknown songs and provided moment-to-moment ratings of experienced intensity of emotions. Subsequently, they evaluated the overall emotional intensity of each song. Results indicate that participants’ evaluations were predominantly influenced by their average impression but that, in addition, the peaks and end emotional intensities contributed substantially. These results indicate that both types of processes play a role: All moments are integrated into an averaged value but single moments might be assigned a higher value in the calculation of this average.

  4. [Maternal experiences at the intensive care unit: a phenomenological experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Regina Lúcia Ribeiro; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa; Moreira, Rui Verlaine de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    This is a phenomenological research in Martin Heidegger's perspective with eight mothers staying with their babies in the hospital, with the aim of understanding their maternal feelings at the ICU of the Albert Sabin Infant Hospital in Fortaleza-CE. The information was obtained by means of phenomenological interviews with the following probing question, "What is it like for you as a mother to be in an ICU and at the same time follow all that goes on in the hospital unit?" and submitted to the analysis of the phenomena sited as proposed by Martins and Bicudo. The experiences of the mothers revealed safety and feer, hope and anguish, potentialities and impotence, existential concerns and expectations of a human being in the world. Beyond these aspects, the mothers showed themselves to be authentic people that got free of the occupation and deal with the pre-occupation.

  5. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    /cm{sup 3}, in order to reduce the pore sizes and to better study the dynamic properties of water close to the water-clay interface. We compared the water dynamics in fully hydrated compacted clays, at two significantly different time-space scales, in an attempt to distinguish the relevant features of the water transport. A fundamental microscopic investigation, tracing down to the atomic level was carried out, by neutron scattering, using time-of-flight and backscattering techniques. A classical macroscopic study was performed by using tracer through-diffusion methods. At the macroscopic level (time/spatial scale of about hours/mm to cm) the water diffusion depends strongly on the clay pore size and arrangement of the particles. However, at the microscopic level (time/spatial scale of about ten to hundred picosecond/10{sup -8} cm) the diffusion is governed by the local environment, which concerns to cations and clay surfaces and less to the particle arrangement. For a further understanding of this local environment, the water diffusion in clays was also measured at different hydration states, to vary the fraction of interlayer or external layer water, as compared to free pore water. The large difference in the diffusion paths of the two selected techniques makes a direct comparison of water diffusivities impossible. Therefore, two possibilities were established: An indirect comparison by connecting the results for diffusion coefficient at the two different scales through pure geometrical and electrostatic factors; and a direct comparison through the activation energy E{sub a} which was estimated from the dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the temperature. In contrast to the macroscopic diffusion coefficients, the activation energy is probably less influenced by geometrical factors and more by microscopic interactions, and thus could possibly be directly compared at the two different scales. The research was accomplished by a detailed characterization of the clay

  6. Perfluorocarbon Tracer Experiments on a 2 km Scale in Manchester Showing Ingress of Pollutants into a Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, James; Wright, Matthew; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic perfluorocarbons (PFCs) have been used to measure the passage of air in urban and rural settings as they are chemically inert, non-toxic and have low background concentrations. The use of pre-concentrators and chemical ionisation gas chromatography enables concentrations of a few parts per quadrillion (ppq) to be measured in bag samples. Three PFC tracers were used in Manchester, UK in the summer of 2015 to map airflow in the city and ingress into buildings: perfluomethylcyclohexane (PMCH), perfluoro-2-4-dimethylcyclohexane (mPDMCH) and perfluoro-2-methyl-3-ethylpentene (PMEP). A known quantity of each PFC was released for 15 minutes from steel canisters using pre-prepared PFC mixtures. Release points were chosen to be upwind of the central sampling location (Simon Building, University of Manchester) and varied in distance up to 2.2 km. Six releases using one or three tracers in different configurations and under different conditions were undertaken in the summer. Three further experiments were conducted in the Autumn, to more closely investigate the rate of ingress and decay of tracer indoors. In each experiment, 10 litre samples were made over 30 minutes into Tedlar bags, starting at the same time the as PFC release. Samples were taken in 11 locations chosen from 15 identified areas including three in public parks, three outside within the University of Manchester area, seven inside and five outside of the Simon building and two outside a building nearby. For building measurements, receptors were placed inside the buildings on different floors; outside measurements were achieved through a sample line out of the window. Three of the sample positions inside the Simon building were paired with samplers outside to allow indoor-outdoor comparisons. PFC concentrations varied depending on location and height. The highest measured concentrations occurred when the tracer was released at sunrise; up to 330 ppq above background (11 ppq) of PMCH was measured at the 6

  7. Minnesota 1973 atmospheric boundary layer experiment: Micrometeorological and tracer data archive. Set 1 (revision 2) documentation report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. K.; Droppo, J. G.; Glantz, C. S.

    1987-03-01

    An archive for micrometeorological and tracer dispersion data was developed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Labs. for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The archive was designed to make the results of extensive field tests readily accessible to EPA for model testing, development, and verification efforts. Documentation was provided for one of the archived data sets, The Minnesota 1973 Boundary Layer Experiment. The aim of the effort was to archive invaluable data sets in a timely fashion before the necessary supporting information about the data becomes lost forever. The entries are as follows: data set fact summary, a narrative description of experimental and data, special information, references, a description of archive data files, contacts (names, addresses, and phone numbers) and standard experiment summary table. Revision 2 includes previously unpublished rawinsonde profile data.

  8. Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

    2014-04-01

    The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome.

  9. Staff empowerment in intensive care: nurses' and physicians' lived experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin, Ingrid; Ek, Anna-Christina; Idvall, Ewa

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe empowerment from the perspective of intensive care staff. What makes intensive care staff experience inner strength and power? Intensive care staff are repeatedly exposed to traumatic situations and demanding events, which could result in stress and burnout symptoms. A higher level of psychological empowerment at the workplace is associated with increased work satisfaction and mental health, fewer burnout symptoms and a decreased number of sick leave days. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 12 intensive care unit (ICU) staff (four registered nurses, four enrolled nurses and four physicians) in southern Sweden. Data were analysed using a phenomenological method. Intensive care staff were found to be empowered both by internal processes such as feelings of doing good, increased self-esteem/self-confidence and increased knowledge and skills, and by external processes such as nourishing meetings, well functioning teamwork and a good atmosphere. Findings show that not only personal knowledge and skills, but also a supporting atmosphere and a good teamwork, has to be focused and encouraged by supervisors in order to increase staff's experiences of empowerment. Staff also need a chance to feel that they do something good for patients, next of kin and other staff members. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Calcium-ammonium exchange experiments on clay minerals using a (45)Ca tracer technique in marine pore water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, Charlotte; Wehrmann, Laura M; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ferdelman, Tim G; Teichert, Barbara M A; Gussone, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cation exchange processes is important for evaluating early diagenetic and synsedimentary processes taking place in marine sediments. To quantify calcium (Ca) exchange and Ca-ammonium exchange in a seawater environment, we performed experiments with a radioactive (45)Ca tracer on clay mineral standards (Fithian illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite) and marine sediments from the North Atlantic Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1306A in artificial seawater (ASW). The results show that equilibrium during the initial attachment of Ca as well as the exchange of Ca by [Formula: see text] is attained in less than 2 min. On average 8-20% of the exchangeable sites of the clay minerals were occupied by Ca in a seawater medium. The conditional selectivity coefficient, describing the [Formula: see text] exchange in ASW is mineral specific and it was determined to be 0.07 for montmorillonite, 0.05 for a natural marine sediment and 0.013 for Fithian illite.

  11. More intense experiences, less intense forecasts: why people overweight probability specifications in affective forecasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechel, Eva C; Zhang, Jiao; Morewedge, Carey K; Vosgerau, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We propose that affective forecasters overestimate the extent to which experienced hedonic responses to an outcome are influenced by the probability of its occurrence. The experience of an outcome (e.g., winning a gamble) is typically more affectively intense than the simulation of that outcome (e.g., imagining winning a gamble) upon which the affective forecast for it is based. We suggest that, as a result, experiencers allocate a larger share of their attention toward the outcome (e.g., winning the gamble) and less to its probability specifications than do affective forecasters. Consequently, hedonic responses to an outcome are less sensitive to its probability specifications than are affective forecasts for that outcome. The results of 6 experiments provide support for our theory. Affective forecasters overestimated how sensitive experiencers would be to the probability of positive and negative outcomes (Experiments 1 and 2). Consistent with our attentional account, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications disappeared when the attention of forecasters was diverted from probability specifications (Experiment 3) or when the attention of experiencers was drawn toward probability specifications (Experiment 4). Finally, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications between forecasters and experiencers were diminished when the forecasted outcome was more affectively intense (Experiments 5 and 6).

  12. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bühring, S.I.; Ehrenhauss, S.; Kamp, A.; Moodley, L.; Prof. Witte, U.

    2006-01-01

    In situ and on-board pulse-chase experiments were carried out on a sublittoral fine sand in the German Bight (southern North Sea) to investigate the hypothesis that sandy sediments are highly active and have fast turnover rates. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments where we

  13. Intensive care nurses' experiences of end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisorio, Leah C; Langley, Gayle C

    2016-04-01

    To explore intensive care nurses' experiences of end-of-life care in adult intensive care units. An exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach was utilised. Purposive sampling method was used to select nurse participants (n=24) working at the selected intensive care units in the three academic affiliated, tertiary specialist hospitals in the Johannesburg and Pretoria regions, South Africa. Using a focus group guide, three focus group discussions were conducted. Data were analysed using the long-table approach (Krueger and Casey, 2000). Trustworthiness of the study was ensured by following the criteria set out by Lincoln and Guba (1985). Five major themes related to nurses' experiences of end-of-life care emerged. These included: "difficulties we experience", "discussion and decision making", "support for patients", "support for families" and "support for nurses". End-of-life care can be difficult and a challenging process. Nevertheless, this study has highlighted some of the interventions and support systems that could be incorporated for improved caring process. Whereas the dying patients and their families need to be continuously supported, critical care nurses too need to be taken care of for them to continue providing the best possible end-of-life care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Van Dorpe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA, and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE. The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of calculations show a rather good agreement between the two codes, and the order of magnitude of the concentrations measured on the soil is predicted. Simulation is best for sampling points located ten kilometers from the source, while we note a divergence for more distant points results (difference in concentrations by a factor 2 to 5. This divergence may be explained by the fact that, for these four experiments, only one weather station (near the point source was used on a field of 10 000 km2, generating the simulation of a uniform wind field throughout the calculation domain.

  15. Environmental Tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Elliot

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental tracers continue to provide an important tool for understanding the source, flow and mixing dynamics of water resource systems through their imprint on the system or their sensitivity to alteration within it. However, 60 years or so after the first isotopic tracer studies were applied to hydrology, the use of isotopes and other environmental tracers are still not routinely necessarily applied in hydrogeological and water resources investigations where appropriate. There is therefore a continuing need to promote their use for developing sustainable management policies for the protection of water resources and the aquatic environment. This Special Issue focuses on the robustness or fitness-for-purpose of the application and use of environmental tracers in addressing problems and opportunities scientifically, to promote their wider use and to address substantive issues of vulnerability, sustainability, and uncertainty in (groundwater resources systems and their management.

  16. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    /cm{sup 3}, in order to reduce the pore sizes and to better study the dynamic properties of water close to the water-clay interface. We compared the water dynamics in fully hydrated compacted clays, at two significantly different time-space scales, in an attempt to distinguish the relevant features of the water transport. A fundamental microscopic investigation, tracing down to the atomic level was carried out, by neutron scattering, using time-of-flight and backscattering techniques. A classical macroscopic study was performed by using tracer through-diffusion methods. At the macroscopic level (time/spatial scale of about hours/mm to cm) the water diffusion depends strongly on the clay pore size and arrangement of the particles. However, at the microscopic level (time/spatial scale of about ten to hundred picosecond/10{sup -8} cm) the diffusion is governed by the local environment, which concerns to cations and clay surfaces and less to the particle arrangement. For a further understanding of this local environment, the water diffusion in clays was also measured at different hydration states, to vary the fraction of interlayer or external layer water, as compared to free pore water. The large difference in the diffusion paths of the two selected techniques makes a direct comparison of water diffusivities impossible. Therefore, two possibilities were established: An indirect comparison by connecting the results for diffusion coefficient at the two different scales through pure geometrical and electrostatic factors; and a direct comparison through the activation energy E{sub a} which was estimated from the dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the temperature. In contrast to the macroscopic diffusion coefficients, the activation energy is probably less influenced by geometrical factors and more by microscopic interactions, and thus could possibly be directly compared at the two different scales. The research was accomplished by a detailed characterization of the clay

  17. sup 26 Al tracer experiment by accelerator mass spectrometry and its application to the studies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Koichi (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology); Yumoto, Sakae; Nagai, Hisao; Hosoyama, Yoshiyuki; Imamura, Mineo; Masuzawa, Shin-ichirou; Koizumi, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    1990-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for {sup 26}Al tracer experiment to study the aluminum toxicity and metabolism in rats. To investigate the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease, the aluminum incorporation into the brain (cerebrum) was studied by AMS using {sup 26}Al as a tracer. When {sup 26}Al was intraperitoneally injected into rats, a considerable amount of {sup 26}Al was incorporated into the cerebrum after 5-35 days of the injection. (author).

  18. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühring, Solveig I.; Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Kamp, Anja

    2006-01-01

    investigated the pathway of settling particulate organic carbon through the benthic food web. The diatom Ditylum brightwellii was labelled with the stable carbon isotope 13C and injected into incubation chambers. On-board incubations lasted 12, 30 and 132 h, while the in situ experiment was incubated for 32 h......In situ and on-board pulse-chase experiments were carried out on a sublittoral fine sand in the German Bight (southern North Sea) to investigate the hypothesis that sandy sediments are highly active and have fast turnover rates. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments where we....... The study revealed a stepwise short-term processing of a phytoplankton bloom settling on a sandy sediment. After the 12 h incubation, the largest fraction of recovered carbon was in the bacteria (62%), but after longer incubation times (30 and 32 h in situ) the macrofauna gained more importance (15 and 48...

  19. Probable IgG4-related sclerosing disease presenting as a gastric submucosal tumor with an intense tracer uptake on PET/CT: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Ryota; Kano, Masayuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Hanari, Naoyuki; Gunji, Hisashi; Hayano, Koichi; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-12-01

    A 44-year-old man consulted an internist because of abnormalities in an upper gastrointestinal series. It showed an elevated lesion with central depression in the greater curvature of the middle part of the stomach. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed an elevated lesion with central depression, bridging hold, and no abnormalities of the gastric mucosa in the greater curvature of the middle part of the stomach. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed a submucosal tumor derived from the muscle layer of the stomach. Computed tomography showed a 22-mm tumor in the upper part of the stomach. Integrated position emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed an intense tracer uptake by the tumor. Based on these findings, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor was suspected and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery was performed. A histopathological examination showed lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis, and an immunohistochemical analysis showed the infiltration of IgG4-positive lymphoplasmacytic cells. The probable diagnosis was IgG4-related sclerosing disease of the stomach. We herein describe a rare case of probable IgG4-related sclerosing disease which presented as a gastric submucosal tumor. PET/CT is a useful imaging technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease.

  20. Development of radioisotope tracer technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Jung, Sung Hee; Park, Soon Chul; Lim, Dong Soon; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Jae Choon; Lee, Doo Sung; Cho, Yong Suk; Shin, Sung Kuan

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology in 1999, experiments to estimate the efficiencies of a sludge digester of a waste water treatment plant and a submerged biological reactor of a dye industry were conducted. As a result, the tracer technology for optimization of facilities related to wastewater treatment has been developed and is believed to contribute to improve their operation efficiency. The quantification of the experimental result was attempted to improve the confidence of tracer technology by ECRIN program which basically uses the MCNP simulation principle. Using thin layer activation technique, wear of tappet shim was estimated. Thin layer surface of a tappet shim was irradiated by proton beam and the correlation between the measured activity loss and the amount of wear was established. The equipment was developed to adjust the energy of proton which collides with the surface of tappet. The tracer project team has participated into the tracer test for estimating the efficiency of RFCC system in SK cooperation. From the experiment the tracer team has obtained the primary elements to be considered for judging the efficiency of RFCC unit. By developing the tracer techniques to test huge industrial units like RFCC, the tracer team will be able to support the local industries that require technical services to solve any urgent trouble. (author)

  1. Late-time cosmology with 21cm intensity mapping experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip; Patel, Prina; Santos, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for forecasting cosmological constraints from future neutral hydrogen intensity mapping experiments at low to intermediate redshifts. In the process, we establish a simple way of comparing such surveys with optical galaxy redshift surveys. We explore a wide range of experimental configurations and assess how well a number of cosmological observables (the expansion rate, growth rate, and angular diameter distance) and parameters (the densities of dark energy and dark matter, spatial curvature, the dark energy equation of state, etc.) will be measured by an extensive roster of upcoming experiments. A number of potential contaminants and systematic effects are also studied in detail. The overall picture is encouraging - Phase I of the SKA should be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state about as well as a DETF Stage IV galaxy redshift survey like Euclid or LSST, in roughly the same timeframe.

  2. Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in anExperimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFDPredictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, Buvaneswari; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Sohn, MichaelD.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Price, Phillip N.; Wood, Emily E.; Sextro,Richard G.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions using a steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with experimental data on airflow and pollutant dispersion under mixed-convection conditions in a 7 x 9 x 11m high experimental facility. The Rayleigh number, based on height, was O(10{sup 11}) and the atrium was mechanically ventilated. We released tracer gas in the atrium and measured the spatial distribution of concentrations; we then modeled the experiment using four different levels of modeling detail. The four computational models differ in the choice of temperature boundary conditions and the choice of turbulence model. Predictions from a low-Reynolds-number k-{var_epsilon} model with detailed boundary conditions agreed well with the data using three different model-measurement comparison metrics. Results from the same model with a single temperature prescribed for each wall also agreed well with the data. Predictions of a standard k-{var_epsilon} model were about the same as those of an isothermal model; neither performed well. Implications of the results for practical applications are discussed.

  3. Nitrous oxide as a dynamical tracer in the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Chan, K. R.; Strahan, S. E.

    1989-01-01

    In situ N2O measurements were made using an airborne tunable laser absorption spectrometer (ATLAS) on 12 flights into the Antarctic vortex, as well as on five transit flights outside the vortex region in August and September 1987, as part of the Airborne Antartic Ozone Experiment. Vertical profiles of N2O were obtained within the vortex on most of these flights and were obtained outside the vortex on several occasions. Flights into the vortex region show N2O decreasing southward between 53 and 72 S latitude on constant potential temperature surfaces in the lower stratosphere. The data lead to two important conclusions about the vortex region: (1) the lower stratosphere in August/September 1987 was occupied by 'old' air, which had subsided several kilometers during polar winter; (2) the N2O profile in the vortex was in an approximately steady state in August/September 1987, which indicates that the spring upwelling, suggested by several theories, did not occur.

  4. Hydrologic Process Regularization for Improved Geoelectrical Monitoring of a Lab-Scale Saline Tracer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oware, E. K.; Moysey, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Regularization stabilizes the geophysical imaging problem resulting from sparse and noisy measurements that render solutions unstable and non-unique. Conventional regularization constraints are, however, independent of the physics of the underlying process and often produce smoothed-out tomograms with mass underestimation. Cascaded time-lapse (CTL) is a widely used reconstruction technique for monitoring wherein a tomogram obtained from the background dataset is employed as starting model for the inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets. In contrast, a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-constrained inversion framework enforces physics-based regularization based upon prior understanding of the expected evolution of state variables. The physics-based constraints are represented in the form of POD basis vectors. The basis vectors are constructed from numerically generated training images (TIs) that mimic the desired process. The target can be reconstructed from a small number of selected basis vectors, hence, there is a reduction in the number of inversion parameters compared to the full dimensional space. The inversion involves finding the optimal combination of the selected basis vectors conditioned on the geophysical measurements. We apply the algorithm to 2-D lab-scale saline transport experiments with electrical resistivity (ER) monitoring. We consider two transport scenarios with one and two mass injection points evolving into unimodal and bimodal plume morphologies, respectively. The unimodal plume is consistent with the assumptions underlying the generation of the TIs, whereas bimodality in plume morphology was not conceptualized. We compare difference tomograms retrieved from POD with those obtained from CTL. Qualitative comparisons of the difference tomograms with images of their corresponding dye plumes suggest that POD recovered more compact plumes in contrast to those of CTL. While mass recovery generally deteriorated with increasing number of time

  5. Sorbing tracer experiments in a crystalline rock fracture at Äspö (Sweden): 2. Transport model and effective parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Cheng, H.; Widestrand, H.; ByegâRd, J.; Winberg, A.; Andersson, P.

    2007-11-01

    Transport and retention of sorbing tracers in a single, altered crystalline rock fracture on a 5 m scale is investigated. We evaluate the results of a comprehensive field study (referred to as Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments, first phase (TRUE-1)), at a 400 m depth of the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (Sweden). A total of 16 breakthrough curves are analyzed, from three test configurations using six radioactive tracers with a broad range of sorption properties. A transport-retention model is proposed, and its applicability is assessed based on available data. We find that the conventional model with an asymptotic power law slope of -3/2 (one-dimensional diffusion into an unlimited rock matrix) is a reasonable approximation for the conditions of the TRUE-1 tests. Retention in the altered rock of the rim zone appears to be significantly stronger than implied by retention properties inferred from generic (unaltered) rock samples. The effective physical parameters which control retention (matrix porosity and retention aperture) are comparable for all three test configurations. The most plausible in situ (rim zone) porosity is in the range 1%-2%, which constrains the effective retention aperture to the range 0.2-0.7 mm. For all sorbing tracers the estimated in situ sorption coefficient appears to be larger by at least a factor of 10, compared to the value inferred from through-diffusion tests using unaltered rock samples.

  6. Evaluating bedload transport with RFID and accelerometer tracers, airborne LiDAR, and HEC-GeoRAS modeling: field experiments in Reynolds Creek, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J. P.; Pierson, F. B.

    2012-12-01

    Relationships between bedload transport, channel geometry, and bed topography in upland channels are not well understood due in part to a lack of quantitative field data. With this motivation, we are performing field experiments related to (i) bedload travel distances within and between transport events, (ii) style of bedload motion during transport events, and (iii) channel characteristics of depositional areas. To address these objectives, we deployed gravel and cobble Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and accelerometer tracers, installed permanent RFID antennas, utilized airborne LiDAR, and conducted stream surveys in Reynolds Creek, Idaho. This gauged coarse alluvial stream is located at the USDA-Agricultural Research Service Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed within the Owyhee Mountains. Flood discharges generally consist of occasional flashy winter rain-on-snow flows spanning less than a day, large spring snowmelt events lasting several weeks, and no high summer discharges during our experiments. Through repeat surveys of tracer clast positions, to date we have quantified travel distances of 800 RFID particles. Spring 2011 discharge transported RFID tracers nearly seven kilometers while the shorter Spring 2012 flow only displaced particles up to approximately three kilometers. During Winter 2011 rain-on-snow events, tracers moved a maximum of 200 meters. Statistical distributions of transport distances vary with deployment location and season- uniform distributions fit some datasets best while gamma distributions fit others better. Permanent cross-stream RFID antennas constrain periods of bedload motion and rest. In Spring 2012, antennas recorded significant RFID tracer motion initiating just when discharge began to rise due to snowmelt, travel times between antennas decreasing as flow increased, and RFID particles no longer passing almost immediately after the hydrograph peaked. Accelerometer tracers deployed in Spring 2012 expanded bedload motion

  7. Family experience survey in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Bridget; Manasia, Anthony; Bassily-Marcus, Adel; Oropello, John; Gayton, Matthew; Gaffney, Christine; Kohli-Seth, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    The experience of critical care is stressful for both patients and their families. This is especially true when patients are not able to make their own care decisions. This article details the creation of a Family Experience Survey in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) to capture and improve overall experience. Kolcaba's "Enhanced Comfort Theory" provided the theoretical basis for question formation, specifically in regards to the four aspects of comfort: "physical," "psycho-spiritual," "sociocultural" and "environmental." Survey results were analyzed in real-time to identify and implement interventions needed for issues raised. Overall, there was a high level of satisfaction reported especially with quality of care provided to patients, communication and availability of nurses and doctors, explanations from staff, inclusion in decision making, the needs of patients being met, quality of care provided to patients and cleanliness of the unit. It was noted that 'N/A' was indicated for cultural needs and spiritual needs, a chaplain now rounds on all patients daily to ensure these services are more consistently offered. In addition, protocols for doctor communication with families, palliative care consults, daily bleach cleaning of high touch areas in patient rooms and nurse-led progressive mobility have been implemented. Enhanced comfort theory enabled the opportunity to identify and provide a more 'broad' approach to care for patients and families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  9. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty

    2015-01-01

    and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct......PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  10. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable.

  11. A field experiment and numerical modeling of a tracer at a gravel beach in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaona; Li, Hailong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Liu, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill persists in many gravel beaches in Prince William Sound (Alaska, USA), despite great remedial efforts. A tracer study using lithium at a gravel beach on Knight Island, Prince William Sound, during the summer of 2008 is reported. The tracer injection and transport along a transect were simulated using the two-dimensional numerical model MARUN. Model results successfully reproduced the tracer concentrations observed at wells along the transect. A sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated parameters are well determined. The simulated spatial distribution of tracer indicated that nutrients applied along the transect for bioremediation purposes would be washed to the sea very quickly (within a semi-diurnal tidal cycle) by virtue of the combination of the two-layered beach structure, the tidal fluctuation and the freshwater flow from inland. Thus, pore-water samples in the transect were found to be clean due to factors other than bioremediation. This may explain why the oil did not persist within the transect.

  12. Ensemble-based simultaneous emission estimates and improved forecast of radioactive pollution from nuclear power plant accidents: application to ETEX tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Li, Q B; Su, G F; Yuan, M Q

    2015-04-01

    The accidental release of radioactive materials from nuclear power plant leads to radioactive pollution. We apply an augmented ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with a chemical transport model to jointly estimate the emissions of Perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), a tracer substitute for radionuclides, from a point source during the European Tracer Experiment, and to improve the forecast of its dispersion downwind. We perturb wind fields to account for meteorological uncertainties. We expand the state vector of PMCH concentrations through continuously adding an a priori emission rate for each succeeding assimilation cycle. We adopt a time-correlated red noise to simulate the temporal emission fluctuation. The improved EnKF system rapidly updates (and reduces) the excessively large initial first-guess emissions, thereby significantly improves subsequent forecasts (r = 0.83, p 80% average reduction of the normalized mean square error).

  13. Measurement of marine productivity using 15N and 13C tracers: Some methodological aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naveen Gandhi; Sanjeev Kumar; S Prakash; R Ramesh; M S Sheshshayee

    2011-02-01

    Various experiments involving the measurement of new, regenerated and total productivity using 15N and 13C tracers were carried out in the Bay of Bengal (BOB) and in the Arabian Sea. Results from 15N tracer experiments indicate that nitrate uptake can be underestimated by experiments with incubation time > 4 hours. Indirect evidence suggests pico- and nano-phytoplankton, on their dominance over microphytoplankton, can also influence the f-ratios. Difference in energy requirement for assimilation of different nitrogen compounds decides the preferred nitrogen source during the early hours of incubation. Variation in light intensity during incubation also plays a significant role in the assimilation of nitrogen. Results from time course experiments with both 15N and 13C tracers suggest that photoinhibition appears significant in BOB and the Arabian Sea during noon. A significant correlation has been found in the productivity values obtained using 15N and 13C tracers.

  14. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, J.E. (Brazzos Ltd., Launceston (UK)); Ferber, G.J. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD (USA). Air Resources Lab.)

    1982-01-01

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximise research benefits.

  15. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, James E.; Ferber, Gilbert J.

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximize research benefits.

  16. Attempting to link hydro-morphology, transient storage and metabolism in streams: Insights from reactive tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Marie J.; Schmidt, Christian; Blaen, Phillip; Knapp, Julia L. A.; Drummond, Jennifer D.; Martí, Eugenia; Zarnetske, Jay P.; Ward, Adam S.; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In-stream transient storage zones, including the hyporheic zone and vegetation beds, can be hotspots of biogeochemical processing in streams, enhancing ecosystem functions such as metabolism and nutrient uptake. The spatio-temporal dynamics and reactivity of these storage zones are influenced by multiple factors, including channel geomorphology, substrate composition and hydrology, and by anthropogenic modifications to flow regimes and nutrient loads. Tracer injections are a commonly employed method to evaluate solute transport and transient storage in streams; however, reactive tracers are needed to differentiate between metabolically active and inactive transient storage zones. The reactive stream tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye which irreversibly transforms to resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, provides a proxy for aerobic respiration and an estimate of the metabolic activity associated with transient storage zones. Across a range of lotic ecosystems, we try to assess the influence of stream channel hydro-morphology, morphologic heterogeneity, and substrate type on reach (103 m) and sub-reach (102 m) scale transient storage, respiration, and nutrient uptake. To do so, we coupled injections of Raz and conservative tracers (uranine and/or salt) at each study site. The study sites included: vegetated mesocosms controlled for water depth; vegetated and un-vegetated sediment-filled mesocosms fed by waste-water effluent; a contrasting sand- vs. gravel-bedded lowland stream (Q = 0.08 m3/s); and a series of upland streams with varying size (Q = 0.1 - 1.5 m3/s) and prevalence of morphologic features. Continuous time-series of tracer concentrations were recorded using in-situ fluorometers and EC loggers. At the stream sites, time-series were recorded at multiple downstream locations in order to resolve sub-reach dynamics. Analyses yielded highly variable transport metrics and Raz-Rru transformation between study sites and between sub

  17. Intense convection over West Africa during AMMA SOP3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenouo, André; Sall, Saïdou Moustapha; Badiane, Daouda; Gaye, Amadou Thierno; Kamga Mkankam, F.

    2016-11-01

    ERA-Interim product from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) assimilation of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) resources, Meteosat satellite images, and synoptic observations were used to study local- and regional-scale environments associated with intense convective systems during the AMMA-SOP3 experiment over West Africa in the Northern Hemisphere of summer 2006. The convective system, from the 21st to 23rd of August 2006, was more active at 0000 and 1800 UTC showing diurnal cycle of deep convection over West Africa where the African easterly waves (AEWs) are developed downstream. Downstream barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with strong AEWs are important for the maintenance of AEW activity in West Africa. Barotropic energy conversions dominate south of the African easterly jet (AEJ), while baroclinic energy conversions are most important north of the AEJ. From a dynamical viewpoint, the low-level vorticity presents strong positive values over the sea and Sahara zone, indicating that exists on the cyclonic shear side of the African easterly jet, which is consistent with baroclinic growth. The 925-hPa equivalent potential temperature structure show a maximum over the Sahara which corresponds to the depression observed in this region. A mosaic of three hourly infrared (IR) satellite images, depicts a very distinct signal from an initial region of convection, developing through several stages and moving off the African coast. These observations, along with those available from the World Weather Watch, provide an opportunity to carry out numerical weather prediction (NWP) studies over West Africa utilizing high resolution limited area models.

  18. Update on the BINGO 21cm intensity mapping experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, Richard; Chen, Tianyue; Dickinson, Clive; Harper, Stuart; Olivari, Lucas; Peel, Michael; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roychowdhury, Sambit; Wilkinson, Peter; Abdalla, Elcio; Abramo, Raul; Ferreira, Elisa; Wuensche, Alex; Vilella, Thyrso; Caldas, Manuel; Tancredi, Gonzalo; Refregier, Alexandre; Monstein, Christian; Abdalla, Filipe; Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Maffei, Bruno; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    21cm intensity mapping is a novel approach aimed at measuring the power spectrum of density fluctuations and deducing cosmological information, notably from the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). We give an update on the progress of BAO from Integrated Neutral Gas Observations (BINGO) which is a single dish intensity mapping project. First we explain the basic ideas behind intensity mapping concept before updating the instrument design for BINGO. We also outline the survey we plan to make and its projected science output including estimates of cosmological parameters.

  19. Vineyard weeds control practices impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage agricultural practices spatial arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, F.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    In rural basins, agricultural landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, agricultural practices and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an agricultural context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control practices (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was practices area ratio, (iii) variability induced by practices spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced practices area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding practices. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard

  20. CXTFIT/Excel-A modular adaptable code for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis for laboratory or field tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Mayes, Melanie A.; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.

    2010-09-01

    We implemented the widely used CXTFIT code in Excel to provide flexibility and added sensitivity and uncertainty analysis functions to improve transport parameter estimation and to facilitate model discrimination for multi-tracer experiments on structured soils. Analytical solutions for one-dimensional equilibrium and nonequilibrium convection dispersion equations were coded as VBA functions so that they could be used as ordinary math functions in Excel for forward predictions. Macros with user-friendly interfaces were developed for optimization, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty analysis, error propagation, response surface calculation, and Monte Carlo analysis. As a result, any parameter with transformations (e.g., dimensionless, log-transformed, species-dependent reactions, etc.) could be estimated with uncertainty and sensitivity quantification for multiple tracer data at multiple locations and times. Prior information and observation errors could be incorporated into the weighted nonlinear least squares method with a penalty function. Users are able to change selected parameter values and view the results via embedded graphics, resulting in a flexible tool applicable to modeling transport processes and to teaching students about parameter estimation. The code was verified by comparing to a number of benchmarks with CXTFIT 2.0. It was applied to improve parameter estimation for four typical tracer experiment data sets in the literature using multi-model evaluation and comparison. Additional examples were included to illustrate the flexibilities and advantages of CXTFIT/Excel. The VBA macros were designed for general purpose and could be used for any parameter estimation/model calibration when the forward solution is implemented in Excel. A step-by-step tutorial, example Excel files and the code are provided as supplemental material.

  1. One year work experience in a municipal Intensive Therapy Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Enseñat Alvarez

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Municipal Intensive Care Units were created in the year 2004, to better the urgency attention in the primary health level. Objective: To characterize the functioning of a Municipal Intensive Care Unit. Method: A descriptive, prospective study that included 348 patients that were received in the unit during the year 2004. The following variables were analized: patients evolution, distribution by diseases, and evolution of the diseases. Results and Conclusions: The number of remissions to the hospital dropped; 183 patients weresent to their homes, 165 were remitted to the Provincial Hospital of Cienfuegos and three of them died in the unit. The angina pectoris was the first cause of admission, followed by cardiac arritmias and cerebrovascular disease.

  2. Gaseous mercury fluxes from forest soils in response to forest harvesting intensity: A field manipulation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, M. [University of Toronto Scarborough, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Mitchell, C.P.J., E-mail: carl.mitchell@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto Scarborough, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Eckley, C.S. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferein Street, Toronto, ON M3H 5T4 (Canada); Eggert, S.L.; Kolka, R.K.; Sebestyen, S.D. [Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 1831 Hwy 169 E, Grand Rapids, MN 55744 (United States); Swain, E.B. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, MN 55155 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Forest harvesting leads to changes in soil moisture, temperature and incident solar radiation, all strong environmental drivers of soil–air mercury (Hg) fluxes. Whether different forest harvesting practices significantly alter Hg fluxes from forest soils is unknown. We conducted a field-scale experiment in a northern Minnesota deciduous forest wherein gaseous Hg emissions from the forest floor were monitored after two forest harvesting prescriptions, a traditional clear-cut and a clearcut followed by biomass harvest, and compared to an un-harvested reference plot. Gaseous Hg emissions were measured in quadruplicate at four different times between March and November 2012 using Teflon dynamic flux chambers. We also applied enriched Hg isotope tracers and separately monitored their emission in triplicate at the same times as ambient measurements. Clearcut followed by biomass harvesting increased ambient Hg emissions the most. While significant intra-site spatial variability was observed, Hg emissions from the biomass harvested plot (180 ± 170 ng m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) were significantly greater than both the traditional clearcut plot (− 40 ± 60 ng m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) and the un-harvested reference plot (− 180 ± 115 ng m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) during July. This difference was likely a result of enhanced Hg{sup 2+} photoreduction due to canopy removal and less shading from downed woody debris in the biomass harvested plot. Gaseous Hg emissions from more recently deposited Hg, as presumably representative of isotope tracer measurements, were not significantly influenced by harvesting. Most of the Hg tracer applied to the forest floor became sequestered within the ground vegetation and debris, leaf litter, and soil. We observed a dramatic lessening of tracer Hg emissions to near detection levels within 6 months. As post-clearcutting residues are increasingly used as a fuel or fiber resource, our observations suggest that gaseous Hg emissions from forest

  3. The interaction of sorbing and non-sorbing tracers with different Aespoe rock types. Sorption and diffusion experiments in the laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byegaard, J.; Johansson, Henrik; Skaalberg, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Tullborg, E.L. [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    1998-11-01

    Laboratory experiments studying the sorption and diffusivity of different tracers in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL) site specific conditions have been performed. The experiments were conducted by applying both the batch sorption and the through diffusion technique. The investigation was focused on slightly sorbing tracers, i e, alkaline metals (Na{sup +}, Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}) and alkaline earth metals (Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+}), but some presumed non-sorbing species have also been included. The dominating generic rock material from Aespoe HRL, Aespoe-diorite and fine-grained granite, were used as well as some altered wall rock and mylonite from the Feature A fracture, the fracture where in situ migration studies have been performed. Synthetic groundwater was used; similar to the high saline groundwater found at the 350m level at Aespoe HRL and at the Feature A site. The results of batch experiments show that the sorption of the tracers increase in the order Natracers were retarded in the same order as was expected from the measured batch sorption coefficients. Furthermore, the largest size fraction was the most

  4. Incidence of Near-Death and Intense Spiritual Experiences in an Intergenerational Sample: An Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Eugene; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Determined incidence of near-death and intense spiritual experiences for a sample of 305 persons from ages 17-85. Found incidence of near-death reports did not vary significantly by age of respondents, but elderly respondents were significantly less likely to report intense spiritual experiences. (Author)

  5. Suspended Sediment Moves 10 km Before Entering Storage: Re-Interpreting a 20th Century Industrial Mercury Release as a Tracer Experiment, South River, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent analyses suggest that the velocity of downstream transport of suspended sediment (averaged over long timescales that include periods of transport and storage in alluvial deposits) can be represented as the ratio Ls/T, where Ls is a distance particles move before entering storage and T is the waiting time particles spend in storage before being remobilized. Sediment budget analyses suggest that Ls is 1-100 km in the mid-Atlantic region, while T may be ~103 years, such that particles move 3-5 orders of magnitude slower than the water in the channel. Given the well-known inaccuracy of sediment budgets, independent verification from a tracer study would be desirable. Here, an historic industrial release of mercury is interpreted as a decadal sediment tracer experiment, releasing sediment particles "tagged" with mercury that are deposited on floodplains. As expected, floodplain mercury inventories decrease exponentially downstream, with a characteristic decay length of 10 km (95% confidence interval: 5-25 km) that defines the distance suspended particles typically move downstream before entering storage. Floodplain mercury inventories are not significantly different above and below three colonial age mill dams (present at the time of mercury release but now breached), suggesting that these results reflect ongoing processes. Suspended sediment routing models that neglect long-term storage, and the watershed management plans based on them, may need revision.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: A decade of surgical intensive care experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare disease, potentially limb and life-threatening infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissue with occasionally muscular involvement. Necrotizing faciitis is surgical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Aim: Aim of this study was to analyze presentation, microbiology, surgical, resuscitative management and outcome of this devastating soft tissue infection. Materials and Methods: The medical records of necrotizing fasciitis patients treated in surgical intensive care unit (SICU of our hospital from Jan 1995 to Feb 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Ninety-four patients with necrotizing fasciitis were treated in the surgical intensive care unit during the review period. Necrotizing fasciitis accounted for 1.15% of total admissions to our SICU. The mean age of our patients was 48.6 years, 75.5% of the cases were male. Diabetes mellitus was the most common comorbid disease (56.4%, 24.5% patients had hypertension, 14.9% patients had coronary artery disease, 9.6% had renal disease and 6.4% cases were obese. History of operation (11.7% was most common predisposing factor in our patients. All patients had leucocytosis at admission to the hospital. Mean duration of symptoms was 3.4 days. Mean number of surgical debridement was 2.1, mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score at admission to SICU was 8.6, 56.38% cases were type 1 necrotizing fasciitis and 43.61% had type 2 infection. Streptococci were most common bacteria isolated (52.1%, commonest regions of the body affected by necrotizing fasciitis were the leg and the foot. Mean intubated days and intensive care unit (ICU stay were 4.8 and 7.6 days respectively. Mean fluid, blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelets concentrate received in first 24 hours were 4.8 liters, 2.0 units, 3.9 units and 1.6 units respectively. Most commonly used antibiotics were tazocin and clindamycin. Common complication was ventricular tachycardia (6.4. 46.8% patients had

  7. Simulations for single-dish intensity mapping experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bigot-Sazy, M -A; Battye, R A; Browne, I W A; Ma, Y -Z; Maffei, B; Noviello, F; Remazeilles, M; Wilkinson, P N

    2015-01-01

    HI intensity mapping is an emerging tool to probe dark energy. Observations of the redshifted HI signal will be contaminated by instrumental noise, atmospheric and Galactic foregrounds. The latter is expected to be four orders of magnitude brighter than the HI emission we wish to detect. We present a simulation of single-dish observations including an instrumental noise model with 1/f and white noise, and sky emission with a diffuse Galactic foreground and HI emission. We consider two foreground cleaning methods: spectral parametric fitting and principal component analysis. For a smooth frequency spectrum of the foreground and instrumental effects, we find that the parametric fitting method provides residuals that are still contaminated by foreground and 1/f noise, but the principal component analysis can remove this contamination down to the thermal noise level. This method is robust for a range of different models of foreground and noise, and so constitutes a promising way to recover the HI signal from the ...

  8. Birth Tourism and Neonatal Intensive Care: A Children's Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhael, Michel; Cleary, John P; Dhar, Vijay; Chen, Yanjun; Nguyen, Danh V; Chang, Anthony C

    2016-12-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to examine characteristics of birth tourism (BT) neonates admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods This was a retrospective review over 3 years; BT cases were identified, and relevant perinatal, medical, social, and financial data were collected and compared with 100 randomly selected non-birth tourism neonates. Results A total of 46 BT neonates were identified. They were more likely to be born to older women (34 vs. 29 years; p < 0.001), via cesarean delivery (72 vs. 48%; p = 0.007), and at a referral facility (80 vs. 32%; p < 0.001). BT group had longer hospital stay (15 vs. 7 days; p = 0.02), more surgical intervention (50 vs. 21%; p < 0.001), and higher hospital charges (median $287,501 vs. $103,105; p = 0.003). One-third of BT neonates were enrolled in public health insurance program and four BT neonates (10%) were placed for adoption. Conclusion Families of BT neonates admitted to the NICU face significant challenges. Larger studies are needed to better define impacts on families, health care system, and society.

  9. Recent High-Intensity Experiments at the Trident Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobble, James; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Gautier, Cort; Kim, Yongho; Huang, Chengkun

    2014-10-01

    With near-diffraction-limited irradiance of 2 × 1020 W/cm2 on target and prelase contrast better than 10-8, we have accessed the regime of relativistic transparency (RT) at the Trident Laser. The goal was to assess electron debris emitted from the target rear surface with phase-contrast imaging (PCI) and current density measurements (hence, the total electron current). Companion diagnostics show whether the experiments are in the target-normal-sheath-acceleration mode or in the RT regime. The superb laser contrast allows us to shoot targets as thin as 50 nm. PCI at 527 nm is temporally resolved to 600 fs. It has shown the evolution of electron behavior over tens of ps, including thermal electrons accompanying the ion jet, accelerated to many tens of MeV earlier in time. Faraday-cup measurements indicate the transfer of many microC of charge during the laser drive. As a ride-along experiment using a gas Cherenkov detector (GCD), we have detected gamma rays of energy >5 MeV. This radiation has a prompt component and a lesser source, driven by accelerated ions, that is time resolved by the GCD. The ion time of flight is compared to Thomson parabola data. Electron energy spectra are also collected. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  10. Pharmaceutical residues in rivers: Quantification of transient storage and travel times by tracer experiments as key parameters for the determination of mass balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, U.; Clemens, C.; Radke, M.

    2009-04-01

    Pharmaceutical residues are commonly detected micropollutants in the aquatic environment. To derive mass balances of these substances in river stretches and to quantify their elimination, besides highly sophisticated analytical methods precise discharge measurements are inevitable. Two additional key parameters are the travel time of water along a river stretch and the hyporheic exchange of water and solutes. Knowledge of travel times is essential to compare concentrations at the upstream and downstream end of an investigated site. As biodegradation in sediments is assumed to be a potentially significant removal process for organic micropollutants in rivers, flow of water and solutes across the sediment-water boundary and their transient storage in the hyporheic zone are also pivotal processes. To determine these river characteristics, tracer experiments using the fluorescent dye uranine were conducted at a 15 km stretch of a small river in Northern Bavaria (Roter Main) in summer 2008. Three sub-reaches were studied in separate tracer tests, and river discharge was simultaneously determined using the ultrasonic doppler technique. The travel time of uranine for the total stretch amounted to almost 1.5 days, corresponding to a mean flow velocity of about 0.4 km/h. Strong tailing of the breakthrough curves could indicate significant transient storage in the hyporheic zone. However, we tentatively attribute this tailing to the merging of two river channels having different flow characteristics and not to transient storage, and thus the hyporheic exchange is expected to be small along the river stretch. The results of the experiments are currently being analyzed by the OTIS model in order to report the exchange rates of surface and pore water on a quantitative basis.

  11. Commissioning and first results of the Intense Beam EXperiment (IBEX) linear Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, S. L.; Carr, E. J.; Martin, L. K.; Budzik, K.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Prior, C. R.

    2017-07-01

    The Intense Beam Experiment (IBEX) is a linear Paul trap designed to replicate the dynamics of intense particle beams in accelerators. Similar to the S-POD apparatus at Hiroshima University, IBEX is a small scale experiment which has been constructed and recently commissioned at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to support theoretical studies of next-generation high intensity proton and ion accelerators, complementing existing computer simulation approaches. Here we report on the status of commissioning and first results obtained.

  12. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna.

  13. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, O.K.; Verweij, J.C.M.; Staa, A.L. van

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five comm

  14. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Verweij; O.K. Helder; Dr. A.L. van Staa

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five comm

  15. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  16. Streamwise decrease of the 'unsteady' virtual velocity of gravel tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klösch, Mario; Gmeiner, Philipp; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Gravel tracers are usually inserted and transported on top of the riverbed, before they disperse vertically and laterally due to periods of intense bedload, the passage of bed forms, lateral channel migration and storage on bars. Buried grains have a lower probability of entrainment, resulting in a reduction of overall mobility, and, on average, in a deceleration of the particles with distance downstream. As a consequence, the results derived from tracer experiments and their significance for gravel transport may depend on the time scale of the investigation period, complicating the comparison of results from different experiments. We developed a regression method, which establishes a direct link between the transport velocity and the unsteady flow variables to yield an 'unsteady' virtual velocity, while considering the tracer slowdown with distance downstream in the regression. For that purpose, the two parameters of a linear excess shear velocity formula (the critical shear velocity u*c and coefficient a) were defined as functions of the travelled distance since the tracer's insertion. Application to published RFID tracer data from the Mameyes River, Puerto Rico, showed that during the investigation period the critical shear velocity u*c of tracers representing the median bed particle diameter (0.11 m) increased from 0.36 m s-1 to 0.44 m s-1, while the coefficient a decreased from the dimensionless value of 4.22 to 3.53, suggesting a reduction of the unsteady virtual velocity at the highest shear velocity in the investigation period from 0.40 m s-1 to 0.08 m s-1. Consideration of the tracer slowdown improved the root mean square error of the calculated mean displacements of the median bed particle diameter from 8.82 m to 0.34 m. As in previous work these results suggest the need of considering the history of transport when deriving travel distances and travel velocities, depending on the aim of the tracer study. The introduced method now allows estimating the

  17. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in primary staging of prostate cancer: PSA and Gleason score predict the intensity of tracer accumulation in the primary tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Kendler, Dorota; Scarpa, Lorenza; Di Santo, Gianpaolo; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer (PC) cells typically show increased expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which can be visualized by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in the primary tumour and metastases in patients with biopsy-proven PC prior to therapy, and to determine whether a correlation exists between the primary tumour-related {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation and the Gleason score (GS) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Ninety patients with transrectal ultrasound biopsy-proven PC (GS 6-10; median PSA: 9.7 ng/ml) referred for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. PET images were analysed visually and semiquantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour and pathologic lesions suspicious for lymphatic or distant metastases were then compared to the physiologic background activity of normal prostate tissue and gluteal muscle. The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour was assessed in relation to both PSA level and GS. Eighty-two patients (91.1%) demonstrated pathologic tracer accumulation in the primary tumour that exceeded physiologic tracer uptake in normal prostate tissue (median SUV{sub max}: 12.5 vs. 3.9). Tumours with GS of 6, 7a (3+4) and 7b (4+3) showed significantly lower {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake, with median SUV{sub max} of 5.9, 8.3 and 8.2, respectively, compared to patients with GS >7 (median SUV{sub max}: 21.2; p < 0.001). PC patients with PSA ≥10.0 ng/ml exhibited significantly higher uptake than those with PSA levels <10.0 ng/ml (median SUV{sub max}: 17.6 versus 7.7; p < 0.001). In 24 patients (26.7%), 82 lymph nodes with pathologic tracer accumulation consistent with metastases were detected (median SUV{sub max}: 10.6). Eleven patients (12.2%) revealed 55 pathologic osseous lesions suspicious for bone metastases (median SUV{sub max}: 11.6). The GS and PSA level correlated with

  18. Synoptic tracer gradients in the upper troposphere over central Canada during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiments by Aircraft Measurements 1998 summer campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.; Brunner, D; Harris, GW; Hoor, P; Lelieveld, J; McKenna, DS; Rudolph, J; Scheeren, HA; Siegmund, P; Wernli, H; Williams, J; Wong, S

    2002-01-01

    [1] During the July 1998 Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiments by Aircraft Measurements (STREAM) intensive campaign, eight measurement flights were conducted from Timmins airport (Ontario, Canada, 48.2degreesN, 79.3degreesW). In situ measurements of ozone, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nonmeth

  19. Empowerment in intensive care: patient experiences compared to next of kin and staff beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin, Ingrid; Ek, Anna-Christina; Idvall, Ewa

    2009-12-01

    Experiences of critically ill patients are an important aspect of the quality of care in intensive care units. If next of kin and staff try to empower the patient, this is probably performed in accordance with their beliefs about what patients experience as empowering. As intensive care patients often have difficulties communicating, staff and next of kin need to interpret their wishes, but there is limited knowledge about how correct picture next of kin and staff have of the intensive care patient's experiences. The aim of this study was to compare intensive care patients' experiences of empowerment with next of kin and staff beliefs. Interviews with 11 intensive care patients, 12 next of kin and 12 staff were conducted and analysed using a content analysis method. The findings showed that the main content is quite similar between patient experiences, next of kin beliefs and staff beliefs, but a number of important differences were identified. Some of these differences were regarding how joy of life and the will to fight were generated, the character of relationships, teamwork, humour, hope and spiritual experiences. Staff and next of kin seemed to regard the patient as more unconscious than the patient him/herself did.

  20. Radon as geological tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, T.; Anjos, R.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Valladares, D.L.; Rizzotto, M.; Velasco, H.; Ayub, J. Juri [Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina). Inst. de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (IMASL); Silva, A.A.R. da; Yoshimura, E.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This work presents measurements of {sup 222}Rn levels performed in La Carolina gold mine and Los Condores tungsten mine at the province of San Luis, Argentina, today used for tourist visitation, and can evaluate the potential use of such radioactive noble gas as tracer or marker for geological processes in underground environments. By concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 23}'8U were also measured in the walls of tunnels were determined the rocks mineral composition, what indicated that the mines have the same composition. In this sense, we used nuclear trace plastic detectors CR-39, gamma spectrometry of rock samples and Geiger-Muller (GM) monitors The patterns of radon gas transportation processes revealed that La Carolina could be interpreted through a model based on a radioactive gas confined into a single entrance tube, with constant cross section and air velocity. Los Condores, which has a second main entrance, could be interpreted through a model based on a radioactive gas confined into a two entrance tube, allowing a chimney effect for air circulation. The results showed the high potential of using {sup 222}Rn as a geological tracer. In what concerns the occupational hazard, in summer (time of more intense tourist activity in the mine) La Carolina presented a mean concentration of the radioactive noble gas that exceeds in four times the action level of 1,5 kBq m{sup -3} recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). The chimney effect shows the low mean concentration of radon in Los Condores. (author)

  1. Studying the ventilation pattern in a large hall by the combined use of tracer-gas experiments, velocity measurements and numerical predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berne, P.; Faivre-Pierret, R.X.

    1992-12-31

    At the nuclear reprocessing plant of La Hague (France), spent fuel elements are left to cool in storage pools before reprocessing. These pools are housed in large buildings (typical dimensions 95 x 25 x 6.5 m), ventilated by twelve ceiling diffusers and sixty-two exhaust slots located near the surface of the pool. The operators of this facility raised several questions concerning this ventilation system: what are the movements of air in the building. What are the transit times and transfer coefficients between the surface of a pool and the air sampling system. Pool water temperature is normally kept at about 30 deg C. In case of perturbation of the cooling system, this temperature would rise to an estimated 40 deg C. How would the airflow in the building be affected. This paper shows how these questions could be addressed by the combined use of smoke injections, velocity measurements, tracer-gas experiments and the numerical predictions of a flow code. (author). 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Impact of meteorological inflow uncertainty on tracer transport and source estimation in urban atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Donald D.; Gowardhan, Akshay; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Baskett, Ronald L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational Bayesian inverse technique is used to quantify the effects of meteorological inflow uncertainty on tracer transport and source estimation in a complex urban environment. We estimate a probability distribution of meteorological inflow by comparing wind observations to Monte Carlo simulations from the Aeolus model. Aeolus is a computational fluid dynamics model that simulates atmospheric and tracer flow around buildings and structures at meter-scale resolution. Uncertainty in the inflow is propagated through forward and backward Lagrangian dispersion calculations to determine the impact on tracer transport and the ability to estimate the release location of an unknown source. Our uncertainty methods are compared against measurements from an intensive observation period during the Joint Urban 2003 tracer release experiment conducted in Oklahoma City. The best estimate of the inflow at 50 m above ground for the selected period has a wind speed and direction of 4.6-2.5+2.0 m s-1 and 158.0-23+16 , where the uncertainty is a 95% confidence range. The wind speed values prescribed in previous studies differ from our best estimate by two or more standard deviations. Inflow probabilities are also used to weight backward dispersion plumes and produce a spatial map of likely tracer release locations. For the Oklahoma City case, this map pinpoints the location of the known release to within 20 m. By evaluating the dispersion patterns associated with other likely release locations, we further show that inflow uncertainty can explain the differences between simulated and measured tracer concentrations.

  3. Metabolic characterization of cultured mammalian cells by mass balance analysis, tracer labeling experiments and computer-aided simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kohno, Susumu; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Fumio; Takahashi, Chiaki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Studying metabolic directions and flow rates in cultured mammalian cells can provide key information for understanding metabolic function in the fields of cancer research, drug discovery, stem cell biology, and antibody production. In this work, metabolic engineering methodologies including medium component analysis, (13)C-labeling experiments, and computer-aided simulation analysis were applied to characterize the metabolic phenotype of soft tissue sarcoma cells derived from p53-null mice. Cells were cultured in medium containing [1-(13)C] glutamine to assess the level of reductive glutamine metabolism via the reverse reaction of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). The specific uptake and production rates of glucose, organic acids, and the 20 amino acids were determined by time-course analysis of cultured media. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the (13)C-labeling of citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, and aspartate confirmed an isotopically steady state of the cultured cells. After removing the effect of naturally occurring isotopes, the direction of the IDH reaction was determined by computer-aided analysis. The results validated that metabolic engineering methodologies are applicable to soft tissue sarcoma cells derived from p53-null mice, and also demonstrated that reductive glutamine metabolism is active in p53-null soft tissue sarcoma cells under normoxia.

  4. Packet Tracer network simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Jesin, A

    2014-01-01

    A practical, fast-paced guide that gives you all the information you need to successfully create networks and simulate them using Packet Tracer.Packet Tracer Network Simulator is aimed at students, instructors, and network administrators who wish to use this simulator to learn how to perform networking instead of investing in expensive, specialized hardware. This book assumes that you have a good amount of Cisco networking knowledge, and it will focus more on Packet Tracer rather than networking.

  5. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M'(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σ(v), equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI.

  6. Hot electron generation and energy coupling in planar experiments with shock ignition high intensity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M. S.; Krauland, C.; Alexander, N.; Zhang, S.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Borwick, E.; Ren, C.; Yan, R.; Haberberger, D.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    Hot electrons produced in nonlinear laser plasma interactions are critical issues for shock ignition (SI) laser fusion. We conducted planar target experiments to characterize hot electron and energy coupling using the high energy OMEGA EP laser system at SI high intensities. Targets were multilayered foils consisting of an ablator (either plastic or lithium) and a Cu layer to facilitate hot electron detection via fluorescence and bremsstrahlung measurements. The target was first irradiated by multi-kJ, low-intensity UV beams to produce a SI-relevant mm-scale hot ( 1 keV) preformed plasma. The main interaction pulse, either a kJ 1-ns UV pulse with intensity 1.6x1016 Wcm-2 or a kJ 0.1-ns IR pulse with intensity up to 2x1017 Wcm-2was injected at varied timing delays. The high intensity IR beam was found to strongly interact with underdense plasmas breaking into many filaments near the quarter critical density region followed by propagation of those filaments to critical density, producing hot electrons with Thot 70 keV in a well-contained beam. While the high intensity UV beam showed poor energy coupling. Details of the experiments and the complementary PIC modeling results will be presented. Work supported by U.S. DOE under contracts DE-NA0002730 (NLUF) and DE-SC0014666 (HEDLP).

  7. Validation of the BERT Point Source Inversion Scheme Using the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Experiment Dataset - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Sara [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    zones. Due to a unique source inversion technique - called the upwind collector footprint approach - the tool runs fast and the source regions can be determined in a few minutes. In this report, we provide an overview of the BERT framework, followed by a description of the source inversion technique. The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment held in Oklahoma City that was used to validate BERT is then described. Subsequent sections describe the metrics used for evaluation, the comparison of the experimental data and BERT output, and under what conditions the BERT tool succeeds and performs poorly. Results are aggregated in different ways (e.g., daytime vs. nighttime releases, 1 vs. 2 vs. 3 hit collectors) to determine if BERT shows any systematic errors. Finally, recommendations are given for how to improve the code and procedures for optimizing performance in operational mode.

  8. A Foreground Removal Strategy for future C[II] Intensity Mapping Experiments: Insights From Galaxies Selected by Stellar Mass and Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Guochao; Viero, Marco P; Bock, Jamie; Bradford, C Matt; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Cheng, Yun-Ting; Cooray, Asantha; Crites, Abigail; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Hunacek, Jonathon; Uzgil, Bade; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping provides a unique avenue to understand the epoch of reionization (EoR), which occurred approximately 500 million to 1 billion years after the Big Bang. The C[II] 158$\\mu$m fine-structure line is one of the brightest emission lines of typical star-forming galaxies and a promising tracer of the global star-formation activity during the epoch of reionization. However, C[II] intensity maps are contaminated by interloping CO rotational line emission ($3 \\leq J_{\\rm upp} \\leq 6$) from lower-redshift galaxies, whose total power is a function of the population's stochasticity. Here we present a model of CO contamination from foreground galaxies to guide the masking strategy of future C[II] intensity mapping experiments. The model is based on empirical measurements of the mean and scatter of the bolometric infrared luminosities, converted to CO line strengths, of galaxies at $z 8$. We find that the addition of scatter, parameterized by a log-normal distribution with $\\sigma = 0.33\\pm 0.04$\\,dex, to ...

  9. Facility for parity and time reversal experiments with intense epithermal (eV) neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. D.; Bowman, J. D.; Herczeg, P.; Szymanski, J.; Yuan, V. W.; Anaya, J. M.; Mortensen, R.; Postma, H.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Baker, O. K.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Mitchell, G. E.; Roberson, N. R.; Zhu, X.; McDonald, A. B.; Benton, D.; Tippens, B.; Chupp, T. E.

    1988-12-01

    A facility for polarized epithermal neutrons of high intensity is set up at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for parityviolation and time reversal experiments at neutron resonances over a wide range of neutron energies. The beam is polarized with the aid of a polarized proton target used as a neutronspin filter. Total cross section measurements as well as capture gamma-ray experiments will be carried out. The main features of this system will be discussed.

  10. Patients’ narratives of lived experiences of intensive care during after-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karen; Berner, Susanne; Hertz, Iben

    2013-01-01

    -care. Several studies have investigated psychological consequences. Additionally, the meaning of dreams and follow-up care been explored. It may therefore seem appropriate to further investigate patients individual experiences in order to search for a deeper understanding of the dimensions that influence...... and critical interpretation and discussion. RESULTS. The preliminary findings indicate that there are three categories of lived experiences of intensive care. CONCLUSIONS. This clinical nursing research provides new basic knowledge useful in the efforts to enhance patient psychological processing after...

  11. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  12. Two politicians in a realistic experiment: attraction, discrepancy, intensity of delivery, and attitude change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, O.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of the Socialists in the Dutch Parliament and his Liberal opponent participated in this realistic experiment. Identical TV interviews with the two politicians were recorded and shown to subjects of both parties. The intensity of delivery was also varied: emotional versus rational. Our fin

  13. Environmental Tax Reforms and Mitigation for Energy-intensive Industries: Some Lessons from European Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse in more detail the international experiences in applying carbon-energy taxation in two important energy-intensive sectors; iron and steel, as well as non-metallic mineral products (where cement is the most significant subsector)....

  14. Is compliance with hand disinfection in the intensive care unit related to work experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Chierego, Marialuisa; Byl, Bauduin; Menestrina, Nicola; Carollo, Tiziana; Struelens, Marc; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    The performance of hand disinfection by staff in a 31-bed department of intensive care was monitored. During 32 hours of observation, 727 opportunities for hand disinfection were observed, and the compliance rate was 27.9%. The level of work experience was not correlated with hand disinfection compliance rates.

  15. The Art of Tomographic Tracer Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Leven, C.; Doro, K. O.; Sanchez-Leon, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    disappeared considerably slower, implying that a longer time is needed between individual tracer tests to make sure that the entire tracer has been removed before the start of the next experiment.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of GeoPET experiments: 3D images of tracer distributions (18F, 124I and 58Co) in Opalinus clay, anhydrite and quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Sauerzapf, Sophie; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2013-08-01

    Understanding conservative fluid flow and reactive tracer transport in soils and rock formations requires quantitative transport visualization methods in 3D+t. After a decade of research and development we established the GeoPET as a non-destructive method with unrivalled sensitivity and selectivity, with due spatial and temporal resolution by applying Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a nuclear medicine imaging method, to dense rock material. Requirements for reaching the physical limit of image resolution of nearly 1 mm are (a) a high-resolution PET-camera, like our ClearPET scanner (Raytest), and (b) appropriate correction methods for scatter and attenuation of 511 keV—photons in the dense geological material. The latter are by far more significant in dense geological material than in human and small animal body tissue (water). Here we present data from Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) reflecting selected GeoPET experiments. The MCS consider all involved nuclear physical processes of the measurement with the ClearPET-system and allow us to quantify the sensitivity of the method and the scatter fractions in geological media as function of material (quartz, Opalinus clay and anhydrite compared to water), PET isotope (18F, 58Co and 124I), and geometric system parameters. The synthetic data sets obtained by MCS are the basis for detailed performance assessment studies allowing for image quality improvements. A scatter correction method is applied exemplarily by subtracting projections of simulated scattered coincidences from experimental data sets prior to image reconstruction with an iterative reconstruction process.

  17. Parent' s experiences and perceives at premature newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Urbančič

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Text treats parent's experiences and perceives and the significant of their newborn premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit in the Ljubljana maternity hospital. Aim of health promotion, the significance of health education in health education counselling are presented. The purpose of this study was to introduction parent' s experiences and make an implementation in nursing practice. The advantage is represent by performing health education counselling for parents in intensive care unit permanently. Perceives of parents during living their newborn infant in neonatal intensive care unit are present on five concepts: perceive parents themselves, perceive their infant, perceive the staff and the intensive care setting and perceive their home setting. Results are showing statistic important differences between mothers and fathers at the time of deliver and at the time charging infant home. A questionare was used for collecting data. Process of development instrument is represent. Descriptive statistics and T-test was used for quantitative data analysed. Using method of internal consistent Chronbach alpha tested reliability of scales and mean differences in time are graf protrayed by 95% confident intervals. Results show statistical significant differences on all five concepts of parent's experiences. Methodological findings and reseaarch limitations are also present. Authoress positive evaluates the effect of health education counselling program and find out its positive effect on parent's critical thinking and contributes to quality assurance nursing.

  18. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  19. Moving on in life after intensive care--partners' experience of group communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Mona; Bäckman, Carl; Jones, Christina; Walther, Sten; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2015-09-01

    Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners' intensive care period. They may appear to be coping well outwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited. The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensive care patients. The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive care unit (ICU) patients was evaluated. A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n = 15), 5 men and 10 women, aged 37-89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote, in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six of the partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews. Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2) Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participate in group communication. Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategies to ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is one way for partners to be able to move forward in life. Group communication with other patients' partners eases the process of going through the burden of being a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus and evidence for the best practice. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  20. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  1. [Nurses' perception, experience and knowledge of palliative care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrafita-Susín, A B; Yoldi-Arzoz, E; Sánchez-Fernández, M; Zuazua-Ros, E; Vázquez-Calatayud, M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate provision of palliative care by nursing in intensive care units is essential to facilitate a "good death" to critically ill patients. To determine the perceptions, experiences and knowledge of intensive care nurses in caring for terminal patients. A literature review was conducted on the bases of Pubmed, Cinahl and PsicINFO data using as search terms: cuidados paliativos, UCI, percepciones, experiencias, conocimientos y enfermería and their alternatives in English (palliative care, ICU, perceptions, experiences, knowledge and nursing), and combined with AND and OR Boolean. Also, 3 journals in intensive care were reviewed. Twenty seven articles for review were selected, most of them qualitative studies (n=16). After analysis of the literature it has been identified that even though nurses perceive the need to respect the dignity of the patient, to provide care aimed to comfort and to encourage the inclusion of the family in patient care, there is a lack of knowledge of the end of life care in intensive care units' nurses. This review reveals that to achieve quality care at the end of life, is necessary to encourage the training of nurses in palliative care and foster their emotional support, to conduct an effective multidisciplinary work and the inclusion of nurses in decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  2. FIFE-Jobsub: a grid submission system for intensity frontier experiments at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The Fermilab Intensity Frontier Experiments use an integrated submission system known as FIFE-jobsub, part of the FIFE (Fabric for Frontier Experiments) initiative, to submit batch jobs to the Open Science Grid. FIFE-jobsub eases the burden on experimenters by integrating data transfer and site selection details in an easy to use and well-documented format. FIFE-jobsub automates tedious details of maintaining grid proxies for the lifetime of the grid job. Data transfer is handled using the Intensity Frontier Data Handling Client (IFDHC) [1] tool suite, which facilitates selecting the appropriate data transfer method from many possibilities while protecting shared resources from overload. Chaining of job dependencies into Directed Acyclic Graphs (Condor DAGS) is well supported and made easier through the use of input flags and parameters.

  3. Detector modules and spectrometers for the TIME-Pilot [CII] intensity mapping experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunacek, Jonathon; Bock, James; Bradford, C. Matt; Bumble, Bruce; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Cheng, Yun-Ting; Cooray, Asantha; Crites, Abigail; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Gong, Yan; Li, Chao-Te; O'Brient, Roger; Shirokoff, Erik; Shiu, Corwin; Sun, Jason; Staniszewski, Zachary; Uzgil, Bade; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This proceeding presents the current TIME-Pilot instrument design and status with a focus on the close-packed modular detector arrays and spectrometers. Results of laboratory tests with prototype detectors and spectrometers are discussed. TIME-Pilot is a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array under development that will study the Epoch of Reionization (the period of time when the first stars and galaxies ionized the intergalactic medium) by mapping the fluctuations of the redshifted 157:7 μm emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z 5:2 to 8:5. As a tracer of star formation, the [CII] power spectrum can provide information on the sources driving reionization and complements 21 cm data (which traces neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium). Intensity mapping provides a measure of the mean [CII] intensity without the need to resolve and detect faint sources individually. We plan to target a 1 degree by 0.35 arcminute field on the sky and a spectral range of 199-305 GHz, producing a spatial-spectral slab which is 140 Mpc by 0.9 Mpc on-end and 1230 Mpc in the redshift direction. With careful removal of intermediate-redshift CO sources, we anticipate a detection of the halo-halo clustering term in the [CII] power spectrum consistent with current models for star formation history in 240 hours on the JCMT. TIME-Pilot will use two stacks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one stack per polarization) with a resolving power R 100 and a spectral range of 183 to 326 GHz. The range is divided into 60 spectral channels, of which 16 at the band edges on each spectrometer serve as atmospheric monitors. The diffraction gratings are curved to produce a compact instrument, each focusing the diffracted light onto an output arc sampled by the 60 bolometers. The bolometers are built in buttable dies of 8 (low freqeuency) or 12 (high frequency) spectral channels by 8 spatial channels and are mated to the spectrometer stacks. Each detector

  4. Two politicians in a realistic experiment: attraction, discrepancy, intensity of delivery, and attitude change

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegman, O.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of the Socialists in the Dutch Parliament and his Liberal opponent participated in this realistic experiment. Identical TV interviews with the two politicians were recorded and shown to subjects of both parties. The intensity of delivery was also varied: emotional versus rational. Our findgins indicated that the experimental interveiw changed the attitude of the subjects. In addition, support was found for a second hypothesis: Attitude change was greater for the attractive source f...

  5. Communicating adaptation with emotions: the role of intense experiences in raising concern about extreme weather.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Vasileiadou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation to extreme weather is often considered as having a low urgency and being a low priority governance option, even though the intensity of extreme weather events is expected to increase as a result of climate change. An important issue is how to raise an adequate level of concern among individuals, policy makers, and broader decision makers in companies and organizations so that adaptation to extreme events becomes mainstream practice. We conducted 40 indepth interviews with individuals from different sectors in The Netherlands to identify the different types of experiences with extreme events, as well as the relationship between such experiences and the level of concern about extreme weather. Our results indicate that individuals who have experienced an intense, life-threatening event have a significantly higher level of concern than those without such an experience. Professional experience and secondhand experience through participating in information events do not significantly affect the level of concern about extreme events. This suggests limited intervention possibilities for communication of adaptation, as well as for raising support for adaptation measures. Framing adaptation measures in relation to personal circumstances and emotions during extreme events could help raise concern about extreme weather events, as well as societal support for adaptation measures.

  6. Tracer monitoring of enhanced oil recovery projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleven R.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In enhanced oil recovery (EOR, chemicals are injected into the oil reservoir, either to increase macroscopic sweep efficiency, or to reduce remaining oil saturation in swept zones. Tracers can be used to identify reservoirs that are specifically suited for EOR operations. Injection of a selection of partitioning tracers, combined with frequent sample analysis of produced fluids, provides information suited for estimation of residual oil saturation. Tracers can also be used to evaluate and optimize the application of EOR chemicals in the reservoir. Suitable tracers will follow the EOR chemicals and assist in evaluation of retention, degradation or trapping. In addition to field applications, tracers also have a large potential as a tool to perform mechanistic studies of EOR chemicals in laboratory experiments. By labelling EOR chemicals with radioactive isotopes of elements such as H, C and S, detailed studies of transport mechanisms can be carried out. Co-injection of labelled compounds in dynamic flooding experiments in porous media will give information about retention or separation of the unique compounds constituting the chemical formulation. Separation of such compounds may be detrimental to obtaining the EOR effect expected. The paper gives new information of specific methods, and discusses current status for use of tracers in EOR operations.

  7. Family members' lived experience in the intensive care unit: a phemenological study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To describe the lived experience of family members of patients in the intensive care unit. BACKGROUND: Admission of a critically ill relative to an intensive care unit causes anxiety and stress to family members. Nursing care is initially focused on maintaining the physiological stability of the patient and less on the needs and concerns of family members. Understanding how families make sense of this experience may help nurses focus on the delivery of family centred care. METHODOLOGY: A phenomenological method was used to describe the lived experiences of family members of patients in an intensive care unit. In-depth interviews were conducted with six family members and analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged from the data: the need to know, making sense of it all, being there with them and caring and support. Family members needed honest information about the patient\\'s progress and outcome to make the situation more bearable for them. Making sense of the situation was a continuous process which involved tracking and evaluating care given. Being with their relative sustained their family bond and was a way to demonstrate love and support. Caring reassurance provided by the nurses enabled a sense of security. Support was needed by family members to assist them in coping. CONCLUSION: The research provided an insight into how family members viewed the impact of the admission and how they subsequently found ways of dealing with the situation. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Using a holistic approach to nursing assessment and care delivery in intensive care necessitates that nurses interact with and care for family members of patients. Development of a philosophy of family centred care is necessary, with formal assessment of families to take place soon after admission and an appropriate plan of care drawn up at this time.

  8. Polarization dependence of transition intensities in double resonance experiments: unresolved spin doublets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Vladimir S; Field, Robert W

    2008-01-07

    The polarization dependence of transition intensities in multiple resonance spectroscopic experiments can provide information useful for making rotational assignments. A formalism to describe the polarization dependence of transition intensities in multiple resonance experiments, particularly for cases when two rotational/fine structure quantum numbers are needed to specify the state of the system, is presented. The formalism is presented in a form usable both when the transitions between the underlying fine structure components are experimentally resolved, as well as when they are unresolved, to form composite lines. This sort of treatment is necessary for cases when the two quantum numbers that specify the fine structure differ significantly, such as is the case at low N, when the difference between J and N becomes comparable to the value of J. Ratios of transition intensities in different experimentally convenient polarization arrangements are evaluated for the case of composite N transitions formed by combining the spin components of a doublet system. The formalism is expressed in a form easily extendable to accommodate experimental cases of more than two excitation steps, or a combination of excitation steps and an external static electric field. This polarization diagnostic has been experimentally applied to assign spectral features in double resonance Rydberg spectra of CaF.

  9. Tracer-based prediction of thermal reservoir lifetime: scope, limitations, and the role of thermosensitive tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Licha, T.; Nottebohm, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    correlation between (early) tracer signals and (later) thermal breakthrough can be re-established. Thus, thermosensitive tracers are indispensable for predicting thermal breakthrough, in such geothermal reservoirs whose 'hydrogeological personality' is given by a finite set of fractures, with flow occurring both across and along the fractures. In terms of the 'gebo benchmark-model' typology investigated by Hördt et al. (2011) [http://eposters.agu.org/abstracts/models-of-geothermal-reservoirs-as-a-basis-for-interdisciplinary-cooperation/] , such systems combine flow and transport patterns of the 'petrothermal' type and of the so-called 'deep-aquifer' type: across the fractures, heat is travelling faster than conservative-solute tracers; along the fractures, conservative-solute tracers experience much less retardation by transversal exchange (matrix diffusion), than heat; fluid (and tracer) flow is not limited to the fractures; matrix flow yields essential contribution to prolonging the fluid (and tracer) residence time. Thermal lifetime results from the opposite effects of fracture aperture as an: advection-related parameter: fluid travel time increases with increasing fracture aperture advection-unrelated parameter: fracture - matrix exchange rate increases with decreasing fracture aperture, which accelerates transport across the fracture, but retards transport along the fracture. In conservative-solute tracer signals, all these fracture aperture effects on tracer transport are masked by the very long residence time associated with the matrix flow component. Thermosensitive tracers are able to 'magnify' the visibility of fracture aperture effects against matrix flow effects. Acknowledgment: This study benefits from thermosensitive-tracer research conducted within the projects Smart Tracers and LOGRO, funded by the German Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU, 0327579 and 0325111B) and by Energie Baden-Württemberg (EnBW).

  10. The Parental Experience of Having an Infant in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Hala M.; Bond, Elaine A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to explore and describe the experience of parents with an infant in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU). A literature search covering the period 1998–2008 was conducted. Fourteen articles reporting qualitative studies describing parental experiences and meeting the inclusion criteria were evaluated and themes were identified. Findings revealed that parents with an infant in the NICU experience depression, anxiety, stress, and loss of control, and they vacillate between feelings of inclusion and exclusion related to the provision of health care to their neonate. Nursing interventions that promote positive psychosocial outcomes are needed to decrease parental feelings of stress, anxiety, and loss of control. Interventions need to focus on family-centered and developmentally supportive care. PMID:20514124

  11. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  12. Reflected light intensity profile of two-layer tissues: phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankri, Rinat; Taitelbaum, Haim; Fixler, Dror

    2011-08-01

    Experimental measurements of the reflected light intensity from two-layer phantoms are presented. We report, for the first time, an experimental observation of a typical reflected light intensity behavior for the two-layer structure characterized by two different slopes in the reflected light profile of the irradiated tissue. The point in which the first slope changes to the second slope, named as the crossover point, depends on the upper layer thickness as well as on the ratio between the absorption coefficients of the two layers. Since similar experiments from one-layer phantoms present a monotonic decay behavior, the existence and the location of the crossover point can be used as a diagnostic fingerprint for two-layer tissue structures. This pertains to two layers with greater absorptivity in the upper layer, which is the typical biological case in tissues like skin.

  13. [Care of mothers of newborns in intensive care units: experiences, feelings and expectations of the mothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, M A

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the experiences, feelings and expectation of mothers of high risk newborns. The population was a group of 20 mothers of high risk newborns of three hospitals in the City of São Paulo. Interview with the mothers was the method of data collection containing opened and structured questions. It was verified that most of the mothers had none or only a little interaction with the newborn after delivery; the eye contact was the most referred during the staying of the newborn in the Intensive Care Unity; all of them demonstrated interest in participating in the care of the newborn and expressed the need of information concerning to the health status of the newborn, the Intensive Care Unity environment and the hospital team. Several were the feelings expressed and the motives that indicated the needs of the mothers.

  14. Simulator for the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering experiment in the Solenoidal Large Intensity Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jack; Hall A SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Solenoid Large Intensity Detector (SoLID) particle detector is the main detector that will be used for high energy particle experiments in Hall A that will be used with the 12 GeV electron beam at the Jefferson Lab. SoLID geometries were writen to be implemented in Geant4 using openGL as the visualization tool. This will allow us to test how the calorimeter, a specific yet integral part of the SoLID detector, detects the particles that result from electron beams colliding with targets. The goal is to simulate the approved experiments for the SoLID detector, starting with the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment. This will provide critical information regarding the effectiveness of the calorimeter's design for such experiments. The expectation is that a Shashlik calorimeter will prove effective for the experiments approved for the SoLID detector. The ideal number of layers, or types of material for said layers, is an aspect of the calorimeter that will require testing through the simulations.The geometry files allow an easily-packaged program that can be shared amongst any collaborators interested in the SoLID experiments. NSF Grant No. 714001.

  15. Simulations and experiments of intense ion beam current density compression in space and timea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Anders, A.; Coleman, J. E.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory has achieved 60-fold longitudinal pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) [P. K. Roy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 234801 (2005)]. To focus a space-charge-dominated charge bunch to sufficiently high intensities for ion-beam-heated warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy studies, simultaneous transverse and longitudinal compression to a coincident focal plane is required. Optimizing the compression under the appropriate constraints can deliver higher intensity per unit length of accelerator to the target, thereby facilitating the creation of more compact and cost-effective ion beam drivers. The experiments utilized a drift region filled with high-density plasma in order to neutralize the space charge and current of an ˜300 keV K+ beam and have separately achieved transverse and longitudinal focusing to a radius 2 MeV) ion beam user-facility for warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy-relevant target physics experiments.

  16. A large aperture reflective wave-plate for high-intensity short-pulse laser experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Aurand, Bastian; Zhao, Huanyu; Kuschel, Stephan; Wünsche, Martin; Jäckel, Oliver; Heyer, Martin; Wunderlich, Frank; Kaluza, Malte C; Paulus, Gerhard G; Kuehl, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report on a reflective wave-plate system utilizing phase-shifting mirrors (PSM) for a continuous variation of elliptical polarization without changing the beam position and direction. The scalability of multilayer optics to large apertures and the suitability for high-intensity broad-bandwidth laser beams make reflective wave-plates an ideal tool for experiments on relativistic laser-plasma interaction. Our measurements confirm the preservation of the pulse duration and spectrum when a 30-fs Ti:Sapphire laser beam passes the system.

  17. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  18. Model experiment on detection and monitoring of fractures by using air as a tracer for seismic wave. 2; Kitai wo tracer to shita kiretsu no danseiha tansa no model jikken. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Takami, Y.; Ishiga, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Clearance provided between two flat resin blocks (being stacked) used as a model of a crack in rocks was subjected to an experiment to investigate elastic wave propagation characteristics when the crack is filled with water and when injected with air. This paper reports the result of the experiment. The experiment was carried out on a case where a parallel flat layer of water (with a thickness of 2 mm) was used as a crack and a case where crack faces are contacted (small resin pieces are inserted into the crack). The experiment was conducted by injecting air bubbles (air) into the water saturated crack from its side to gradually expand the air bubble existing region. Seven ceramic piezoelectric elements (one is a vibration source) were arranged on top of a resin block and six elements beneath the block to measure a wave reflected from the crack face and a wave permeated through the crack. It was found that as the air bubble existing region is expanded, the amplitude of the permeated wave decreases remarkably (however, only to a certain level when the crack faces are contacted), and the amplitude of the reflected wave increases. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Intensive care nurses' experiences and perceptions of delirium and delirium care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamoscik, Katarzyna; Godbold, Rosemary; Freeman, Pauline

    2017-06-01

    To explore nurses' experiences and perceptions of delirium, managing delirious patients, and screening for delirium, five years after introduction of the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care into standard practice. Twelve nurses from a medical-surgical intensive care unit in a large teaching hospital attended two focus group sessions. The collected qualitative data was thematically analysed using Braun and Clarke's framework (2006). The analysis identified seven themes: (1) Delirium as a Secondary Matter (2) Unpleasant Nature of Delirium (3) Scepticism About Delirium Assessment (4) Distrust in Delirium Management (5) Value of Communication (6) Non-pharmacological Therapy (7) Need for Reviewed Delirium Policy. Nurses described perceiving delirium as a low priority matter and linked it to work culture within the intensive care specialty. Simultaneously, they expressed their readiness to challenge this culture and to promote the notion of providing high-quality delirium care. Nurses discussed their frustrations related to lack of confidence in assessing delirium, as well as lack of effective therapies in managing this group of patients. They declared their appreciation for non-pharmacological interventions in treatment of delirium, suggested improvements to current delirium approach and proposed introducing psychological support for nurses dealing with delirious patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The experience of registered nurses nursing in the general audit intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pope

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article a phenomenological qualitative research study is discussed. More attention will be given to the methodology of the research. The objectives of the study are two-fold: firstly to explore and describe the experience of registered nurses nursing in the adult intensive care unit (this is the first phase of the research and to describe guidelines based on the information obtained in the first phase to support the nurses in the form of a support programme in the second phase. The units of research are the registered nurses in the intensive care unit. The characteristics of the unit of research led to the emergence of a qualitative phenomenological research design of an explorative, descriptive and contextual nature. In the discussion of research methodology attention will be given to phase one: data gathering (ethical considerations and informed consent; purposive selection, phenomenological interviews and field notes; data analysis (Tesch’s method of data analysis, methods to ensure trustworthiness, organisation of raw data and integration of findings supported by literature. Five themes were identified through the data analysis: impaired communication with management; discrimination: white on black racism; lack of fair, competitive remuneration and disregard for professional worth; non-conducive physical environment, and stressful working environment. Phase two: Guidelines were described to support the registered nurses in the intensive care unit based on the information obtained in phase one of the research.

  1. Simulation of Experiments Generating Collisionless Shocks With Intense Lasers Using the CRASH Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Park, H. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J. S.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woosley, N.

    2011-10-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for particles is long compared to the length scale for shock interaction, are found ubiquitously in astrophysics. Experiments to investigate collisionless shocks in a laboratory-scale system are being carried out on intense lasers; measuring the density, temperature, magnetic field, and velocity of counter-streaming flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports hydrodynamic simulations modeling the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs and infer properties of collected data from previous single foil experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52-08NA28616.

  2. Preterm infant: maternal experience during breastfeeding in neonatal intensive care unit and after discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Medeiros Melo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to identify the perceptions and experiences in relation to maternal care during hospitalization feeding of preterm infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and after discharge. Qualitative approach, exploratory-descriptive, using semi-structured interviews, aimed to address the lived experience of eleven mothers who gave birth to their babies. The interviews were conducted in the homes of mothers, between the months of June and October 2009. Through an analysis and interpretative understanding, the results indicated difficulties inter-subjective communication with professionals and the occurrence of significant early weaning with the introduction of porridge and other foods potentially harmful to the health of preterm infants. It was clear that mothers need to be accommodated in formal advisory groups during and after hospitalization, receiving structured information about feeding practices to establish the most appropriate health care for their children.

  3. A quantitative theory-versus-experiment comparison for the intense laser dissociation of H2+

    CERN Document Server

    Serov, V; Atabek, O; Billy, N

    2003-01-01

    A detailed theory-versus-experiment comparison is worked out for H$_2^+$ intense laser dissociation, based on angularly resolved photodissociation spectra recently recorded in H.Figger's group. As opposite to other experimental setups, it is an electric discharge (and not an optical excitation) that prepares the molecular ion, with the advantage for the theoretical approach, to neglect without lost of accuracy, the otherwise important ionization-dissociation competition. Abel transformation relates the dissociation probability starting from a single ro-vibrational state, to the probability of observing a hydrogen atom at a given pixel of the detector plate. Some statistics on initial ro-vibrational distributions, together with a spatial averaging over laser focus area, lead to photofragments kinetic spectra, with well separated peaks attributed to single vibrational levels. An excellent theory-versus-experiment agreement is reached not only for the kinetic spectra, but also for the angular distributions of fr...

  4. Physical restraint: experiences, attitudes and opinions of adult intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Samantha; Hallett, Christine; McHugh, Gretl

    2016-03-01

    Patients within the adult intensive care unit have the potential to develop delirium and agitation. This can result in the patient displaying unwanted behaviours such as attempting to remove the medical devices to which they are attached. Some adult intensive care units within the UK are starting to adopt physical restraint as a method of managing unwanted behaviours. To determine the experiences, attitudes and opinions of adult intensive care nurses in relation to the application of physical restraint. Questionnaire survey. A postal questionnaire was distributed to all nurses (n = 192) within two purposefully selected large adult intensive care units in the UK. Data were collected between November 2012 and February 2013. The questionnaire was completed by 38·9% (n = 75) of the nurses contacted. All believed that physical restraint had a place, with the majority of the view that the reason for its application was to maintain patient safety. Some expressed discomfort about the use of physical restraint. Nurses were happy to discuss the use of restraint with families. There was a perceived need for training and support for nursing staff as well as the need for medical staff to support the decision-making process. Nurses require more support and evidence to base their decision-making upon. They require guidance from professional bodies as well as support from medical colleagues. The findings have limited generalizability as they can only be applied to the units accessed and the response rate was poor. Alternative approaches such as pain management, sleep promotion and the involvement of relatives need to be explored before physical restraint policy can be written. Further research is required into the safety of physical restraint, alternative methods of managing the risk of agitation and identifying predisposing factors to accidental device removal. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  5. The Effects of Active Videogame Feedback and Practicing Experience on Children's Physical Activity Intensity and Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Haichun

    2017-08-01

    The study aims to explore the effects of receiving active videogame (AVG) feedback and playing experience on individuals' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and perceived enjoyment. This was a within-subject design study. The participants included 36 (n = 15 and 21 for boys and girls, respectively) fourth graders enrolled in a rural elementary school in southern Georgia area. The experiment lasted for 6 weeks with each week including three sessions. The participants were assigned in either front row (sensor feedback) or back row (no sensor feedback) during practice, which was alternated in different sessions. Two different dance games were played during the study with each game implemented for 3 weeks. The MVPA was measured with GT3X+ accelerometers. Physical activity (PA) enjoyment was assessed after the completion of the first two and last two sessions of each game. A repeated one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance) was used to examine the effects of AVG feedback and game on MVPA. A repeated one-way MANOVA (multivariate analysis of variance) was conducted for each game to examine the effects of experience and AVG feedback on enjoyment and MVPA. No effects of AVG feedback were found for MVPA or enjoyment (P > 0.05). The effects of experience on MVPA were found for Just Dance Kids 2014 with experience decreased MVPA (P < 0.05). Students who practiced dance AVG without receiving feedback still demonstrated positive affection and accumulated similar MVPA than when practicing while receiving feedback. Experience for certain dance games tends to decrease PA intensity.

  6. Image analysis of concentration distribution in two-dimensional sandbox tracer experiment%二维砂箱溶质示踪实验的图像分析法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋小源; 刘杰; 郑春苗

    2012-01-01

    Dye tracer has been widely used in sandbox experiments of solute transport.This study uses image analysis to determine the concentration of dye tracer in porous media.By establishing a quantitative relationship between the concentration and the hue value of the dye tracer,the concentration distribution of the dye tracer can be quickly obtained.The image analysis provides a cost-effective and high-resolution method to quantify the solute concentration distribution in two-dimensional sandbox experiment for groundwater solute transport studies.Because the range of image hue values is limited,the image analysis method can only be applied to a certain range of solute concentration.%有色示踪剂在砂箱溶质运移实验中有着广泛的应用,因此,本文介绍了一种通过对数字图像进行分析以确定多孔介质中有色示踪剂浓度分布的方法.在实验过程中,通过建立有色示踪剂浓度与图像颜色要素之间的定量关系,从而能够利用数字图像迅速确定某一时刻砂箱内部的示踪剂浓度分布.结果发现,与传统定点采样方法相比,图像分析法可以达到更高的空间和时间分辨率,从而观察到有可能被忽视的重要溶质运移过程,能够为地下水溶质运移实验研究提供了一种经济实用和高空间分辨率的数据采集手段.但由于色彩空间变化范围的限制,图像分析法只能在一定溶质浓度范围内适用.

  7. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  8. Bain linguistique contre douche ecossaise: une experience de sejour intensif a l'etranger (Linguistic Immersion versus Hot-and-Cold Shower: An Experience of Intensive Overseas Stay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheila; Verguet, Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Describes the elaboration, over a period of three years, of a French language and civilization program consisting of linguistic and cultural preparation in England, followed by a one-week intensive linguistic and cultural experience in France. (AM)

  9. Evacuation of Intensive Care Units During Disaster: Learning From the Hurricane Sandy Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Mary A; Dorfman, Molly V; Einav, Sharon; Niven, Alex S; Kissoon, Niranjan; Grissom, Colin K

    2016-02-01

    Data on best practices for evacuating an intensive care unit (ICU) during a disaster are limited. The impact of Hurricane Sandy on New York City area hospitals provided a unique opportunity to learn from the experience of ICU providers about their preparedness, perspective, roles, and activities. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of nurses, respiratory therapists, and physicians who played direct roles during the Hurricane Sandy ICU evacuations. Sixty-eight health care professionals from 4 evacuating hospitals completed surveys (35% ICU nurses, 21% respiratory therapists, 25% physicians-in-training, and 13% attending physicians). Only 21% had participated in an ICU evacuation drill in the past 2 years and 28% had prior training or real-life experience. Processes were inconsistent for patient prioritization, tracking, transport medications, and transport care. Respondents identified communication (43%) as the key barrier to effective evacuation. The equipment considered most helpful included flashlights (24%), transport sleds (21%), and oxygen tanks and respiratory therapy supplies (19%). An evacuation wish list included walkie-talkies/phones (26%), lighting/electricity (18%), flashlights (10%), and portable ventilators and suction (16%). ICU providers who evacuated critically ill patients during Hurricane Sandy had little prior knowledge of evacuation processes or vertical evacuation experience. The weakest links in the patient evacuation process were communication and the availability of practical tools. Incorporating ICU providers into hospital evacuation planning and training, developing standard evacuation communication processes and tools, and collecting a uniform dataset among all evacuating hospitals could better inform critical care evacuation in the future.

  10. Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

  11. Influence of the excitation light intensity on the rate of fluorescence quenching reactions: pulsed experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Gonzalo; Milkiewicz, Jadwiga; Kattnig, Daniel; Nejbauer, Michał; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Szczepanek, Jan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wnuk, Paweł; Grampp, Günter

    2017-02-22

    The effect of multiple light excitation events on bimolecular photo-induced electron transfer reactions in liquid solution is studied experimentally. It is found that the decay of fluorescence can be up to 25% faster if a second photon is absorbed after a first cycle of quenching and recombination. A theoretical model is presented which ascribes this effect to the enrichment of the concentration of quenchers in the immediate vicinity of fluorophores that have been previously excited. Despite its simplicity, the model delivers a qualitative agreement with the observed experimental trends. The original theory by Burshtein and Igoshin (J. Chem. Phys., 2000, 112, 10930-10940) was created for continuous light excitation though. A qualitative extrapolation from the here presented pulse experiments to the continuous excitation conditions lead us to conclude that in the latter the order of magnitude of the increase of the quenching efficiency upon increasing the light intensity of excitation, must also be on the order of tens of percent. These results mean that the rate constant for photo-induced bimolecular reactions depends not only on the usual known factors, such as temperature, viscosity and other properties of the medium, but also on the intensity of the excitation light.

  12. A tunable, linac based, intense, broad-band THz source forpump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerge, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Corbett, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Durr, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fazio, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fisher, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Frisch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gaffney, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Guehr, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hettel, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hoffmann, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hogan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Holtkamp, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kirchmann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Limborg, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lindenberg, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Raubenheimer, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Reis, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ross, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Z. -X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stupakov, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tantawi, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tian, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Xiang, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-02

    We propose an intense THz source with tunable frequency and bandwidth that can directly interact with the degrees of freedom that determine the properties of materials and thus provides a new tool for controlling and directing these ultrafast processes as well as aiding synthesis of new materials with new functional properties. This THz source will broadly impact our understanding of dynamical processes in matter at the atomic-scale and in real time. Established optical pumping schemes using femtosecond visible frequency laser pulses for excitation are extended into the THz frequency regime thereby enabling resonant excitation of bonds in correlated solid state materials (phonon pumping), to drive low energy electronic excitations, to trigger surface chemistry reactions, and to all-optically bias a material with ultrashort electric fields or magnetic fields. A linac-based THz source can supply stand-alone experiments with peak intensities two orders of magnitude stronger than existing laser-based sources, but when coupled with atomic-scale sensitive femtosecond x-ray probes it opens a new frontier in ultrafast science with broad applications to correlated materials, interfacial and liquid phase chemistry, and materials in extreme conditions.

  13. Taking care of the newborn dying and their families: Nurses' experiences of neonatal intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane de Amorim Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the experiences of nurses when caring for dying newborns and their families in the NICU; and redeem their perceptions about acting before the death and grieving process. Method A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed with nine nurses at the ICU of a hospital in São Paulo (SP, Brazil. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD. Results Caring for newborns who are dying and their families is very difficult for nurses, due to the intense involvement. They seek strategies to deal with the situation and, before the newborn’s death, despite the suffering, express the feeling of accomplishment. Conclusions Facing death and grief triggers mechanisms that emerge life references, coming across painful issues. Learning to deal with these questions is a daily challenge for nurses of the NICU.

  14. Experience in teaching intensive course of thermal physics for undergraduate physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Farkhad

    2009-03-01

    This talk of non-technical nature describes experience of the author in teaching the intensive course of thermal physics for the undergraduate physics students at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain. After brief introduction to the program, description of the WEB support of the course, I shall describe practical classes ( home-works, visits to the Laboratories, experimental demonstrations, typical problems and typical topics for presentations on the advanced thermodynamics, etc. ). I shall further discuss different possible actions to wake up an interest of the students to the thermal physics and ways to simulate their active participation in the class discussions. I also describe different schemes employed in the last few years to evaluate effectively and clearly the students work and knowledge. Finally, I will analyze the efficiency of our methodic in improving teaching of thermal physics at University level.

  15. Caring for dying infants: experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, B M; Rossiter, J C; Cheung, K Y

    2001-09-01

    Ten registered nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit in Hong Kong were interviewed to explore their experiences of caring for infants whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment, their perceptions of palliative care, and factors influencing their care. Eight categories emerged from the content analysis of the interviews: disbelieving; feeling ambivalent and helpless; protecting emotional self; providing optimal physical care to the infant; providing emotional support to the family; expressing empathy; lack of knowledge and counselling skills; and conflicting values in care. The subtle cultural upbringing and socialization in nurse training and workplace environment also contributed to their moral distress. Hospital and nurse administrators should consider different ways of facilitating palliative care in their acute care settings. For example, by culture-specific death education, peer support groups, bereavement teams, modification of departmental policies, and a supportive work environment. Future research could include the identification of family needs and coping as well as ethical decision-making among nurses.

  16. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Abrams, Robert [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Dinkel, Holly [U. Missouri, Columbia; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, Grigory [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  17. Study of large eddy simulation of the effects of boundary layer convection on tracer uplift and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Wang, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Using large eddy model (LEM) and observed data from Dunhuang meteorological station during the intensive period of land-atmosphere interaction field experiment over arid region of North-west China, a series of sensitivity experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of the surface heat flux and wind shear on the strength and the organization of boundary layer convection as well as the growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL). The results show that surface heat flux increases with constant wind shear will give rise to a thicker and warmer CBL, stronger convections and larger thermal eddies due to intense surface turbulence transporting more energy to the upper layer. On the other hand wind shear increases with constant surface heat flux lead to a thicker and warmer CBL because of the entrainment of warm air from the inversion layer to the mixed layer, while the boundary layer convection became weaker with broken thermal eddies. To investigate the quantitative linkage of surface heat flux, wind shear with the tracer uplift rate and transport height, a passive tracer with a constant value of 100 was added at all model levels below the 100 m in all simulations. The least square analysis reveals that the tracer uplift rate increases linearly with the surface heat flux when wind shear is less than 10.5×10-3 s-1 owing to the enhancement of the downward transport of higher momentum. However, the tracer uplift rate decreases with increasing wind shear when the surface heat flux is less than 462.5 W/m2 because of the weakened convection. The passive tracer in the model is also shown to be transported to the higher altitude with increasing surface heat flux and under constant wind shear. However, under a constant surface heat flux, the tracer transport height increases with increasing wind shear only when the shear is above a certain threshold and this threshold depend on the magnitude of surface heat fluxes.

  18. Validating under-resolved turbulence intensities for PIV experiments in canonical wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Kevin; Monty, J. P.; Hutchins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The discrepancy between measured turbulence intensity obtained from experiments in wall-bounded turbulence and the fully resolved reference results (usually from DNS datasets) are often attributed to spatial resolution issues, especially in PIV measurements due to the presence of spatial averaging within the interrogation region/volume. In many cases, in particular at high Reynolds numbers (where there is a lack of DNS data), there is no attempt to verify that this is the case. There is a risk that attributing unexpected PIV statistics to spatial resolution, without careful checks, could mask wider problems with the experimental setup or test facility. Here, we propose a robust technique to validate the under-resolved PIV obtained turbulence intensity profiles for canonical wall-bounded turbulence. This validation scheme is independent of Reynolds number and does not rely on empirical functions. It is based on arguments that (1) the viscous-scaled small-scale turbulence energy is invariant with Reynolds number and that (2) the spatially under-resolved measurement is sufficient to capture the large-scale energy. This then suggests that we can estimate the missing energy from volume-filtered DNS data at much lower Reynolds numbers. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and estimation profiles for all three velocity components, demonstrating that the estimation tool successfully computes the missing energy for given spatial resolutions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. A database for a canonical turbulent boundary layer and associated MATLAB function are provided that enable this missing energy to be calculated across a range of interrogation volume sizes, so that users do not require access to raw DNS data. This methodology and tool will provide PIV practitioners, investigating canonical wall-bounded turbulent flow with a convenient check of the effects of spatial resolution on a given experiment.

  19. Coping with the neonatal intensive care unit experience: parents' strategies and views of staff support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vincent C; Steelfisher, Gillian K; Salhi, Carmel; Shen, Lisa Y

    2012-01-01

    It is stressful for parents to have an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To better understand the parents' experience and the role of staff, we examined parental reports of their NICU experiences, coping strategies, and views of the ways NICU staff supported them. Between June and July 2007, we interviewed 29 current and graduate parents from the study institution's NICU. A trained researcher conducted all interviews, which were recorded and transcribed. This was a qualitative analysis of prospectively collected interview data. Parents used the following coping strategies: (1) participating in care of the child; (2) getting away from the NICU; (3) gathering information; (4) involvement of friends and family; and (5) engagement with other NICU parents. Staff can support the parents' coping strategies in the following ways: (1) facilitating participation of the parents with the infant's care; (2) emphasizing documentation of the infant's progress; (3) demonstrating affection for the infant; (4) addressing concerns that make parents hesitant to leave the NICU; (5) providing accurate, consistent clinical information; (6) limiting unscheduled nonemergency phone calls; and (7) arranging voluntarily activities or programs in which parents whose infants have similar medical conditions may interact.

  20. The implementation and data analysis of an interferometer for intense short pulse laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaebum; Baldis, Hector A.; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We present an interferometry setup and the detailed fringe analysis method for intense short pulse (SP) laser experiments. The interferometry scheme was refined through multiple campaigns to investigate the effects of pre-plasmas on energetic electrons at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The interferometer used a frequency doubled (${\\it\\lambda}=0.527~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$) 0.5 ps long optical probe beam to measure the pre-plasma density, an invaluable parameter to better understand how varying pre-plasma conditions affect the characteristics of the energetic electrons. The hardware of the diagnostic, data analysis and example data are presented. The diagnostic setup and the analysis procedure can be employed for any other SP laser experiments and interferograms, respectively.

  1. Recent Experiments At Ndcx-II: Irradiation Of Materials Using Short, Intense Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, P A; Persaud, A; Feinberg, E; Ludewigt, B; Silverman, M; Sulyman, A; Waldron, W L; Schenkel, T; Barnard, J J; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I D; Stepanov, A; Treffert, F; Zimmer, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the performance of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) accelerator at Berkeley Lab, and summarize recent studies of material properties created with nanosecond and millimeter-scale ion beam pulses. The scientific topics being explored include the dynamics of ion induced damage in materials, materials synthesis far from equilibrium, warm dense matter and intense beam-plasma physics. We summarize the improved accelerator performance, diagnostics and results of beam-induced irradiation of thin samples of, e.g., tin and silicon. Bunches with over 3x10^10 ions, 1- mm radius, and 2-30 ns FWHM duration have been created. To achieve these short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV He+ ion beam is neutralized in a drift compression section which removes the space charge defocusing effect during final compression and focusing. Quantitative comparison of detailed particle-in-cell simulations with the experiment play an important role in optimizing acc...

  2. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  3. A qualitative study exploring the experiences of parents of children admitted to seven Dutch pediatric intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Schuurman, Beatrix Elink; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; van Dam, Nicolette A. M.; Dullaart, Eugenie; van Heerde, Marc; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; van Vught, Elise M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' experiences during the admission of their children to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Qualitative method using in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis was applied to capture parents' experiences. Thirty-nine mothers and 25 fathers of 41 children admitted to seven of the ei

  4. A qualitative study exploring the experiences of parents of children admitted to seven Dutch pediatric intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Latour (Jos); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans); B.E. Schuurman (Beatrix); M.J.I.J. Albers (Marcel); N.A.M. van Dam (Nicolette); E. Dullaart (Eugenie); M. van Heerde (Marc); C.W.M. Verlaat (Carin); E.M. van Vught (Elise); J.A. Hazelzet (Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To explore parents' experiences during the admission of their children to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Method: Qualitative method using in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis was applied to capture parents' experiences. Thirty-nine mothers and 25 fathers of 41 childre

  5. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  6. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed to facilitate the design of tracer tests by root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using a preset average tracer concentration which provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass. The method uses basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) that are combined in functional relatipnships that descrive solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. These initial estimates for time of travel and velocity are then applied to a hypothetical continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) as an analog for the hydrological-flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration, tracer mass, and axial dispersion. Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to be necessary for descri

  7. Moral distress in intensive care unit professionals is associated with profession, age, and years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter M; Wong, Hubert; Norena, Monica; Ayas, Najib; Reynolds, Steven C; Keenan, Sean P; Hamric, Ann; Rodney, Patricia; Stewart, Miriam; Alden, Lynn

    2016-02-01

    To determine which demographic characteristics are associated with moral distress in intensive care unit (ICU) professionals. We distributed a self-administered, validated survey to measure moral distress to all clinical personnel in 13 ICUs in British Columbia, Canada. Each respondent to the survey also reported their age, sex, and years of experience in the ICU where they were working. We used multivariate, hierarchical regression to analyze relationships between demographic characteristics and moral distress scores, and to analyze the relationship between moral distress and tendency to leave the workplace. Response rates to the surveys were the following: nurses--428/870 (49%); other health professionals (not nurses or physicians)--211/452 (47%); physicians--30/68 (44%). Nurses and other health professionals had higher moral distress scores than physicians. Highest ranked items associated with moral distress were related to cost constraints and end-of-life controversies. Multivariate analyses showed that age is inversely associated with moral distress, but only in other health professionals (rate ratio [95% confidence interval]: -7.3 [-13.4, -1.2]); years of experience is directly associated with moral distress, but only in nurses (rate ratio (95% confidence interval):10.8 [2.6, 18.9]). The moral distress score is directly related to the tendency to leave the ICU job, in both the past and present, but only for nurses and other non-physician health professionals. Moral distress is higher in ICU nurses and other non-physician professionals than in physicians, is lower with older age for other non-physician professionals but greater with more years of experience in nurses, and is associated with tendency to leave the job. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  9. Spatial dynamics of laser-induced fluorescence in an intense laser beam: experiment and theory in alkali metal atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalnins, Uldis

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that it is possible to model accurately optical phenomena in intense laser fields by taking into account the intensity distribution over the laser beam. We developed a theoretical model that divided an intense laser beam into concentric regions, each with a Rabi frequency that corresponds to the intensity in that region, and solved a set of coupled optical Bloch equations for the density matrix in each region. Experimentally obtained magneto-optical resonance curves for the $F_g=2\\longrightarrow F_e=1$ transition of the $D_1$ line of $^{87}$Rb agreed very well with the theoretical model up to a laser intensity of around 200 mW/cm$^2$ for a transition whose saturation intensity is around 4.5 mW/cm$^2$. We have studied the spatial dependence of the fluorescence intensity in an intense laser beam experimentally and theoretically. An experiment was conducted whereby a broad, intense pump laser excited the $F_g=4\\longrightarrow F_e=3$ transition of the $D_2$ line of cesium while a weak, narrow probe ...

  10. In-Situ Characterization of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Using Partitioning Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary A. Pope; Daene C. McKinney; Akhil Datta Gupta; Richard E. Jackson; Minquan Jin

    2000-03-20

    Majors advances have been made during the past three years in our research on interwell partitioning tracers tests (PITTs). These advances include (1) progress on the inverse problem of how to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of NAPL in aquifers from the tracer data, (2) the first ever partitioning tracer experiments in dual porosity media, (3) the first modeling of partitioning tracers in dual porosity media (4) experiments with complex NAPLs such as coal tar, (5) the development of an accurate and simple method to predict partition coefficients using the equivalent alkane carbon number approach, (6) partitioning tracer experiments in large model aquifers with permeability layers, (7) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data to estimate the change in composition of a NAPL before and after remediation (8) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data after a field demonstration of surfactant foam to remediate NAPL and (9) experiments at elevated temperatures .

  11. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  12. Muon "Depth-Intensity" Relation Measured by LVD Underground Experiment and Cosmic-Ray Muon Spectrum at Sea Level

    CERN Document Server

    Aglietta, M

    1998-01-01

    We present the analysis of the muon events with all muon multiplicities collected during 21804 hours of operation of the first LVD tower. The measured angular distribution of muon intensity has been converted to the `depth -- vertical intensity' relation in the depth range from 3 to 12 km w.e.. The analysis of this relation allowed to derive the power index, $\\gamma$, of the primary all-nucleon spectrum: $\\gamma=2.78 \\pm 0.05$. The `depth -- vertical intensity' relation has been converted to standard rock and the comparison with the data of other experiments has been done. We present also the derived vertical muon spectrum at sea level.

  13. Swiss Experiment: Design, implemention and use of a cross-disciplinary infrastructure for data intensive science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, N.; Salehi, A.; Clifton, A.; Bavay, M.; Aberer, K.; Parlange, M. B.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    It has long been known that environmental processes are cross-disciplinary, but data has continued to be acquired and held for a single purpose. Swiss Experiment is a rapidly evolving cross-disciplinary, distributed sensor data infrastructure, where tools for the environmental science community stem directly from computer science research. The platform uses the bleeding edge of computer science to acquire, store and distribute data and metadata from all environmental science disciplines at a variety of temporal and spatial resolutions. SwissEx is simultaneously developing new technologies to allow low cost, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements such that small areas can be intensely monitored. This data is then combined with existing widespread, low density measurements in the cross-disciplinary platform to provide well documented datasets, which are of use to multiple research disciplines. We present a flexible, generic infrastructure at an advanced stage of development. The infrastructure makes the most of Web 2.0 technologies for a collaborative working environment and as a user interface for a metadata database. This environment is already closely integrated with GSN, an open-source database middleware developed under Swiss Experiment for acquisition and storage of generic time-series data (2D and 3D). GSN can be queried directly by common data processing packages and makes data available in real-time to models and 3rd party software interfaces via its web service interface. It also provides real-time push or pull data exchange between instances, a user management system which leaves data owners in charge of their data, advanced real-time processing and much more. The SwissEx interface is increasingly gaining users and supporting environmental science in Switzerland. It is also an integral part of environmental education projects ClimAtscope and O3E, where the technologies can provide rapid feedback of results for children of all ages and where the

  14. The Parents' Perception of Nursing Support in their Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani F. Magliyah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NICU is an environment that has many challenges in information receiving and understanding. The infants that are cared for might have serious and complex medical problems. For Parents the NICU experience is filled with stress, fear, sadness, guilt and shock of having a sick baby in NICU. The aim of this research was to explore and describe parents' experience when their infant is admitted to the NICU. And assess their perception of nursing support of information provision and according to their emotional feelings. This study was undertaken at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia which is part of National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA organization in the kingdom. The study utilized a self-report questionnaire with likert scale measurement and telephone interview with closed questions. One hundred and four parents agree to be the part of study and provided their consent to include their children in the study. The majority of respondents were mothers (76%, the remaining (24% from the total sample were Fathers. All their infants have been admitted to the NICU at 2014. Many parents did not able to receive enough information easily from the unit; most of them found the information by nurses was difficult to understand. The majority of parent's perceived high stress and anxiety level according to this information. Also, Most Parents was not agreed about the nurses' support towards their emotional feeling and care. Additional finding indicate that a decrease in support level being associated with an increase in stress and anxiety level. In order to provide a high level of support and decrease the level of stress, there is a need for developing support strategies. One strategy is through a technology to develop an automatic daily summary for parent.

  15. Healing presence: Experiences and perceptions of cardiac intensive care patients concerning the nurse presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafipour V

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Presence is an essential aspect of any nursing care situation and is provided by considering the overall needs of the patients and lead to their comfort and health. Heart disease is a stressful experience for many patients that are associated with unwanted fear that can create a lot of needs and tension. Nurse can recognize and solve the caring needs of patients through an effective presence. Therefore, this study was conducted aimed to explain the experiences and perceptions of cardiac intensive care patients concerning the nurse presence.  Materials and Method: This study was conducted with a qualitative, conventional content analysis approach. The participants were 15 cardiac patients which were selected through purposive sampling. Data collection was performed by unstructured interviews. Data collection continued until data saturation. Continuous analysis of data was performed simultaneously with data collection and through a comparative method.  Results: From data analysis three main themes emerged including "Patient's comfort with continuous monitoring of the nurse with the sub-themes (ongoing watch, attention and follow-up the provided care humanistic and responsibly relationship of the nurse with the sub-themes (committed and respectful encounter of nurse, Patience and empathy, and understanding the nurse supporting with the sub-themes (receiving the necessary information and education, and easy access to the nurse.   Conclusion: The real presence of nurses is source of comfort and provides the patients needs. So it is recommended that the clinical nurses and managers with relying on these findings design the caring activities so that the nurses’ presence act as a facilitated factor in recovery process of patients.

  16. Concurrent and prospective relations between attention to emotion and affect intensity: an experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Renee J; Mata, Jutta; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Gotlib, Ian H

    2011-12-01

    Theorists contend that emotional awareness is vital to being able to use emotional information adaptively. The extent to which individuals attend to and value their feelings, or attention to emotion, is a facet of emotional awareness. Little research, however, has examined whether attention to emotion affects the magnitude or intensity of emotional experiences. In the present study we examined the relations between attention to emotion and levels of affect in 53 healthy adults. Participants carried hand-held electronic devices for approximately 7 days and were randomly prompted eight times per day to answer a series of questions. At each prompt, participants reported attention to emotion, current negative affect (NA), and positive affect (PA). All findings presented were computed using multilevel modeling. Replicating findings obtained using trait-level measures, we found that attention to emotion was associated concurrently with higher levels of both NA and PA. We also found prospectively that attention to emotion at one prompt predicted a decrease in levels of NA, but no change in levels of PA, at the subsequent prompt. These findings suggest that emotional processes serve different functions over time and highlight the role of attention to emotion in affect regulation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Systematic investigations on high intense cluster-jet beams for storage ring experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Esperanza; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Taeschner, Alexander; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Bonaventura, Daniel; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A high-density cluster-jet target will be one of two planned internal target stations for the PANDA experiment at the antiproton accelerator and storage ring HESR/FAIR. For the investigation of elementary anti pN interactions hydrogen and deuterium are of highest interest as used target material. Cluster-jet targets allow high and constant target densities at the interaction point, i.e. 2 m behind the nozzle, with the possibility of a continuous variation during operation. At the University of Muenster a cluster-jet target prototype was designed, built up and set succesfully into operation. The system is installed in complete PANDA geometry, so that the observed cluster beam characteristics can be directly transferred to the later situation at PANDA. Recent optical investigations on the cluster beam directly behind the nozzle resulted in the observation of distinct density structures when the target is operated at highest densities. The development and installation of a special nozzle tilting system allows for the extraction of these high-intense core beams, leading to a significant improvement of the target density. The performance and achieved densities of cluster beams are presented.

  18. Demeter/ICE Experiment: Study of low frequency transmitter intensity variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Moldovan, I.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Al-Haddad, E.; Biagi, P. F.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on low frequency (LF) transmitter signal recorded by the 'Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We mainly consider the signal emitted by the Brasov broadcasting station (25.60E, 45.75N) at frequency of about 153 kHz. We analyze the reception conditions of this transmitter several weeks before the occurrence of the Vrancea earthquakes, on October, 27th, 2004. Ground-based observations revealed the presence of sudden decrease of the Y-component of the magnetic field at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), at about 68 km from the epicenter, as reported by Moldovan et al. (Rom. Journ. Phys., Vol. 54, Nos. 1-2, p. 249-261, Bucharest, 2009). In this contribution we attempt to check if the LF Brasov signal was also subject to similar disturbances as observed by the ground-station. We focus on the variation of the LF transmitter intensity levels, several weeks before and after the Vrancea earthquake occurrence. We discuss the physical parameters which may disturb the signal reception in particular the geomagnetic activity and the signal to noise ratios.

  19. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  20. Urban Pollutant Transport and Infiltration into Buildings Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, James C.; Bacak, Asan; Khan, M. Anwar H.; Wright, Matthew D.; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl J.; Shallcross, Dudley E.

    2017-01-01

    People spend the majority of their time indoors and therefore the quality of indoor air is worthy of investigation; indoor air quality is affected by indoor sources of pollutants and from pollutants entering buildings from outdoors. In this study, unique perfluorocarbon tracers were released in five experiments at a 100 m and ~2 km distance from a large university building in Manchester, UK and tracer was also released inside the building to measure the amount of outdoor material penetrating into buildings and the flow of material within the building itself. Air samples of the tracer were taken in several rooms within the building, and a CO2 tracer was used within the building to estimate air-exchange rates. Air-exchange rates were found to vary between 0.57 and 10.90 per hour. Indoor perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were paired to outdoor tracer concentrations, and in-out ratios were found to vary between 0.01 and 3.6. The largest room with the lowest air-exchange rate exhibited elevated tracer concentrations for over 60 min after the release had finished, but generally had the lowest concentrations, the room with the highest ventilation rates had the highest concentration over 30 min, but the peak decayed more rapidly. Tracer concentrations indoors compared to outdoors imply that pollutants remain within buildings after they have cleared outside, which must be considered when evaluating human exposure to outdoor pollutants. PMID:28230812

  1. Urban Pollutant Transport and Infiltration into Buildings Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, James C; Bacak, Asan; Khan, M Anwar H; Wright, Matthew D; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E

    2017-02-21

    People spend the majority of their time indoors and therefore the quality of indoor air is worthy of investigation; indoor air quality is affected by indoor sources of pollutants and from pollutants entering buildings from outdoors. In this study, unique perfluorocarbon tracers were released in five experiments at a 100 m and ~2 km distance from a large university building in Manchester, UK and tracer was also released inside the building to measure the amount of outdoor material penetrating into buildings and the flow of material within the building itself. Air samples of the tracer were taken in several rooms within the building, and a CO₂ tracer was used within the building to estimate air-exchange rates. Air-exchange rates were found to vary between 0.57 and 10.90 per hour. Indoor perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were paired to outdoor tracer concentrations, and in-out ratios were found to vary between 0.01 and 3.6. The largest room with the lowest air-exchange rate exhibited elevated tracer concentrations for over 60 min after the release had finished, but generally had the lowest concentrations, the room with the highest ventilation rates had the highest concentration over 30 min, but the peak decayed more rapidly. Tracer concentrations indoors compared to outdoors imply that pollutants remain within buildings after they have cleared outside, which must be considered when evaluating human exposure to outdoor pollutants.

  2. A Study on sediment sources in a small watershed by using REE tracer method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石辉; 田均良; 刘普灵; 周佩华

    1997-01-01

    In simulation experiments, rare earth element (REE) tracer method was first used to sludy the sources of sediment yield in a small watershed. The experimental results have shown that the chief parts of sediment sources are constantly changing with the development of gullies. The cutting erosion plays a major role in the primary stage of watershed development. Slope erosion intensity increased gradually with gully development of the watershed, while gully erosion intensity decreased. Similar process was also observed in an individual rainfall. The simulation experiments have shown that the method can satisfactorily interpret the origins of sediment yield of a small watershed on an effective way. The simulation experiments have also provided basic information for field researches.

  3. Using neural networks to describe tracer correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Lary

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and methane volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.. In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation coefficient between simulated and training values of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE which has continuously observed CH4  (but not N2O from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  4. Nanoparticle tracers in calcium carbonate porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2014-07-15

    Tracers are perhaps the most direct way of diagnosing subsurface fluid flow pathways for ground water decontamination and for natural gas and oil production. Nanoparticle tracers could be particularly effective because they do not diffuse away from the fractures or channels where flow occurs and thus take much less time to travel between two points. In combination with a chemical tracer they can measure the degree of flow concentration. A prerequisite for tracer applications is that the particles are not retained in the porous media as the result of aggregation or sticking to mineral surfaces. By screening eight nanoparticles (3-100 nm in diameter) for retention when passed through calcium carbonate packed laboratory columns in artificial oil field brine solutions of variable ionic strength we show that the nanoparticles with the least retention are 3 nm in diameter, nearly uncharged, and decorated with highly hydrophilic polymeric ligands. The details of these column experiments and the tri-modal distribution of zeta potential of the calcite sand particles in the brine used in our tests suggests that parts of the calcite surface have positive zeta potential and the retention of negatively charged nanoparticles occurs at these sites. Only neutral nanoparticles are immune to at least some retention. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  5. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  6. An integrated ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system for in-vivo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the system architecture of an integrated Ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USgHIFU) system for image-guided surgery and temperature tracking in vivo. The system is capable of operating with multiple frontends. Current implementation has a SonixRP for imaging and a custom designed dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system (32Tx/32Rx) for imaging/therapy. The highlights of the system include a fully-programmable, multiple data stream capable data processing engine, and an arbitrarily programmable high power array driver that is able to synthesize complex beam patterns in space and time. The data processing engine features a pipeline-style design that can be programmed on-the-fly by re-arranging the pre-verified GPU-accelerated high performance pipeline blocks, which cover an extensive range from basic functions such as filtering to specialized processing like speckle tracking. Furthermore, the pipeline design also has the option of bringing in MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA, US) as part of the processing chain, thus vastly increase the capability of the system. By properly balancing the processing load between GPU-enabled routine and MATLAB script. This allows one to achieve a high degree of flexibility while meeting real-time constraints. Results are presented from in vivo rat experiment. Where low dose of therapeutic ultrasound was delivered into the hind limb of the Copenhagen rats using DMUA and temperature was tracked using a linear probe (HST, Ultrasonix). The data is processed in realtime with MATLAB in the loop to perform temperature regularization. Results show that we can reliably track the low temperature heating in the presence of motion artifacts (respiration and pulsation).

  7. Eutrophication and algal blooms in channel type reservoirs: A novel enclosure experiment by changing light intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjin Cao; Binghui Zheng; Zhenlou Chen; Minsheng Huang; Jialei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    To explore eutrophication and algal bloom mechanisms in channel type reservoirs,a novel enclosure experiment was conducted by changing light intensity (LI) in the Daning River of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR).Square enclosures (side 5.0 m) were covered on the surface with shading materials of different thickness,and with their bases open to the river.Changes and characteristics of the main eutrophication factors under the same water quality and hydrodynamic conditions but different LI were evaluated.All experimental water samples were neutral and alkalescent,with high nitrogen and phosphate concentrations,low potassium permanganate index,stable water quality,and different LI.At the same water depth,LI decreased with increasing shade material,while dissolved oxygen and water temperature were both stable.The growth peak of phytoplankton was with light of 345-4390 lux underwater or 558-7450lux above the water surface,and water temperature of 25.6-26.5℃.Algae were observed in all water samples,accounting for 6 phylum and 57 species,with algal density changing frequently.The results showed that significantly strong or weak light was unfavorable for phytoplankton growth and the function together with suitable temperature and LI and ample sunshine encouraged algal blooms under the same water quality and hydrodynamic conditions.Correlation analysis indicated that algae reduced gradually lengthwise along water depth in the same enclosure while pH became high.The power exponent relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl-a) and LI was found by curve fitting,that is Chi-a =K(LI)n.

  8. Taking care of the newborn dying and their families: Nurses' experiences of neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fabiane de Amorim; Moraes, Mariana Salim de; Cunha, Mariana Lucas da Rocha

    2016-06-01

    To understand the experiences of nurses when caring for dying newborns and their families in the NICU; and redeem their perceptions about acting before the death and grieving process. A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed with nine nurses at the ICU of a hospital in São Paulo (SP), Brazil. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD). Caring for newborns who are dying and their families is very difficult for nurses, due to the intense involvement. They seek strategies to deal with the situation and, before the newborn's death, despite the suffering, express the feeling of accomplishment. Facing death and grief triggers mechanisms that emerge life references, coming across painful issues. Learning to deal with these questions is a daily challenge for nurses of the NICU. Compreender as experiências vivenciadas por enfermeiros ao cuidar de neonatos que estão morrendo e seus familiares na UTIN; e resgatar as suas percepções sobre a atuação diante do processo de morte e luto. Estudo descritivo exploratório, de abordagem qualitativa, desenvolvido com nove enfermeiras da UTIN de um hospital de São Paulo (SP), Brasil. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista semi-estruturada e analisados pela técnica do Discurso de Sujeito Coletivo (DSC). Cuidar de neonatos que estão morrendo e suas famílias é muito difícil para as enfermeiras, devido ao intenso envolvimento. Buscam estratégias para lidar com a situação e, diante do óbito do neonato, apesar do sofrimento, manifestam o sentimento de dever cumprido. Enfrentar a morte e o luto aciona mecanismos que afloram referências de vida, deparando-se com questões dolorosas. Aprender a lidar com essas questões é um desafio diário para os enfermeiros de UTIN.

  9. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care : Development and validation of a European questionnaire (euroQ2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T.; Koopmans, Matty; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Curtis, Jared Randall; Ording, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Materials and methods: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature a

  10. The Effect of Previous Co-Worker Experience on the Survival of Knowledge Intensive Start-Ups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the effect of previous co-worker experience on the survival of knowledge intensive start-ups. For the empirical analysis I use the Danish Integrated Database of Labor Market Research (IDA). This longitudinal employer-employee database allows me to identify co...

  11. Characterization of an alluvial aquifer with thermal tracer tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In the summer of 2015, a series of thermal tracer tests was performed at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland. At this site numerous hydraulic, tracer, geophysical and hydrogeophysical field tests have been conducted in the past to investigate a shallow alluvial aquifer. The goals of the campaign in 2015 were to design a cost-effective thermal tracer tomography setup and to validate the concept of travel time-based thermal tracer tomography under field conditions. Thermal tracer tomography uses repeated thermal tracer injections with different injection depths and distributed temperature measurements to map the hydraulic conductivity distribution of a heterogeneous aquifer. The tracer application was designed with minimal experimental time and cost. Water was heated in inflatable swimming pools using direct sunlight of the warm summer days, and it was injected as low temperature pulses in a well. Because of the small amount of injected heat, no long recovery times were required between the repeated heat tracer injections and every test started from natural thermal conditions. At Widen, four thermal tracer tests were performed during a period of three days. Temperatures were measured in one downgradient well using a distributed temperature measurement system installed at seven depth points. Totally 12 temperature breakthrough curves were collected. Travel time based tomographic inversion assumes that thermal transport is dominated by advection and the travel time of the thermal tracer can be related to the hydraulic conductivities of the aquifer. This assumption is valid in many shallow porous aquifers where the groundwater flow is fast. In our application, the travel time problem was treated by a tomographic solver, analogous to seismic tomography, to derive the hydraulic conductivity distribution. At the test site, a two-dimensional cross-well hydraulic conductivity profile was reconstructed with the travel time based inversion. The reconstructed profile

  12. Multiple Tracer Tests in Porous Media During Clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, A.; Banning, A.; Siegmund, J.; Freye, S.; Goekpinar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Transport processes are known to be governed by the physical and chemical heterogeneity of the subsurface. Clogging processes can alter this heterogeneity as function of time and thus can modify transport. To understand transport under clogging conditions and to unravel the potential of multiple tracer tests to characterize such transport process we perform column and sandbox experiments. Our recently developed column and sandbox experiments are used to perform multiple tracer tests during clogging. In a first set of experiments, a cubic cell of 0.1 m x 0.1 m x 0.1 m is used to experimentally estimate flow and transport characteristics of an unconsolidated sediment through Darcy and tracer experiments. The water streaming through the experiment is amended with ammonium sulfate permanently. Salt tracers are added to the streaming water repeatedly, to be detected at micro electrodes at the inflow and the outflow of the cubic cell. Through repeated syringe injections of a barium chloride solution into the center of the cubic cell clogging processes are forced to occur around the mixing zone of the injected and streaming water by precipitation of barium sulfate. In a second set of experiments, a sandbox model including a sediment body of 0.3 m x 0.3 m x 0.1 m is used. Tracer, streaming, and injection water chemistry is kept similar to the cubic cell experiments. However, tracer breakthrough is now detected at nine positions within the experiment and at the inflow and the outflow of the sandbox model. Injection of barium chloride solution is now at two locations around the center of the sandbox model. Flow and transport characteristics of the sediment body are estimated based on Darcy and tracer experiments, which are performed repeatedly. Combined analysis of local and ensemble breakthrough curves and integrated numerical modeling will be used to understand effective and local flow and transport in a in a porous medium during clogging.

  13. Intensity distribution of the parhelic circle and embedded parhelia at low solar elevations: theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Borchardt, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We describe the intensity distribution of the parhelic circle for plate-oriented hexagonal ice crystals at very low solar elevations using geometrical optics. An experimental as well as theoretical study of in-plane ray-paths provides details on the mechanism for several halos, including the parhelia, the $120^{\\circ}$ parhelia, the blue spot and the Liljequist parhelia. Azimuthal coordinates for associated characteristic features in the intensity distribution are compared to data obtained using a rotating hexagonal glass prism.

  14. Intensive care unit admission of obstetric cases: a single centre experience with contemporary update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Vivian K S; Lo, T K; Tsang, H H; Lau, W L; Leung, W C

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVES. To review the characteristics of a series of obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in a regional hospital in 2006-2010, to compare them with those of a similar series reported from the same hospital in 1989-1995 and a series reported from another regional hospital in 1998-2007. DESIGN. Retrospective case series. SETTING. A regional hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Obstetric patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Kwong Wah Hospital from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2010. RESULTS. From 2006 to 2010, there were 67 such patients admitted to the intensive care unit (0.23% of total maternities and 2.34% of total intensive care unit admission), which was a higher incidence than reported in two other local studies. As in the latter studies, the majority were admitted postpartum (n=65, 97%), with postpartum haemorrhage (n=39, 58%) being the commonest cause followed by pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (n=17, 25%). In the current study, significantly more patients had had elective caesarean sections for placenta praevia but fewer had had a hysterectomy. The duration of intensive care unit stay was shorter (mean, 1.8 days) with fewer invasive procedures performed than in the two previous studies, but maternal and neonatal mortality was similar (3% and 6%, respectively). CONCLUSION. Postpartum haemorrhage and pregnancy-induced hypertension were still the most common reasons for intensive care unit admission. There was an increasing trend of intensive care unit admissions following elective caesarean section for placenta praevia and for early aggressive intervention of pre-eclampsia. Maternal mortality remained low but had not decreased. The intensive care unit admission rate by itself might not be a helpful indicator of obstetric performance.

  15. Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

  16. Beam-Induced Effects and Radiological Issues in High-Intensity High-Energy Fixed Target Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Drozhdin, A I; Pronskikh, V S; Reitzner, D; Tropin, I S; Vaziri, K

    2014-01-01

    The next generation of accelerators for Megawatt proton and heavy-ion beams moves us into a completely new domain of extreme specific energies of up to 0.1 MJ/g (Megajoule/gram) and specific power up to 1 TW/g (Terawatt/gram) in beam interactions with matter. This paper is focused on deleterious effects of controlled and uncontrolled impacts of high-intensity beams on components of beam-lines, target stations, beam absorbers, shielding and environment. Two new experiments at Fermilab are taken as an example. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will explore the interactions and transformations of the world's highest-intensity neutrino beam by sending it from Fermilab more than 1,000 kilometers through the Earth's mantle to a large liquid argon detector. The Mu2e experiment is devoted to studies of the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos.

  17. A monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution for research on plant physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzui, N.; Kawachi, N.; Ishioka, N.; Fujimaki, S. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The mechanism of nutrient uptake in plants has received considerable attention in the field of plant science. Here we describe the development of a new monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution, which enables the noninvasive measurement of radioactive tracer uptake by an intact plant. In addition, we incorporated a weighing instrument into this system in order to simultaneously monitor water uptake by the same plant. For an evaluation of this monitoring system, we conducted a tracer experiment with a rice plant and a positron-emitting radioactive tracer, and successfully obtained continuous data for the amounts of radioactive tracer and water taken up by the intact plant over 36 h. (authors)

  18. [Metabolism, intensity of lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant defense system in humans during chamber experiments with long-term isolation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, A A; Stroganova, L B; Vostrikova, L V; Balashov, O I; Nichiporuk, I A

    1997-01-01

    Blood biochemical parameters of lipid, protein, carbohydrate and energy metabolism were measured in a 135-day chamber experiment. Also, dynamics of the intensity of lipid peroxidation and status of the antioxidant defence system were evaluated. Results of the investigation showed that extended chamber isolation led to modifications of several biochemical parameters including hemoglobin, bilirubin, cholesterol and its fractions, elevated transaminase activity which are typical for long-term space mission. However, these were not accompanied by substantive changes in protein, energy and carbohydrate metabolisms, or intensity of free radical processes. Effects of prolonged stay in chamber was successfully counterbalanced by organism.

  19. Nutritional importance of benthic bacteria for deep-sea nematodes from the Arctic ice margin: results of an isotope tracer experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guilini, K.; Van Oevelen, D.J.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Middelburg, J.J.; Vanreusel, A.

    2010-01-01

    A stable isotope (13C)-labeling experiment was performed to quantify the importance of bacterial carbon as a food source for an Arctic deep-sea nematode community. Bacterial functional groups were isotopically enriched with 13C-glucose, 13C-acetate, 13C-bicarbonate, and 13C-amino acids injected into

  20. Family members' experiences of being cared for by nurses and physicians in Norwegian intensive care units: a phenomenological hermeneutical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frivold, Gro; Dale, Bjørg; Slettebø, Åshild

    2015-08-01

    When patients are admitted to intensive care units, families are affected. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being taken care of by nurses and physicians for relatives in Norwegian intensive care units. Thirteen relatives of critically ill patients treated in intensive care units in southern Norway were interviewed in autumn 2013. Interview data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method inspired by the philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes emerged: being in a receiving role and being in a participating role. The receiving role implies experiences of informational and supportive care from nurses and physicians. The participating role implies relatives' experiences of feeling included and being able to participate in caring activities and decision-making processes. The meaning of being a relative in ICU is experienced as being in a receiving role, and at the same time as being in a participating role. Quality in relations is described as crucial when relatives share their experiences of care by nurses and physicians in the ICU. Those who experienced informational and supportive care, and who had the ability to participate, expressed feelings of gratitude and confidence in the healthcare system. In contrast, those who did not experience such care, especially in terms of informational care expressed feelings of frustration, confusion and loss of confidence. However, patient treatment and care outweighed relatives' own feelings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lived experiences of parents of premature babies in the intensive care unit in a private hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Steyn

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many of the 15 million premature babies born worldwide every year survive because of advanced medical interventions. Their parents have intense experiences when their babies are in the intensive care unit (ICU, and these have an impact on their thoughts, feelings and relationships, including their relationships with their premature babies. Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore and describe the lived experiences of parents of premature babies in an ICU. Method: Research design was qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual. A purposive sample of parents with premature babies in an ICU in a private hospital in Johannesburg Gauteng in South Africa was used. Eight parents, four mothers and four fathers, married and either Afrikaans or English-speaking, were included in the study. Data were collected by conducting in-depth phenomenological interviews with them and making use of field notes. Trustworthiness was ensured by implementing the strategies of credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. Ethical principles such as autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice were adhered to throughout the research process. Results: Thematic analyses were utilised to analyse the data. Two themes in the experiences of parents with premature babies in ICU became apparent. Parents experienced thoughts, emotions and hope while their premature babies were in the ICU as well as challenges in their relationships and these challenges influenced their experiences. Recommendations: Mindfulness of intensive care nurses should be facilitated so that intensive care nurses can promote the mental health of parents with premature babies in the ICU. Conclusion: Parents with premature babies in the ICU have thoughts and emotional experiences which include hope and they affect parents’ relationships.

  2. Tracer Diffusion Mechanism in Amorphous Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Hung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracer diffusion in amorphous solid is studied by mean of nB-bubble statistic. The nB-bubble is defined as a group of atoms around a spherical void and large bubble that represents a structural defect which could be eliminated under thermal annealing. It was found that amorphous alloys such as CoxB100−x (x=90, 81.5 and 70 and Fe80P20 suffer from a large number of vacancy bubbles which function like diffusion vehicle. The concentration of vacancy bubble weakly depends on temperature, but essentially on the relaxation degree of considered sample. The diffusion coefficient estimated for proposed mechanism via vacancy bubbles is in a reasonable agreement with experiment for actual amorphous alloys. The relaxation effect for tracer diffusion in amorphous alloys is interpreted by the elimination of vacancy bubbles under thermal annealing.

  3. Proceedings of the atmospheric tracers and tracer application workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, S.; Gedayloo, T. (comps.)

    1979-12-01

    In addition to presentations by participating members a general discussion was held in order to summarize and outline the goals and objectives of the workshop. A number of new low level background tracers such as heavy methanes, perfluorocarbons, multiply labeled isotopes such as /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/, helium 3, in addition to sample collection techniques and analytical methods for various tracers were discussed. This report is a summary of discussions and papers presented at this workshop.

  4. Laboratory Testing of Magnetic Tracers for Soil Erosion Measurement*1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-Qing; DONG Yuan-Jie; WANG Hui; QIU Xian-Kui; WANG Yan-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Soil erosion, which includes soil detachment, transport, and deposition, is one of the important dynamic land surface processes. The magnetic tracer method is a useful method for studying soil erosion processes. In this study, five types of magnetic tracers were made with fine soil, fly ash, cement, bentonite, and magnetic powder (reduced iron powder) using the method of disk granulation. The tracers were uniformly mixed with soil and tested in the laboratory using simulated rainfall and inflow experiments to simulate the interrill and rill components of soil erosion, in order to select one or more tracers which could be used to study detachment and deposition by the erosive forces of raindrops and surface flow of water on a slope. The results showed that the five types of magnetic tracers with high magnetic susceptibility and a wide range of sizes had a range of 0.99-1.29 gcm-s in bulk density. In the interrill and rill experiments, the tracers FC1 and FC2 which consisted of fly ash and cement at ratios of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, were transported in phase with soil particles since the magnetic susceptibility of sediment approximated that of the soil which was uneroded and the slopes of the regression equations between the detachment of sediment and magnetic tracers FC1 and FC2 were very close to the expected value of 20, which was the original soil/tracer ratio. The detachment and deposition on slopes could be accurately reflected by the magnetic susceptibility differences. The change in magnetic susceptibility depended on whether deposition or detachment occurred. However, the tracer FS which consisted of fine soil and the tracers FB1 and FB2 which consisted of fly ash and bentonite at ratios of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, were all unsuitable for soil erosion study since there was no consistent relationship between sediment and tracer detachment for increasing amounts of runoff. Therefore, the tracers FC1 and FC2 could be used to study soil erosion by water.

  5. Saying It "More Intensely": Using Sensory Experience To Teach Poetry Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Suggests the best way to help high school students write poetry is to bring them to memories that would stimulate the expression of everything more intensely. Describes four workshops that appeal to the senses: scent writing, taste writing, music writing, and sight writing. (RS)

  6. Reverse Transfer: Experiences of International Chinese Students in Intensive English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of international Chinese undergraduate students enrolled in United States.colleges and universities in the past few years. Many began their journey in an intensive English program of a four-year university due to lack of English proficiency. Instead of continuing their study at the same institution, a considerable number of…

  7. Experience from multidisciplinary follow-up on critically ill patients treated in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Rosendahl-Nielsen, Mette

    2015-05-01

    International literature describes that former intensive care unit (ICU) patients suffer considerable physical and neuropsychological complications. Systematic data on Danish ICU survivors are scarce as standardised follow-up after intensive care has yet to be described. This article describes and evaluates the knowledge gained from outpatient follow-up at a tertiary intensive care unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, during a three-year period. A total of 101 adult former ICU patients attended the outpatient clinic over a three-year period. Patients included were medical and surgical patients with a length of stay exceeding four days. Patients attended the clinic after discharge from hospital and for a minimum of two months from their discharge from the ICU. The patients were assessed for physical, neuropsychological and psychological problems and, if necessary, further treatment or rehabilitation was initiated. Reduced physical ability was seen in 82%. A total of 89% suffered a substantial weight loss. 83.2% had signs indicating acute brain dysfunction during the ICU stay, and approximately half of the patients still had cognitive problems. A total of 66 interventions were initiated. Our data confirmed that a large proportion of ICU survivors suffer considerable long-term physical and neuropsychological sequelae. Intensive care follow-up may contribute to address these specific problems and to initiate the needed interventions. Research is needed to determine whether specialised rehabilitation is required. not relevant. not relevant.

  8. An Intensive Programme on Education for Sustainable Development: The Participants' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the framework of an intensive programme (IP) organised by UNESCO and addressed to young graduate professionals to prepare them for a career in fields related to sustainability. The aims of the IP were to address participants' environmental awareness and to develop attitudes and skills related to environmental planning and…

  9. An Intensive Programme on Education for Sustainable Development: The Participants' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the framework of an intensive programme (IP) organised by UNESCO and addressed to young graduate professionals to prepare them for a career in fields related to sustainability. The aims of the IP were to address participants' environmental awareness and to develop attitudes and skills related to environmental planning and…

  10. Empowerment of Parents in the Intensive Care: A journey discovering parental experiences and satisfaction with care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Latour (Jos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis – the EMPATHIC studies – was to develop and implement validated parent satisfaction questionnaires for pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. Part I presents the general introduction, which justifies the construction, validation, and utilization of parent sat

  11. Strengthening Collaborative Capacity: Experiences from a Short, Intensive Field Course on Ecosystems, Health and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Margot W.; Saint-Charles, Johanne; Cole, Donald C.; Gislason, Maya; Hicks, Elisabeth; Le Bourdais, Courtney; McKellar, Kaileah A.; St-Cyr Bouchard, Maude

    2017-01-01

    A key capacity for engagement in the emerging field of ecohealth is the ability to work collaboratively. Between 2008 and 2010, the Canadian Community of Practice in Ecosystem Approaches to Health collectively designed and delivered three foundational, intensive, field courses. This paper presents findings derived from both quantitative and…

  12. Effects of an Intensive Disability-Focused Training Experience on University Faculty Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Seely, John R.; Gerdes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates the short-term effects of a disability-focused training on the disability-related self-efficacy of university faculty. Three consecutive cohorts of faculty (N = 102) participated in an intensive four-day training institute focused on understanding and supporting university students with disabilities. Self-efficacy for…

  13. Dependence of the muon intensity on the atmospheric temperature measured by the GRAPES-3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunbabu, K. P.; Ahmad, S.; Chandra, A.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Hariharan, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Jhansi, V. B.; Kawakami, S.; Kojima, H.; Mohanty, P. K.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Reddy, L. V.; Shibata, S.; Tanaka, K.; Zuberi, M.

    2017-09-01

    The large area (560 m2) GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope has been operating uninterruptedly at Ooty, India since 2001. Every day, it records 4 × 109 muons of ≥1 GeV with an angular resolution of ∼4°. The variation of atmospheric temperature affects the rate of decay of muons produced by the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), which in turn modulates the muon intensity. By analyzing the GRAPES-3 data of six years (2005-2010), a small (amplitude ∼0.2%) seasonal variation (1 year (Yr) period) in the intensity of muons could be measured. The effective temperature 'Teff' of the upper atmosphere also displays a periodic variation with an amplitude of ∼1 K which was responsible for the observed seasonal variation in the muon intensity. At GeV energies, the muons detected by the GRAPES-3 are expected to be anti-correlated with Teff. The anti-correlation between the seasonal variation of Teff, and the muon intensity was used to measure the temperature coefficient αT by fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique. The magnitude of αT was found to scale with the assumed attenuation length 'λ' of the hadrons in the range λ = 80-180 g cm-2. However, the magnitude of the correction in the muon intensity was found to be almost independent of the value of λ used. For λ = 120 g cm-2 the value of temperature coefficient αT was found to be (- 0.17 ± 0.02)% K-1.

  14. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  15. Intensity ramp-up: 2011 experience - Limitations, mitigation, risks, strategy, pushing it in 2012, 1380 in 3 weeks?

    CERN Document Server

    Zerlauth, M; Wenninger, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper will discuss the experience with ramping up the beam intensities in the early days of the 2011 run and after the subsequent technical stops. Weak points and limitations are being identified and their possible mitigations evaluated. In view of the risks and drawbacks of a too aggressive approach, possible improvements of the applied strategy whilst maintaining the required validation points for the various equipment and machine protection systems (MPS) are being discussed.

  16. Compartmental modeling and tracer kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David H

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with mathematical aspects of compartmental an­ alysis. In particular, linear models are closely analyzed since they are fully justifiable as an investigative tool in tracer experiments. The objective of the monograph is to bring the reader up to date on some of the current mathematical prob­ lems of interest in compartmental analysis. This is accomplished by reviewing mathematical developments in the literature, especially over the last 10-15 years, and by presenting some new thoughts and directions for future mathematical research. These notes started as a series of lectures that I gave while visiting with the Division of Applied ~1athematics, Brown University, 1979, and have developed in­ to this collection of articles aimed at the reader with a beginning graduate level background in mathematics. The text can be used as a self-paced reading course. With this in mind, exercises have been appropriately placed throughout the notes. As an aid in reading the material, the e~d of a ...

  17. Randomization techniques for the intensity modulation-based quantum stream cipher and progress of experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Hirota, Osamu

    2011-08-01

    The quantum noise based direct encryption protocol Y-OO is expected to provide physical complexity based security, which is thought to be comparable to information theoretic security in mathematical cryptography, for the. physical layer of fiber-optic communication systems. So far, several randomization techniques for the quantum stream cipher by Y-OO protocol have been proposed, but most of them were developed under the assumption that phase shift keying is used as the modulation format. On the other hand, the recent progress in the experimental study on the intensity modulation based quantum stream cipher by Y-OO protocol raises expectations for its realization. The purpose of this paper is to present design and implementation methods of a composite model of the intensity modulation based quantum stream cipher with some randomization techniques. As a result this paper gives a viewpoint of how the Y-OO cryptosystem is miniaturized.

  18. Safe intravenous administration in pediatrics: A 5-year Pediatric Intensive Care Unit experience with smart pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Rodríguez, S; Sánchez-Galindo, A C; Fernández-Llamazares, C M; Calvo-Calvo, M M; Carrillo-Álvarez, Á; Sanjurjo-Sáez, M

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the impact of smart pump implementation in a pediatric intensive care unit in terms of number and type of administration errors intercepted. Observational, prospective study carried out from January 2010 to March 2015 with syringe and great volumen infusion pumps available in the hospital. A tertiary level hospital pediatric intensive care unit. Infusions delivered with infusion pumps in all pediatric intensive care unit patients. Design of a drug library with safety limits for all intravenous drugs prescribed. Users' compliance with drug library as well as number and type of errors prevented were analyzed. Two hundred and eighty-three errors were intercepted during 62 months of study. A high risk drug was involved in 58% of prevented errors, such as adrenergic agonists and antagonists, sedatives, analgesics, neuromuscular blockers, opioids, potassium and insulin. Users' average compliance with the safety software was 84%. Smart pumps implementation has proven effective in intercepting high risk drugs programming errors. These results might be exportable to other critical care units, involving pediatric or adult patients. Interdisciplinary colaboration is key to succeed in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Driven tracers in narrow channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cividini, J.; Mukamel, D.; Posch, H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Steady-state properties of a driven tracer moving in a narrow two-dimensional (2D) channel of quiescent medium are studied. The tracer drives the system out of equilibrium, perturbs the density and pressure fields, and gives the bath particles a nonzero average velocity, creating a current in the channel. Three models in which the confining effect of the channel is probed are analyzed and compared in this study: the first is the simple symmetric exclusion process (SSEP), for which the stationary density profile and the pressure on the walls in the frame of the tracer are computed. We show that the tracer acts like a dipolar source in an average velocity field. The spatial structure of this 2D strip is then simplified to a one-dimensional (1D) SSEP, in which exchanges of position between the tracer and the bath particles are allowed. Using a combination of mean-field theory and exact solution in the limit where no exchange is allowed gives good predictions of the velocity of the tracer and the density field. Finally, we show that results obtained for the 1D SSEP with exchanges also apply to a gas of overdamped hard disks in a narrow channel. The correspondence between the parameters of the SSEP and of the gas of hard disks is systematic and follows from simple intuitive arguments. Our analytical results are checked numerically.

  20. Uptake of algal carbon and the synthesis of an "essential" fatty acid by Uvigerina ex. gr. semiornata (Foraminifera within the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone: evidence from fatty acid biomarker and 13C tracer experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Larkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera are an important component of benthic communities in oxygen depleted settings, where they potentially play a~significant role in the processing of organic matter. We tracked the uptake of a 13C-labeled algal food source into individual fatty acids in the benthic foraminiferal species, Uvigerina ex. gr. semiornata, from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. The tracer experiments were conducted on the Pakistan Margin during the late/post monsoon period (August–October 2003. A monoculture of the diatom Thalassiosira weisflogii was 13C-labeled and used to simulate a pulse of phytoplankton in two complementary experiments. A lander system was used for in situ incubations at 140 m and for 2.5 days duration, whilst a laboratory incubation used an oxystat system to maintain ambient dissolved oxygen concentrations. These shipboard experiments were terminated after 5 days. Uptake of diatoms was rapid, with high incorporation of diatom fatty acids into foraminifera after ~2 days in both experiments. Ingestion of the diatom food source was indicated by the increase over time in the quantity of diatom biomarker fatty acids in the foraminifera and by the high percentage of 13C in many of the fatty acids present at the endpoint of both in~situ and laboratory-based experiments. These results indicate that U. ex. gr. semiornata rapidly ingested the diatom food source and that this foraminifera will play an important role in the short-term cycling of organic matter within this OMZ environment. The experiments also suggested that U. ex. gr. semiornata consumed non-labeled bacterial food items, particularly bacteria, and synthesised the polyunsaturated fatty acid 20:4(n-6 de novo. 20:4(n-6 is often abundant in benthic fauna yet its origins and function have remained unclear. This study demonstrates that U. ex. gr. semiornata is capable of de novo synthesis of this "essential fatty acid" and is potentially a major source of this dietary nutrient

  1. In Our Intensive Care Unit the Experience of the Checklist Use to Prevent Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semiha Solak Grassie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intensive care units are high risk units for serious infections like ventilator associated pneumonia. Preventing ventilator associated pneumonia is one of the most important infection control practice in intensive care units. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effect of the ventilator associated pneumonia prevention checklist use in decreasing ventilator associated pneumonia rates. Material and Method: This study was performed in the intensive care units at Yenimahalle Training and Research Hospital between January 2013 and September 2013. In the first 3 months, the routine infection control measurements were used. At the end of this term a lecture about using the checklist was given to the nurses. At the second 3 months period, the checklist was filled by each patient’s nurse. At the last 3 months period there was no checklist use. The ventilator associated pneumonia rates were registered in all these terms. After and before the intervention term tests about ventilator associated pneumonia prevention with 20 questions were given to the nurses. Results: Between January to March 2013, at the first 3 months, ventilator associated pneumonia rate was 38.2%; at the second term, it was 7.4%; at the third term, it was 3.8%. At the front test, the nurses got 84.5 point success rate and at the last test, the rate was 92.6. The success rate differences between these two tests were statistically significant with the Wilcoxon test (z-3.4, p=0.001. Conclusion: At the end of this study, despite any changes in the other routine and patient population, it was seen that there were obvious decrease in the ventilator associated pneumonia rates during the intervention term and the term after the intervention. Also the checklist use increased the nurses’ knowledge level about the ventilator associated pneumonia prevention and hand hygiene adherence rate.

  2. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  3. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, C. J., E-mail: c.price10@imperial.ac.uk; Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Donnelly, T. D. [Department of Physics, Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California 91711 (United States); Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T. [Radiation Physics, AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  4. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  5. MULTISPECIES REACTIVE TRACER TEST IN A SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS: PART 2: TRANSPORT OF CHROMIUM (VI) AND LEAD-, COPPER-, AND ZINC-EDTA TRACERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report discusses the transport of a group of reactive tracers over the course of a large-scale, natural gradient tracer test conducted at the USGS Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Research site, near Falmouth, Massachusetts. The overall objectives of the experiment were ...

  6. Tracer Diffusion in a Soft Glassy Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Laure; Barentin, Catherine; Colombani, Jean; Ybert, Christophe; Barrat, Jean-Louis; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2008-07-01

    We have carried out Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching measurements of the diffusion of tracers of various sizes in a colloidal glass (a Laponite suspension). We have shown that the diffusion is only dependent on the ratio of the tracer size and the distance between Laponite disks. This suggests that the tracer diffusion hindrance in the glass stems from the hydrodynamical interactions between the tracer and the Laponite network, the physico-chemical Laponite-tracer interaction playing a negligible role.

  7. Impact of Clinical Pharmacist on the Pediatric Intensive Care Practice: An 11-Year Tertiary Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sandeep; Crabtree, Heidi M; Fryer, Karen R; Graner, Kevin K; Arteaga, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    With increasing complexity of critical care medicine comes an increasing need for multidisciplinary involvement in care. In many institutions, pharmacists are an integral part of this team, but long-term data on the interventions performed by pharmacists and their effects on patient care and outcomes are limited. We aimed to describe the role of pediatric clinical pharmacists in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) practice. We retrospectively reviewed the records of pharmacy interventions in the PICU at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 2003-2013, with a distinct period of increased pharmacist presence in the PICU from 2008 onward. We compared demographic and outcome data on patients who did and who did not have pharmacy interventions during 2 periods (2003-2007 and 2008-2013). We identified 27,773 total interventions by pharmacists during the 11-year period, of which 79.8% were accepted by the clinical team. These interventions were made on 10,963 unique PICU admissions and prevented 5867 order entry errors. Pharmacists' interventions increased year over year, including a significant change in 2008. Patients who required pharmacy involvement were younger, sicker, and had longer intensive care unit, hospital, and ventilator duration. Average central line infections and central line entry rates decreased significantly over the study period. Increased pharmacist presence in the PICU is associated with increased interventions and prevention of adverse drug events. Pharmacist participation during rounds and order entry substantially improved the care of critically sick children and should be encouraged.

  8. Environment tracers application to groundwater circulation assessment in an alluvial aquifer in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappa, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Maurizio; Vitale, Stefania

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability assessment is an important tool in order to plan any groundwater protection strategy. The aim of this study is to experiment a specific approach to give a conceptual model about groundwater circulation characterization. This approach has been applied to a suspected contaminated site in a large alluvial plan, made of sediments coming from weathered volcanic rocks, laying on marine sediments, where more than thirty years ago had been built a very important urban waste solid landfill. In referring to this case history it has been pointed out the importance of natural chemical interaction between ground water and rock mass, especially when pyroclastic origin sediments are involved. The landfill had been isolated from the surrounding environment, especially to protect aquifers, by a waterproof diaphragm This land is characterised by intensive agricultural and industrial activities (oil refineries, medical waste incinerators, concrete production, tar factory). The study will highlight the importance of environmental tracers which provide information about the flow and mixing processes of water coming from different sources. They are also useful to point out directions of groundwater flow and to determine origin Environmental tracers are natural chemical and isotopic substances that can be measured in groundwater and used to understand hydrologic properties of aquifers. They may be input into the hydrological system from the atmosphere at recharge and/or are added/lost/exchanged inherently as waters flow over and through materials. Variations in their chemical abundances and isotopic compositions can be used as tracers to determine sources (provenance), pathways (of reaction or interaction) and also timescales (dating) of environmental processes. In combination with these, the basic idea is to use. In this case enviromental tracers have been integrated by temperature and electric conductivity logs, to better investigate different levels of faster

  9. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  10. [Resistance of hospital flora to imipenem. Experience in two intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon-Poupinel, V; Le Coutour, X; Vergnaud, M; Malbruny, B

    1991-10-19

    Imipenem is a beta-lactam antibiotic active against most Gram-negative bacilli. Between July 1, 1987 and September 30, 1989 (9 semesters), the activity of imipenem against 6 micro-organisms was tested in two intensive care units attached to the university hospital of Caen (Normandy). During the same period, the consumption of imipenem was evaluated from the number of vials drawn by each of these two units from the central pharmacy. Imipenem was found to be 100 percent effective against 5 of the 6 micro-organisms tested, but transient falls in sensitivity and an increase in imipenem consumption were observed when Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the pathogen. The most probable cause of these transient decreases of imipenem activity against Ps. aeruginosa was the existence of a resistant strain which showed a protein abnormality in its outer membrane by temporary selection pressure.

  11. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  12. Calibration of a neutron time-of-flight multidetector system for an intensity interferometry experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghetti, R; Colonna, N; Helgesson, J; Avdeichikov, [No Value; Golubev, P; Jakobsson, B; Tagliente, G; Brandenburg, S; Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Kopecky, S; Anderson, EW; Nadel-Turonski, P; Westerberg, L; Bellini, [No Value; Sperduto, ML; Sutera, C

    2004-01-01

    We present the details of an experiment on light particle interferometry. In particular, we focus on a time-of-flight technique which uses a cyclotron RF signal as a start and a liquid scintillator time signal as a stop, to measure neutron energy in the range of En approximate to 1.8-150 MeV. This d

  13. Results of the experience with the use of varenicline in daily practice using intensive monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, I.; Harmark, L.; Van Puijenbroek, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although a concise overview of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) of varenicline is known, little is known about the time related information about ADRs of varenicline such as for example latencies. Objectives: To gain insight in the experience and safety of varenicline in daily practice as r

  14. Intensity and Passion: On Musical Experience, Layers of Meaning, and Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkøy, Øivind; Westby, Inger Anne

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors link the discussion of differing musical experiences to Frede V. Nielsen's exploration of music as a multifarious universe of meaning, which, in encounter with the listener's receptive consciousness, presents different layers of musical meaning. The focal point of the article is that which Nielsen refers to…

  15. Gaseous mercury fluxes from forest soils in response to forest harvesting intensity: A field manipulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Mazur; C.P.J. Mitchell; C.S. Eckley; S.L. Eggert; R.K. Kolka; S.D. Sebestyen; E.B. Swain

    2014-01-01

    Forest harvesting leads to changes in soil moisture, temperature and incident solar radiation, all strong environmental drivers of soil-air mercury (Hg) fluxes. Whether different forest harvesting practices significantly alter Hg fluxes from forest soils is unknown.We conducted a field-scale experiment in a northern Minnesota deciduous forest wherein gaseous Hg...

  16. Improving throughput and user experience for information intensive websites by applying HTTP compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Ratnakar

    2008-11-06

    HTTP compression is a technique specified as part of the W3C HTTP 1.0 standard. It allows HTTP servers to take advantage of GZIP compression technology that is built into latest browsers. A brief survey of medical informatics websites show that compression is not enabled. With compression enabled, downloaded files sizes are reduced by more than 50% and typical transaction time is also reduced from 20 to 8 minutes, thus providing a better user experience.

  17. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  18. The Brain on Art: Intense Aesthetic Experience Activates the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A Vessel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different subnetworks. Activity increased linearly with observers’ ratings (4-level scale in sensory (occipito-temporal regions. Activity in the striatum also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (4 ratings and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the default mode network previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance.

  19. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1990-12-31

    Ground water tracers are solutes dissolved in or carried by ground water to delineate flow pathways. Tracers provide information on direction and speed of water movement and that of contaminants that might be conveyed by the water. Tracers can also be used to measure effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and solute distribution coefficients. For most applications tracers should be conservative, that is, move at the same rate as the water and not sorb to aquifer materials. Tracers must have a number of properties to be functional. Regardless of the desired properties, the chemical and physical behavior of a tracer in ground water and the porous medium under study must be understood. Good estimates of tracer behavior can be obtained from laboratory studies. Studies in this proposal will address tracer properties with analytical method development, static sorption and degradation studies and column transport studies, Mutagenicity tests will be performed on promising candidates. The tracers that will be used for these experiments are fluorinated organic acids and other organic compounds that have the chemical and biological stability necessary to be effective in the Yucca Mountain environment. Special emphasis will be placed on compounds that fluoresce or have very large ultraviolet absorption coefficients for very high analytical sensitivity.

  20. Design and Fabrication of TES Detector Modules for the TIME-Pilot [CII] Intensity Mapping Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bumble, B.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Gong, Y.; Kenyon, M.; Koch, P.; Li, C.-T.; O'Brient, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Shiu, C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-08-01

    We are developing a series of close-packed modular detector arrays for TIME-Pilot, a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map the intensity fluctuations of the redshifted 157.7 \\upmu m emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z ˜ 5 to 9. TIME-Pilot's two banks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one bank per polarization) will have a spectral range of 183-326 GHz and a resolving power of R ˜ 100. The spectrometers use a curved diffraction grating to disperse and focus the light on a series of output arcs, each sampled by 60 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers with gold micro-mesh absorbers. These low-noise detectors will be operated from a 250 mK base temperature and are designed to have a background-limited NEP of {˜ }10^{-17} mathrm {W}/mathrm {Hz}^{1/2}. This proceeding presents an overview of the detector design in the context of the TIME-Pilot instrument. Additionally, a prototype detector module produced at the Microdevices Laboratory at JPL is shown.

  1. First Experience Of Application Of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Ablation (Hifu In Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Stativko

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific article points out that 40 sessions of HIFU prostate ablation have been performed for estimation of clinical efficiency. Average frequency of influences presents 628±164 impulses; average volume of tissues subjected to influence during one procedure is 33,8±16,3 smi (132 % of prostate volume; average operation time constitutes 150 minutes (from 90 to 200 minutes. During the operation no complications have been occurred. In the first days after the session of HIFU there was a peak of PSA increase and then during 1,5-3 months there was decrease to the lowest index. Minimal PSA level was reached in 10-12 weeks after treatment and it constituted from 0,04 till 1,1 ngml depending on the disease state. Reduction of prostate volume occurred in average from the 30th day of postoperative period and lasted for 6 months, reaching in average 50 % from initial volume. Postoperative period varied from 10 till 16 days and constituted in average 12±0,8 days. Thus application of high-intensity focused ultrasonic ablation allows treating successfully various stages of prostate cancer with minimal number of side-effects and makes possible the early estimation of treatment efficiency

  2. Combination of Intensive Chemotherapy and Anticancer Vaccines in the Treatment of Human Malignancies: The Hematological Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Liseth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have demonstrated that cancer-specific T cell cytotoxicity can be induced both ex vivo and in vivo, but this therapeutic strategy should probably be used as an integrated part of a cancer treatment regimen. Initial chemotherapy should be administered to reduce the cancer cell burden and disease-induced immune defects. This could be followed by autologous stem cell transplantation that is a safe procedure including both high-dose disease-directed chemotherapy and the possibility for ex vivo enrichment of the immunocompetent graft cells. The most intensive conventional chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation are used especially in the treatment of aggressive hematologic malignancies; both strategies induce T cell defects that may last for several months but cancer-specific T cell reactivity is maintained after both procedures. Enhancement of anticancer T cell cytotoxicity is possible but posttransplant vaccination therapy should probably be combined with optimalisation of immunoregulatory networks. Such combinatory regimens should be suitable for patients with aggressive hematological malignancies and probably also for other cancer patients.

  3. Oesophageal atresia: a 10-year experience of a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Pinho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Oesophageal atresia (OA is a congenital malformation with a variable prognosis. The aims were to establish OA’s incidence in the central region, to characterize infants with OA admitted and to compare its clinical outcome after surgical repair, according to OA classifi cation. Methods: A retrospective review of infants with OA admitted to a PICU, after surgical repair, between 2002 and 2011. Patient characteristics, OA’s classifi cation, surgery, morbidity and mortality were analyzed. Two groups were compared according to OA classifi cation. Results: Thirty-four infants were admitted, out of which 65% were male, with a median gestational age of 36 weeks and birth weight of 2310g. Nineteen of them presented other malformations, mainly cardiac. Nine cases were classifi ed as long-gap OA. Fistula ligation and primary oesophageal anastomosis was the most common surgical option (n=27. Early complications occurred in 13 infants (38%, mostly anastomotic leak, and were similar according to gap length (p=0.704. PICU stay and mechanical ventilation were longer in long-gap OA patients (p=0.009 and p<0.001 respectively and in infants with other malformations (p=0.027 and p=0.003 respectively. There was no mortality. Conclusions: The frequency of OA associated malformations implies a systematic screening of these patients. Gap length and presence of associated malformations were the major determinants of length of intensive care stay and ventilation days in OA patients.

  4. Discharge against medical advice from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: 10 years experience at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim K Al-Turkistani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discharging patients against medical advice is a problem of every age-group. However, because of their physiological vulnerability, the risk for the neonatal population is greater when discharged against medical advice (DAMA. This article is a study of the prevalence of the problem, the possible causes and/or risk factors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 10 years of medical records of neonates discharged against medical advice from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU at a university hospital. Results: The overall prevalence of DAMA was 1.6%. Most of the 51 infants who were taken out of hospital against medical advice (AMA were term (72.5% with a mean gestational age of 37.78 ± 2.5 weeks, of normal birth weight, with a mean of 2736 ± 661 g, Saudis (96%, those delivered vaginally (69%, and those that were provisionally diagnosed with transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN and/or query sepsis (49%. There was no difference between males and females (M/F = 1.2. There was an association between DAMA and the timing of DAMA (27.5% of DAMA at weekends and 67% of DAMA from May to October. Conclusion: DAMA of neonates is particularly critical. The causes and risk factors are many and difficult to predict. In addition to several other factors, its prevalence is influenced negatively by some socio-cultural beliefs.

  5. Contrast and Intensity upgrades to the Texas Petawatt laser for hadron generation and non-linear QED experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M.; Arefiev, Alexey; Ditmire, Todd; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gillis; Gaul, Erhard; Labun, Lance; Luedtke, Scott; Martinez, Mikael; McCarry, Edward; Stark, David; Pomerantz, Ishay; Tiwari, Ganesh; Toncian, Toma

    2015-11-01

    Advances in laser-based hadron generation, especially with respect to particle energy, as well as reaching the new regime of radiation dominated plasmas and non-linear QED, require laser fields of Petavolts per meter that preferably interact with very high density, overcritical plasmas. To achieve these conditions we are upgrading the Texas Petawatt Laser both respect to on-target laser intensity and laser-contrast, aiming to reach intensities of ~ 5x1022 W/cm2 and pulse contrast parameters allowing the interaction with overcritical, yet ultrathin, sub-micron targets. We will report on the planned experiments aimed at ion acceleration, neutron generation and the first experimental measurement of radiation reactions to motivate the chosen upgrade parameters. We will further report on the technical changes to the laser and present first measurements of the achieved intensity and contrast parameters. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045) and the National Institute of Health SBIR.

  6. Assessing preferential flow by simultaneously injecting nanoparticle and chemical tracers

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The exact manner in which preferential (e.g., much faster than average) flow occurs in the subsurface through small fractures or permeable connected pathways of other kinds is important to many processes but is difficult to determine, because most chemical tracers diffuse quickly enough from small flow channels that they appear to move more uniformly through the rock than they actually do. We show how preferential flow can be assessed by injecting 2 to 5 nm carbon particles (C-Dots) and an inert KBr chemical tracer at different flow rates into a permeable core channel that is surrounded by a less permeable matrix in laboratory apparatus of three different designs. When the KBr tracer has a long enough transit through the system to diffuse into the matrix, but the C-Dot tracer does not, the C-Dot tracer arrives first and the KBr tracer later, and the separation measures the degree of preferential flow. Tracer sequestration in the matrix can be estimated with a Peclet number, and this is useful for experiment design. A model is used to determine the best fitting core and matrix dispersion parameters and refine estimates of the core and matrix porosities. Almost the same parameter values explain all experiments. The methods demonstrated in the laboratory can be applied to field tests. If nanoparticles can be designed that do not stick while flowing through the subsurface, the methods presented here could be used to determine the degree of fracture control in natural environments, and this capability would have very wide ranging value and applicability.

  7. Pulmonary-renal syndromes: Experience from an Indian Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rajagopala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of patients presenting with pulmonary-renal syndrome (PRS to Intensive Care Units (ICUs in India is not previously reported. Aims: The aim was to describe the prevalence, etiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of PRS in an Indian ICU and identify variables that differentiate immunologic causes of PRS from tropical syndromes presenting with PRS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of all patients presenting with PRS over 1-year. Clinical characteristics of patients with "definite PRS" were compared with those with "PRS mimics." Results: We saw 27 patients with "provisional PRS" over the said duration; this included 13 patients with "definite PRS" and 14 with "PRS mimics." The clinical symptoms were similar, but patients with PRS were younger and presented with longer symptom duration. Ninety-two percent of the PRS cohort required mechanical ventilation, 77% required vasopressors and 61.5% required dialysis within 48 h of ICU admission. The etiologic diagnosis of PRS was made after ICU admission in 61.5%. Systemic lupus erythrematosus (54% was the most common diagnosis. A combination of biopsy and serology was needed in the majority (69%, 9/13. Pulse methylprednisolone (92% and cyclophosphamide (61.5% was the most common protocol employed. Patients with PRS had more alveolar hemorrhage, hypoxemia and higher mortality (69% when compared to "PRS mimics." Conclusion: The spectrum of PRS is different in the tropics and tropical syndromes presenting with PRS are not uncommon. Multicentric studies are needed to further characterize the burden, etiology, treatment protocols, and outcomes of PRS in India.

  8. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estimation equations are reviewed here, 32 of which were evaluated using previously published tracer-test design examination parameters. Comparison of the results produced a wide range of estimated tracer mass, but no means is available by which one equation may be reasonably selected over the others. Each equation produces a simple approximation for tracer mass. Most of the equations are based primarily on estimates or measurements of discharge, transport distance, and suspected transport times. Although the basic field parameters commonly employed are appropriate for estimating tracer mass, the 33 equations are problematic in that they were all probably based on the original developers' experience in a particular field area and not necessarily on measured hydraulic parameters or solute-transport theory. Suggested sampling frequencies are typically based primarily on probable transport distance, but with little regard to expected travel times. This too is problematic in that tends to result in false negatives or data aliasing. Simulations from the recently developed efficient hydrologic tracer-test design methodology (EHTD) were compared with those obtained from 32 of the 33 published tracer-

  9. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  10. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  11. Investigation of helical flow by using tracer technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacıyakupoğlu S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The flow through coiled tubes is, in practice, important for pipe systems, heat exchangers, chemical reactors, mixers of different gas components, etc., and is physically interesting because of the peculiar characteristics caused by the centrifugal force. Therefore, it is not so easy to observe flow parameters in the helical pipe experimentally. Tracer techniques are being increasingly used to determine characteristics such as volume flow rate, residence time, dispersion and mixing process in industry. In this study, the flow in the helical pipe was obtained in the laboratory and investigated by using the tracer technique. The experimental system including the helical pipe was set up in the laboratory. In the experiments methylene-blue (C16H17N3S has been used as the tracer. The experiments were successfully performed with different flow rates and their results were evaluated with the flow parameters.

  12. Optimization of parameters affecting signal intensity in an LTQ-orbitrap in negative ion mode: A design of experiments approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonakis, Nikolaos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Gikas, Evagelos

    2016-01-15

    A multistage optimization of all the parameters affecting detection/response in an LTQ-orbitrap analyzer was performed, using a design of experiments methodology. The signal intensity, a critical issue for mass analysis, was investigated and the optimization process was completed in three successive steps, taking into account the three main regions of an orbitrap, the ion generation, the ion transmission and the ion detection regions. Oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were selected as the model compounds. Overall, applying this methodology the sensitivity was increased more than 24%, the resolution more than 6.5%, whereas the elapsed scan time was reduced nearly to its half. A high-resolution LTQ Orbitrap Discovery mass spectrometer was used for the determination of the analytes of interest. Thus, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were infused via the instruments syringe pump and they were analyzed employing electrospray ionization (ESI) in the negative high-resolution full-scan ion mode. The parameters of the three main regions of the LTQ-orbitrap were independently optimized in terms of maximum sensitivity. In this context, factorial design, response surface model and Plackett-Burman experiments were performed and analysis of variance was carried out to evaluate the validity of the statistical model and to determine the most significant parameters for signal intensity. The optimum MS conditions for each analyte were summarized and the method optimum condition was achieved by maximizing the desirability function. Our observation showed good agreement between the predicted optimum response and the responses collected at the predicted optimum conditions.

  13. Calibration of a neutron time-of-flight multidetector system for an intensity interferometry experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghetti, R. E-mail: roberta.ghetti@nuclear.lu.se; Colonna, N.; Helgesson, J.; Avdeichikov, V.; Golubev, P.; Jakobsson, B.; Tagliente, G.; Brandenburg, S.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Wilschut, H.W.; Kopecky, S.; Anderson, E.W.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Westerberg, L.; Bellini, V.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C

    2004-01-11

    We present the details of an experiment on light particle interferometry. In particular, we focus on a time-of-flight technique which uses a cyclotron RF signal as a start and a liquid scintillator time signal as a stop, to measure neutron energy in the range of E{sub n}{approx}1.8-150 MeV. This dynamic range (up to 300 ns) is much larger than the beam bunch separation (54 ns) of the AGOR cyclotron (KVI). However, the problem of a short burst period is overcome by using the time information obtained from a fast projectile fragment phoswich detector. The complete analysis procedure to extract the final neutron kinetic energy spectra, is discussed.

  14. Wasp Sting Intensive Nursing Experience%毒蜂蛰伤重症护理心得

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马婷

    2014-01-01

    总结6例毒蜂蛰伤患者的重症护理经验,迅速建立静脉通路,严密观察病情变化,配合医生做好对症治疗,加强心理护理和预防宣教,是抢救成功的关键。%To summarize 6 cases of bees sting injury in patients with severe nursing experience, quickly establishing venous access, close observation of disease conditions, do a good job with the doctor symptomatic treatment, strengthen the psychological nursing and preventive education, is the key to successful rescue.

  15. Pneumothorax in neonates: a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Íris Santos Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumothorax occurs more frequently in the neonatal period than in any other period of life and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Several risk factors for pneumothorax, including respiratory pathology, invasive and non-invasive respiratory support, and predictors of mortality have been described.Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of pneumothorax, to assess risk factors and to describe the clinical characteristics, management and outcome of newborn infants with pneumothorax, as well as to identify predictors of mortality in these newborns.Methods: This retrospective case-control study included all newborns hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of “Centro Hospitalar São João”, Porto, Portugal, between 2003 and 2014, with the diagnosis of pneumothorax. A control group was selected among the newborns without pneumothoraces, admitted to the same NICU during the same period. The collected data included: demographics and perinatal data, pneumothorax characteristics, classification, treatment and clinical outcomes.Results: Our study included 240 neonates (80 with pneumothoraces and 160 controls, of whom 145 were male (60.4%. Median gestational age was 37 (24-40 weeks and median birthweight 2,613 (360-4,324 grams. The prevalence in our NICU was 1.5%. Pneumothorax was significantly associated with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS (p = 0.010 and transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN (p < 0.001. Invasive mechanical ventilation (MV (p = 0.016 and FiO2 ≥ 0.4 (p = 0.003, were independent risk factors for the development of pneumothoraces. The mortality rate was 13.8%. Hypotension, MV and thoracentesis followed by a chest tube insertion were found to be predictors of mortality in newborns with pneumothoraces, but pneumothorax per se was not a predictor of mortality.Conclusion: Pneumothorax is relatively frequent in the NICU. Its risk factors and predictors of mortality should be known in order to

  16. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus colonization in neonatal intensive care unit: prevention and eradication experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Derya; Yavuzcan Öztürk, Dilek; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ocalmaz, Mutlu Seyda; Karatekin, Güner; Ovalı, Hüsnü Fahri

    2012-10-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) are important etiologic agents of nosocomial infections and colonization for hospitalized patients. Isolation rate of VRE is higher especially in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), due to the immune insufficiency of neonates, frequent use of antibiotics and prolonged duration of hospitalization. The aims of this report were to present the rapid dissemination of VRE colonization in our NICU, to determine the factors related to colonization and to share the precautions taken to prevent the dissemination. Upon the isolation of VRE from the urine culture of a premature infant followed up in the NICU, rectal swab specimens were obtained from this index patient, other patients staying at the NICU, the related health-care personnel and also environmental sampling was performed. Although strict contact precautions were implemented for the VRE positive patient, VRE were isolated from the rectal swabs of other patients and the number of VRE positive cases increased to 11 on the 18th day. No VRE were detected in the environmental samples. By strict adherence and compliance to isolation precautions, physical separation of VRE positive newborns and healthcare workers and education of the personnel, VRE colonization was eradicated on the 55th day. During the period between the first detection of VRE colonization and the management of eradication (August 10th-October 4th 2009), 133 patients were followed up in the NICU and 52 (40%) of those patients were colonized by VRE. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of VRE colonization. These patients' anthropometric and clinical findings were evaluated retrospectively. Gestational age and birth weights of VRE positive and negative patients were 30.9 ± 3.8 weeks and 1441 ± 543 g; 34.5 ± 4 weeks and 2396 ± 917 g, respectively (pdetected on the postnatal 16th day (days between 2-144). VRE became negative in 10 (19.2%) of the 52 colonized patients during

  17. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with {sup 41}Ca tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.P.H.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); King, J.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nutritional Science; Vieira, N.E. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States); Woodhouse, L.R. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nutritional Science; Yergey, A.L. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of {sup 41}Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, {sup 41}Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  18. Estimation of migration characteristics of a nonsorbing tracer through an artificial rock fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, B. H.; Park, J. K.; Han, P. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    Experiment on the transport of a nonsorbing tracer in an artificial rock fracture was carried out. The scale of an artificial rock was 50x20x5cm. The migration field was assumed as a two dimensional system. Eosine, a kind of an organic dye, was used as a nonsorbing tracer. This tracer was injected as a pulse function in a point source and point withdraw system. Volumetric flow rate was 0.5ml/min. The migration plume of the tracer was captured by a digital camera and compared with a result from transport modeling.

  19. The characterization of petroleum contamination in heterogenous media using partitioning tracer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.; Rhee, S.; Park, J. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    A partitioning tracer method for characterizing petroleum contamination in heterogenous media was discussed. The average saturation level of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) was calculated by comparing the transport of the partitioning tracers to a conservative tracer. The NAPL saturation level represented a continuous value throughout the contaminated site. Experiments were conducted in a 2-D sandbox divided into 4 parts using different-sized sands. Soils were contaminated with a mixture of kerosene and diesel. Partitioning tracer tests were conducted both before and after contamination. A partitioning batch test was conducted to determine the partition coefficient (K) of the tracer between the NAPL and water. Breakthrough curves were obtained, and a retardation factor (R) was calculated. Results of the study showed that the calculated NAPL saturation was in good agreement with determined values. It was concluded that the partitioning tracer test is an accurate method of locating and quantifying NAPLs.

  20. Design of an intense ion source and LEBT for Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Sun, L. T.; Cui, B. Q.; Lian, G.; Yang, Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Tang, X. D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Liu, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics experiment (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultralow background in China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), high current accelerator driven by on an ECR source and highly sensitive detector to study directly a number of important reactions for the first time within their relevant stellar energy range. A 2.45 GHz ECR ion source is one of its key components to provide 10 emA H+, 10 emA He+ and 2.0 emA He2+ beams for the study of (p,γ), (p,α), (α,p) and (α,γ) reactions in the first phase of the JUNA project. Ion beam is extracted from the source with energies up to 50 kV/q. The following low energy beam transport (LEBT) system transports and matches the ion beam from the exit of ion source to the acceleration tube (AT). The design status of the ECR ion source and LEBT system for the JUNA project are presented. The potential risks of the ion source are also discussed and analysed.

  1. Design of an intense ion source and LEBT for Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q., E-mail: wuq@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun, L.T., E-mail: sunlt@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Cui, B.Q.; Lian, G. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Yang, Y.; Ma, H.Y.; Tang, X.D.; Zhang, X.Z.; Zhang, Z.M. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, W.P. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2016-09-11

    The ongoing Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics experiment (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultralow background in China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), high current accelerator driven by on an ECR source and highly sensitive detector to study directly a number of important reactions for the first time within their relevant stellar energy range. A 2.45 GHz ECR ion source is one of its key components to provide 10 emA H{sup +}, 10 emA He{sup +} and 2.0 emA He{sup 2+} beams for the study of (p,γ), (p,α), (α,p) and (α,γ) reactions in the first phase of the JUNA project. Ion beam is extracted from the source with energies up to 50 kV/q. The following low energy beam transport (LEBT) system transports and matches the ion beam from the exit of ion source to the acceleration tube (AT). The design status of the ECR ion source and LEBT system for the JUNA project are presented. The potential risks of the ion source are also discussed and analysed.

  2. Simultaneous Analyses and Applications of Multiple Fluorobenzoate and Halide Tracers in Hydrologic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E

    2004-01-22

    An analytical method that employs ion chromatography has been developed to more fully exploit the use of fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) and halides as hydrologic tracers. In a single run, this reliable, sensitive, and robust method can simultaneously separate and quantify halides (fluoride, chloride, bromide, and iodide) and up to seven FBAs from other common groundwater constituents (e.g., nitrate and sulfate). The usefulness of this ion chromatographic (IC) analytical method is demonstrated in both field and laboratory tracer experiments. Field experiments in unsaturated tuff featuring fractures or a fault show that this efficient and cost-effective method helps achieve the objectives of tracer studies that use multiple FBAs and/or diffusivity tracers (simultaneous use of one or more FBA and halide). The field study examines the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix to different flow rates and the contribution of matrix diffusion in chemical transport. Laboratory tracer experiments with eight geologic media from across the United States--mostly from Department of Energy facilities where groundwater contamination is prevalent and where subsurface characterization employing tracers has been ongoing or is in need--reveal several insights about tracer transport behavior: (1) Bromide and FBAs are not always transported conservatively. (2) The delayed transport of these anionic tracers is likely related to geologic media characteristics, such as organic matter, pH, iron oxide content, and clay mineralogy. (3) Any use of iodine as a hydrologic tracer should take into account the different sorption behaviors of iodide and iodate and the possible conversion of iodine's initial chemical form. (4) The transport behavior of potential FBA and halide tracers under relevant geochemical conditions should be evaluated before beginning ambitious, large-scale field tracer experiments.

  3. Simultaneous Analyses and Applications of Multiple Fluorobenzoate and Halide Tracers in Hydrologic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E

    2004-01-22

    An analytical method that employs ion chromatography has been developed to more fully exploit the use of fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) and halides as hydrologic tracers. In a single run, this reliable, sensitive, and robust method can simultaneously separate and quantify halides (fluoride, chloride, bromide, and iodide) and up to seven FBAs from other common groundwater constituents (e.g., nitrate and sulfate). The usefulness of this ion chromatographic (IC) analytical method is demonstrated in both field and laboratory tracer experiments. Field experiments in unsaturated tuff featuring fractures or a fault show that this efficient and cost-effective method helps achieve the objectives of tracer studies that use multiple FBAs and/or diffusivity tracers (simultaneous use of one or more FBA and halide). The field study examines the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix to different flow rates and the contribution of matrix diffusion in chemical transport. Laboratory tracer experiments with eight geologic media from across the United States--mostly from Department of Energy facilities where groundwater contamination is prevalent and where subsurface characterization employing tracers has been ongoing or is in need--reveal several insights about tracer transport behavior: (1) Bromide and FBAs are not always transported conservatively. (2) The delayed transport of these anionic tracers is likely related to geologic media characteristics, such as organic matter, pH, iron oxide content, and clay mineralogy. (3) Any use of iodine as a hydrologic tracer should take into account the different sorption behaviors of iodide and iodate and the possible conversion of iodine's initial chemical form. (4) The transport behavior of potential FBA and halide tracers under relevant geochemical conditions should be evaluated before beginning ambitious, large-scale field tracer experiments.

  4. Polyethyleneimine as tracer for electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurer, Jacob Willem

    1980-01-01

    In this thesis the development of a tracer particle for use in electron microscopy is described. Attempts were made to use this tracer particle in immuno-electron microscopy and to trace negatively charged tissue components. ... Zie: Summary

  5. Experience of the MALA bag in the open abdomen management in an obstetrical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón Reyes, Ricardo Mauricio; Reyes Mendoza, Luis Emilio; Angeles Vásquez, María de Jesús; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: As indicações atuais para a gestão de abdómen aberto são a cirurgia de controlo de danos, a abordagem de sepsis intraabdominal grave, a síndrome de compartimento abdominal, o encerramento da parede abdominal sob tensão e a perda de massa da parede abdominal.Objetivo: Descrever a experiência em gestão e cirurgias de abdómen aberto usando a bolsa MALA (Maior Absorção de Líquido Abdominal).Material e Métodos: Estudo descritivo, incluindo todos os doentes com o diagnóstico de abdómen aberto gerido com a bolsa MALA internados na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos Obstétricos de Fevereiro de 2009 a Junho de 2012.Resultados: Dos 25 casos identificados no período do estudo, sete foram eliminados por arquivos incompletos, permanecendo 18 casos para a análise. A média de idade foi de 31,5 anos. Setenta e oito por cento dos doentes eram multíparas, 50% com uma história de dois ou mais partos, 83% com uma cesariana anterior e 78% histerectomizadas, por atonia uterina, na maioria dos casos. A principal indicação para tratamento cirúrgico foi o controlo de danos. Uma doente morreu e uma segunda foi transferida para outra instituição, tendo as demais tido melhoria clínica. Doze doentes (67%) permaneceram menos de 14 dias na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos Obstétricos e apenas uma precisou de mais de 30 dias na unidade.Conclusão: A bolsa MALA pode oferecer uma opção económica e eficaz para a gestão cirúrgica abdominal aberta, bem como umatécnica de drenagem.

  6. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  7. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    Bioluminescent cultures were acquired and tested for use as biological tracers for reservoir characterization by small independent oil companies. Initially these bacterial cultures were fastidious to work with, but when we finally determined their critical growth parameters simple test variations were developed that could be routinely accomplished. The intensity of their luminescence is easily distinguished by the human eye and requires no sophisticated technical knowledge or instrumentation. Cultures were received from culture banks and collected from marine environments. In our laboratory they were screened using the criteria of optimum growth and luminescence. Three stock cultures proved to grow profusely even when variations were made in nutrient additions, salts, and temperature. These three selected cultures were not inhibited when introduced to formations and formation waters and were not overgrown by other bacteria. Cultures isolated from the Gulf of Mexico were overgrown by indigenous bacteria and therefore, they were eliminated from further screening and adaption. Experiments were performed according to three major task descriptions: 1. Establish growth and luminescencing limitations of selected bacteria in various media, varying salt concentration and temperature. 2. Adapt cultures to formation waters. 3. Determine transport limitations of bioluminescent bacteria through representative reservoir cores. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  9. Taiwanese parents' experience of making a "do not resuscitate" decision for their child in pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Mei; Lin, Hung-Ru; Lu, Frank L; Lee, Tzu-Ying

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore the parental experience of making a "do not resuscitate" (DNR) decision for their child who is or was cared for in a pediatric intensive care unit in Taiwan. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted following parental signing of a standard hospital DNR form on behalf of their critically ill child. Sixteen Taiwanese parents of 11 children aged 1 month to 18 years were interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, analyzed and sorted into themes by the sole interviewer plus other researchers. Three major themes were identified: (a) "convincing points to sign", (b) "feelings immediately after signing", and (c) "post-signing relief or regret". Feelings following signing the DNR form were mixed and included "frustration", "guilt", and "conflicting hope". Parents adjusted their attitudes to thoughts such as "I have done my best," and "the child's life is beyond my control." Some parents whose child had died before the time of the interview expressed among other things "regret not having enough time to be with and talk to my child". Open family visiting hours plus staff sensitivity and communication skills training are needed. To help parents with this difficult signing process, nurses and other professionals in the pediatric intensive care unit need education on initiating the conversation, guiding the parents in expressing their fears, and providing continuing support to parents and children throughout the child's end of life process. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  11. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts detected by the SIGNE experiment. 1: Correlation between intensity and spectral hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargatis, Vincent E.; Liang, Edison P.; Hurley, Kevin C.; Barat, C.; Eveno, E.; Niel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We study the continuum spectral evolution of 16 gamma-ray bursts detected by the Franco-Soviet SIGNE experiment in 1981-1982 by fitting time resolved (0.5 s) spectra in count space with simple thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron models. We find that there is no single characteristic of spectral evolution: we see hard-to-soft, soft-to-hard, luminosity-hardness tracking, and chaotic evolution. We perform correlation studies between instantaneous burst intensity and spectral temperature for seven bursts. While we basically confirm the existence of a correlation between these variables as originally claimed by Golenetskii et al. (1983) we find higher values and a broader range of correlation indices.

  12. Nurses' experiences of caring for critically ill, non-sedated, mechanically ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore nurses' experiences of caring for non-sedated, critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a qualitative explorative design and was based on 13 months of fieldwork in two intensive care units in Denmark where...... a protocol of no sedation is implemented. Data were generated during participant observation in practice and by interviews with 16 nurses. Data were analysed using thematic interpretive description. FINDINGS: An overall theme emerged: "Demanding, yet rewarding". The demanding aspects of caring for more awake...... closeness. CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of care, nurses preferred to care for more awake rather than sedated patients and appreciated caring for just one patient at a time. The importance of close collaboration between nurses and doctors to ensure patient comfort during mechanical ventilation...

  13. Tracer-tracer relations as a tool for research on polar ozone loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rolf

    2010-07-01

    The report includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction: ozone in the atmosphere, anthropogenic influence on the ozone layer, polar stratospheric ozone loss; (2) Tracer-tracer relations in the stratosphere: tracer-tracer relations as a tool in atmospheric research; impact of cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry on polar ozone; (3) quantifying polar ozone loss from ozone-tracer relations: principles of tracer-tracer correlation techniques; reference ozone-tracer relations in the early polar vortex; impact of mixing on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex; impact of mesospheric intrusions on ozone-tracer relations in the stratospheric polar vortex calculation of chemical ozone loss in the arctic in March 2003 based on ILAS-II measurements; (4) epilogue.

  14. Development of radioisotope tracer technology and nucleonic control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Jung, Sung Hee and others

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and basic technology of nuclear control systems that are widely used for automation of industrial plants, and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology, the data acquisition system, the column scanning equipment and the detection pig for a leakage test have been developed. In order to use in analyzing data of tracer experiments, a computer program for the analysis of residence time distribution has been created as well. These results were utilized in developing the tracer technologies, such as the column scanning, the flow measurement using the dilution method, the simultaneous monitoring rotational movement of piston rings and the optimization of a waste water treatment facility, and the technologies were successfully demonstrated in the local industrial. The stripper of RFCC reactor has been examined to find an unwanted structure in it by imminent request from the industry. Related to the development of nucleonic control system, the state of art report on the technology has been written and an equipment for the analysis of asphalt content has been developed. (author)

  15. Design and Fabrication of a Prototype Tracer Surveillance Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    problem with reproducibility and reliability at low spin rates. (6) The existing light sensor assembly and optico - electronic conditioning circuitry...is quite useful to redesign the light sensor assembly/ optico -electronic circuitry so as to obtain quantitative information on the actual intensity...pressurization/depressurization characteristics 31 of the combustion chamber 8a Oscilloscope trace of tracer RPM and light sensor output for 32 30,000

  16. Increased self-efficacy: the experience of high-intensity exercise of nursing home residents with dementia - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Cecilie Fromholt; Telenius, Elisabeth Wiken; Engedal, Knut; Bergland, Astrid

    2015-09-14

    There has been increasing interest in the use of non-pharmacological interventions, such as physical exercise, to improve the well-being of nursing home residents with dementia. For reasons regarding disease symptoms, persons with dementia might find it difficult to participate in exercise programs. Therefore, it is important to find ways to successfully promote regular exercise for patients in residential care. Several quantitative studies have established the positive effects of exercise on biopsychosocial factors, such as self-efficacy in older people; however, little is known regarding the qualitative aspects of participating in an exercise program among older people with dementia. From the perspective of residents, we explored the experiences of participating in a high-intensity functional exercise program among nursing home residents with dementia. The participants were eight elderly people with mild-to-moderate dementia. We conducted semi-structured interviews one week after they had finished a 10-week supervised high-intensity exercise program. We analyzed the data using an inductive content analysis. Five overreaching and interrelated themes emerged from the interviews: "Pushing the limits," "Being invested in," "Relationships facilitate exercise participation," "Exercise revives the body, increases independence and improves self-esteem" and "Physical activity is a basic human necessity--use it or lose it!" The results were interpreted in light of Bandura's self-efficacy theory. The exercise program seemed to improve self-efficacy through several mechanisms. By being involved, "being invested in" and having something expected of them, the participants gained a sense of empowerment in their everyday lives. The importance of social influences related to the exercise instructor and the exercise group was accentuated by the participants. The nursing home residents had, for the most part, positive experiences with regard to participating in the exercise program

  17. The influence of surgical experience, type of instructions given to patients and patient sex on postoperative pain intensity following lower wisdom tooth surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijević, Marko; Uzarević, Zvonimir; Gvozdić, Vlatka; Mikelić, Valentina Matijević; Leović, Dinko; Macan, Darko

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which the intensity of postoperative pain in the first seven days after lower wisdom tooth extraction is affected by operator experience, patient level of information and patient sex. Postoperative pain intensity after lower wisdom tooth extraction was assessed in 108 patients. Depending on the type of information given to each patient individually, the patients were divided into two groups: test group in which patients were provided with detailed standard written and verbal instructions and control group where patients only received detailed standard written instructions about treatment after surgery. Each of these two groups was divided into three subgroups depending on operator experience. Results of this study showed that the type of information irrespective of being given verbally or not had no effects on postoperative pain intensity, whereas operator experience and patient sex influenced postoperative pain intensity.

  18. Fractured-rock hydrogeophysics with electrically conductive and neutrally buoyant tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakas, A.; Linde, N.; Baron, L.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Lavenant, N.; Gerard, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Artificial tracer tests help to characterize and understand the dynamics of groundwater systems. This remains a challenging task, especially when dealing with highly heterogeneous formations in which flow can be very localized and the interpretation of tracer breakthrough curves may be ambiguous. As a complement to tracer tests, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography can map the space-time migration of electrically conductive tracers. In hydrogeophysics, the most common tracer is dissolved table salt in water. However, conventional salt tracers lead to density effects that are often ignored. Even less than 1% density variations can have a dramatic effect on transport behavior and affect tracer tests in complex ways. Such effects have been demonstrated in our previous experiments that used single-hole GPR to monitor saline push-pull tests in fractured granite. It is possible to model density effects, but this leads to computational complexity and field dynamics that are not necessarily representative of the natural responses of the system. To minimize density effects, we performed a new set of push-pull tests using a neutrally buoyant and electrically conductive tracer at the same test site located close to Ploemeur, France. This novel tracer consists of a mixture of salt (NaCl), water and pure ethanol. Ethanol has a density of 789 g/L at 20° C and is used to counter-act the salt-induced density increase. Our GPR time-lapse images and tracer breakthrough data indicate a largely reversible transport process that confirms the neutral buoyancy of the tracer. Ethanol is biodegradable and does not pose significant environmental issues. Furthermore, calibration of the neutral-buoyant mixture is straightforward to perform in the field using Archimedes principle. Based on these results, we argue that neutrally buoyant ethanol-salt-water mixtures are ideal for a wide variety of hydrogeophysical tracer tests in porous or fractured media.

  19. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saqlain A; Ferguson, R M; Krishnan, K M

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho ) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  20. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Michał; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Sagués, Francesc; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the obstructed motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens, and radius of a diffusing probe.

  1. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cieśla, Michał; Sagués, Francesc; Sokolov, Igor M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens and radius of a diffusing probe.

  2. North Atlantic ventilation using chlorofluorocarbons and idealised-tracer simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chun He

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The simulated chlorofluorocarbon CFC-11 and 29 geographically defined CFC-11 tracers, as well as 29 geographically defined idealised tracers, are used to quantify the regional contribution to the ventilation of the North Atlantic Ocean in a global version of the Miami Isopycnal Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM driven by the daily NCEP/NCAR forcing. Age tracers attached to 29 idealised tracers are also used to estimate the timescales for the water masses’ transports. Our results show that the simulated overturning circulation matches the available observed data for both intensity and variability, and the simulated distribution of CFC-11 concentration in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean is in good agreement with the observations, particularly above 800 m in depth. We found that the sandwich-like distribution of CFC-11 concentration in the subtropical North Atlantic in both the observations and simulations is mainly caused by subduction from the western and eastern subpolar North Atlantic, but the contribution of the former (56.0% is almost four times larger than that of the latter (15.7%. We demonstrated that the ocean dynamics, instead of the source function, determine the annual and inter-annual variability in both dynamically active tracer (such as water temperature and salinity and passive tracer (such as CFC-11 and idealised tracer concentrations in the deep North Atlantic. The ‘apparent age’ distribution shows that the surface water in the western subpolar North Atlantic takes about 12 yr to reach the Nordic Seas and takes 20 yr from the Nordic Seas to the subtropical deep North Atlantic. The transit-time derived by ‘optimum time lag’ approach shows a 9.3–13.6 yr lag for the signals propagating from the western subpolar North Atlantic to the subtropical North Atlantic, which is generally consistent with that of about 10 yr derived from the ‘apparent age’. The study suggests that geographically defined tracers can be used as

  3. The lived experiences of adult intensive care patients who were conscious during mechanical ventilation: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Veronika; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Forsberg, Anna

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the lived experience of patients who were conscious during mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU). Interviews with 12 patients assessed as being conscious during mechanical ventilation were conducted approximately one week after discharge from an ICU. The text was analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by Ricoeur. Apart from breathlessness, voicelessness was considered the worst experience. The discomfort and pain caused by the tracheal tube was considerable. A feeling of being helpless, deserted and powerless because of their serious physical condition and inability to talk prompted the patients to strive for independence and recovery and made them willing to 'flow with' the treatment and care. Comments from the patients suggest that their suffering can be alleviated by communication, participation in care activities and companionship. A patient's endurance whilst conscious during mechanical ventilation seems to be facilitated by the presence of nurses, who mediate hope and belief in recovery, strengthening the patient's will to fight for recovery and survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hands-on approach during breastfeeding support in a neonatal intensive care unit: a qualitative study of Swedish mothers' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumas Louise

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assisting mothers to breastfeed is not easy when babies experience difficulties. In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, nurses often help mothers by using hands-on-breast without their permission. Little is known about how mothers feel about this unusual body touching. To gain more knowledge from mothers who lived through this experience, this hands-on practice was studied in a NICU in Sweden. Methods Between January and June 2001, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten mothers of preterm or sick term infants and all of them experienced the hands-on approach. In this research, Radnitzky's seven principles of hermeneutic interpretation were applied in order to interpret the meaning of mothers' responses. This article presents results related to the period of initiation of breastfeeding. This qualitative study was based on a combination of the models of Gustafsson, Orem, and Aarts' Marte Meo. Results Five main themes were identified: Insult to integrity, Manipulating the baby, Understanding and adjustment, Breasts as objects, Alternatives to this practice. Hands-on help in the breastfeeding situation was experienced as unpleasant and the women experienced their breasts as objectified. The mothers accepted the hands-on help given by nursing staff, even though they considered it unpleasant. Most mothers expressed a need for assistance when starting breastfeeding, but could not suggest any alternative to hands-on help such as demonstrating with an artificial breast and a doll. Conclusion The study provides information about how mothers experience unexpected hands-on help with breastfeeding in a NICU, which has not been described previously. Since most mothers in this study regarded this behavior as unpleasant and not helpful mostly because it was unexpected and unexplained, it would be important to either explain beforehand to mothers what type of physical approach could be attempted on their body or better, to avoid this

  5. Temporal and spatial profiles of emission intensities in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulse: Experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cheng; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shen, Yuan [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Weidong [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Saint Peter' s University, Jersey City, New Jersey 07306 (United States); Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Naidis, George V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-28

    A needle-circular electrode structure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulsed power is studied. Spatially resolved emission results show that the emission intensity of He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) line decreases monotonically along the axial direction, while those of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}), N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}∑{sup +}{sub u}), and O(3p{sup 5}P) reach their maxima at 3 cm, 2.6 cm, and 1.4 cm, respectively. The plasma plume of the four species shows different characteristics: The N{sub 2} emission plume travels at a fast speed along the entire plasma jet; the N{sub 2}{sup +} emission plume is composed of a bright head and relatively weak tail and travels a shorter distance than the N{sub 2} emission plume; the He emission plume travels at a slower speed for only a very short distance; propagation of the O emission plume is not observed. Results of calculation of radiation fluxes emitted by positive streamers propagating along helium plasma jets are presented. It is shown, in agreement with the results of the present experiment and with other available experimental data, that the intensities of radiation of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}) molecules and He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) atoms vary with time (along the plasma jet) quite differently. The factors resulting in this difference are discussed.

  6. Tracer tests in geothermal resource management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelsson G.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal reinjection involves injecting energy-depleted fluid back into geothermal systems, providing an effective mode of waste-water disposal as well as supplementary fluid recharge. Cooling of production boreholes is one of the main disadvantages associated with reinjection, however. Tracer testing is an important tool for reinjection studies because tracer tests actually have a predictive power since tracer transport is orders of magnitude faster than cold-front advancement around reinjection boreholes. A simple and efficient method of tracer test interpretation, assuming specific flow channels connecting reinjection and production boreholes, is available. It simulates tracer return profiles and estimates properties of the flow channels, which are consequently used for predicting the production borehole cooling. Numerous examples are available worldwide on the successful application of tracer tests in geothermal management, many involving the application of this interpretation technique. Tracer tests are also used for general subsurface hydrological studies in geothermal systems and for flow rate measurements in two-phase geothermal pipelines. The tracers most commonly used in geothermal applications are fluorescent dyes, chemical substances and radioactive isotopes. New temperature-resistant tracers have also been introduced and high-tech tracers are being considered.

  7. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  8. Profiling of Ionospheric Electron Density Based on FormoSat-3/COSMIC Data: Results from the Intense Observation Period Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chih Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel Global Position System (GPS carrier phase signals received by the FormoSat-3 (FS3/COSMIC program's six low Earth orbiting (LEO satellites were used to undertake active limb sounding of the Earth¡¦s atmosphere and ionosphere via radio occultation (RO. In this study, the effects of large-scale horizontal gradients and/or inhomogeneous ionospheric electron densities (ne were considered by developing an iterative scheme to determine "compensated" total electron content (TEC values through nearby occultation observations. Using an iterative Abel inversion through "compensated" TEC values, more than one-hundred and eighty thousand vertical ionospheric ne profiles were collected during the intense observation period (IOP of 20 June - 27 September (day number 171 to 270 2006. Coincidences of GPS RO observations to ionospheric ne ionosonde data from forty-nine worldwide stations have been examined. It is found that the iterative scheme gives improved retrievals over the standard Abel inversion. From several thousand matches within the IOP experiment, the root mean square (rms foF2 differences between the ionosonde measurements and the FS3/COSMIC retrievals are improved from 1.67 to 1.07 MHz. The results also show improvement in the overestimates (underestimates on low (high retrieved foF2s, while the obtained hmF2s give better agreement with ionosonde observations.

  9. High-intensity static magnetic field exposure devices for in vitro experiments on biopharmaceutical plant factories in aerospace environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    Three high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) exposure devices have been designed and realized for application to in vitro experimental research on hairy root cultures, supposed to grow in extreme environments- as those of space aircrafts- for producing biopharmaceutical molecules. The devices allow the exposure at two different levels of induction magnetic (B) field (250 mT and 500 mT) plus sham for blind exposure. The exposure levels can be considered representative of possible B-fields experienced within the habitat of a spacecraft in presence of active magnetic shielding systems. Each device can house a single 85-mm diameter Petri dish. Numerical simulations have been performed to accurately evaluate the B-field distribution in the biological target. Numerical results have been confirmed by measured data, proving that designed setups allows exposure to SMFs with a homogeneity better than 90%. The exposure devices will be employed for experiments scheduled within BIOxTREME research project, funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  10. Application of enriched stable isotopes as tracers in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stürup, Stefan; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The application of enriched stable isotopes of minerals and trace elements as tracers in biological systems is a rapidly growing research field that benefits from the many new developments in inorganic mass spectrometric instrumentation, primarily within inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry...... (ICP-MS) instrumentation, such as reaction/collision cell ICP-MS and multicollector ICP-MS with improved isotope ratio measurement and interference removal capabilities. Adaptation and refinement of radioisotope tracer experiment methodologies for enriched stable isotope experiments......, and the development of new methodologies coupled with more advanced compartmental and mathematical models for the distribution of elements in living organisms has enabled a broader use of enriched stable isotope experiments in the biological sciences. This review discusses the current and future uses of enriched...

  11. “Waiting for the Bass to Drop”: Correlations between Intense Emotional Experiences and Production Techniques in Build-up and Drop Sections of Electronic Dance Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Torvanger Solberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the correlations between theories of intense emotional experiences and production techniques used in the electronic dance music (EDM sections “build-up” and “drop”, which are designed to build tension and create a heightened emotional intensity among clubbers. This is done by descriptive and interpretive music analysis, where spectrograms and a schematic model visually represent the dominant production techniques. Through a theoretical framework consisting of musical expectancy and gravity, the analysis suggests that i extensive use of uplifters, ii the “drum roll effect”, iii large frequency changes, iv removal and reintroduction of bass and bass drum and v a contrasting “breakdown” cause tension and anticipation, which seems to correlate with a possible intensification of emotional experience. This is furthermore discussed and more broadly related to the club experience seen as a whole, drawing on the psychological concepts Peak experience, Strong experiences with music (SEM and Absorption.

  12. Experiences with the use of conservative tracers as an aid in transferring lysimeter results to the open field; Erfahrungen beim Einsatz von konservativen Tracern als Hilfsmittel zur Uebertragung von Lysimeterergebnissen auf Freilandflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, J.; Meissner, R.; Rupp, H. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Falkenberg (Germany). Lysimeterstation; Mueller, L.; Eulenstein, F. [Zentrum fuer Agrarlandschafts- und Landnutzungsforschung e.V. (ZALF), Muencheberg (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    Four lysimeter trials performed on an IS-type soil yielded an almost constant range of displacement of a tracer front (NO{sub 3} front) of 4.0 to 4.5 mm / l of seepage water (referred to a surface area of 1 m-2 and a depth of 1 m). This was experimental confirmation of a tentatively formulated simplified relationship between seepage water volume, vertical tracer displacement, and field capacity. The results were also in very good agreement with those of a control study in the open field carried out under similar hydrological, pedological, and agrotechnical conditions using lysimeters and Cl tracers for determining quantities of seepage water formation. As the present lysimeter trials mirror soil hydrological processes in the open field with sufficient accuracy, they appear well suited to take the place of the so often lacking territorial data as a means of validating mathematical models describing seepage-water-bound material export. [Deutsch] Auf der Basis von 4 Lysimeterversuchen konnte fuer die Bodenart IS ein nahezu konstanter Wertebereich fuer die Verlagerung einer Tracerfront (NO{sub 3}-Front) in Hoehe von 4,0 bis 4,5 mm/l Sickerwasser (bezogen auf eine Oberflaeche von 1 m{sup 2} und eine Tiefe von 1 m) ermittelt werden. Damit konnte die vereinfachte Beziehung zwischen Sickerwassermenge, Tracerverlagerungstiefe und Feldkapazitaet experimentell bestaetigt werden. Ein Vergleich zur Bestimmung der Sickerwassermengenbildung mit Hilfe von Lysimetern und durch Einsatz von Cl-Tracern unter aehnlich hydrologischen, pedologischen und agrotechnischen Bedingungen im Freiland wies eine hohe Uebereinstimmung auf. Da die hier durchgefuehrten Lysimeteruntersuchungen bodenhydrologische Prozesse von Freilandflaechen mit ausreichender Genauigkeit widerspieglen, erscheinen sie anstelle oft fehlender Gebietskenndaten zur Validierung von mathematischen Modellen zur Beschreibung sickerwassergebundener Stoffaustraege gut geeignet. (orig.)

  13. Tracer tests in geothermal resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson G.

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal reinjection involves injecting energy-depleted fluid back into geothermal systems, providing an effective mode of waste-water disposal as well as supplementary fluid recharge. Cooling of production boreholes is one of the main disadvantages associated with reinjection, however. Tracer testing is an important tool for reinjection studies because tracer tests actually have a predictive power since tracer transport is orders of magnitude faster than cold-front advancement around reinj...

  14. Sulfadimethoxine transport in soil columns in relation to sorbable and non-sorbable tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Yol; Huwe, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    In this study, miscible displacement experiment and batch sorption experiments were performed with sulfadimethoxine, dye tracer, Brilliant Blue FCF (BB) and a conservative tracer (bromide) to depict, analyse and interpret transport paths of sulfadimethoxine in undisturbed and disturbed soil columns. Batch sorption experiment revealed that sorption potential increased in the order: Brilliant Blue FCF > sulfadimethoxine > bromide. The horizontal spatial patterns of sulfadimethoxine and the tracers were analysed in each depth, and selective samples were taken in horizontal cross-section. Non-adsorbable and conservative tracer, bromide spread more widely into longitudinal and horizontal direction than sulfadimethoxine and Brilliant Blue FCF, since adsorption reduced transversal dispersion of the sulfadimethoxine and dye. In non-stained area, residual concentrations of sulfadimethoxine were relatively lower than in stained areas. Therefore, Brilliant Blue FCF distribution can be used to approximate sulfadimethoxine movement in soil. However, presence of preferential flow networks found in undisturbed soil cores can enhance mobility of sulfadimethoxine and the tracers, due to faster flow velocities and non-equilibrium adsorption. Our findings showed that other dye tracers may also be applicable to identify transport pathways of various organic contaminants, of which physico-chemical properties are similar to those of the dye tracers. Preferential flow should be considered for drinking water managements and transport modelling, since this allows faster pollutants transport from their sources, and create critical consequences for groundwater quality and solute transport modelling.

  15. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results.

  16. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design (Ehtd) Program (2003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  17. Simultaneous tracer diffusion and interdiffusion in a sandwich-type configuration to provide the composition dependence of the tracer diffusion coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, I. V.; Kulkarni, N. S.; Sohn, Y. H.; Murch, G. E.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a new formalism of a combined tracer and interdiffusion experiment for a binary interdiffusion couple is developed. The analysis requires an interdiffusion couple that initially contains a thin layer of tracers of one or both of the constituent elements at the original interface of the couple (sandwich interdiffusion experiment). This type of interdiffusion experiment was first performed in 1958 by J.R. Manning. The theoretical analysis presented in this paper is based on a newly developed phenomenological theory of isotopic interdiffusion combined with the Boltzmann-Matano formalism. This new analysis now provides the means to obtain the composition dependent interdiffusion coefficient and tracer diffusion coefficients simultaneously from analysis of the interdiffusion and tracer profiles in a single sandwich interdiffusion experiment. The new analysis is successfully applied to the results of Manning's original 'sandwich interdiffusion' experiment in the Ag-Cd system (six couples in total) and is validated with an independent determination of the Ag and Cd tracer diffusion coefficients by Schoen using the conventional thin film technique. Suggestions for further development of the sandwich interdiffusion experiment and analysis to the case of multicomponent alloys are provided.

  18. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the

  19. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the

  20. Are Psychophysical Scales of Intensities the Same or Different when Stimuli Vary on Other Dimensions? Theory with Experiments Varying Loudness and Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, R. Duncan; Steingrimsson, Ragnar; Narens, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Most studies concerning psychological measurement scales of intensive attributes have concluded that these scales are of ratio type and that the psychophysical function is closely approximated by a power function. Experiments show, for such cases, that a commutativity property must hold under either successive increases or successive decreases…

  1. "Learning Is an Endless Journey for Anyone": Undergraduate Awareness, Experiences and Perceptions of the Research Culture in a Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel; Mirosa, Romain; Darrou, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Our study explored undergraduates' experiences of the research culture at a research-intensive university in southern New Zealand. In 2009, 1281 students responded to a survey that probed aspects of the research culture. Data were analysed through descriptive statistics and an inductive analysis of comments. Survey results for final-year students…

  2. The impact of center experience on results of reduced intensity : allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for AML. An analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebel, S.; Labopin, M.; Mohty, M.; Mufti, G. J.; Niederwieser, D.; Cornelissen, J. J.; Janssen, J. J. W. M.; Milpied, N.; Vindelov, L.; Petersen, E.; Arnold, R.; Bacigalupo, A.; Blaise, D.; Craddock, C.; Nagler, A.; Frassoni, F.; Sadus-Wojciechowska, M.; Rocha, V.

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-HSCT) is increasingly adopted for the treatment of older adults with AML. Our goal was to verify for the first time, if center experience influences outcome of RIC-HSCT. Results of 1413 transplantations from HLA-matched related or

  3. The impact of center experience on results of reduced intensity:allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for AML. An analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, S; Labopin, M; Mohty, M

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-HSCT) is increasingly adopted for the treatment of older adults with AML. Our goal was to verify for the first time, if center experience influences outcome of RIC-HSCT. Results of 1413 transplantations from HLA-matched related...

  4. The Accurate Particle Tracer Code

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The Accurate Particle Tracer (APT) code is designed for large-scale particle simulations on dynamical systems. Based on a large variety of advanced geometric algorithms, APT possesses long-term numerical accuracy and stability, which are critical for solving multi-scale and non-linear problems. Under the well-designed integrated and modularized framework, APT serves as a universal platform for researchers from different fields, such as plasma physics, accelerator physics, space science, fusion energy research, computational mathematics, software engineering, and high-performance computation. The APT code consists of seven main modules, including the I/O module, the initialization module, the particle pusher module, the parallelization module, the field configuration module, the external force-field module, and the extendible module. The I/O module, supported by Lua and Hdf5 projects, provides a user-friendly interface for both numerical simulation and data analysis. A series of new geometric numerical methods...

  5. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rossi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra. In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  6. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of environmentally friendly fluorescent particle tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Rapiti, Emiliano; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Tracers are widely used in experimental fluid mechanics and hydrology to investigate complex flows and water cycle processes. Commonly used tracers include dyes, artificial tracers, naturally occurring isotopes and chemicals, microorganisms, and DNA-based systems. Tracers should be characterized by low detection limits and high accuracy in following water paths and flow structures. For natural studies, tracers are also expected to be nontoxic and with low sorption affinity to natural substrates to minimize losses in the environment. In this context, while isotopes are completely natural, their use in field studies is limited by their ubiquity and, therefore, by the high uncertainty in data processing methodologies. Further, the use of dyes and artificial tracers can be hampered by extremely low detection limits due to dilution in natural streams and microorganisms, while DNA-based system may require physical sampling and time-consuming functionalization and detection procedures. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of fluorescent beads incorporating an eco-compatible fluorophore for environmental and laboratory applications. The particles are synthesized from natural beeswax through an inexpensive thermal procedure and can be engineered to present variable densities and diameters. A thorough characterization of their surface morphology at the nanoscale, crystal structure and size, chemical composition, and dye incorporation into the beeswax matrix is described by using a wide array of microscopy techniques. In addition, the particle fluorescence response is studied by performing excitation and emission scans on melted beeswax bead samples. The feasibility of using the synthesized particles in environmental settings is assessed through the design of ad-hoc weathering agent experiments where the beads are exposed to high energy radiation and hot water. Further, a proof of concept test is described to understand the particles' potential as a

  8. IMAGE Project: Results of Laboratory Tests on Tracers for Supercritical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandvoll, Øyvind; Opsahl Viig, Sissel; Nardini, Isabella; Muller, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    The use of tracers is a well-established technique for monitoring dynamic behaviour of water and gas through a reservoir. In geothermal reservoirs special challenges are encountered due to high temperatures and pressures. In this work, tracer candidates for monitoring water at supercritical conditions (temperature > 374°C, pressure ca 218 bar), are tested in laboratory experiments. Testing of tracers at supercritical water conditions requires experimental set-ups which tolerate harsh conditions with respect to high temperature and pressure. In addition stringent HES (health, environment and safety) factors have to be taken into consideration when designing and performing the experiments. The setup constructed in this project consists of a pressure vessel, high pressure pump, instrumentation for pressure and temperature control and instrumentation required for accurate sampling of tracers. In order to achieve accurate results, a special focus has been paid to the development of the tracer sampling technique. Perfluorinated cyclic hydrocarbons (PFCs) have been selected as tracer candidates. This group of compounds is today commonly used as gas tracers in oil reservoirs. According to the literature they are stable at temperatures up to 400°C. To start with, five PFCs have been tested for thermal stability in static experiments at 375°C and 108 bar in the experimental setup described above. The tracer candidates will be further tested for several months at the relevant conditions. Preliminary results indicate that some of the PFC compounds show stability after three months. However, in order to arrive at conclusive results, the experiments have to be repeated over a longer period and paying special attention to more accurate sampling procedures.

  9. Applied tracers for the observation of subsurface stormflow at the hillslope scale

    OpenAIRE

    J. Wienhöfer; Germer, K.; F. Lindenmaier; Färber, A.; Zehe, E.

    2009-01-01

    Rain fall-runoff response in temperate humid headwater catchments is mainly controlled by hydrolo gical processes at the hillslope scale. Applied tracer experiments with fluore scent dye and salt tracers are well known tools in groundwater studies at the large scale and vadose zone studies at the plot scale, where they provide a means to characterise subsurface flow. We extend this approach to the hillslope scale to investigate saturated and unsaturated flow path s concertedly at a forested h...

  10. Ice-affected streamflow records using tracer-dilution discharge methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capesius, J.P.; Sullivan, J.R.; Williams, C.A.; O'Neill, G. B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Accurate ice-affected streamflow records are difficult to obtain for several reasons. Problems measuring stage, variable backwater conditions, access limitations in wintertime, and problems measuring flowing water under ice cover all contribute to make ice-affected streamflow records less accurate than open-channel streamflow records. The inaccuracy of ice-affected streamflow records is particularly troublesome for small streams where Instream-Flow water rights exist. The Colorado Water Conservation Board uses these water rights to protect in-stream aquatic communities. In January and February 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted an experiment using a sodium chloride tracer to determine streamflow under ice cover. The purpose of this study is to determine the usefulness and accuracy of ice-affected streamflow records using a sodium chloride tracer that was automatically injected into the stream. The tracer was injected at two gaging stations once per day for up to 25 days. Multiple-parameter water-quality sensors at the two gaging stations monitored background and peak tracer concentrations and conductance. These data were used to determine discharge at each site. A comparison of current-meter measurements to tracer-dilution discharge measurements shows an underestimation of discharge due to inaccuracy of current-meter measurements with ice cover and inconsistent tracer-pump rates caused by partial freezing of the tracer solution in the injection lines.

  11. Using Tracer Technology to Characterize Contaminated Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maresca, Joseph, W., Jr., Ph.D.; Bratton, Wesley, L., Ph.D., P.E.; Dickerson, Wilhelmina; Hales, Rochelle

    2005-12-30

    The Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) technique uses conservative and partitioning, reactive or other interactive tracers to remotely determine the amount of contaminant within a run of piping or ductwork. The PCUT system was motivated by a method that has been successfully used to characterize subsurface soil contaminants and is similar in operation to that of a gas chromatography column. By injecting a ?slug? of both conservative and partitioning tracers at one end (or section) of the piping and measuring the time history of the concentration of the tracers at the other end (or another section) of the pipe, the presence, location, and amount of contaminant within the pipe or duct can be determined. The tracers are transported along the pipe or duct by a gas flow field, typically air or nitrogen, which has a velocity that is slow enough so that the partitioning tracer has time to interact with the contaminant before the tracer slug completely passes over the contaminate region. PCUT not only identifies the presence of contamination, it also can locate the contamination along the pipeline and quantify the amount of residual. PCUT can be used in support of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of piping and ducts that may have been contaminated with hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, radioactive materials, or heavy metals, such as mercury.

  12. Studies of Tracer Dispersion and Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rage, T.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis explores the connection between the topology of a porous medium and its macroscopic transport properties and is based on computerized simulation. In porous media, both diffusion and convection contribute to the dispersion of a tracer and their combined effect is emphasized. The governing equations are solved numerically, using finite differences and Monte Carlo technique. The influence of finite Reynolds number on the outcome of echo-experiments is discussed. Comparing experiments and simulations it is found that nonlinear inertial forces lead to a visible deformation of a returned tracer at surprisingly small Reynolds numbers. In a study of tracer dispersion and fluid flow in periodic arrays of discs it is demonstrated that the mechanisms of mechanical dispersion in periodic media and in natural (non-periodic) porous media are essentially different. Measurements of the percolation probability distribution of a sandstone sample is presented. Local porosity theory predicts that this simple geometric function of a porous medium is of dominant importance for its macroscopic transport properties. It is demonstrated that many aspects of transport through fractures can be studied by using simple but realistic models and readily available computer resources. An example may be the transport of hydrocarbon fluids from the source rock to a reservoir. 165 refs., 44 figs., 1 table

  13. The 1996 thaw as a {sup 18}O tracer experiment at the lysimeter plant in Wagna; Die Schneeschmelze 1996 als {sup 18}O-Tracerversuch an der Lysimeteranlage in Wagna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fank, J.; Zojer, H. [Forschungsgesellschaft Joanneum, Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Geothermie und Hydrogeologie; Stichler, W. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrologie

    1999-02-01

    In the year 1991 a research site was set up in Wagna in the western Leibnitz Field (Styria) which permits an examination of seepage water movement and of material transport as a function of the permeability of the uppermost soil layers and the underlying more coarsly clastic sediments under locale-specific natural management systems. Research at this site is largely based on hydrochemical and isotope-hydrological analysis. The {sup 18}O isotope is an ideal natural tracer of water movement. Infiltration water from the thaw following a snowy winter was displaced downward into the unsaturated zone as a result of a major precipitation event of 85.5 mm from April 2 to 5, 1996. This displacement is evident in the {sup 18}O concentrations of the seepage water at various measuring depths. The displacement is associated with recharge events, thaw processes tending to produce dispersive flows and precipitation events leading to ``piston flow effects. Winter precipitation water reaches a depth of 60 to 70 cm by mid-April. The attenuated {sup 18}O concentration reveals the predominant flow characteristics in the different compartments of the unsaturated zone (finely clastic soils, gravels, and sands). [Deutsch] Im Jahre 1991 wurde in Wagna, im westlichen Leibnitzer Feld (Steiermark), eine Forschungsstation errichtet, die es erlaubt, unter ortsueblichen, natuerlichen Bewirtschaftungssystemen die Sickerwasserbewegung und den Transport von Stoffen in Abhaengigkeit von der Durchlaessigkeit der obersten Bodenschichten und der darunter folgenden groeberklastischen Sedimente vor allem auf Grundlage der hydrochemischen und isotopenhydrologischen Analytik zu untesuchen. Die Verwendung des {sup 18}O-Isotops als natuerlicher Tracer repraesentiert in idealer Weise die Bewegung des Wassers. Infiltrationswasser aus der Schneeschmelze nach einem schneereichen Winter wurde durch ein starkes Niederschlagsereignis von 85.6 mm zwischen 2. und 5. April 1996 in der ungesaettigten Zone

  14. In-situ fracture mapping using geotomography and brine tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deadrick, F.J.; Ramirez, A.L.; Lytle, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently assessing the capabilities of high resolution geophysical methods to characterize geologic sites for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. A successful experiment has recently been performed in which salt water tracers and high frequency electromagnetic waves were utilized to map rock mass fracture zones in-situ. Multiple cross-borehole EM transmissions were used to generate a tomographic image of the fractured rock region between two boreholes. The tomographs obtained correlate well with conventional wireline geophysical logs which can be used to infer the location of fractured zones in the rock mass. This indirect data suggests that the geotomography and brine tracer technique may have merit in mapping fractured zones between boreholes.

  15. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Peter [Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Harris, Joel [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-05-08

    The aim of this proposal is to develop, through novel high-temperature-tracing approaches, three technologies for characterizing fracture creation within Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The objective of a first task is to identify, develop and demonstrate adsorbing tracers for characterizing interwell reservoir-rock surface areas and fracture spacing. The objective of a second task is to develop and demonstrate a methodology for measuring fracture surface areas adjacent to single wells. The objective of a third task is to design, fabricate and test an instrument that makes use of tracers for measuring fluid flow between newly created fractures and wellbores. In one method of deployment, it will be used to identify qualitatively which fractures were activated during a hydraulic stimulation experiment. In a second method of deployment, it will serve to measure quantitatively the rate of fluid flowing from one or more activated fracture during a production test following a hydraulic stimulation.

  16. Taiwanese Parents' Experience of Making a “Do Not Resuscitate” Decision for Their Child in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Mei Liu, RN, MN

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Open family visiting hours plus staff sensitivity and communication skills training are needed. To help parents with this difficult signing process, nurses and other professionals in the pediatric intensive care unit need education on initiating the conversation, guiding the parents in expressing their fears, and providing continuing support to parents and children throughout the child's end of life process.

  17. Thermal tracer tomography: from numerical simulation to field implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Choosing heat for subsurface investigations is attractive because changes in temperature can be easily measured, and natural variations are typically slower than the timescale of the experiments. The tomographical setup expands the applicability of such tests to reconstruct the spatial distribution of hydraulic aquifer properties. A new inversion methodology is presented for thermal tracer tomography, using tracer travel times to invert the hydraulic conductivity distribution of the aquifer. If we can assume that heat transport is driven by advection, the travel time of the thermal tracer can be related to the hydraulic parameters of the aquifer. With this assumption other thermal effects such as thermal diffusion or density driven flow appear as noise in the results. To reduce these effects the early time diagnostics of the recorded breakthrough curves are used, focusing on the fastest transport routes between the sources and receivers. The inverse problem of the experiment thus can be formulated as a classical travel time problem, and it can be solved using standard eikonal solver algorithms known from seismic or hydraulic tomography. The method is demonstrated with a high resolution 3-D aquifer analog dataset. The generated 3-D reconstruction reveals the potential of the method, especially in finding the preferential flow paths within the aquifer. Aside from this, the developed method is computationally efficient and can provide results in a fragment of the time required for full-physics model calibration. The method is also tested under field conditions. Four heat tracer injections were performed during a three day field campaign at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland. Pulse signals were used and the temperature evolution was measured downstream using a distributed measurement system. The preliminary results of the tomographic inversion correspond well with the findings of earlier studies from the field site imaging the same geological features as

  18. A Novel Femtosecond-Gated, High-Resolution, Frequency-Shifted Shearing Interferometry Technique for Probing Pre-Plasma Expansion in Ultra-Intense Laser Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Feister, S; Morrison, J T; Frische, K D; Orban, C; Chowdhury, E A; Roquemore, W M

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments (>10$^{18}$ W/cm$^{2}$) with dense targets are highly sensitive to the effect of laser "noise" (in the form of pre-pulses) preceding the main ultra-intense pulse. These system-dependent pre-pulses in the nanosecond and/or picosecond regimes are often intense enough to modify the target significantly by ionizing and forming a plasma layer in front of the target. Time resolved interferometry offers a robust way to characterize the expanding plasma during this period. We have developed a novel pump-probe interferometry system for an ultra-intense laser experiment that uses two short-pulse amplifiers synchronized by one ultra-fast seed oscillator to achieve 40-femtosecond time resolution over hundreds of nanoseconds, using a variable delay line and other techniques. The first of these amplifiers acts as the pump and delivers maximal energy to the interaction region. The second amplifier is frequency shifted and then frequency doubled to generate the femtosecond p...

  19. Three-Dimensional Bayesian Geostatistical Aquifer Characterization at the Hanford 300 Area using Tracer Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Murakami, Haruko; Hahn, Melanie S.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Zachara, John M.; Rubin, Yoram

    2012-06-01

    Tracer testing under natural or forced gradient flow holds the potential to provide useful information for characterizing subsurface properties, through monitoring, modeling and interpretation of the tracer plume migration in an aquifer. Non-reactive tracer experiments were conducted at the Hanford 300 Area, along with constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) profiling. A Bayesian data assimilation technique, the method of anchored distributions (MAD) [Rubin et al., 2010], was applied to assimilate the experimental tracer test data with the other types of data and to infer the three-dimensional heterogeneous structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation. In this study, the Bayesian prior information on the underlying random hydraulic conductivity field was obtained from previous field characterization efforts using the constant-rate injection tests and the EBF data. The posterior distribution of the conductivity field was obtained by further conditioning the field on the temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves at various observation wells. MAD was implemented with the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to cope with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of MAD. A synthetic study proved that the proposed method could effectively invert tracer test data to capture the essential spatial heterogeneity of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field. Application of MAD to actual field data shows that the hydrogeological model, when conditioned on the tracer test data, can reproduce the tracer transport behavior better than the field characterized without the tracer test data. This study successfully demonstrates that MAD can sequentially assimilate multi-scale multi-type field data through a consistent Bayesian framework.

  20. Utility of Flexible Bronchoscopy in Intensive Care Unit: Experience of Türkiye Yüksek İhtisas Education and Research Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Turan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB is the most frequently used tool for invasive pulmonary evaluation with high diagnostic yield and low incidence of major complications. These advantages led to increasing use of FOB in intensive care units. In this article, we discussed our experiences of FOB applications in mechanical ventilated critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: We investigated FOB procedures of 118 patients on mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in intensive care unit retrospectively. All patients’ demographic data, indications, complications and arterial blood gas analyses belong to before and after bronchoscopy were evaluated. Results: FOB indications of the patients were 55.1% for mucoid plug clearance, 9.3% for treatment of atelectasia, 7.6% for identifying hemorrhagic foci, 17.8% for tracheostomy management, 6.8% for bronchoalveolar lavage and 3.4% for exploratory purposes. Overall complication rate of FOB was 11.9%. Arterial blood gas analyses statistically improved after FOB. Conclusion: In this study, we observed that FOB is being performed with many different indications and acceptable complication rates in our intensive care unit and also contributes to diagnose and treatment of intensive care patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 48-53

  1. Exchanging expertise, theory and practice at Master's level healthcare education between Russia and Finland - experiences from an intensive course in St. Petersburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopia, Hanna; Liimatainen, Leena; Turkina, Natalija Victorovna; Filenkov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to raise discussion on the internationalisation possibilities of master's students who study while working. The objective of the article is to describe and share experiences on how to make the development of students' internationalisation competence possible through collaboration with representatives of different cultures during a one-week intensive course. Internationalisation is an essential component in the competence-based curriculum of master's level social and healthcare education. On the other hand, it has been a difficult task for adult students to enhance their internationalisation competence when they pursue studies alongside work. In addition, internationalisation in master's level education has been a key feature both in Finland and in Russia. An intensive course is one educational method to share students' existing professional know-how in an international multi-professional student group and to enable adult students' mobility. This paper describes a one-week intensive course which was carried out in St. Petersburg, Russia in autumn 2008. The course was evaluated by the adult students and their teachers participating in the course. The intensive course increased the degree of transparency and compatibility between higher education and advanced professional education qualifications gained in postgraduate healthcare education in the partner organisations. It seems that an intensive course is a good pedagogical method for enhancing the internationalisation competence of adult students.

  2. This article has been retracted and is available online only: Exploration of Iranian intensive care nurses' experience of end-of-life care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, John; Scholes, Julie

    2012-01-01

    RETRACTION: The following article from Nursing in Critical Care, 'Exploration of Iranian intensive care nurses' experience of end-of-life care: a qualitative study' by Sina Valiee, Reza Negarandeh and Nahid Dehghan Nayeri, published online on 9 May 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors and the journal Editors. The retraction has been agreed due to errors in the manuscript handling process which meant that an early version of the article was published that did not include all the amendments made as part of the peer review process. John Albarran and Julie Scholes Editors Nursing in Critical Care REFERENCE Valiee, S., Negarandeh, R. and Dehghan Nayeri, N. (2012), Exploration of Iranian intensive care nurses' experience of end-of-life care: a qualitative study. Nursing in Critical Care. doi: 10.1111/j.1478-5153.2012.00505.x.

  3. Graphical Analysis of PET Data Applied to Reversible and Irreversible Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jean

    1999-11-18

    Graphical analysis refers to the transformation of multiple time measurements of plasma and tissue uptake data into a linear plot, the slope of which is related to the number of available tracer binding sites. This type of analysis allows easy comparisons among experiments. No particular model structure is assumed, however it is assumed that the tracer is given by bolus injection and that both tissue uptake and the plasma concentration of unchanged tracer are monitored following tracer injection. The requirement of plasma measurements can be eliminated in some cases when a reference region is available. There are two categories of graphical methods which apply to two general types of ligands--those which bind reversibly during the scanning procedure and those which are irreversible or trapped during the time of the scanning procedure.

  4. Effects of experience on the dimensions of intensity, direction and frequency of the competitive anxiety and self-confidence: A study in athletes of individual and team sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gimenes Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study had the following objectives: i to examine the inter-scale correlations between the three dimensions of responses (intensity, direction and frequency of the CSAI-2R and its relationship with competitive experience, and ii evaluate the effect of competitive experience anxiety (cognitive and somatic and self-confidence in the total sample and for different types of modalities (individual vs. team. The sample consisted of 267 athletes (196 male and 71 female, of different sports, aged between 18 and 40 years (M = 24.30, SD = 5.62. Athletes completed the Brazilian version of the CSAI-2, which included the addition of the dimensions of direction and frequency response. Spearman test and Manova were used for the data analysis. Overall, it was found that the competitive experience has a high multivariate and significant effect on the dimensions of competitive anxiety. Both individual and team athletes with low competitive experience showed a trend to report lower levels of self-confidence intensity, compared to counterparts with high competitive experience. These results were discussed in view of the theoretic framework and practical implications planning Sport Psychology intervention programs in local athletes with different backgrounds.

  5. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  6. Cardiometry: pioneering experience in assessment of the heart performance and evaluation of fatal arrhythmia risks in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Chepenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented is an application study of the heart performance phase mechanism with the use of the Cardiocode analyzer based on principles of cardiometry for evaluating iatrogenic complications caused by antiarrhythmic therapy and monitoring the quality of treatment of hemodynamic disorders in inhospital intensive care units. The aim of the study is a thorough estimation of the diagnostic and functional quality of the performance of the Cardiocode device and developing a new methodology of its application under the conditions of the intensive care units, when predicting fatal arrhythmia progression. 50 patients with true cardiogenic shock of different degrees of severity have been examined with Cardiocode. As a result, it is established that the application of the heart cycle phase analysis in diagnostics, hemodynamics evaluation and management with the medication and infusion therapy supported by the Cardiocode device allows reducing the mortality rate by 32 ± 3.4%.

  7. Using the tracer-dilution discharge method to develop streamflow records for ice-affected streams in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capesius, Joseph P.; Sullivan, Joseph R.; O'Neill, Gregory B.; Williams, Cory A.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate ice-affected streamflow records are difficult to obtain for several reasons, which makes the management of instream-flow water rights in the wintertime a challenging endeavor. This report documents a method to improve ice-affected streamflow records for two gaging stations in Colorado. In January and February 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted an experiment using a sodium chloride tracer to measure streamflow under ice cover by the tracer-dilution discharge method. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of obtaining accurate ice-affected streamflow records by using a sodium chloride tracer that was injected into the stream. The tracer was injected at two gaging stations once per day for approximately 20 minutes for 25 days. Multiple-parameter water-quality sensors at the two gaging stations monitored background and peak chloride concentrations. These data were used to determine discharge at each site. A comparison of the current-meter streamflow record to the tracer-dilution streamflow record shows different levels of accuracy and precision of the tracer-dilution streamflow record at the two sites. At the lower elevation and warmer site, Brandon Ditch near Whitewater, the tracer-dilution method overestimated flow by an average of 14 percent, but this average is strongly biased by outliers. At the higher elevation and colder site, Keystone Gulch near Dillon, the tracer-dilution method experienced problems with the tracer solution partially freezing in the injection line. The partial freezing of the tracer contributed to the tracer-dilution method underestimating flow by 52 percent at Keystone Gulch. In addition, a tracer-pump-reliability test was conducted to test how accurately the tracer pumps can discharge the tracer solution in conditions similar to those used at the gaging stations. Although the pumps were reliable and consistent throughout the 25-day study period

  8. Radioisotope tracer study in a sludge hygienization research irradiator (SHRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Thýn, J; Zitný, R; Bhatt, B C

    2001-01-01

    A radioisotope tracer study has been carried out in a batch type sludge hygienization research irradiator with flow from top to bottom, the objective being to measure flow rate, circulation and mixing times and to investigate the hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator for identifying the cause(s) of malfunction. A stimulus-response technique with NH4(82)Br as a tracer was used to measure the above parameters. Experiments were carried out at three different flow rates, i.e 1.0, 0.64 and 0.33 m3/min. Three combined models based on a set of differential equations are proposed and used to simulate the measured tracer concentration curves. The obtained parameters were used to estimate dead volume and analyse hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator. The nonlinear regression problem of model parameter estimation was solved using the Marquardt-Levenberg method. The measured flow rate was found to be in good agreement with the values shown by the flow meter. The circulation times were found to be half of the mixing times. A simple approach for estimation of dose based on a known vertical dose-rate profile inside the irradiator is presented. About one-fourth of the volume of the irradiator was found to be dead at lower flow rates and this decreased with increase in flow rate. At higher flow rates, a semi stagnant volume was found with slow exchange of flow between the active and dead volumes.

  9. Radioisotope tracer study in a sludge hygienization research irradiator (SHRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, H.J. E-mail: hjpant@aspsara.barc.ernet.in; Thyn, J.; Zitny, R.; Bhatt, B.C

    2001-01-15

    A radioisotope tracer study has been carried out in a batch type sludge hygienization research irradiator with flow from top to bottom, the objective being to measure flow rate, circulation and mixing times and to investigate the hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator for identifying the cause(s) of malfunction. A stimulus-response technique with NH{sup 82}{sub 4}Br as a tracer was used to measure the above parameters. Experiments were carried out at three different flow rates, i.e 1.0, 0.64 and 0.33 m{sup 3}/min. Three combined models based on a set of differential equations are proposed and used to simulate the measured tracer concentration curves. The obtained parameters were used to estimate dead volume and analyse hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator. The nonlinear regression problem of model parameter estimation was solved using the Marquardt-Levenberg method. The measured flow rate was found to be in good agreement with the values shown by the flow meter. The circulation times were found to be half of the mixing times. A simple approach for estimation of dose based on a known vertical dose-rate profile inside the irradiator is presented. About one-fourth of the volume of the irradiator was found to be dead at lower flow rates and this decreased with increase in flow rate. At higher flow rates, a semi stagnant volume was found with slow exchange of flow between the active and dead volumes.

  10. Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocabas, I.

    1989-10-01

    This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

  11. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  12. First Experiences in Intensity Modulated Radiation Surgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery: A Dosimetric Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.; Celis-López, Miguel A.

    2003-09-01

    The National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City has acquired a Novalis® shaped beam radiosurgery unit. The institute is pioneer in the use of new technologies for neuroscience. The Novalis® unit allows the use of conformal beam radiosurgery/therapy and the more advanced modality of conformal therapy: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). In the present work we present the first cases of treatments that use the IMRT technique and show its ability to protect organs at risk, such as brainstem and optical vias.

  13. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estima...

  14. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estima...

  15. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  16. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies.

  17. Obstetric indications for admission to the intensive care unit of a tertiary referral center; an Iranian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Rasooli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU in the setting of a tertiary referral hospital in an attempt to identify the risk factors influencing maternal outcome. Method: In a prospective, cross-sectional study, all parturient patients during pregnancy and up to 6 weeks postpartum admitted to the ICU of a tertiary referral hospital between 2013 and 2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, medical histories, pregnancy, and intrapartum and postpartum data were collected. Moreover, interventions and fetomaternal outcomes were noted. Results: Ninety nine obstetric patients were admitted to the ICU. Fifty seven percent of the admissions were postpartum. The main indications for admission were hypertensive disorders (37.3%, and obstetric hemorrhage (13.1%. Non-obstetric indications of ICU admission were the cardiac diseases. Conclusion: The major obstetric indications for admission in our study were hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and obstetric hemorrhage.     Keywords: Pregnancy; Intensive care unit; maternal mortality; morbidity

  18. Luminescent two-color tracer particles for simultaneous velocity and temperature measurements in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massing, J.; Kaden, D.; Kähler, C. J.; Cierpka, C.

    2016-11-01

    The simultaneous and non-intrusive measurement of temperature and velocity fields in flows is of great scientific and technological interest. To sample the velocity and temperature, tracer particle based approaches have been developed, where the velocity is measured using PIV or PTV and the temperature is obtained from the intensity (LIF, thermographic phosphors) or frequency (TLC) of the light emitted or reflected by the tracer particles. In this article, a measurement technique is introduced, that relates the luminescent intensity ratio of individual dual-color luminescent tracer particles to temperature. Different processing algorithms are tested on synthetic particle images and compared with respect to their accuracy in estimating the intensity ratio. Furthermore, polymer particles which are doped with the temperature sensitive dye europium (III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTTA) and the nearly temperature insensitive reference dye perylene are characterized as valid tracers. The results show a reduction of the temperature measurement uncertainty of almost 40% (95% confidence interval) compared to previously reported luminescent particle based measurement techniques for microfluidics.

  19. Relative Roles of Gap Junction Channels and Cytoplasm in Cell-to-Cell Diffusion of Fluorescent Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranyos, Richard G. A.; Caveney, Stanley; Miller, James G.; Petersen, Nils O.

    1987-04-01

    Intercellular (tissue) diffusion of molecules requires cytoplasmic diffusion and diffusion through gap junctional (or cell-to-cell) channels. The rates of tissue and cytoplasmic diffusion of fluorescent tracers, expressed as an effective diffusion coefficient, De, and a cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient, Dcyt, have been measured among the developing epidermal cells of a larval beetle, Tenebrio molitor L., to determine the contribution of the junctional channels to intercellular diffusion. Tracer diffusion was measured by injecting fluorescent tracers into cells and quantitating the rate of subsequent spread into adjacent cells. Cytoplasmic diffusion was determined by fluorescence photobleaching. These experiments show that gap junctional channels constitute approximately 70-80% of the total cell-to-cell resistance to the diffusion of organic tracers at high concentrations in this tissue. At low concentrations, however, the binding of tracer to cytoplasm slows down the cytoplasmic diffusion, which may limit intercellular diffusion.

  20. Two-dimensional thermal simulations of aluminum and carbon ion strippers for experiments at SPIRAL2 using the highest beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kim, V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Lamour, E. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC-Sorbonne Universite, CNRS-UMR 7588, 75252 Paris (France); Lomonosov, I.V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A.R. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Rozet, J.P. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC-Sorbonne Universite, CNRS-UMR 7588, 75252 Paris (France); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholz-Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Sultanov, V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Vernhet, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC-Sorbonne Universite, CNRS-UMR 7588, 75252 Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report on two-dimensional numerical simulations of heating of a rotating, wheel shaped target impacted by the full intensity of the ion beam that will be delivered by the SPIRAL2 facility at Caen, France. The purpose of this work is to study heating of solid targets that will be used to strip the fast ions of SPIRAL2 to the required high charge state for the FISIC (Fast Ion-Slow Ion Collision) experiments. Strippers of aluminum with different emissivities and of carbon are exposed to high beam current of different ion species as oxygen, neon and argon. These studies show that carbon, due to its much higher sublimation temperature and much higher emissivity, is more favorable compared to aluminum. For the highest beam intensities, an aluminum stripper does not survive. However, problem of the induced thermal stresses and long term material fatigue needs to be investigated before a final conclusion can be drawn.

  1. Tracer techniques for urine volume determination and urine collection and sampling back-up system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility, functionality, and overall accuracy of the use of lithium were investigated as a chemical tracer in urine for providing a means of indirect determination of total urine volume by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. Experiments were conducted to investigate the parameters of instrumentation, tracer concentration, mixing times, and methods for incorporating the tracer material in the urine collection bag, and to refine and optimize the urine tracer technique to comply with the Skylab scheme and operational parameters of + or - 2% of volume error and + or - 1% accuracy of amount of tracer added to each container. In addition, a back-up method for urine collection and sampling system was developed and evaluated. This back-up method incorporates the tracer technique for volume determination in event of failure of the primary urine collection and preservation system. One chemical preservative was selected and evaluated as a contingency chemical preservative for the storage of urine in event of failure of the urine cooling system.

  2. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  3. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  4. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  5. A high intensity H2 + multicusp ion source for the isotope decay-at-rest experiment, IsoDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axani, S.; Winklehner, D.; Alonso, J.; Conrad, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Isotope Decay-At-Rest (IsoDAR) experimental program aims to decisively test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. In essence, it is a novel cyclotron based neutrino factory that will improve the frontiers in both high-intensity cyclotrons and electron flavor anti-neutrino sources. By using a source in which the usual H- ions are replaced with the more tightly bound H2 + ions, we can negate the effects of Lorentz stripping in a cyclotron, reduce the overall perveance due to the space-charge effect, and deliver twice the number of protons per nuclei on target. To produce the H2 + , we are currently developing a dedicated multicusp ion source, MIST-1 (generation-1 Multicusp Ion Source Technologies at MIT), and a low-energy beam transport system for the IsoDAR cyclotron. This will increase the overall H2 + current leading up to the cyclotron and improve the emittance of the beam injected into the cyclotron.

  6. Patient safety certification in a Department of Intensive Care Medicine: our experience with standard UNE 179003:2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Bustamante, E; Campillo-Artero, C; Bartual, E; Tuero, G; Marí, J

    2014-01-01

    Systematic and structured methods must be used to ensure that healthcare risks are effectively managed. Spanish standard UNE 179003:2013 provides healthcare organizations with a framework and a systematic protocol for managing patient safety from a clinical and organizational perspective. Furthermore, it is useful in securing an efficient balance among health risk, health outcomes and costs. The UNE 179003:2013 certifies that a clinical service complies with rules and operating procedures aimed at reducing the incidence of adverse events. It also requires mandatory continuous improvement, given that the standard entails frequent monitoring of the risk management system through periodic audits. The aims of this paper are to describe the UNE 179003:2013 certification process in an Intensive Care Unit, propose a risk management program for critical patients, and offer some recommendations regarding its implementation.

  7. Numerical study of tracers transport by a mesoscale convective system over West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Pinty

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the vertical transport from the lower to the upper troposphere in a mesoscale convective system (MCS that occurred over Niger on 15 August 2004. The redistribution of five passive tracers initially confined in horizontally homogeneous layers is analyzed. The monsoon layer tracer (0–1.5 km is the most efficiently transported in the upper troposphere with concentrations 3 to 4 times higher than the other tracers in the anvil. On the contrary the African Easterly Jet tracer (~3 km has the lowest contribution above 5 km. The vertical profiles of the mid-troposphere tracers (4.5–10 km in the MCS exhibit two peaks: one in their initial layers, and the second one at 13–14 km altitude, underlying the importance of mid-tropospheric air in feeding the upper troposphere. Mid-tropospheric tracers also experience efficient transport by convective downdrafts with a consequent increase of their concentrations at the surface. The concentration of the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere tracer exhibits strong gradients at the edge of the cloud, meaning almost no entrainment of this tracer into the cloud. No downward transport from the upper troposphere is simulated below 5 km. A proxy for lightning produced NOx is transported preferentially in the forward anvil in the upper troposphere. Additionally, lateral inflows significantly contribute to the updraft and downdraft airflows emphasizing the three-dimensional structure of the West African MCSs.

  8. Gastrostomy Tube Weaning and Treatment of Severe Selective Eating in Childhood: Experience in Israel Using an Intensive Three Week Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalem, Tzippora; Fradkin, Akiva; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite; Sadeh-Kon, Tal; Goz-Gulik, Tali; Fishler, Yael; Weiss, Batia

    2016-06-01

    Children dependent on gastrostomy tube feeding and those with extremely selective eating comprise the most challenging groups of early childhood eating disorders. We established, for the first time in Israel, a 3 week intensive weaning and treatment program for these patients based on the "Graz model." To investigate the Graz model for tube weaning and for treating severe selective eating disorders in one center in Israel. Pre-program assessment of patients' suitability to participate was performed 3 months prior to the study, and a treatment goal was set for each patient. The program included a multidisciplinary outpatient or inpatient 3 week treatment course. The major outcome measures were achievement of the target goal of complete or partial tube weaning for those with tube dependency, and expansion of the child's nutritional diversity for those with selective eating. Thirty-four children, 28 with tube dependency and 6 with selective eating, participated in four programs conducted over 24 months. Their mean age was 4.3 ± 0.37 years. Of all patients, 29 (85%) achieved the target goal (24 who were tube-dependent and 5 selective eaters). One patient was excluded due to aspiration pneumonia. After 6 months follow-up, 24 of 26 available patients (92%) maintained their target or improved. This intensive 3 week program was highly effective in weaning children with gastrostomy tube dependency and ameliorating severe selective eating. Preliminary evaluation of the family is necessary for completion of the program and achieving the child's personal goal, as are an experienced multidisciplinary team and the appropriate hospital setup, i.e., inpatient or outpatient.

  9. rFRET: A comprehensive, Matlab-based program for analyzing intensity-based ratiometric microscopic FRET experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Szöllősi, János

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) remains one of the most widely used methods for assessing protein clustering and conformation. Although it is a method with solid physical foundations, many applications of FRET fall short of providing quantitative results due to inappropriate calibration and controls. This shortcoming is especially valid for microscopy where currently available tools have limited or no capability at all to display parameter distributions or to perform gating. Since users of multiparameter flow cytometry usually apply these tools, the absence of these features in applications developed for microscopic FRET analysis is a significant limitation. Therefore, we developed a graphical user interface-controlled Matlab application for the evaluation of ratiometric, intensity-based microscopic FRET measurements. The program can calculate all the necessary overspill and spectroscopic correction factors and the FRET efficiency and it displays the results on histograms and dot plots. Gating on plots and mask images can be used to limit the calculation to certain parts of the image. It is an important feature of the program that the calculated parameters can be determined by regression methods, maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and from summed intensities in addition to pixel-by-pixel evaluation. The confidence interval of calculated parameters can be estimated using parameter simulations if the approximate average number of detected photons is known. The program is not only user-friendly, but it provides rich output, it gives the user freedom to choose from different calculation modes and it gives insight into the reliability and distribution of the calculated parameters. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. Plutonium as a tracer for soil erosion assessment in northeast China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Pan, Shaoming;

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and agricultural problems faced by human society. Assessing intensity is an important issue for controlling soil erosion and improving eco-environmental quality. The suitability of the application of plutonium (Pu) as a tracer for soil erosion...... assessment in northeast China was investigated by comparing with that of 137Cs. Here we build on preliminary work, in which we investigated the potential of Pu as a soil erosion tracer by sampling additional reference sites and potential erosive sites, along the Liaodong Bay region in northeast China, for Pu...... in cultivated land. The baseline inventories of 239+240Pu and 137Cs were 88.4 and 1688Bqm-2 respectively. Soil erosion rates estimated by 239+240Pu tracing method were consistent with those obtained by the 137Cs method, confirming that Pu is an effective tracer with a similar tracing behavior to that of 137Cs...

  11. Rovibrational intensities for the Delta V = 1 bands of the X 3Sigma(-) NH radical - Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Guelachvili, G.; Lopez-Pineiro, A.; Tipping, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The vibrational transition dipole moment for the highly reactive radical species NH in its ground electronic state is obtained via the Herman-Wallis effect manifest in emission spectra produced in a plasma reactor. The results of these experiments on the five lowest Delta V = 1 bands are in good agreement with high quality ab initio calculations of the electric dipole moment function.

  12. A novel femtosecond-gated, high-resolution, frequency-shifted shearing interferometry technique for probing pre-plasma expansion in ultra-intense laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feister, S., E-mail: feister.7@osu.edu; Orban, C. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45459 (United States); Nees, J. A. [Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45459 (United States); Center for Ultra-Fast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Morrison, J. T. [Fellow, National Research Council, Washington, D.C. 20001 (United States); Frische, K. D. [Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45459 (United States); Chowdhury, E. A. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Intense Energy Solutions, LLC., Plain City, Ohio 43064 (United States); Roquemore, W. M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments (>10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) with dense targets are highly sensitive to the effect of laser “noise” (in the form of pre-pulses) preceding the main ultra-intense pulse. These system-dependent pre-pulses in the nanosecond and/or picosecond regimes are often intense enough to modify the target significantly by ionizing and forming a plasma layer in front of the target before the arrival of the main pulse. Time resolved interferometry offers a robust way to characterize the expanding plasma during this period. We have developed a novel pump-probe interferometry system for an ultra-intense laser experiment that uses two short-pulse amplifiers synchronized by one ultra-fast seed oscillator to achieve 40-fs time resolution over hundreds of nanoseconds, using a variable delay line and other techniques. The first of these amplifiers acts as the pump and delivers maximal energy to the interaction region. The second amplifier is frequency shifted and then frequency doubled to generate the femtosecond probe pulse. After passing through the laser-target interaction region, the probe pulse is split and recombined in a laterally sheared Michelson interferometer. Importantly, the frequency shift in the probe allows strong plasma self-emission at the second harmonic of the pump to be filtered out, allowing plasma expansion near the critical surface and elsewhere to be clearly visible in the interferograms. To aid in the reconstruction of phase dependent imagery from fringe shifts, three separate 120° phase-shifted (temporally sheared) interferograms are acquired for each probe delay. Three-phase reconstructions of the electron densities are then inferred by Abel inversion. This interferometric system delivers precise measurements of pre-plasma expansion that can identify the condition of the target at the moment that the ultra-intense pulse arrives. Such measurements are indispensable for correlating laser pre-pulse measurements

  13. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  14. 双棱镜干涉实验的深入研究%Intensive Study of Double Prism Interference Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹真; 邹淑娟; 陈娟; 权慧

    2014-01-01

    This experiment, by using the method of the double prism for two-beam interference to measure the wavelength of light waves, explains the experimental principle. The experiment adopts sodium light, mercury lamp and laser light to test the experimental principle, describes how to quickly adjust the clear interference fringes and how to measure the distance between the two imaginary coherent light sources, and summarizes the deficiencies to use two lens imaging method to measure the distance between two virtual light sources. The experiment also mea-sures relevant experimental data to calculate the wavelength of light waves, and discusses the relevant amounts of experiments on the experiment.%实验用双棱镜获得双光束干涉的方法测量了光波的波长,解释了用双棱镜干涉测光波波长的实验原理。实验应用了钠光、汞灯、激光等光源对双棱镜干涉测光波波长,叙述了如何快速的调节出清晰的干涉条纹以及测量两虚相干光源间的距离,总结了用透镜两次成像法测两虚光源的间距的不足,测得相关实验数据,计算出相关光波的波长,并讨论了实验的相关量对实验的影响。

  15. Intensive mobilities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of facto....... By exploring how experiences of long-distance workers become constituted by a range of different material forces enables us to more sensitively consider the practical, technical, and political implications of this increasingly prevalent yet underexplored regime of work....... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  16. Intensive care survivors' experiences of ward-based care: Meleis' theory of nursing transitions and role development among critical care outreach services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Thompson, Andrew; Walsh, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To explore the psychosocial needs of patients discharged from intensive care, the extent to which they are captured using existing theory on transitions in care and the potential role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services. Intensive care patients are at an increased risk of adverse events, deterioration or death following ward transfer. Nurse-led critical care outreach, follow-up or liaison services have been adopted internationally to prevent these potentially avoidable sequelae. The need to provide patients with psychosocial support during the transition to ward-based care has also been identified, but the evidence base for role development is currently limited. Twenty participants were invited to discuss their experiences of ward-based care as part of a broader study on recovery following prolonged critical illness. Psychosocial distress was a prominent feature of their accounts, prompting secondary data analysis using Meleis et al.'s mid-range theory on experiencing transitions. Participants described a sense of disconnection in relation to profound debilitation and dependency and were often distressed by a perceived lack of understanding, indifference or insensitivity among ward staff to their basic care needs. Negotiating the transition between dependence and independence was identified as a significant source of distress following ward transfer. Participants varied in the extent to which they were able to express their needs and negotiate recovery within professionally mediated boundaries. These data provide new insights into the putative origins of the psychosocial distress that patients experience following ward transfer. Meleis et al.'s work has resonance in terms of explicating intensive care patients' experiences of psychosocial distress throughout the transition to general ward-based care, such that the future role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services may be more theoretically informed

  17. Kangaroo Care: Experiences and Needs of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care: A Systematic Review ‘Parents’ Experience of Kangaroo Care’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriels, karlijn; Brouwer, AJ; maat, Jessica; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review is focusing on the experiences and needs of parents with infants within NICU regarding Kangaroo Care. Ten studies with qualitative designs were included. Kangaroo Care was overall experienced as positive; giving parents the opportunity to get to know their babies and (re-) const

  18. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  19. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Chemical and Isotopic Tracers for Characterization Of Groundwater Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Singleton, M J; Carle, S F; Esser, B K

    2007-09-13

    In many regions, three dimensional characterization of the groundwater regime is limited by coarse well spacing or borehole lithologic logs of low quality. However, regulatory requirements for drinking water or site remediation may require collection of extensive chemical and water quality data from existing wells. Similarly, for wells installed in the distant past, lithologic logs may not be available, but the wells can be sampled for chemical and isotopic constituents. In these situations, a thorough analysis of trends in chemical and isotopic constituents can be a key component in characterizing the regional groundwater system. On a basin or subbasin scale, especially in areas of intensive groundwater management where artificial recharge is important, introduction of an extrinsic tracer can provide a robust picture of groundwater flow. Dissolved gases are particularly good tracers since a large volume of water can be tagged, there are no real or perceived health risks associated with the tracer, and a very large dynamic range allows detection of a small amount of tagged water in well discharge. Recent applications of the application of extrinsic tracers, used in concert with intrinsic chemical and isotopic tracers, demonstrate the power of chemical analyses in interpreting regional subsurface flow regimes.

  20. 3D radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer: the Shanghai Cancer Hospital experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the outcomes of irradiation by using three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer. Between 2007 and 2010, 50 patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were treated using 3D-RT or IMRT. The median time interval between the initial treatment and the start of irradiation was 12 (6-51 months. Salvage surgery was performed before irradiation in 5 patients, and 38 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent 3D-RT, and 34 patients received IMRT. Median follow-up for all the patients was 18.3 months. Three-year overall survival and locoregional control were 56.1% and 59.7%, respectively. Three-year progression-free survival and disease-free survival were 65.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Nine patients developed grade 3 leukopenia. Grade 5 acute toxicity was not observed in any of the patients; however, 2 patients developed Grade 3 late toxicity. 3D-RT or IMRT is effective for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer, with the 3-year overall survival of 56.1%, and its complications are acceptable. Long-term follow-up and further studies are needed to confirm the role of 3D-RT or IMRT in the multimodality management of the disease.

  1. EARLY STAGE RESPONSES OF INTENSIVE CARE UNITS DURING MAJOR DISASTERS: FROM THE EXPERIENCES OF THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Iida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of intensive care units (ICU) during disasters, including the responses of our ICU following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Our ICU comprises 8 beds for postoperative inpatients and those with rapidly deteriorating conditions; 20 beds in an emergency unit for critically ill patients; and 17 beds for neonates. It is important to secure empty beds when a major disaster occurs, as was the case after the Great Hanshin Earthquake, due to the resulting large numbers of trauma patients. Therefore, each ICU section cooperated to ensure sufficient space for admissions following the Great East Japan Earthquake. However, unlike the Great Hanshin Earthquake, securing beds was ultimately unnecessary due to the nature of the recent disaster, which also consisted of a subsequent tsunami and nuclear accident. Therefore, air quality monitoring was required on this occasion due to the risk of environmental radioactive pollution from the nuclear disaster causing problems with artificial respiration management involving atmospheric air. The variability in damage arising during different disasters thus requires a flexible response from ICUs that handle seriously ill patients.

  2. Outcome of Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Who Require Intensive Care Unit Support: A Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Becerra, Samantha; Labastida-Mercado, Nancy; Rosales-Padrón, Jaime; García-Chavez, Jessica; Soto-Vega, Elena; Rivadeneyra-Espinoza, Liliana; León-Peña, Andres A; Fernández-Lara, Danitza; Dominguez-Cid, Monica; Anthon-Méndez, Javier; Arizpe-Bravo, Daniel; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a patient who has been grafted with hematopoietic stem cells is a serious event, but the role of the ICU in this setting remains controversial. Data were analyzed from patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla, México, between May 1993 and October 2014. In total, 339 patients were grafted: 150 autografts and 189 allografts; 68 of the grafted patients (20%) were admitted to the ICU after transplantation: 27% of the allografted and 11% of the autografted patients (p = 0.2). Two of 17 autografted patients (12%) and 5 of 51 allografted patients (10%) survived. All patients who required insertion of an endotracheal tube died, whereas 7 of 11 patients without invasive mechanical ventilation survived (p = 0.001). Only 10% of the grafted patients survived their stay in the ICU; this figure is lower than those reported from other centers and may reflect several facts, varying from the quality of the ICU support to ICU admission criteria to the initial management of all the grafts in an outpatient setting, which could somehow delay the arrival of patients to the hospital. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Pugni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group. All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1% neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5% received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16. At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria, ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01. The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock.

  4. First clinical experience with a dedicated MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound system for breast cancer ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Knuttel, Floor M.; Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, Utrecht (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dalen, Thijs van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schubert, Gerald [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Weits, Teun [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vaessen, Paul H.H.B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Anesthesiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gorp, Joost M.H.H. van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the safety and feasibility of MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation in breast cancer patients using a dedicated breast platform. Patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer underwent partial tumour ablation prior to surgical resection. MR-HIFU ablation was performed using proton resonance frequency shift MR thermometry and an MR-HIFU system specifically designed for breast tumour ablation. The presence and extent of tumour necrosis was assessed by histopathological analysis of the surgical specimen. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationship between sonication parameters, temperature increase and size of tumour necrosis at histopathology. Ten female patients underwent MR-HIFU treatment. No skin redness or burns were observed in any of the patients. No correlation was found between the applied energy and the temperature increase. In six patients, tumour necrosis was observed with a maximum diameter of 3-11 mm. In these patients, the number of targeted locations was equal to the number of areas with tumour necrosis. A good correlation was found between the applied energy and the size of tumour necrosis at histopathology (Pearson = 0.76, p = 0.002). Our results show that MR-HIFU ablation with the dedicated breast system is safe and results in histopathologically proven tumour necrosis. (orig.)

  5. Intensive cisplatin/oral etoposide for epithelial ovarian cancer: the Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre experience: too toxic for relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounaris, Ioannis; Iddawela, Mahesh; Parkinson, Christine; Pratt, Jennie; Hatcher, Helen; Basu, Bristi; Tan, Li Tee; Brenton, James D; Earl, Helena M

    2016-03-01

    Intensive cisplatin and oral etoposide for relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), commonly known as the van der Burg (VDB) protocol, has been reported to improve response rates and progression-free survival. We report on all patients with relapsed EOC treated on the VDB protocol at the Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre. From the institutional databases, we identified all patients treated since 2001. We extracted demographic, clinical, treatment, and toxicity data and outcomes. We used Cox regression to identify predictors of survival. A total of 35 patients were treated on the VDB protocol. Toxicity was significant, with grade 3/4 fatigue, nausea and vomiting affecting 46, 46 and 29% of patients, respectively. Six patients had grade 3/4 infection and four (11%) deaths occurred on treatment. Efficacy was encouraging, with a radiological response rate of 43%, a median progression-free survival of 5.8 months and a median overall survival of 14.1 months. No significant difference in efficacy was seen between platinum-resistant and sensitive patients. We report significant activity of the VDB protocol in a routine clinical setting. However, the high rates of serious toxicity and treatment-related deaths among patients treated with palliative intent proved unacceptable. The Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre no longer uses this regimen in women with relapsed EOC.

  6. Transformationally decoupling clustering and tracer bias

    CERN Document Server

    Neyrinck, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Gaussianizing transformations are used statistically in many non-cosmological fields, but in cosmology, we are only starting to apply them. Here I explain a strategy of analyzing the 1-point function (PDF) of a spatial field, together with the 'essential' clustering statistics of the Gaussianized field, which are invariant to a local transformation. In cosmology, if the tracer sampling is sufficient, this achieves two important goals. First, it can greatly multiply the Fisher information, which is negligible on nonlinear scales in the usual $\\delta$ statistics. Second, it decouples clustering statistics from a local bias description for tracers such as galaxies.

  7. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  8. A review of methods for modelling environmental tracers in groundwater: Advantages of tracer concentration simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnadge, Chris; Smerdon, Brian D.

    2014-11-01

    Mathematical models of varying complexity have been developed since the 1960s to interpret environmental tracer concentrations in groundwater flow systems. This review examines published studies of model-based environmental tracer interpretation, the progress of different modelling approaches, and also considers the value of modelling tracer concentrations directly rather than estimations of groundwater age. Based on citation metrics generated using the Web of Science and Google Scholar reference databases, the most highly utilised interpretation approaches are lumped parameter models (421 citations), followed closely by direct age models (220 citations). A third approach is the use of mixing cell models (99 citations). Although lumped parameter models are conceptually simple and require limited data, they are unsuitable for characterising the internal dynamics of a hydrogeological system and/or under conditions where large scale anthropogenic stresses occur within a groundwater basin. Groundwater age modelling, and in particular, the simulation of environmental tracer transport that explicitly accounts for the accumulation and decay of tracer mass, has proven to be highly beneficial in constraining numerical models. Recent improvements in computing power have made numerical simulation of tracer transport feasible. We argue that, unlike directly simulated ages, the results of tracer mass transport simulation can be compared directly to observations, without needing to correct for apparent age bias or other confounding factors.

  9. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy for the Treatment of Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: Initial Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Byung Ihn; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Joo Ha [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (United States)

    2011-04-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential clinical value of concurrent chemotherapy and pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (CCHT), as well as the safety of pulsed HIFU, for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Twelve patients were treated with HIFU from October 2008 to May 2010, and three of them underwent CCHT as the main treatment (the CCHT group). The overall survival (OS), the time to tumor progression (TTP), the complications and the current performance status in the CCHT and non-CCHT groups were analyzed. Nine patients in the non-CCHT group were evaluated to determine why CCHT could not be performed more than twice. The OS of the three patients in the CCHT group was 26.0, 21.6 and 10.8 months, respectively, from the time of diagnosis. Two of them were alive at the time of preparing this manuscript with an excellent performance status, and one of them underwent a surgical resection one year after the initiation of CCHT. The TTP of the three patients in the CCHT group was 13.4, 11.5 and 9.9 months, respectively. The median OS and TTP of the non-CCHT group were 10.3 months and 4.4 months, respectively. The main reasons why the nine patients of the non-CCHT group failed to undergo CCHT more than twice were as follows: pancreatitis (n = 1), intolerance of the pain during treatment (n = 4), palliative use of HIFU for pain relief (n = 1) and a poor physical condition due to disease progression (n = 3). No major complications were encountered except one case of pancreatitis. This study shows that CCHT is a potentially effective and safe modality for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer

  10. Coronary risk reduction through intensive community-based lifestyle intervention: the Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, H A

    1998-11-26

    Vigorous cholesterol lowering with diet, drugs, or a combination has been shown to slow, arrest, or even reverse atherosclerosis. Residential lifestyle intervention programs have successfully lowered serum cholesterol levels and other coronary risk factors, but they have the disadvantages of high cost and difficulty with long-term adherence. Community-based risk-reduction programs have the potential to effect change at low cost and improve long-term adherence. To assess the effectiveness of, and to develop a model for, such programs, the community-based Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) was developed in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In the intensive (30-day, 40-hour), hospital-based educational program, participants are encouraged to exercise 30 minutes a day and to embrace a largely unrefined plant-food-centered diet that is high in complex carbohydrates and fiber; very low in fat, animal protein, sugar, and salt; and virtually free of cholesterol. A total of 304 enrollees in the first program were at elevated risk of coronary artery and related diseases: 70% were > or =10% above their ideal weight, 14% had diabetes, 47% had hypertension, and 32% had a history of coronary artery disease. Of the enrollees, 288 "graduated" from the program (123 men, 165 women; mean age was 55+/-11 years). Various markers of disease risk, including serum blood lipids and fasting blood glucose concentrations, were measured before and after the program. At 4 weeks, overall improvements in the participants' laboratory test results, blood pressures, weights, and body mass indexes were highly significant (p 200 mg/dL in men, 200-299 mg/dL in women).

  11. Preliminary safety and efficacy results with robotic high-intensity focused ultrasound : A single center Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There are no Indian data of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU. Being an alternative, still experimental modality, reporting short-term safety outcome is paramount. Aims : This study was aimed at to assess the safety and short-term outcome in patients with prostate cancer treated by HIFU. Settings and Design : A retrospective study of case records of 30 patients undergoing HIFU between January 2008 to September 2010 was designed and conducted. Materials and Methods : The procedural safety was analyzed at 3 months. Follow-up consisted of 3 monthly prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels and transrectal biopsy if indicated. All the patients had a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Results : A mean prostate volume of 26.9 ± 8.5 cm 3 was treated in a mean time of 115 ± 37.4 min. There was no intraoperative complication. The postoperative pain visual analogue score at day 0 was 2.1 ± 1.9 and at day 1 was 0.4 ± 0.8 on a scale of 1-10. Mean duration of perurethral catheter removal was 3.9 days. The complications after treatment were: LUTS in seven patients, stress incontinence in two, stricture in two, and symptomatic urinary tract infection in five. Average follow-up duration was 10.4 months (range, 6-20 months. Mean time to obtain PSA nadir was 6 ± 3 months with a median PSA nadir value of 0.3 ng/ml. Two patients had positive prostatic biopsy in the localized (high risk group. Conclusions : HIFU was safe in carcinoma prostate patients. The short-term results were efficacious in localized disease. The low complication rates and favorable functional outcome support the planning of further larger studies.

  12. Delineation of Fast Flow Paths in Porous Media Using Noble Gas Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, G B; Moran, J E

    2002-03-21

    Isotopically enriched xenon isotopes are ideal for tracking the flow of relatively large volumes of groundwater. Dissolved noble gas tracers behave conservatively in the saturated zone, pose no health risk to drinking water supplies, and can be used with a large dynamic range. Different Xe isotopes can be used simultaneously at multiple recharge sources in a single experiment. Results from a tracer experiment at a California water district suggests that a small fraction of tracer moved from the recharge ponds through the thick, unconfined, coarse-grained alluvial aquifer to high capacity production wells at a horizontal velocity of 6 m/day. In contrast, mean water residence times indicate that the average rate of transport is 0.5 to 1 m/day.

  13. When Phase Contrast Fails: ChainTracer and NucTracer, Two ImageJ Methods for Semi-Automated Single Cell Analysis Using Membrane or DNA Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsson, Simon; Vischer, Norbert O E; Gao, Yongqiang; Hamoen, Leendert W

    2016-01-01

    Within bacterial populations, genetically identical cells often behave differently. Single-cell measurement methods are required to observe this heterogeneity. Flow cytometry and fluorescence light microscopy are the primary methods to do this. However, flow cytometry requires reasonably strong fluorescence signals and is impractical when bacteria grow in cell chains. Therefore fluorescence light microscopy is often used to measure population heterogeneity in bacteria. Automatic microscopy image analysis programs typically use phase contrast images to identify cells. However, many bacteria divide by forming a cross-wall that is not detectable by phase contrast. We have developed 'ChainTracer', a method based on the ImageJ plugin ObjectJ. It can automatically identify individual cells stained by fluorescent membrane dyes, and measure fluorescence intensity, chain length, cell length, and cell diameter. As a complementary analysis method we developed 'NucTracer', which uses DAPI stained nucleoids as a proxy for single cells. The latter method is especially useful when dealing with crowded images. The methods were tested with Bacillus subtilis and Lactococcus lactis cells expressing a GFP-reporter. In conclusion, ChainTracer and NucTracer are useful single cell measurement methods when bacterial cells are difficult to distinguish with phase contrast.

  14. An Experimental Study of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound on Pig's Pancreas and the Early Clinical Experience on Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, LiuLin; Huang, XiaoBo; Yao, SongSen; Yu, JinSheng; Hwang, JooHa; Fei, XingBo; Yu, QiuHong; Xue, WeiCheng; Zheng, ZhuYing; Wang, XiaoFeng

    2007-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of in vivo pig pancreases, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HIFU in the clinical treatment of pancreatic cancer in humans. Methods: HIFU was performed in 12 domestic pig pancreases in vivo with varying acoustic energies. The safety of HIFU treatments was assessed by necropsy. The pathology and microstructure of the treated pancreases were evaluated using standard histology and transmission electron microscopy. Following the animal studies 62 patients with advanced pancreas cancer were treated with 250 - 420 W of acoustic power. There were 3 patients with stage II, 23 patients with stage III, and 36 patients with stage IV disease. Results: In animal studies, precise regions of coagulation necrosis were identified on pathology in 8 specimens that were treated with 420 W or 645 W acoustic power. Treatment effects were unable to be identified in 4 specimens treated with 300˜340 W acoustic power; however, damages to the cells microstructure and apoptosis were identified on electron microscopy. Damage to the stomach and colon were seen in some animals treated with 645 W. In the clinical treatments in humans the following were seen: local tumor control: complete response (CR) 0%, partial response (PR) 17.7%, no change (NC) 54.8%, progressive disease (PD) 27.5%. Pain relief was achieved in 87.1% of patients. The median survival for stage II and III patients was 11.2 months and median survival for stage IV patients was 5.6 months. The total median survival was 8.6 months. The survival rate at 1 year was as follows: stage II and III 42.3%, stage IV 5.6%. The survival rate at 2 years was as follows: stage II and III 15.4%, stage IV 0%. There were no severe complications or adverse events related to HIFU therapy seen in any of the patients treated. Conclusions: This study supports the feasibility of HIFU in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The clinical

  15. Blood tracer kinetics in the arterial tree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Kellner

    Full Text Available Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data.

  16. Blood tracer kinetics in the arterial tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Elias; Gall, Peter; Günther, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Fleysher, Roman; Kiselev, Valerij G

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data.

  17. Fractal tracer distributions in turbulent field theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. Lundbek; Bohr, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    We study the motion of passive tracers in a two-dimensional turbulent velocity field generated by the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. By varying the direction of the velocity-vector with respect to the field-gradient we can continuously vary the two Lyapunov exponents for the particle motion and t...

  18. Suitability of tracers; Eignung von Tracern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrologie

    1999-02-01

    Hydrological tracer techniques are a means of making statements on the direction and speed of underground water. One of the simpler tasks is to find out whether there is hydrological communication between two given points. This requires a determination of the direction of flow, which places less exacting demands on the properties of the tracer than does the task of determining the flow velocity of underground water. Tracer methods can serve to infer from flow velocity the distance (flow) velocity, which is defined as the ratio between the distance between two points located in flow direction and the actual time it takes water to flow from one to the other. [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe der hydrologischen Markierungstechniken koennen Aussagen ueber die Richtung und die Geschwindigkeit von Bewegungen des unterirdischen Wassers gemacht werden. Der einfachere Fall liegt vor, wenn festgestellt werden soll, ob zwischen zwei Punkten eine hydrologische Verbindung besteht. Bei dieser Fliessrichtungsbestimmung sind die Forderungen an die Eigenschaften der einzusetzenden Tracer geringer als bei der Bestimmung der Geschwindigkeit des unterirdischen Wassers. Von den Geschwindigkeiten des unterirdischen Wassers ist die Abstands-(Fliess)geschwindigkeit, die definiert ist durch das Verhaeltnis aus dem Abstand und der wahren Fliesszeit zwischen zwei in Bewegungsrichtung gelegenen Punkten, durch Tracermethoden zu bestimmen. (orig.)

  19. Travel-time-based thermal tracer tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    Active thermal tracer testing is a technique to get information about the flow and transport properties of an aquifer. In this paper we propose an innovative methodology using active thermal tracers in a tomographic setup to reconstruct cross-well hydraulic conductivity profiles. This is facilitated by assuming that the propagation of the injected thermal tracer is mainly controlled by advection. To reduce the effects of density and viscosity changes and thermal diffusion, early-time diagnostics are used and specific travel times of the tracer breakthrough curves are extracted. These travel times are inverted with an eikonal solver using the staggered grid method to reduce constraints from the pre-defined grid geometry and to improve the resolution. Finally, non-reliable pixels are removed from the derived hydraulic conductivity tomograms. The method is applied to successfully reconstruct cross-well profiles as well as a 3-D block of a high-resolution fluvio-aeolian aquifer analog data set. Sensitivity analysis reveals a negligible role of the injection temperature, but more attention has to be drawn to other technical parameters such as the injection rate. This is investigated in more detail through model-based testing using diverse hydraulic and thermal conditions in order to delineate the feasible range of applications for the new tomographic approach.

  20. Effects of an intensive middle school science experience on the attitude toward science, self-esteem, career goal orientation, and science achievement of eighth-grade female students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tammy Kay

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of a year long intensive extracurricular middle school science experience on the self-esteem, career goal orientation, and attitude toward science of eighth grade female students using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Sixteen self-selected eighth grade female students participated in extracurricular science experiences such as camping, rock climbing, specimen collecting and hiking, as well as meeting and interacting with female science role models. Data was collected using pre- and posttest methods using the Children's Attitude Toward Science Survey, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, and the Self-Directed Search (SDS) Career Explorer. End of year science course grades were examined for seventh and eighth grades and compared to first semester high school grades. Qualitative data was in the form of: (1) focus group interviews conducted prior to field experiences, at the end of all field experiences, and at the end of the first semester of high school, and (2) journal entries from throughout the project. Qualitative data was examined for changes in student perceptions of science as a discipline, self as scientist, women in science, and social comparison of self in science.

  1. Halon-1301, a new Groundwater Age Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Monique; van der Raaij, Rob; Morgenstern, Uwe; Jackson, Bethanna

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge and to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and limitations of each tracer method when applied alone. There is a need for additional, complementary groundwater age tracers. We recently discovered that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate [Beyer et al, 2014]. Halon-1301 can be determined along with SF6, SF5CF3 and CFC-12 in groundwater using a gas chromatography setup with attached electron capture detector developed by Busenberg and Plummer [2008]. Halon-1301 has not been assessed in groundwater. This study assesses the behaviour of Halon-1301 in water and its suitability as a groundwater age tracer. We determined Halon-1301 in 17 groundwater and various modern (river) waters sites located in 3 different groundwater systems in the Wellington Region, New Zealand. These waters have been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 with mean residence times ranging from 0.5 to over 100 years. The waters range from oxic to anoxic and some show evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allows us to assess the different properties affecting the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer, such as its conservativeness in water and local contamination potential. The samples are analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6simultaneously, which allows identification of issues commonly faced when using gaseous tracers such as contamination with modern air during sampling. Overall we found in the assessed groundwater samples Halon-1301 is a feasible new groundwater tracer. No sample indicated significantly elevated

  2. An uncertainty inclusive un-mixing model to identify tracer non-conservativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Franks, Stewart; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2015-04-01

    uncertainty was only marginally impacted by the corrupted tracer. Improvement of uncertainty resulted from increasing the number of tracers in both the perfect and corrupted datasets. FR2000 was capable of detecting non-conservative tracer behaviour within the range of mean source values, therefore, it provided a more sensitive screening technique than assessing target values against source data. Non-conservative behaviour was identified in field data however only at a significant degree of corruption. Whilst further testing is required to determine the impact of individual and combined uncertainty components on synthetic, controlled experiments and field data, this study provides a framework for future assessment of uncertainty in un-mixing models.

  3. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  4. Laplace transform in tracer kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Eliete B., E-mail: eliete@pucrs.br [Instituto do Cerebro (InsCer/FAMAT/PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS, (Brazil). Faculdade de Matematica

    2013-07-01

    The main objective this paper is to quantify the pharmacokinetic processes: absorption, distribution and elimination of radiopharmaceutical(tracer), using Laplace transform method. When the drug is administered intravenously absorption is complete and is available in the bloodstream to be distributed throughout the whole body in all tissues and fluids, and to be eliminated. Mathematical modeling seeks to describe the processes of distribution and elimination through compartments, where distinct pools of tracer (spatial location or chemical state) are assigned to different compartments. A compartment model is described by a system of differential equations, where each equation represents the sum of all the transfer rates to and from a specific compartment. In this work a two-tissue irreversible compartment model is used for description of tracer, [{sup 18}F]2-fluor-2deoxy-D-glucose. In order to determine the parameters of the model, it is necessary to have information about the tracer delivery in the form of an input function representing the time-course of tracer concentration in arterial blood or plasma. We estimate the arterial input function in two stages and apply the Levenberg-Marquardt Method to solve nonlinear regressions. The transport of FDG across de arterial blood is very fast in the first ten minutes and then decreases slowly. We use de Heaviside function to represent this situation and this is the main contribution of this study. We apply the Laplace transform and the analytical solution for two-tissue irreversible compartment model is obtained. The only approach is to determinate de arterial input function. (author)

  5. Intensity Mapping of the History of Stellar Emission with the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Alicia E.; Arai, Toshiaki; Battle, John; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha R.; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Lee, Dae Hee; Mason, Peter; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Onishi, Yosuke; Shirahata, Mai; Tsumurai, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the near-infrared Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) anisotropy find excess spatial power above the level predicted by known galaxy populations at large angular scales. These anisotropies trace spatial variations in integrated photon production, so measurements of EBL surface brightness fluctuations provide a complete census of the emission from stars summed over cosmic history. As a result, EBL fluctuations contain contributions from objects forming during the Epoch of Reionization (EOR), from the integrated galactic light (IGL), and faint, extended components such as intra-halo light (IHL) from stars tidally stripped from galaxies during merger events. Additional measurements with greater sensitivity, spectral range, and spectral resolution are required to disentangle these contributions.The Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment 2 (CIBER-2) is an instrument optimized for the measurement of near-infrared EBL anisotropies. As the Earth's atmosphere generates time-varying near-infrared emission, CIBER-2 is launched on a sounding rocket from which it will carry out multiwavelength imaging in six spectral bands that span the visible to near-infrared. The 2.4 square degree images allow CIBER-2 to produce measurements of EBL fluctuations with high fidelity on large angular scales. The Lyman break feature from EOR sources provides a unique spectral feature which can be used to disentangle the high from the low redshift contributions to the anisotropy signal. Measurement in six independent wavebands allows detailed cross-correlation studies to constrain the source of the excess fluctuations at large angular scales. We provide an overview of the CIBER-2 instrument and explain CIBER-2 spectral feature identification and cross-correlation study methodologies.

  6. An inexpensive field fluorometer for hydrogeological tracer tests with three tracers and turbidity measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Schnegg, Pierre-André

    2005-01-01

    The Geomagnetism Group of the University of Neuchâtel has recently designed a flow-through field fluorometer with added spectral capabilities for hydrological tracer tests. This instrument is equipped with four optical axes allowing water sample illumination with four independent light sources at different wavelenghs covering the full spectrum from UV to red. As many as three conveniently selected (dye) tracers can be simultaneously measured and separeted from a cocktail. Careful turbidity me...

  7. EVALUATION OF LEAKAGE FROM FUME HOODS USING TRACER GAS, TRACER NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPOWDER HANDLING TEST METHODOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R.; Bennett, James S.; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tr...

  8. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  9. LC-MS solvent composition monitoring and chromatography alignment using mobile phase tracer molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sharon S; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2005-12-27

    In the field of proteomics, reproducible liquid chromatographic description of analytes is often a key element for the differentiation or identification of proteins or peptides for clinical or biological research projects. However, analyte identification by retention time can be problematic in proteomics where lack of standardization can result in significantly different chromatography for the same analytes analyzed on different machines. Here we present a novel method of monitoring the mobile phase gradient of LC-MS/MS analyses by monitoring the ion current signal intensities of tracer molecules dissolved in the mobile phase solvents. The tracers' ion current signal intensities chronicled gradient fluctuations, did not adversely affect the number or quality of CID-based sequence identifications, and had lower run-to-run variance when compared to retention time.

  10. Natural tracer profiles across argillaceous formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, Martin, E-mail: mazurek@geo.unibe.ch [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern (Switzerland); Alt-Epping, Peter [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern (Switzerland); Bath, Adrian [Intellisci, Willoughby on the Wolds, Loughborough LE12 6SZ (United Kingdom); Gimmi, Thomas [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niklaus Waber, H. [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern (Switzerland); Buschaert, Stephane [Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Canniere, Pierre De; Craen, Mieke De [SCK-CEN, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Gautschi, Andreas [Nagra, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland); Savoye, Sebastien [IRSN, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Vinsot, Agnes [Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Wemaere, Isabelle [SCK-CEN, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wouters, Laurent [Ondraf/Niras, 1210 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Solute transport processes in clay and shale formations at nine sites are examined. > Conservative pore-water tracers (e.g. Cl{sup -}, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 2}H, He) show regular profiles. > These indicate the dominance of diffusive transport over times of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years. > The contribution of vertical advection to transport is limited or negligible. > Modelled evolution times are in line with independent palaeo-hydrogeological data. - Abstract: Argillaceous formations generally act as aquitards because of their low hydraulic conductivities. This property, together with the large retention capacity of clays for cationic contaminants, has brought argillaceous formations into focus as potential host rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive and other waste. In several countries, programmes are under way to characterise the detailed transport properties of such formations at depth. In this context, the interpretation of profiles of natural tracers in pore waters across the formations can give valuable information about the large-scale and long-term transport behaviour of these formations. Here, tracer-profile data, obtained by various methods of pore-water extraction for nine sites in central Europe, are compiled. Data at each site comprise some or all of the conservative tracers: anions (Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}), water isotopes ({delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 2}H) and noble gases (mainly He). Based on a careful evaluation of the palaeo-hydrogeological evolution at each site, model scenarios are derived for initial and boundary pore-water compositions and an attempt is made to numerically reproduce the observed tracer distributions in a consistent way for all tracers and sites, using transport parameters derived from laboratory or in situ tests. The comprehensive results from this project have been reported in . Here the results for three sites are presented in detail, but the conclusions are based on model interpretations of the

  11. Catalytically driven assembly of trisegmented metallic nanorods and polystyrene tracer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Erik L; Wang, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2016-03-07

    Trisegmented Au-Ru-Au and Ru-Au-Ru nanorods catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, pumping fluid along their axis as "pullers" and "pushers" respectively. Numerical simulations and experiments with passive tracer particles show that catalytically generated hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces both contribute to pairwise and collective particle assembly.

  12. An assessment of selected properties of the fluorescent tracer, Tinopal CBS-X related to conservative behavior, and suggested improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licha, Tobias; Niedbala, Anne; Bozau, Elke; Geyer, Tobias

    2013-03-01

    SummaryA conservative or well known reactive behavior of water tracers is a prerequisite in the quantitative evaluation of their tracer breakthrough curves. The fluorescent dye, Tinopal CBS-X, is one of the few licensed fluorescent dyes for water tracing with safe use. Its main advantage is its blue fluorescence, which is barely visible to the human eye and thus can be used when coloring water must be avoided. However, scientists have described the recovery of this dye as poor to very poor in field tracer experiments. Hence, this study focuses on examining the interaction of the main water chemistry with Tinopal CBS-X by determining the solubility products of the dye with most common cations. The findings of this investigation reveal that the tracer forms precipitates of very low aqueous solubility with di- and trivalent cations (pKsp 6.4-16.8). As a consequence, Tinopal CBS-X is not a conservative tracer and respective tracer breakthrough curves will exhibit strong tailings at least in part, as result of precipitations formed. The addition of a chemical modifier, EDTA, is suggested to enhance the solubility of Tinopal CBS-X in order to overcome its non-conservative behavior. Equations for estimating the amount of EDTA necessary are provided. In the light of these results, earlier reported tracer breakthrough curves are revisited and re-interpreted.

  13. A Very Intense Neutrino Super Beam Experiment for Leptonic CP Violation Discovery based on the European Spallation Source Linac: A Snowmass 2013 White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Baussan, E; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Lindroos, M.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J.Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-01-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few $\\mu$s with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground ...

  14. L'insegnamento intensivo del progetto. Un'esperienza di didattica internazionale / Intensive teaching for the architectural project. An international didactic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Marzo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available L'articolo illustra l'esperienza dell'Erasmus Intensive Programme intitolato “Fortified Places” svoltosi in tre edizioni, tra l'aprile del 2012 e il febbraio 2014, a Venezia, Parigi e Siviglia, e indaga il metodo di insegnamento del progetto adottato nell'iniziativa. La discussione sui progetti si è svolta a più livelli incrociati tra loro: studenti-studenti, studenti-docenti, docenti-docenti e questo ha arricchito notevolmente lo scambio di informazioni e metodi didattici intorno al progetto. Svolgendosi in tale modalità, il trasferimento del sapere, dei punti di vista e delle conoscenze è avvenuto sia sull’asse verticale (docente-allievo, sia sull’asse orizzontale (studente-studente, docente-docente. / This article outlines the experience of the Erasmus Intensive Programme entitled "Fortified Places" which took place in three editions, between April 2012 and February 2014, in Venice, Paris and Seville, and investigates the project’s teaching method adopted in such initiative. The discussions surrounding the projects took place at several different intersecting levels: student-to-student, student-to-teacher, teacher-to-teacher; and this greatly enhanced the exchange of information and teaching methods. Given this modality, the transfer of knowledge, skills and different points of view could occur both vertically (teacher - student as well as horizontally (student-student, teacher-teacher.

  15. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  16. Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-scale spatial moment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor the migration of a saline tracer in a two-well pumping-injection experiment conducted at the Massachusetts Military Reservation in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. After injecting 2200 mg/L of sodium chloride for 9 hours, ERT data sets were collected from four wells every 6 hours for 20 days. More than 180,000 resistance measurements were collected during the tracer test. Each ERT data set was inverted to produce a sequence of 3-D snapshot maps that track the plume. In addition to the ERT experiment a pumping test and an infiltration test were conducted to estimate horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity values. Using modified moment analysis of the electrical conductivity tomograms, the mass, center of mass, and spatial variance of the imaged tracer plume were estimated. Although the tomograms provide valuable insights into field-scale tracer migration behavior and aquifer heterogeneity, standard tomographic inversion and application of Archie's law to convert electrical conductivities to solute concentration results in underestimation of tracer mass. Such underestimation is attributed to (1) reduced measurement sensitivity to electrical conductivity values with distance from the electrodes and (2) spatial smoothing (regularization) from tomographic inversion. The center of mass estimated from the ERT inversions coincided with that given by migration of the tracer plume using 3-D advective-dispersion simulation. The 3-D plumes seen using ERT exhibit greater apparent dispersion than the simulated plumes and greater temporal spreading than observed in field data of concentration breakthrough at the pumping well.

  17. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  18. Accurate blood flow measurements: are artificial tracers necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelma, Christian; Kloosterman, Astrid; Hierck, Beerend P; Westerweel, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case), as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements). These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented.

  19. Using biofuel tracers to study alternative combustion regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, J. H.; Flowers, D. L.; Buchholz, B. A.; Dibble, R. W.

    2007-06-01

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and engines is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO2 emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions and higher noise. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions. However, relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic due to economic constraints and difficult due to the emerging PM standards. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K inhibits NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to improve our combustion modeling.

  20. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-07-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors.

  1. Isotopologues of dense gas tracers in NGC 1068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junzhi; Qiu, Jianjie [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, 200030, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Zhi-Yu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Shi, Yong [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang, Jiangshui [Center For Astrophysics, GuangZhou University, 510006, GuangZhou (China); Fang, Min, E-mail: jzwang@shao.ac.cn [ESO, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munich (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    We present observations of isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward the nuclear region of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 m telescope. We detected four isotopic lines (H{sup 13}CN 1-0, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 1-0, HN{sup 13}C 1-0, and HC{sup 18}O{sup +} 1-0) at the 3 mm band with the IRAM 30 m telescope and obtained upper limits of other lines. We calculated optical depths of dense gas tracers with the detected isotopic lines of HCN 1-0, HCO{sup +} 1-0, and HNC 1-0. We find that the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N abundance ratio is greater than 420 if we adopt the upper limit of HC{sup 15}N(1-0) emission. Combining this with fluxes of 1-0 lines from IRAM 30 m observations and the upper limit of 3-2 lines from APEX 12 m observations, we also estimated the excitation condition of molecular gas in the nuclear region of NGC 1068, which is less dense than that in the extreme starburst regions of galaxies.

  2. Accurate blood flow measurements: are artificial tracers necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Poelma

    Full Text Available Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case, as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements. These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented.

  3. Tracer Flux Balance at an Urban Canyon Intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Robins, Alan G.

    2010-05-01

    Despite their importance for pollutant dispersion in urban areas, the special features of dispersion at street intersections are rarely taken into account by operational air quality models. Several previous studies have demonstrated the complex flow patterns that occur at street intersections, even with simple geometry. This study presents results from wind-tunnel experiments on a reduced scale model of a complex but realistic urban intersection, located in central London. Tracer concentration measurements were used to derive three-dimensional maps of the concentration field within the intersection. In combination with a previous study (Carpentieri et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorol 133:277-296, 2009) where the velocity field was measured in the same model, a methodology for the calculation of the mean tracer flux balance at the intersection was developed and applied. The calculation highlighted several limitations of current state-of-the-art canyon dispersion models, arising mainly from the complex geometry of the intersection. Despite its limitations, the proposed methodology could be further developed in order to derive, assess and implement street intersection dispersion models for complex urban areas.

  4. The medical applications of radioactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.G.

    1947-12-31

    This report provides a broad yet in depth overview of the use of radioactive materials as tracers in medicine and biology for the period of 1935--1947. Particular attention is paid to is of radio-sodium, radio-iodine, radio-iron, radio-phosphorus, radio-strontium, and fission products. The main thrust of this paper is human rather than animal work and focuses in work that has been published.

  5. Molecules as tracers of galaxy evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costagliola, F.; Aalto, S.; I. Rodriguez, M.;

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the molecular gas properties of a sample of 23 galaxies in order to find and test chemical signatures of galaxy evolution and to compare them to IR evolutionary tracers. Observation at 3 mm wavelengths were obtained with the EMIR broadband receiver, mounted on the IRAM 30 m telesco...... detect the molecule in its vibrationally excited state.We find low HNC/HCN line ratios (...

  6. Very Massive Tracers and Higher Derivative Biases

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir; Angulo, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Most of the upcoming cosmological information will come from analyzing the clustering of the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe through LSS or CMB observations. It is therefore essential to be able to understand their behavior with exquisite precision. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a consistent framework to make predictions for LSS observables in the mildly non-linear regime. In this paper we focus on biased tracers. We argue that in calculations at a given order in the dark matter perturbations, highly biased tracers will underperform because of their larger higher derivative biases. A natural prediction of the EFTofLSS is therefore that by simply adding higher derivative biases, all tracers should perform comparably well. We implement this prediction for the halo-halo and the halo-matter power spectra at one loop, and the halo-halo-halo, halo-halo-matter, and halo-matter-matter bispectra at tree-level, and compare with simulations. We find good agreement ...

  7. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  8. Real-time monitoring of the penetration of amphiphilic acrylate copolymer in leather using a fluorescent copolymer as tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jin-Xia; Shi, Lu; Peng, Bi-Yu

    2015-12-01

    A fluorescent tracer, poly (acrylic-co-stearyl acrylate-co-3-acryloyl fluorescein) [poly (AA-co-SA-co-Ac-Flu)], used for real-time monitoring the penetration of amphiphilic acrylate copolymer, poly (acrylic-co-stearyl acrylate) [poly (AA-co-SA)], in leather was synthesized by radical polymerization of acrylic, stearyl acrylate and fluorescent monomer, 3-acryloyl fluorescein (Ac-Flu). The structure, molecular weight, introduced fluorescent group content and fluorescent characteristics of the fluorescent tracer and target copolymer, amphiphilic acrylate copolymer, were also characterized. The results show that the tracer presents the similar structural characteristics to the target and enough fluorescence intensity with 1.68 wt % of the fluorescent monomer introduced amount. The vertical section of the leather treated with the target copolymer mixing with 7% of the tracer exhibits evident fluorescence, and the change of fluorescence intensity along with the vertical section with treating time increasing can reflect the penetration depth of the target copolymer. The introduction of the fluorescent group in polymer structure through copolymerization with a limited amount of fluorescent monomer, Ac-Flu, is an effective way to make a tracer to monitor the penetration of the target in leather, which provides a new thought for the penetration research of syntans such as vinyl copolymer materials in leather manufacture.

  9. Preparation of Plant 41Ca Tracer Samples for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Qing-zhang1;JANG Ping-ping3;LIN De-yu4;YANG Xian-lin1;DOU Liang1;PANG Yi-jun1;WANG Xiao-ming1;ZHANG Hui1,5;YANG Xu-ran1;WU Shao-yong1;GAO Dong-sheng2;LI Ling2;WANG Lei2;SUN Ke-peng2;ZHOU Jun2;DONG Ke-jun1;HE Ming1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the metabolism of plants and animals. In this paper, the preparation method of plant 41Ca for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS measurement was developed for the first time in China. AMS, with its advantages of high sensitivity, small dose of radioactivity, high accuracy, large measuring range, and long tracer cycle, can be used to measure cosmogenic nuclide 41Ca , which has long half-life. The intensity of the beam in ion source is an important parameter for the sensitivity of AMS measurement. The high beam current can improve the sensitivity of AMS. The preparation methods of plant samples of 41Ca tracer were systematically studied to obtain high beam current using wet, dry and a combining method with wet and dry re-fluoride. A reliable preparation procedure of plant samples for 41Ca tracer and its optimization parameters were determined by testing beam currents of various samples and lay a foundation for the 41Ca-AMS technology at plant tracer applications.

  10. NeuriteTracer: a novel ImageJ plugin for automated quantification of neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Madeline; Thiemann, Joachim; Bar-Or, Amit; Fournier, Alyson E

    2008-02-15

    In vitro assays to measure neuronal growth are a fundamental tool used by many neurobiologists studying neuronal development and regeneration. The quantification of these assays requires accurate measurements of neurite length and neuronal cell numbers in neuronal cultures. Generally, these measurements are obtained through labor-intensive manual or semi-manual tracing of images. To automate these measurements, we have written NeuriteTracer, a neurite tracing plugin for the freely available image-processing program ImageJ. The plugin analyzes fluorescence microscopy images of neurites and nuclei of dissociated cultured neurons. Given user-defined thresholds, the plugin counts neuronal nuclei, and traces and measures neurite length. We find that NeuriteTracer accurately measures neurite outgrowth from cerebellar, DRG and hippocampal neurons. Values obtained by NeuriteTracer correlate strongly with those obtained by semi-manual tracing with NeuronJ and by using a sophisticated analysis package, MetaXpress. We reveal the utility of NeuriteTracer by demonstrating its ability to detect the neurite outgrowth promoting capacity of the rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Our plugin is an attractive alternative to existing tracing tools because it is fully automated and ready for use within a freely accessible imaging program.

  11. ATTILA - Atmospheric Tracer Transport In a Langrangian Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reithmeier, C.; Sausen, R.

    2000-07-01

    The Lagrangian model ATTILA (atmospheric tracer transport in a Lagrangian model) has been developed to treat the global-scale transport of passive trace species in the atmosphere within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM). ATTILA runs online within the GCM ECHAM4 and uses the GCM produced wind field to advect the centrois of 80.000 to 180.000 constant mass air parcels into which the model atmosphere is divided. Each trace constituent is thereby represented by a mass mixing ratio in each parcel. ATTILA contains state-of-the-art parameterizations of convection, turbulent boundary layer mixing, and interparcel transport and provides an algorithm to map the tracer concentrations from the trajectories to the ECHAM model grid. We use two experiments to evaluate the transport characteristics of ATTILA against observations and the standard semiLagrangian transport scheme of ECHAM. In the first experiment we simulate the distribution of the short-lived tracer Radon ({sup 222}Rn) in order to examine fast vertical transport over continents, and long-range transport from the continents to remote areas. In the second experiment, we simulate the distribution of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) that was injected into the northern stratosphere during the nuclear weapon tests in the early 60ties, in order to examine upper tropospheric and stratospheric transport characteristics. ATTILA compares well to the observations and in many respects to the semiLagrangian scheme. However, contrary to the semiLagrangian scheme, ATTILA shows a greatly reduced meridional transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and a reduced downward flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere, especially in midlatitudes. Since both transport schemes use the same model meteorology, we conclude that the often cited enhanced meridional transport and overestimated downward flux in ECHAM as described above is rather due to the numerical properties of the semiLagrangian scheme than due to an

  12. ATTILA - Atmospheric Tracer Transport In a Langrangian Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reithmeier, C.; Sausen, R.

    2000-07-01

    The Lagrangian model ATTILA (atmospheric tracer transport in a Lagrangian model) has been developed to treat the global-scale transport of passive trace species in the atmosphere within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM). ATTILA runs online within the GCM ECHAM4 and uses the GCM produced wind field to advect the centrois of 80.000 to 180.000 constant mass air parcels into which the model atmosphere is divided. Each trace constituent is thereby represented by a mass mixing ratio in each parcel. ATTILA contains state-of-the-art parameterizations of convection, turbulent boundary layer mixing, and interparcel transport and provides an algorithm to map the tracer concentrations from the trajectories to the ECHAM model grid. We use two experiments to evaluate the transport characteristics of ATTILA against observations and the standard semiLagrangian transport scheme of ECHAM. In the first experiment we simulate the distribution of the short-lived tracer Radon ({sup 222}Rn) in order to examine fast vertical transport over continents, and long-range transport from the continents to remote areas. In the second experiment, we simulate the distribution of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) that was injected into the northern stratosphere during the nuclear weapon tests in the early 60ties, in order to examine upper tropospheric and stratospheric transport characteristics. ATTILA compares well to the observations and in many respects to the semiLagrangian scheme. However, contrary to the semiLagrangian scheme, ATTILA shows a greatly reduced meridional transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and a reduced downward flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere, especially in midlatitudes. Since both transport schemes use the same model meteorology, we conclude that the often cited enhanced meridional transport and overestimated downward flux in ECHAM as described above is rather due to the numerical properties of the semiLagrangian scheme than due to an

  13. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  14. Nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit: when should Pseudomonas aeruginosa be suspected? Experience of the French national surveillance of nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit, Rea-Raisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venier, A-G; Lavigne, T; Jarno, P; L'heriteau, F; Coignard, B; Savey, A; Rogues, A-M

    2012-01-01

    Individual and ward risk factors for P. aeruginosa-induced urinary tract infection in the case of nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit were determined with hierarchical (multilevel) logistic regression. The 2004-2006 prospective French national intensive care unit nosocomial infection surveillance dataset was used and 3252 patients with urinary tract infection were included; 16% were infected by P. aeruginosa. Individual risk factors were male sex, duration of stay, antibiotics at admission and transfer from another intensive care unit. Ward risk factors were patient turnover and incidence of P. aeruginosa-infected patients.

  15. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  16. Early life low intensity stress experience modifies acute stress effects on juvenile brain cell proliferation of European sea bass (D. Labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokos, S; Pavlidis, M; Yiotis, T; Tsalafouta, A; Papandroulakis, N; Dermon, C R

    2017-01-15

    Early life adversity may be critical for the brain structural plasticity that in turn would influence juvenile behaviour. To address this, we questioned whether early life environment has an impact on stress responses latter in life, using European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, as a model organism. Unpredictable chronic low intensity stress (UCLIS), using a variety of moderate intensity stressors, was applied during two early ontogenetic stages, flexion or formation all fins. At juvenile stage, fish were exposed to acute stress and plasma cortisol, brain mRNA expression of corticosteroid receptors' genes (gr1, gr2, mr) and brain cell proliferation (using BrdU immunohistochemistry) were determined in experimental and matched controls. UCLIS treatment specifically decreased brain gr1 expression in juveniles, but had no effect on the juvenile brain cell proliferation pattern within the major neurogenic zones studied of dorsal (Dm, Dld) and ventral (Vv) telencephalic, preoptic (NPO) areas, periventricular tectum gray zone (PGZ) and valvula cerebellum (VCe). In contrast, exposure to acute stress induced significant plasma cortisol rise, decreases of cerebral cell proliferation in juveniles, not previously exposed to UCLIS, but no effect detected on the expression levels of gr1, gr2 and mr in all groups of different early life history. Interestingly, juveniles with UCLIS history showed modified responses to acute stress, attenuating acute stress-induced cell proliferation decreases, indicating a long-lasting effect of early life treatment. Taken together, early life mild stress experience influences an acute stress plasticity end-point, cerebral cell proliferation, independently of the stress-axis activation, possibly leading to more effective coping styles.

  17. Impacts of Siberian biomass burning on organic aerosols over the North Pacific Ocean and the Arctic: primary and secondary organic tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xinming; Xie, Zhouqing; Zhang, Zhou; Sun, Liguang

    2013-04-02

    During the 2003 Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE2003) from the Bohai Sea to the high Arctic (37°N-80°N), filter-based particle samples were collected and analyzed for tracers of primary and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) as well as water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Biomass burning (BB) tracer levoglucosan had comparatively much higher summertime average levels (476 ± 367 pg/m(3)) during our cruise due to the influence of intense forest fires then in Siberia. On the basis of 5-day back trajectories, samples with air masses passing through Siberia had organic tracers 1.3-4.4 times of those with air masses transporting only over the oceans, suggesting substantial contribution of continental emissions to organic aerosols in the marine atmosphere. SOA tracers from anthropogenic aromatics were negligible or not detected, while those from biogenic terpenenoids were ubiquitously observed with the sum of SOA tracers from isoprene (623 ± 414 pg/m(3)) 1 order of magnitude higher than that from monoterpenes (63 ± 49 pg/m(3)). 2-Methylglyceric acid as a product of isoprene oxidation under high-NOx conditions was dominant among SOA tracers, implying that these BSOA tracers were not formed over the oceans but mainly transported from the adjacent Siberia where a high-NOx environment could be induced by intense forest fires. The carbon fractions shared by biogenic SOA tracers and levoglucosan in WSOC in our ocean samples were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those previously reported in continental samples, BB emissions or chamber simulation samples, largely due to the chemical evolution of organic tracers during transport. As a result of the much faster decline in levels of organic tracers than that of WSOC during transport, the trace-based approach, which could well reconstruct WSOC using biogenic SOA and BB tracers for continental samples, only explained ∼4% of measured WSOC during our expedition if the same tracer-WSOC or tracer-SOC relationships were

  18. Size dependence of tracer diffusion in a laponite colloidal gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Laure; Barentin, Catherine; Colombani, Jean; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2009-10-20

    Using a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, we present measurements of probe diffusion in a colloidal glass-a Laponite suspension. By varying the probe size over 2 orders of magnitude, as well as the concentration of the colloidal glass, we evidence and quantify the deviations of the probe diffusivity from the bulk Stokes-Einstein expectations. These experiments suggest that the probe diffusion in the dynamically arrested Laponite structure is mainly controlled by the ratio between the probe size and the typical clay platelets interdistance. Comparing with a simple hindered diffusion mechanism, the reduction of tracer diffusion is discussed in terms of the hydrodynamic interaction of the probe with the Laponite structure. Finally, these results can be interpreted in terms of a scale dependent viscosity of the colloidal glass.

  19. A comparison of SLAM and SCIPUFF using SEADEX tracer data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchison, M.K.

    1999-07-01

    The transport and diffusion models SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated Puff) and SLAM (Short-range Layered Atmospheric Model) were compared against each other using the land-sea breeze tracer data set SEADEX (The Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment). Predicted concentrations from both of these models were compared to observed concentrations at distances up to 15 km from a source for two of nine SEADEX releases. Emphasis was placed on a comparison of model output produced using various types of weather data (surface and upper-air). For the SEADEX release 1, SLAM was better at predicting the peak concentrations while SCIPUFF did a better job of predicting the overall plume widths. For SEADEX release 6, both SCIPUFF and SLAM performed similarly. However, SLAM moved the plume too fast compared to SCIPUFF and the actual observed plume location.

  20. Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy of deeply buried tracer layers as a density and temperature diagnostic for the fast ignitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitenko, A. I., Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences

    1997-03-26

    The fast igniter concept for inertial confinement fusion relies on the generation of hot electrons, produced by a short-pulse ultra-high intensity laser, which propagate through high-density plasma to deposit their energy in the compressed fuel core and heat it to ignition. In preliminary experiments designed to investigate deep heating of high density matter, we used a 20 joule, 0.5-30 ps laser to heat solid targets, and used emission spectroscopy to measure plasma temperatures and densities achieved at large depths (2-20 microns) away from the initial target surface. The targets consisted of an Al tracer layer buried within a massive CH slab H-like and He-like line emission was then used to diagnose plasma conditions. We observe spectra from tracer layers buried up to 20 microns deep, measure emission durations of up to 200 ps, measure plasma temperatures up to T{sub c} = 650 eV, and measure electron densities near 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}. Analysis is in progress, but the data appear to be in reasonable agreement with simulations when space-charge induced inhibition is included in hot-electron transport.

  1. Soil pipe flow tracer experiments: 1. Connectivity and transport characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much debate has occurred in catchment hydrology regarding the connectivity of flow paths from upslope areas to catchment outlets. This study was conducted in two catchments, one with three upper branches, in a loess soil with a fragipan that fosters lateral flow and exhibits an extensive distributio...

  2. Detection of tracer materials in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, A.; Lovelock, J.E.

    1981-12-08

    As oxygen is an electron absorber it is desirable, when monitoring an atmospheric flow for the presence of tracer materials capable of detection in an electron capture detector, to remove the oxygen from the flow to the detector. The invention introduces a hydrogen supply directly into the atmospheric flow to allow the hydrogen to combine catalytically with the oxygen content of the flow to form water or water vapor. The thus formed water or water vapor is extracted from the flow proceeding to the detector. The reaction can occur within a palladium or palladium alloy conduit forming a part of the flow path to the detector.

  3. The application of electrical conductivity as a tracer for hydrograph separation in urban catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, B.A.; Wollheim, W.M.; Feng, X.; Vororsmarty, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Two-component hydrograph separation was performed on 19 low-to-moderate intensity rainfall events in a 4.1-km2 urban watershed to infer the relative and absolute contribution of surface runoff (e.g. new water) to stormflow generation between 2001 and 2003. The electrical conductivity (EC) of water was used as a continuous and inexpensive tracer, with order of magnitude differences in precipitation (12-46 ??S/cm) and pre-event streamwater EC values (520-1297 ??S/cm). While new water accounted for most of the increased discharge during storms (61-117%), the contribution of new water to total discharge during events was typically lower (18-78%) and negatively correlated with antecedent stream discharge (r2 = 0??55, p < 0??01). The amount of new water was positively correlated with total rainfall (r2 = 0??77), but hydrograph separation results suggest that less than half (9-46%) of the total rainfall on impervious surfaces is rapidly routed to the stream channel as new water. Comparison of hydrograph separation results using non-conservative tracers (EC and Si) and a conservative isotopic tracer (??D) for two events showed similar results and highlighted the potential application of EC as an inexpensive, high frequency tracer for hydrograph separation studies in urban catchments. The use of a simple tracer-based approach may help hydrologists and watershed managers to better understand impervious surface runoff, stormflow generation and non-point-source pollutant loading to urban streams. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure: ten-year’s clinical experience of a Respiratory Semi-Intensive Care Unit (VERSIONE IN ITALIANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Naldi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough several prospective controlled randomizedtrials demonstrated the success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV in selected cases of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (IRA in setting with different care levels, clinical practice data about the use of NIV in the “real world” are limited.AimTo report the results of our clinical experience in NIV applied for IRA in the Respiratory Semi-Intensive Care Unit (UTSIR allocated within the Respiratory Division of Arezzo in the years 1996-2006 in terms of: tolerance, effects upon arterial blood gases, success rate and predictors of failure.MethodsThree hundred filthy of the 1484 patients (23.6% consecutively admitted for IRA to our RespiratoryDivision during the study period received NIV in addition to standard therapy, according to the pre-defined routinely used criteria.ResultsEight patients (2.3% did not tolerated NIV becauseof mask discomfort, while the remaining 342 (M: 240, F: 102; median (interquartiles age: 74.0 (68.0-79.3 yrs; COPD: 69.3% were ventilatedfor >1 hour. Arterial blood gases significantlyimproved after two hours of NIV (mean (standard deviation pH: 7.33 (0.07 versus 7.28 (7.25-7.31, p 48 hrs of ventilation after an initial positive response.ConclusionsAs results of our ten-year’s clinical experience performed in a UTSIR, NIV is confirmed to be well tolerated, effective in improving arterial blood gases and useful in avoiding intubation in most IRA episodes non-responder to standard therapy.

  5. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.; Petersson, K. F.; White, I. R.; Henshaw, S. J.; Nickless, G.; Lovelock, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Dunbar, T.; Wood, C. R.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from two tracer (cyclic perfluorocarbon) experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment) campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study vertical dispersion profiles and transport times in central London. Vertical gradients are contrasted with the relevant Pasquill stability classes. Estimation of lateral advection and vertical mixing times are made and compared with previous measurements. Data are then compared with a simple operational dispersion model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign. This correlates dosage with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analyses illustrate the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  6. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from two tracer (cyclic perfluorocarbon experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study vertical dispersion profiles and transport times in central London. Vertical gradients are contrasted with the relevant Pasquill stability classes. Estimation of lateral advection and vertical mixing times are made and compared with previous measurements. Data are then compared with a simple operational dispersion model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign. This correlates dosage with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analyses illustrate the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  7. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Shallcross

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from cyclic perfluorocarbon tracer experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study dispersion over a large vertical gradient. These gradients are then compared with classical Gaussian profiles of the relevant stability classes over a range of distances as well as interpretation of data with reference to both anemometry and LIDAR measurements made. Data are then compared with an operational model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign looking at dosage compared with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analysis illustrates the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  8. Thermal OH Emission, A New Tracer for Galaxy Structure: Z-Thickness and Rolling Motion of the Perseus Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Philip; Allen, Ronald J.; Hogg, David E.

    2016-06-01

    Recent observations with the Green Bank Telescope (Allen et al. 2015) have shown that high-sensitivity measurements of OH 18-cm emission can be a useful alternative tracer for the large-scale distribution of molecular gas in the Galactic ISM. This component of the ISM is not well traced by 3-mm CO(1-0) emission. In the quiescent regions examined so far, fewer than half of the OH spectral features found show corresponding CO emission in the CfA survey (Dame el al. 2001). The intensities of the two main-line OH transitions at 1665 and 1667 MHz are in the “thermal” or LTE ratio of 5:9 and emanate from low-opacity gas with a wide spatial distribution similar to the HI. This morphology resembles that of the “dark gas” (or “dark neutral medium”) postulated by Grenier et al. (2005) as the possible source of target nucleii required to explain the excess gamma ray emission from the Galactic ISM. OH 18-cm emission provides a new tool for studies of the quantity, distance, and kinematics of this new CO-dark molecular component of the ISM. As a demonstration of the utility of this new tool, we apply it to two questions about the molecular structure of the Perseus Arm: the thickness in the z-direction, and the rolling motions of the arm discovered in the earliest HI maps of the Galaxy (e.g. Oort 1962, Rougoor 1964). Using OH emission as a molecular tracer, we find that the molecular component of gas in the Perseus Arm has a comparable z-thickness to that measured using HI, although it appears to be clumpier. OH also shows that the molecular component experiences the “rolling motions” known from the HI data. As a molecular tracer, OH allows more regions to be observed than can be observed using CO(1-0), and as an optically-thin emission line, OH can provide direct column density measurements.

  9. The structure of the haze plume over the Indian Ocean during INDOEX: tracer simulations and LIDAR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Forêt

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional nested tracer simulations of a pollution plume originating from the Indian sub-continent over the Indian Ocean in the framework of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX between 5 and 9 March 1999 were performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS to provide insight into the transport patterns of the pollutants as well as investigate the dynamical mechanisms controlling the vertical structure of the plume and its evolution in the vicinity of the Maldives Islands. Airborne and ground-based LIDAR observations of the structure of the haze plume made on 7 March 1999 were used to assess the quality of the simulations as well as the impact of grid resolution on the vertical structure of the simulated plume. It is shown that, over the Arabian Sea, in the vicinity of the Maldives Islands, the pollutants composing the plume observed by the airborne LIDAR essentially originated from the city of Madras and that the vertical structure of the plume was controlled by the diurnal cycle of the continental boundary layer depth. A combination of tracer simulations and remote sensing observations (airborne LIDAR, ship-borne photometer, ground-based LIDAR in Goa was used to analyse the diurnal evolution of the haze plume over the sea. We find evidence that the sea breeze circulation and orographic lifting taking place in the southern part of the Indian sub-continent during the day time play a crucial role in the modulation of the continental boundary layer depth, and in turn, the haze plume depth. The dynamical processes, as well as entrainment at the top of the marine atmospheric boundary layer, also play a crucial role in re-circulating a fraction of the tracers transported over ocean by the monsoon flow above the marine atmospheric boundary layer in the landward (southwesterly branch of breeze circulation during the next day. This in turn leads to pollutant accumulation in the vicinity of the Indian coastline. Nevertheless, this

  10. Tracer Dispersion in a Multi-compartment Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Skvortsov, A; Gamble, G; Roberts, M; Ilaya, O; Pitaliadda, D

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study of the tracer dispersion in a complex structure is presented. A point source of tracer (dyed salt) was placed inside a multi-compartment structure embedded in water tank. This experimental setting corresponds to a hazardous tracer release inside the engineering structure (building, ship, aircarft etc). A system of conductivity sensors was deployed to monitor the propagation of a tracer plume in the structure, including tracer trapping inside some compartments and its release to the outside environment through the external openings. The experimental data is processed by employing the ideas of scaling and self-similarity of underlying transport processes. The established and validated scaling laws provide a rigorous way to up-scale the results of laboratory modeling to real operational scenarios and can be used as an important step in the development of risk-assessment models for the first responders to hazardous releases. Keywords: hazardous plume, tracer dispersion, diffusion and advecti...

  11. A study of the lived experiences of registered nurses who have provided end-of-life care within an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holms, Natalie; Milligan, Stuart; Kydd, Angela

    2014-11-01

    End-of-life care (EOLC) in the intensive care unit (ICU) has received little attention in the literature in comparison to the considerable amount of existing literature available on EOLC in other areas of nursing. The ethos of the ICU is to preserve life, but as many patients die in this environment, EOLC should be an integral part of the ICU nurse's role. This qualitative study explored the experiences of ICU nurses who had provided EOLC to patients and their families. Participants were purposively recruited within one local ICU (n=5). A semi-structured interview format was used to guide in-depth interviews. The themes identified from the interview analysis were; use of integrated care systems, communication, the environment, education and training, staff distress. The findings suggest that ICU nurses do not feel adequately prepared to give proficient EOLC. Those who felt more confident in EOLC had learned what to do over time. Appropriate training, support and improved communication between staff, patients and families is necessary for good EOLC in ICUs.

  12. A comparative analysis of computational approaches to relative protein quantification using peptide peak intensities in label-free LC-MS proteomics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Melissa M; Brown, Joseph N; Gritsenko, Marina A; Metz, Thomas O; Pounds, Joel G; Rodland, Karin D; Shukla, Anil K; Smith, Richard D; Waters, Katrina M; McDermott, Jason E; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo

    2013-02-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is widely used to identify and quantify peptides in complex biological samples. In particular, label-free shotgun proteomics is highly effective for the identification of peptides and subsequently obtaining a global protein profile of a sample. As a result, this approach is widely used for discovery studies. Typically, the objective of these discovery studies is to identify proteins that are affected by some condition of interest (e.g. disease, exposure). However, for complex biological samples, label-free LC-MS proteomics experiments measure peptides and do not directly yield protein quantities. Thus, protein quantification must be inferred from one or more measured peptides. In recent years, many computational approaches to relative protein quantification of label-free LC-MS data have been published. In this review, we examine the most commonly employed quantification approaches to relative protein abundance from peak intensity values, evaluate their individual merits, and discuss challenges in the use of the various computational approaches.

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Computational Approaches to Relative Protein Quantification Using Peptide Peak Intensities in Label-free LC-MS Proteomics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzke, Melissa M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Metz, Thomas O.; Pounds, Joel G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2013-02-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is widely used to identify and quantify peptides in complex biological samples. In particular, label-free shotgun proteomics is highly effective for the identification of peptides and subsequently obtaining a global protein profile of a sample. As a result, this approach is widely used for discovery studies. Typically, the objective of these discovery studies is to identify proteins that are affected by some condition of interest (e.g. disease, exposure). However, for complex biological samples, label-free LC-MS proteomics experiments measure peptides and do not directly yield protein quantities. Thus, protein quantification must be inferred from one or more measured peptides. In recent years, many computational approaches to relative protein quantification of label-free LC-MS data have been published. In this review, we examine the most commonly employed quantification approaches to relative protein abundance from peak intensity values, evaluate their individual merits, and discuss challenges in the use of the various computational approaches.

  14. Experience of Carrying out High Quality Nursing in Intensive Care Unit%重症监护病房开展优质护理的体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许怡

    2016-01-01

    Through the study of pediatric intensive care unit to carry out the main points of the quality of nursing care, it is concluded that experience: improves the quality of nursing service first update nursing concept,establishes the con-cept of “the patient as the center”and “people-oriented”,give humanistic care,comprehensively carries the nursing mea-sures,reflects the value of the nurse, strengthens health education, gives love to the children, in order to improve customer satisfaction, enhance the image of the hospital, enhance social benefits.%通过探讨儿科重症监护病房开展优质护理的要点,得出体会:搞好优质护理服务首先更新护理理念,树立“以病人为中心”、“以人为本”的观念,真正做到人文关怀。全面落实护理措施,体现护士价值,加强健康教育,把爱献给患儿,以提高满意度,提升医院形象,增强社会效益。

  15. Developement of radioisotope tracer technique; development of verification method for hydraulic model using radioisotope tracer techniques in the municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. W.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, J. W.; Yun, J. S.; Wo, S. B. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    This study focuses on the development of the computational fluid dynamics that can be used in secondary clarifier in wastewater treatment plants. This model could describe the internal flow characteristics and predicted similar results as the isotopic tracer experiment. Therefore, it was demonstrated that the isotopic tracer method was a powerful tool as a hydrodynamic model to understand the internal hydraulics. Generally the secondary clarifier can be improved by special design, changing coagulation characteristics by addition of coagulation chemicals and well management by experienced operator. Because of expensive coagulation chemicals and limited availability of experienced operator, the improvement of the design is feasible way to upgrade the secondary clarifier. Though it is very complex and difficult to model the fluid dynamics, CFD model can describe correctly density flow, short circuiting, turbulent dispersion and settling characteristics. There are few trust worthy methods for verifying the hydrodynamic model. Also, it is very difficult to prove the flow by experiment in secondary sedimentation tank because of the disturbing the flow by the experimental equipment. However, the isotope tracer experiment is known as a useful tool for the study of the hydraulic characteristics and floc movement in the sedimentation tank because the isotope tracer does not disturb the internal flow and provide the data quickly through the on-line system. Therefore, the computed fluid dynamic model was developed to make the isotope tracer experiment available as a model verifying method. Predicted results in model simulation were made the same pattern as the experiment on-line data with the time. These results were compared each other. Also, the model explained the detail flow pattern of the area without the monitoring in the sedimentation tank and visualized the internal flow and concentration distribution with time using the graphic software. Because of the complicated

  16. Developement of radioisotope tracer technique; development of verification method for hydraulic model using radioisotope tracer techniques in the municipal wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. W.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, J. W.; Yun, J. S.; Wo, S. B. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    This study focuses on the development of the computational fluid dynamics that can be used in secondary clarifier in wastewater treatment plants. This model could describe the internal flow characteristics and predicted similar results as the isotopic tracer experiment. Therefore, it was demonstrated that the isotopic tracer method was a powerful tool as a hydrodynamic model to understand the internal hydraulics. Generally the secondary clarifier can be improved by special design, changing coagulation characteristics by addition of coagulation chemicals and well management by experienced operator. Because of expensive coagulation chemicals and limited availability of experienced operator, the improvement of the design is feasible way to upgrade the secondary clarifier. Though it is very complex and difficult to model the fluid dynamics, CFD model can describe correctly density flow, short circuiting, turbulent dispersion and settling characteristics. There are few trust worthy methods for verifying the hydrodynamic model. Also, it is very difficult to prove the flow by experiment in secondary sedimentation tank because of the disturbing the flow by the experimental equipment. However, the isotope tracer experiment is known as a useful tool for the study of the hydraulic characteristics and floc movement in the sedimentation tank