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  1. Localization of MLH3 at the Centrosomes

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    Lennart M. Roesner

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in human DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes are commonly associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. MLH1 protein heterodimerizes with PMS2, PMS1, and MLH3 to form MutLα, MutLβ, and MutLγ, respectively. We reported recently stable expression of GFP-linked MLH3 in human cell lines. Monitoring these cell lines during the cell cycle using live cell imaging combined with confocal microscopy, we detected accumulation of MLH3 at the centrosomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP revealed high mobility and fast exchange rates at the centrosomes as it has been reported for other DNA repair proteins. MLH3 may have a role in combination with other repair proteins in the control of centrosome numbers.

  2. Biochemical characterization of MLH3 missense mutations does not reveal an apparent role of MLH3 in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Jianghua; Rasmussen, Merete; Westers, Helga

    2009-01-01

    for eight of these MLH3 UVs identified in suspected Lynch syndrome patients, we performed several biochemical tests. We determined the protein expression and stability, protein localization and interaction of the mutant MLH3 proteins with wildtype MLH1. All eight MLH3 UVs gave protein expression levels...... comparable with wildtype MLH3. Furthermore, the UV-containing proteins, in contrast to previous studies, were all localized normally in the nucleus and they interacted normally with wildtype MLH1. Our different biochemical assays yielded no evidence that the eight MLH3 UVs tested are the cause of hereditary...

  3. Three-dimensional micro assembly of a hinged nickel micro device by magnetic lifting and micro resistance welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chun-Wei; Hsu, Wensyang

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional micro assembly of hinged nickel micro devices by magnetic lifting and micro resistance welding is proposed here. By an electroplating-based surface machining process, the released nickel structure with the hinge mechanism can be fabricated. Lifting of the released micro structure to different tilted angles is accomplished by controlling the positions of a magnet beneath the device. An in situ electro-thermal actuator is used here to provide the pressing force in micro resistance welding for immobilizing the tilted structure. The proposed technique is shown to immobilize micro devices at controlled angles ranging from 14° to 90° with respect to the substrate. Design parameters such as the electro-thermal actuator and welding beam width are also investigated. It is found that there is a trade-off in beam width design between large contact pressure and low thermal deformation. Different dominated effects from resistivity enhancement and contact area enlargement during the welding process are also observed in the dynamic resistance curves. Finally, a lifted and immobilized electro-thermal bent-beam actuator is shown to displace upward about 27.7 µm with 0.56 W power input to demonstrate the capability of electrical transmission at welded joints by the proposed 3D micro assembly technique

  4. Lynch syndrome associated with two MLH1 promoter variants and allelic imbalance of MLH1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Luke B; Packham, Deborah; Kwok, Chau-To; Nunez, Andrea C; Ng, Benedict; Schmidt, Christa; Fields, Michael; Wong, Jason W H; Sloane, Mathew A; Ward, Robyn L

    2015-06-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes. The implementation of predictive testing and targeted preventative surveillance is hindered by the frequent finding of sequence variants of uncertain significance in these genes. We aimed to determine the pathogenicity of previously reported variants (c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T) within the MLH1 5'untranslated region (UTR) in two individuals from unrelated suspected Lynch syndrome families. We investigated whether these variants were associated with other pathogenic alterations using targeted high-throughput sequencing of the MLH1 locus. We also determined their relationship to gene expression and epigenetic alterations at the promoter. Sequencing revealed that the c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T variants were the only potentially pathogenic alterations within the MLH1 gene. In both individuals, the levels of transcription from the variant allele were reduced to 50% compared with the wild-type allele. Partial loss of expression occurred in the absence of constitutional epigenetic alterations within the MLH1 promoter. We propose that these variants may be pathogenic due to constitutional partial loss of MLH1 expression, and that this may be associated with intermediate penetrance of a Lynch syndrome phenotype. Our findings provide further evidence of the potential importance of noncoding variants in the MLH1 5'UTR in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Distinct features between MLH1-methylated and unmethylated colorectal carcinomas with the CpG island methylator phenotype: implications in the serrated neoplasia pathway.

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    Kim, Jung Ho; Bae, Jeong Mo; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2016-03-22

    The presence or absence of MLH1 methylation may critically affect the heterogeneity of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Here, we investigated the differential characteristics of CIMP-high (CIMP-H) CRCs according to MLH1 methylation status. To further confirm the MLH1-dependent features in CIMP-H CRC, an independent analysis was performed using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In our CIMP-H CRC samples, MLH1-methylated tumors were characterized by older patient age, proximal colonic location, mucinous histology, intense lymphoid reactions, RUNX3/SOCS1 promoter methylation, BRAF mutations, and microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) status. By contrast, MLH1-unmethylated tumors were associated with earlier age of onset, increased distal colorectal localization, adverse pathologic features, and KRAS mutations. In the TCGA dataset, the MLH1-silenced CIMP-H CRC demonstrated proximal location, MSI-H status, hypermutated phenotype, and frequent BRAF mutations, but the MLH1-non-silenced CIMP-H CRC was significantly associated with high frequencies of KRAS and APC mutations. In conclusion, the differential nature of CIMP-H CRCs depends primarily on the MLH1 methylation status. Based on the current knowledge, the sessile serrated adenoma/polyp may be the major precursor of MLH1-methylated CIMP-H CRCs, whereas MLH1-unmethylated CIMP-H CRCs may develop predominantly from KRAS-mutated traditional serrated adenomas and less commonly from BRAF-mutated traditional serrated adenomas and/or sessile serrated adenomas/polyps.

  6. Contribution of MLH1 constitutional methylation for Lynch syndrome diagnosis in patients with tumor MLH1 downregulation.

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    Pinto, Diana; Pinto, Carla; Guerra, Joana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Santos, Rui; Vedeld, Hege Marie; Yohannes, Zeremariam; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinto, Pedro; Lopes, Paula; Lothe, Ragnhild; Lind, Guro Elisabeth; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2018-02-01

    Constitutional epimutation of the two major mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2, has been identified as an alternative mechanism that predisposes to the development of Lynch syndrome. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of MLH1 constitutional methylation in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with abnormal expression of the MLH1 protein in their tumors. In a series of 38 patients who met clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome genetic testing, with loss of MLH1 expression in the tumor and with no germline mutations in the MLH1 gene (35/38) or with tumors presenting the BRAF p.Val600Glu mutation (3/38), we screened for constitutional methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter using methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) in various biological samples. We found four (4/38; 10.5%) patients with constitutional methylation in the MLH1 gene promoter. RNA studies demonstrated decreased MLH1 expression in the cases with constitutional methylation when compared with controls. We could infer the mosaic nature of MLH1 constitutional hypermethylation in tissues originated from different embryonic germ layers, and in one family we could show that it occurred de novo. We conclude that constitutional MLH1 methylation occurs in a significant proportion of patients who have loss of MLH1 protein expression in their tumors and no MLH1 pathogenic germline mutation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that MLH1 constitutional hypermethylation is the molecular mechanism behind about 3% of Lynch syndrome families diagnosed in our institution, especially in patients with early onset or multiple primary tumors without significant family history. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mlh1-Mlh3 heterodimer is an endonuclease that preferentially binds to Holliday junctions.

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    Ranjha, Lepakshi; Anand, Roopesh; Cejka, Petr

    2014-02-28

    MutLγ, a heterodimer of the MutL homologues Mlh1 and Mlh3, plays a critical role during meiotic homologous recombination. The meiotic function of Mlh3 is fully dependent on the integrity of a putative nuclease motif DQHAX2EX4E, inferring that the anticipated nuclease activity of Mlh1-Mlh3 is involved in the processing of joint molecules to generate crossover recombination products. Although a vast body of genetic and cell biological data regarding Mlh1-Mlh3 is available, mechanistic insights into its function have been lacking due to the unavailability of the recombinant protein complex. Here we expressed the yeast Mlh1-Mlh3 heterodimer and purified it into near homogeneity. We show that recombinant MutLγ is a nuclease that nicks double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate that MutLγ binds DNA with a high affinity and shows a marked preference for Holliday junctions. We also expressed the human MLH1-MLH3 complex and show that preferential binding to Holliday junctions is a conserved capacity of eukaryotic MutLγ complexes. Specific DNA recognition has never been observed with any other eukaryotic MutL homologue. MutLγ thus represents a new paradigm for the function of the eukaryotic MutL protein family. We provide insights into the mode of Holliday junction recognition and show that Mlh1-Mlh3 prefers to bind the open unstacked Holliday junction form. This further supports the model where MutLγ is part of a complex acting on joint molecules to generate crossovers in meiosis.

  8. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mlh1-Mlh3 Heterodimer Is an Endonuclease That Preferentially Binds to Holliday Junctions*

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    Ranjha, Lepakshi; Anand, Roopesh; Cejka, Petr

    2014-01-01

    MutLγ, a heterodimer of the MutL homologues Mlh1 and Mlh3, plays a critical role during meiotic homologous recombination. The meiotic function of Mlh3 is fully dependent on the integrity of a putative nuclease motif DQHAX2EX4E, inferring that the anticipated nuclease activity of Mlh1-Mlh3 is involved in the processing of joint molecules to generate crossover recombination products. Although a vast body of genetic and cell biological data regarding Mlh1-Mlh3 is available, mechanistic insights into its function have been lacking due to the unavailability of the recombinant protein complex. Here we expressed the yeast Mlh1-Mlh3 heterodimer and purified it into near homogeneity. We show that recombinant MutLγ is a nuclease that nicks double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate that MutLγ binds DNA with a high affinity and shows a marked preference for Holliday junctions. We also expressed the human MLH1-MLH3 complex and show that preferential binding to Holliday junctions is a conserved capacity of eukaryotic MutLγ complexes. Specific DNA recognition has never been observed with any other eukaryotic MutL homologue. MutLγ thus represents a new paradigm for the function of the eukaryotic MutL protein family. We provide insights into the mode of Holliday junction recognition and show that Mlh1-Mlh3 prefers to bind the open unstacked Holliday junction form. This further supports the model where MutLγ is part of a complex acting on joint molecules to generate crossovers in meiosis. PMID:24443562

  9. MLH1 function is context dependent in colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Thomas; Ahmed, Mohamed A H; Seth, Rashmi; Jackson, Darryl; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    Loss of mismatch repair (MMR) function in sporadic colorectal cancer occurs most commonly because of inactivation of MLH1, and it causes an increase in mutation rate. However, it is uncertain whether loss of MMR alters any other cellular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMR in regulating cell numbers and apoptosis. MLH1 protein levels were manipulated by (a) cloning and forcibly expressing MLH1 in HCT116 (a cell line with MLH1 mutation) and RKO (a cell line with MLH1 silencing), and (b) knockdown of MLH1 in SW480 (a cell line with normal MMR function). Cell number and apoptotic bodies were measured in standard and 'high stress' (ie, after staurosporine exposure) conditions. Restoration of MLH1 function in HCT116 and RKO resulted in increased cell number (pculture conditions. However, on induction of apoptotic stress, restoration of MLH1 resulted in reduced cell numbers (pcontext dependent: in 'low stress' conditions it may act to inhibit apoptosis, while in 'high stress' conditions it may induce apoptosis. However, within the context of chromosomal instability, the effect of MLH1 on cell numbers is limited.

  10. A role for MLH3 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Sijmons, RH; Mensink, RGJ; Verlind, E; Kooi, KA; van der Sluis, T; Kempinga, C; van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Buys, CHCM; Kleibeuker, JH; Hofstra, RMW

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a possible role of the mismatch-repair gene MLH3 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer by scanning for mutations in 39 HNPCC families and in 288 patients suspected of having HNPCC. We identified ten different germline MLH3 variants, one frameshift and nine missense mutations,

  11. Project JADE. Description of the MLH-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstedt, H.; Munier, R.; Wichmann, C.; Isaksson, Therese

    2001-08-01

    This report constitutes a part of a series of reports within project JADE, comparison of deposition methods. A comparison of the deposition methods MLH (Medium Long Holes with approximately 25 copper canisters emplaced in a horizontal deposition hole about 200 metres in length bored between central and side tunnels) and KBS-3 (copper canisters are emplaced in vertical deposition holes bored in the floors of horizontal tunnels) has earlier been performed and KBS-3 was judged to be more advantageous than MLH. However, the prerequisites for the comparison have changed with time and an updated evaluation of MLH was therefore required. In this report, the current knowledge of MLH is summarized with focus on geological prerequisites, methods for boring long, horizontal deposition holes, reinforcement and sealing, deposition and cost. Comparisons with KBS-3 are performed sequentially. An MLH-repository is judged to be more sensitive to ingress of water to the deposition holes during the deposition process. This implies that a MLH repository based on today's knowledge is basically recommended for bedrock with fairly low water baring capacity. It has been demonstrated that MLH has considerable economic potential compared to KBS-3. However, the method is judged to be more technically immature than KBS-3. Particularly, methods and equipment for deposition of canisters need to be developed further. Methods and equipment for deposition can be developed, which fulfill the demands on function and safety, in the near future. MLH cannot therefore be rejected as deposition method

  12. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Comino, Aleksandra; Zupanec, Neja [Department for Biosynthesis and Biotransformation, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hudler, Petra [Medical Center for Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komel, Radovan [Department for Biosynthesis and Biotransformation, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Medical Center for Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-10-28

    Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T) were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene.

  13. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudler Petra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Methods Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. Results The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Conclusion Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene.

  14. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Comino, Aleksandra; Zupanec, Neja; Hudler, Petra; Komel, Radovan

    2009-01-01

    Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T) were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene

  15. Mlh2 is an accessory factor for DNA mismatch repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Christopher S Campbell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the essential mismatch repair (MMR endonuclease Mlh1-Pms1 forms foci promoted by Msh2-Msh6 or Msh2-Msh3 in response to mispaired bases. Here we analyzed the Mlh1-Mlh2 complex, whose role in MMR has been unclear. Mlh1-Mlh2 formed foci that often colocalized with and had a longer lifetime than Mlh1-Pms1 foci. Mlh1-Mlh2 foci were similar to Mlh1-Pms1 foci: they required mispair recognition by Msh2-Msh6, increased in response to increased mispairs or downstream defects in MMR, and formed after induction of DNA damage by phleomycin but not double-stranded breaks by I-SceI. Mlh1-Mlh2 could be recruited to mispair-containing DNA in vitro by either Msh2-Msh6 or Msh2-Msh3. Deletion of MLH2 caused a synergistic increase in mutation rate in combination with deletion of MSH6 or reduced expression of Pms1. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae Mlh2 protein and the mammalian PMS1 protein are homologs. These results support a hypothesis that Mlh1-Mlh2 is a non-essential accessory factor that acts to enhance the activity of Mlh1-Pms1.

  16. Colorectal cancer incidence in path_MLH1 carriers subjected to different follow-up protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Toni; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy.......We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy....

  17. MLH1 constitutional and somatic methylation in patients with MLH1 negative tumors fulfilling the revised Bethesda criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucianelli, Francesca; Tricarico, Rossella; Turchetti, Daniela; Gorelli, Greta; Gensini, Francesca; Sestini, Roberta; Giunti, Laura; Pedroni, Monica; Ponz de Leon, Maurizio; Civitelli, Serenella; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a tumor predisposing condition caused by constitutional defects in genes coding for components of the mismatch repair (MMR) apparatus. While hypermethylation of the promoter of the MMR gene MLH1 occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer samples, it has also been observed as a constitutional alteration, in the absence of DNA sequence mutations, in a small number of LS patients. In order to obtain further insights on the phenotypic characteristics of MLH1 epimutation carriers, we investigated the somatic and constitutional MLH1 methylation status of 14 unrelated subjects with a suspicion of LS who were negative for MMR gene constitutional mutations and whose tumors did not express the MLH1 protein. A novel case of constitutional MLH1 epimutation was identified. This patient was affected with multiple primary tumors, including breast cancer, diagnosed starting from the age of 55 y. Investigation of her offspring by allele specific expression revealed that the epimutation was not stable across generations. We also found MLH1 hypermethylation in cancer samples from 4 additional patients who did not have evidence of constitutional defects. These patients had some characteristics of LS, namely early age at onset and/or positive family history, raising the possibility of genetic influences in the establishment of somatic MLH1 methylation.

  18. Cancer risks for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Dowty, James G.; Win, Aung K.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Clendenning, Mark; Antill, Yoland C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steve; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Haile, Robert W.; Young, Graeme P.; James, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    We studied 17,576 members of 166 MLH1 and 224 MSH2 mutation-carrying families from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Average cumulative risks of colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer (EC) and other cancers for carriers were estimated using modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria. Heterogeneity in risks was investigated using a polygenic risk modifier. Average CRC cumulative risks to age 70 years (95% confidence intervals) for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers, ...

  19. Mlh1-Mlh3, a Meiotic Crossover and DNA Mismatch Repair Factor, Is a Msh2-Msh3-stimulated Endonuclease*

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    Rogacheva, Maria V.; Manhart, Carol M.; Chen, Cheng; Guarne, Alba; Surtees, Jennifer; Alani, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Crossing over between homologous chromosomes is initiated in meiotic prophase in most sexually reproducing organisms by the appearance of programmed double strand breaks throughout the genome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the double-strand breaks are resected to form three prime single-strand tails that primarily invade complementary sequences in unbroken homologs. These invasion intermediates are converted into double Holliday junctions and then resolved into crossovers that facilitate homolog segregation during Meiosis I. Work in yeast suggests that Msh4-Msh5 stabilizes invasion intermediates and double Holliday junctions, which are resolved into crossovers in steps requiring Sgs1 helicase, Exo1, and a putative endonuclease activity encoded by the DNA mismatch repair factor Mlh1-Mlh3. We purified Mlh1-Mlh3 and showed that it is a metal-dependent and Msh2-Msh3-stimulated endonuclease that makes single-strand breaks in supercoiled DNA. These observations support a direct role for an Mlh1-Mlh3 endonuclease activity in resolving recombination intermediates and in DNA mismatch repair. PMID:24403070

  20. Reduced migration of MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells depends on SPTAN1.

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    Hinrichsen, Inga; Ernst, Benjamin Philipp; Nuber, Franziska; Passmann, Sandra; Schäfer, Dieter; Steinke, Verena; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Plotz, Guido; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela

    2014-01-24

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein MLH1 are frequently observed in sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers (CRC). Affected tumors generate much less metastatic potential than the MLH1 proficient forms. Although MLH1 has been shown to be not only involved in postreplicative MMR but also in several MMR independent processes like cytoskeletal organization, the connection between MLH1 and metastasis remains unclear. We recently identified non-erythroid spectrin αII (SPTAN1), a scaffolding protein involved in cell adhesion and motility, to interact with MLH1. In the current study, the interaction of MLH1 and SPTAN1 and its potential consequences for CRC metastasis was evaluated. Nine cancer cell lines as well as fresh and paraffin embedded colon cancer tissue from 12 patients were used in gene expression studies of SPTAN1 and MLH1. Co-expression of SPTAN1 and MLH1 was analyzed by siRNA knock down of MLH1 in HeLa, HEK293, MLH1 positive HCT116, SW480 and LoVo cells. Effects on cellular motility were determined in MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T compared to their MLH1 proficient sister cells, respectively. MLH1 deficiency is clearly associated with SPTAN1 reduction. Moreover, siRNA knock down of MLH1 decreased the mRNA level of SPTAN1 in HeLa, HEK293 as well as in MLH1 positive HCT116 cells, which indicates a co-expression of SPTAN1 by MLH1. In addition, cellular motility of MLH1 deficient HCT116 and MLH1 deficient HEK293T cells was impaired compared to the MLH1 proficient sister clones. Consequently, overexpression of SPTAN1 increased migration of MLH1 deficient cells while knock down of SPTAN1 decreased cellular mobility of MLH1 proficient cells, indicating SPTAN1-dependent migration ability. These data suggest that SPTAN1 levels decreased in concordance with MLH1 reduction and impaired cellular mobility in MLH1 deficient colon cancer cells. Therefore, aggressiveness of MLH1-positive CRC might be related to SPTAN1.

  1. mlh3 mutations in baker's yeast alter meiotic recombination outcomes by increasing noncrossover events genome-wide.

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    Najla Al-Sweel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mlh1-Mlh3 is an endonuclease hypothesized to act in meiosis to resolve double Holliday junctions into crossovers. It also plays a minor role in eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR. To understand how Mlh1-Mlh3 functions in both meiosis and MMR, we analyzed in baker's yeast 60 new mlh3 alleles. Five alleles specifically disrupted MMR, whereas one (mlh3-32 specifically disrupted meiotic crossing over. Mlh1-mlh3 representatives for each class were purified and characterized. Both Mlh1-mlh3-32 (MMR+, crossover- and Mlh1-mlh3-45 (MMR-, crossover+ displayed wild-type endonuclease activities in vitro. Msh2-Msh3, an MSH complex that acts with Mlh1-Mlh3 in MMR, stimulated the endonuclease activity of Mlh1-mlh3-32 but not Mlh1-mlh3-45, suggesting that Mlh1-mlh3-45 is defective in MSH interactions. Whole genome recombination maps were constructed for wild-type and MMR+ crossover-, MMR- crossover+, endonuclease defective and null mlh3 mutants in an S288c/YJM789 hybrid background. Compared to wild-type, all of the mlh3 mutants showed increases in the number of noncrossover events, consistent with recombination intermediates being resolved through alternative recombination pathways. Our observations provide a structure-function map for Mlh3 that reveals the importance of protein-protein interactions in regulating Mlh1-Mlh3's enzymatic activity. They also illustrate how defective meiotic components can alter the fate of meiotic recombination intermediates, providing new insights for how meiotic recombination pathways are regulated.

  2. The mismatch repair and meiotic recombination endonuclease Mlh1-Mlh3 is activated by polymer formation and can cleave DNA substrates in trans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Carol M; Ni, Xiaodan; White, Martin A; Ortega, Joaquin; Surtees, Jennifer A; Alani, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Crossing over between homologs is initiated in meiotic prophase by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks that occur throughout the genome. In the major interference-responsive crossover pathway in baker's yeast, these breaks are resected to form 3' single-strand tails that participate in a homology search, ultimately forming double Holliday junctions (dHJs) that primarily include both homologs. These dHJs are resolved by endonuclease activity to form exclusively crossovers, which are critical for proper homolog segregation in Meiosis I. Recent genetic, biochemical, and molecular studies in yeast are consistent with the hypothesis of Mlh1-Mlh3 DNA mismatch repair complex acting as the major endonuclease activity that resolves dHJs into crossovers. However, the mechanism by which the Mlh1-Mlh3 endonuclease is activated is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that Mlh1-Mlh3 does not behave like a structure-specific endonuclease but forms polymers required to generate nicks in DNA. This conclusion is supported by DNA binding studies performed with different-sized substrates that contain or lack polymerization barriers and endonuclease assays performed with varying ratios of endonuclease-deficient and endonuclease-proficient Mlh1-Mlh3. In addition, Mlh1-Mlh3 can generate religatable double-strand breaks and form an active nucleoprotein complex that can nick DNA substrates in trans. Together these observations argue that Mlh1-Mlh3 may not act like a canonical, RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvase and support a novel model in which Mlh1-Mlh3 is loaded onto DNA to form an activated polymer that cleaves DNA.

  3. Haplotype defined by the MLH1-93G/A polymorphism is associated with MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in sporadic colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Tahara, Makiko; Lefor, Alan T; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kokichi

    2014-11-24

    Methylation of the MLH1 promoter region has been suggested to be a major mechanism of gene inactivation in sporadic microsatellite instability-positive (MSI-H) colorectal cancers (CRCs). Recently, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the MLH1 promoter region (MLH1-93G/A; rs1800734) has been proposed to be associated with MLH1 promoter methylation, loss of MLH1 protein expression and MSI-H tumors. We examined the association of MLH1-93G/A and six other SNPs surrounding MLH1-93G/A with the methylation status in 210 consecutive sporadic CRCs in Japanese patients. Methylation of the MLH1 promoter region was evaluated by Na-bisulfite polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The genotype frequencies of SNPs located in the 54-kb region surrounding the MLH1-93G/A SNP were examined by SSCP analysis. Methylation of the MLH1 promoter region was observed in 28.6% (60/210) of sporadic CRCs. The proportions of MLH1-93G/A genotypes A/A, A/G and G/G were 26% (n=54), 51% (n=108) and 23% (n=48), respectively, and they were significantly associated with the methylation status (p=0.01). There were no significant associations between genotype frequency of the six other SNPs and methylation status. The A-allele of MLH1-93G/A was more common in cases with methylation than the G-allele (p=0.0094), especially in females (p=0.0067). In logistic regression, the A/A genotype of the MLH1-93G/A SNP was shown to be the most significant risk factor for methylation of the MLH1 promoter region (odds ratio 2.82, p=0.003). Furthermore, a haplotype of the A-allele of rs2276807 located -47 kb upstream from the MLH1-93G/A SNP and the A-allele of MLH1-93G/A SNP was significantly associated with MLH1 promoter methylation. These results indicate that individuals, and particularly females, carrying the A-allele at the MLH1-93G/A SNP, especially in association with the A-allele of rs2276807, may harbor an increased risk of methylation of the MLH1 promoter

  4. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  5. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  6. MLH1-deficient Colorectal Carcinoma With Wild-type BRAF and MLH1 Promoter Hypermethylation Harbor KRAS Mutations and Arise From Conventional Adenomas.

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    Farchoukh, Lama; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2016-10-01

    Between 10% and 15% of colorectal carcinomas demonstrate sporadic DNA mismatch-repair protein deficiency as a result of MLH1 promoter methylation and are thought to arise from sessile serrated adenomas, termed the serrated neoplasia pathway. Although the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation is indicative of a sporadic cancer, up to 30% to 50% of colorectal carcinomas with MLH1 promoter hypermethylation will lack a BRAF mutation. We report the clinicopathologic and molecular features of MLH1-deficient colorectal carcinoma with wild-type BRAF and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation (referred to as MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinoma, n=36) in comparison with MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma (n=113) and Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n=36). KRAS mutations were identified in 31% of MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas compared with 0% of MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinomas and 37% of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinomas. When a precursor polyp was identified, MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas arose from precursor polyps resembling conventional tubular/tubulovillous adenomas in contrast to MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinomas, which arose from precursor sessile serrated adenomas (PMLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinoma and MLH1-deficient BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma had a predilection for the right colon compared with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (86% vs. 92% vs. 49%, P0.05). In conclusion, our results indicate that MLH1-hypermethylated BRAF wild-type colorectal carcinomas can harbor KRAS mutations and arise from precursor polyps resembling conventional tubular/tubulovillous adenomas.

  7. DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1 induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Hirata, Hiroshi; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2014-11-30

    Mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes have been shown to be deficient in prostate cancer (PCa). MMR can influence the regulation of tumor development in various cancers but their role on PCa has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to determine the functional effects of the mutL-homolog 1 (MLH1) gene on growth of PCa cells. The DU145 cell line has been established as MLH1-deficient and thus, this cell line was utilized to determine effects of MLH1 by gene expression. Lack of MLH1 protein expression was confirmed by Western blotting in DU145 cells whereas levels were high in normal PWR-1E and RWPE-1 prostatic cells. MLH1-expressing stable transfectant DU145 cells were then created to characterize the effects this MMR gene has on various growth properties. Expression of MLH1 resulted in decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion properties. Lack of cell growth in vivo also indicated a tumor suppressive effect by MLH1. Interestingly, MLH1 caused an increase in apoptosis along with phosphorylated c-Abl, and treatment with MLH1 siRNAs countered this effect. Furthermore, inhibition of c-Abl with STI571 also abrogated the effect on apoptosis caused by MLH1. These results demonstrate MLH1 protects against PCa development by inducing c-Abl-mediated apoptosis.

  8. The MLH1 ATPase domain is needed for suppressing aberrant formation of interstitial telomeric sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pingping; Chai, Weihang

    2018-05-01

    Genome instability gives rise to cancer. MLH1, commonly known for its important role in mismatch repair (MMR), DNA damage signaling and double-strand break (DSB) repair, safeguards genome stability. Recently we have reported a novel role of MLH1 in preventing aberrant formation of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) at intra-chromosomal regions. Deficiency in MLH1, in particular its N-terminus, leads to an increase of ITSs. Here, we identify that the ATPase activity in the MLH1 N-terminal domain is important for suppressing the formation of ITSs. The ATPase activity is also needed for recruiting MLH1 to DSBs. Moreover, defective ATPase activity of MLH1 causes an increase in micronuclei formation. Our results highlight the crucial role of MLH1's ATPase domain in preventing the aberrant formation of telomeric sequences at the intra-chromosomal regions and preserving genome stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial carcinoma with MLH1 germline mutation and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takanori; Takehara, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Nao; Kaneko, Keika; Fujimoto, Etsuko; Okazawa-Sakai, Mika; Okame, Shinichi; Shiroyama, Yuko; Yokoyama, Takashi; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Saito, Shinya; Imai, Kazuho; Sugano, Kokichi

    2018-05-21

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Analysis for microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of protein expressions of disease-associated genes is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer patients. When losses of both MLH1 and PMS2 proteins are observed by IHC, MLH1 promoter methylation analysis is conducted to distinguish Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial cancer from sporadic cancer. Here we report a woman who developed endometrial cancer at the age of 49 years. She had a family history of colorectal cancer (first-degree relative aged 52 years) and stomach cancer (second-degree relative with the age of onset unknown). No other family history was present, and she failed to meet the Amsterdam II criteria for the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. Losses of MLH1 and PMS2, but not MSH2 and MSH6, proteins were observed by IHC in endometrial cancer tissues. Because MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was detected in endometrial cancer tissue samples, the epigenetic silencing of MLH1 was suspected as the cause of the protein loss. However, because of the early onset of endometrial cancer and the positive family history, a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome was also suspected. Therefore, we provided her with genetic counseling. After obtaining her consent, MLH1 promoter methylation testing and genetic testing of peripheral blood were performed. MLH1 promoter methylation was not observed in peripheral blood. However, genetic testing revealed a large deletion of exon 5 in MLH1; thus, we diagnosed the presence of Lynch syndrome. Both MLH1 germline mutation and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation may be observed in endometrial cancer. Therefore, even if MLH1 promoter hypermethylation is detected, a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome cannot be excluded.

  10. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MLH3 gene functions in MSH3-dependent suppression of frameshift mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Rozas, H.; Kolodner, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes four MutL homologs. Of these, MLH1 and PMS1 are known to act in the MSH2-dependent pathway that repairs DNA mismatches. We have investigated the role of NLH3 in mismatch repair. Mutations in MLH3 increased the rate of reversion of the hom3-10 allele by increasing the rate of deletion of a single T in a run of 7 Ts. Combination of mutations in MLH3 and MSH6 caused a synergistic increase in the hom3-10 reversion rate, whereas the hom3-10 reversion rate in an mlh3 msh3 double mutant was the same as in the respective single mutants. Similar results were observed when the accumulation of mutations at frameshift hot spots in the LYS2 gene was analyzed, although mutation of MLH3 did not cause the same extent of affect at every LYS2 frameshift hot spot. MLH3 interacted with MLH1 in a two-hybrid system. These data are consistent with the idea that a proportion of the repair of specific insertion/deletion mispairs by the MSH3-dependent mismatch repair pathway uses a heterodimeric MLH1-MLH3 complex in place of the MLH1-PMS1 complex

  11. Disruption of a -35kb enhancer impairs CTCF binding and MLH1 expression in colorectal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Thoms, Julie A; Nunez, Andrea C; Huang, Yizhou; Knezevic, Kathy; Packham, Deborah; Poulos, Rebecca C; Williams, Rachel; Beck, Dominik; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Ward, Robyn L; Wong, Jason W H; Hesson, Luke B; Sloane, Mathew A; Pimanda, John

    2018-06-13

    MLH1 is a major tumour suppressor gene involved in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome and various sporadic cancers. Despite their potential pathogenic importance, genomic regions capable of regulating MLH1 expression over long distances have yet to be identified. Here we use chromosome conformation capture (3C) to screen a 650-kb region flanking the MLH1 locus to identify interactions between the MLH1 promoter and distal regions in MLH1 expressing and non-expressing cells. Putative enhancers were functionally validated using luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and CRISPR-Cas9 mediated deletion of endogenous regions. To evaluate whether germline variants in the enhancer might contribute to impaired MLH1 expression in patients with suspected Lynch syndrome, we also screened germline DNA from a cohort of 74 patients with no known coding mutations or epimutations at the MLH1 promoter. A 1.8kb DNA fragment, 35kb upstream of the MLH1 transcription start site enhances MLH1 gene expression in colorectal cells. The enhancer was bound by CTCF and CRISPR-Cas9 mediated deletion of a core binding region impairs endogenous MLH1 expression. 5.4% of suspected Lynch syndrome patients have a rare single nucleotide variant (G>A; rs143969848; 2.5% in gnomAD European, non-Finnish) within a highly conserved CTCF binding motif, which disrupts enhancer activity in SW620 colorectal carcinoma cells. A CTCF bound region within the MLH1 -35 enhancer regulates MLH1 expression in colorectal cells and is worthy of scrutiny in future genetic screening strategies for suspected Lynch syndrome associated with loss of MLH1 expression. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Loss of MLH1 sensitizes colon cancer cells to DNA-PKcs inhibitor KU60648.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Ackermann, Anne; Düding, Tonja; Graband, Annika; Filmann, Natalie; Plotz, Guido; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Germline mutations of MLH1 are responsible for tumor generation in nearly 50% of patients with Lynch Syndrome, and around 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers show MLH1-deficiency due to promotor hypermethylation. Although these tumors are of lower aggressiveness the benefit for these patients from standard chemotherapy is still under discussion. Recently, it was shown that the sensitivity to the DNA-PKcs inhibitor KU60648 is linked to loss of the MMR protein MSH3. However, loss of MSH3 is rather secondary, as a consequence of MMR-deficiency, and frequently detectable in MLH1-deficient tumors. Therefore, we examined the expression of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and MSH3 in different MMR-deficient and proficient cell lines and determined their sensitivity to KU60648 by analyzing cell viability and survival. MLH1-dependent ability of double strand break (DSB) repair was monitored after irradiation via γH2AX detection. A panel of 12 colon cancer cell lines, two pairs of cells, where MLH1 knock down was compared to controls with the same genetic background, and one MLH1-deficient cell line where MLH1 was overexpressed, were included. In summary, we found that MLH1 and/or MSH3-deficient cells exhibited a significantly higher sensitivity to KU60648 than MMR-proficient cells and that overexpression of MLH1 in MLH1-deficient cells resulted in a decrease of cell sensitivity. KU60648 efficiency seems to be associated with reduced DSB repair capacity. Since the molecular testing of colon tumors for MLH1 expression is a clinical standard we believe that MLH1 is a much better marker and a greater number of patients would benefit from KU60648 treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Finding the needle in a haystack: identification of cases of Lynch syndrome with MLH1 epimutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchins, Megan P

    2016-07-01

    Constitutional epimutation of the DNA mismatch repair gene, MLH1, represents a minor cause of Lynch syndrome. MLH1 epimutations are characterized by the soma-wide distribution of methylation of a single allele of the MLH1 promoter accompanied by constitutive allelic loss of transcription. 'Primary' MLH1 epimutations, considered pure epigenetic defects, tend to arise de novo in patients without a family history or any apparent genetic mutation. These demonstrate non-Mendelian inheritance. 'Secondary' MLH1 epimutations have a genetic basis and have been linked to non-coding genetic alterations in the vicinity of MLH1. These demonstrate autosomal dominant inheritance. Despite convincing evidence of their role in causing Lynch-type cancers, routine screening for MLH1 epimutations has not been widely adopted. Complicating factors may include: the need to perform additional methylation-based testing beyond the standard genetic screening for a germline mutation; the lack of a consensus algorithm for the selection of patients warranting MLH1 epimutation testing; overlapping molecular pathology features of MLH1 methylation and loss of MLH1 expression with more prevalent sporadic MSI cancers; the rarity of MLH1 epimutation; the variable inter-generational inheritance patterns; and the cost-effectiveness of screening. Nevertheless, a positive molecular diagnosis of MLH1 epimutation is clinically important because carriers have a high personal risk of developing metachronous Lynch-type cancers, and their relatives may also be at risk of carriage. Extending existing universal and clinic-based screening algorithms for Lynch syndrome to include an additional arm of selection criteria for cases warranting MLH1 epimutation testing could provide a cost-effective means of diagnosing these cases.

  14. Development of a method for RIA of MLH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haoyi; Jin Lichun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method of RIA for MLH to measure the serum level of LH in Rhesus Monkey for animal experiment in reproductive medicine. Methods: 125 I-MLH was prepared with chloramine T-Iodogen method. Rabbit anti-MLH was used as first antibody and sheep anti-rabbit IgG was used as separating agent. RIA was performed with liquid phase competitive radioassay. Results: The specific radioactivity of labelled antigen was 67 μg/mCi; antibody affinity constant was Ka = 3.44 x 10 -9 mol/L the shape of the standard curve was good. r = 0.991, intra-assay error CV = 3.49%, inter-assay error CV = 4.65%. The minimal detectable concentration was 0.42 μg/ml. Mean value of 30 normal Rhesus Monkey serum specimens was 1.17 +- 1.30 μg/ml. Conclusion: The developed method was simple reliable and sensitive. It would be of use in study of contraceptive and sex-physiology drugs

  15. Differential cellular responses to prolonged LDR-IR in MLH1-proficient and MLH1-deficient colorectal cancer HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Seo, Yuji; Kinsella, Timothy J

    2009-11-15

    MLH1 is a key DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein involved in maintaining genomic stability by participating in the repair of endogenous and exogenous mispairs in the daughter strands during S phase. Exogenous mispairs can result following treatment with several classes of chemotherapeutic drugs, as well as with ionizing radiation. In this study, we investigated the role of the MLH1 protein in determining the cellular and molecular responses to prolonged low-dose rate ionizing radiation (LDR-IR), which is similar to the clinical use of cancer brachytherapy. An isogenic pair of MMR(+) (MLH1(+)) and MMR(-) (MLH1(-)) human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells was exposed to prolonged LDR-IR (1.3-17 cGy/h x 24-96 h). The clonogenic survival and gene mutation rates were examined. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed with flow cytometry. Changes in selected DNA damage repair proteins, DNA damage response proteins, and cell death marker proteins were examined with Western blotting. MLH1(+) HCT116 cells showed greater radiosensitivity with enhanced expression of apoptotic and autophagic markers, a reduced HPRT gene mutation rate, and more pronounced cell cycle alterations (increased late-S population and a G(2)/M arrest) following LDR-IR compared with MLH1(-) HCT116 cells. Importantly, a progressive increase in MLH1 protein levels was found in MLH1(+) cells during prolonged LDR-IR, which was temporally correlated with a progressive decrease in Rad51 protein (involved in homologous recombination) levels. MLH1 status significantly affects cellular responses to prolonged LDR-IR. MLH1 may enhance cell radiosensitivity to prolonged LDR-IR through inhibition of homologous recombination (through inhibition of Rad51).

  16. Clinicopathologic Risk Factor Distributions for MLH1 Promoter Region Methylation in CIMP-Positive Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A Joan; Phipps, Amanda I; Baron, John A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ahnen, Dennis J; Cohen, Stacey A; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Rosty, Christophe; Haile, Robert W; Laird, Peter W; Weisenberger, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is a major molecular pathway in colorectal cancer. Approximately 25% to 60% of CIMP tumors are microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) due to DNA hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. Our aim was to determine if the distributions of clinicopathologic factors in CIMP-positive tumors with MLH1 DNA methylation differed from those in CIMP-positive tumors without DNA methylation of MLH1. We assessed the associations between age, sex, tumor-site, MSI status BRAF and KRAS mutations, and family colorectal cancer history with MLH1 methylation status in a large population-based sample of CIMP-positive colorectal cancers defined by a 5-marker panel using unconditional logistic regression to assess the odds of MLH1 methylation by study variables. Subjects with CIMP-positive tumors without MLH1 methylation were significantly younger, more likely to be male, and more likely to have distal colon or rectal primaries and the MSI-L phenotype. CIMP-positive MLH1-unmethylated tumors were significantly less likely than CIMP-positive MLH1-methylated tumors to harbor a BRAF V600E mutation and significantly more likely to harbor a KRAS mutation. MLH1 methylation was associated with significantly better overall survival (HR, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.82). These data suggest that MLH1 methylation in CIMP-positive tumors is not a completely random event and implies that there are environmental or genetic determinants that modify the probability that MLH1 will become methylated during CIMP pathogenesis. MLH1 DNA methylation status should be taken into account in etiologic studies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Clinicopathological risk factor distributions for MLH1 promoter region methylation in CIMP positive tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A. Joan; Phipps, Amanda I.; Baron, John A.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Cohen, Stacey A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Rosty, Christophe; Haile, Robert W.; Laird, Peter W.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is a major molecular pathway in colorectal cancer (CRC). Approximately 25% to 60% of CIMP tumors are microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) due to DNA hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. Our aim was to determine if the distributions of clinicopathologic factors in CIMP-positive tumors with MLH1 DNA methylation differed from those in CIMP-positive tumors without DNA methylation of MLH1. Methods We assessed the associations between age, sex, tumor-site, MSI status BRAF and KRAS mutations and family CRC history with MLH1 methylation status in a large population-based sample of CIMP-positive CRCs defined by a 5-marker panel using unconditional logistic regression to assess the odds of MLH1 methylation by study variables. Results Subjects with CIMP-positive tumors without MLH1 methylation were significantly younger, more likely to be male, more likely to have distal colon or rectal primaries and the MSI-L phenotype. CIMP-positive MLH1-unmethylated tumors were significantly less likely than CIMP-positive MLH1-methylated tumors to harbor a BRAF V600E mutation and significantly more likely to harbor a KRAS mutation. MLH1 methylation was associated with significantly better overall survival (HR=0.50; 95% Confidence Interval (0.31, 0.82)). Conclusions These data suggest that MLH1 methylation in CIMP-positive tumors is not a completely random event and implies that there are environmental or genetic determinants that modify the probability that MLH1 will become methylated during CIMP pathogenesis. Impact MLH1 DNA methylation status should be taken into account in etiologic studies. PMID:26512054

  18. Expression and promoter DNA methylation of MLH1 in colorectal cancer and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunxia; Chen, Yuan; Petersen, Iver

    2017-04-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a common molecular feature in human cancer. The aims of this study were to analyze the methylation status of MLH1, one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, in human colorectal and lung cancer and to evaluate its clinical relevance. The expression of MLH1 was analyzed in 8 colorectal cancer (CRC) and 8 lung cancer cell lines by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. The MLH1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays including 121 primary CRC and 90 lung cancer patient samples. In cancer cell lines, the methylation status of MLH1 promoter and exon 2 was investigated by bisulfite sequencing (BS). Methylation-specific-PCR (MSP) was used to evaluate methylation status of MLH1. The expression of MLH1 mRNA was detected in 8 CRC cell lines as well as normal colonic fibroblast cells CCD-33Co. At protein levels, MLH1 was lost in one CRC cell line HCT-116 and normal cells CCD-33Co. No methylation was found in the promoter and exon 2 of MLH1 in CRC cell lines. MLH1 was expressed in 8 lung cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels. Compared to cancer cells, normal bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) had lower expression of MLH1 protein. In primary CRC, 54.5% of cases exhibited positive staining, while 47.8% of lung tumors were positive for MLH1 protein. MSP analysis showed that 58 out of 92 (63.0%) CRC and 41 out of 73 (56.2%) lung cancer exhibited MLH1 methylation. In CRC, the MLH1 methylation was significantly associated with tumor invasion in veins (P=0.012). However, no significant links were found between MLH1 expression and promoter methylation in both tumor entities. MLH1 methylation is a frequent molecular event in CRC and lung cancer patients. In CRC, methylation of MLH1 could be linked to vascular invasiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Prognostic value of MLH1 promoter methylation in male patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongping; Chen, Xiaoying; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haiyong; Yu, Guangmao; Jiang, Luping; Hong, Qingxiao; Duan, Shiwei

    2017-04-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene MutL homolog 1 ( MLH1 ) is critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter was identified as a prognostic marker for numerous types of cancer including glioblastoma, colorectal, ovarian and gastric cancer. The present study aimed to determine whether MLH1 promoter methylation was associated with survival in male patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ESCC tissues were collected from 87 male patients. MLH1 promoter methylation was assessed using the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction approach. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank tests were used to evaluate the association between MLH1 promoter methylation and overall survival (OS) in patients with ESCC. Cox regression analysis was used to obtain crude and multivariate hazard ratios (HR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The present study revealed that MLH1 promoter methylation was observed in 53/87 (60.9%) of male patients with ESCC. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was significantly associated with poorer prognosis in patients with ESCC (P=0.048). Multivariate survival analysis revealed that MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was an independent predictor of poor OS in male patients with ESCC (HR=1.716; 95% CI=1.008-2.921). Therefore, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation may be a predictor of prognosis in male patients with ESCC.

  20. Estrogen enhances mismatch repair by induction of MLH1 expression via estrogen receptor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-Yu; Jin, Peng; Gao, Wei; Wang, De-Zhi; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2017-06-13

    Epidemiological data demonstrated that hormone replace treatment has protective effect against colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous studies showed that this effect may be associated with DNA mismatch repair. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of estrogen induction of MLH1, and whether colorectal tumor proliferation can be inhibited through induction of MLH1 by estrogen signal pathway. Human CRC cell lines were used to examine the regulation of MLH1 expression by over-expression and depletion of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and estrogen receptor-β (ERβ), under the treatment with 17β-estradiol or β-Estradiol 6-(O-carboxy-methyl)oxime:BSA, followed by a real-time Q-PCR and Western blotting analysis. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were used to identify the estrogen response elements in the proximal promoter of MLH1 gene. Then, the influence of estrogen-induced MLH1 on CRC tumor growth were determined in vitro and in vivo. We found that mismatch repair ability and microsatellite stability of cells were enhanced by estrogen via induction of MLH1 expression, which was mediated by ERβ, through a transcriptional activation process. Furthermore, we identified that ERβ exerted an inhibitory effect on CRC tumor proliferation in vitro and in vivo, combined with 5-FU, through up-regulation of MLH1 expression. Finally, we concluded that estrogen enhances mismatch repair ability and tumor inhibition effect in vitro and in vivo, via induction of MLH1 expression mediated by ERβ.

  1. Effect of MLH1 -93G>A on gene expression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck, Alexandre; Santos, Juliana C; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J L; Rabenhorst, Silvia H B; Martinez, Carlos A R; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-09-01

    The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by preventing the emergence of mutations. Furthermore, the -93G>A polymorphism in the MLH1 gene has been associated with an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the expression pattern and effect of this polymorphism in normal and tumour samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The MLH1 -93G>A (rs1800734) polymorphism was detected by PCR-RFLP in 49 cases of colorectal cancer. MLH1 expression was investigated using real-time quantitative PCR. The results indicate a significant decrease in MLH1 expression in tumour samples compared to their normal counterparts. The MLH1 gene was also significantly repressed in samples from patients who had some degree of tumour invasion into other organs. Similarly, those patients who were in a more advanced tumour stage (TNM III and IV) exhibited a significant reduction in MLH1 gene expression. Finally, the mutant genotype AA of MLH1 was associated with a significant decrease in the expression of this gene. This finding suggests that this polymorphism could increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer by a defective mismatch repair system, particularly through the loss of MLH1 expression in an allele-specific manner.

  2. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants

  3. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); Kerr, Iain D., E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc., 320 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Min, Jinrong, E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  4. MLH1 promoter methylation frequency in colorectal cancer patients and related clinicopathological and molecular features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    Full Text Available To describe the frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation in colorectal cancer (CRC; to explore the associations between MLH1 promoter methylation and clinicopathological and molecular factors using a systematic review and meta-analysis.A literature search of the PubMed and Embase databases was conducted to identify relevant articles published up to September 7, 2012 that described the frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation or its associations with clinicopathological and molecular factors in CRC. The pooled frequency, odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated.The pooled frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation in unselected CRC was 20.3% (95% CI: 16.8-24.1%. They were 18.7% (95% CI: 14.7-23.6% and 16.4% (95% CI: 11.9-22.0% in sporadic and Lynch syndrome (LS CRC, respectively. Significant associations were observed between MLH1 promoter methylation and gender (pooled OR = 1.641, 95% CI: 1.215-2.215; P = 0.001, tumor location (pooled OR = 3.804, 95% CI: 2.715-5.329; P<0.001, tumor differentiation (pooled OR = 2.131, 95% CI: 1.464-3.102; P<0.001, MSI (OR: 27.096, 95% CI: 13.717-53.526; P<0.001. Significant associations were also observed between MLH1 promoter methylation and MLH1 protein expression, BRAF mutation (OR = 14.919 (95% CI: 6.427-34.631; P<0.001 and 9.419 (95% CI: 2.613-33.953; P = 0.001, respectively.The frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation in unselected CRC was 20.3%. They were 18.7% in sporadic CRC and 16.4% in LS CRC, respectively. MLH1 promoter methylation may be significantly associated with gender, tumor location, tumor differentiation, MSI, MLH1 protein expression, and BRAF mutation.

  5. Regulation of MLH1 mRNA and protein expression by promoter methylation in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann; Byriel, Lene

    2013-01-01

    In colorectal cancer MLH1 deficiency causes microsatellite instability, which is relevant for the patient's prognosis and treatment, and its putative heredity. Dysfunction of MLH1 is caused by sporadic gene promoter hypermethylation or by hereditary mutations as seen in Lynch Syndrome. The aim...... of this study was to determine in detail how DNA methylation regulates MLH1 expression and impacts clinical management....

  6. Molecular analysis of MLH1 variants in Chinese sporadic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H X; Xu, X; Yang, R; Chu, Y M; Yang, D M; Xu, Y; Zhou, F L; Ma, W Z; Zhang, X J; Guan, M; Yang, Z H; Jin, Z D

    2016-04-26

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mismatch repair genes, especially in the MLH1 gene, are closely associated with susceptibility to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. However, few relevant findings are available regarding the association between sporadic colorectal cancer (SCRC) and SNPs of MLH1 in Chinese patients. Therefore, the present study aimed to describe the pathogenic association between three important MLH1 polymorphisms and SCRC in the Chinese population. Peripheral blood samples from 156 SCRC patients and 311 healthy controls were collected. DNA was purified from peripheral blood, and the V384D, R217C, and I219V polymorphisms were evaluated using high-resolution melting analysis and direct sequencing. The association between the three important MLH1 polymorphisms and clinical pathological features of the SCRC patients was analyzed. In addition, PMS2-MLH1 protein interactions were determined by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) to determine the protein functional alteration induced by these SNPs. Among the three polymorphisms, V384D was significantly associated with the risk of SCRC (OR = 31.36, P MLH1 R217C, V384D, and I219V variants had relative binding abilities with PMS2 of 0.59, 0.70, and 0.80, respectively, compared with the wild-type. These findings suggest that MLH1 V384D could be a promising genetic marker for susceptibility to SCRC.

  7. Role of MLH1 methylation in esophageal cancer carcinogenesis and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyun; Ye, Dong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Yingying; Li, Qun; Deng, Hongxia; Zhou, Chongchang

    2018-01-01

    The mutL homolog-1 ( MLH1 ) is a DNA mismatch repair gene and has been reported to be frequently methylated in numerous cancers. However, the association between MLH1 methylation and esophageal cancer (EC), as well as its clinical significance, remains unclear. Hence, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis based on 19 articles (including 1384 ECs, 345 premalignant lesions, and 1244 healthy controls). Our analysis revealed that the frequency of MLH1 methylation was significantly elevated during EC carcinogenesis. In addition, we observed that MLH1 promoter methylation was associated with age (odds ratio [OR]=1.79; 95% CI =1.20-2.66), advanced tumor grade (OR=3.7; 95% CI =2.37-5.77), lymph node metastasis (OR=2.65; 95% CI =1.81-3.88), distant metastasis (OR=7.60; 95% CI =1.23-47.19), advanced clinical stage (OR=4.46; 95% CI =2.88-6.91), and poor prognosis in EC patients (hazard ratio =1.64, 95% CI =1.00-2.69). The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of MLH1 methylation in EC patients versus healthy individuals were 0.15, 0.99, and 0.77, respectively. Our findings indicate that MLH1 methylation is involved in the carcinogenesis, progression, and metastasis of EC. Moreover, methylated MLH1 could be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for EC.

  8. Patients with colorectal cancer associated with Lynch syndrome and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation have similar prognoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Wu, Christina; Weng, Daniel Y; Shields, Peter G; Frankel, Wendy L; Pan, Xueliang; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goldberg, Richard M; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-09-01

    Mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) colorectal cancer (CRC) is caused by Lynch syndrome (LS) in 3% and sporadic inactivation of MLH1 by hypermethylation (MLH1-hm) in 12% of cases. It is not clear whether outcomes between LS-associated and MLH1-hm CRC differ. The objective of this study was to explore differences in clinical factors and outcomes in these two groups. Patients with dMMR CRC identified by immunohistochemistry staining and treated at a single institution from 1998 to 2012 were included. MLH1-hm was established with BRAF mutational analysis or hypermethylation testing. Patients' charts were accessed for information on pathology, germ-line MMR mutation testing, and clinical course. A total of 143 patients had CRC associated with LS (37 patients, 26%) or MLH1-hm (106 patients, 74%). Patients with LS were younger, more often male, presented more often with stage III disease, and had more metachronous disease than patients with MLH1-hm tumors. There was no difference in cancer-specific survival (CSS) between the groups; overall survival was longer in patients with LS, but this difference was minimal after adjusting for age and stage at diagnosis. CSS did not differ in LS-associated CRC compared with MLH1-hm CRC, suggesting that they carry a similar prognosis.Genet Med 18 9, 863-868.

  9. Expression of MLH1 and MSH2 in urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Laleh; Osunkoya, Adeboye O

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we investigated microsatellite instability in urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis by lack of immunohistochemical staining for MLH1 and MSH2. The study included 44 cases of urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis obtained from radical nephroureterectomy specimens at our institution. We evaluated the loss of nuclear immunohistochemical staining of MLH1 and MSH2. Eight of 44 (18 %) patients had negative MLH1 expression and 25/44 (57 %) patients had negative MSH2 expression. Six of 8 (75 %) patients with negative MLH1 expression were male and 2/8 (25 %) patients were female. Nineteen of 25 (75 %) patients with negative MSH2 expression were male, and 6/25 (24 %) patients were female. Seven of 8 (88 %) cases with negative MLH1 expression were high-grade urothelial carcinoma, and 21/25 (84 %) cases with negative MSH2 expression were high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Twenty-one of 44 (48 %) cases had an inverted growth pattern, of which 3/21 (14 %) cases had negative MLH1 expression and 14/21 (67 %) cases had negative MSH2 expression. Our study showed that microsatellite instability based on negative expression of MLH1 and MSH2 was more common in male patients with high-grade urothelial carcinoma. There is a strong correlation between inverted growth pattern and negative MSH2 expression. Microsatellite instability testing should be performed in patients with upper urinary tract carcinoma and may have prognostic value.

  10. High Mutation Levels are Compatible with Normal Embryonic Development in Mlh1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yulong; Sang, Meixiang; Cai, Jianhui; Li, Qiaoxia; Ozaki, Toshinori; Ono, Tetsuya; He, Dongwei

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the role of the mismatch repair gene Mlh1 in genome instability during the fetal stage, spontaneous mutations were studied in Mlh1-deficient lacZ-transgenic mouse fetuses. Mutation levels were high at 9.5 days post coitum (dpc) and gradually increased during the embryonic stage, after which they remained unchanged. In addition, mutations that were found in brain, liver, spleen, small intestine and thymus showed similar levels and no statistically significant difference was found. The molecular nature of mutations at 12.5 dpc in fetuses of Mlh1 +/+ and Mlh1 -/- mice showed their own unique spectra, suggesting that deletion mutations were the main causes in the deficiency of the Mlh1 gene. Of note, fetuses of irradiated mice exhibited marked differences such as post-implantation loss and Mendelian distribution. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that high mutation ofMlh1 -/- -deficient fetuses has little effect on the fetuses during their early developmental stages, whereas Mlh1 -/- -deficient fetuses from X-ray irradiated mothers are clearly effected.

  11. Activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease in a Reconstituted Mismatch Repair System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine E.; Bowen, Nikki; Graham, William J.; Goellner, Eva M.; Srivatsan, Anjana; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported the reconstitution of an Mlh1-Pms1-independent 5′ nick-directed mismatch repair (MMR) reaction using Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. Here we describe the reconstitution of a mispair-dependent Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease activation reaction requiring Msh2-Msh6 (or Msh2-Msh3), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and replication factor C (RFC) and a reconstituted Mlh1-Pms1-dependent 3′ nick-directed MMR reaction requiring Msh2-Msh6 (or Msh2-Msh3), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), replication protein A (RPA), RFC, PCNA, and DNA polymerase δ. Both reactions required Mg2+ and Mn2+ for optimal activity. The MMR reaction also required two reaction stages in which the first stage required incubation of Mlh1-Pms1 with substrate DNA, with or without Msh2-Msh6 (or Msh2-Msh3), PCNA, and RFC but did not require nicking of the substrate, followed by a second stage in which other proteins were added. Analysis of different mutant proteins demonstrated that both reactions required a functional Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site, as well as mispair recognition and Mlh1-Pms1 recruitment by Msh2-Msh6 but not sliding clamp formation. Mutant Mlh1-Pms1 and PCNA proteins that were defective for Exo1-independent but not Exo1-dependent MMR in vivo were partially defective in the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease and MMR reactions, suggesting that both reactions reflect the activation of Mlh1-Pms1 seen in Exo1-independent MMR in vivo. The availability of this reconstituted MMR reaction should now make it possible to better study both Exo1-independent and Exo1-dependent MMR. PMID:26170454

  12. Concomitant mutation and epimutation of the MLH1 gene in a Lynch syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, Giulia; Carnevali, Ileana; Quaia, Michele; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Sala, Paola; Giacomini, Elisa; Maestro, Roberta; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Viel, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited predisposition cancer syndrome, typically caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. In the last years, a role for epimutations of the same genes has also been reported. MLH1 promoter methylation is a well known mechanism of somatic inactivation in tumors, and more recently, several cases of constitutional methylation have been identified. In four subjects affected by multiple tumors and belonging to a suspected LS family, we detected a novel secondary MLH1 gene epimutation. The methylation of MLH1 promoter was always linked in cis with a 997 bp-deletion (c.-168_c.116+713del), that removed exon 1 and partially involved the promoter of the same gene. Differently from cases with constitutional primary MLH1 inactivation, this secondary methylation was allele-specific and CpGs of the residual promoter region were totally methylated, leading to complete allele silencing. In the colon tumor of the proband, MLH1 and PMS2 expression was completely lost as a consequence of a pathogenic somatic point mutation (MLH1 c.199G>A, p.Gly67Arg) that also abrogated local methylation by destroying a CpG site. The evidences obtained highlight how MLH1 mutations and epimutations can reciprocally influence each other and suggest that an altered structure of the MLH1 locus results in epigenetic alteration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease in a Reconstituted Mismatch Repair System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine E; Bowen, Nikki; Graham, William J; Goellner, Eva M; Srivatsan, Anjana; Kolodner, Richard D

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies reported the reconstitution of an Mlh1-Pms1-independent 5' nick-directed mismatch repair (MMR) reaction using Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. Here we describe the reconstitution of a mispair-dependent Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease activation reaction requiring Msh2-Msh6 (or Msh2-Msh3), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and replication factor C (RFC) and a reconstituted Mlh1-Pms1-dependent 3' nick-directed MMR reaction requiring Msh2-Msh6 (or Msh2-Msh3), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), replication protein A (RPA), RFC, PCNA, and DNA polymerase δ. Both reactions required Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) for optimal activity. The MMR reaction also required two reaction stages in which the first stage required incubation of Mlh1-Pms1 with substrate DNA, with or without Msh2-Msh6 (or Msh2-Msh3), PCNA, and RFC but did not require nicking of the substrate, followed by a second stage in which other proteins were added. Analysis of different mutant proteins demonstrated that both reactions required a functional Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site, as well as mispair recognition and Mlh1-Pms1 recruitment by Msh2-Msh6 but not sliding clamp formation. Mutant Mlh1-Pms1 and PCNA proteins that were defective for Exo1-independent but not Exo1-dependent MMR in vivo were partially defective in the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease and MMR reactions, suggesting that both reactions reflect the activation of Mlh1-Pms1 seen in Exo1-independent MMR in vivo. The availability of this reconstituted MMR reaction should now make it possible to better study both Exo1-independent and Exo1-dependent MMR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Ovarian metastasis from uveal melanoma with MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in a patient with germline MLH1 mutated Lynch syndrome: consequence or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, João; Pinto, Carla; Freitas, Micaela; Pinheiro, Manuela; Vizcaino, Rámon; Oliva, Esther; Teixeira, Manuel R; Jerónimo, Carmen; Bartosch, Carla

    2017-03-01

    Currently, uveal melanoma is not considered within the Lynch syndrome tumor spectrum. However, there are studies suggesting a contribution of microsatellite instability in sporadic uveal melanoma tumorigenesis. We report a 45-year-old woman who was referred for genetic counseling due to a family history of Lynch syndrome caused by a MLH1 mutation. She originally underwent enucleation of the right eye secondary to a uveal spindle cell melanoma diagnosed at age 25. The tumor recurred 22 years later presenting as an ovarian metastasis and concurrently a microscopic endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, grade 1/3 was diagnosed. Subsequent studies highlighted that the uveal melanoma showed high microsatellite instability and loss of MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression, with no MLH1 promoter methylation or BRAF mutation. Additionally, a GNAQ mutation was found. We conclude that our patient's uveal melanoma is most likely related to MLH1 germline mutation and thus Lynch syndrome related. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of uveal melanoma showing MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in the context of Lynch syndrome.

  15. Cancer risks and immunohistochemical profiles linked to the Danish MLH1 Lynch syndrome founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Ladelund, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Founder mutations with a large impact in distinct populations have been described in Lynch syndrome. In Denmark, the MLH1 c.1667+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT mutation accounts for 25 % of the MLH1 mutant families. We used the national Danish hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer register...... to estimate the cumulative lifetime risks for Lynch syndrome-associated cancer in 16 founder mutation families with comparison to 47 other MLH1 mutant families. The founder mutation conferred comparable risks for colorectal cancer (relative risks, RR, of 0.99 for males and 0.79 for females) and lower risks...... in 68 % with extensive inter-tumor variability despite the same underlying germline mutation. In conclusion, the Danish MLH1 founder mutation that accounts for a significant proportion of Lynch syndrome and is associated with a lower risk for extracolonic cancers....

  16. MLH1 Promoter Methylation Frequency in Colorectal Cancer Patients and Related Clinicopathological and Molecular Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yao, Xiaoping; Wang, Yibaina; Hu, Fulan; Wang, Fan; Jiang, Liying; Liu, Yupeng; Wang, Da; Sun, Guizhi; Zhao, Yashuang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation in colorectal cancer (CRC); to explore the associations between MLH1 promoter methylation and clinicopathological and molecular factors using a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods A literature search of the PubMed and Embase databases was conducted to identify relevant articles published up to September 7, 2012 that described the frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation or its associations with clinicopathological and molecular factors in CRC. The pooled frequency, odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results The pooled frequency of MLH1 promoter methylation in unselected CRC was 20.3% (95% CI: 16.8–24.1%). They were 18.7% (95% CI: 14.7–23.6%) and 16.4% (95% CI: 11.9–22.0%) in sporadic and Lynch syndrome (LS) CRC, respectively. Significant associations were observed between MLH1 promoter methylation and gender (pooled OR = 1.641, 95% CI: 1.215–2.215; P = 0.001), tumor location (pooled OR = 3.804, 95% CI: 2.715–5.329; PMLH1 promoter methylation and MLH1 protein expression, BRAF mutation (OR = 14.919 (95% CI: 6.427–34.631; PMLH1 promoter methylation in unselected CRC was 20.3%. They were 18.7% in sporadic CRC and 16.4% in LS CRC, respectively. MLH1 promoter methylation may be significantly associated with gender, tumor location, tumor differentiation, MSI, MLH1 protein expression, and BRAF mutation. PMID:23555617

  17. MGMT and MLH1 methylation in Helicobacter pylori-infected children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Marisa C; Santos, Juliana C; Maniezzo, Nathália; Ladeira, Marcelo S; da Silva, Artur L C; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2013-05-28

    To evaluate the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and MLH1 and MGMT methylation and its relationship with microsatellite instability (MSI). The methylation status of the MLH1 and MGMT promoter region was analysed by methylation specific methylation-polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) in gastric biopsy samples from uninfected or H. pylori-infected children (n = 50), from adults with chronic gastritis (n = 97) and from adults with gastric cancer (n = 92). MLH1 and MGMT mRNA expression were measured by real-time PCR and normalised to a constitutive gene (β actin). MSI analysis was performed by screening MSI markers at 4 loci (Bat-25, Bat-26, D17S250 and D2S123) with PCR; PCR products were analysed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by silver staining. Statistical analyses were performed with either the χ(2) test with Yates continuity correction or Fisher's exact test, and statistical significance for expression analysis was assessed using an unpaired Student's t-test. Methylation was not detected in the promoter regions of MLH1 and MGMT in gastric biopsy samples from children, regardless of H. pylori infection status. The MGMT promoter was methylated in 51% of chronic gastritis adult patients and was associated with H. pylori infection (P MLH1 methylation frequencies among H. pylori-infected and non-infected chronic gastritis adult patients were 13% and 7%, respectively. We observed methylation of the MLH1 promoter (39%) and increased MSI levels (68%) in samples from gastric cancer patients in comparison to samples from H. pylori-infected adult chronic gastritis patients (P MLH1 and MGMT mRNA were significantly reduced in chronic gastritis samples that were also hypermethylated (P MLH1 methylation did not occur in earlier-stage H. pylori infections and thus might depend on the duration of infection.

  18. Tumour MLH1 promoter region methylation testing is an effective prescreen for Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, K; Jorgensen, N M; Wallace, A J; Buchanan, D D; Lalloo, F; McMahon, R F T; Hill, J; Evans, D G

    2014-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) patients have DNA mismatch repair deficiency and up to 80% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Screening of mutation carriers reduces CRC incidence and mortality. Selection for constitutional mutation testing relies on family history (Amsterdam and Bethesda Guidelines) and tumour-derived biomarkers. Initial biomarker analysis uses mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability. Abnormalities in either identify mismatch repair deficiency but do not differentiate sporadic epigenetic defects, due to MLH1 promoter region methylation (13% of CRCs) from LS (4% of CRCs). A diagnostic biomarker capable of making this distinction would be valuable. This study compared two biomarkers in tumours with mismatch repair deficiency; quantification of methylation of the MLH1 promoter region using a novel assay and BRAF c.1799T>A, p.(Val600Glu) mutation status in the identification of constitutional mutations. Tumour DNA was extracted (formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, FFPE tissue) and pyrosequencing used to test for MLH1 promoter methylation and presence of the BRAF c.1799T>A, p.(Val600Glu) mutation 71 CRCs from individuals with pathogenic MLH1 mutations and 73 CRCs with sporadic MLH1 loss. Specificity and sensitivity was compared. Unmethylated MLH1 promoter: sensitivity 94.4% (95% CI 86.2% to 98.4%), specificity 87.7% (95% CI 77.9% to 94.2%), Wild-type BRAF (codon 600): sensitivity 65.8% (95% CI 53.7% to 76.5%), specificity 98.6% (95% CI 92.4% to 100.0%) for the identification of those with pathogenic MLH1 mutations. Quantitative MLH1 promoter region methylation using pyrosequencing is superior to BRAF codon 600 mutation status in identifying constitutional mutations in mismatch repair deficient tumours. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Autophagy influences the low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by regulating MLH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Xiao, Zhuya; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Weihong; Jie, Wuyun; Cao, Xing; Yin, Zhongyuan; Cheng, Jing

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the impact of autophagy on the low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) of human lung adenocarcinoma cells via MLH1 regulation. Immunofluorescent staining, Western blotting, and electron microscopy were utilized to detect autophagy in A549 and H460 cells. shRNA was used to silence MLH1 expression. The levels of MLH1, mTOR, p-mTOR, BNIP3, and Beclin-1 were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. A549 cells, which have low levels of MLH1 expression, displayed HRS/induced radioresistance (IRR). Conversely, the radiosensitivity of H460 cells, which express high levels of MLH1, conformed to the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. After down-regulating MLH1 expression, A549 cells showed increased HRS and inhibition of autophagy, whereas H460 cells exhibited HRS/IRR. The levels of mTOR, p-mTOR, and BNIP3 were reduced in cells harboring MLH1 shRNA, and the changes in the mTOR/p-mTOR ratio mirrored those in MLH1 expression. Low MLH1-expressing A549 cells may exhibit HRS. Both the mTOR/p-mTOR and BNIP3/Beclin-1 signaling pathways were found to be related to HRS, but only mTOR/p-mTOR is involved in the regulation of HRS via MLH1 and autophagy.

  20. Differential expression of hMLH1 in sporadic human colorectal cancer tumors and distant metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai Balle; Heiberg Engel, Peter Johan; Rasmussen, Merete

    2009-01-01

    in expression between the tumor transition zone and the invasive front. Expression of hMSH2, hMLH1, and hPMS2 was screened immunohistochemically in 92 stage IV tumors and derived liver metastases. In cases with loss of mismatch repair protein expression, lymph node metastases were also examined....... Clinicopathological parameters and Ki-67 staining indexes were evaluated and compared. Four tumors displayed a complete loss of hMLH1/hPMS2 expression at the transition zone; however, three of these expressed both proteins at the invasive front and in liver and lymph node metastases. A further four were predominantly...... hMLH1/hPMS2 negative at the transition zone, but with distinct subclones of hMLH1/hPMS2-expressing cells at the transition zone. All of these tumors expressed hMLH1/hPMS2 at the invasive front and in liver metastases, with three also expressing hMLH/hPMS2 in lymph node metastases. No significant...

  1. Constitutional MLH1 methylation presenting with colonic polyposis syndrome and not Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Trilokesh D; Blanco, Amie; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Terdiman, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    At least one-third of patients meeting clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome will have no germline mutation and constitutional epimutations leading to promoter methylation of MLH1 have been identified in a subset of these patients. We report the first case of constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation associated with a colonic polyposis syndrome in a 39 year-old man with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) and a personal history of 21 polyps identified over 8 years as well as the development of two synchronous CRCs over 16 months who was evaluated for a hereditary cancer syndrome. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of multiple tumors showed absent MLH1 and PMS2 expression, though germline testing with Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of these mismatch repair genes (MMR) genes was negative. A next generation sequencing panel of 29 genes also failed to identify a pathogenic mutation. Hypermethylation was identified in MLH1 intron 1 in tumor specimens along with buccal cells and peripheral white blood cells, confirming the diagnosis of constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation. This case highlights that constitutional MLH1 methylation should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a polyposis syndrome if IHC staining shows absent MMR gene expression.

  2. The unstructured linker arms of Mlh1-Pms1 are important for interactions with DNA during mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plys, Aaron J.; Rogacheva, Maria V.; Greene, Eric C.; Alani, Eric

    2012-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) models have proposed that MSH proteins identify DNA polymerase errors while interacting with the DNA replication fork. MLH proteins (primarily Mlh1-Pms1 in baker’s yeast) then survey the genome for lesion-bound MSH proteins. The resulting MSH-MLH complex formed at a DNA lesion initiates downstream steps in repair. MLH proteins act as dimers and contain long (20 – 30 nanometers) unstructured arms that connect two terminal globular domains. These arms can vary between 100 to 300 amino acids in length, are highly divergent between organisms, and are resistant to amino acid substitutions. To test the roles of the linker arms in MMR, we engineered a protease cleavage site into the Mlh1 linker arm domain of baker’s yeast Mlh1-Pms1. Cleavage of the Mlh1 linker arm in vitro resulted in a defect in Mlh1-Pms1 DNA binding activity, and in vivo proteolytic cleavage resulted in a complete defect in MMR. We then generated a series of truncation mutants bearing Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms of varying lengths. This work revealed that MMR is greatly compromised when portions of the Mlh1 linker are removed, whereas repair is less sensitive to truncation of the Pms1 linker arm. Purified complexes containing truncations in Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms were analyzed and found to have differential defects in DNA binding that also correlated with the ability to form a ternary complex with Msh2-Msh6 and mismatch DNA. These observations are consistent with the unstructured linker domains of MLH proteins providing distinct interactions with DNA during MMR. PMID:22659005

  3. Distinct effects of the recurrent Mlh1G67R mutation on MMR functions, cancer, and meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Avdievich, Elena; Reiss, Cora; Scherer, Stefan J.; Zhang, Yongwei; Maier, Sandra M.; Jin, Bo; Hou, Harry; Rosenwald, Andreas; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Kucherlapati, Raju; Cohen, Paula E.; Edelmann, Winfried; Kneitz, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 are associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome, HNPCC) and a significant proportion of sporadic colorectal cancer. The inactivation of MLH1 results in the accumulation of somatic mutations in the genome of tumor cells and resistance to the genotoxic effects of a variety of DNA damaging agents. To study the effect of MLH1 missense mutations on cancer susceptibility, we generated a mouse line carrying the ...

  4. Sessile serrated adenomas with dysplasia: morphological patterns and correlations with MLH1 immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Walker, Neal I; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki Lj; Bettington, Mark L; Rosty, Christophe

    2017-12-01

    Sessile serrated adenomas are the precursor polyp of approximately 20% of colorectal carcinomas. Sessile serrated adenomas with dysplasia are rarely encountered and represent an intermediate step to malignant progression, frequently associated with loss of MLH1 expression. Accurate diagnosis of these lesions is important to facilitate appropriate surveillance, particularly because progression from dysplasia to carcinoma can be rapid. The current World Health Organization classification describes two main patterns of dysplasia occurring in sessile serrated adenomas, namely, serrated and conventional. However, this may not adequately reflect the spectrum of changes seen by pathologists in routine practice. Furthermore, subtle patterns of dysplasia that are nevertheless associated with loss of MLH1 expression are not encompassed in this classification. We performed a morphological analysis of 266 sessile serrated adenomas with dysplasia with concurrent MLH1 immunohistochemistry with the aims of better defining the spectrum of dysplasia occurring in these lesions and correlating dysplasia patterns with MLH1 expression. We found that dysplasia can be divided morphologically into four major patterns, comprising minimal deviation (19%), serrated (12%), adenomatous (8%) and not otherwise specified (79%) groups. Minimal deviation dysplasia is defined by minor architectural and cytological changes that typically requires loss of MLH1 immunohistochemical expression to support the diagnosis. Serrated dysplasia and adenomatous dysplasia have distinctive histological features and are less frequently associated with loss of MLH1 expression (13 and 5%, respectively). Finally, dysplasia not otherwise specified encompasses most cases and shows a diverse range of morphological changes that do not fall into the other subgroups and are frequently associated with loss of MLH1 expression (83%). This morphological classification of sessile serrated adenomas with dysplasia may represent an

  5. Expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Andreas M; Doukas, Alexander; Hugo, Heinz-Herrmann; Hedderich, Jürgen; Hattermann, Kirsten; Maximilian Mehdorn, H; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2015-02-01

    Methylated O6-methylguanin-DNA-methytransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is associated with survival in patients with glioblastoma. Current evidence suggests that further mismatch repair genes play a pivotal role in the tumor response to treatment. Candidate genes are MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. Formerly, we found evidence of prognostic impact of MLH1 and MSH6 immunohistochemical expression in a small series of patients with initial glioblastoma. Two hundred and eleven patients were included who underwent macroscopically total removal of primary glioblastoma and at least one re-craniotomy for recurrence. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin-embedded specimens of initial tumors with specific antibodies against MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. RESULTS were compared to the Ki67 proliferation index and patient survival. Additionally, fresh frozen samples from 16 paired initial and recurrent specimens were examined using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers against MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. RESULTS were compared to MGMT status and survival. (1) Immunohistochemical expression of MSH6 was significantly associated with the Ki67 proliferation index (PMLH1, MLH2, and MSH6 over treatment combined with lacking MGMT methylation. In another two patients, decreased MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 expression was observed in combination with MGMT promoter methylation. Our data indicate that there may be glioblastoma patient subgroups characterized by MMR-expression changes beyond MGMT promoter methylation. The immunohistochemical expression of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in initial glioblastoma is not associated with patient survival.

  6. Identification of constitutional MLH1 epimutations and promoter variants in colorectal cancer patients from the Colon Cancer Family Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robyn L.; Dobbins, Timothy; Lindor, Noralane M.; Rapkins, Robert W.; Hitchins, Megan P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Constitutional MLH1 epimutations manifest as promoter methylation and silencing of the affected allele in normal tissues, predisposing to Lynch syndrome–associated cancers. This study investigated their frequency and inheritance. Methods: A total of 416 individuals with a colorectal cancer showing loss of MLH1 expression and without deleterious germline mutations in MLH1 were ascertained from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (C-CFR). Constitutive DNA samples were screened for MLH1 methylation in all 416 subjects and for promoter sequence changes in 357 individuals. Results: Constitutional MLH1 epimutations were identified in 16 subjects. Of these, seven (1.7%) had mono- or hemi-allelic methylation and eight had low-level methylation (2%). In one subject the epimutation was linked to the c.-27C>A promoter variant. Testing of 37 relatives from nine probands revealed paternal transmission of low-level methylation segregating with a c.+27G>A variant in one case. Five additional probands had a promoter variant without an MLH1 epimutation, with three showing diminished promoter activity in functional assays. Conclusion: Although rare, sequence changes in the regulatory region of MLH1 and aberrant methylation may alone or together predispose to the development of cancer. Screening for these changes is warranted in individuals who have a negative germline sequence screen of MLH1 and loss of MLH1 expression in their tumor. PMID:22878509

  7. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Binding Site of Mlh1 Required for Exonuclease I-Dependent Mismatch Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dherin, Claudine; Gueneau, Emeric; Francin, Mathilde

    2009-01-01

    Mlh1 is an essential factor of mismatch repair (MMR) and meiotic recombination. It interacts through its C-terminal region with MutL homologs and proteins involved in DNA repair and replication. In this study, we identified the site of yeast Mlh1 critical for the interaction with Exo1, Ntg2......, and Sgs1 proteins, designated as site S2 by reference to the Mlh1/Pms1 heterodimerization site S1. We show that site S2 is also involved in the interaction between human MLH1 and EXO1 or BLM. Binding at this site involves a common motif on Mlh1 partners that we called the MIP-box for the Mlh1 interacting...... protein box. Direct and specific interactions between yeast Mlh1 and peptides derived from Exo1, Ntg2, and Sgs1 and between human MLH1 and peptide derived from EXO1 and BLM were measured with K(d) values ranging from 8.1 to 17.4 microM. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a mutant of Mlh1 targeted at site S2...

  8. MLH1-93 G/a polymorphism is associated with MLH1 promoter methylation and protein loss in dysplastic sessile serrated adenomas with BRAFV600E mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Lochlan J; Jamieson, Saara; McKeone, Diane; Corish, Tracie; Rohdmann, Megan; Furner, Tori; Bettington, Mark; Liu, Cheng; Kawamata, Futoshi; Bond, Catherine; Van De Pols, Jolieke; Leggett, Barbara; Whitehall, Vicki

    2018-01-05

    Sessile serrated adenomas with BRAF mutation progress rapidly to cancer following the development of dysplasia (SSAD). Approximately 75% of SSADs methylate the mismatch repair gene MLH1, develop mismatch repair deficiency and the resultant cancers have a good prognosis. The remaining SSADs and BRAF mutant traditional serrated adenomas (TSA) develop into microsatellite stable cancers with a poor prognosis. The reason for this dichotomy is unknown. In this study, we assessed the genotypic frequency of the MLH1-93 polymorphism rs1800734 in SSADs and TSAs to determine if the uncommon variant A allele predisposes to MLH1 promoter hypermethylation. We performed genotyping for the MLH1-93 polymorphism, quantitative methylation specific PCR, and MLH1 immunohistochemistry on 124 SSAD, 128 TSA, 203 BRAF mutant CRCs and 147 control subjects with normal colonoscopy. The minor A allele was significantly associated with a dose dependent increase in methylation at the MLH1 promoter in SSADs (p = 0.022). The AA genotype was only observed in SSADs with MLH1 loss. The A allele was also overrepresented in BRAF mutant cancers with MLH1 loss. Only one of the TSAs showed loss of MLH1 and the overall genotype distribution in TSAs did not differ from controls. The MLH1-93 AA genotype is significantly associated with promoter hypermethylation and MLH1 loss in the context of SSADs. BRAF mutant microsatellite stable colorectal cancers with the AA genotype most likely arise in TSAs since the A allele does not predispose to methylation in this context.

  9. Nuclear import of human MLH1, PMS2, and MutLalpha: redundancy is the key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Vivian; Lorenowicz, Jessica; Kozij, Natalie; Guarné, Alba

    2009-08-01

    DNA mismatch repair maintains genomic stability by correcting errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading. Defects on mismatch repair genes lead to an increased mutation rate, microsatellite instability and predisposition to human non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Human MutLalpha is a heterodimer formed by the interaction of MLH1 and PMS2 that coordinates a series of key events in mismatch repair. It has been proposed that nuclear import of MutLalpha may be the first regulatory step on the activation of the mismatch repair pathway. Using confocal microscopy and mismatch repair deficient cells, we have identified the sequence determinants that drive nuclear import of human MLH1, PMS2, and MutLalpha. Transient transfection of the individual proteins reveals that MLH1 has a bipartite and PMS2 has a single monopartite nuclear localization signal. Although dimerization is not required for nuclear localization, the MutLalpha heterodimer is imported more efficiently than the MLH1 or PMS2 monomers. Interestingly, the bipartite localization signal of MLH1 can direct import of MutLalpha even when PMS2 encompasses a mutated localization signal. Hence we conclude that the presence of redundant nuclear localization signals guarantees nuclear transport of MutLalpha and, consequently, efficient mismatch repair.

  10. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  11. Utility of MLH1 methylation analysis in the clinical evaluation of Lynch Syndrome in women with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegl, Amanda S; Djordjevic, Bojana; Urbauer, Diana L; Westin, Shannon N; Soliman, Pamela T; Lu, Karen H; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical screening criteria, such as young age of endometrial cancer diagnosis and family history of signature cancers, have traditionally been used to identify women with Lynch Syndrome, which is caused by mutation of a DNA mismatch repair gene. Immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability analysis have evolved as important screening tools to evaluate endometrial cancer patients for Lynch Syndrome. A complicating factor is that 15-20% of sporadic endometrial cancers have immunohistochemical loss of the DNA mismatch repair protein MLH1 and high levels of microsatellite instability due to methylation of MLH1. The PCR-based MLH1 methylation assay potentially resolves this issue, yet many clinical laboratories do not perform this assay. The objective of this study was to determine if clinical and pathologic features help to distinguish sporadic endometrial carcinomas with MLH1 loss secondary to MLH1 methylation from Lynch Syndrome-associated endometrial carcinomas with MLH1 loss and absence of MLH1 methylation. Of 337 endometrial carcinomas examined, 54 had immunohistochemical loss of MLH1. 40/54 had MLH1 methylation and were designated as sporadic, while 14/54 lacked MLH1 methylation and were designated as Lynch Syndrome. Diabetes and deep myometrial invasion were associated with Lynch Syndrome; no other clinical or pathological variable distinguished the 2 groups. Combining Society of Gynecologic Oncology screening criteria with these 2 features accurately captured all Lynch Syndrome cases, but with low specificity. In summary, no single clinical/pathologic feature or screening criteria tool accurately identified all Lynch Syndrome-associated endometrial carcinomas, highlighting the importance of the MLH1 methylation assay in the clinical evaluation of these patients.

  12. Promoter hypermethylation of mismatch repair gene hMLH1 predicts the clinical response of malignant astrocytomas to nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Takao; Katayama, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takao; Yoshino, Atsuo; Ogino, Akiyoshi; Ohta, Takashi; Komine, Chiaki

    2005-02-15

    In certain types of human cancers, transcriptional inactivation of hMLH1 by promoter hypermethylation plays a causal role in the loss of mismatch repair functions that modulate cytotoxic pathways in response to DNA-damaging agents. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of promoter methylation of the hMLH1 gene in malignant astrocytomas. We examined the hMLH1 promoter methylation in a homogeneous cohort of patients with 41 malignant astrocytomas treated by 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-2(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea chemotherapy in combination with radiation and interferon therapy, and assessed the correlation of such methylation with clinical outcome. hMLH1 promoter methylation was found in 6 (15%) of the 41 newly diagnosed malignant astrocytomas. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 promoter corresponded closely with a loss of immunohistochemical staining for hMLH1 protein (P = 0.0013). Patients with hMLH1-methylated tumors displayed a greater chance of responding to adjuvant therapy as compared with those with hMLH1-unmethylated tumors (P = 0.0150). The presence of hMLH1 hypermethylation was significantly associated with a longer progression-free survival on both univariate analysis (P = 0.0340) and multivariate analysis (P = 0.0161). The present study identified hMLH1 methylation status as a predictor of the clinical response of malignant astrocytomas to chloroethylnitrosourea-based adjuvant therapy. The findings obtained suggest that determination of the methylation status of hMLH1 could provide a potential basis for designing rational chemotherapeutic strategies, as well as for predicting prognosis.

  13. Artefactual punctate MLH1 staining can lead to erroneous reporting of isolated PMS2 loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Bonnie T; Hammond, Rory F L; Leen, Sarah L S; Faruqi, Asma Z; Trevisan, Giorgia; Gilks, C Blake; Singh, Naveena

    2018-05-31

    Germline mutations in the PMS2 gene are an uncommon cause of Lynch Syndrome (LS), present in PMS2 immunohistochemical expression, with retained MLH1 expression, triggers referral to genetics services due to the significant risk of LS 3 . As detection of PMS2 germline mutations is problematic 4 , this may result in patients being labeled as "Lynch-like", with implications for future surveillance 5 . A recent study suggested that some cases of isolated PMS2 loss result from MLH1 promoter methylation and are sporadic rather than likely LS 6 ; they therefore recommended MLH1 promoter methylation testing in all cases of isolated PMS2 loss 6 . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Cancer-Predicting Gene Expression Changes in Colonic Mucosa of Western Diet Fed Mlh1 +/- Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermadi Bebek, Denis; Valo, Satu; Reyhani, Nima; Ollila, Saara; Päivärinta, Essi; Peltomäki, Päivi; Mutanen, Marja; Nyström, Minna

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world and interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including diet, are suggested to play a critical role in its etiology. We conducted a long-term feeding experiment in the mouse to address gene expression and methylation changes arising in histologically normal colonic mucosa as putative cancer-predisposing events available for early detection. The expression of 94 growth-regulatory genes previously linked to human CRC was studied at two time points (5 weeks and 12 months of age) in the heterozygote Mlh1 +/- mice, an animal model for human Lynch syndrome (LS), and wild type Mlh1 +/+ littermates, fed by either Western-style (WD) or AIN-93G control diet. In mice fed with WD, proximal colon mucosa, the predominant site of cancer formation in LS, exhibited a significant expression decrease in tumor suppressor genes, Dkk1, Hoxd1, Slc5a8, and Socs1, the latter two only in the Mlh1 +/- mice. Reduced mRNA expression was accompanied by increased promoter methylation of the respective genes. The strongest expression decrease (7.3 fold) together with a significant increase in its promoter methylation was seen in Dkk1, an antagonist of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of Dkk1 seems to predispose to neoplasias in the proximal colon. This and the fact that Mlh1 which showed only modest methylation was still expressed in both Mlh1 +/- and Mlh1 +/+ mice indicate that the expression decreases and the inactivation of Dkk1 in particular is a prominent early marker for colon oncogenesis. PMID:24204690

  15. Cancer-predicting gene expression changes in colonic mucosa of Western diet fed Mlh1+/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaana Pussila

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world and interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including diet, are suggested to play a critical role in its etiology. We conducted a long-term feeding experiment in the mouse to address gene expression and methylation changes arising in histologically normal colonic mucosa as putative cancer-predisposing events available for early detection. The expression of 94 growth-regulatory genes previously linked to human CRC was studied at two time points (5 weeks and 12 months of age in the heterozygote Mlh1(+/- mice, an animal model for human Lynch syndrome (LS, and wild type Mlh1(+/+ littermates, fed by either Western-style (WD or AIN-93G control diet. In mice fed with WD, proximal colon mucosa, the predominant site of cancer formation in LS, exhibited a significant expression decrease in tumor suppressor genes, Dkk1, Hoxd1, Slc5a8, and Socs1, the latter two only in the Mlh1(+/- mice. Reduced mRNA expression was accompanied by increased promoter methylation of the respective genes. The strongest expression decrease (7.3 fold together with a significant increase in its promoter methylation was seen in Dkk1, an antagonist of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of Dkk1 seems to predispose to neoplasias in the proximal colon. This and the fact that Mlh1 which showed only modest methylation was still expressed in both Mlh1(+/- and Mlh1(+/+ mice indicate that the expression decreases and the inactivation of Dkk1 in particular is a prominent early marker for colon oncogenesis.

  16. Ionizing radiation, inflammation, and their interactions in colon carcinogenesis in Mlh1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Takamitsu; Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kito, Seiji; Tokairin, Yutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Yoshimi, Naoki; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2015-03-01

    Genetic, physiological and environmental factors are implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) gene, one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, are a main cause of hereditary colon cancer syndromes such as Lynch syndrome. Long-term chronic inflammation is also a key risk factor, responsible for colitis-associated colorectal cancer; radiation exposure is also known to increase colorectal cancer risk. Here, we studied the effects of radiation exposure on inflammation-induced colon carcinogenesis in DNA mismatch repair-proficient and repair-deficient mice. Male and female Mlh1(-/-) and Mlh1(+/+) mice were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays when aged 2 weeks or 7 weeks and/or were treated with 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days at 10 weeks old to induce mild inflammatory colitis. No colon tumors developed after X-rays and/or DSS treatment in Mlh1(+/+) mice. Colon tumors developed after DSS treatment alone in Mlh1(-/-) mice, and exposure to radiation prior to DSS treatment increased the number of tumors. Histologically, colon tumors in the mice resembled the subtype of well-to-moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of human Lynch syndrome. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of both p53 and β-catenin and loss of p21 and adenomatosis polyposis coli proteins were observed at the later stages of carcinogenesis, suggesting a course of molecular pathogenesis distinct from typical sporadic or colitis-associated colon cancer in humans. In conclusion, radiation exposure could further increase the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis induced by inflammation under the conditions of Mlh1 deficiency. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Biallelic MLH1 SNP cDNA expression or constitutional promoter methylation can hide genomic rearrangements causing Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Monika; Koehler, Udo; Schackert, Hans Konrad; Steinke, Verena; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Schulmann, Karsten; Kloor, Matthias; Höchter, Wilhelm; Weingart, Josef; Keiling, Cortina; Massdorf, Trisari; Holinski-Feder, Elke

    2011-08-01

    A positive family history, germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, tumours with high microsatellite instability, and loss of mismatch repair protein expression are the hallmarks of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome). However, in ~10-15% of cases of suspected Lynch syndrome, no disease-causing mechanism can be detected. Oligo array analysis was performed to search for genomic imbalances in patients with suspected mutation-negative Lynch syndrome with MLH1 deficiency in their colorectal tumours. A deletion in the LRRFIP2 (leucine-rich repeat flightless-interacting protein 2) gene flanking the MLH1 gene was detected, which turned out to be a paracentric inversion on chromosome 3p22.2 creating two new stable fusion transcripts between MLH1 and LRRFIP2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in MLH1 exon 8 was expressed from both alleles, initially pointing to appropriate MLH1 function at least in peripheral cells. In a second case, an inherited duplication of the MLH1 gene region resulted in constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation. Constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation may therefore in rare cases be a heritable disease mechanism and should not be overlooked in seemingly sporadic patients.

  18. Completion of meiosis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) despite lack of DNA mismatch repair gene mlh1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, M.C.; Feitsma, H.; Cuppen, E.; Franca, L.R.; Schulz, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Mlh1 is a member of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery and is also essential for the stabilization of crossovers during the first meiotic division. Recently, we have shown that zebrafish mlh1 mutant males are completely infertile because of a block in metaphase I, whereas females are fertile but

  19. Functional implications of the p.Cys680Arg mutation in the MLH1 mismatch repair protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Drost, Mark; Therkildsen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    >C missense mutation in exon 18 of the human MLH1 gene and biochemically characterization of the p.Cys680Arg mutant MLH1 protein to implicate it in the pathogenicity of the Lynch syndrome (LS). We show that the mutation is deficient in DNA mismatch repair and, therefore, contributing to LS in the carriers....

  20. Evaluation of promoter methylation status of MLH1 gene in Iranian patients with colorectal tumors and adenoma polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarandi, Ashkan; Irani, Shiva; Savabkar, Sanaz; Chaleshi, Vahid; Ghavideldarestani, Maryam; Mirfakhraie, Reza; Khodadoostan, Mahsa; Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, Ehsan; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the methylation status of the promoter region of MLH1 gene in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its precursor lesions as well as elucidate its association with various clinicopathological characteristics among Iranian population. Epigenetic silencing of mismatch repair genes, such as MLH1 , by methylation of CpG islands of their promoter region has been proved to be an important mechanism in colorectal carcinogenesis. Fifty colorectal cancer and polyp tissue samples including 13 Primary colorectal tumor and 37 Adenoma polyp samples were enrolled in this study. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was performed to find the frequency of MLH1 Promoter Methylation. Promoter methylation of MLH1 gene was detected in 5 out of 13 tumor tissues and 4 out of 37 adenoma polyp. The frequency of MLH1 methylation in tumor samples was significantly higher compared to that in polyp tissues (P= 0.026). No significant association was observed between MLH1 promoter methylation and clinicopathological characteristics of the patients. The frequency of  MLH1  promoter methylation in CRC and colon polyp was 18%. Our findings indicated that methylation of MLH1 promoter region alone cannot be considered as a biomarker for early detection of CRC.

  1. Completion of meiosis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) despite lack of DNA mismatch repair gene mlh1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, M.C.; Feitsma, H.; Cuppen, E.; França, L.R.; Schulz, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Mlh1 is a member of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery and is also essential for the stabilization of crossovers during the first meiotic division. Recently, we have shown that zebrafish mlh1 mutant males are completely infertile because of a block in metaphase I, whereas females are fertile

  2. Functional characterization of MLH1 missense variants identified in Lynch Syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Lützen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MSH2 and MLH1 are associated with the inherited cancer disorder Lynch Syndrome (LS), also known as Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer or HNPCC. A proportion of MSH2 and MLH1 mutations found in suspected LS patients give rise...... localization and protein-protein interaction with the dimer partner PMS2 and the MMR-associated exonuclease 1. We show that a significant proportion of examined variant proteins have functional defects in either subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions, which is suspected to lead to the cancer...

  3. The MLH1 c.-27C>A and c.85G>T variants are linked to dominantly inherited MLH1 epimutation and are borne on a European ancestral haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chau-To; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Rapkins, Robert W; Ward, Robyn L; Chun, Nicolette; Ford, James M; Ladabaum, Uri; McKinnon, Wendy C; Greenblatt, Marc S; Hitchins, Megan P

    2014-05-01

    Germline mutations of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2, and deletions affecting the EPCAM gene adjacent to MSH2, underlie Lynch syndrome by predisposing to early-onset colorectal, endometrial and other cancers. An alternative but rare cause of Lynch syndrome is constitutional epimutation of MLH1, whereby promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing of one allele occurs throughout normal tissues. A dominantly transmitted constitutional MLH1 epimutation has been linked to an MLH1 haplotype bearing two single-nucleotide variants, NM_000249.2: c.-27C>A and c.85G>T, in a Caucasian family with Lynch syndrome from Western Australia. Subsequently, a second seemingly unrelated Caucasian Australian case with the same MLH1 haplotype and concomitant epimutation was reported. We now describe three additional, ostensibly unrelated, cancer-affected families of European heritage with this MLH1 haplotype in association with constitutional epimutation, bringing the number of index cases reported to five. Array-based genotyping in four of these families revealed shared haplotypes between individual families that extended across ≤2.6-≤6.4 megabase regions of chromosome 3p, indicating common ancestry. A minimal ≤2.6 megabase founder haplotype common to all four families was identified, which encompassed MLH1 and additional flanking genes and segregated with the MLH1 epimutation in each family. Our findings indicate that the MLH1 c.-27C>A and c.85G>T variants are borne on a European ancestral haplotype and provide conclusive evidence for its pathogenicity via a mechanism of epigenetic silencing of MLH1 within normal tissues. Additional descendants bearing this founder haplotype may exist who are also at high risk of developing Lynch syndrome-related cancers.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of the MLH1 promoter region in 480 patients with colorectal cancer and 1150 controls reveals new variants including one with a heritable constitutional MLH1 epimutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Monika; Ibisler, Ayseguel; Keller, Gisela; Jessen, Ellen; Laner, Andreas; Gonzales-Fassrainer, Daniela; Locher, Melanie; Massdorf, Trisari; Nissen, Anke M; Benet-Pagès, Anna; Holinski-Feder, Elke

    2018-04-01

    Germline defects in MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 and PMS2 predisposing for Lynch syndrome (LS) are mainly based on sequence changes, whereas a constitutional epimutation of MLH1 (CEM) is exceptionally rare. This abnormal MLH1 promoter methylation is not hereditary when arising de novo, whereas a stably heritable and variant-induced CEM was described for one single allele. We searched for MLH1 promoter variants causing a germline or somatic methylation induction or transcriptional repression. We analysed the MLH1 promoter sequence in five different patient groups with colorectal cancer (CRC) (n=480) composed of patients with i) CEM (n=16), ii) unsolved loss of MLH1 expression in CRC (n=37), iii) CpG-island methylator-phenotype CRC (n=102), iv) patients with LS (n=83) and v) MLH1-proficient CRC (n=242) as controls. 1150 patients with non-LS tumours also served as controls to correctly judge the results. We detected 10 rare MLH1 promoter variants. One novel, complex MLH1 variant c.-63_-58delins18 is present in a patient with CRC with CEM and his sister, both showing a complete allele-specific promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing. The other nine promoter variants detected in 17 individuals were not associated with methylation. For four of these, a normal, biallelic MLH1 expression was found in the patients' cDNA. We report the second promoter variant stably inducing a hereditary CEM. Concerning the classification of promoter variants, we discuss contradictory results from the literature for two variants, describe classification discrepancies between existing rules for five variants, suggest the (re-)classification of five promoter variants to (likely) benign and regard four variants as functionally unclear. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Influence of MLH1 on colon cancer sensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor combined with irinotecan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentori, Lucio; Leonetti, Carlo; Muzi, Alessia; Dorio, Annalisa Susanna; Porru, Manuela; Dolci, Susanna; Campolo, Federica; Vernole, Patrizia; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Praz, Françoise; Graziani, Grazia

    2013-07-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) are currently evaluated in clinical trials in combination with topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors against a variety of cancers, including colon carcinoma. Since the mismatch repair component MLH1 is defective in 10-15% of colorectal cancers we have investigated whether MLH1 affects response to the Top1 inhibitor irinotecan, alone or in combination with PARPi. To this end, the colon cancer cell lines HCT116, carrying MLH1 mutations on chromosome 3 and HCT116 in which the wild-type MLH1 gene was replaced via chromosomal transfer (HCT116+3) or by transfection of the corresponding MLH1 cDNA (HCT116 1-2) were used. HCT116 cells or HCT116+3 cells stably silenced for PARP-1 expression were also analysed. The results of in vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that MLH1, together with low levels of Top1, contributed to colon cancer resistance to irinotecan. In the MLH1-proficient cells SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, induced lower levels of DNA damage than in MLH1-deficient cells, as shown by the weaker induction of γ-H2AX and p53 phosphorylation. The presence of MLH1 contributed to induce of prompt Chk1 phosphorylation, restoring G2/M cell cycle checkpoint and repair of DNA damage. On the contrary, in the absence of MLH1, HCT116 cells showed minor Chk1 phosphorylation and underwent apoptosis. Remarkably, inhibition of PARP function by PARPi or by PARP-1 gene silencing always increased the antitumor activity of irinotecan, even in the presence of low PARP-1 expression.

  6. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Krogh, Lotte N; Bernstein, Inge; Okkels, Henrik; Wikman, Friedrik; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2013-10-03

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomic rearrangements. However, a large number of mutations, including missense, silent, and intronic variants, are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance. Intronic MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 variants were investigated using in silico prediction tools and mini-gene assay to asses the effect on splicing. We describe in silico and in vitro characterization of nine intronic MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients, of which four mutations are novel. The analysis revealed aberrant splicing of five mutations (MLH1 c.588 + 5G > A, MLH1 c.677 + 3A > T, MLH1 c.1732-2A > T, MSH2 c.1276 + 1G > T, and MSH2 c.1662-2A > C), while four mutations had no effect on splicing compared to wild type (MLH1 c.117-34A > T, MLH1 c.1039-8 T > A, MSH2 c.2459-18delT, and MSH6 c.3439-16C > T). In conclusion, we classify five MLH1/MSH2 mutations as pathogenic, whereas four MLH1/MSH2/MSH6 mutations are classified as neutral. This study supports the notion that in silico prediction tools and mini-gene assays are important for the classification of intronic variants, and thereby crucial for the genetic counseling of patients and their family members.

  7. Immunohistochemical and DNA sequencing analysis on human mismatch repair gene MLH1 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma with LOH of this gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, X.; Guo, Z.; Pang, T.; Li, Q.; Afink, G.; Pontén, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human MLH1 gene (hMLH1) is one of the DNA mismatch repair genes. Defects in these genes are believed to be the underlying cause of microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI has been demonstrated in many human cancers such as colon cancer and some female-specific tumors. The hMLH1 gene

  8. Tumors with unmethylated MLH1 and the CpG island methylator phenotype are associated with a poor prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Liu, Yanliang; Li, Kai; Wan, Weiwei; Pappou, Emmanouil P; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kerner, Zachary; Baylin, Stephen B; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Ahuja, Nita

    2016-12-27

    We previously developed a novel tumor subtype classification model for duodenal adenocarcinomas based on a combination of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and MLH1 methylation status. Here, we tested the prognostic value of this model in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Tumors were assigned to CIMP+/MLH1-unmethylated (MLH1-U), CIMP+/MLH1-methylated (MLH1-M), CIMP-/MLH1-U, or CIMP-/MLH1-M groups. Age, tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, and mucin production differed among the four patient subgroups, and CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors were more likely to have lymphovascular invasion and mucin production. Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed differences in both disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among the four groups. In a multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 methylation status was predictive of both DFS and OS, and DFS and OS were shortest in CIMP+/MLH1-U stage II CRC patients. These results suggest that tumor subtype classification based on the combination of CIMP and MLH1 methylation status is informative in stage II CRC patients, and that CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors exhibit aggressive features and are associated with poor clinical outcomes.

  9. Evidence of constitutional MLH1 epimutation associated to transgenerational inheritance of cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Michel; Dieu, Marie-Claire; Lejeune, Sophie; Escande, Fabienne; Boidin, Denis; Porchet, Nicole; Morin, Gilles; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Mathieu, Michèle; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Constitutional epimutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have been recently reported as a possible cause of Lynch syndrome. However, little is known about their prevalence, the risk of transmission through the germline and the risk for carriers to develop cancers. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of constitutional epimutations of MMR genes in Lynch syndrome. A cohort of 134 unrelated Lynch syndrome-suspected patients without MMR germline mutation was screened for constitutional epimutations of MLH1 and MSH2 by quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing. Patients were also screened for the presence of EPCAM deletions, a possible cause of MSH2 methylation. Tumors from patients with constitutional epimutations were extensively analyzed. We identified a constitutional MLH1 epimutation in two proband patients. For one of them, we report for the first time evidence of transmission to two children who also developed early colonic tumors, indicating that constitutional MLH1 epimutations are associated to a real risk of transgenerational inheritance of cancer susceptibility. Moreover, a somatic BRAF mutation was detected in one affected child, indicating that tumors from patients carrying constitutional MLH1 epimutation can mimic MSI-high sporadic tumors. These findings may have important implications for future diagnostic strategies and genetic counseling. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Germline Hypermethylation of MLH1 and EPCAM Deletions Are a Frequent Cause of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Westers, Helga; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Kooi, Krista; Jager, Paul O. J.; de Groote, Marloes L.; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Sijmons, Rolf H.

    It was shown that Lynch syndrome can be caused by germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 and MSH2 promoters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated very recently that germline deletions of the 3' region of EPCAM cause transcriptional read-through which results in silencing of MSH2 by hypermethylation.

  11. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulp, Rein P; Vos, Yvonne J; Mol, Bart; Karrenbeld, Arend; de Raad, Monique; van der Mijle, Huub J C; Sijmons, Rolf H

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast

  12. Germline hypermethylation of MLH1 and EPCAM deletions are a frequent cause of Lynch syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Hofstra, R.M.; Westers, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kooi, K.; Jager, P.O.; Groote, M.L. de; Dijkhuizen, T.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Hollema, H.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Sijmons, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that Lynch syndrome can be caused by germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 and MSH2 promoters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated very recently that germline deletions of the 3' region of EPCAM cause transcriptional read-through which results in silencing of MSH2 by hypermethylation.

  13. Expression defect size among unclassified MLH1 variants determines pathogenicity in Lynch syndrome diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Brieger, Angela; Trojan, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by a germline mutation in a mismatch repair gene, most commonly the MLH1 gene. However, one third of the identified alterations are missense variants with unclear clinical significance. The functionality of these variants can be tested in the laboratory, but the results...

  14. Small suitability of the DLEC1, MLH1 and TUSC4 mRNA expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JACEK KORDIAK

    2017-06-18

    Jun 18, 2017 ... The DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression was analysed in lung tumour tissue samples obtained from ... among men, however, the incidence is also rising in women ... rate of lung cancer patients is still poor, mainly because .... Up to 30 PYs. 18 ..... study performed by our group, high percentage (78%).

  15. Predictive value of CHFR and MLH1 methylation in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yazhuo; Yang, Yunsheng; Lu, Youyong; Herman, James G; Brock, Malcolm V; Zhao, Po; Guo, Mingzhou

    2015-04-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) has one of the highest mortality rates of cancer diseases and has a high incidence rate in China. Palliative chemotherapy is the main treatment for advanced gastric cancer. It is necessary to compare the effectiveness and toxicities of different regimens. This study explores the possibility of methylation of DNA damage repair genes serving as a prognostic and chemo-sensitive marker in human gastric cancer. The methylation status of five DNA damage repair genes (CHFR, FANCF, MGMT, MLH1, and RASSF1A) was detected by nested methylation-specific PCR in 102 paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to evaluate the association of methylation status and clinic-pathological factors. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models were employed to analyze the association of methylation status and chemo-sensitivity. The results indicate that CHFR, MLH1, RASSF1A, MGMT, and FANCF were methylated in 34.3% (35/102), 21.6% (22/102), 12.7% (13/102), 9.8% (10/102), and 0% (0/102) of samples, respectively. No association was found between methylation of CHFR, MLH1, RASSF1A, MGMT, or FANCF with gender, age, tumor size, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In docetaxel-treated gastric cancer patients, resistance to docetaxel was found in CHFR unmethylated patients by Cox proportional hazards model (HR 0.243, 95% CI, 0.069-0.859, p = 0.028), and overall survival is longer in the CHFR methylated group compared with the CHFR unmethylated group (log-rank, p = 0.036). In oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer patients, resistance to oxaliplatin was found in MLH1 methylated patients (HR 2.988, 95% CI, 1.064-8.394, p = 0.038), and overall survival was longer in the MLH1 unmethylated group compared with the MLH1 methylated group (log-rank, p = 0.046). CHFR is frequently methylated in human gastric cancer, and CHFR methylation may serve as a docetaxel-sensitive marker. MLH1 methylation was

  16. MLH1-rheMac hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, David W; Gillespie, Patrick J; Tian, Mei; Young, Daniel; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Williams, Lawrence E; Gagea, Mihai; Benavides, Fernando J; Perez, Carlos J; Broaddus, Russell R; Bernacky, Bruce J; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Alauddin, Mian M; Bhutani, Manoop S; Gibbs, Richard A; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Rogers, Jeffrey; Abee, Christian R; Gelovani, Juri G

    2018-03-13

    Over the past two decades, 33 cases of colonic adenocarcinomas have been diagnosed in rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta ) at the nonhuman primate colony of the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The distinctive feature in these cases, based on PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging, was the presence of two or three tumor lesions in different locations, including proximal to the ileocecal juncture, proximal to the hepatic flexure, and/or in the sigmoid colon. These colon carcinoma lesions selectively accumulated [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG) and [ 18 F]fluoroacetate ([ 18 F]FACE) at high levels, reflecting elevated carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism in these tumors. In contrast, the accumulation of [ 18 F]fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) was less significant, reflecting slow proliferative activity in these tumors. The diagnoses of colon carcinomas were confirmed by endoscopy. The expression of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 proteins and the degree of microsatellite instability (MSI) was assessed in colon carcinomas. The loss of MLH1 protein expression was observed in all tumors and was associated with a deletion mutation in the MLH1 promoter region and/or multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations in the MLH1 gene. All tumors exhibited various degrees of MSI. The pedigree analysis of this rhesus macaque population revealed several clusters of affected animals related to each other over several generations, suggesting an autosomal dominant transmission of susceptibility for colon cancer. The newly discovered hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in rhesus macaques, termed MLH1 -rheMac, may serve as a model for development of novel approaches to diagnosis and therapy of Lynch syndrome in humans. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  17. MLH1-Silenced and Non-Silenced Subgroups of Hypermutated Colorectal Carcinomas Have Distinct Mutational Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donehower, Lawrence A.; Creighton, Chad J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shinbrot, Eve; Chang, Kyle; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Muzny, Donna; Sander, Chris; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15% of colorectal carcinomas (CRC) exhibit a hypermutated genotype accompanied by high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and defects in DNA mismatch repair. These tumors, unlike the majority of colorectal carcinomas, are often diploid, exhibit frequent epigenetic silencing of the MLH1 DNA mismatch repair gene, and have a better clinical prognosis. As an adjunct study to The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium that recently analyzed 224 colorectal cancers by whole exome sequencing, we compared the 35 CRC (15.6%) with a hypermutated genotype to those with a non-hypermutated genotype. We found that 22 (63%) of hypermutated CRC exhibited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 gene, a high frequency of BRAF V600E gene mutations and infrequent APC and KRAS mutations, a mutational pattern significantly different from their non-hypermutated counterparts. However, the remaining 13 (37%) hypermutated CRC lacked MLH1 silencing, contained tumors with the highest mutation rates (“ultramutated” CRC), and exhibited higher incidences of APC and KRAS mutations, but infrequent BRAF mutations. These patterns were confirmed in an independent validation set of 250 exome-sequenced CRC. Analysis of mRNA and microRNA expression signatures revealed that hypermutated CRC with MLH1 silencing had greatly reduced levels of WNT signaling and increased BRAF signaling relative non-hypermutated CRC. Our findings suggest that hypermutated CRC include one subgroup with fundamentally different pathways to malignancy than the majority of CRC. Examination of MLH1 expression status and frequencies of APC, KRAS, and BRAF mutation in CRC may provide a useful diagnostic tool that could supplement the standard microsatellite instability assays and influence therapeutic decisions. PMID:22899370

  18. I219V polymorphism in hMLH1 gene in patients affected with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietri, Maria Teresa; Riegler, Gabriele; De Paola, Marialaura; Simeone, Serena; Boggia, Maria; Improta, Alessia; Parisi, Mariarita; Molinari, Anna Maria; Cioffi, Michele

    2009-04-01

    hMLH1 gene, lying on chromosome 3p21-23, is a key factor of the mismatch repair (MMR) complex, which amends DNA replication errors. MMR alterations are involved in the development of both hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma related to ulcerative colitis (UC). I219V Polymorphism is located on exon 8 of hMLH1 and provides an aminoacidic substitution of isoleucine to valine, on the protein codon 219. This may affect the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis because of a tRNA paucity or changes in the mRNA secondary structure. Most of the hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer-associated missense mutations of hMLH1 cause structural changes of the amino- or carboxy-terminal regions, involving the domains that interact with ATP and hPMS2. In this study, we analyzed the hMLH1 I219V polymorphism frequency in colectomized patients with UC. Venous blood from 100 ulcerative patients and 97 apparently healthy subjects has been collected. Out of 100 patients affected with UC, 75 noncolectomized showed an alternating course of disease, while 25 did not respond to the common drugs, and underwent colectomy. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and following enzymatic digestion by BccI. No significant differences were found between patients with UC and controls both for genotype and allele frequencies. However, our data show a significant association when colectomized and noncolectomized patients are compared. The frequencies of G homozygosity were 28% in colectomized and 10.7% in noncolectomized patients (p < 0.05, chi(2) = 4.4, Odds ratio = 3.3). The allele frequencies of allele A were 52% in colectomized and 68% in noncolectomized patients; while those of allele G were 48% and 32%, respectively. I219V polymorphism in hMLH1 could influence the clinical course of the disease and lead to resistance to therapy.

  19. Identification of Lynch syndrome mutations in the MLH1-PMS2 interface that disturb dimerization and mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, Jan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Friedhoff, Peter; Plotz, Guido

    2010-08-01

    Missense alterations of the mismatch repair gene MLH1 have been identified in a significant proportion of individuals suspected of having Lynch syndrome, a hereditary syndrome that predisposes for cancer of colon and endometrium. The pathogenicity of many of these alterations, however, is unclear. A number of MLH1 alterations are located in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of MLH1, which is responsible for constitutive dimerization with PMS2. We analyzed which alterations may result in pathogenic effects due to interference with dimerization. We used a structural model of CTD of MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer to select 19 MLH1 alterations located inside and outside two candidate dimerization interfaces in the MLH1-CTD. Three alterations (p.Gln542Leu, p.Leu749Pro, p.Tyr750X) caused decreased coexpression of PMS2, which is unstable in the absence of interaction with MLH1, suggesting that these alterations interfere with dimerization. All three alterations are located within the dimerization interface suggested by our model. They also compromised mismatch repair, suggesting that defects in dimerization abrogate repair and confirming that all three alterations are pathogenic. Additionally, we provided biochemical evidence that four alterations with uncertain pathogenicity (p.Ala586Pro, p.Leu636Pro, p.Thr662Pro, and p.Arg755Trp) are deleterious because of poor expression or poor repair efficiency, and confirm the deleterious effect of eight further alterations.

  20. Diversity of genetic events associated with MLH1 promoter methylation in Lynch syndrome families with heritable constitutional epimutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Julie; Flament, Cathy; Lovecchio, Tonio; Delattre, Lucie; Ait Yahya, Emilie; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Burnichon, Nelly; Bronner, Myriam; Cabaret, Odile; Lejeune, Sophie; Guimbaud, Rosine; Morin, Gilles; Mauillon, Jacques; Jonveaux, Philippe; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Frébourg, Thierry; Porchet, Nicole; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2018-04-12

    PurposeConstitutional epimutations are an alternative to genetic mutations in the etiology of genetic diseases. Some of these epimutations, termed secondary, correspond to the epigenetic effects of cis-acting genetic defects transmitted to the offspring following a Mendelian inheritance pattern. In Lynch syndrome, a few families with such apparently heritable MLH1 epimutations have been reported so far.MethodsWe designed a long-range polymerase chain reaction next-generation sequencing strategy to screen MLH1 entire gene and applied it to 4 French families with heritable epimutations and 10 additional patients with no proven transmission of their epimutations.ResultsThis strategy successfully detected the insertion of an Alu element in MLH1 coding sequence in one family. Two previously unreported MLH1 variants were also identified in other epimutation carriers: a nucleotide substitution within intron 1 and a single-nucleotide deletion in the 5'-UTR. Detection of a partial MLH1 duplication in another family required multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technology. We demonstrated the segregation of these variants with MLH1 methylation and studied the functional consequences of these defects on transcription.ConclusionThis is the largest cohort of patients with MLH1 secondary epimutations associated with a broad spectrum of genetic defects. This study provides further insight into the complexity of molecular mechanisms leading to secondary epimutations.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 12 April 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2018.47.

  1. MLH1 Promoter Methylation and Prediction/Prognosis of Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta and Bioinformatic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shixuan; Chen, Xiaohui; Li, Hao; Sun, Liping; Yuan, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Background: The promoter methylation of MLH1 gene and gastric cancer (GC)has been investigated previously. To get a more credible conclusion, we performed a systematic review and meta and bioinformatic analysis to clarify the role of MLH1 methylation in the prediction and prognosis of GC. Methods: Eligible studies were targeted after searching the PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, BIOSIS, CNKI and Wanfang Data to collect the information of MLH1 methylation and GC. The link strength between the two was estimated by odds ratio with its 95% confidence interval. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used for quantity assessment . Subgroup and sensitivity analysis were conducted to explore sources of heterogeneity. The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were employed for bioinformatics analysis on the correlation between MLH1 methylation and GC risk, clinicopathological behavior as well as prognosis. Results: 2365 GC and 1563 controls were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled OR of MLH1 methylation in GC was 4.895 (95% CI: 3.149-7.611, PMLH1 methylation enhanced GC risk but might not related with GC clinicopathological features and prognosis. Conclusion: MLH1 methylation is an alive biomarker for the prediction of GC and it might not affect GC behavior. Further study could be conducted to verify the impact of MLH1 methylation on GC prognosis.

  2. Correlation of MLH1 and MGMT expression and promoter methylation with genomic instability in patients with thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Bastos, André Uchimura; Cerutti, Janete Maria; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2013-01-01

    Gene silencing of the repair genes MLH1 and MGMT was shown to be a mechanism underlying the development of microsatellite instability (MSI), a phenotype frequently associated with various human malignancies. Recently, aberrant methylation of MLH1, MGMT and MSI were shown to be associated with mutations in genes such as BRAF, RAS and IDH1 in colon and brain tumours. Little is known about the methylation status of MLH1 and MGMT in thyroid tumours and its association with MSI and mutational status. In a series of 96 thyroid tumours whose mutational profiles of BRAF, IDH1 and NRAS mutations and RET/PTC were previously determined, we investigated MLH1 and MGMT expression and methylation status by qPCR and methylation-specific PCR after bisulphite treatment, respectively. MSI was determined by PCR using seven standard microsatellite markers. Samples with point mutations (BRAF, IDH1 and NRAS) show a decrease in MLH1 expression when compared to negative samples. Additionally, malignant lesions show a higher MSI pattern than benign lesions. The MSI phenotype was also associated with down-regulation of MLH1. The results of this study allow us to conclude that low expression of MLH1 is associated with BRAF V600E mutations, RET/PTC rearrangements and transitions (IDH1 and NRAS) in patients with thyroid carcinoma. In addition, a significant relationship between MSI status and histological subtypes was found

  3. Repair genes expression profile of MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mônica Ghislaine Oliveira; Carta, Celina Faig Lima; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic smoking on the expression profile of the repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers and never smokers. The sample consisted of thirty exfoliative cytology smears per group obtained from Smokers and Never Smokers. Total RNA was extracted and expression of the MLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time and immunocytochemistry. The gene and protein expression data were correlated to the clinical data. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using the Student t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, with pMLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were downregulated in the smoking group compared to the control with significant values for MLH1 (p=0.006), MSH2 (p=0.0001) and ATM (p=0.0001). Immunocytochemical staining for anti-MLH1, anti-MSH2 and anti-ATM was negative in Never Smokers; in Smokers it was rarely positive. No significant correlation was observed among the expression of MLH1, MSH2, ATM and age, number of cigarettes consumed per day, time of smoking during life, smoking history or levels of CO in expired air. The expression of genes and proteins related to DNA repair mechanism MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers was reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Abrupt loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expression in endometrial carcinoma: molecular and morphologic analysis of 6 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rish K; Plesec, Thomas P; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; Yang, Bin; Marquard, Jessica; Shadrach, Bonnie; Roma, Andres R

    2015-07-01

    Given that endometrial cancer (EC) is often the sentinel cancer for female Lynch syndrome patients, we have successfully implemented universal screening of ECs and have previously shown that this is the preferred method to identify these patients. However, during the course of universal screening of EC, we encountered 6 cases with an unusual pattern of mismatch-repair protein immunohistochemistry that has not been previously described in this setting. In these 6 cases, there was an abrupt loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expression in a portion of the tumor. In 3 cases, marked histologic differences were identified between the areas of the tumor with retained expression and areas with loss of expression. In 2 cases, the areas with loss of expression were of higher grade (1 demonstrated solid growth and the other demonstrated increased nuclear atypia with diffuse p53 expression). In 4 tumors, histologic features associated with microsatellite instability (MSI) were present, including increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. The areas with loss of and retained MLH1/PMS2 expression were separately microdissected and assessed for MSI and MLH1 promoter methylation. The areas with loss of MLH1 and PMS2 more commonly demonstrated MSI compared with the areas with intact expression (83% vs. 33%). MLH1 promoter methylation analysis demonstrated heterogenous hypermethylation, as all areas with loss of MLH1/PMS2 expression had more extensive methylation of MLH1 compared with those areas with retained expression. In summary, we describe the histologic and molecular features of 6 cases of EC with abrupt loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expression and demonstrate that heterogenous methylation of the MLH1 promoter results in this distinct and unusual pattern of immunohistochemical expression.

  5. A tailored approach to BRAF and MLH1 methylation testing in a universal screening program for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Tomer; Rodgers, Linda H; Shannon, Kristen M; Yoshida, Makoto; Ma, Tianle; Mattia, Anthony; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Iafrate, Anthony J; Chung, Daniel C

    2017-03-01

    To determine the correlation between BRAF genotype and MLH1 promoter methylation in a screening program for Lynch syndrome (LS), a universal screening program for LS was established in two medical centers. Tumors with abnormal MLH1 staining were evaluated for both BRAF V600E genotype and MLH1 promoter methylation. Tumors positive for both were considered sporadic, and genetic testing was recommended for all others. A total 1011 colorectal cancer cases were screened for Lynch syndrome, and 148 (14.6%) exhibited absent MLH1 immunostaining. Both BRAF and MLH1 methylation testing were completed in 126 cases. Concordant results (both positive or both negative) were obtained in 86 (68.3%) and 16 (12.7%) cases, respectively, with 81% concordance overall. The positive and negative predictive values for a BRAF mutation in predicting MLH1 promoter methylation were 98.9% and 41%, respectively, and the negative predictive value fell to 15% in patients ≥70 years old. Using BRAF genotyping as a sole test to evaluate cases with absent MLH1 staining would have increased referral rates for genetic testing by 2.3-fold compared with MLH1 methylation testing alone (31% vs 13.5%, respectively, PMLH1 methylation testing for BRAF wild-type cases only would significantly decrease the number of methylation assays performed and reduce the referral rate for genetic testing to 12.7%. A BRAF mutation has an excellent positive predictive value but poor negative predictive value in predicting MLH1 promoter methylation. A hybrid use of these tests may reduce the number of low-risk patients referred to genetic counseling and facilitate wider implementation of Lynch syndrome screening programs.

  6. Prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations as a cause of Lynch syndrome in unselected versus selected consecutive series of patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, Adela; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Rodriguez-Soler, María; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Egoavil, Cecilia; Barberá, Victor M; Castillejo, María-Isabel; Guarinos, Carla; Martínez-de-Dueñas, Eduardo; Juan, María-Jose; Sánchez-Heras, Ana-Beatriz; García-Casado, Zaida; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Juárez, Miriam; Bujanda, Luis; Clofent, Juan; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Alenda, Cristina; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo; Soto, José-Luis

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in the general population is unknown. We sought to analyse the prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in unselected and selected series of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients with diagnoses of CRC (n=2123) were included in the unselected group. For comparison, a group of 847 selected patients with CRC who fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines (rBG) were also included. Somatic and constitutional MLH1 methylation was assayed via methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of cases lacking MLH1 expression. Germline alterations in mismatch-repair (MMR) genes were assessed via Sanger sequencing and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Loss of MLH1 expression occurred in 5.5% of the unselected series and 12.5% of the selected series (pMLH1 were detected in the unselected population (0/62); five cases from the selected series were positive for MLH1 epimutations (15.6%, 5/32; p=0.004). Our results suggest a negligible prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in unselected cases of CRC. Therefore, MLH1 constitutional epimutation analysis should be conducted only for patients who fulfil the rBG and who lack MLH1 expression with methylated MLH1. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Functional characterization of rare missense mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Kariola, Reetta; Korhonen, Mari K

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have performed a population based study to analyse the frequency of colorectal cancer related MLH1 and MSH2 missense mutations in the Danish population. Half of the analyzed mutations were rare and most likely only present in the families where they were identified originally. Some...... of the missense mutations were located in conserved regions in the MLH1 and MSH2 proteins indicating a relation to disease development. In the present study, we functionally characterized 10 rare missense mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 identified in 13 Danish CRC families. To elucidate the pathogenicity...

  8. Subsets of microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers exhibit discordance between the CpG island methylator phenotype and MLH1 methylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung H; Rhee, Ye-Y; Bae, Jeong-M; Kwon, Hyeong-J; Cho, Nam-Y; Kim, Mi J; Kang, Gyeong H

    2013-07-01

    Although the presence of MLH1 methylation in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer generally indicates involvement of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in the development of the tumor, these two conditions do not always correlate. A minority of microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers exhibit discordance between CIMP and MLH1 methylation statuses. However, the clinicopathological features of such microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers with discrepant MLH1 methylation and CIMP statuses remain poorly studied. Microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers (n=220) were analyzed for CIMP and MLH1 methylation statuses using the MethyLight assay. Based on the combinatorial CIMP and MLH1 methylation statuses, the microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers were grouped into four subtypes (CIMP-high (CIMP-H) MLH1 methylation-positive (MLH1m+), CIMP-H MLH1 methylation-negative, CIMP-low/0 (CIMP-L/0) MLH1m+, and CIMP-L/0 MLH1 methylation-negative), which were compared in terms of their associations with clinicopathological and molecular features. The CIMP-L/0 MLH1 methylation-negative and CIMP-H MLH1m+ subtypes were predominant, comprising 63.6 and 24.1% of total microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers, respectively. The discordant subtypes, CIMP-H MLH1 methylation-negative and CIMP-L/0 MLH1m+, were found in 5 and 7% of microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers, respectively. The CIMP-H MLH1 methylation-negative subtype exhibited elevated incidence rates in male patients and was associated with larger tumor size, more frequent loss of MSH2 expression, increased frequency of KRAS mutation, and advanced cancer stage. The CIMP-L/0 MLH1m+ subtype was associated with onset at an earlier age, a predominance of MLH1 loss, and earlier cancer stage. None of the CIMP-L/0 MLH1m+ subtype patients succumbed to death during the follow-up. Our findings suggest that the discordant subtypes of colorectal cancers exhibit distinct clinicopathological and molecular features

  9. Reduction of MLH1 and PMS2 confers temozolomide resistance and is associated with recurrence of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsato, Yoshinari; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Yunoue, Shunji; Yonezawa, Hajime; Minami, Kentarou; Nishizawa, Yukihiko; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kawahara, Kohichi; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Hirano, Hirofumi; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Arita, Kazunori

    2013-12-01

    Although there is a relationship between DNA repair deficiency and temozolomide (TMZ) resistance in glioblastoma (GBM), it remains unclear which molecule is associated with GBM recurrence. We isolated three TMZ-resistant human GBM cell lines and examined the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and mismatch repair (MMR) components. We used immunohistochemical analysis to compare MutL homolog 1 (MLH1), postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) and MGMT expression in primary and recurrent GBM specimens obtained from GBM patients during TMZ treatment. We found a reduction in MLH1 expression and a subsequent reduction in PMS2 protein levels in TMZ-resistant cells. Furthermore, MLH1 or PMS2 knockdown confered TMZ resistance. In recurrent GBM tumours, the expression of MLH1 and PMS2 was reduced when compared to primary tumours.

  10. Human MLH1 suppresses the insertion of telomeric sequences at intra-chromosomal sites in telomerase-expressing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pingping; Chastain, Megan; Zou, Ying; Her, Chengtao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant formation of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) promotes genome instabilities. However, it is unclear how aberrant ITS formation is suppressed in human cells. Here, we report that MLH1, a key protein involved in mismatch repair (MMR), suppresses telomeric sequence insertion (TSI) at intra-chromosomal regions. The frequency of TSI can be elevated by double-strand break (DSB) inducer and abolished by ATM/ATR inhibition. Suppression of TSI requires MLH1 recruitment to DSBs, indicating that MLH1's role in DSB response/repair is important for suppressing TSI. Moreover, TSI requires telomerase activity but is independent of the functional status of p53 and Rb. Lastly, we show that TSI is associated with chromosome instabilities including chromosome loss, micronuclei formation and chromosome breakage that are further elevated by replication stress. Our studies uncover a novel link between MLH1, telomerase, telomere and genome stability. PMID:28180301

  11. Tumour MLH1 promoter region methylation testing is an effective pre-screen for Lynch Syndrome (HNPCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, K; Jorgensen, NM; Wallace, AJ; Buchanan, DD; Lalloo, F; McMahon, RFT; Hill, J; Evans, DG

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Lynch syndrome patients have DNA mismatch repair deficiency and up to 80% life-time risk of colorectal cancer. Screening of mutation carriers reduces colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Selection for constitutional mutation testing relies on family history (Amsterdam and Bethesda Guidelines) and tumour derived biomarkers. Initial biomarker analysis uses mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability. Abnormalities in either identify mismatch repair deficiency but do not differentiate sporadic epigenetic defects, due to MLH1 promoter region methylation (13% of CRCs) from Lynch Syndrome (4% of CRCs). A diagnostic biomarker capable of making this distinction would be valuable. This study compared two biomarkers in tumours with mismatch repair deficiency; quantification of methylation of the MLH1 promoter region using a novel assay and BRAF c.1799T>A, p.(Val600Glu) mutation status in the identification of constitutional mutations. Methods Tumour DNA was extracted (FFPE tissue) and pyrosequencing used to test for MLH1 promoter methylation and presence of the BRAF c.1799T>A, p.(Val600Glu) mutation 71 CRCs from individuals with pathogenic MLH1 mutations and 73 CRCs with sporadic MLH1 loss. Specificity and sensitivity was compared. Findings Unmethylated MLH1 promoter: sensitivity 94.4% (95% CI 86.2–98.4%), specificity 87.7% (95% CI 77.9–94.2%), Wild-type BRAF (codon 600): sensitivity 65.8% (95% CI 53.7–76.5%), specificity 98.6% (95% CI 92.4–100.0%) for the identification of those with pathogenic MLH1 mutations. Conclusions Quantitative MLH1 promoter region methylation using pyrosequencing is superior to BRAF codon 600 mutation status in identifying constitutional mutations in mismatch repair deficient tumours. PMID:25280751

  12. MLH1 expression predicts the response to preoperative therapy and is associated with PD-L1 expression in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Kota; Yamasaki, Makoto; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-07-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) inhibition therapy demonstrates potential as a future treatment for esophageal cancer. Mismatch repair status and tumor PD-L1 expression are the candidate predictive biomarkers for response to this therapy. In colorectal cancer, mismatch repair-deficient tumors are associated with improved survival, although they are not sensitive to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) expression and prognosis, response to therapy and PD-L1 expression in esophageal cancer. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate MLH1 and PD-L1 expression in 251 resected specimens. Of the specimens, 30.3% exhibited low MLH1 expression and 15.5% exhibited high PD-L1 expression. The 5-year overall survival rates for the high MLH1 expression group and the low MLH1 expression group were 51.3 and 55.6%, respectively (P=0.5260). The responder ratio was 45.7% in the high MLH1 expression group and 15.4% in the low MLH1 expression group (PMLH1 expression group (P=0.0064) and 25.0% in the low MLH1 expression group. MLH1 expression may be a predictive factor for the response to preoperative therapy in esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer with low MLH1 expression may have a mechanism that assists in promoting tumor PD-L1 expression.

  13. A modifier of Huntington's disease onset at the MLH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Chao, Michael J; Harold, Denise; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2017-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in HTT. Many clinical characteristics of HD such as age at motor onset are determined largely by the size of HTT CAG repeat. However, emerging evidence strongly supports a role for other genetic factors in modifying the disease pathogenesis driven by mutant huntingtin. A recent genome-wide association analysis to discover genetic modifiers of HD onset age provided initial evidence for modifier loci on chromosomes 8 and 15 and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 3. Here, genotyping of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in a cohort of 3,314 additional HD subjects yields independent confirmation of the former two loci and moves the third to genome-wide significance at MLH1, a locus whose mouse orthologue modifies CAG length-dependent phenotypes in a Htt-knock-in mouse model of HD. Both quantitative and dichotomous association analyses implicate a functional variant on ∼32% of chromosomes with the beneficial modifier effect that delays HD motor onset by 0.7 years/allele. Genomic DNA capture and sequencing of a modifier haplotype localize the functional variation to a 78 kb region spanning the 3'end of MLH1 and the 5'end of the neighboring LRRFIP2, and marked by an isoleucine-valine missense variant in MLH1. Analysis of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) provides modest support for altered regulation of MLH1 and LRRFIP2, raising the possibility that the modifier affects regulation of both genes. Finally, polygenic modification score and heritability analyses suggest the existence of additional genetic modifiers, supporting expanded, comprehensive genetic analysis of larger HD datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in MLH1 predict poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaonian; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Zhigang; Tan, Chao; Bei, Chunhua; Qin, Linyuan; Ren, Yuan; Tan, Shengkui

    2017-10-03

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant cancer causing deleterious health effect worldwide, especially in China. So far clinical cure rate and long-term survival rate of HCC remains low. Most HCC patients after cancer resection have recurrence or metastasis within 5 years. This study aims to explore the genetic association of mutL homolog 1 ( MLH1 ) polymorphisms with HCC risk and prognosis. Four candidate MLH1 polymorphisms, rs1800734, rs10849, rs3774343 and rs1540354 were studied from a hospital-based case-control study including 1,036 cases (HCC patients) and 1,036 controls (non-HCC patients) in Guangxi, China. All these SNPs interacted with environmental risk factors, such as HBV infection, alcohol intake and smoking in the pathogenesis of HCC. However, only rs1800734 had significant difference between cases and controls. Compared to the AA genotype, patients with AG, GG and AG/GG genotype of rs1800734 had an increased risk of HCC [ORs (95% CI) = 1.217 (1.074∼1.536), 1.745 (1.301∼2.591) and 1.291 (1.126∼1.687)] and a decreased survival time [co-dominant, HR (95% CI) = 1.553 (1.257∼1.920); dominant, HR (95% CI) = 2.207 (1.572∼3.100)]. Furthermore, we found that tumor number, tumor staging, metastasis and rs1800734 were associated with the overall survival of HCC patients by multivariate COX regression analysis. No significant difference was found between the other three MLH1 polymorphisms with HCC risk and prognosis. Our study suggests MLH1 SNP, rs1800734 as a new predictor for poor prognosis of HCC patients.

  15. Mlh1 deficiency in normal mouse colon mucosa associates with chromosomally unstable colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pussila, Marjaana; Törönen, Petri; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Katayama, Shintaro; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Holm, Liisa; Kere, Juha; Peltomäki, Päivi; Mäkinen, Markus J; Linden, Jere; Nyström, Minna

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) genome is unstable and different types of instabilities, such as chromosomal instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MSI) are thought to reflect distinct cancer initiating mechanisms. Although 85% of sporadic CRC reveal CIN, 15% reveal mismatch repair (MMR) malfunction and MSI, the hallmarks of Lynch syndrome with inherited heterozygous germline mutations in MMR genes. Our study was designed to comprehensively follow genome-wide expression changes and their implications during colon tumorigenesis. We conducted a long-term feeding experiment in the mouse to address expression changes arising in histologically normal colonic mucosa as putative cancer preceding events, and the effect of inherited predisposition (Mlh1+/−) and Western-style diet (WD) on those. During the 21-month experiment, carcinomas developed mainly in WD-fed mice and were evenly distributed between genotypes. Unexpectedly, the heterozygote (B6.129-Mlh1tm1Rak) mice did not show MSI in their CRCs. Instead, both wildtype and heterozygote CRC mice showed a distinct mRNA expression profile and shortage of several chromosomal segregation gene-specific transcripts (Mlh1, Bub1, Mis18a, Tpx2, Rad9a, Pms2, Cenpe, Ncapd3, Odf2 and Dclre1b) in their colon mucosa, as well as an increased mitotic activity and abundant numbers of unbalanced/atypical mitoses in tumours. Our genome-wide expression profiling experiment demonstrates that cancer preceding changes are already seen in histologically normal colon mucosa and that decreased expressions of Mlh1 and other chromosomal segregation genes may form a field-defect in mucosa, which trigger MMR-proficient, chromosomally unstable CRC. PMID:29701748

  16. The Germline MLH1 K618A Variant and Susceptibility to Lynch Syndrome-Associated Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Fabiola; Lindor, Noralane M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Highsmith, W. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Missense variants discovered during sequencing of cancer susceptibility genes can be problematic for clinical interpretation. MLH1 K618A, which results from a 2-bp alteration (AAG→GCG) leading to a substitution of lysine to alanine in codon 618, has variously been interpreted as a pathogenic mutation, a variant of unknown significance, and a benign polymorphism. We evaluated the role of MLH1 K618A in predisposition to cancer by genotyping 1512 control subjects to assess its frequency in the general population. We also reviewed the literature concerning MLH1 K618A in families with colorectal cancer. The measured allele frequency of the K618A variant was 0.40%, which is remarkably close to the 0.44% summarized from 2491 control subjects in the literature. K618A was over-represented in families with suspected Lynch syndrome. In 1366 families, the allele frequency was 0.88% (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3 to 3.5; P = 0.006). In studies of sporadic cancers of the type associated with Lynch syndrome, K618A was over-represented in 1742 cases (allele frequency of 0.83) (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.2; P = 0.008). We conclude that MLH1 K618A is not a fully penetrant Lynch syndrome mutation, although it is not without effect, appearing to increase the risk of Lynch syndrome-associated tumors approximately twofold. Our systematic assessment approach may be useful for variants in other genes. PMID:22426235

  17. Synchronous gastric and sebaceous cancers, a rare manifestation of MLH1-related Muir-Torre syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švec, Jiří; Schwarzová, L.; Janošíková, B.; Štekrová, J.; Mandys, V.; Kment, M.; Vodička, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2014), s. 5196-5202 ISSN 1936-2625 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) Prvouk-P27/LF1/1; Univerzita Karlova(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24024 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : germline mutation * gastric cancer * MLH1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2014

  18. Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression is Frequently Caused by Heterogenous MLH1 Promoter Hypermethylation in Lynch Syndrome Screening for Endometrial Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Aya; Sato, Naoki; Sugawara, Tae; Takahashi, Kazue; Kito, Masahiko; Makino, Kenichi; Sato, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Dai; Shirasawa, Hiromistu; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Kumazawa, Yukiyo; Sato, Akira; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder mainly caused by a germline mutation in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) and is associated with increased risk for various cancers, particularly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (EC). Women with LS account for 2% to 6% of EC patients; it is clinically important to identify LS in such individuals for predicting and/or preventing additional LS-associated cancers. PMS2 germline mutation (PMS2-LS) is the rarest contribution to LS etiology among the 4 LS-associated MMR germline mutations, and its detection is complicated. Therefore, prudent screening for PMS2-LS is important as it leads to an efficient LS identification strategy. Immunohistochemistry is recommended as a screening method for LS in EC. Isolated loss of PMS2 (IL-PMS2) expression is caused not only by PMS2-LS but also by MLH1 germline mutation or MLH1 promoter hypermethylation (MLH-PHM). This study aimed to determine the association between MLH1-PHM and IL-PMS2 to avoid inappropriate genetic analysis. We performed MLH1 methylation analysis and MLH1/PMS2 germline mutation testing on the IL-PMS2 cases. By performing MMR-immunohistochemistry on 360 unselected ECs, we could select 8 (2.2%) cases as IL-PMS2. Heterogenous MLH1 staining and MLH1-PHM were detected in 4 of 8 (50%) IL-PMS2 tumors. Of the 5 IL-PMS2 patients who underwent genetic analysis, 1 had PMS2 germline mutation with normal MLH1 expression (without MLH1-PHM), and no MLH1 germline mutation was detected. We suggest that MLH1 promoter methylation analysis for IL-PMS2 EC should be performed to exclude sporadic cases before further PMS2 genetic testing.

  19. Reduced MLH3 Expression in the Syndrome of Gan-Shen Yin Deficiency in Patients with Different Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Zhong, Maofeng; Liu, Dong; Liang, Shufang; Liu, Xiaolin; Cheng, Binbin; Zhang, Yani; Yin, Zifei; Wang, Yuan; Ling, Changquan

    2017-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine formulates treatment according to body constitution (BC) differentiation. Different constitutions have specific metabolic characteristics and different susceptibility to certain diseases. This study aimed to assess the characteristic genes of gan-shen Yin deficiency constitution in different diseases. Fifty primary liver cancer (PLC) patients, 94 hypertension (HBP) patients, and 100 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients were enrolled and classified into gan-shen Yin deficiency group and non-gan-shen Yin deficiency group according to the body constitution questionnaire to assess the clinical manifestation of patients. The mRNA expressions of 17 genes in PLC patients with gan-shen Yin deficiency were different from those without gan-shen Yin deficiency. However, considering all patients with PLC, HBP, and DM, only MLH3 was significantly lower in gan-shen Yin deficiency group than that in non-gen-shen Yin deficiency. By ROC analysis, the relationship between MLH3 and gan-shen Yin deficiency constitution was confirmed. Treatment of MLH3 (-/- and -/+) mice with Liuweidihuang wan, classical prescriptions for Yin deficiency, partly ameliorates the body constitution of Yin deficiency in MLH3 (-/+) mice, but not in MLH3 (-/-) mice. MLH3 might be one of material bases of gan-shen Yin deficiency constitution.

  20. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  1. A Mononucleotide Markers Panel to Identify hMLH1/hMSH2 Germline Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pedroni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary NonPolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease caused by germline mutations in a class of genes deputed to maintain genomic integrity during cell replication, mutations result in a generalized genomic instability, particularly evident at microsatellite loci (Microsatellite Instability, MSI. MSI is present in 85–90% of colorectal cancers that occur in Lynch Syndrome. To standardize the molecular diagnosis of MSI, a panel of 5 microsatellite markers was proposed (known as the “Bethesda panel”. Aim of our study is to evaluate if MSI testing with two mononucleotide markers, such as BAT25 and BAT26, was sufficient to identify patients with hMLH1/hMSH2 germline mutations. We tested 105 tumours for MSI using both the Bethesda markers and the two mononucleotide markers BAT25 and BAT26. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins was executed on the tumours with at least one unstable microsatellite, whereas germline hMLH1/hMSH2 mutations were searched for all cases showing two or more unstable microsatellites.

  2. Association between MLH1 -93G>a polymorphism and risk of colorectal cancer.

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    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available The -93G>A (rs1800734 polymorphism located in the promoter of mismatch repair gene, MLH1, has been identified as a low-penetrance variant for cancer risk. Many published studies have evaluated the association between the MLH1 -93G>A polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC risk. However, the results remain conflicting rather than conclusive.The aim of this study was to assess the association between the MLH1 -93G>A polymorphism and the risk of CRC.To derive a more precise estimation of the association, a meta-analysis of six studies (17,791 cases and 13,782 controls was performed. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to evaluate the strength of the association. Four of these published studies were performed on subjects of known microsatellite instability (MSI status. An additional analysis including 742 cases and 10,895 controls was used to assess the association between the MLH1 -93G>A polymorphism and the risk of MSI-CRC.The overall results indicated that the variant genotypes were associated with a significantly increased risk of CRC (AG versus GG: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01-1.11; AA/AG versus GG: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01-1.11. This increased risk was also found during stratified analysis of MSI status (AA versus GG: OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.94-3.28; AG versus GG: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.10-1.52; AA/AG versus GG: OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.24-1.68; AA versusOR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.78-2.96. Egger's test did not show any evidence of publication bias.Our results suggest that the MLH1 -93G>A polymorphism may contribute to individual susceptibility to CRC and act as a risk factor for MSI-CRC.

  3. Novel roles for MLH3 deficiency and TLE6-like amplification in DNA mismatch repair-deficient gastrointestinal tumorigenesis and progression.

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    Peng-Chieh Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA mismatch repair suppresses gastrointestinal tumorgenesis. Four mammalian E. coli MutL homologues heterodimerize to form three distinct complexes: MLH1/PMS2, MLH1/MLH3, and MLH1/PMS1. To understand the mechanistic contributions of MLH3 and PMS2 in gastrointestinal tumor suppression, we generated Mlh3(-/-;Apc(1638N and Mlh3(-/-;Pms2(-/-;Apc(1638N (MPA mice. Mlh3 nullizygosity significantly increased Apc frameshift mutations and tumor multiplicity. Combined Mlh3;Pms2 nullizygosity further increased Apc base-substitution mutations. The spectrum of MPA tumor mutations was distinct from that observed in Mlh1(-/-;Apc(1638N mice, implicating the first potential role for MLH1/PMS1 in tumor suppression. Because Mlh3;Pms2 deficiency also increased gastrointestinal tumor progression, we used array-CGH to identify a recurrent tumor amplicon. This amplicon contained a previously uncharacterized Transducin enhancer of Split (Tle family gene, Tle6-like. Expression of Tle6-like, or the similar human TLE6D splice isoform in colon cancer cells increased cell proliferation, colony-formation, cell migration, and xenograft tumorgenicity. Tle6-like;TLE6D directly interact with the gastrointestinal tumor suppressor RUNX3 and antagonize RUNX3 target transactivation. TLE6D is recurrently overexpressed in human colorectal cancers and TLE6D expression correlates with RUNX3 expression. Collectively, these findings provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of individual MutL homologue tumor suppression and demonstrate an association between TLE mediated antagonism of RUNX3 and accelerated human colorectal cancer progression.

  4. Analysis of MLH3 C2531T Polymorphism in Infertile Men with Idiopathic Azoospermia or Severe Oligozoospermia

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    MA Zaimy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is described as the inability to get pregnant after one year of unprotected intercourse. About half of infertility cases are because of male factors. Idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia caused by genetic alterations is a significant part of male infertility. A key step of spermatogenesis is crossover events during meiotic reciprocal recombination. MLH3 protein has a crucial role in meiotic recombination and in spermatogenesis. We evaluated this function of MLH3 protein by examining the contribution of functional polymorphism in MLH3 (C2531T to the risk of male infertility. Methods: We studied this polymorphism in 110 infertile male with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, and 110 fertile men with normozoospermia as a control group. MLH3 C2531T polymorphism was analyzed using the tetra-amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (4P-ARMS-PCR method. Results: Genotypes CC, CT and TT of the MLH3 gene presented frequencies of 13.6%,59.1% and 27.3%, respectively, in the men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia and 37.3%,53.6% and 9.1% in the control group (p<0.001. Conclusion: The data suggest that the MLH3 C2531T polymorphism can be associated with risk of male infertility. The research data showed that presence of the polymorphic allele T leads to an increased risk of 2.35 times (OR =2.35, 95% CI =1.57-3.51; p<0.001 to develop infertility in relation to the normal control group. Therefore, the MLH3 gene polymorphism may be genetic determinant for defective spermatogenesis in the humans.

  5. GLI1 interferes with the DNA mismatch repair system in pancreatic cancer through BHLHE41-mediated suppression of MLH1.

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    Inaguma, Shingo; Riku, Miho; Hashimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Murakami, Hideki; Saga, Shinsuke; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2013-12-15

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system is indispensable for the fidelity of DNA replication, the impairment of which predisposes to the development and progression of many types of cancers. To date, GLI1 transcription factor, a key molecule of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, has been shown to regulate the expression of several genes crucial for a variety of cancer cell properties in many types of cancers, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but whether GLI1 could control the MMR system was not known. Here, we showed that GLI1 and GLI2 indirectly suppressed the expression of MLH1 in PDAC cells. Through GLI1 target gene screening, we found that GLI1 and GLI2 activated the expression of a basic helix-loop-helix type suppressor BHLHE41/DEC2/SHARP1 through a GLI-binding site in the promoter. Consistent with a previous report that BHLHE41 suppresses the MLH1 promoter activity, we found that the activation of GLI1 led to the BHLHE41-dependent suppression of MLH1, and a double knockdown of GLI1 and GLI2 conversely increased the MLH1 protein in PDAC cells. Using TALEN-based modification of the MLH1 gene, we further showed that GLI1 expression was indeed associated with an increased tolerance to a methylating agent, methylnitrosourea cooperatively with a lower copy number status of MLH1. Finally, GLI1 expression was immunohistochemically related positively with BHLHE41 and inversely with MLH1 in PDAC cells and precancerous lesions of the pancreas. On the basis of these results, we propose that GLI1 depresses the MMR activity and might contribute to the development and progression of PDAC. ©2013 AACR.

  6. The mutational profile and infiltration pattern of murine MLH1-/- tumors: concurrences, disparities and cell line establishment for functional analysis.

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    Maletzki, Claudia; Beyrich, Franziska; Hühns, Maja; Klar, Ernst; Linnebacher, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Mice lines homozygous negative for one of the four DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, MSH6) were generated as models for MMR deficient (MMR-D) diseases. Clinically, hereditary forms of MMR-D include Lynch syndrome (characterized by a germline MMR gene defect) and constitutional MMR-D, the biallelic form. MMR-D knockout mice may be representative for both diseases. Here, we aimed at characterizing the MLH1-/- model focusing on tumor-immune microenvironment and identification of coding microsatellite mutations in lymphomas and gastrointestinal tumors (GIT).All tumors showed microsatellite instability (MSI) in non-coding mononucleotide markers. Mutational profiling of 26 coding loci in MSI+ GIT and lymphomas revealed instability in half of the microsatellites, two of them (Rfc3 and Rasal2) shared between both entities. MLH1-/- tumors of both entities displayed a similar phenotype (high CD71, FasL, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 expression). Additional immunofluorescence verified the tumors' natural immunosuppressive character (marked CD11b/CD200R infiltration). Vice versa, CD3+ T cells as well as immune checkpoints molecules were detectable, indicative for an active immune microenvironment. For functional analysis, a permanent cell line from an MLH1-/- GIT was established. The newly developed MLH1-/- A7450 cells exhibit stable in vitro growth, strong invasive potential and heterogeneous drug response. Moreover, four additional MSI target genes (Nktr1, C8a, Taf1b, and Lig4) not recognized in the primary were identified in this cell line.Summing up, molecular and immunological mechanisms of MLH1-/- driven carcinogenesis correlate well with clinical features of MMR-D. MLH1-/- knockout mice combine characteristics of Lynch syndrome and constitutional MMR-D, making them suitable models for preclinical research aiming at MMR-D related diseases.

  7. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations.

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    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-20

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

  8. MLH1 as a direct target of MiR-155 and a potential predictor of favorable prognosis in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhou, Li; Cui, Quan-Cai; Zhou, Wei-Xun; You, Lei; Chen, Ge; Shu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of Mut L homologue 1 (MLH1) expression by microRNA (miR)-155 and its prognostic significance in pancreatic cancer (PC) remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to address the issues. MiR-155 mimics and inhibitor were transfected to PC cell lines, Panc-1 and Capan-1. Expression of MLH1 was subsequently evaluated. Then, luciferase activity was detected after miR-155 mimics and pRL-TK plasmids containing wild-type and mutant 3'UTRs of MLH1 mRNA were co-transfected. Finally, immunohistochemical staining for MLH1 was performed in PC samples. Transfection of miR-155 mimics and inhibitor led to reversely altered protein expressions of miR-155 and MLH1, whereas the corresponding mRNA expressions were similar. A significant decrease in luciferase activity in the cells transfected with the wild-type pRL-TK plasmid was shown in contrast to those transfected with the mutant one. In addition, MLH1 was less expressed in tumor than in para-tumor tissues of PC. Extensive MLH1 expression was significantly associated with favorable differentiation and less lymph node metastasis. MLH1 expression was found to be a prognosticator in univariate analysis, and being of marginally significant impact in multivariate test. MLH1 might serve as a direct target of miR-155 and a potential prognosis predictor in PC.

  9. Association between promoter methylation of MLH1 and MSH2 and reactive oxygen species in oligozoospermic men-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, S; Agarwal, A; Henkel, R; Mahmutoglu, A M; Sharma, R; Esteves, S C; Aljowair, A; Emirzeoglu, D; Alkhani, A; Pelegrini, L; Joumah, A; Sabanegh, E

    2018-04-01

    MLH1 and MSH2 are important genes for DNA mismatch repair and crossing over during meiosis and are implicated in male infertility. Therefore, the methylation patterns of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in oligozoospermic males were investigated. Ten oligozoospermic patients and 29 normozoospermic donors were analysed. Methylation profiles of the MLH1 and MSH2 promotors were analysed. In addition, sperm motility and seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted to determine the accuracy of the DNA methylation status of MLH1 and MSH2 to distinguish between oligozoospermic and normozoospermic men. In oligozoospermic men, MLH1 was significantly (p = .0013) more methylated compared to normozoospermic men. Additionally, there was a significant positive association (r = .384; p = .0159) between seminal ROS levels and MLH1 methylation. Contrary, no association between MSH2 methylation and oligozoospermia was found. ROC curve analysis for methylation status of MLH1 was significant (p = .0275) with an area under the curve of 61.1%, a sensitivity of 22.2% and a specificity of 100.0%. This pilot study indicates oligozoospermic patients have more methylation of MLH1 than normozoospermic patients. Whether hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter plays a role in repairing relevant mismatches of sperm DNA strands in idiopathic oligozoospermia warrants further investigation. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Clinical Significance of Epigenetic Inactivation of hMLH1 and BRCA1 in Tunisian Patients with Invasive Breast Carcinoma

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    Sondes Karray-Chouayekh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant hypermethylation of gene promoter regions is one of the mechanisms for inactivation of tumour suppressor genes in many human cancers including breast carcinoma. In the current study, we aimed to assess by MSP, the methylation pattern of two cancer-related genes involved in DNA repair: hMLH1 (mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2 (E. coli and BRCA1 (breast cancer 1, early onset in 78 primary breast cancers from Tunisian patients. The methylation frequencies were 24.36% for hMLH1 and 46% for BRCA1. BRCA1 methylation correlated with age at diagnosis (P=.015 and 5-years disease free survival (P=.016 while hMLH1 methylation was more frequent in larger tumors (P=.002 and in presence of distant metastasis (P=.004. Furthermore, methylation of hMLH1 significantly correlated with high level of P53 expression (P=.006 and with overall survival (P=.015 suggesting that silencing of hMLH1 through aberrant promoter methylation could be used as a poor prognosis indicator in breast cancer.

  11. Haplotype analysis suggest that the MLH1 c.2059C > T mutation is a Swedish founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Liu, Tao; Keihäs, Markku; Morak, Moni; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Berry, Ian R; Moilanen, Jukka S; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-12-29

    Lynch syndrome (LS) predisposes to a spectrum of cancers and increases the lifetime risk of developing colorectal- or endometrial cancer to over 50%. Lynch syndrome is dominantly inherited and is caused by defects in DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2, with the vast majority detected in MLH1 and MSH2. Recurrent LS-associated variants observed in apparently unrelated individuals, have either arisen de novo in different families due to mutation hotspots, or are inherited from a founder (a common ancestor) that lived several generations back. There are variants that recur in some populations while also acting as founders in other ethnic groups. Testing for founder mutations can facilitate molecular diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome more efficiently and more cost effective than screening for all possible mutations. Here we report a study of the missense mutation MLH1 c.2059C > T (p.Arg687Trp), a potential founder mutation identified in eight Swedish families and one Finnish family with Swedish ancestors. Haplotype analysis confirmed that the Finnish and Swedish families shared a haplotype of between 0.9 and 2.8 Mb. While MLH1 c.2059C > T exists worldwide, the Swedish haplotype was not found among mutation carriers from Germany or France, which indicates a common founder in the Swedish population. The geographic distribution of MLH1 c.2059C > T in Sweden suggests a single, ancient mutational event in the northern part of Sweden.

  12. Modulation of histone methylation and MLH1 gene silencing by hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hong; Zhou Xue; Chen Haobin; Li Qin; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a mutagen and carcinogen, and occupational exposure can lead to lung cancers and other adverse health effects. Genetic changes resulting from DNA damage have been proposed as an important mechanism that mediates chromate's carcinogenicity. Here we show that chromate exposure of human lung A549 cells increased global levels of di- and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 4 (H3K4) but decreased the levels of tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) and di-methylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2). Most interestingly, H3K9 dimethylation was enriched in the human MLH1 gene promoter following chromate exposure and this was correlated with decreased MLH1 mRNA expression. Chromate exposure increased the protein as well as mRNA levels of G9a a histone methyltransferase that specifically methylates H3K9. This Cr(VI)-induced increase in G9a may account for the global elevation of H3K9 dimethylation. Furthermore, supplementation with ascorbate, the primary reductant of Cr(VI) and also an essential cofactor for the histone demethylase activity, partially reversed the H3K9 dimethylation induced by chromate. Thus our studies suggest that Cr(VI) may target histone methyltransferases and demethylases, which in turn affect both global and gene promoter specific histone methylation, leading to the silencing of specific tumor suppressor genes such as MLH1.

  13. Germline mutations in PMS2 and MLH1 in individuals with solitary loss of PMS2 expression in colorectal carcinomas from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosty, Christophe; Clendenning, Mark; Walsh, Michael D; Eriksen, Stine V; Southey, Melissa C; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Poplawski, Nicola K; Parry, Susan; Arnold, Julie; Young, Joanne P; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; DeRycke, Melissa; Lindor, Noralane M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-02-19

    Immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in individuals with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although solitary loss of PMS2 expression is indicative of carrying a germline mutation in PMS2, previous studies reported MLH1 mutation in some cases. We determined the prevalence of MLH1 germline mutations in a large cohort of individuals with a CRC demonstrating solitary loss of PMS2 expression. This cohort study included 88 individuals affected with a PMS2-deficient CRC from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort. Germline PMS2 mutation analysis (long-range PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) was followed by MLH1 mutation testing (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification). Of the 66 individuals with complete mutation screening, we identified a pathogenic PMS2 mutation in 49 (74%), a pathogenic MLH1 mutation in 8 (12%) and a MLH1 variant of uncertain clinical significance predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis in 3 (4%); 6 (9%) carried variants likely to have no clinical significance. Missense point mutations accounted for most alterations (83%; 9/11) in MLH1. The MLH1 c.113A> G p.Asn38Ser mutation was found in 2 related individuals. One individual who carried the MLH1 intronic mutation c.677+3A>G p.Gln197Argfs*8 leading to the skipping of exon 8, developed 2 tumours, both of which retained MLH1 expression. A substantial proportion of CRCs with solitary loss of PMS2 expression are associated with a deleterious MLH1 germline mutation supporting the screening for MLH1 in individuals with tumours of this immunophenotype, when no PMS2 mutation has been identified. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Specific variants in the MLH1 gene region may drive DNA methylation, loss of protein expression, and MSI-H colorectal cancer.

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    Miralem Mrkonjic

    Full Text Available We previously identified an association between a mismatch repair gene, MLH1, promoter SNP (rs1800734 and microsatellite unstable (MSI-H colorectal cancers (CRCs in two samples. The current study expanded on this finding as we explored the genetic basis of DNA methylation in this region of chromosome 3. We hypothesized that specific polymorphisms in the MLH1 gene region predispose it to DNA methylation, resulting in the loss of MLH1 gene expression, mismatch-repair function, and consequently to genome-wide microsatellite instability.We first tested our hypothesis in one sample from Ontario (901 cases, 1,097 controls and replicated major findings in two additional samples from Newfoundland and Labrador (479 cases, 336 controls and from Seattle (591 cases, 629 controls. Logistic regression was used to test for association between SNPs in the region of MLH1 and CRC, MSI-H CRC, MLH1 gene expression in CRC, and DNA methylation in CRC. The association between rs1800734 and MSI-H CRCs, previously reported in Ontario and Newfoundland, was replicated in the Seattle sample. Two additional SNPs, in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs1800734, showed strong associations with MLH1 promoter methylation, loss of MLH1 protein, and MSI-H CRC in all three samples. The logistic regression model of MSI-H CRC that included MLH1-promoter-methylation status and MLH1 immunohistochemistry status fit most parsimoniously in all three samples combined. When rs1800734 was added to this model, its effect was not statistically significant (P-value  = 0.72 vs. 2.3×10(-4 when the SNP was examined alone.The observed association of rs1800734 with MSI-H CRC occurs through its effect on the MLH1 promoter methylation, MLH1 IHC deficiency, or both.

  15. Impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution after curative surgical tumor resection in a murine orthotopic xenograft model for human MSI colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Katy; Ferron, Marianne; Calmel, Claire; Fléjou, Jean-François; Pocard, Marc; Praz, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) displaying microsatellite instability (MSI) most often result from MLH1 deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of MLH1 expression per se on tumor evolution after curative surgical resection using a xenograft tumor model. Transplantable tumors established with the human MLH1-deficient HCT116 cell line and its MLH1-complemented isogenic clone, mlh1-3, were implanted onto the caecum of NOD/SCID mice. Curative surgical resection was performed at day 10 in half of the animals. The HCT116-derived tumors were more voluminous compared to the mlh1-3 ones (P = .001). Lymph node metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred significantly more often in the group of mice grafted with HCT116 (P = .007 and P = .035, respectively). Mlh1-3-grafted mice did not develop peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastasis. After surgical resection, lymph node metastases only arose in the group of mice implanted with HCT116 and the rate of cure was significantly lower than in the mlh1-3 group (P = .047). The murine orthotopic xenograft model based on isogenic human CRC cell lines allowed us to reveal the impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution in mice who underwent curative surgical resection and in mice whose tumor was left in situ. Our data indicate that the behavior of MLH1-deficient CRC is not only governed by mutations arising in genes harboring microsatellite repeated sequences but also from their defect in MLH1 as such. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 confer susceptibility to esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Zhong; Ju, Hui-Xiang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Jin, Hao; Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair genes like MSH2 and MLH1 confer increased risk of cancers. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MSH2 and MLH1 were investigated for their potential contribution to the risk of esophageal cancer. This study recruited 614 participants from Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, of which 289 were patients with esophageal cancer, and the remainder was healthy individuals who served as a control group. Two SNPs, MSH2 c.2063T>G and MLH1 IVS14-19A>G, were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Carriers of the MSH2 c.2063G allele were at significantly higher risk for esophageal cancer compared to individuals with the TT genotype [OR = 3.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-11.03]. The MLH1 IVS14-19A>G allele also conferred significantly increased (1.70-fold) for esophageal cancer compared to the AA genotype (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-5.06). Further, the variant alleles interacted such that individuals with the susceptible genotypes at both MSH2 and MLH1 had a significantly exacerbated risk for esophageal cancer (OR = 12.38, 95% CI: 3.09-63.11). In brief, SNPs in the DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 increase the risk of esophageal cancer. Molecular investigations are needed to uncover the mechanism behind their interaction effect.

  17. Excess of extracolonic non-endometrial multiple primary cancers in MSH2 germline mutation carriers over MLH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Hurtubise, Kevin M; Yheulon, Christopher G; Gagliano, Ronald A; Lynch, Henry T

    2013-12-01

    The lynch syndrome (LS) tumor spectrum involves colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer (EC), and less frequently various extracolonic non-endometrial cancers (non-EC). The organ-specific survival rates of these patients are well defined, however, the collective survival of all-cancers combined (CRC + EC + non-EC) are unclear. Fifty-two MSH2 patients and 68 MLH1 patients were followed for a median of 6.3 years after diagnosis of first cancer, regardless of type. The proportions of CRC only, EC, non-EC, and multiple primary cancers were compared between the two genotypes. Kaplan-Meier curves were developed for survival comparisons. MSH2 patients present less frequently with only CRC (37% MSH2, 62% MLH1, P = 0.0096), manifest more multiple primary cancers (38% MSH2, 18% MLH1, P = 0.013), develop more extracolonic cancers (62% MSH2, 38% MLH1, P = 0.003), non-EC only cancers (46% MSH2, 24% MLH1, P = 0.028) and carry a greater risk for urinary tract cancer (UTC) (13.4% MSH2, 1.5% MLH1, P = 0.024). There was no difference in 10-year survival between the two groups (P = 0.4). The additional propensity for UTC in MSH2 carriers argues in favor of UTC screening in MSH2 individuals. Other types of cancer screening should be tailored to the expression history of the specific LS mutation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modulation of transcription factor binding and epigenetic regulation of the MLH1 CpG island and shore by polymorphism rs1800734 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Andrea J; Bapat, Bharati

    2017-06-03

    The MLH1 promoter polymorphism rs1800734 is associated with MLH1 CpG island hypermethylation and expression loss in colorectal cancer (CRC). Conversely, variant rs1800734 is associated with MLH1 shore, but not island, hypomethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA. To explore these distinct patterns, MLH1 CpG island and shore methylation was assessed in CRC cell lines stratified by rs1800734 genotype. Cell lines containing the variant A allele demonstrated MLH1 shore hypomethylation compared to wild type (GG). There was significant enrichment of transcription factor AP4 at the MLH1 promoter in GG and GA cell lines, but not the AA cell line, by chromatin immunoprecipitation studies. Preferential binding to the G allele was confirmed by sequencing in the GA cell line. The enhancer-associated histone modification H3K4me1 was enriched at the MLH1 shore; however, H3K27ac was not, indicating the shore is an inactive enhancer. These results demonstrate the role of variant rs1800734 in altering transcription factor binding as well as epigenetics at regions beyond the MLH1 CpG island in which it is located.

  19. Colorectal cancer incidence in path_MLH1 carriers subjected to different follow-up protocols : A Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seppala, Toni; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth; Jarvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rodland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos tot Nederveen; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Jenkins, Mark; Genuardi, Maurizio; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Frayling, Ian M.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Sampson, Julian R.; Capella, Gabriel; Moslein, Gabriela; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moller, Pal

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenicMLH1variants(path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy. METHODS: The cohort included Finnish carriers enrolled in 3-yearly colonoscopy (n = 505; 4625 observation

  20. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

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    Jisha Elias

    2017-12-01

    In this study we identified three families with Lynch syndrome from a rural cancer center in western India (KCHRC, Goraj, Gujarat, where 70-75 CRC patients are seen annually. DNA isolated from the blood of consented family members of all three families (8-10 members/family was subjected to NGS sequencing methods on an Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform. We identified unique mutations in the MLH1 gene in all three HNPCC family members. Two of the three unrelated families shared a common mutation (154delA and 156delA. Total 8 members of a family were identified as carriers for 156delA mutation of which 5 members were unaffected while 3 were affected (age of onset: 1 member <30yrs & 2 were>40yr. The family with 154delA mutation showed 2 affected members (>40yr carrying the mutations.LYS618DEL mutation found in 8 members of the third family showed that both affected and unaffected carried the mutation. Thus the common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in two unrelated families had a high risk for lynch syndrome especially above the age of 40.

  1. Epigenetic silencing of the DNA mismatch repair gene, MLH1, induced by hypoxic stress in a pathway dependent on the histone demethylase, LSD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuhong; Wajapeyee, Narendra; Turker, Mitchell S.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Silencing of the MLH1 gene is frequently seen in sporadic cancers. We report that hypoxia causes decreased H3K4 methylation at the MLH1 promoter via the H3K4 demethylases, LSD1 and PLU-1, and promotes long-term silencing of the promoter in a pathway that requires LSD1. Knockdown of LSD1 or its co-repressor, CoREST, also prevents the re-silencing (and cytosine DNA methylation) of the endogenous MLH1 promoter in RKO colon cancer cells following transient reactivation by the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC). The results demonstrate that hypoxia is a critical driving force for silencing of MLH1 through chromatin modification and indicate that the LSD1/CoREST complex is essential for MLH1 silencing. PMID:25043185

  2. The MLH1 c.-27C>A and c.85G>T variants are linked to dominantly inherited MLH1 epimutation and are borne on a European ancestral haplotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, C.T.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Rapkins, R.W.; Ward, R.L.; Chun, N.; Ford, J.M.; Ladabaum, U.; McKinnon, W.C.; Greenblatt, M.S.; Hitchins, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2, and deletions affecting the EPCAM gene adjacent to MSH2, underlie Lynch syndrome by predisposing to early-onset colorectal, endometrial and other cancers. An alternative but rare cause of Lynch syndrome is constitutional

  3. Fruits, vegetables and hMLH1 protein-deficient and-proficient colon cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Veer, van 't P.; Wijhe, van G.; Luchtenborg, M.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Goeij, de A.F.P.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical and pathologic differences exist between colon carcinomas deficient and proficient in the mismatch repair protein hMLH1. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that fruits, vegetables, folate, and antioxidants are associated with colonic expression of mismatch repair genes.METHODS:

  4. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J

    2013-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomi...

  5. Associations of dietary methyl donor intake with MLH1 promoter hypermethylation and related molecular phenotypes in sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Bongaerts, B.W.C.; Wouters, K.A.D.; Kester, A.D.M.; Schouten, L.J.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Engeland, M. van; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    Intake of dietary factors that serve as methyl group donors may influence promoter hypermethylation in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated whether dietary folate, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6, methionine and alcohol were associated with mutL homologue 1 (MLH1) hypermethylation and the related

  6. First description of mutational analysis of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in Algerian families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziada-Bouchaar, H; Sifi, K; Filali, T; Hammada, T; Satta, D; Abadi, N

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the early onset of colorectal cancer (CRC) linked to germline defects in Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes. We present here, the first molecular study of the correlation between CRC and mutations occurring in these genes performed in twenty-one unrelated Algerian families. The presence of germline mutations in MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was tested by sequencing all exons plus adjacent intronic sequences and Multiplex ligand-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for testing large genomic rearrangements. Pathogenic mutations were identified in 20 % of families with clinical suspicion on HNPCC. Two novel variants described for the first time in Algerian families were identified in MLH1, c.881_884delTCAGinsCATTCCT and a large deletion in MSH6 gene from a young onset of CRC. Moreover, the variants of MSH2 gene: c.942+3A>T, c.1030C>T, the most described ones, were also detected in Algerian families. Furthermore, the families HNPCC caused by MSH6 germline mutation may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations. In this study, we confirmed that MSH2, MLH1, and MSH6 contribute to CRC susceptibility. This work represents the implementation of a diagnostic algorithm for the identification of Lynch syndrome patients in Algerian families.

  7. Dietary fat and risk of colon and rectal cancer with aberrant MLH1 expression, APC or KRAS genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, M.P.; Luchtenborg, M.; Goeij, A.F. de; Brink, M.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Bruine, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate baseline fat intake and the risk of colon and rectal tumors lacking MLH1 (mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2) repair gene expression and harboring mutations in the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) tumor suppressor gene and in the KRAS (v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat

  8. Dietary fat and risk of colon and rectal cancer with aberrant MLH1 expression, APC or KRAS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijenberg, Matty P; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Brink, Mirian; van Muijen, Goos N P; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2007-10-01

    To investigate baseline fat intake and the risk of colon and rectal tumors lacking MLH1 (mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2) repair gene expression and harboring mutations in the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) tumor suppressor gene and in the KRAS (v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) oncogene. After 7.3 years of follow-up of the Netherlands Cohort Study (n = 120,852), adjusted incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed, based on 401 colon and 130 rectal cancer patients. Total, saturated and monounsaturated fat were not associated with the risk of colon or rectal cancer, or different molecular subgroups. There was also no association between polyunsaturated fat and the risk of overall or subgroups of rectal cancer. Linoleic acid, the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in the diet, was associated with increased risk of colon tumors with only a KRAS mutation and no additional truncating APC mutation or lack of MLH1 expression (RR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.69 for one standard deviation (i.e., 7.5 g/day) increase in intake, p-trend over the quartiles of intake colon tumors without any of the gene defects, or with tumors harboring aberrations in either MLH1 or APC. Linoleic acid intake is associated with colon tumors with an aberrant KRAS gene, but an intact APC gene and MLH1 expression, suggesting a unique etiology of tumors with specific genetic aberrations.

  9. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa [National Cancer Institute, Department of Oncologic Genetics, Klenova 1, 833 01 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bartosova, Zdena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2009-11-20

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  10. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilencikova Denisa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs of the mismatch repair (MMR genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. Methods The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. Results We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6, and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6. The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7. We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. Conclusion LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1

  11. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova; Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa; Bartosova, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  12. Early onset MSI-H colon cancer with MLH1 promoter methylation, is there a genetic predisposition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roon, Eddy HJ van; Hes, Frederik J; Tops, Carli MJ; Wezel, Tom van; Boer, Judith M; Morreau, Hans; Puijenbroek, Marjo van; Middeldorp, Anneke; Eijk, Ronald van; Meijer, Emile J de; Erasmus, Dianhdra; Wouters, Kim AD; Engeland, Manon van; Oosting, Jan

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the etiology of MLH1 promoter methylation in mismatch repair (MMR) mutation-negative early onset MSI-H colon cancer. As this type of colon cancer is associated with high ages, young patients bearing this type of malignancy are rare and could provide additional insight into the etiology of sporadic MSI-H colon cancer. We studied a set of 46 MSI-H colon tumors cases with MLH1 promoter methylation which was enriched for patients with an age of onset below 50 years (n = 13). Tumors were tested for CIMP marker methylation and mutations linked to methylation: BRAF, KRAS, GADD45A and the MLH1 -93G>A polymorphism. When available, normal colon and leukocyte DNA was tested for GADD45A mutations and germline MLH1 methylation. SNP array analysis was performed on a subset of tumors. We identified two cases (33 and 60 years) with MLH1 germline promoter methylation. BRAF mutations were less frequent in colon cancer patients below 50 years relative to patients above 50 years (p-value: 0.044). CIMP-high was infrequent and related to BRAF mutations in patients below 50 years. In comparison with published controls the G>A polymorphism was associated with our cohort. Although similar distribution of the pathogenic A allele was observed in the patients with an age of onset above and below 50 years, the significance for the association was lost for the group under 50 years. GADD45A sequencing yielded an unclassified variant. Tumors from both age groups showed infrequent copy number changes and loss-of-heterozygosity. Somatic or germline GADD45A mutations did not explain sporadic MSI-H colon cancer. Although germline MLH1 methylation was found in two individuals, locus-specific somatic MLH1 hypermethylation explained the majority of sporadic early onset MSI-H colon cancer cases. Our data do not suggest an intrinsic tendency for CpG island hypermethylation in these early onset MSI-H tumors other than through somatic mutation of BRAF

  13. Early onset MSI-H colon cancer with MLH1 promoter methylation, is there a genetic predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes Frederik J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the etiology of MLH1 promoter methylation in mismatch repair (MMR mutation-negative early onset MSI-H colon cancer. As this type of colon cancer is associated with high ages, young patients bearing this type of malignancy are rare and could provide additional insight into the etiology of sporadic MSI-H colon cancer. Methods We studied a set of 46 MSI-H colon tumors cases with MLH1 promoter methylation which was enriched for patients with an age of onset below 50 years (n = 13. Tumors were tested for CIMP marker methylation and mutations linked to methylation: BRAF, KRAS, GADD45A and the MLH1 -93G>A polymorphism. When available, normal colon and leukocyte DNA was tested for GADD45A mutations and germline MLH1 methylation. SNP array analysis was performed on a subset of tumors. Results We identified two cases (33 and 60 years with MLH1 germline promoter methylation. BRAF mutations were less frequent in colon cancer patients below 50 years relative to patients above 50 years (p-value: 0.044. CIMP-high was infrequent and related to BRAF mutations in patients below 50 years. In comparison with published controls the G>A polymorphism was associated with our cohort. Although similar distribution of the pathogenic A allele was observed in the patients with an age of onset above and below 50 years, the significance for the association was lost for the group under 50 years. GADD45A sequencing yielded an unclassified variant. Tumors from both age groups showed infrequent copy number changes and loss-of-heterozygosity. Conclusion Somatic or germline GADD45A mutations did not explain sporadic MSI-H colon cancer. Although germline MLH1 methylation was found in two individuals, locus-specific somatic MLH1 hypermethylation explained the majority of sporadic early onset MSI-H colon cancer cases. Our data do not suggest an intrinsic tendency for CpG island hypermethylation in these early onset MSI-H tumors other than through

  14. Genetic changes of MLH1 and MSH2 genes could explain constant findings on microsatellite instability in intracranial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Bukovac, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Hrašćan, Reno

    2017-07-01

    Postreplicative mismatch repair safeguards the stability of our genome. The defects in its functioning will give rise to microsatellite instability. In this study, 50 meningiomas were investigated for microsatellite instability. Two major mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2, were analyzed using microsatellite markers D1S1611 and BAT26 amplified by polymerase chain reaction and visualized by gel electrophoresis on high-resolution gels. Furthermore, genes DVL3 (D3S1262), AXIN1 (D16S3399), and CDH1 (D16S752) were also investigated for microsatellite instability. Our study revealed constant presence of microsatellite instability in meningioma patients when compared to their autologous blood DNA. Altogether 38% of meningiomas showed microsatellite instability at one microsatellite locus, 16% on two, and 13.3% on three loci. The percent of detected microsatellite instability for MSH2 gene was 14%, and for MLH1, it was 26%, for DVL3 22.9%, for AXIN1 17.8%, and for CDH1 8.3%. Since markers also allowed for the detection of loss of heterozygosity, gross deletions of MLH1 gene were found in 24% of meningiomas. Genetic changes between MLH1 and MSH2 were significantly positively correlated (p = 0.032). We also noted a positive correlation between genetic changes of MSH2 and DVL3 genes (p = 0.034). No significant associations were observed when MLH1 or MSH2 was tested against specific histopathological meningioma subtype or World Health Organization grade. However, genetic changes in DVL3 were strongly associated with anaplastic histology of meningioma (χ 2  = 9.14; p = 0.01). Our study contributes to better understanding of the genetic profile of human intracranial meningiomas and suggests that meningiomas harbor defective cellular DNA mismatch repair mechanisms.

  15. Performance of Lynch syndrome predictive models in quantifying the likelihood of germline mutations in patients with abnormal MLH1 immunoexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabreira, Verónica; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Lopes, Paula; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Veiga, Isabel; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Pedro; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) accounts for up to 4 % of all colorectal cancers (CRC). Detection of a pathogenic germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes is the definitive criterion for LS diagnosis, but it is time-consuming and expensive. Immunohistochemistry is the most sensitive prescreening test and its predictive value is very high for loss of expression of MSH2, MSH6, and (isolated) PMS2, but not for MLH1. We evaluated if LS predictive models have a role to improve the molecular testing algorithm in this specific setting by studying 38 individuals referred for molecular testing and who were subsequently shown to have loss of MLH1 immunoexpression in their tumors. For each proband we calculated a risk score, which represents the probability that the patient with CRC carries a pathogenic MLH1 germline mutation, using the PREMM 1,2,6 and MMRpro predictive models. Of the 38 individuals, 18.4 % had a pathogenic MLH1 germline mutation. MMRpro performed better for the purpose of this study, presenting a AUC of 0.83 (95 % CI 0.67-0.9; P < 0.001) compared with a AUC of 0.68 (95 % CI 0.51-0.82, P = 0.09) for PREMM 1,2,6 . Considering a threshold of 5 %, MMRpro would eliminate unnecessary germline mutation analysis in a significant proportion of cases while keeping very high sensitivity. We conclude that MMRpro is useful to correctly predict who should be screened for a germline MLH1 gene mutation and propose an algorithm to improve the cost-effectiveness of LS diagnosis.

  16. Cancer risk in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers; different risk profiles may influence clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsoekh Dewkoemar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is associated with a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic malignancies, such as endometrial carcinoma (EC. The risk is dependent of the affected mismatch repair gene. The aim of the present study was to calculate the cumulative risk of LS related cancers in proven MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers. Methods The studypopulation consisted out of 67 proven LS families. Clinical information including mutation status and tumour diagnosis was collected. Cumulative risks were calculated and compared using Kaplan Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 mutation carriers, both males and females had the lowest risk for developing CRC at age 70 years, 54% and 30% respectively and the age of onset was delayed by 3-5 years in males. With respect to endometrial carcinoma, female MSH6 mutation carriers had the highest risk at age 70 years (61% compared to MLH1 (25% and MSH2 (49%. Also, the age of EC onset was delayed by 5-10 years in comparison with MLH1 and MSH2. Conclusions Although the cumulative lifetime risk of LS related cancer is similar, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations seem to cause distinguishable cancer risk profiles. Female MSH6 mutation carriers have a lower CRC risk and a higher risk for developing endometrial carcinoma. As a consequence, surveillance colonoscopy starting at age 30 years instead of 20-25 years is more suitable. Also, prophylactic hysterectomy may be more indicated in female MSH6 mutation carriers compared to MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers.

  17. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Smith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  18. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine E; Mendillo, Marc L; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D

    2013-10-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  19. The mRNA level of MLH1 in peripheral blood is a biomarker for the diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Li, Hui; Cui, Yongan; Xiao, Wei; Dai, Guihong; Huang, Junxing; Wang, Chaofu

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is caused by functional defects in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, including mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2). This study aimed to assess whether the mRNA expression of MLH1 in peripheral blood could be used as a biomarkers for the diagnosis of HNPCC. The mRNA level of MLH1 was determined in 19 HNPCC families (46 members) using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The mRNA levels of MLH1 in HNPCC were significantly lower than controls (P MLH1 for the diagnosis of HNPCC with the area under curve of 0.858. At an optimal cut-off value (0.511), the mRNA level of MLH1 had a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 86.7% for distinguishing HNPCC from controls. In conclusion, the mRNA expression of MLH1 in peripheral blood may serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of HNPCC.

  20. DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and PMS2 can be imported to the nucleus by a classical nuclear import pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Andrea C; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Kobe, Boštjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2018-03-01

    MLH1 and PMS2 proteins form the MutLα heterodimer, which plays a major role in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans. Mutations in MMR-related proteins are associated with cancer, especially with colon cancer. The N-terminal region of MutLα comprises the N-termini of PMS2 and MLH1 and, similarly, the C-terminal region of MutLα is composed by the C-termini of PMS2 and MLH1, and the two are connected by linker region. The nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) necessary for the nuclear transport of the two proteins are found in this linker region. However, the exact NLS sequences have been controversial, with different sequences reported, particularly for MLH1. The individual components are not imported efficiently, presumably due to their C-termini masking their NLSs. In order to gain insights into the nuclear transport of these proteins, we solved the crystal structures of importin-α bound to peptides corresponding to the supposed NLSs of MLH1 and PMS2 and performed isothermal titration calorimetry to study their binding affinities. Both putative MLH1 and PMS2 NLSs can bind to importin-α as monopartite NLSs, which is in agreement with some previous studies. However, MLH1-NLS has the highest affinity measured by a natural NLS peptide, suggesting a major role of MLH1 protein in nuclear import compared to PMS2. Finally, the role of MLH1 and PMS2 in the nuclear transport of the MutLα heterodimer is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  1. Germline MLH1 Mutations Are Frequently Identified in Lynch Syndrome Patients With Colorectal and Endometrial Carcinoma Demonstrating Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall E; Thull, Darcy; Bahary, Nathan; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2015-08-01

    Current guidelines on germline mutation testing for patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome are not entirely clear in patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic features of patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression in an attempt to (1) determine the frequency of germline MLH1 and PMS2 mutations and (2) correlate mismatch-repair protein immunohistochemistry and tumor histology with germline mutation results. A total of 3213 consecutive colorectal carcinomas and 215 consecutive endometrial carcinomas were prospectively analyzed for DNA mismatch-repair protein expression by immunohistochemistry. In total, 32 tumors from 31 patients demonstrated isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression, including 16 colorectal carcinomas and 16 endometrial carcinomas. Microsatellite instability (MSI) polymerase chain reaction was performed in 29 tumors from 28 patients with the following results: 28 tumors demonstrated high-level MSI, and 1 tumor demonstrated low-level MSI. Twenty of 31 (65%) patients in the study group had tumors demonstrating histopathology associated with high-level MSI. Seventeen patients underwent germline mutation analysis with the following results: 24% with MLH1 mutations, 35% with PMS2 mutations, 12% with PMS2 variants of undetermined significance, and 29% with no mutations in either MLH1 or PMS2. Three of the 4 patients with MLH1 germline mutations had a mutation that results in decreased stability and quantity of the MLH1 protein that compromises the MLH1-PMS2 protein complex, helping to explain the presence of immunogenic but functionally inactive MLH1 protein within the tumor. The high frequency of MLH1 germline mutations identified in our study has important implications for testing strategies in patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome and indicates that patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression

  2. Expression of the DNA repair gene MLH1 correlates with survival in patients who have resected pancreatic cancer and have received adjuvant chemoradiation: NRG Oncology RTOG Study 9704.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Yaacov R; Moughan, Jennifer; Magliocco, Anthony M; Klimowicz, Alexander C; Regine, William F; Mowat, Rex B; DiPetrillo, Thomas A; Small, William; Simko, Jeffry P; Golan, Talia; Winter, Kathryn A; Guha, Chandan; Crane, Christopher H; Dicker, Adam P

    2018-02-01

    The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer who undergo curative resection experience rapid disease recurrence. In previous small studies, high expression of the mismatch-repair protein mutL protein homolog 1 (MLH1) in pancreatic cancers was associated with better outcomes. The objective of this study was to validate the association between MLH1 expression and survival in patients who underwent resection of pancreatic cancer and received adjuvant chemoradiation. Samples were obtained from the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 prospective, randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00003216), which compared 2 adjuvant protocols in patients with pancreatic cancer who underwent resection. Tissue microarrays were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, resected tumor tissues. MLH1 expression was quantified using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and automated quantitative analysis, and expression was dichotomized above and below the median value. Immunohistochemical staining was successfully performed on 117 patients for MLH1 (60 and 57 patients from the 2 arms). The characteristics of the participants who had tissue samples available were similar to those of the trial population as a whole. At the time of analysis, 84% of participants had died, with a median survival of 17 months. Elevated MLH1 expression levels in tumor nuclei were significantly correlated with longer disease-free and overall survival in each arm individually and in both arms combined. Two-year overall survival was 16% in patients who had low MLH1 expression levels and 53% in those who had high MLH1 expression levels (P MLH1 expression was correlated with long-term survival. Further studies should assess whether MLH1 expression predicts which patients with localized pancreatic cancer may benefit most from aggressive, multimodality treatment. Cancer 2018;124:491-8. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Endometrial tumour BRAF mutations and MLH1 promoter methylation as predictors of germline mismatch repair gene mutation status: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Alexander M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that displays high microsatellite instability (MSI-H) can be caused by either germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, or non-inherited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 promoter. A correlation between MLH1 promoter methylation, specifically the 'C' region, and BRAF V600E status has been reported in CRC studies. Germline MMR mutations also greatly increase risk of endometrial cancer (EC), but no systematic review has been undertaken to determine if these tumour markers may be useful predictors of MMR mutation status in EC patients. Endometrial cancer cohorts meeting review inclusion criteria encompassed 2675 tumours from 20 studies for BRAF V600E, and 447 tumours from 11 studies for MLH1 methylation testing. BRAF V600E mutations were reported in 4/2675 (0.1%) endometrial tumours of unknown MMR mutation status, and there were 7/823 (0.9%) total sequence variants in exon 11 and 27/1012 (2.7%) in exon 15. Promoter MLH1 methylation was not observed in tumours from 32 MLH1 mutation carriers, or for 13 MSH2 or MSH6 mutation carriers. MMR mutation-negative individuals with tumour MLH1 and PMS2 IHC loss displayed MLH1 methylation in 48/51 (94%) of tumours. We have also detailed specific examples that show the importance of MLH1 promoter region, assay design, and quantification of methylation. This review shows that BRAF mutations occurs so infrequently in endometrial tumours they can be discounted as a useful marker for predicting MMR-negative mutation status, and further studies of endometrial cohorts with known MMR mutation status are necessary to quantify the utility of tumour MLH1 promoter methylation as a marker of negative germline MMR mutation status in EC patients.

  4. CpG Island Methylator Phenotype Positive Tumors in the Absence of MLH1 Methylation Constitute a Distinct Subset of Duodenal Adenocarcinomas and Are Associated with Poor Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Pappou, Emmanouil P.; Guzzetta, Angela A.; Jeschke, Jana; Kwak, Ruby; Dave, Pujan; Hooker, Craig M.; Morgan, Richard; Baylin, Stephen B.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ahuja, Nita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Little information is available on genetic and epigenetic changes in duodenal adenocarcinomas. The purpose was to identify possible subsets of duodenal adenocarcinomas based on microsatellite instability (MSI), DNA methylation, mutations in the KRAS and BRAF genes, clinicopathologic features, and prognosis. Experimental Design Demographics, tumor characteristics and survival were available for 99 duodenal adenocarcinoma patients. Testing for KRAS and BRAF mutations, MSI, MLH1 methylation and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status was performed. A Cox proportional hazard model was built to predict survival. Results CIMP+ was detected in 27 of 99 (27.3%) duodenal adenocarcinomas, and was associated with MSI (P = 0.011) and MLH1 methylation (P CIMP− tumors. No BRAF V600E mutation was detected. Among the CIMP+ tumors, 15 (55.6%) were CIMP+/MLH1-unmethylated (MLH1-U). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed tumors classified by CIMP, CIMP/MLH1 methylation status or CIMP/MSI status could predict overall survival (OS; P = 0.047, 0.002, and 0.002, respectively), while CIMP/MLH1 methylation status could also predict time-to-recurrence (TTR; P = 0.016). In multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 methylation status showed a significant prognostic value regarding both OS (P CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors had the worst OS and TTR. Conclusions Our results demonstrate existence of CIMP in duodenal adenocarcinomas. The combination of CIMP+/MLH1-U appears to be independently associated with poor prognosis in patients with duodenal adenocarcinomas. This study also suggests that BRAF mutations are not involved in duodenal tumorigenesis, MSI or CIMP development. PMID:22825585

  5. Identification and verification of a pathogenic MLH1 mutation c.1145dupA in a Lynch syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Feifei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS, an autosomal-dominant disorder with an increased risk of predominantly colorectal and endometrial cancers, is caused by germ-line mutations in mismatch repair genes. The identification of germ-line mutations that predispose to cancer is important to further our understanding of tumorigenesis, guide patient management and inform the best practice for healthcare. A 45-year-old woman with atypical endometrial hyperplasia who suffered colon cancer at the age of 30 years underwent hysterectomy and genetic counseling. Pedigree analysis revealed her family fulfilling the Amsterdam I criteria. Next-generation sequencing was offered to the patient. A mutation in the MLH1 gene, c.1145dupA, was identified and verified by Sanger sequencing. In addition, her nine family members were tested for the mutation. Two were affected (colon cancer at the age of 43 years and 45 years and one healthy relative carried the same mutation in the MLH1 gene. The mutation resulted in a frame-shift (p.Met383Aspfs*12 located in exon12, as well as a polypeptide truncation of 393 amino acids by the formation of a premature stop codon. An immunohistochemistry analysis of endometrial hyperplasia tissues revealed defects in MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression in the patient. Based on the 2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG guideline, we report this MLH1 c.1145dupA variation to be a pathogenic mutation that contributes to a strongly increased cancer risk in this LS family. Proper screening suggestions were offered to the three affected patients and the healthy carrier. To the best of our knowledge, this germ-line mutation of MLH1 was previously submitted to the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD database, but no comprehensive evidence or supporting observations were reported previously in the literature. The present report found a single nucleotide insertion in exon12 of the MLH1 gene, which can be considered causative of Lynch phenotype

  6. The silent mutation MLH1 c.543C>T resulting in aberrant splicing can cause Lynch syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Wakatsuki, Tomokazu; Kikuchi, Mari; Horiguchi, Shin-Ichiro; Akagi, Kiwamu

    2017-06-01

    The proband was a 67-year-old man with transverse and sigmoid colon cancer. Microsatellite instability analysis revealed a high frequency of microsatellite instability, and immunohistochemical staining showed the absence of both MLH1 and PMS2 proteins in the sigmoid colon cancer tissue specimens from the patient. DNA sequencing revealed a nucleotide substitution c.543C>T in MLH1, but this variant did not substitute an amino acid. The MLH1 c.543C>T variant was located 3 bases upstream from the end of exon 6 and created a new splice donor site 4 bases upstream from the end of exon 6. Consequently, the last 4 bases of exon 6 were deleted and frameshift occurred. Thus, the MLH1 c.543C>T silent mutation is considered 'pathogenic'. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Detailed characterization of MLH1 p.D41H and p.N710D variants coexisting in a Lynch syndrome family with conserved MLH1 expression tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, M; González-Acosta, M; Thompson, B A; Sánchez, R; Gómez, C; Martínez-López, J; Perea, J; Caldés, T; Rodríguez, Y; Landolfi, S; Balmaña, J; Lázaro, C; Robles, L; Capellá, G; Rueda, D

    2015-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility disease caused by inactivating germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Variants of unknown significance (VUS) are often detected in mutational analysis of MMR genes. Here we describe a large family fulfilling Amsterdam I criteria carrying two rare VUS in the MLH1 gene: c.121G > C (p.D41H) and c.2128A > G (p.N710D). Collection of clinico-pathological data, multifactorial analysis, in silico predictions, and functional analyses were used to elucidate the clinical significance of the identified MLH1 VUS. Only the c.121G > C variant cosegregated with LS-associated tumors in the family. Diagnosed colorectal tumors were microsatellite unstable although immunohistochemical staining revealed no loss of MMR proteins expression. Multifactorial likelihood analysis classified c.2128A > G as a non-pathogenic variant and c.121G > C as pathogenic. In vitro functional tests revealed impaired MMR activity and diminished expression of c.121G > C. Accordingly, the N710 residue is located in the unconserved MLH1 C-terminal domain, whereas D41 is highly conserved and located in the ATPase domain. The obtained results will enable adequate genetic counseling of c.121G > C and c.2128A > G variant carriers and their families. Furthermore, they exemplify how cumulative data and comprehensive analyses are mandatory to refine the classification of MMR variants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Epitope-positive truncating MLH1 mutation and loss of PMS2: implications for IHC-directed genetic testing for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zighelboim, Israel; Powell, Matthew A; Babb, Sheri A; Whelan, Alison J; Schmidt, Amy P; Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Thibodeau, Stephen N; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    We assessed mismatch repair by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis in an early onset endometrial cancer and a sister's colon cancer. We demonstrated high-level MSI and normal expression for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. PMS2 failed to stain in both tumors, strongly implicating a PMS2 defect. This family did not meet clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome. However, early onset endometrial cancers in the proband and her sister, a metachronous colorectal cancer in the sister as well as MSI in endometrial and colonic tumors suggested a heritable mismatch repair defect. PCR-based direct exonic sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were undertaken to search for PMS2 mutations in the germline DNA from the proband and her sister. No mutation was identified in the PMS2 gene. However, PMS2 exons 3, 4, 13, 14, 15 were not evaluated by MLPA and as such, rearrangements involving those exons cannot be excluded. Clinical testing for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation revealed a germline deletion of MLH1 exons 14 and 15. This MLH1 germline deletion leads to an immunodetectable stable C-terminal truncated MLH1 protein which based on the IHC staining must abrogate PMS2 stabilization. To the best of our knowledge, loss of PMS2 in MLH1 truncating mutation carriers that express MLH1 in their tumors has not been previously reported. This family points to a potential limitation of IHC-directed gene testing for suspected Lynch syndrome and the need to consider comprehensive MLH1 testing for individuals whose tumors lack PMS2 but for whom PMS2 mutations are not identified.

  9. Mlh1 is required for female fertility in Drosophila melanogaster: An outcome of effects on meiotic crossing over, ovarian follicles and egg activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimal, Divya; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandey, Ashutosh; Sharma, Divya; Saini, Sanjay; Gupta, Snigdha; Ravi Ram, Kristipati; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2018-03-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) system, a conserved DNA repair pathway, plays crucial role in DNA recombination and is involved in gametogenesis. The impact of alterations in MMR family of proteins (bacterial MutS and MutL homologues) on mammalian fertility is well documented. However, an insight to the role of MMR in reproduction of non-mammalian organisms is limited. Hence, in the present study, we analysed the impact of mlh1 (a MutL homologue) on meiotic crossing over/recombination and fertility in a genetically tractable model, Drosophila melanogaster. Using mlh1 e00130 hypomorphic allele, we report female specific adverse reproductive outcome for reduced mlh1 in Drosophila: mlh1 e00130 homozygous females had severely reduced fertility while males were fertile. Further, mlh1 e00130 females contained small ovaries with large number of early stages as well as significantly reduced mature oocytes, and laid fewer eggs, indicating discrepancies in egg production and ovulation. These observations contrast the sex independent and/or male specific sterility and normal follicular development as well as ovulation reported so far for MMR family proteins in mammals. However, analogous to the role(s) of mlh1 in meiotic crossing over and DNA repair processes underlying mammalian fertility, ovarian follicles from mlh1 e00130 females contained significantly increased DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and reduced synaptonemal complex foci. In addition, large proportion of fertilized eggs display discrepancies in egg activation and fail to proceed beyond stage 5 of embryogenesis. Hence, reduction of the Mlh1 protein level leads to defective oocytes that fail to complete embryogenesis after fertilization thereby reducing female fertility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Four novel germline mutations in the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer Haghighi, Mahdi; Radpour, Ramin; Aghajani, Katayoun; Zali, Narges; Molaei, Mahsa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-08-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is the most common cause of early onset hereditary colorectal cancer. In the majority of HNPCC families, microsatellite instability (MSI) and germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are found. The entire coding sequence of MMR genes (MLH1, MLH2, MLH6, and PMS2) was analyzed using direct sequencing. Also, tumor tests were done as MSI and immunohistochemistry testing. We were able to find three novel MLH1 and one novel PMS2 germline mutations in three Iranian HNPCC patients. The first was a transversion mutation c.346A>C (T116P) and happened in the highly conserved HATPase-c region of MLH1 protein. The second was a transversion mutation c.736A>T (I246L), which caused an amino acid change of isoleucine to leucine. The third mutation (c.2145,6 delTG) was frameshift and resulted in an immature stop codon in five codons downstream. All of these three mutations were detected in the MLH1 gene. The other mutation was a transition mutation, c.676G>A (G207E), which has been found in exon six of the PMS2 gene and caused an amino acid change of glycine to glutamic acid. MSI assay revealed high instability in microsatellite for two patients and microsatellite stable for one patient. In all patients, an abnormal expression of the MMR proteins in HNPCC was related to the above novel mutations.

  11. MLH1 V384D polymorphism associates with poor response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with EGFR L858R-positive lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chao-Hua; Ho, Hsiang-Ling; Doong, Howard; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Mei-Yu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Tsai, Chun-Ming

    2015-04-10

    A significant fraction of patients with lung adenocarcinomas harboring activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations do not experience clinical benefits from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. Using next-generation sequencing, we screened 739 mutation hotspots in 46 cancer-related genes in EGFR L858R-mutant lung adenocarcinomas from 29 patients who received EGFR-TKI therapy; 13 had short ( 1 year) progression-free survival (PFS). We discovered MLH1 V384D as a genetic variant enriched in the group of patients with short PFS. Next, we investigated this genetic variation in 158 lung adenocarcinomas with the EGFR L858R mutation and found 14 (8.9%) patients had MLH1 V384D; available blood or non-tumor tissues from patients were also tested positive for MLH1 V384D. Patients with MLH1 V384D had a significantly shorter median PFS than those without (5.1 vs. 10.6 months; P= 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that MLH1 V384D polymorphism was an independent predictor for a reduced PFS time (hazard ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 7.2; P= 0.001). In conclusion, MLH1 V384D polymorphism is associated with primary resistance to EGFR-TKIs in patients with EGFR L858R-positive lung adenocarcinoma and may potentially be a novel biomarker to guide treatment decisions.

  12. Chronic exposure to arsenic, estrogen, and their combination causes increased growth and transformation in human prostate epithelial cells potentially by hypermethylation-mediated silencing of MLH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treas, Justin; Tyagi, Tulika; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic and estrogen is associated with risk of prostate cancer, but their mechanism is not fully understood. Additionally, the carcinogenic effects of their co-exposure are not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to arsenic, estrogen, and their combination, on cell growth and transformation, and identify the mechanism behind these effects. RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial cells were chronically exposed to arsenic and estrogen alone and in combination. Cell growth was measured by cell count and cell cycle, whereas cell transformation was evaluated by colony formation assay. Gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and confirmed at protein level by Western blot analysis. MLH1 promoter methylation was determined by pyrosequencing method. Exposure to arsenic, estrogen, and their combinations increases cell growth and transformation in RWPE-1 cells. Increased expression of Cyclin D1 and Bcl2, whereas decreased expression of mismatch repair genes MSH4, MSH6, and MLH1 was also observed. Hypermethylation of MLH1 promoter further suggested the epigenetic inactivation of MLH1 expression in arsenic and estrogen treated cells. Arsenic and estrogen combination caused greater changes than their individual treatments. Findings of this study for the first time suggest that arsenic and estrogen exposures cause increased cell growth and survival potentially through epigenetic inactivation of MLH1 resulting in decreased MLH1-mediated apoptotic response, and consequently increased cellular transformation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Deoxyinosine triphosphate induces MLH1/PMS2- and p53-dependent cell growth arrest and DNA instability in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoko; Mori, Masahiko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Noda, Tetsuo; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyinosine (dI) occurs in DNA either by oxidative deamination of a previously incorporated deoxyadenosine residue or by misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) from the nucleotide pool during replication. To exclude dITP from the pool, mammals possess specific hydrolysing enzymes, such as inosine triphosphatase (ITPA). Previous studies have shown that deficiency in ITPA results in cell growth suppression and DNA instability. To explore the mechanisms of these phenotypes, we analysed ITPA-deficient human and mouse cells. We found that both growth suppression and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of ITPA-deficient cells depended on MLH1/PMS2. The cell growth suppression of ITPA-deficient cells also depended on p53, but not on MPG, ENDOV or MSH2. ITPA deficiency significantly increased the levels of p53 protein and p21 mRNA/protein, a well-known target of p53, in an MLH1-dependent manner. Furthermore, MLH1 may also contribute to cell growth arrest by increasing the basal level of p53 activity. PMID:27618981

  14. Age-Dependent Cancer Risk Is not Different in between MSH2 and MLH1 Mutation Carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olschwang, S.; Olschwang, S.; Yu, K.

    2009-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is mostly characterized by early-onset colorectal and endometrial adenocarcinomas. Over 90% of the causal mutations occur in two mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the age-dependent cancer risk in MSH2 or MLH1 mutation carriers from data of DNA diagnostic laboratories. To avoid overestimation, evaluation was based on the age-dependent proportion of mutation carriers in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of identified mutation carriers. Data from 859 such eligible relatives were collected from 8 centers; 387 were found to have inherited the mutation from their relatives. Age-dependent risks were calculated either using a nonparametric approach for four discrete age groups or assuming a modified Weibull distribution for the dependence of risk on age. Cancer risk was estimated starting at 28 (25-32 0.68 confidence interval) and to reach near 0.70 at 70 years. The risks were very similar for MSH2 and MLH1 mutation carriers. Although not statistically significant, the risk in males appeared to precede that for females by ten years. This difference needs to be investigated on a larger dataset. If confirmed, this would indicate that the onset of the colonoscopic surveillance may be different in male and female mutation carriers.

  15. High frequency induction of mitotic recombination by ionizing radiation in Mlh1 null mouse cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qi; Ponomareva, Olga N.; Lasarev, Michael; Turker, Mitchell S.

    2006-01-01

    Mitotic recombination in somatic cells involves crossover events between homologous autosomal chromosomes. This process can convert a cell with a heterozygous deficiency to one with a homozygous deficiency if a mutant allele is present on one of the two homologous autosomes. Thus mitotic recombination often represents the second mutational step in tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In this study we examined the frequency and spectrum of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced autosomal mutations affecting Aprt expression in a mouse kidney cell line null for the Mlh1 mismatch repair (MMR) gene. The mutant frequency results demonstrated high frequency induction of mutations by IR exposure and the spectral analysis revealed that most of this response was due to the induction of mitotic recombinational events. High frequency induction of mitotic recombination was not observed in a DNA repair-proficient cell line or in a cell line with an MMR-independent mutator phenotype. These results demonstrate that IR exposure can initiate a process leading to mitotic recombinational events and that MMR function suppresses these events from occurring

  16. Clinical and prognosis value of the CIMP status combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadallah-Kallel, Amana; Abdelmaksoud-Dammak, Rania; Triki, Mouna; Charfi, Slim; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Sallemi-Boudawara, Tahia; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation of CpG islands occurred frequently in CRC and associated with transcriptional silencing of key genes. In this study, the CIMP combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation status was determined in CRC patients and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and overall survival. Our data showed that CIMP+ CRCs were identified in 32.9% of cases and that CACNAG1 is the most frequently methylated promoter. When we combined the CIMP with the MLH1 or the p16 INK4a methylation status, we found that CIMP-/MLH1-U (37.8%) and CIMP-/p16 INK4a -U (35.4%) tumors were the most frequent among the four subtypes. Statistical analysis showed that tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, TNM stage, and MSI differed among the group of patients. Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed differences in overall survival according to the CIMP combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation status. In a multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 and CIMP/p16 INK4a methylation statuses were predictive of prognosis, and the OS was longer for patients with tumors CIMP-/MLH1-M, as well as CIMP-/p16 INK4a -M. Furthermore, DNMT1 is significantly overexpressed in tumors than in normal tissues as well as in CIMP+ than CIMP- tumors. Our results suggest that tumor classification based on the CIMP status combined with MLH1 or p16 INK4a methylation is useful to predict prognosis in CRC patients.

  17. Correlation of MLH1 and MGMT methylation levels between peripheral blood leukocytes and colorectal tissue DNA samples in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Wang, Yibaina; Zhang, Zuoming; Yao, Xiaoping; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Yashuang

    2013-11-01

    CpG island methylation in the promoter regions of the DNA mismatch repair gene mutator L homologue 1 ( MLH1 ) and DNA repair gene O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase ( MGMT ) genes has been shown to occur in the leukocytes of peripheral blood and colorectal tissue. However, it is unclear whether the methylation levels in the blood leukocytes and colorectal tissue are correlated. The present study analyzed and compared the levels of MGMT and MLH1 gene methylation in the leukocytes of peripheral blood and colorectal tissues obtained from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The methylation levels of MGMT and MLH1 were examined using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. A total of 44 patients with CRC were selected based on the MLH1 and MGMT gene methylation levels in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood. Corresponding colorectal tumor and normal tissues were obtained from each patient and the DNA methylation levels were determined. The correlation coefficients were evaluated using Spearman's rank test. Agreement was determined by generalized κ-statistics. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r) for the methylation levels of the MGMT and MLH1 genes in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood and normal colorectal tissue were 0.475 and 0.362, respectively (P=0.001 and 0.016, respectively). The agreement of the MGMT and MLH1 gene methylation levels in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood and normal colorectal tissue were graded as fair and poor (κ=0.299 and 0.126, respectively). The methylation levels of MGMT and MLH1 were moderately and weakly correlated between the patient-matched leukocytes and the normal colorectal tissue, respectively. Blood-derived DNA methylation measurements may not always represent the levels of normal colorectal tissue methylation.

  18. Epigenetic Loss of MLH1 Expression in Normal Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Clones is Defined by the Promoter CpG Methylation Pattern Observed by High-Throughput Methylation Specific Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Jonathan; Nickel-Meester, Gabrielle; Qing, Yulan; Santos-Guasch, Gabriela; Drake, Ellen; PingfuFu; Sun, Shuying; Bai, Xiaodong; Wald, David; Arts, Eric; Gerson, Stanton L

    Normal human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPC) lose expression of MLH1 , an important mismatch repair (MMR) pathway gene, with age. Loss of MMR leads to replication dependent mutational events and microsatellite instability observed in secondary acute myelogenous leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. Epigenetic CpG methylation upstream of the MLH1 promoter is a contributing factor to acquired loss of MLH1 expression in tumors of the epithelia and proximal mucosa. Using single molecule high-throughput bisulfite sequencing we have characterized the CpG methylation landscape from -938 to -337 bp upstream of the MLH1 transcriptional start site (position +0), from 30 hematopoietic colony forming cell clones (CFC) either expressing or not expressing MLH1 . We identify a correlation between MLH1 promoter methylation and loss of MLH1 expression. Additionally, using the CpG site methylation frequencies obtained in this study we were able to generate a classification algorithm capable of sorting the expressing and non-expressing CFC. Thus, as has been previously described for many tumor cell types, we report for the first time a correlation between the loss of MLH1 expression and increased MLH1 promoter methylation in CFC derived from CD34 + selected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

  19. Promoter hypermethylation of DNA repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Five years survival of lung cancer is 16%, significantly lower than in prostate (99.9%, breast (88.5% and colon (64.1% carcinomas. When diagnosed in the surgical stage it increases to 50% but this group only comprises 14–16% of the cases. DNA methylation has emerged as a potential cancer-specific biomarker. Hypermethylation of CpG islands located in the promoter regions of tumour suppressor genes is now firmly established as an important mechanism for gene inactivation.This retrospective study included 40 squamous cell carcinomas and 40 adenocarcinomas in various surgical TNM stages to define methylation profile and possible silencing of DNA repair genes – MLH1 and MSH2 – using Methylation-Specific PCR and protein expression by immunohistochemistry in tumoural tissue, preneoplastic lesions and respiratory epithelium with normal histological features.The protein expression of MLH1 and MSH2 genes, in the available preneoplastic lesions and in normal cylindrical respiratory epithelium appeared reduced. The frequency of promoter hypermethylation found on these DNA repair genes was elevated, with a higher prevalence of methylation of MLH1 gene in 72% of squamous cell carcinoma. The differences are not so obvious for MSH2 promoter hypermethylation. No correlation was found among the status of methylation, the protein expression and the clinicopathological characteristics.With a larger study, a better characterization of the hypermethylation status of neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions in small biopsies would be achieved, inherent to tumour histology, heterogeneity and preservation, and finally differences in the study population to elucidate other possible mechanisms of altered expression of the hMLH1 and hMSH. Resumo: A sobrevivência aos cinco anos no cancro do pulmão é de 16%, significativamente inferior que nos carcinomas na próstata (99,9%, mama (88,5% e cólon (64,1%. Quando diagnosticado na fase cir

  20. Promoter hypermethylation of CDKN2A, MGMT, MLH1, and DAPK genes in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and their associations with clinical profiles of the patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, Stefano; Jordanov, Stanislav H; Mitkova, Atanaska V; Chalakov, Ivan J; Melnicharov, Mincho B; Kunev, Kuncho V; Mitev, Vanio I; Kaneva, Radka P; Goranova, Teodora E

    2014-08-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (laryngeal SCC) is a frequently occurring cancer of the head and neck area. Epigenetic changes of tumor-related genes contribute to its genesis and progression. We assessed promoter methylation status of the selected genes (CDKN2A, MGMT, MLH1, and DAPK) using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) in 100 patients with laryngeal SCC and studied the correlations with clinical characteristics. The prevalence of promoter methylation in MGMT, CDKN2A, MLH1, and DAPK was 59 of 97 (60.8%), 46 of 97 (47.4%), 45 of 97 (46.4%), and 41 of 97 patients (42.3%), respectively. Significantly increased methylation of CDKN2A was observed in heavy smokers. Epigenetic inactivation of CDKN2A and MLH1 were found to be associated with lymph node involvement. An inverse correlation was present between MLH1 methylation and alcohol consumption. Our results strongly suggest that deregulation of p16-associated, and MLH1-associated pathways, because of promoter hypermethylation, is associated with increased cancer cell migration, tumor invasiveness, and, thus, aggressive phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A novel deletion in the splice donor site of MLH1 exon 6 in a Japanese colon cancer patient with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Junya; Sato, Yuri; Kita, Mizuho; Nomura, Sachio; Yamamoto, Noriko; Kato, Yo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Arai, Masami

    2015-10-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that is characterized by a predisposition to cancers, mainly colorectal cancer. Germline mutations of DNA mismatch repair genes such as MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 have been described in patients with Lynch syndrome. Here, we report deletion of 2 bp in the splice donor site of the MLH1 exon 6 (c.545+4_545+5delCA) in a 48-year-old Japanese woman with Lynch syndrome. RT-PCR direct sequencing analysis revealed that this mutation led to an increase in the level of an MLH1 transcript in which exon 6 was skipped, and may cause a frameshift (p.E153FfsX8). Therefore, this mutation appears to be pathogenic and is responsible for Lynch syndrome. Additionally, analysis of the patient's tumor cells indicated microsatellite instability high phenotype and loss of the MLH1 and PMS2 proteins. To our knowledge, this is a germline splice site mutation of MLH1 that has not been reported previously. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Expression of DNA repair proteins MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Michailidi, Christina; Stolakis, Vasileios; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Tsourouflis, Gerasimos; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background DNA repair is a major defense mechanism, which contributes to the maintenance of genetic sequence, and minimizes cell death, mutation rates, replication errors, DNA damage persistence and genomic instability. Alterations in the expression levels of proteins participating in DNA repair mechanisms have been associated with several aspects of cancer biology. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of DNA repair proteins MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. Material/Methods MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues from 90 patients with benign and malignant lesions. Results The expression levels of MLH1 was significantly upregulated in cases with malignant compared to those with benign thyroid lesions (p=0.038). The expression levels of MGMT was significantly downregulated in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p=0.001). Similar associations for both MLH1 and MGMT between cases with papillary carcinoma and hyperplastic nodules were also noted (p=0.014 and p=0.026, respectively). In the subgroup of malignant thyroid lesions, MSH2 downregulation was significantly associated with larger tumor size (p=0.031), while MLH1 upregulation was significantly associated with the presence of lymphatic and vascular invasion (p=0.006 and p=0.002, respectively). Conclusions Alterations in the mismatch repair proteins MSH2 and MLH1 and the direct repair protein MGMT may result from tumor development and/or progression. Further studies are recommended to draw definite conclusions on the clinical significance of DNA repair proteins in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:21358597

  3. Efficient molecular screening of Lynch syndrome by specific 3' promoter methylation of the MLH1 or BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer with high-frequency microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Cullings, Harry M; Notohara, Kenji; Hoshijima, Naoko; Young, Joanne; Lynch, Henry T; Tanaka, Noriaki; Matsubara, Nagahide

    2009-06-01

    It is sometimes difficult to diagnose Lynch syndrome by the simple but strict clinical criteria, or even by the definitive genetic testing for causative germline mutation of mismatch repair genes. Thus, some practical and efficient screening strategy to select highly possible Lynch syndrome patients is exceedingly desirable. We performed a comprehensive study to evaluate the methylation status of whole MLH1 promoter region by direct bisulfite sequencing of the entire MLH1 promoter regions on Lynch and non-Lynch colorectal cancers (CRCs). Then, we established a convenient assay to detect methylation in key CpG islands responsible for the silencing of MLH1 expression. We studied the methylation status of MLH1 as well as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins on 16 cases of Lynch CRC and 19 cases of sporadic CRCs with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Sensitivity to detect Lynch syndrome by MLH1 (CCAAT) methylation was 88% and the specificity was 84%. Positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 5.5 and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.15. Sensitivity by mutational analysis of BRAF was 100%, specificity was 84%, PLR was 6.3 and NLR was zero. By CIMP analysis; sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 79%, PLR was 4.2, and NLR was 0.16. BRAF mutation or MLH1 methylation analysis combined with MSI testing could be a good alternative to screen Lynch syndrome patients in a cost effective manner. Although the assay for CIMP status also showed acceptable sensitivity and specificity, it may not be practical because of its rather complicated assay.

  4. Genotyping of BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, CDKN2A, MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a male patient with secondary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodusek, Ana Lina; Novakovic, Srdjan; Stegel, Vida; Jereb, Berta

    2011-01-01

    Some tumour suppressor genes (BRCA2) and mismatch repair genes (MSH2, MLH1) are correlated with an increased risk for male breast cancer. Our patient developed secondary breast cancer after the treatment for Hodgkin’s disease in childhood. DNA was isolated from the patients’ blood and screened for mutations, polymorphisms and variants in BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, CDKN2A, MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found no mutations but common polymorphisms, and three variants in mismatch repair genes. Nucleotide variants c.2006-6T>C and p.G322D in MSH2 might be correlated with male breast cancer

  5. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, MLH1 IN EVALUATION OF DIFFERENTIATION GRADE OF COLON ADENOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Raskin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability is associated with dysfunction of the MSH2, MLH1, PMS2 and MSH6 genes, which participate in the repair of unpaired nucleotides of DNA. It is known that microsatellite instability is an independent prognostic factor in determining the differentiation grade of colon cancer. The use of immunohistochemistry to study the repair system of unpaired nucleotides has its own characteristics and limitations. Materials and methods. The study included 39 patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Moderately-differentiated colon adenocarcinoma was the most common histological type (72 %. There were 8 % of well-differentiated and 12 % poorly-differentiated carcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis of SH2, MSH6, PMS2 and MLH1 proteins was done according to the standard protocol. Results. Out of 39 cases, 6 (15 % had loss of expression of at least one of the studied proteins. Out of these 6 cases with indirect signs of MSI-H, 3 were poorlydifferentiated, 1 was mucinous and 2 were moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas. Conclusion. Thus, immunohistochemical analysis of DNA repair genes can be used to determine the histological differentiation of colon adenocarcinoma.

  6. Tumor mismatch repair immunohistochemistry and DNA MLH1 methylation testing of patients with endometrial cancer diagnosed at age younger than 60 years optimizes triage for population-level germline mismatch repair gene mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Daniel D; Tan, Yen Y; Walsh, Michael D; Clendenning, Mark; Metcalf, Alexander M; Ferguson, Kaltin; Arnold, Sven T; Thompson, Bryony A; Lose, Felicity A; Parsons, Michael T; Walters, Rhiannon J; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Cummings, Margaret; Oehler, Martin K; Blomfield, Penelope B; Quinn, Michael A; Kirk, Judy A; Stewart, Colin J; Obermair, Andreas; Young, Joanne P; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-01-10

    Clinicopathologic data from a population-based endometrial cancer cohort, unselected for age or family history, were analyzed to determine the optimal scheme for identification of patients with germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Endometrial cancers from 702 patients recruited into the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and for MLH1 gene promoter methylation in MLH1-deficient cases. MMR mutation testing was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-protein deficient tumors. Prediction of germline mutation status was compared for combinations of tumor characteristics, age at diagnosis, and various clinical criteria (Amsterdam, Bethesda, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, ANECS). Tumor MMR-protein deficiency was detected in 170 (24%) of 702 cases. Germline testing of 158 MMR-deficient cases identified 22 truncating mutations (3% of all cases) and four unclassified variants. Tumor MLH1 methylation was detected in 99 (89%) of 111 cases demonstrating MLH1/PMS2 IHC loss; all were germline MLH1 mutation negative. A combination of MMR IHC plus MLH1 methylation testing in women younger than 60 years of age at diagnosis provided the highest positive predictive value for the identification of mutation carriers at 46% versus ≤ 41% for any other criteria considered. Population-level identification of patients with MMR mutation-positive endometrial cancer is optimized by stepwise testing for tumor MMR IHC loss in patients younger than 60 years, tumor MLH1 methylation in individuals with MLH1 IHC loss, and germline mutations in patients exhibiting loss of MSH6, MSH2, or PMS2 or loss of MLH1/PMS2 with absence of MLH1 methylation.

  7. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: a prospective cohort study (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, de A.F.P.M.; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruine, de A.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods:The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  8. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...

  9. RRAF-V600E is not involved in the colorectal tumorigenesis of HNPCC in patients with functional MLH1 and MSH2 genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domingo, E; Niessen, RC; Oliveira, C; Alhopuro, P; Moutinho, C; Espin, E; Armengol, M; Sijmons, RH; Kleibeuker, JH; Seruca, R; Aaltonen, LA; Imai, K; Yamamoto, H; Schwartz, S; Hofstra, RMW

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that the oncogenic activation of BRAF, a member of the RAS/RAF family of kinases, by the V600E mutation is characteristic for sporadic colon tumors with microsatellite instability. Further, it was shown to associate with the silencing of the mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 by

  10. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers : A study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Stormorken, A; Menko, FH; Nagengast, FM; Kleibeuker, JH; Griffioen, G; Taal, BG; Moller, P; Wijnen, JT

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  11. Phenotype comparison of MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers in a cohort of 1,914 individuals undergoing clinical genetic testing in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); J. Balmana (Judith); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R. Mercado (Rowena); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Lynch syndrome is caused by germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations. We examined the phenotypic differences between MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutation carriers and whether mutation type (point versus large rearrangement) affected phenotypic expression. Methods: This is a

  12. Clinical Significance of MLH1 Methylation and CpG Island Methylator Phenotype as Prognostic Markers in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Mori, Yoshiko; Yokomichi, Naosuke; Kawai, Takashi; Fuji, Tomokazu; Kimura, Keisuke; Umeda, Yuzo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Goel, Ajay; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve the outcome of patients suffering from gastric cancer, a better understanding of underlying genetic and epigenetic events in this malignancy is required. Although CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and microsatellite instability (MSI) have been shown to play pivotal roles in gastric cancer pathogenesis, the clinical significance of these events on survival outcomes in patients with gastric cancer remains unknown. Methods This study included a patient cohort with pathologically confirmed gastric cancer who had surgical resections. A cohort of 68 gastric cancers was analyzed. CIMP and MSI statuses were determined by analyzing promoter CpG island methylation status of 28 genes/loci, and genomic instability at 10 microsatellite markers, respectively. A Cox’s proportional hazards model was performed for multivariate analysis including age, stage, tumor differentiation, KRAS mutation status, and combined CIMP/MLH1 methylation status in relation to overall survival (OS). Results By multivariate analysis, longer OS was significantly correlated with lower pathologic stage (P = 0.0088), better tumor differentiation (P = 0.0267) and CIMP-high and MLH1 3' methylated status (P = 0.0312). Stratification of CIMP status with regards to MLH1 methylation status further enabled prediction of gastric cancer prognosis. Conclusions CIMP and/or MLH1 methylation status may have a potential to be prognostic biomarkers for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26121593

  13. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers: a study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Stormorken, A.; Menko, F.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Griffioen, G.; Taal, B.G.; Moller, P.; Wijnen, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  14. Rapidly progressive adenomatous polyposis in a patient with germline mutations in both the APC and MLH1 genes: the worst of two worlds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R; Rijcken, FE; Koornstra, JJ; Hollema, H; Fodde, R; Menko, F.H.; Sijmons, RH; Bijleveld, CM; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    The two most common inherited forms of colorectal cancer are familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Simultaneous inheritance of both an APC gene mutation and a mismatch repair gene (for example, MLH1) mutation has never been described. In the present case

  15. Clinical Significance of MLH1 Methylation and CpG Island Methylator Phenotype as Prognostic Markers in Patients with Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunitoshi Shigeyasu

    Full Text Available To improve the outcome of patients suffering from gastric cancer, a better understanding of underlying genetic and epigenetic events in this malignancy is required. Although CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP and microsatellite instability (MSI have been shown to play pivotal roles in gastric cancer pathogenesis, the clinical significance of these events on survival outcomes in patients with gastric cancer remains unknown.This study included a patient cohort with pathologically confirmed gastric cancer who had surgical resections. A cohort of 68 gastric cancers was analyzed. CIMP and MSI statuses were determined by analyzing promoter CpG island methylation status of 28 genes/loci, and genomic instability at 10 microsatellite markers, respectively. A Cox's proportional hazards model was performed for multivariate analysis including age, stage, tumor differentiation, KRAS mutation status, and combined CIMP/MLH1 methylation status in relation to overall survival (OS.By multivariate analysis, longer OS was significantly correlated with lower pathologic stage (P = 0.0088, better tumor differentiation (P = 0.0267 and CIMP-high and MLH1 3' methylated status (P = 0.0312. Stratification of CIMP status with regards to MLH1 methylation status further enabled prediction of gastric cancer prognosis.CIMP and/or MLH1 methylation status may have a potential to be prognostic biomarkers for patients with gastric cancer.

  16. Germline MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 variants in Brazilian patients with colorectal cancer and clinical features suggestive of Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nayê Balzan; Pastor, Tatiane; Paula, André Escremim de; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Santos, Ândrea Ribeiro Dos; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz; Rosset, Clévia; Pinheiro, Manuela; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo Martins; Palmero, Edenir Inêz

    2018-05-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, caused by germline mutations in one of the major genes involved in mismatch repair (MMR): MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and more rarely, PMS2. Recently, germline deletions in EPCAM have been also associated to the syndrome. Most of the pathogenic MMR mutations found in LS families occur in MLH1 or MSH2. Gene variants include missense, nonsense, frameshift mutations, large genomic rearrangements and splice-site variants and most of the studies reporting the molecular characterization of LS families have been conducted outside South America. In this study, we analyzed 60 unrelated probands diagnosed with colorectal cancer and LS criteria. Testing for germline mutations and/or rearrangements in the most commonly affected MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, EPCAM and MSH6) was done by Sanger sequencing and MLPA. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants were identified in MLH1 or MSH2 in 21 probands (35.0%). Of these, approximately one-third were gene rearrangements. In addition, nine variants of uncertain significance (VUS) were identified in 10 (16.6%) of the sixty probands analyzed. Other four novel variants were identified, only in MLH1. Our results suggest that MSH6 pathogenic variants are not common among Brazilian LS probands diagnosed with CRC and that MMR gene rearrangements account for a significant proportion of the germline variants in this population underscoring the need to include rearrangement analysis in the molecular testing of Brazilian individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Promoter methylation of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and p16 is a phenomenon of advanced-stage HCCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Kemp, Matthias; Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Passmann, Sandra; Plotz, Guido; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes has been observed in various cancers. Looking at hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific protein silencing was previously demonstrated to be associated with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the proposed HCV dependent promoter methylation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and thereby enhanced progression of hepatocarcinogenesis has been the subject of controversial discussion. We investigated promoter methylation pattern of the MMR genes MLH1, MSH2 and PMS2 as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A gene (p16) in 61 well characterized patients with HCCs associated with HCV, Hepatitis B virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour and non-tumour adjacent tissue and analysed by methylation-specific PCR. Moreover, microsatellite analysis was performed in tissues showing methylation in MMR gene promoters. Our data demonstrated that promoter methylation of MLH1, MSH2, PMS2 and p16 is present among all considered HCCs. Hereby, promoter silencing was detectable more frequently in advanced-stage HCCs than in low-stage ones. However, there was no significant correlation between aberrant DNA methylation of MMR genes or p16 and HCV infection in related HCC specimens. In summary, we show that promoter methylation of essential MMR genes and p16 is detectable in HCCs most dominantly in pT3 stage tumour cases. Since loss of MMR proteins was previously described to be not only responsible for tumour development but also for chemotherapy resistance, the knowledge of mechanisms jointly responsible for HCC progression might enable significant improvement of individual HCC therapy in the future.

  18. Promoter methylation of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and p16 is a phenomenon of advanced-stage HCCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Hinrichsen

    Full Text Available Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes has been observed in various cancers. Looking at hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC specific protein silencing was previously demonstrated to be associated with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV. However, the proposed HCV dependent promoter methylation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes and thereby enhanced progression of hepatocarcinogenesis has been the subject of controversial discussion. We investigated promoter methylation pattern of the MMR genes MLH1, MSH2 and PMS2 as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A gene (p16 in 61 well characterized patients with HCCs associated with HCV, Hepatitis B virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour and non-tumour adjacent tissue and analysed by methylation-specific PCR. Moreover, microsatellite analysis was performed in tissues showing methylation in MMR gene promoters. Our data demonstrated that promoter methylation of MLH1, MSH2, PMS2 and p16 is present among all considered HCCs. Hereby, promoter silencing was detectable more frequently in advanced-stage HCCs than in low-stage ones. However, there was no significant correlation between aberrant DNA methylation of MMR genes or p16 and HCV infection in related HCC specimens. In summary, we show that promoter methylation of essential MMR genes and p16 is detectable in HCCs most dominantly in pT3 stage tumour cases. Since loss of MMR proteins was previously described to be not only responsible for tumour development but also for chemotherapy resistance, the knowledge of mechanisms jointly responsible for HCC progression might enable significant improvement of individual HCC therapy in the future.

  19. Association between hMLH1 hypermethylation and JC virus (JCV) infection in human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkin, Alex; Niv, Yaron

    2011-04-01

    Incorporation of viral DNA may interfere with the normal sequence of human DNA bases on the genetic level or cause secondary epigenetic changes such as gene promoter methylation or histone acetylation. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. Chromosomal instability (CIN) was established as the key mechanism in cancer development. Later, it was found that CRC results not only from the progressive accumulation of genetic alterations but also from epigenetic changes. JC virus (JCV) is a candidate etiologic factor in sporadic CRC. It may act by stabilizing β-catenin, facilitating its entrance to the cell nucleus, initialing proliferation and cancer development. Diploid CRC cell lines transfected with JCV-containing plasmids developed CIN. This result provides direct experimental evidence for the ability of JCV T-Ag to induce CIN in the genome of colonic epithelial cells. The association of CRC hMLH1 methylation and tumor positivity for JCV was recently documented. JC virus T-Ag DNA sequences were found in 77% of CRCs and are associated with promoter methylation of multiple genes. hMLH1 was methylated in 25 out of 80 CRC patients positive for T-Ag (31%) in comparison with only one out of 11 T-Ag negative cases (9%). Thus, JCV can mediate both CIN and aberrant methylation in CRC. Like other viruses, chronic infection with JCV may induce CRC by different mechanisms which should be further investigated. Thus, gene promoter methylation induced by JCV may be an important process in CRC and the polyp-carcinoma sequence.

  20. Epigenetic Silencing of the MLH1 Promoter in Relation to the Development of Gastric Cancer and its use as a Biomarker for Patients with Microsatellite Instability: a Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guimei; Qin, Lijun; Zhang, Xinjun; Ye, Guoliang; Huang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Human mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) promoter methylation was reported in gastric cancer (GC). This study determined the clinicopathological, prognostic, and diagnostic effects of MLH1 promoter methylation in GC. The combined odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed. A total of 4654 GC patients and 3669 non-malignant controls were identified in this systematic analysis. MLH1 promoter methylation was significantly higher in GC samples than in gastric adenomas, chronic gastritis, adjacent tissues, normal gastric mucosa, and normal healthy blood samples, but it exhibited a similar frequency in GC vs. intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia samples. MLH1 promoter methylation correlated with age and microsatellite instability (MSI), but it was not associated with gender, H. pylori infection, smoking, drinking behaviors, pathological histology, tumor differentiation, clinical stage, lymph node status, distant metastasis, or overall survival of GC. MLH1 promoter methylation exhibited a poor sensitivity value (MLH1 promoter methylation in GC with MSI vs. GC with microsatellite stability (MSS) samples were 0.64, 0.96, and 0.90, respectively. Our results suggest that the detection of MLH1 promoter methylation may be a potential prognostic biomarker for GC patients with MSI. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. De novo constitutional MLH1 epimutations confer early-onset colorectal cancer in two new sporadic Lynch syndrome cases, with derivation of the epimutation on the paternal allele in one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ajay; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Leung, Hon-Chiu E; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Rhees, Jennifer; Hotchkiss, Erin; Arnold, Mildred; Banerji, Pia; Koi, Minoru; Kwok, Chau-To; Packham, Deborah; Lipton, Lara; Boland, C Richard; Ward, Robyn L; Hitchins, Megan P

    2011-02-15

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome classically caused by germline mutations of the mismatch repair genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Constitutional epimutations of the MLH1 gene, characterized by soma-wide methylation of a single allele of the promoter and allelic transcriptional silencing, have been identified in a subset of Lynch syndrome cases lacking a sequence mutation in MLH1. We report two individuals with no family history of colorectal cancer who developed that disease at age 18 and 20 years. In both cases, cancer had arisen because of the de novo occurrence of a constitutional MLH1 epimutation and somatic loss-of-heterozygosity of the functional allele in the tumors. We show for the first time that the epimutation in one case arose on the paternally inherited allele. Analysis of 13 tumors from seven individuals with constitutional MLH1 epimutations showed eight tumors had lost the second MLH1 allele, two tumors had a novel pathogenic missense mutation and three had retained heterozygosity. Only 1 of 12 tumors demonstrated the BRAF V600E mutation and 3 of 11 tumors harbored a mutation in KRAS. The finding that epimutations can originate on the paternal allele provides important new insights into the mechanism of origin of epimutations. It is clear that the second hit in MLH1 epimutation-associated tumors typically has a genetic not epigenetic basis. Individuals with mismatch repair-deficient cancers without the BRAF V600E mutation are candidates for germline screening for sequence or methylation changes in MLH1. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  2. The dynamic DNA methylation landscape of the mutL homolog 1 shore is altered by MLH1-93G>A polymorphism in normal tissues and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Andrea J; Mrkonjic, Miralem; Lemire, Mathieu; Gallinger, Steven; Knight, Julia A; Bapat, Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) undergo distinct genetic and epigenetic alterations. Expression of mutL homolog 1 ( MLH1 ), a mismatch repair gene that corrects DNA replication errors, is lost in up to 15% of sporadic tumours due to mutation or, more commonly, due to DNA methylation of its promoter CpG island. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CpG island of MLH1 ( MLH1 -93G>A or rs1800734) is associated with CpG island hypermethylation and decreased MLH1 expression in CRC tumours. Further, in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA of both CRC cases and non-cancer controls, the variant allele of rs1800734 is associated with hypomethylation at the MLH1 shore, a region upstream of its CpG island that is less dense in CpG sites . To determine whether this genotype-epigenotype association is present in other tissue types, including colorectal tumours, we assessed DNA methylation in matched normal colorectal tissue, tumour, and PBMC DNA from 349 population-based CRC cases recruited from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. Using the semi-quantitative real-time PCR-based MethyLight assay, MLH1 shore methylation was significantly higher in tumour tissue than normal colon or PBMCs ( P  MLH1 was not associated with MSI status or promoter CpG island hypermethylation, regardless of genotype. To confirm these results, bisulfite sequencing was performed in matched tumour and normal colorectal specimens from six CRC cases, including two cases per genotype (wildtype, heterozygous, and homozygous variant). Bisulfite sequencing results corroborated the methylation patterns found by MethyLight, with significant hypomethylation in normal colorectal tissue of variant SNP allele carriers. These results indicate that the normal tissue types tested (colorectum and PBMC) experience dynamic genotype-associated epigenetic alterations at the MLH1 shore, whereas tumour DNA incurs aberrant hypermethylation compared to normal DNA.

  3. Recruiting intensity

    OpenAIRE

    R. Jason Faberman

    2014-01-01

    To hire new workers, employers use a variety of recruiting methods in addition to posting a vacancy announcement. The intensity with which employers use these alternative methods can vary widely with a firm’s performance and with the business cycle. In fact, persistently low recruiting intensity helps to explain the sluggish pace of US job growth following the Great Recession.

  4. Isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression is frequently caused by heterogeneous MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in Lynch syndrome screening for endometrial cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Aya; Sato, Naoki; Sugawara, Tae; Takahashi, Kazue; Kito, Masahiko; Makino, Kenichi; Sato, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Dai; Shirasawa, Hiromitu; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Kumazawa, Yukiyo; Sato, Akira; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder mainly caused by a germline mutation in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2) and is associated with increased risk of various cancers, particularly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (EC). Women with LS account for 2–6% of EC patients; it is clinically important to identify LS in such individuals for predicting and/or preventing additional LS-associated cancers. PMS2 germline mutation ...

  5. Loss of mutL homolog-1 (MLH1) expression promotes acquisition of oncogenic and inhibitor-resistant point mutations in tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springuel, Lorraine; Losdyck, Elisabeth; Saussoy, Pascale; Turcq, Béatrice; Mahon, François-Xavier; Knoops, Laurent; Renauld, Jean-Christophe

    2016-12-01

    Genomic instability drives cancer progression by promoting genetic abnormalities that allow for the multi-step clonal selection of cells with growth advantages. We previously reported that the IL-9-dependent TS1 cell line sequentially acquired activating substitutions in JAK1 and JAK3 upon successive selections for growth factor independent and JAK inhibitor-resistant cells, suggestive of a defect in mutation avoidance mechanisms. In the first part of this paper, we discovered that the gene encoding mutL homolog-1 (MLH1), a key component of the DNA mismatch repair system, is silenced by promoter methylation in TS1 cells. By means of stable ectopic expression and RNA interference methods, we showed that the high frequencies of growth factor-independent and inhibitor-resistant cells with activating JAK mutations can be attributed to the absence of MLH1 expression. In the second part of this paper, we confirm the clinical relevance of our findings by showing that chronic myeloid leukemia relapses upon ABL-targeted therapy correlated with a lower expression of MLH1 messenger RNA. Interestingly, the mutational profile observed in our TS1 model, characterized by a strong predominance of T:A>C:G transitions, was identical to the one described in the literature for primitive cells derived from chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Taken together, our observations demonstrate for the first time a causal relationship between MLH1-deficiency and incidence of oncogenic point mutations in tyrosine kinases driving cell transformation and acquired resistance to kinase-targeted cancer therapies.

  6. Epigenetic silencing of MLH1 in endometrial cancers is associated with larger tumor volume, increased rate of lymph node positivity and reduced recurrence-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Casey M; Cohn, David E; Hampel, Heather; Frankel, Wendy L; Jones, Dan; McElroy, Joseph P; Suarez, Adrian A; Zhao, Weiqiang; Chen, Wei; Salani, Ritu; Copeland, Larry J; O'Malley, David M; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Chassen, Alexis S; Pearlman, Rachel; Goodfellow, Paul J; Backes, Floor J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the relationship between mismatch repair (MMR) classification and clinicopathologic features including tumor volume, and explore outcomes by MMR class in a contemporary cohort. Single institution cohort evaluating MMR classification for endometrial cancers (EC). MMR immunohistochemistry (IHC)±microsatellite instability (MSI) testing and reflex MLH1 methylation testing was performed. Tumors with MMR abnormalities by IHC or MSI and MLH1 methylation were classified as epigenetic MMR deficiency while those without MLH1 methylation were classified as probable MMR mutations. Clinicopathologic characteristics were analyzed. 466 endometrial cancers were classified; 75% as MMR proficient, 20% epigenetic MMR defects, and 5% as probable MMR mutations. Epigenetic MMR defects were associated with advanced stage, higher grade, presence of lymphovascular space invasion, and older age. MMR class was significantly associated with tumor volume, an association not previously reported. The epigenetic MMR defect tumors median volume was 10,220mm 3 compared to 3321mm 3 and 2,846mm 3 , for MMR proficient and probable MMR mutations respectively (PMLH1 methylation analysis defines a subset of tumors that have worse prognostic features and reduced RFS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunohistochemical null-phenotype for mismatch repair proteins in colonic carcinoma associated with concurrent MLH1 hypermethylation and MSH2 somatic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Stadler, Zsofia K; Zhang, Liying; Weiser, Martin R; Basturk, Olca; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Vakiani, Efsevia; Saltz, Lenard B; Klimstra, David S; Shia, Jinru

    2018-04-01

    Microsatellite instability, a well-established driver pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, can develop in both sporadic and hereditary conditions via different molecular alterations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR protein immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently widely used for the detection of MMR deficiency in solid tumors. The IHC test, however, can show varied staining patterns, posing challenges in the interpretation of the staining results in some cases. Here we report a case of an 80-year-old female with a colonic adenocarcinoma that exhibited an unusual "null" IHC staining pattern with complete loss of all four MMR proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). This led to subsequent MLH1 methylation testing and next generation sequencing which demonstrated that the loss of all MMR proteins was associated with concurrent promoter hypermethylation of MLH1 and double somatic truncating mutations in MSH2. These molecular findings, in conjunction with the patient's age being 80 years and the fact that the patient had no personal or family cancer history, indicated that the MMR deficiency was highly likely sporadic in nature. Thus, the stringent Lynch syndrome type surveillance programs were not recommended to the patient and her family members. This case illustrates a rare but important scenario where a null IHC phenotype signifies complex underlying molecular alternations that bear clinical management implications, highlighting the need for recognition and awareness of such unusual IHC staining patterns.

  8. Colorectal cancer incidence in path_MLH1 carriers subjected to different follow-up protocols: a Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Toni; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth; Järvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rødland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Jenkins, Mark; Genuardi, Maurizio; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Frayling, Ian M; Plazzer, John-Paul; Sampson, Julian R; Capella, Gabriel; Möslein, Gabriela; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Møller, Pål

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1 ) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy. The cohort included Finnish carriers enrolled in 3-yearly colonoscopy ( n  = 505; 4625 observation years) and carriers from other countries enrolled in colonoscopy 2-yearly or more frequently ( n  = 439; 3299 observation years). We examined whether the longer interval between colonoscopies in Finland could explain the high incidence of CRC and whether disease expression correlated with differences in population CRC incidence. Cumulative CRC incidences in carriers of path_MLH1 at 70-years of age were 41% for males and 36% for females in the Finnish series and 58% and 55% in the non-Finnish series, respectively ( p  > 0.05). Mean time from last colonoscopy to CRC was 32.7 months in the Finnish compared to 31.0 months in the non-Finnish (p > 0.05) and was therefore unaffected by the recommended colonoscopy interval. Differences in population incidence of CRC could not explain the lower point estimates for CRC in the Finnish series. Ten-year overall survival after CRC was similar for the Finnish and non-Finnish series (88% and 91%, respectively; p > 0.05). The hypothesis that the high incidence of CRC in path_MLH1 carriers was caused by a higher incidence in the Finnish series was not valid. We discuss whether the results were influenced by methodological shortcomings in our study or whether the assumption that a shorter interval between colonoscopies leads to a lower CRC incidence may be wrong. This second possibility is intriguing, because it suggests the dogma that CRC in path_MLH1 carriers develops from polyps that can be detected at colonoscopy and removed to prevent CRC may be erroneous. In view of the excellent 10-year overall survival in the Finnish and non-Finnish series we remain strong advocates of current surveillance practices for those with LS pending

  9. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  10. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  11. Small suitability of the DLEC1, MLH1 and TUSC4 mRNA expression analysis as potential prognostic or differentiating markers for NSCLC patients in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordiak, Jacek; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Antczak, Adam; Migdalska-Sęk, Monika; Nawrot, Ewa; Domańska-Senderowska, Daria; Kiszałkiewicz, Justyna; Brzeziańska-Lasota, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    According to the latest data, lung cancer is one of the most common cancer worldwide, men contributing nearly 21.2% and women 8.6% of all diagnosed cancers. Late detection of tumour drastically reduces the chance for a cure. Thus, it is important to search for candidate biomarkers for screening of early stage nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Tumour suppressor genes, DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1, localized on 3p21 are recognized to play a role in NSCLC carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 mRNA expression, and clinical features of NSCLC patients, tobacco addiction, and tumour histopathological characteristics. The DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression was analysed in lung tumour tissue samples obtained from 69 patients diagnosed with NSCLC: squamous cell carcinoma (n = 34), adenocarcinoma (n = 24), large cell carcinoma (n = 5), carcinoma adenosquamosum (n = 5). A decreased gene expression (RQ MLH1 in 50.7% and for TUSC4 in 26% of NSCLC samples. DLEC1 was decreased in more aggressive subtypes: large cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma-squamous cell carcinoma. The simultaneous downregulation of two of the studied genes, DLEC1 andMLH1,was observed in 30.4% of NSCLCsamples, highlighting the importance of these two genes in lung carcinogenesis. We found no correlation between the DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 gene expression and NSCLC patient characteristics (gender, age and smoking) or cancer histopathology. No significant differences in the gene expression among NSCLC subtypes indicate the weakness of DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression analysis as potential differentiating markers of NSCLC subtypes in the Polish population.

  12. Epigenetic Silencing of the MLH1 Promoter in Relation to the Development of Gastric Cancer and its use as a Biomarker for Patients with Microsatellite Instability: a Systematic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimei Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Human mutL homolog 1 (MLH1 promoter methylation was reported in gastric cancer (GC. This study determined the clinicopathological, prognostic, and diagnostic effects of MLH1 promoter methylation in GC. Methods: The combined odds ratio (OR or hazard ratio (HR and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve (AUC were analyzed. Results: A total of 4654 GC patients and 3669 non-malignant controls were identified in this systematic analysis. MLH1 promoter methylation was significantly higher in GC samples than in gastric adenomas, chronic gastritis, adjacent tissues, normal gastric mucosa, and normal healthy blood samples, but it exhibited a similar frequency in GC vs. intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia samples. MLH1 promoter methylation correlated with age and microsatellite instability (MSI, but it was not associated with gender, H. pylori infection, smoking, drinking behaviors, pathological histology, tumor differentiation, clinical stage, lymph node status, distant metastasis, or overall survival of GC. MLH1 promoter methylation exhibited a poor sensitivity value (< 0.5 in patients with GC compared with adjacent tissues, gastric adenomas, chronic gastritis, normal gastric mucosa, and normal healthy blood samples. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of MLH1 promoter methylation in GC with MSI vs. GC with microsatellite stability (MSS samples were 0.64, 0.96, and 0.90, respectively. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the detection of MLH1 promoter methylation may be a potential prognostic biomarker for GC patients with MSI.

  13. Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Weijenberg, Matty P; Wark, Petra A; Saritas, A Merdan; Roemen, Guido MJM; Muijen, Goos NP van; Bruïne, Adriaan P de; Brandt, Piet A van den; Goeij, Anton FPM de

    2005-01-01

    The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras (K-ras) pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics. In a group of 656 unselected sporadic colorectal cancer patients, aberrations in the APC, K-ras, CTNNB1 genes, and expression of hMLH1 were investigated. Additionally, tumours were divided in groups based on molecular features and compared with respect to patient's age at diagnosis, sex, family history of colorectal cancer, tumour sub-localisation, Dukes' stage and differentiation. Mutations at the phosphorylation sites (codons 31, 33, 37, and 45) in the CTNNB1 gene were observed in tumours from only 5/464 patients. Tumours with truncating APC mutations and activating K-ras mutations in codons 12 and 13 occurred at similar frequencies (37% (245/656) and 36% (235/656), respectively). Seventeen percent of tumours harboured both an APC and a K-ras mutation (109/656). Nine percent of all tumours (58/656) lacked hMLH1 expression. Patients harbouring a tumour with absent hMLH1 expression were older, more often women, more often had proximal colon tumours that showed poorer differentiation when compared to patients harbouring tumours with an APC and/or K-ras mutation. CTNNB1 mutations seem to be of minor importance in sporadic colorectal cancer. The main differences in tumour and patient characteristics are found between groups of patients based on mismatch repair deficiency

  14. Secondary mutation in a coding mononucleotide tract in MSH6 causes loss of immunoexpression of MSH6 in colorectal carcinomas with MLH1/PMS2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shia, Jinru; Zhang, Liying; Shike, Moshe; Guo, Min; Stadler, Zsofia; Xiong, Xiaoling; Tang, Laura H; Vakiani, Efsevia; Katabi, Nora; Wang, Hangjun; Bacares, Ruben; Ruggeri, Jeanine; Boland, C Richard; Ladanyi, Marc; Klimstra, David S

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins may be affected by various biological and technical factors. Staining variations that could potentially lead to erroneous interpretations have been recognized. A recently recognized staining variation is the significant reduction of staining for MSH6 in some colorectal carcinomas. The frequency and specific characteristics of this aberrant MSH6 staining pattern, however, have not been well analyzed. In this study of 420 colorectal carcinoma samples obtained from patients fulfilling the Revised Bethesda Guidelines, we detected 9 tumors (2%) showing extremely limited staining for MSH6 with positive staining present in PMS2 protein-deficient carcinomas (n=5, including 1 with a pathogenic mutation in PMS2); and (2) MLH1, PMS2 and MSH2 normal but with chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy before surgery (n=4). To test our hypothesis that somatic mutation in the coding region microsatellite of the MSH6 gene might be a potential underlying mechanism for such limited MSH6 staining, we evaluated frameshift mutation in a (C)(8) tract in exon 5 of the MSH6 gene in seven tumors that had sufficient DNA for analysis, and detected mutation in four; all four tumors belonged to the MLH1/PMS2-deficient group. In conclusion, our data outline the main scenarios where significant reduction of MSH6 staining is more likely to occur in colorectal carcinoma, and suggest that somatic mutations of the coding region microsatellites of the MSH6 gene is an underlying mechanism for this staining phenomenon in MLH1/PMS2-deficient carcinomas.

  15. Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruïne Adriaan P

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1 and Ras (K-ras pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics. Methods In a group of 656 unselected sporadic colorectal cancer patients, aberrations in the APC, K-ras, CTNNB1 genes, and expression of hMLH1 were investigated. Additionally, tumours were divided in groups based on molecular features and compared with respect to patient's age at diagnosis, sex, family history of colorectal cancer, tumour sub-localisation, Dukes' stage and differentiation. Results Mutations at the phosphorylation sites (codons 31, 33, 37, and 45 in the CTNNB1 gene were observed in tumours from only 5/464 patients. Tumours with truncating APC mutations and activating K-ras mutations in codons 12 and 13 occurred at similar frequencies (37% (245/656 and 36% (235/656, respectively. Seventeen percent of tumours harboured both an APC and a K-ras mutation (109/656. Nine percent of all tumours (58/656 lacked hMLH1 expression. Patients harbouring a tumour with absent hMLH1 expression were older, more often women, more often had proximal colon tumours that showed poorer differentiation when compared to patients harbouring tumours with an APC and/or K-ras mutation. Conclusion CTNNB1 mutations seem to be of minor importance in sporadic colorectal cancer. The main differences in tumour and patient characteristics are found between groups of patients based on mismatch repair deficiency.

  16. Screening of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in a Greek cohort of Lynch syndrome suspected families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thodi, Georgia; Fountzilas, George; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael; Nasioulas, George; Grivas, Anastasios; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Mylonaki, Maria; Panopoulos, Christos; Magic, Mirjana Brankovic

    2010-01-01

    Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to Lynch syndrome, thus conferring a high relative risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. The MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutational spectrum reported so far involves minor alterations scattered throughout their coding regions as well as large genomic rearrangements. Therefore, a combination of complete sequencing and a specialized technique for the detection of genomic rearrangements should be conducted during a proper DNA-testing procedure. Our main goal was to successfully identify Lynch syndrome families and determine the spectrum of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations in Greek Lynch families in order to develop an efficient screening protocol for the Greek colorectal cancer patients' cohort. Forty-two samples from twenty-four families, out of which twenty two of Greek, one of Cypriot and one of Serbian origin, were screened for the presence of germline mutations in the major mismatch repair genes through direct sequencing and MLPA. Families were selected upon Amsterdam criteria or revised Bethesda guidelines. Ten deleterious alterations were detected in twelve out of the twenty-four families subjected to genetic testing, thus our detection rate is 50%. Four of the pathogenic point mutations, namely two nonsense, one missense and one splice site change, are novel, whereas the detected genomic deletion encompassing exon 6 of the MLH1 gene has been described repeatedly in the LOVD database. The average age of onset for the development of both colorectal and endometrial cancer among mutation positive families is 43.2 years. The mutational spectrum of the MMR genes investigated as it has been shaped by our analysis is quite heterogeneous without any strong indication for the presence of a founder effect

  17. Altered expression of HER-2 and the mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 predicts the outcome of T1 high-grade bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguedolce, Francesca; Cormio, Antonella; Massenio, Paolo; Pedicillo, Maria C; Cagiano, Simona; Fortunato, Francesca; Calò, Beppe; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Carrieri, Giuseppe; Bufo, Pantaleo; Cormio, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    The identification of factors predicting the outcome of stage T1 high-grade bladder cancer (BC) is a major clinical issue. We performed immunohistochemistry to assess the role of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) and microsatellite instability (MSI) factors MutL homologue 1 (MLH1) and MutS homologue 2 (MSH2) in predicting recurrence and progression of T1 high-grade BCs having undergone transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) alone or TURBT + intravesical instillations of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). HER-2 overexpression was a significant predictor of disease-free survival (DFS) in the overall as well as in the two patients' population; as for progression-free survival (PFS), it was significant in the overall but not in the two patients' population. MLH1 was an independent predictor of PFS only in patients treated with BCG and MSH2 failed to predict DFS and PFS in all populations. Most importantly, the higher the number of altered markers the lowers the DFS and PFS. In multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis, the number of altered molecular markers and BCG treatment were significant predictors (p = 0.0004 and 0.0283, respectively) of DFS, whereas the number of altered molecular markers was the only significant predictor (p = 0.0054) of PFS. Altered expression of the proto-oncogene HER-2 and the two molecular markers of genetic instability MLH1 and MSH2 predicted T1 high-grade BC outcome with the higher the number of altered markers the lower the DFS and PFS. These findings provide grounds for further testing them in predicting the outcome of this challenging disease.

  18. Intensive mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience......This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...

  19. Hsp27, Hsp70 and mismatch repair proteins hMLH1 and hMSH2 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Silvina Beatriz; Vargas-Roig, Laura M; Drago, Gisela; Ibarra, Jorge; Ciocca, Daniel R

    2007-07-08

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency and higher expression levels of heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been implicated with drug resistance to topoisomerase II poisons (doxorubicin) and to platinum compounds (cisplatin). This study was designed to determine individual influences of doxorubicin and cisplatin treatment on the expression of Hsp27, Hsp70, hMLH1 and hMSH2 proteins and in the DNA damage status in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). In addition, we studied whether these proteins and the DNA damage correlated with the survival of cancer patients. PBLs from 10 healthy donors and 25 cancer patients (before and after three cycles of chemotherapy) were exposed to in vitro treatments: C (control), HS (heat shock at 42 degrees C), Do or Pt (doxorubicin or cisplatin alone), and HS+Do or HS+Pt (heat shock+doxorubicin or heat shock+cisplatin). PBLs were collected at time 0 (T0: immediately after drug treatment) and after 24h of repair (T24). Hsp27, Hsp70, hMLH1 and hMSH2 were studied by immunocytochemistry and the DNA damage by alkaline comet assay. Immunofluorescence studies and confocal microscopy revealed that hMLH1 and hMSH2 colocalized with Hsp27 and Hsp72 (inducible form of Hsp70). hMLH1 and hMSH2 were significantly induced by Pt and HS+Pt at T24 in cancer patients, but only modestly influenced by Do. Cancer patients presented higher basal expression of total and nuclear Hsp27 and Hsp70 than controls, and these proteins were also increased by HS, Do and HS+Do. The Hsp70 induction by Pt and HS+Pt was noted in cancer patients, especially nuclear Hsp70. In cancer patients, basal DNA damage was slightly higher than in healthy persons; and after Pt and HS+Pt treatments, DNA migration and number of apoptotic cells were higher than controls. Hsps accomplished a cytoprotective function in pre-chemotherapy PBLs (HS before Do or Pt), but not in post-chemotherapy samples. In Pt-treated patients the ratio N/C (nuclear/cytoplasmic) of Hsp27 was related to disease free survival

  20. The importance of proper bioinformatics analysis and clinical interpretation of tumor genomic profiling: a case study of undifferentiated sarcoma and a constitutional pathogenic BRCA2 mutation and an MLH1 variant of uncertain significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Elizabeth; Chao, Elizabeth C; Yeager, Nicholas D

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is increasingly utilized to identify therapeutic targets for patients with malignancy. This technology also has the capability to reveal the presence of constitutional genetic alterations, which may have significant implications for patients and their family members. Here we present the case of a 23 year old Caucasian patient with recurrent undifferentiated sarcoma who had NGS-based tumor analysis using an assay which simultaneously analyzed the entire coding sequence of 236 cancer-related genes (3769 exons) plus 47 introns from 19 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer. Pathogenic alterations were reported in tumor as the predicted protein alterations, BRCA2 "R645fs*15″ and MLH1 "E694*". Because constitutional BRCA2 and MLH1 gene mutations are associated with Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Lynch syndrome respectively, sequence analysis of DNA isolated from peripheral blood was performed. The presence of the alterations, BRCA2 c.1929delG and MLH1 c.2080G>T, corresponding to the previously reported predicted protein alterations, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the constitutional DNA. An additional DNA finding was reported in this analysis, MLH1 c.2081A>C at the neighboring nucleotide. Further evaluation of the family revealed that all alterations were paternally inherited and the two MLH1 substitutions were in cis, more appropriately referred to as MLH1 c.2080_2081delGAinsTC, which is classified as a variant of uncertain significance. This case illustrates important considerations related to appropriate interpretation of NGS tumor results and follow-up of patients with potentially deleterious constitutional alterations.

  1. The MLH1 c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in colorectal cancer: genetic association study in 18,723 individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abulí

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, being Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Lynch syndrome tumors develop mainly as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair associated with germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. A significant proportion of variants identified by screening these genes correspond to missense or noncoding changes without a clear pathogenic consequence, and they are designated as "variants of uncertain significance", being the c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in the MLH1 gene a clear example. The implication of this variant as a low-penetrance risk variant for CRC was assessed in the present study by performing a case-control study within a large cohort from the COGENT consortium-COST Action BM1206 including 18,723 individuals (8,055 colorectal cancer cases and 10,668 controls and a case-only genotype-phenotype correlation with several clinical and pathological characteristics restricted to the Epicolon cohort. Our results showed no involvement of this variant as a low-penetrance variant for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility and no association with any clinical and pathological characteristics including family history for this neoplasm or Lynch syndrome.

  2. Project on Alternative Systems Study - PASS. Comparison of technology of KBS-3, MLH, VLH and VDH concepts by using an expert group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Lars; Sandstedt, H.

    1992-09-01

    This report constitutes a technical comparison and ranking of four repository concepts for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, that have been studied by SKB: KBS-3, Medium Long Holes (MLH), Very Long Holes (VLH) and Very Deep Holes (VDH). The technical comparison is part of the project 'Project on Alternative Systems Study, PASS', which was initiated by SKB. With the objective of presenting a ranking of the four concepts. Besides this comparison of Technology the ranking is separately made for Long-term Performance and Safety, and Costs before the merging into one verdict. The ranking regarding Technology was carried out in accordance with the method Analytical Hierarchy Process, AHP, and by the aid of expert judgement in the form of a group consisting of six experts. The AHP method implies that the criteria for comparison are ordered in a hierarchy and that the ranking is carried out by pairwise comparison of the criteria. In the evaluation process a measure of the relative importance of each criterion is obtained. The result of the expert judgement exercise was that each expert individually ranked the four concepts in the following order with the top ranked alternative first: KBS-3, MLH, VLH and VDH. The common opinion among the experts was that the top ranking of KBS-3 is significant and the the major criteria used in the study could change substantially without changing the top ranking of KBS-3

  3. Avaliação da expressão tecidual do gene de reparo MLH1 e dos níveis de dano oxidativo ao DNA em doentes com câncer colorretal Evaluation of expression of mismatch repair gene MLH1 and levels of oxidative DNA damage in normal and neoplastic tissues of patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Real Martinez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O dano oxidativo ao DNA provocado por radicais livres de oxigênio representa um dos principais mecanismos responsáveis pelas etapas iniciais da carcinogênese colorretal. O estresse oxidativo ocasiona erros de pareamento de bases possibilitando o aparecimento de mutações em genes controladores do ciclo celular. As células possuem um sistema de defesa representado pelos genes de reparo do DNA que corrigindo os erros de pareamento impedem o desenvolvimento de mutações. Poucos estudos avaliaram a relação entre dano oxidativo ao DNA e a expressão tecidual do gene de reparo MLH1. OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar os níveis de estresse oxidativo ao DNA e a expressão tecidual do gene de reparo MLH1 nas células da mucosa cólica normal e neoplásica de doentes com câncer colorretal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram estudados 44 doentes com diagnóstico de adenocarcinoma colorretal. Foram excluídos os doentes com câncer colorretal hereditário, portadores de câncer relacionado às doenças inflamatórias intestinais e os submetidos à radioquimioterapia neoadjuvante. Para a avaliação dos níveis de dano oxidativo ao DNA utilizou-se a técnica da eletroforese alcalina em gel de célula isolada (ensaio do cometa avaliando 100 células obtidas dos tecidos normal e neoplásico. Para a avaliação da expressão do gene MLH1 utilizou-se a técnica de reação de polimerase em cadeia em tempo real (RT-PCR com primer especificamente desenhados para amplificação do gene. A comparação dos resultados encontrados para os níveis de estresse oxidativo ao DNA, e expressão do gene MLH1 nos tecidos normais e neoplásicos foi feito pelo teste t de Student, adotando-se nível de significância de 5% (pThe oxidative DNA damage caused by oxygen free radicals is one of the most important mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of colorectal carcinogenesis. The oxidative stress can cause errors in the pairing of nitrogenous bases that

  4. Screening for germline mutations of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 genes in Slovenian colorectal cancer patients: implications for a population specific detection strategy of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berginc, Gasper; Bracko, Matej; Ravnik-Glavac, Metka; Glavac, Damjan

    2009-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is present in more than 90% of colorectal cancers of patients with Lynch syndrome, and is therefore a feasible marker for the disease. Mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2, which are one of the main causes of deficient mismatch repair and subsequent MSI, have been linked to the disease. In order to establish the role of each of the 4 genes in Slovenian Lynch syndrome patients, we performed MSI analysis on 593 unselected CRC patients and subsequently searched for the presence of point mutations, larger genomic rearrangements and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in patients with MSI-high tumours. We detected 43 (7.3%) patients with MSI-H tumours, of which 7 patients (1.3%) harboured germline defects: 2 in MLH1, 4 in MSH2, 1 in PMS2 and none in MSH6. Twenty-nine germline sequence variations of unknown significance and 17 deleterious somatic mutations were found. MLH1 promoter methylation was detected in 56% of patients without detected germline defects and in 1 (14%) suspected Lynch syndrome. Due to the minor role of germline MSH6 mutations, we adapted the Lynch syndrome detection strategy for the Slovenian population of CRC patients, whereby germline alterations should be first sought in MLH1 and MSH2 followed by a search for larger genomic rearrangements in these two genes. When no germline mutations are found tumors should be further tested for the presence of germline defects in PMS2 and MSH6. The choice about which gene should be tested first can be guided more accurately by the immunohistochemical analysis. Our study demonstrates that the incidence of MMR mutations in a population should be known prior to the application of one of several suggested strategies for detection of Lynch syndrome.

  5. [Immunohistochemical examination of MSH2, PMS2, MLH1, MSH6 compared with the analysis of microsatellite instability in colon adenocarcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, G A; Ianus, G A; Kornilov, A V; Orlova, R V; Petrov, S V; Protasova, A É; Pozharisskiĭ, K M; Imianitov, E N

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the colon in 10-20% is associated with microsatellite instability, which can occur both in sporadic cancers and in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer. Our analysis of 195 cases of adenocarcinoma of the colon showed that microsatellite instability (MSI-H) was found only in 1.5% of patients. Subsequent choice of patients with suspected hereditary Lynch syndrome led to the identification of additional 17 patients with microsatellite instability. They passed an analysis of genes of repair system of unpaired nucleotides of DNA. The study showed that immunohistochemical staining of MSH2, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2 could effectively conduct a preliminary screening of the Lynch syndrome but was unable to divide cases of sporadic and hereditary MSI-H colon cancer.

  6. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic hybridizat......Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic...... deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...... from several 100 kb, including large flanking regions, to rearrangements, allowing convenient design...

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4: ... ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity ...

  8. Evidence for classification of c.1852_1853AA>GC in MLH1 as a neutral variant for Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llor Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is an autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndrome characterized by early onset cancers of the colorectum, endometrium and other tumours. A significant proportion of DNA variants in LS patients are unclassified. Reports on the pathogenicity of the c.1852_1853AA>GC (p.Lys618Ala variant of the MLH1 gene are conflicting. In this study, we provide new evidence indicating that this variant has no significant implications for LS. Methods The following approach was used to assess the clinical significance of the p.Lys618Ala variant: frequency in a control population, case-control comparison, co-occurrence of the p.Lys618Ala variant with a pathogenic mutation, co-segregation with the disease and microsatellite instability in tumours from carriers of the variant. We genotyped p.Lys618Ala in 1034 individuals (373 sporadic colorectal cancer [CRC] patients, 250 index subjects from families suspected of having LS [revised Bethesda guidelines] and 411 controls. Three well-characterized LS families that fulfilled the Amsterdam II Criteria and consisted of members with the p.Lys618Ala variant were included to assess co-occurrence and co-segregation. A subset of colorectal tumour DNA samples from 17 patients carrying the p.Lys618Ala variant was screened for microsatellite instability using five mononucleotide markers. Results Twenty-seven individuals were heterozygous for the p.Lys618Ala variant; nine had sporadic CRC (2.41%, seven were suspected of having hereditary CRC (2.8% and 11 were controls (2.68%. There were no significant associations in the case-control and case-case studies. The p.Lys618Ala variant was co-existent with pathogenic mutations in two unrelated LS families. In one family, the allele distribution of the pathogenic and unclassified variant was in trans, in the other family the pathogenic variant was detected in the MSH6 gene and only the deleterious variant co-segregated with the disease in both

  9. Risk Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer in a Subset of Patients with Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 in Taiwan Fulfilling the Amsterdam II Criteria for Lynch Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Bunya Kamiza

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes, is a predisposing factor for colorectal cancer (CRC. This retrospective cohort study investigated the risk factors associated with the development of CRC in patients with MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutations.In total, 301 MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutation carriers were identified from the Amsterdam criteria family registry provided by the Taiwan Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Consortium. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs to determine the association between the risk factors and CRC development. A robust sandwich covariance estimation model was used to evaluate family dependence.Among the total cohort, subjects of the Hakka ethnicity exhibited an increased CRC risk (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.09-2.34; however, those who performed regular physical activity exhibited a decreased CRC risk (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41-0.88. The CRC risk was enhanced in MLH1 germline mutation carriers, with corresponding HRs of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.16-2.55 and 0.54 (95% CI = 0.34-0.83 among subjects of the Hakka ethnicity and those who performed regular physical activity, respectively. In addition, the total cohort with a manual occupation had a 1.56 times higher CRC risk (95% CI = 1.07-2.27 than did that with a skilled occupation. Moreover, MSH2 germline mutation carriers with blood group type B exhibited an increased risk of CRC development (HR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.06-6.58 compared with those with blood group type O.The present study revealed that Hakka ethnicity, manual occupation, and blood group type B were associated with an increased CRC risk, whereas regular physical activity was associated with a decreased CRC risk in MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutation carriers.

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... 45 David, Age 65 Harold, Age 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do ...

  11. Vitamin E Modifies High-Fat Diet-Induced Increase of DNA Strand Breaks, and Changes in Expression and DNA Methylation of Dnmt1 and MLH1 in C57BL/6J Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Remely

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, increased ROS production and DNA damage. Supplementation with antioxidants might ameliorate DNA damage and support epigenetic regulation of DNA repair. C57BL/6J male mice were fed a high-fat (HFD or a control diet (CD with and without vitamin E supplementation (4.5 mg/kg body weight (b.w. for four months. DNA damage, DNA promoter methylation and gene expression of Dnmt1 and a DNA repair gene (MLH1 were assayed in liver and colon. The HFD resulted in organ specific changes in DNA damage, the epigenetically important Dnmt1 gene, and the DNA repair gene MLH1. Vitamin E reduced DNA damage and showed organ-specific effects on MLH1 and Dnmt1 gene expression and methylation. These results suggest that interventions with antioxidants and epigenetic active food ingredients should be developed as an effective prevention for obesity—and oxidative stress—induced health risks.

  12. Vitamin E Modifies High-Fat Diet-Induced Increase of DNA Strand Breaks, and Changes in Expression and DNA Methylation of Dnmt1 and MLH1 in C57BL/6J Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remely, Marlene; Ferk, Franziska; Sterneder, Sonja; Setayesh, Tahereh; Kepcija, Tatjana; Roth, Sylvia; Noorizadeh, Rahil; Greunz, Martina; Rebhan, Irene; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Haslberger, Alexander

    2017-06-14

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, increased ROS production and DNA damage. Supplementation with antioxidants might ameliorate DNA damage and support epigenetic regulation of DNA repair. C57BL/6J male mice were fed a high-fat (HFD) or a control diet (CD) with and without vitamin E supplementation (4.5 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)) for four months. DNA damage, DNA promoter methylation and gene expression of Dnmt1 and a DNA repair gene ( MLH1 ) were assayed in liver and colon. The HFD resulted in organ specific changes in DNA damage, the epigenetically important Dnmt1 gene, and the DNA repair gene MLH1 . Vitamin E reduced DNA damage and showed organ-specific effects on MLH1 and Dnmt1 gene expression and methylation. These results suggest that interventions with antioxidants and epigenetic active food ingredients should be developed as an effective prevention for obesity-and oxidative stress-induced health risks.

  13. Promoter methylation and expression of MGMT and the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 in paired primary and recurrent glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsberg, Jörg; Thon, Niklas; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Hentschel, Bettina; Sabel, Michael C; Westphal, Manfred; Schackert, Gabriele; Kreth, Friedrich Wilhelm; Pietsch, Torsten; Löffler, Markus; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Tonn, Jörg C

    2011-08-01

    Epigenetic silencing of the O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter is associated with prolonged survival in glioblastoma patients treated with temozolomide (TMZ). We investigated whether glioblastoma recurrence is associated with changes in the promoter methylation status and the expression of MGMT and the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 in pairs of primary and recurrent glioblastomas of 80 patients, including 64 patients treated with radiotherapy and TMZ after the first operation. Among the primary tumors, the MGMT promoter was methylated in 31 patients and unmethylated in 49 patients. In 71 patients (89%), the MGMT promoter methylation status of the primary tumor was retained at recurrence. MGMT promoter methylation, but not MGMT protein expression, was associated with longer progression-free survival, overall survival and postrecurrence survival (PRS). Moreover, PRS was increased under salvage chemotherapy. Investigation of primary and recurrent glioblastomas of 43 patients did not identify promoter methylation in any of the four MMR genes. However, recurrent glioblastomas demonstrated significantly lower MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 protein expression as detected by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, reduced expression of MMR proteins, but not changes in MGMT promoter methylation, is characteristic of glioblastomas recurring after the current standards of care. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  14. Mismatch Repair Proteins and Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Carcinoma (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2): Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Nour El Hoda S; El Sheikh, Samar A; Talaat, Suzan M; Salem, Eman M

    2017-03-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Microsatellite instability (MSI) is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers. CRC with MSI has particular characteristics such as improved survival rates and better prognosis. They also have a distinct sensitivity to the action of chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to detect microsatellite instability in a cohort of colorectal cancer Egyptian patients using the immunohistochemical expression of mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Cases were divided into Microsatellite stable (MSS), Microsatellite unstable low (MSI-L) and Microsatellite unstable high (MSI-H). This Microsatellite stability status was correlated with different clinicopathological parameters. There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of cases, tumor site & grade and the microsatellite stability status. There was no statistically significant correlation between the gender of patients, tumor subtype, stage, mucoid change, necrosis, tumor borders, lymphocytic response, lymphovascular emboli and the microsatellite stability status. Testing for MSI should be done for all colorectal cancer patients, especially those younger than 50 years old, right sided and high-grade CRCs.

  15. Tissue expression of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 proteins and prognostic value of microsatellite instability in Wilms tumor: experience of 45 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Gulden; Aktas, Safiye; Cubuk, Cankut; Ortac, Ragip; Vergin, Canan; Olgun, Nur

    2013-05-01

    Although the importance of microsatellite instability (MSI) and mismatch repair genes (MMR) is strongly established in colorectal cancer seen in the Lynch syndrome, its significance has not been fully established in Wilms tumor (WT). The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of MSI and MMR proteins in WT. This study included 45 pediatric cases with nephroblastoma. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of archival tissue sections. Real-time PCR melting analysis and fluorescence capillary electrophoresis (FCE) were performed to evaluate the MSI markers BAT25, BAT26, NR21, NR24, MONO27, penta D, and penta C in DNA extracted from tumor and normal tissues. Lower levels of MSI were observed in six cases (13.3%). There were no statistically significant correlations between MSI and some clinical prognostic factors such as stage of the tumors, and survival rates. Nineteen tumors (42.2%) showed loss of protein expression of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, or MSH6. MMR protein defects were correlated with size (P = .021), and stage (P = .019) of the tumor, and survival rates (P < .01).Similarly MSI was also correlated with the size of the tumor (P = .046). This study showed that a small proportion of WT might be associated with the presence of MSI, as is the case with defects of DNA mismatch repair genes in the pathogenesis of WT. However, there was no concordance with the frequency of tissue expression of MMR proteins and MSI. These findings suggest that MMR genes may play an important role in the development of WT via different pathways.

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart Rate & Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion ( ... a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived ...

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Share Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, ... The table below lists examples of activities classified as moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity based upon the ...

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... for a breath. Absolute Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. ...

  20. Iowa Intensive Archaeological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file contains intensive level archaeological survey areas for the state of Iowa. All intensive Phase I surveys that are submitted to the State Historic...

  1. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed.......This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  2. Stress Analysis of the D-Zero Solenoid Magnet Lifting Fixture PPD Fixture No.102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, M.

    1997-01-01

    This engineering note presents stress analysis calculations for the below the hook lifting fixture which will be used to move the D-Zero solenoid magnet during installation work at the D-Zero Assembly building. Load bearing structural members are shown to have a minimum design factor of 3 based on yield strength as required by ASME B30.20. All bolts were analyzed and shown to be kept below allowable loads/stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) manual. The lifting fixture will be manufactured at Fermilab using some material scavenged from an existing lifting fixture that was shipped with the magnet from the magnet manufacturer, Toshiba Corporation. The fixture is designed with built in versatility so that the solenoid magnet can be maneuvered through the stages of preparation and installation into it's final mounted position. The structure has been analyzed for all phases of its use, although the analysis of the structure as a below the hook lifting device is the main purpose of this note.

  3. Stochastic conditional intensity processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauwens, Luc; Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2006-01-01

    model allows for a wide range of (cross-)autocorrelation structures in multivariate point processes. The model is estimated by simulated maximum likelihood (SML) using the efficient importance sampling (EIS) technique. By modeling price intensities based on NYSE trading, we provide significant evidence......In this article, we introduce the so-called stochastic conditional intensity (SCI) model by extending Russell’s (1999) autoregressive conditional intensity (ACI) model by a latent common dynamic factor that jointly drives the individual intensity components. We show by simulations that the proposed...... for a joint latent factor and show that its inclusion allows for an improved and more parsimonious specification of the multivariate intensity process...

  4. Quantitative PCR high-resolution melting (qPCR-HRM) curve analysis, a new approach to simultaneously screen point mutations and large rearrangements: application to MLH1 germline mutations in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Etienne; Lefol, Cédrick; Bourdon, Violaine; Coulet, Florence; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Soubrier, Florent; Bièche, Ivan; Olschwang, Sylviane; Sobol, Hagay; Lidereau, Rosette

    2009-06-01

    Several techniques have been developed to screen mismatch repair (MMR) genes for deleterious mutations. Until now, two different techniques were required to screen for both point mutations and large rearrangements. For the first time, we propose a new approach, called "quantitative PCR (qPCR) high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis (qPCR-HRM)," which combines qPCR and HRM to obtain a rapid and cost-effective method suitable for testing a large series of samples. We designed PCR amplicons to scan the MLH1 gene using qPCR HRM. Seventy-six patients were fully scanned in replicate, including 14 wild-type patients and 62 patients with known mutations (57 point mutations and five rearrangements). To validate the detected mutations, we used sequencing and/or hybridization on a dedicated MLH1 array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). All point mutations and rearrangements detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC)+multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were successfully detected by qPCR HRM. Three large rearrangements were characterized with the dedicated MLH1 array-CGH. One variant was detected with qPCR HRM in a wild-type patient and was located within the reverse primer. One variant was not detected with qPCR HRM or with dHPLC due to its proximity to a T-stretch. With qPCR HRM, prescreening for point mutations and large rearrangements are performed in one tube and in one step with a single machine, without the need for any automated sequencer in the prescreening process. In replicate, its reagent cost, sensitivity, and specificity are comparable to those of dHPLC+MLPA techniques. However, qPCR HRM outperformed the other techniques in terms of its rapidity and amount of data provided.

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ...

  6. AGS intensity upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    After the successful completion of the AGS Booster and several upgrades of the AGS, a new intensity record of 6.3 x 10 13 protons per pulse accelerated to 24 GeV was achieved. The high intensity slow-extracted beam program at the AGS typically serves about five production targets and about eight experiments including three rare Kaon decay experiments. Further intensity upgrades are being discussed that could increase the average delivered beam intensity by up to a factor of four

  7. Counteraction of Oxidative Stress by Vitamin E Affects Epigenetic Regulation by Increasing Global Methylation and Gene Expression of MLH1 and DNMT1 Dose Dependently in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Zappe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity- or diabetes-induced oxidative stress is discussed as a major risk factor for DNA damage. Vitamin E and many polyphenols exhibit antioxidative activities with consequences on epigenetic regulation of inflammation and DNA repair. The present study investigated the counteraction of oxidative stress by vitamin E in the colorectal cancer cell line Caco-2 under normal (1 g/l and high (4.5 g/l glucose cell culture condition. Malondialdehyde (MDA as a surrogate marker of lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS was analyzed. Gene expression and promoter methylation of the DNA repair gene MutL homolog 1 (MLH1 and the DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 as well as global methylation by LINE-1 were investigated. Results revealed a dose-dependent counteracting effect of vitamin E on H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Thereby, 10 μM vitamin E proved to be more efficient than did 50 μM in reducing MDA. Further, an induction of MLH1 and DNMT1 gene expression was noticed, accompanied by an increase in global methylation. Whether LINE-1 hypomethylation is a cause or effect of oxidative stress is still unclear. In conclusion, supplementation of exogenous antioxidants like vitamin E in vitro exhibits beneficial effects concerning oxidative stress as well as epigenetic regulation involved in DNA repair.

  8. Metabonomics and Intensive Care

    OpenAIRE

    Antcliffe, D; Gordon, AC

    2016-01-01

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency medicine 2016. Other selected articles can be found online at http://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2016. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901.

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... miles per hour Tennis (doubles) Ballroom dancing General gardening Vigorous Intensity Race walking, jogging, or running Swimming ... miles per hour or faster Jumping rope Heavy gardening (continuous digging or hoeing) Hiking uphill or with ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists examples ... of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, ... If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay ... State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ... RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road ...

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists ... upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers ... required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend ...

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... 10 miles per hour or faster Jumping rope Heavy gardening (continuous digging or hoeing) Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart ...

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart ...

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated ... YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion (Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale) Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email ... ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Absolute Intensity The ... site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  4. [Intensive medicine in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Intensive care medicine is a medical specialty that was officially established in our country in 1978, with a 5-year training program including two years of common core training followed by three years of specific training in an intensive care unit accredited for training. During this 32-year period, intensive care medicine has carried out an intense and varied activity, which has allowed its positioning as an attractive and with future specialty in the hospital setting. This document summarizes the history of the specialty, its current situation, the key role played in the programs of organ donation and transplantation of the National Transplant Organization (after more than 20 years of mutual collaboration), its training activities with the development of the National Plan of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, with a trajectory of more than 25 years, its interest in providing care based on quality and safety programs for the severely ill patient. It also describes the development of reference registries due to the need for reliable data on the care process for the most prevalent diseases, such as ischemic heart disease or ICU-acquired infections, based on long-term experience (more than 15 years), which results in the availability of epidemiological information and characteristics of care that may affect the practical patient's care. Moreover, features of its scientific society (SEMICYUC) are reported, an organization that agglutinates the interests of more than 280 ICUs and more than 2700 intensivists, with reference to the journal Medicina Intensiva, the official journal of the society and the Panamerican and Iberian Federation of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care Societies. Medicina Intensiva is indexed in the Thompson Reuters products of Science Citation Index Expanded (Scisearch(®)) and Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition. The important contribution of the Spanish intensive care medicine to the scientific community is also analyzed, and in relation to

  5. Data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Critchlow, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Data-intensive science has the potential to transform scientific research and quickly translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, and economic success. But this collaborative science is still lacking the effective access and exchange of knowledge among scientists, researchers, and policy makers across a range of disciplines. Bringing together leaders from multiple scientific disciplines, Data-Intensive Science shows how a comprehensive integration of various techniques and technological advances can effectively harness the vast amount of data being generated and significan

  6. Towards higher intensities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 weeks, commissioning of the machine protection system has advanced significantly, opening up the possibility of higher intensity collisions at 3.5 TeV. The intensity has been increased from 2 bunches of 1010 protons to 6 bunches of 2x1010 protons. Luminosities of 6x1028 cm-2s-1 have been achieved at the start of fills, a factor of 60 higher than those provided for the first collisions on 30 March.   The recent increase in LHC luminosity as recorded by the experiments. (Graph courtesy of the experiments and M. Ferro-Luzzi) To increase the luminosity further, the commissioning crews are now trying to push up the intensity of the individual proton bunches. After the successful injection of nominal intensity bunches containing 1.1x1011 protons, collisions were subsequently achieved at 450 GeV with these intensities. However, half-way through the first ramping of these nominal intensity bunches to 3.5 TeV on 15 May, a beam instability was observed, leading to partial beam loss...

  7. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. Detection of asymmetries in solar coronal emission lines is one example. Removal of line blends is another. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It can be used with any fitting function, but we employ a cubic spline in a new analysis routine called Intensity Conserving Spline Interpolation (ICSI). As the name implies, it conserves the observed intensity within each wavelength bin, which ordinary fits do not. Given the rapid convergence, speed of computation, and ease of use, we suggest that ICSI be made a standard component of the processing pipeline for spectroscopic data.

  8. The intense neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1966-07-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through {mu}-, {pi}- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  9. The intense neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1966-01-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through μ-, π- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  10. Up-regulation of mismatch repair genes MSH6, PMS2 and MLH1 parallels development of genetic instability and is linked to tumor aggressiveness and early PSA recurrence in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, Waldemar; Rashed, Semin; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Simon, Ronald; Büscheck, Franziska; Clauditz, Till Sebastian; Grupp, Katharina; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Möller-Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Adam, Meike; Haese, Alexander; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob Robert; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Lebok, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is integral to the maintenance of genetic stability. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of MMR gene expression in prostate cancer. The MMR genes MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 11152 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared with ETS-related gene status and deletions of PTEN, 3p13, 5q21 and 6q15. MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 expression was detectable in 89.5%, 85.4% and 85.0% of cancers and was particularly strong in cancers with advanced pathological tumor stage (P < 0.0001 each), high Gleason grade (P < 0.0001 each), nodal metastasis (P ≤ 0.0083) and early biochemical recurrence (P < 0.0001). High levels of MMR gene expression paralleled features of genetic instability, such as the number of genomic deletions per cancer; strong expression of all three MMR genes was found in 24%, 29%, 30%, 33% and 42% of cancers with no, one, two, three or four to five deletions (P < 0.0001). The prognostic value of the analyzed MMR genes was largely driven by the subset of cancers lacking ERG fusion (P < 0.0001), while the prognostic impact of MMR gene overexpression was only marginal in ERG-positive cancers. Multivariate analyses suggested an independent prognostic relevance of MMR genes in ERG-negative prostate cancers when compared with prognostic parameters available at the time of initial biopsy. In conclusion, MMR overexpression is common in prostate cancer and is linked to poor outcome as well as features indicating genetic instability. ERG fusion should be analyzed along with MMR gene expression in potential clinical tests. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Strongly intensive quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of fluctuations of hadron production properties in collisions of relativistic particles profits from use of measurable intensive quantities which are independent of system size variations. The first family of such quantities was proposed in 1992; another is introduced in this paper. Furthermore we present a proof of independence of volume fluctuations for quantities from both families within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. These quantities are referred to as strongly intensive ones. Influence of conservation laws and resonance decays is also discussed.

  12. High intensity hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit ... Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water aerobics Bicycling slower ...

  14. AGS intensity record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleser, Ed

    1994-01-01

    As flashed in the September issue, this summer the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) reached a proton beam intensity of 4.05 x 10 13 protons per puise, claimed as the highest intensity ever achieved in a proton synchrotron. It is, however, only two-thirds of the way to its final goal of 6 x 10 13 . The achievement is the resuit of many years of effort. The Report of the AGS II Task Force, issued in February 1984, laid out a comprehensive programme largely based on a careful analysis of the PS experience at CERN. The AGS plan had two essential components: the construction of a new booster, and major upgrades to the AGS itself.

  15. Intensities of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissell, David; Vannini, Phillip; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the intensities of long-distance commuting journeys in order to understand how bodily sensibilities become attuned to the regular mobilities which they undertake. More people are travelling farther to and from work than ever before, owing to a variety of factors which relate...... to complex social and geographical dynamics of transport, housing, lifestyle, and employment. Yet, the experiential dimensions of long-distance commuting have not received the attention that they deserve within research on mobilities. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in Australia, Canada, and Denmark...... this paper aims to further develop our collective understanding of the experiential particulars of long-distance workers or ‘supercommuters’. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in broad social patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions...

  16. Intensive culture”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2012-01-01

    Scott Lash argumenterer i bogen Intensive Culture for en vending fra ”ekstensiv” til ”intensiv” i den nutidige globalisering. Bogens udgangspunkt er en stadig mere ekstensiv og gennemtrængende globalisering af kultur, forbrugs- og vareformer, ”comtemporary culture, today’s capitalism – our global......, samlivsmøstre etc.; ”the sheer pace of life in the streets of today’s mega-city would seem somehow to be intensive”....

  17. Intense ion beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Sudan, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation

  18. Intense fusion neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10 15 -10 21 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10 20 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  19. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  20. Orchestrating intensities and rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Juelskjær, Malou

    2016-01-01

    environmentality and learning-centered governance standards has dramatic and performative effects for the production of (educational) subjectivities. This implies a shift from governing identities, categories and structures towards orchestrating affective intensities and rhythms. Finally, the article discusses...... and the making of subjects have held sway for many years; and it is also well known that schools have been some of the most regular purchasers of psychological methods, tests and classifications. Following but also elaborating upon governmentality studies, it is suggested that a current shift towards...

  1. Windowless microfluidic platform based on capillary burst valves for high intensity x-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vig, Asger Laurberg; Enevoldsen, Nikolaj; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Eriksen, Johan; Kristensen, Anders; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2009-01-01

    We propose and describe a microfluidic system for high intensity x-ray measurements. The required open access to a microfluidic channel is provided by an out-of-plane capillary burst valve (CBV). The functionality of the out-of-plane CBV is characterized with respect to the diameter of the windowless access hole, ranging from 10 to 130 μm. Maximum driving pressures from 22 to 280 mbar corresponding to refresh rates of the exposed sample from 300 Hz to 54 kHz is demonstrated. The microfluidic system is tested at beamline ID09b at the ESRF synchrotron radiation facility in Grenoble, and x-ray scattering measurements are shown to be feasible and to require only very limited amounts of sample, <1 ml/h of measurements without recapturing of sample. With small adjustments of the present chip design, scattering angles up to 30 deg. can be achieved without shadowing effects and integration on-chip mixing and spectroscopy appears straightforward.

  2. French intensive truck garden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T D

    1983-01-01

    The French Intensive approach to truck gardening has the potential to provide substantially higher yields and lower per acre costs than do conventional farming techniques. It was the intent of this grant to show that there is the potential to accomplish the gains that the French Intensive method has to offer. It is obvious that locally grown food can greatly reduce transportation energy costs but when there is the consideration of higher efficiencies there will also be energy cost reductions due to lower fertilizer and pesticide useage. As with any farming technique, there is a substantial time interval for complete soil recovery after there have been made substantial soil modifications. There were major crop improvements even though there was such a short time since the soil had been greatly disturbed. It was also the intent of this grant to accomplish two other major objectives: first, the garden was managed under organic techniques which meant that there were no chemical fertilizers or synthetic pesticides to be used. Second, the garden was constructed so that a handicapped person in a wheelchair could manage and have a higher degree of self sufficiency with the garden. As an overall result, I would say that the garden has taken the first step of success and each year should become better.

  3. Compton scattering at high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinzl@plymouth.ac.u [University of Plymouth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    High-intensity Compton scattering takes place when an electron beam is brought into collision with a high power laser. We briefly review the main intensity signatures using the formalism of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

  4. Turbulence Intensity Scaling: A Fugue

    OpenAIRE

    Basse, Nils T.

    2018-01-01

    We study streamwise turbulence intensity definitions using smooth- and rough-wall pipe flow measurements made in the Princeton Superpipe. Scaling of turbulence intensity with the bulk (and friction) Reynolds number is provided for the definitions. The turbulence intensity is proportional to the square root of the friction factor with the same proportionality constant for smooth- and rough-wall pipe flow. Turbulence intensity definitions providing the best description of the measurements are i...

  5. High intensity circular proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1987-12-01

    Circular machines suitable for the acceleration of high intensity proton beams include cyclotrons, FFAG accelerators, and strong-focusing synchrotrons. This paper discusses considerations affecting the design of such machines for high intensity, especially space charge effects and the role of beam brightness in multistage accelerators. Current plans for building a new generation of high intensity 'kaon factories' are reviewed. 47 refs

  6. Intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Georges; Moty-Monnereau, Celine; Meyer, Aurelia; David, Pauline; Pages, Frederique; Muller, Felix; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; David, Denis Jean

    2006-12-01

    This publication reports the assessment of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMCR). This assessment is based on a literature survey which focussed on indications, efficiency and safety on the short term, on the risk of radio-induced cancer on the long term, on the role in the therapeutic strategy, on the conditions of execution, on the impact on morbidity-mortality and life quality, on the impact on the health system and on public health policies and program. This assessment is also based on the opinion of a group of experts regarding the technical benefit of IMCR, its indications depending on the cancer type, safety in terms of radio-induced cancers, and conditions of execution. Before this assessment, the report thus indicates indications for which the use of IMCR can be considered as sufficient or not determined. It also proposes a technical description of IMCR and helical tomo-therapy, discusses the use of this technique for various pathologies or tumours, analyses the present situation of care in France, and comments the identification of this technique in foreign classifications

  7. Intensive Care Unit Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsuk Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is described as a manifestation of acute brain injury and recognized as one of the most common complications in intensive care unit (ICU patients. Although the causes of delirium vary widely among patients, delirium increases the risk of longer ICU and hospital length of stay, death, cost of care, and post-ICU cognitive impairment. Prevention and early detection are therefore crucial. However, the clinical approach toward delirium is not sufficiently aggressive, despite the condition’s high incidence and prevalence in the ICU setting. While the underlying pathophysiology of delirium is not fully understood, many risk factors have been suggested. As a way to improve delirium-related clinical outcome, high-risk patients can be identified. A valid and reliable bedside screening tool is also needed to detect the symptoms of delirium early. Delirium is commonly treated with medications, and haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics are commonly used as standard treatment options for ICU patients although their efficacy and safety have not been established. The approaches for the treatment of delirium should focus on identifying the underlying causes and reducing modifiable risk factors to promote early mobilization.

  8. MRI intensity inhomogeneity correction by combining intensity and spatial information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vovk, Uros; Pernus, Franjo; Likar, Bostjan

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel fully automated method for retrospective correction of intensity inhomogeneity, which is an undesired phenomenon in many automatic image analysis tasks, especially if quantitative analysis is the final goal. Besides most commonly used intensity features, additional spatial image features are incorporated to improve inhomogeneity correction and to make it more dynamic, so that local intensity variations can be corrected more efficiently. The proposed method is a four-step iterative procedure in which a non-parametric inhomogeneity correction is conducted. First, the probability distribution of image intensities and corresponding second derivatives is obtained. Second, intensity correction forces, condensing the probability distribution along the intensity feature, are computed for each voxel. Third, the inhomogeneity correction field is estimated by regularization of all voxel forces, and fourth, the corresponding partial inhomogeneity correction is performed. The degree of inhomogeneity correction dynamics is determined by the size of regularization kernel. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on simulated and real MR brain images. The obtained results show that the proposed method does not corrupt inhomogeneity-free images and successfully corrects intensity inhomogeneity artefacts even if these are more dynamic

  9. Intense electron and ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Molokovsky, Sergey Ivanovich

    2005-01-01

    Intense Ion and Electron Beams treats intense charged-particle beams used in vacuum tubes, particle beam technology and experimental installations such as free electron lasers and accelerators. It addresses, among other things, the physics and basic theory of intense charged-particle beams; computation and design of charged-particle guns and focusing systems; multiple-beam charged-particle systems; and experimental methods for investigating intense particle beams. The coverage is carefully balanced between the physics of intense charged-particle beams and the design of optical systems for their formation and focusing. It can be recommended to all scientists studying or applying vacuum electronics and charged-particle beam technology, including students, engineers and researchers.

  10. Macroseismic intensity attenuation in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaei-Sabegh, Saman

    2018-01-01

    Macroseismic intensity data plays an important role in the process of seismic hazard analysis as well in developing of reliable earthquake loss models. This paper presents a physical-based model to predict macroseismic intensity attenuation based on 560 intensity data obtained in Iran in the time period 1975-2013. The geometric spreading and energy absorption of seismic waves have been considered in the proposed model. The proposed easy to implement relation describes the intensity simply as a function of moment magnitude, source to site distance and focal depth. The prediction capability of the proposed model is assessed by means of residuals analysis. Prediction results have been compared with those of other intensity prediction models for Italy, Turkey, Iran and central Asia. The results indicate the higher attenuation rate for the study area in distances less than 70km.

  11. Intense low energy positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e + beams exist producing of the order of 10 8 - 10 9 e + /sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e + beams with intensities greater than 10 9 e + /sec and current densities of the order of 10 13 - 10 14 e + sec - 1 cm -2 . Intense e + beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B + moderators or by increasing the available activity of B + particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e + collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e + beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e + microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e + diffraction and other fields. Intense e + beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies

  12. Energy intensity: a new look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, H.

    1995-01-01

    Energy intensity is compared among different countries by dividing their energy use by their gross domestic product (GDP) in dollar terms. GDP (US$), being a varying monetary value, will have different meaning in different countries because of the varying means of converting it into dollars. Therefore distorted results of energy intensity are obtained. The newly devised concept of presenting GDP in terms of purchasing power parity in dollars (US PPP) goes a long way to solving this distortion. It also allows the energy intensity of developing countries to be presented in a more favourable way. (author)

  13. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...... and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II) for all patients and for patients with septic shock. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005...

  14. Transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertson, G.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of using intense bursts of heavy ions to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated interest in the transport of intense unneutralized heavy ion beams by quadrupole or solenoid systems. This problem was examined in some detail, using numerical integration of the coupled envelope equations for the quadrupole case. The general relations which emerge are used to develop examples of high energy transport systems and as a basis for discussing the limitations imposed by a transport system on achievable intensities for initial acceleration

  15. Detección de mutaciones de los genes hMLH1 y hMSH2 del sistema de reparación de malos apareamientos del ADN en familias colombianas sospechosas de cancer colorrectal no polipósico hereditario (síndrome de Lynch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gómez

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El cáncer colorrectal es la segunda causa de morbilidad y mortalidad por cáncer en los países desarrollados. En Colombia es la quinta causa de muerte entre los diferentes cánceres. Cerca del 75% de éstos corresponde a cánceres esporádicos, alrededor del 25% son familiares, y son claramente hereditarios el 5%. De éstos, el más importantes es el cáncer colorrectal no polipósico hereditario o síndrome de Lynch. Objetivo. Analizar los dos genes más importantes involucrados en el síndrome de Lynch, el hMLH1 y el hMSH2. Materiales y métodos. En 17 familias colombianas que cumplían con los criterios de Ámsterdam II o las pautas de Bethesda, se analizaron por SSCP los 35 exones de estos dos genes y las variantes electroforéticas se secuenciaron. Resultados. Se detectaron 8 mutaciones de línea germinal en las familias analizadas, 7 en el gen hMLH1 y 1 en hMSH2, y se encontró una tasa de detección de mutaciones del 47%. Seis de las 8 mutaciones encontradas en este estudio han sido previamente reportadas en la literatura. Un cambio de una base en el sitio donador de empalme en el exón 9 del gen hMLH1 (G>A (dos familias, un cambio A>G en el codón 755 del exón 17, y un cambio G>A en el exón 18. Se detectaron dos nuevas mutaciones, una en el exón 17, un cambio C>T en el codón 640, y una deleción de TG en el codón 184 del exón 3 del gen hMSH2. También se detectó en dos familias un polimorfismo del intrón 13 del hMLH1. Conclusión. Este es el primer estudio realizado en Colombia que detecta mutaciones en el síndrome de Lynch y pretende establecer un programa integral de manejo y prevención.

  16. Intensive variable and its application

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Xinqi; Yuan, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Opening with intensive variables theory, using a combination of static and dynamic GIS and integrating numerical calculation and spatial optimization, this book creates a framework and methodology for evaluating land use effect, among other concepts.

  17. Vacuum in intensive gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matinian, S.G.

    1977-12-01

    The behaviour of vacuum in a covariantly constant Yang-Mills field is considered. The expressions for the effective Lagrangian in an intensive field representing the asymptotic freedom of the theory are found

  18. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, GSTM1, GSTT1, MSH2, MLH1, MSH3, and MGMT Genes and Radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangoni, Monica; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carozzi, Francesca; Sani, Cristina; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo; Barletta, Emanuela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical radiosensitivity varies considerably among patients, and radiation-induced side effects developing in normal tissue can be therapy limiting. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to correlate with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective study of 87 female patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast surgery. We evaluated the association between acute skin reaction following radiotherapy and 11 genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), MSH2 (gIVS12-6T>C), MLH1 (Ile219Val), MSH3 (Ala1045Thr), MGMT (Leu84Phe), and in damage-detoxification GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (allele deletion). Methods and Materials: Individual genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and single nucleotide primer extension for single nucleotide polymorphisms or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for deletion polymorphisms. The development of severe acute skin reaction (moist desquamation or interruption of radiotherapy due to toxicity) associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose. Results: Radiosensitivity developed in eight patients and was increased in carriers of variants XRCC3-241Met allele (hazard ratio [HR] unquantifiably high), MSH2 gIVS12-6nt-C allele (HR = 53.36; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.56-798.98), and MSH3-1045Ala allele (HR unquantifiably high). Carriers of XRCC1-Arg194Trp variant allele in combination with XRCC1-Arg399Gln wild-type allele had a significant risk of radiosensitivity (HR = 38.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1232.52). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report to find an association between MSH2 and MSH3 genetic variants and the development of radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that mismatch repair mechanisms may be

  19. Scenarios of future energy intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present scenarios of potential change in energy intensities in the OECD countries and in the Soviet Union. These scenarios are meant to illustrate how intensities might evolve over the next 20 years given different conditions with respect to energy prices, energy-efficiency policies, and other key factors. Changes in intensity will also be affected by the rates of growth and stock turnover in each sector. They have not tried to forecast how activity levels and structure will evolve. However, the OECD scenarios assume a world in which GDP averages growth in the 2-3%/year range, with some differences among countries. For the Soviet Union, the degree and pace of intensity decline will be highly dependent on the success of the transition to a market economy; each scenario explicitly envisions a different degree of success. They have not constructed comparable scenarios for the developing countries. The scenarios presented in this chapter do not predict what will happen in the future. They believe, however, that they illustrate a plausible set of outcomes if energy prices, policies, programs, and other factors evolve as described in each case. With higher energy prices and vigorous policies and programs, intensities in the OECD countries in 2010 could be nearly 50% less on average than the level where trends seem to be point. In the former Soviet Union, a combination of rapid, successful economic reform and extra effort to improve energy efficiency might result in average intensity being nearly 40% less than in a slow reform case. And in the LDCs, a mixture of sound policies, programs, and energy pricing reform could also lead to intensities being far lower than they would be otherwise. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  20. Energy intensities: Prospects and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the previous chapter, the author described how rising activity levels and structural change are pushing toward higher energy use in many sectors and regions, especially in the developing countries. The extent to which more activity leads to greater energy use will depend on the energy intensity of end-use activities. In this chapter, the author presents an overview of the potential for intensity reductions in each sector over the next 10-20 years. It is not the author's intent to describe in detail the various technologies that could be employed to improve energy efficiency, which has been done by others (see, for example, Lovins ampersand Lovins, 1991; Goldembert et al., 1987). Rather, he discusses the key factors that will shape future energy intensities in different parts of the world, and gives a sense for the changes that could be attained if greater attention were given to accelerate efficiency improvement. The prospects for energy intensities, and the potential for reduction, vary among sectors and parts of the world. In the majority of cases, intensities are tending to decline as new equipment and facilities come into use and improvements are made on existing stocks. The effect of stock turnover will be especially strong in the developing countries, where stocks are growing at a rapid pace, and the Former East Bloc, where much of the existing industrial plant will eventually be retired and replaced with more modern facilities. While reductions in energy intensity are likely in most areas, there is a large divergence between the technical and economic potential for reducing energy intensities and the direction in which present trends are moving. In the next chapter, the author presents scenarios that illustrate where trends are pointing, and what could be achieved if improving energy efficiency were a focus of public policies. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. High-intensity laser physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohideen, U.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the effect of high intensity lasers on atoms, free electrons and the generation of X-rays from solid density plasmas. The laser produced 50 milli Joule 180 femto sec pulses at 5 Hz. This translates to a maximum intensity of 5 x 10 18 W/cm 2 . At such high fields the AC stark shifts of atoms placed at the focus is much greater than the ionization energy. The characteristics of multiphoton ionization of atoms in intense laser fields was studied by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Free electrons placed in high intensity laser fields lead to harmonic generation. This phenomenon of Nonlinear Compton Scattering was theoretically investigated. Also, when these high intensity pulses are focused on solids a hot plasma is created. This plasma is a bright source of a short X-ray pulse. The pulse-width of X-rays from these solid density plasmas was measured by time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

  2. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  3. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiansen CF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Christian Fynbo Christiansen,1 Morten Hylander Møller,2 Henrik Nielsen,1 Steffen Christensen3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Department of Intensive Care 4131, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 3Department of Intensive Care, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. Study population: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID was established in 2007 and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. Main variables: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II. The variables are recorded with 90%–100% completeness in the recent years, except for SAPS II score, which is 73%–76% complete. The DID currently includes five quality indicators. Process indicators include out-of-hour discharge and transfer to other ICUs for capacity reasons. Outcome indicators include ICU readmission within 48 hours and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II for all patients and for patients with septic shock. Descriptive data: The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005–2015 (average 31,958 ICU admissions per year. Conclusion: The DID provides a

  4. Intense beams of light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, Noel

    1985-01-01

    Results of experiments performed in order to accelerate intense beams of light and heavier ions are presented. The accelerating diodes are driven by existing pulsed power generators. Optimization of the generator structure is described in chapter I. Nuclear diagnostics of the accelerated light ion beams are presented in chapter II. Chapter III deals with the physics of intense charged particle beams. The models developed are applied to the calculation of the performances of the ion diodes described in the previous chapters. Chapter IV reports preliminary results on a multiply ionized carbon source driven by a 0.1 TW pulsed power generator. (author) [fr

  5. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antal, Andrea; Alekseichuk, I; Bikson, M

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...

  6. Sound intensity and its measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    The paper summarises the basic theory of sound intensity and its measurement and gives an overview of the state of the art with particular emphasis on recent developments in the field. Eighty references are given, most of which to literature published in the past two years. The paper describes...

  7. Industrial Penetration and Internet Intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-C. Wu (Yu-Chieh)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the effect of industrial penetration and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whether the relationships are substitutes or complements. The sample observations are based on 153,081 manufacturing plants, and covers 26 two-digit industry

  8. Spatiotemporal control of laser intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, Dustin H.; Turnbull, David; Davies, Andrew S.; Kessler, Terrance J.; Haberberger, Dan; Palastro, John P.; Bahk, Seung-Whan; Begishev, Ildar A.; Boni, Robert; Bucht, Sara; Katz, Joseph; Shaw, Jessica L.

    2018-05-01

    The controlled coupling of a laser to plasma has the potential to address grand scientific challenges1-6, but many applications have limited flexibility and poor control over the laser focal volume. Here, we present an advanced focusing scheme called a `flying focus', where a chromatic focusing system combined with chirped laser pulses enables a small-diameter laser focus to propagate nearly 100 times its Rayleigh length. Furthermore, the speed at which the focus moves (and hence the peak intensity) is decoupled from the group velocity of the laser. It can co- or counter-propagate along the laser axis at any velocity. Experiments validating the concept measured subluminal (-0.09c) to superluminal (39c) focal-spot velocities, generating a nearly constant peak intensity over 4.5 mm. Among possible applications, the flying focus could be applied to a photon accelerator7 to mitigate dephasing, facilitating the production of tunable XUV sources.

  9. The intense neutron generator study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1966-07-01

    The study has confirmed that a beam of 65 mA of protons at 1000 MeV, striking a molten lead-bismuth target surrounded by heavy water moderator, would give the desired flux of 10{sup 16} thermal neutrons per cm{sup 2} per second to provide intense beams of neutrons and also to produce radioisotopes. The proton beam passing through a thin auxiliary target would also produce beams of mesons. The design and construction of the ion source, injector, accelerator, target and auxiliaries present challenging technical problems. Moreover, continued development for improved life and economy promises to be rewarding. The high neutron intensity is sought for research in solid and liquid state physics and also for nuclear physics. Participation by universities and industry, both in development and use, is expected to be extensive. (author)

  10. How is intensive care reimbursed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Donnelly, Maria; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2013-01-01

    Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can...... be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries' reimbursement schemes---despite all...... of them originating from a DRG system, the high degree of complexity found, and the difficulties faced in several countries when collecting the data for this collaborative work. This review has been designed to help the intensivist clinician and researcher to understanding neighbouring countries...

  11. The intense neutron generator study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1966-01-01

    The study has confirmed that a beam of 65 mA of protons at 1000 MeV, striking a molten lead-bismuth target surrounded by heavy water moderator, would give the desired flux of 10 16 thermal neutrons per cm 2 per second to provide intense beams of neutrons and also to produce radioisotopes. The proton beam passing through a thin auxiliary target would also produce beams of mesons. The design and construction of the ion source, injector, accelerator, target and auxiliaries present challenging technical problems. Moreover, continued development for improved life and economy promises to be rewarding. The high neutron intensity is sought for research in solid and liquid state physics and also for nuclear physics. Participation by universities and industry, both in development and use, is expected to be extensive. (author)

  12. Box-particle intensity filter

    OpenAIRE

    Schikora, Marek; Gning, Amadou; Mihaylova, Lyudmila; Cremers, Daniel; Koch, Wofgang; Streit, Roy

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a novel approach for multi-target tracking, called box-particle intensity filter (box-iFilter). The approach is able to cope with unknown clutter, false alarms and estimates the unknown number of targets. Furthermore, it is capable of dealing with three sources of uncertainty: stochastic, set-theoretic and data association uncertainty. The box-iFilter reduces the number of particles significantly, which improves the runtime considerably. The low particle number enables thi...

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  14. LHC Report: reaching high intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven

    2015-01-01

    After both beams having been ramped to their full energy of 6.5 TeV, the last two weeks saw the beam commissioning process advancing on many fronts. An important milestone was achieved when operators succeeded in circulating a nominal-intensity bunch. During the operation, some sudden beam losses resulted in beam dumps at top energy, a problem that needed to be understood and resolved.   In 2015 the LHC will be circulating around 2800 bunches in each beam and each bunch will contain just over 1 x 1011 protons. Until a few days ago commissioning was taking place with single bunches of 5 x 109 protons. The first nominal bunch with an intensity of 1 x 1011 protons was injected on Tuesday, 21 April. In order to circulate such a high-intensity bunch safely, the whole protection system must be working correctly: collimators, which protect the aperture, are set at preliminary values known as coarse settings; all kicker magnets for injecting and extracting the beams are commissioned with beam an...

  15. Absolute intensities of supersonic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Habets, A.H.M.; Verster, N.F.

    1977-01-01

    In a molecular beam experiment the center-line intensity I(0) (particles s -1 sterad -1 ) and the flow rate dN/dt (particles s -1 ) of a beam source are important features. To compare the performance of different types of beam sources the peaking factor, kappa, is defined as the ratio kappa=π(I(0)/dN/dt). The factor π is added to normalize to kappa=1 for an effusive source. The ideal peaking factor for the supersonic flow from a nozzle follows from continuum theory. Numerical values of kappa are available. Experimental values of kappa for an argon expansion are presented in this paper, confirming these calculations. The actual center-line intensity of a supersonic beam source with a skimmer is reduced in comparison to this ideal intensity if the skimmer shields part of the virtual source from the detector. Experimental data on the virtual source radius are given enabling one to predict this shielding quantitatively. (Auth.)

  16. High Intensity Source Laboratory (HISL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The High Intensity Source Laboratory (HISL) is a laboratory facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by EG ampersand G, Energy Measurements (EG ampersand G/EM). This document is intended as an overview -- primarily for external users -- of the general purposes and capabilities of HISL; numerous technical details are beyond its scope. Moreover, systems at HISL are added, deleted, and modified to suit current needs, and upgraded with continuing development. Consequently, interested parties are invited to contact the HISL manager for detailed, current, technical, and administrative information. The HISL develops and operates pulsed radiation sources with energies, intensities, and pulse widths appropriate for several applications. Principal among these are development, characterization, and calibration of various high-bandwidth radiation detectors and diagnostic systems. Hardness/vulnerability of electronic or other sensitive components to radiation is also tested. In this connection, source development generally focuses on attending (1) the highest possible intensities with (2) reasonably short pulse widths and (3) comprehensive output characterization

  17. Intensive treatment of leg lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy Jose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of all the problems caused by lymphedema, this disease continues to affect millions of people worldwide. Thus, the identification of the most efficacious forms of treatment is necessary. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel intensive outpatient treatment for leg lymphedema. Methods: Twenty-three legs of 19 patients were evaluated in a prospective randomized study. The inclusion criteria were patients with Grade II and III lymphedema, where the difference, measured by volumetry, between the affected limb below the knee and the healthy limb was greater than 1.5 kg. Intensive treatment was carried out for 6- to 8-h sessions in the outpatient clinic. Analysis of variance was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P-value < 0.05 being considered significant. Results: All limbs had significant reductions in size with the final mean loss being 81.1% of the volume of edema. The greatest losses occurred in the first week (P-value < 0.001. Losses of more than 90% of the lymphedema occurred in 9 (39.13% patients; losses of more than 80% in 13 (56.52%, losses of more than 70% in 17 (73.91% and losses of more than 50% were recorded for 95.65% of the patients; only 1 patient lost less than 50% (37.9% of the edema. Conclusion: The intensive treatment of lymphedema in the outpatient clinic can produce significant reductions in the volume of edema over a short period of time and can be recommended for any grade of lymphedema, in particular the more advanced degrees.

  18. Lean production of intensive cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene Gad; Bojesen, Anders; Bramming, Pia

    2014-01-01

    turnover. This is analysed in terms of Italo Calvino's Invisible cities. It is argued that Calvino's themes and prose help us understand change as a multiplicity of temporal intensities producing ambivalence and affect. We describe this use of literary abstractions as a ‘hyperbolic social epistemology......’. Through the depiction of four intensifications of Lean Production, the metaphors of Calvino's cities show how reality and illusion; hope and poverty; dreams and death and utopia and dystopia are intricately mingled and produce temporary and equally ambivalent affects of alienation, hypocrisy, self...

  19. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  20. INTENSITY DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEI, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is currently under commissioning after a seven-year construction cycle. Unlike conventional hadron colliders, this machine accelerates, stores, and collides heavy ion beams of various combinations of species. The dominant intensity dependent effects are intra-beam scattering at both injection and storage, and complications caused by crossing transition at a slow ramp rate. In this paper, the authors present theoretical formalisms that have been used for the study, and discuss mechanisms, impacts, and compensation methods including beam cooling and transition jump schemes. Effects of space charge, beam-beam, and ring impedances are also summarized

  1. Plasmas and intense laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The present article begins with a description of the laser technology required to reach the high irradiances of interest and provides a brief outline of the more important diagnostic techniques used in investigating the plasmas. An introduction to plasma waves is given and the linear and nonlinear excitation of waves is discussed. The remainder of the article describes some of the experimental evidence supporting the interpretation of the plasma behaviour at high laser-light intensities in terms of the excitation of plasma waves and the subsequent heating of plasma by these waves. (author)

  2. Intensive and critical care medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aochi, Osamu; Amaha, Keisuke; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    Eight papers in this volume are in INIS scope, respectively dealing with the scientific use of the chest radiograph in intensive care unit, xenon computed tomography cerebral blood flow in diagnosis and management of symptomatic vasospasm and severe head injury, therapeutic relevance of MRI in acute head trauma, computerized tomography in the diagnosis of cerebral air embolism, thallium 201 myocardial perfusion during weaning from mechanical ventilation, thoracic computed tomography for ICU patients, and the effect of xenon inhalation upon internal carotid artery blood flow in awake monkeys. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  3. The intense proton accelerator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1990-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency of Japan has formulated the OMEGA project, in which incineration of nuclear wastes by use of accelerators is defined as one of the important tasks. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been engaged for several years in basic studies in incineration technology with use of an intense proton linear accelerator. The intense proton accelerator program intends to provide a large scale proton linear accelerator called Engineering Test Accelerator. The principal purpose of the accelerator is to develop nuclear waste incineration technology. The accelerator will also be used for other industrial applications and applied science studies. The present report further outlines the concept of incineration of radio-activities of nuclear wastes, focusing on nuclear reactions and a concept of incineration plant. Features of Engineering Test Accelerator are described focusing on the development of the accelerator, and research and development of incineration technology. Applications of science and technology other than nuclear waste incineration are also discussed. (N.K.)

  4. Intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira De Godoy, J M; Amador Franco Brigidio, P; Buzato, E; Fátima Guerreiro De Godoy, M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to report on a novel approach to the intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis of an underprivileged population. Prospective, random study, the diagnosis of lymphedema was clinical and the inclusion of patients was by order of arrival in the treatment center where all were invited to participate in the study. Intensive outpatient therapy was performed for 6 to 8 hours daily over a period of four weeks. Eleven legs with grade III elephantiasis of 8 patients were evaluated in a random prospective study. Three patients were men and five were women with ages ranging between 28 and 66 years old. Treatment included mechanical lymph drainage using the RAGodoy® apparatus for a period of 6 to 8 hours daily and the Godoy & Godoy cervical stimulation technique for 20 minutes per day, both associated to the use of a home-made medical compression stocking using a low-stretch cotton-polyester material. Additionally, manual lymph drainage using the Godoy & Godoy technique was performed for one hour. Perimetry was used to compare measurements made before and after treatment, of the three points of the limb with the largest circumferences. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error greater than 5% (P-value elephantiasis.

  5. Beam intensity increases at the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Norem, J.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has managed a 40% increase in time average beam current over the last two years. Currents of up to 15.6μA (3.25 x 10 12 protons at 30 Hz) have been successfully accelerated and cleanly extracted. Our high current operation demands low loss beam handling to permit hands-on maintenance. Synchrotron beam handling efficiencies of 90% are routine. A new H - ion source which was installed in March of 1983 offered the opportunity to get above 8 μA but an instability caused unacceptable losses when attempting to operate at 10 μA and above. Simple techniques to control the instabilities were introduced and have worked well. These techniques are discussed below. Other improvements in the regulation of various power supplies have provided greatly improved low energy orbit stability and contributed substantially to the increased beam current

  6. Time variations in geomagnetic intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre

    2003-03-01

    After many years spent by paleomagnetists studying the directional behavior of the Earth's magnetic field at all possible timescales, detailed measurements of field intensity are now needed to document the variations of the entire vector and to analyze the time evolution of the field components. A significant step has been achieved by combining intensity records derived from archeological materials and from lava flows in order to extract the global field changes over the past 12 kyr. A second significant step was due to the emergence of coherent records of relative paleointensity using the remanent magnetization of sediments to retrace the evolution of the dipole field. A third step was the juxtaposition of these signals with those derived from cosmogenic isotopes. Contemporaneous with the acquisition of records, new techniques have been developed to constrain the geomagnetic origin of the signals. Much activity has also been devoted to improving the quality of determinations of absolute paleointensity from volcanic rocks with new materials, proper selection of samples, and investigations of complex changes in magnetization during laboratory experiments. Altogether these developments brought us from a situation where the field changes were restricted to the past 40 kyr to the emergence of a coherent picture of the changes in the geomagnetic dipole moment for at least the past 1 Myr. On longer timescales the field variability and its average behavior is relatively well documented for the past 400 Myr. Section 3 gives a summary of most methods and techniques that are presently used to track the field intensity changes in the past. In each case, current limits and potential promises are discussed. The section 4 describes the field variations measured so far over various timescales covered by the archeomagnetic and the paleomagnetic records. Preference has always been given to composite records and databases in order to extract and discuss major and global geomagnetic

  7. Intensive Care for Eclampic Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of treatment of puerperas with eclampic coma, by substantiating, developing, and introducing new algorithms for correction of systemic hemodynamic, metabolic disturbances, and perfusion-metabolic changes in brain tissues. Subjects and methods. Studies were conducted in 18 puerperas with eclampic coma (Group 2 in whom the authors used a new treatment algorithm aimed at maintaining baseline cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP, restoring volemic levels at the expense of interstitial fluid. A control group (Group 1 included 30 patients who received conventional standard therapy. Regional cerebral circulation was measured by a non-invasive (inhalation radioisotopic method, by applying the tracer 131Xe, as described by V. D. Obrist et al., on a modified КПРДИ-1 apparatus (USSR. The rate of brain oxygen uptake was determined from the oxygen content between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Central hemodynamic parameters were studied by the direct method of right heart catheterization using a flow-directed Swan-Ganz catheter. The volumes of total and extracellular fluids were estimated using 20% urea and mannitol solutions, respectively, at 0.2 g/kg weight by the procedure of V. M. Mogen. Circulating blood volume (CBV was determined by a radioisotopic method using 131iodine albumin on an УPI-7 apparatus (USSR. Cerebral spinal fluid pressure was measured by an ИиНД apparatus. Studies were made in four steps: 1 on admission; 2 on days 2—3; 3 during emergence from coma; 4 before transition. Results. The use of the new algorithm for intensive care for eclampic coma, which is aimed at improving the perfusion metabolic provision of brain structures, with a reduction in mean blood pressure by 10—15% of the baseline level, by administering magnesium sulfate and nimodipine, and at compensating for CBV by high-molecular-weight hydroxyethylated starch (stabizol, ensured early emergence from a comatose state

  8. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...... patients. We were not able to further reduce the already existing low noise levels in the ICU and did not find any association between the environmental intervention and the presence of normal sleep characteristics in the PSG....

  9. Jet target intense neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    A jet target Intense Neutron Source (INS) is being built by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with DOE/MFE funding in order to perform radiation damage experiments on materials to be used in fusion power reactors. The jet target can be either a supersonic or a subsonic jet. Each type has its particular advantages and disadvantages, and either of the jets can be placed inside the spherical blanket converter which will be used to simulate a fusion reactor neutron environment. Preliminary mock-up experiments with a 16-mA, 115 keV, H + ion beam on a nitrogen gas supersonic jet show no serious problems in the beam formation, transport, or jet interaction

  10. Human Influence on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity.We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  11. Global intensity correction in dynamic scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, P.J.; Schutte, K.; Groen, F.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Changing image intensities causes problems for many computer vision applications operating in unconstrained environments. We propose generally applicable algorithms to correct for global differences in intensity between images recorded with a static or slowly moving camera, regardless of the cause

  12. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  13. Treatment Intensity and Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aravind K.; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Hard, Jennifer; Rudzicz, Frank; Rietveld, Toni; Maassen, Ben; Kroll, Robert; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intensive treatment has been repeatedly recommended for the treatment of speech deficits in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, differences in treatment outcomes as a function of treatment intensity have not been systematically studied in this population. Aim: To investigate the effects of treatment intensity on outcome…

  14. Subjective intensity and pleasantness in taste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on intensity and pleasantness in taste perception. There is a formal relationship between intensity and hedonic value of stimuli, which can be expressed in an inverted U. The fact that pleasantness depends partially on stimulus intensity poses a problem when one wants to

  15. Analytical theory of intensity fluctuations in SASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.H.; Krinsky, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1997-07-01

    Recent advances in SASE experiments stimulate interest in quantitative comparison of measurements with theory. Extending the previous analysis of the SASE intensity in guided modes, the authors provide an analytical description of the intensity fluctuations by calculating intensity correlation functions in the frequency domain. Comparison of the results with experiment yields new insight into the SASE process.

  16. The Canadian intense neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunnicliffe, P R

    1967-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. has proposed construction of an Intense Neutron-Generator. The generator would produce uniquely-intense beams of thermal neutrons for solid-state and low-energy nuclear studies and would yield significant quantities of radioisotopes of both research and commercial value; it would also produce copious sources of mesons and energetic nucleons for use in intermediate-energy nuclear physics and in nuclear-structure studies. The primary neutron source of 10{sup 19}/sec would be generated by bombarding a heavy-element target with a continuous beam of 65 mA of 1 GeV protons. The target of circulating and cooled Pb-Bi eutectic would be surrounded by a tank of heavy water moderator yielding a maximum useful flux of 10{sup 16} thermal neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec in the region where neutron beams can be extracted. This high-energy spallation process for producing neutrons is nearly four times more efficient in producing neutrons per unit of thermal energy released in the neutron source compared with a fission reactor. Nevertheless, if energy costs for producing the 65 MW proton beam are to be within reason, the machine producing the beam must be efficient. A D.C. machine is in principle ideal but practical achievement of 1 GV is not likely within the time desired. An accelerator where the protons gain energy from radio-frequency fields is the most likely prospect. We have selected a linear accelerator as our reference design and detailed theoretical and experimental studies are in progress. The machine is based on the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility design reoptimized for continuous rather than pulsed operation. It is approximately one mile long and is expected to achieve nearly 50 percent overall efficiency. There are two major portions, an 'Alvarez' Section operating at 200 MHz accelerating the beam to about 150 MeV, followed by a 'Waveguide' section operating at 800 MHz. Protons are initially injected by an 0.75 MV D.C. accelerator. The Alvarez

  17. Analysis of energy intensity in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shigeharu; Okajima, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses the causes of the increase in Japan's energy intensity, defined as energy consumption divided by GDP, since the early 1990s. The significant reduction in Japan's energy intensity ceased in the early 1980s and has even slightly increased since the early 1990s, indicating that Japan seemingly stopped taking aggressive action to improve energy use. However, further analysis at prefecture level and sector level provides additional insight on energy intensity trends. To analyze the causes of the increase in Japan's energy intensity, energy intensity is decomposed into energy efficiency (improvements in energy efficiency) and energy activity (structural changes from the secondary sector to the tertiary sector of the economy). Our result indicates that the non-uniform energy intensity trends between prefectures are attributed to a high variability in energy efficiency. At sector level, we estimate the income elasticity of energy consumption in each sector and find that a structural change in energy consumption behaviors occurred in all sectors at different time points. The industrial sector and commercial sector became less energy efficient after 1981 and 1988, respectively, which is presumably responsible for the deterioration of Japan's energy intensity since the early 1990s. - Highlights: • We examine why the reduction in Japan's energy intensity increased in the early 1990s. • There is a high variability in energy intensity trends between regions. • The structural changes in energy consumption behaviors occurred in sector level. • These changes may be responsible for the deterioration of Japan's energy intensity

  18. Low-intensity conflict in multinational corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Andersen, Poul Houman; Storgaard, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    in four Danish MNCs. Findings: They describe consequences of low-intensity conflict and identify three types of actions by headquarters’ representatives that could lead to the development of low-intensity conflicts, namely, ignoring, bypassing and educating. Originality/value: Very few studies have dealt......Purpose: This paper aims to identify antecedents for, and consequences of, low-intensity inter-unit conflict in multinational corporations (MNCs). Inter-unit conflict in MNCs is an important and well-researched theme. However, while most studies have focused on open conflict acknowledged by both...... parties, much less research has dealt with low-intensity conflicts. Still, low-intensity conflicts can be highly damaging – not least because they are rarely resolved. Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a qualitative approach to understanding low-intensity conflict relying on 170 interviews...

  19. Sulphur mountain: Cosmic ray intensity records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, D.; Mathews, T.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the comic ray intensity registrations at the Sulphur Mountain Cosmic Ray Laboratory. The time series of intensity form a valuable data-set, for studying cosmic ray intensity variations and their dependence on solar activity. The IGY neutron monitor started operating from July 1, 1957 and continued through 1963. Daily mean values are tabulated for the period and these are also represented in plots. This monitor was set up by the National Research Council of Canada

  20. Latitudinal variation of the solar photospheric intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Rast, Mark P.; Ortiz, Ada; Meisner, Randle W.

    2007-01-01

    We have examined images from the Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) in search of latitudinal variation in the solar photospheric intensity. Along with the expected brightening of the solar activity belts, we have found a weak enhancement of the mean continuum intensity at polar latitudes (continuum intensity enhancement $\\sim0.1 - 0.2%$ corresponding to a brightness temperature enhancement of $\\sim2.5{\\rm K}$). This appears to be thermal in ...

  1. Energy Intensity of the Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław Dziubiński

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy intensity is a dependency between continuous energy intensity and energy intensity of movement. In the paper it is proposed analyze energy intensity of the movement, as the size specifying the power demand to the wheel drive and presented the balance of power of an electric car moving in the urban cycle. The object of the test was the hybrid vehicle with an internal combustion engine and electric motor. The measurements were carried out for 4 speeds and 2 driving profiles.

  2. Hurricane feedback research may improve intensity forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-06-01

    Forecasts of a hurricane's intensity are generally much less accurate than forecasts of its most likely path. Large-scale atmospheric patterns dictate where a hurricane will go and how quickly it will get there. The storm's intensity, however, depends on small-scale shifts in atmospheric stratification, upwelling rates, and other transient dynamics that are difficult to predict. Properly understanding the risk posed by an impending storm depends on having a firm grasp of all three properties: translational speed, intensity, and path. Drawing on 40 years of hurricane records representing 3090 different storms, Mei et al. propose that a hurricane's translational speed and intensity may be closely linked.

  3. Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, J.L.; Brock, R.; Butler, J.N.; Casey, B.C.K.; Collar, J.; de Gouvea, A.; Essig, R.; Grossman, Y.; Haxton, W.; Jaros, J.A.; Jung, C.K.; Lu, Z.T.; Pitts, K.; Ligeti, Z.; Patterson, J.R.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Ritchie, J.L.; Roodman, A.; Scholberg, K.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Zeller, G.P.; Aefsky, S.; Afanasev, A.; Agashe, K.; Albright, C.; Alonso, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Aoki, M.; Arguelles, C.A.; Arkani-Hamed, N.; Armendariz, J.R.; Armendariz-Picon, C.; Arrieta Diaz, E.; Asaadi, J.; Asner, D.M.; Babu, K.S.; Bailey, K.; Baker, O.; Balantekin, B.; Baller, B.; Bass, M.; Batell, B.; Beacham, J.; Behr, J.; Berger, N.; Bergevin, M.; Berman, E.; Bernstein, R.; Bevan, A.J.; Bishai, M.; Blanke, M.; Blessing, S.; Blondel, A.; Blum, T.; Bock, G.; Bodek, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boyce, J.; Breedon, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Brice, S.J.; Briere, R.A.; Brodsky, S.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Browder, T.E.; Bryman, D.A.; Buckley, M.; Burnstein, R.; Caden, E.; Campana, P.; Carlini, R.; Carosi, G.; Castromonte, C.; Cenci, R.; Chakaberia, I.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Cheng, C.H.; Choudhary, B.; Christ, N.H.; Christensen, E.; Christy, M.E.; Chupp, T.E.; Church, E.; Cline, D.B.; Coan, T.E.; Coloma, P.; Comfort, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, J.; Cooper, R.J.; Cowan, R.; Cowen, D.F.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Datta, A.; Davies, G.S.; Demarteau, M.; DeMille, D.P.; Denig, A.; Dermisek, R.; Deshpande, A.; Dewey, M.S.; Dharmapalan, R.; Dhooghe, J.; Dietrich, M.R.; Diwan, M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dobbs, S.; Duraisamy, M.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Duyang, H.; Dwyer, D.A.; Eads, M.; Echenard, B.; Elliott, S.R.; Escobar, C.; Fajans, J.; Farooq, S.; Faroughy, C.; Fast, J.E.; Feinberg, B.; Felde, J.; Feldman, G.; Fierlinger, P.; Fileviez Perez, P.; Filippone, B.; Fisher, P.; Flemming, B.T.; Flood, K.T.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.J.; Freyberger, A.; Friedland, A.; Gandhi, R.; Ganezer, K.S.; Garcia, A.; Garcia, F.G.; Gardner, S.; Garrison, L.; Gasparian, A.; Geer, S.; Gehman, V.M.; Gershon, T.; Gilchriese, M.; Ginsberg, C.; Gogoladze, I.; Gonderinger, M.; Goodman, M.; Gould, H.; Graham, M.; Graham, P.W.; Gran, R.; Grange, J.; Gratta, G.; Green, J.P.; Greenlee, H.; Group, R.C.; Guardincerri, E.; Gudkov, V.; Guenette, R.; Haas, A.; Hahn, A.; Han, T.; Handler, T.; Hardy, J.C.; Harnik, R.; Harris, D.A.; Harris, F.A.; Harris, P.G.; Hartnett, J.; He, B.; Heckel, B.R.; Heeger, K.M.; Henderson, S.; Hertzog, D.; Hill, R.; Hinds, E.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Holt, R.J.; Holtkamp, N.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Huelsnitz, W.; Imber, J.; Irastorza, I.; Jaeckel, J.; Jaegle, I.; James, C.; Jawahery, A.; Jensen, D.; Jessop, C.P.; Jones, B.; Jostlein, H.; Junk, T.; Kagan, A.L.; Kalita, M.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Karle, A.; Katori, T.; Kayser, B.; Kephart, R.; Kettell, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Kirby, M.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.; Kneller, J.; Kobach, A.; Kohl, M.; Kopp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Korsch, W.; Kourbanis, I.; Krisch, A.D.; Krizan, P.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kulkarni, S.; Kumar, K.S.; Kuno, Y.; Kutter, T.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lamm, M.; Lancaster, J.; Lancaster, M.; Lane, C.; Lang, K.; Langacker, P.; Lazarevic, S.; Le, T.; Lee, K.; Lesko, K.T.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, M.; Lindner, A.; Link, J.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.S.; Littlejohn, B.; Liu, C.Y.; Loinaz, W.; Lorenzon, W.; Louis, W.C.; Lozier, J.; Ludovici, L.; Lueking, L.; Lunardini, C.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Machado, P.A.N.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Maloney, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Marsh, W.; Marshak, M.; Martin, J.W.; Mauger, C.; McFarland, K.S.; McGrew, C.; McLaughlin, G.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Meadows, B.T.; Mehdiyev, R.; Melconian, D.; Merkel, H.; Messier, M.; Miller, J.P.; Mills, G.; Minamisono, U.K.; Mishra, S.R.; Mocioiu, I.; Sher, S.Moed; Mohapatra, R.N.; Monreal, B.; Moore, C.D.; Morfin, J.G.; Mousseau, J.; Moustakas, L.A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, P.; Muether, M.; Mumm, H.P.; Munger, C.; Murayama, H.; Nath, P.; Naviliat-Cuncin, O.; Nelson, J.K.; Neuffer, D.; Nico, J.S.; Norman, A.; Nygren, D.; Obayashi, Y.; O'Connor, T.P.; Okada, Y.; Olsen, J.; Orozco, L.; Orrell, J.L.; Osta, J.; Pahlka, B.; Paley, J.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papucci, M.; Parke, S.; Parker, R.H.; Parsa, Z.; Partyka, K.; Patch, A.; Pati, J.C.; Patterson, R.B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Paz, Gil; Perdue, G.N.; Perevalov, D.; Perez, G.; Petti, R.; Pettus, W.; Piepke, A.; Pivovaroff, M.; Plunkett, R.; Polly, C.C.; Pospelov, M.; Povey, R.; Prakesh, A.; Purohit, M.V.; Raby, S.; Raaf, J.L.; Rajendran, R.; Rajendran, S.; Rameika, G.; Ramsey, R.; Rashed, A.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Rebel, B.; Redondo, J.; Reimer, P.; Reitzner, D.; Ringer, F.; Ringwald, A.; Riordan, S.; Roberts, B.L.; Roberts, D.A.; Robertson, R.; Robicheaux, F.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Rott, C.; Rubin, P.; Saito, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schellman, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, D.W.; Schneps, J.; Schopper, A.; Schuster, P.; Schwartz, A.J.; Schwarz, M.; Seeman, J.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Seth, K.K.; Shafi, Q.; Shanahan, P.; Sharma, R.; Sharpe, S.R.; Shiozawa, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Sigurdson, K.; Sikivie, P.; Singh, J.; Sivers, D.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H.; Soderberg, M.; Song, Y.H.; Soni, A.; Souder, P.; Sousa, A.; Spitz, J.; Stancari, M.; Stavenga, G.C.; Steffen, J.H.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoeckinger, D.; Stone, S.; Strait, J.; Strassler, M.; Sulai, I.A.; Sundrum, R.; Svoboda, R.; Szczerbinska, B.; Szelc, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Tanedo, P.; Taneja, S.; Tang, J.; Tanner, D.B.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, I.; Thomas, J.; Thorn, C.; Tian, X.; Tice, B.G.; Tobar, M.; Tolich, N.; Toro, N.; Towner, I.S.; Tsai, Y.; Tschirhart, R.; Tunnell, C.D.; Tzanov, M.; Upadhye, A.; Urheim, J.; Vahsen, S.; Vainshtein, A.; Valencia, E.; Van de Water, R.G.; Van de Water, R.S.; Velasco, M.; Vogel, J.; Vogel, P.; Vogelsang, W.; Wah, Y.W.; Walker, D.; Weiner, N.; Weltman, A.; Wendell, R.; Wester, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitmore, J.; Widmann, E.; Wiedemann, G.; Wilkerson, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R.J.; Winter, W.; Wise, M.B.; Wodin, J.; Wojcicki, S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wongjirad, T.; Worcester, E.; Wurtele, J.; Xin, T.; Xu, J.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yavin, I.; Yeck, J.; Yeh, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Young, A.; Zimmerman, E.; Zioutas, K.; Zisman, M.; Zupan, J.; Zwaska, R.; Intensity Frontier Workshop

    2012-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

  4. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This article presents an overview of the physics and applications of the interaction of high intensity laser light with matter. It traces the crucial advances that have occurred over the past few decades in laser technology and nonlinear optics and then discusses physical phenomena that occur in intense laser fields and their ...

  5. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is to provide a medium for the dissemination of original works in Africa and other parts of the world about anaesthesia and intensive care including the application of basic sciences ...

  6. Development and comparison of different intensity duration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... Microsoft Excel software was used to develop exponential, logarithmic and power intensity-duration-frequency models for return period (T) of duration-frequency models for return period (T) of between 2 years and 100 years using rainfall intensity data for durations of 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, ...

  7. Treatment intensity and childhood apraxia of speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namasivayam, Aravind K.; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Hard, Jennifer; Rudzicz, Frank; Rietveld, Toni; Maassen, Ben; Kroll, Robert; van Lieshout, Pascal

    BackgroundIntensive treatment has been repeatedly recommended for the treatment of speech deficits in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, differences in treatment outcomes as a function of treatment intensity have not been systematically studied in this population. AimTo investigate the

  8. Government expenditure and energy intensity in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuxiang, Karl; Chen, Zhongchang

    2010-01-01

    The recent economic stimulus package of China has raised growing concern about its potential impact on energy demand and efficiency. To what extent does such expansion of government expenditure influence energy intensity? This question has not been well answered by the previous research. Using provincial panel data, this paper provides some evidence of a link between government expenditure and energy intensity in China. The empirical results demonstrate that the expansion of government expenditure since Asian financial crisis has exerted a significant influence on energy intensity. An increase in government expenditure in China leads to an increase in energy intensity. Further analysis compares such relationships in different economic situations. The comparison shows that such positive effect of government expenditure remains significant after the alteration in economic situation. Therefore, the results suggest introducing some measures to consolidate China's existing gains in energy efficiency. The analysis also explains why the downward trend in energy intensity is reversed in China since 2002. (author)

  9. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system.

  10. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, Inez; Dalgas, Ulrik; Vandenabeele, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2...... exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body...... composition, maximal endurance capacity and self-reported physical activity levels were assessed before and after 12 weeks. Results Compared to SED, 12 weeks of high intensity exercise increased mean fiber CSA (HITR: +21±7%, HCTR: +23±5%). Furthermore, fiber type I CSA increased in HCTR (+29±6%), whereas type...

  11. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1980-04-01

    Relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays were evaluated for 16 nuclides, 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 133 Ba, 139 Ce, sup(180m)Hf, 198 Au, 203 Hg and 207 Bi. For most of these nuclides disintegration rates can be determined by means of β-γ or X-γ coincidence method. Since decay schemes of these nuclides are established, intensities per decay of strong gamma rays were accurately evaluated by using weak beta-ray branching ratios, relative gamma-ray intensities and internal conversion coefficients. Half-lives of the nuclides were also evaluated. Use of the nuclides, therefore, are recommended for precision intensity calibration of the detectors. (author)

  12. [Quality assurance concepts in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A; Braun, J P; Riessen, R; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Bingold, T M

    2015-11-01

    Intensive care medicine (ICM) is characterized by a high degree of complexity and requires intense communication and collaboration on interdisciplinary and multiprofessional levels. In order to achieve good quality of care in this environment and to prevent errors, a proactive quality and error management as well as a structured quality assurance system are essential. Since the early 1990s, German intensive care societies have developed concepts for quality management and assurance in ICM. In 2006, intensive care networks were founded in different states to support the implementation of evidence-based knowledge into clinical routine and to improve medical outcome, efficacy, and efficiency in ICM. Current instruments and concepts of quality assurance in German ICM include core intensive care data from the data registry DIVI REVERSI, quality indicators, peer review in intensive care, IQM peer review, and various certification processes. The first version of German ICM quality indicators was published in 2010 by an interdisciplinary and interprofessional expert commission. Key figures, indicators, and national benchmarks are intended to describe the quality of structures, processes, and outcomes in intensive care. Many of the quality assurance tools have proved to be useful in clinical practice, but nationwide implementation still can be improved.

  13. Dynamic jump intensities and risk premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Ornthanalai, Chayawat; Jacobs, Kris

    2012-01-01

    We build a new class of discrete-time models that are relatively easy to estimate using returns and/or options. The distribution of returns is driven by two factors: dynamic volatility and dynamic jump intensity. Each factor has its own risk premium. The models significantly outperform standard...... models without jumps when estimated on S&P500 returns. We find very strong support for time-varying jump intensities. Compared to the risk premium on dynamic volatility, the risk premium on the dynamic jump intensity has a much larger impact on option prices. We confirm these findings using joint...

  14. Innovation system and knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this deliverable is to investigate the properties and the nature of knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship as a largely distributed phenomenon at firm, sector and national levels in Denmark. Following the guidelines previously developed in the Deliverable 2.2.1 “Innovation systems...... and knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship: Analytical framework and guidelines for case study research” I will investigate the interplay between national innovation systems and knowledge- intensive entrepreneurship by focusing on two main sectors: machine tools, and computer and related activities....

  15. Neutron intensity of fast reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    Neutron intensity of spent fuel of the JOYO Mk-II core with a burnup of 62,500 MWd/t and cooling time of 5.2 years was measured at the spent fuel storage pond. The measured data were compared with the calculated values based on the JOYO core management code system `MAGI`, and the average C/E approximately 1.2 was obtained. It was found that the axial neutron intensity didn`t simply follow the burnup distribution, and the neutron intensity was locally increased at the bottom end of the fuel region due to an accumulation of {sup 244}Cm. (author)

  16. Intense Ion Pulses for Radiation Effects Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    induction linear accelerator that has been developed to deliver intense, up to 50 nC/pulse/mm2, sub-ns pulses of light ions with kinetic energy up to 1.2...II induction linear accelerator for intense ion beam pulses at Berkeley Lab. Figure 3. Helium current and integrated charge versus time at the...under contracts DE-AC02-205CH11231 and DE-AC52-07NA27344. JOURNAL OF RADIATION EFFECTS, Research and Engineering Vol. 35, No. 1, April 2017 158 INTENSE

  17. Generation of intensity duration frequency curves and intensity temporal variability pattern of intense rainfall for Lages/SC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio Orli Cardoso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to analyze the frequency distribution and intensity temporal variability of intense rainfall for Lages/SC from diary pluviograph data. Data on annual series of maximum rainfalls from rain gauges of the CAV-UDESC Weather Station in Lages/SC were used from 2000 to 2009. Gumbel statistic distribution was applied in order to obtain the rainfall height and intensity in the following return periods: 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 years. Results showed intensity-duration-frequency curves (I-D-F for those return periods, as well as I-D-F equations: i=2050.Tr0,20.(t+30-0,89, where i was the intensity, Tr was the rainfall return periods and t was the rainfall duration. For the intensity of temporal variability pattern along of the rainfall duration time, the convective, or advanced pattern was the predominant, with larger precipitate rainfalls in the first half of the duration. The same pattern presented larger occurrences in the spring and summer stations.

  18. Intensive educational course in allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, A; Perez, E E; Sriaroon, P; Nguyen, D; Lockey, R F; Dorsey, M J

    2012-09-01

    A one-day intensive educational course on allergy and immunology theory and diagnostic procedure significantly increased the competency of allergy and immunology fellows-in-training. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Data Intensive Systems (DIS) Benchmark Performance Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musmanno, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    .... However, elements such as larger caches, prefetching, and multithreading do not address the needs of data-intensive DoD applications, which consequently operate at rates far below the peak processor- capacity...

  20. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... in the Scandinavian countries to help critically ill patients come to terms with their illness after hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the emergence and evolution of intensive care patient diaries in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The study had a comparative international design using...... secondary analysis of qualitative data generated by key-informant telephone interviews with intensive care nurses (n=114). The study showed that diaries were introduced concurrently in the three Scandinavian countries as a grass-roots initiative by mutual cross-national inspiration. The concept has evolved...

  1. Intelligent agents in data-intensive computing

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Luís; Molina, José

    2016-01-01

    This book presents new approaches that advance research in all aspects of agent-based models, technologies, simulations and implementations for data intensive applications. The nine chapters contain a review of recent cross-disciplinary approaches in cloud environments and multi-agent systems, and important formulations of data intensive problems in distributed computational environments together with the presentation of new agent-based tools to handle those problems and Big Data in general. This volume can serve as a reference for students, researchers and industry practitioners working in or interested in joining interdisciplinary work in the areas of data intensive computing and Big Data systems using emergent large-scale distributed computing paradigms. It will also allow newcomers to grasp key concepts and potential solutions on advanced topics of theory, models, technologies, system architectures and implementation of applications in Multi-Agent systems and data intensive computing. .

  2. Intensive Care Management of Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2018-06-01

    Cirrhosis is a major worldwide health problem which results in a high level of morbidity and mortality. Patients with cirrhosis who require intensive care support have high mortality rates of near 50%. The goal of this review is to address the management of common complications of cirrhosis in the ICU. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increase in hospitalizations due to advanced liver disease with an associated increase in intensive care utilization. Given an increasing burden on the healthcare system, it is imperative that we strive to improve our management cirrhotic patients in the intensive care unit. Large studies evaluating the management of patients in the intensive care setting are lacking. To date, most recommendations are based on extrapolation of data from studies in cirrhosis outside of the ICU or by applying general critical care principles which may or may not be appropriate for the critically ill cirrhotic patient. Future research is required to answer important management questions.

  3. Physiotherapy patients in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Miszewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of the Minister of Health dated 20/12/2012 on medical standards of conduct in the field of Anaesthesiology and intensive therapy, for carrying out the activities of healing in section § 2.2 intense therapy defines as: "any proceedings to maintain vital functions, and treatment of patients in life-threatening States, caused by potentially reversible renal failure one or more basic body systems, in particular the respiration, cardiovascular, central nervous system". However, in point § 12.1. We read that "Treatment of patients under intensive care in the hospital is an interdisciplinary". Annex 1 to this regulation refers to the work of physiotherapist in the ICU (INTENSIVE CARE UNITS and reads as follows: "the equivalent of at least 0.5 FTE-physical therapist-up to a range of benefits to be performed (the third reference level". [6

  4. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1978-03-01

    Results of literature survey and evaluation of relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays are presented. Evaluations were made for 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 48 Sc, 48 V, 54 Mn, 57 Co, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, 95 Zr, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 144 Pr, 203 Hg, and 207 Bi. For eight of the nuclides, the half-lives were also evaluated. (auth.)

  5. Solar flares and the cosmic ray intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between the cosmic ray intensity and solar activity during solar cycle 20 is discussed. A model is developed whereby it is possible to simulate the observed cosmic ray intensity from the observed number of solar flares of importance >= 1. This model leads to a radius for the modulation region of 60-70 AU. It is suggested that high speed solar streams also made a small contribution to the modulation of cosmic rays during solar cycle 20. (orig.)

  6. Developing data-intensive applications on Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    Hribar, Rok

    2011-01-01

    Facebook applications are becoming an important asset to companies in marketing and promotion of their services or products. For easier and more efficient marketing for companies there are many different data-intensive Facebook applications that businesses can use. Data-intensive applications require large amounts of data, the greater part of the implementation is used primarily for searching and transfering data from database. In my graduation thesis I focused on the development, transfe...

  7. Early stages of technology intensive companies

    OpenAIRE

    Muhos, M. (Matti)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to clarify the early development stages of technology intensive companies. The current literature does not offer an extensive review of stage perspectives for company growth – the overall picture of the field is somewhat vague. The evolution of this field remains unclear as well as the current state. Further, recent empirical stage models focusing on technology intensive companies have not been delineated. As companies move through their early stages, they face ev...

  8. Intensity of plant collecting in southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Gibbs Russell

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of plant collecting in southern Africa is mapped using records from the Pretoria National Herbarium Computerized Information System (PRECIS, For the entire area, over 85% of the quarter degree grid squares have fewer than 100 specimens recorded. Collecting intensities are compared for different countries, biomes and climatic zones. Future field work from the National Herbarium will be concentrated in areas most seriously under-collected.

  9. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  10. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Elsner

    Full Text Available The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1 for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93 [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  11. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  12. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin; Connors, Alanna; Freeman, Peter E.; Zezas, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper

  13. A savanna response to precipitation intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S Berry

    Full Text Available As the atmosphere warms, precipitation events are becoming less frequent but more intense. A three-year experiment in Kruger National Park, South Africa, found that fewer, more intense precipitation events encouraged woody plant encroachment. To test whether or not these treatment responses persisted over time, here, we report results from all five years of that experiment. Grass growth, woody plant growth, total fine root number and area and hydrologic tracer uptake by grasses and woody plants were measured in six treated plots (8 m by 8 m and six control plots. Treatment effects on soil moisture were measured continuously in one treated and one control plot. During the fourth year, increased precipitation intensity treatments continued to decrease water flux in surface soils (0-10 cm, increase water flux in deeper soils (20+ cm, decrease grass growth and increase woody plant growth. Greater root numbers at 20-40 cm and greater woody plant uptake of a hydrological tracer from 45-60 cm suggested that woody plants increased growth by increasing root number and activity (but not root area in deeper soils. During the fifth year, natural precipitation events were large and intense so treatments had little effect on precipitation intensity or plant available water. Consistent with this effective treatment removal, there was no difference in grass or woody growth rates between control and treated plots, although woody plant biomass remained higher in treated than control plots due to treatment effects in the previous four years. Across the five years of this experiment, we found that 1 small increases in precipitation intensity can result in large increases in deep (20-130 cm soil water availability, 2 plant growth responses to precipitation intensity are rapid and disappear quickly, and 3 because woody plants accumulate biomass, occasional increases in precipitation intensity can result in long-term increases in woody plant biomass (i.e., shrub

  14. FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT INTENSITY EFFECTS ON TFP INTENSITY OF ASEAN 5 PLUS 2

    OpenAIRE

    Elsadig Musa Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of foreign direct investment (FDI) intensity through decomposition of labour productivity growth into contributions of capital deepening, increased usage of foreign direct investment (FDI) intensity, and the simultaneous contribution of the quality of these factors. This has expressed as the contribution of total factor productivity (TFP) intensity growth in achieving productivity driven growth in ASEAN 5 (Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore and...

  15. Numerical evaluation of the intensity transport equation for well-known wavefronts and intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Granados-Agustín, Fermín.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Estrada-Molina, Amilcar; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Moreno-Oliva, Víctor Iván.

    2013-11-01

    In order to obtain a clearer interpretation of the Intensity Transport Equation (ITE), in this work, we propose an algorithm to solve it for some particular wavefronts and its corresponding intensity distributions. By simulating intensity distributions in some planes, the ITE is turns into a Poisson equation with Neumann boundary conditions. The Poisson equation is solved by means of the iterative algorithm SOR (Simultaneous Over-Relaxation).

  16. Gait Recognition and Walking Exercise Intensity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Shing Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients’ exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD was used to filter the noise of patients’ attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study.

  17. Steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Alan Anwar; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition. A number of existing schemes such as binary, Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, Lucas, and Catalan-Fibonacci (CF) are evaluated in terms of payload capacity and stego quality. A new technique based on a specific representation is proposed to decompose pixel intensity values into 16 (virtual) bit-planes suitable for embedding purposes. The proposed decomposition has a desirable property whereby the sum of all bit-planes does not exceed the maximum pixel intensity value, i.e. 255. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique offers an effective compromise between payload capacity and stego quality of existing embedding techniques based on pixel intensity value decomposition. Its capacity is equal to that of binary and Lucas, while it offers a higher capacity than Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, and CF when the secret bits are embedded in 1st Least Significant Bit (LSB). When the secret bits are embedded in higher bit-planes, i.e., 2nd LSB to 8th Most Significant Bit (MSB), the proposed scheme has more capacity than Natural numbers based embedding. However, from the 6th bit-plane onwards, the proposed scheme offers better stego quality. In general, the proposed decomposition scheme has less effect in terms of quality on pixel value when compared to most existing pixel intensity value decomposition techniques when embedding messages in higher bit-planes.

  18. Affect intensity and processing fluency of deterrents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The theory of emotional intensity (Brehm, 1999) suggests that the intensity of affective states depends on the magnitude of their current deterrents. Our study investigated the role that fluency--the subjective experience of ease of information processing--plays in the emotional intensity modulations as reactions to deterrents. Following an induction phase of good mood, we manipulated both the magnitude of deterrents (using sets of photographs with pre-tested potential to instigate an emotion incompatible with the pre-existent affective state--pity) and their processing fluency (normal vs. enhanced through subliminal priming). Current affective state and perception of deterrents were then measured. In the normal processing conditions, the results revealed the cubic effect predicted by the emotional intensity theory, with the initial affective state being replaced by the one appropriate to the deterrent only in participants exposed to the high magnitude deterrence. In the enhanced fluency conditions the emotional intensity pattern was drastically altered; also, the replacement of the initial affective state occurred at a lower level of deterrence magnitude (moderate instead of high), suggesting the strengthening of deterrence emotional impact by enhanced fluency.

  19. Analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo, M; Pinamonti, A; Cingolani, E; Grassi, L; Bianconi, M; Contu, P; Gritti, G; Alvisi, R

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the relationship between analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care. One hundred fifty-two adult, cooperative intensive care unit (ICU) patients were interviewed 6 months after hospital discharge about their memory of intensive care. The patient was considered to be cooperative when he/she was aware of self and environment at the interview. The patients were grouped as follows: A (45 patients) substantially no sedation, B (85) morphine, and C (22) morphine and other sedatives. The patients having no memory of intensive care were 38%, 34%, and 23% respectively, in the three groups. They were less ill, according to SAPS II (P memories was not different among the three groups. Females reported at least one emotional memory more frequently than males (odds ratio 4.17; 95% CI 10.97-1.59). The patients receiving sedatives in the ICU are not comparable with those receiving only opiates or nothing, due to the different clinical condition. The lack of memory of intensive care is present in one third of patients and is influenced more by length of stay in ICU than by the sedation received. Sedation does not influence the incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories of ICU admitted patients. Females have higher incidences of emotional memories than males. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  20. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M M [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A; Jovanovic, M

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  1. Infrared line intensities of chlorine monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, T.; Faris, J. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Deming, D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute infrared line intensities of several ClO lines in the rotational-vibrational (1-0) band were measured using infrared heterodyne spectroscopy near 12 microns. A measurement technique using combined ultraviolet absorption and infrared line measurements near 9.5 microns and 12 microns permitted an accurate determination of the column densities of O3 and ClO in the absorption cell and thus improved ClO line intensities. Results indicate ClO line and band intensities approximately 2.4 times lower than previous experimental results. Effects of possible failure of local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in the absorption cell and the implication of the results for stratospheric ClO measurements in the infrared are discussed.

  2. Changing land use intensity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Sluis, Theo; Pedroli, Bas; Kristensen, Søren Bech Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades the intensification of agricultural production in many European countries has been one of the key components of land-use change. The impact of agricultural intensification varies according to national and local contexts and a greater understanding of the drivers of intensification...... will help to mitigate against its negative impacts and harness potential benefits. This paper analyses changes in land use intensity in six case studies in Europe. A total of 437 landowners were interviewed and their responses were analysed in relation to changes in land use intensity and agricultural...... use intensity) versus those in the Netherlands, Denmark and Greece (decreasing). In the Mediterranean cases we observe a process where agriculture is becoming increasingly marginalised, at the same time as changes in function with regard to urbanisation and recreational land uses have taken place...

  3. Intense pulsed ion beams for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The subject of this review paper is the field of intense pulsed ion beam generation and the potential application of the beams to fusion research. Considerable progress has been made over the past six years. The ion injectors discussed utilize the introduction of electrons into vacuum acceleration gaps in conjunction with high voltage pulsed power technology to achieve high output current. Power levels from injectors exceeding 1000 MW/cm 2 have been obtained for pulse lengths on the order of 10 -7 sec. The first part of the paper treats the physics and technology of intense ion beams. The second part is devoted to applications of intense ion beams in fusion research. A number of potential uses in magnetic confinement systems have been proposed

  4. Making thermodynamic functions of nanosystems intensive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassimi, A M; Parsafar, G A

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy of interaction among particles in many systems is proportional to r -α . In systems for which α< d, we encounter nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions, where d is the space dimension. A scaling parameter, N-tilde, has been introduced to make the nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions of such systems extensive (intensive). Our simulation results show that this parameter is not capable of making the thermodynamic functions of a nanosystem extensive (intensive). Here we have presented a theoretical justification for N-tilde. Then we have generalized this scaling parameter to be capable of making the nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions of nanosystems extensive (intensive). This generalized parameter is proportional to the potential energy per particle at zero temperature

  5. Spin and radiation in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, M.W.; Urbach, D.J.; Hatsagortsyan, K.Z.; Hu, S.X.; Keitel, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics and its reaction on the particle motion are investigated for free and bound electrons in intense linearly polarized laser fields. Employing both classical and quantum treatments we analytically evaluate the spin oscillation of free electrons in intense laser fields and indicate the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the motion of the electron. In Mott scattering an estimation for the spin oscillation is derived. In intense laser ion dynamics spin signatures are studied in detail with emphasis on high-order harmonic generation in the tunneling regime. First- and second-order calculations in the ratio of electron velocity and the speed of light show spin signatures in the radiation spectrum and spin-orbit effects in the electron polarization

  6. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    will increase signal directionality in the field along with intensity thus increasing sonar range. During the last phase of prey pursuit, vespertilionid bats broaden their echolocation beam considerably, probably to counter evasive maneuvers of eared prey. We highlight how multiple call parameters (frequency......The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed "whispering" can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm......, duration, intensity, and directionality of echolocation signals) in unison define the search volume probed by bats and in turn how bats perceive their surroundings. Small changes to individual parameters can, in combination, drastically change the bat's perception, facilitating successful navigation...

  7. Workload modelling for data-intensive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study built upon the requirements of a global data-intensive system, built for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. First, a scalable method is described to capture distributed data management operations in a non-intrusive way. These operations are collected into a globally synchronised sequence of events, the workload. A comparative analysis of this new data-intensive workload against existing computational workloads is conducted, leading to the discovery of the importance of descriptive attributes in the operations. Existing computational workload models only consider the arrival rates of operations, however, in data-intensive systems the correlations between attributes play a central role. Furthermore, the detrimental effect of rapid correlated arrivals, so called bursts, is assessed. A model is proposed that can learn burst behaviour from captured workload, and in turn forecast potential future bursts. To help with the creation of a full representative...

  8. Intensive agriculture reduces soil biodiversity across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiafouli, Maria A; Thébault, Elisa; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; de Ruiter, Peter C; van der Putten, Wim H; Birkhofer, Klaus; Hemerik, Lia; de Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D; Brady, Mark Vincent; Bjornlund, Lisa; Jørgensen, Helene Bracht; Christensen, Sören; Hertefeldt, Tina D'; Hotes, Stefan; Gera Hol, W H; Frouz, Jan; Liiri, Mira; Mortimer, Simon R; Setälä, Heikki; Tzanopoulos, Joseph; Uteseny, Karoline; Pižl, Václav; Stary, Josef; Wolters, Volkmar; Hedlund, Katarina

    2015-02-01

    Soil biodiversity plays a key role in regulating the processes that underpin the delivery of ecosystem goods and services in terrestrial ecosystems. Agricultural intensification is known to change the diversity of individual groups of soil biota, but less is known about how intensification affects biodiversity of the soil food web as a whole, and whether or not these effects may be generalized across regions. We examined biodiversity in soil food webs from grasslands, extensive, and intensive rotations in four agricultural regions across Europe: in Sweden, the UK, the Czech Republic and Greece. Effects of land-use intensity were quantified based on structure and diversity among functional groups in the soil food web, as well as on community-weighted mean body mass of soil fauna. We also elucidate land-use intensity effects on diversity of taxonomic units within taxonomic groups of soil fauna. We found that between regions soil food web diversity measures were variable, but that increasing land-use intensity caused highly consistent responses. In particular, land-use intensification reduced the complexity in the soil food webs, as well as the community-weighted mean body mass of soil fauna. In all regions across Europe, species richness of earthworms, Collembolans, and oribatid mites was negatively affected by increased land-use intensity. The taxonomic distinctness, which is a measure of taxonomic relatedness of species in a community that is independent of species richness, was also reduced by land-use intensification. We conclude that intensive agriculture reduces soil biodiversity, making soil food webs less diverse and composed of smaller bodied organisms. Land-use intensification results in fewer functional groups of soil biota with fewer and taxonomically more closely related species. We discuss how these changes in soil biodiversity due to land-use intensification may threaten the functioning of soil in agricultural production systems. © 2014 John Wiley

  9. The future of intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, L; Annane, D; Antonelli, M; Chiche, J D; Cuñat, J; Girard, T D; Jiménez, E J; Quintel, M; Ugarte, S; Mancebo, J

    2013-03-01

    Intensive care medical training, whether as a primary specialty or as secondary add-on training, should include key competences to ensure a uniform standard of care, and the number of intensive care physicians needs to increase to keep pace with the growing and anticipated need. The organisation of intensive care in multiple specialty or central units is heterogeneous and evolving, but appropriate early treatment and access to a trained intensivist should be assured at all times, and intensivists should play a pivotal role in ensuring communication and high-quality care across hospital departments. Structures now exist to support clinical research in intensive care medicine, which should become part of routine patient management. However, more translational research is urgently needed to identify areas that show clinical promise and to apply research principles to the real-life clinical setting. Likewise, electronic networks can be used to share expertise and support research. Individuals, physicians and policy makers need to allow for individual choices and priorities in the management of critically ill patients while remaining within the limits of economic reality. Professional scientific societies play a pivotal role in supporting the establishment of a defined minimum level of intensive health care and in ensuring standardised levels of training and patient care by promoting interaction between physicians and policy makers. The perception of intensive care medicine among the general public could be improved by concerted efforts to increase awareness of the services provided and of the successes achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Locating irregularly shaped clusters of infection intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiannakoulias, Niko; Wilson, Shona; Kariuki, H. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    of infection intensity identifies two small areas within the study region in which infection intensity is elevated, possibly due to local features of the physical or social environment. Collectively, our results show that the "greedy growth scan" is a suitable method for exploratory geographical analysis...... for cluster detection. Real data are based on samples of hookworm and S. mansoni from Kitengei, Makueni district, Kenya. Our analysis of simulated data shows how methods able to find irregular shapes are more likely to identify clusters along rivers than methods constrained to fixed geometries. Our analysis...

  11. Solar cycle variations in IMF intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Annual averages of logarithms of hourly interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) intensities, obtained from geocentric spacecraft between November 1963 and December 1977, reveal the following solar cycle variation. For 2--3 years at each solar minimum period, the IMF intensity is depressed by 10--15% relative to its mean value realized during a broad 9-year period contered at solar maximum. No systematic variations occur during this 9-year period. The solar minimum decrease, although small in relation to variations in some other solar wind parameters, is both statistically and physically significant

  12. Cryogenic semiconductor high-intensity radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.G.; Bell, W.H.; Borer, K.; Casagrande, L.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.R.H.; Dezillie, B.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Hauler, F.; Jungermann, L.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Shea, V. O'; Ruggiero, G.; Sonderegger, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel technique to monitor high-intensity particle beams by means of a semiconductor detector. It consists of cooling a semiconductor detector down to cryogenic temperature to suppress the thermally generated leakage current and to precisely measure the integrated ionization signal. It will be shown that such a device provides very good linearity and a dynamic range wider than is possible with existing techniques. Moreover, thanks to the Lazarus effect, extreme radiation hardness can be achieved providing in turn absolute intensity measurements against precise calibration of the device at low beam flux

  13. Data-Intensive Science and Research Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Elliott, Kevin C; Soranno, Patricia A; Smith, Elise M

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, we consider questions related to research integrity in data-intensive science and argue that there is no need to create a distinct category of misconduct that applies to deception related to processing, analyzing, or interpreting data. The best way to promote integrity in data-intensive science is to maintain a firm commitment to epistemological and ethical values, such as honesty, openness, transparency, and objectivity, which apply to all types of research, and to promote education, policy development, and scholarly debate concerning appropriate uses of statistics.

  14. Beam monitoring system for intense neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tron, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring system realizing novel principle of operation and allowing to register a two-dimensional beam current distribution within entire aperture (100...200 mm) of ion pipe for a time in nanosecond range has been designed and accomplished for beam control of the INR intense neutron source, for preventing thermo-mechanical damage of its first wall. Key unit of the system is monitor of two-dimensional beam current distribution, elements of which are high resistant to heating by the beam and to radiation off the source. The description of the system and monitor are presented. Implementation of the system for the future sources with more high intensities are discussed. (author)

  15. Intense positron beams and possible experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, K.G.; Frieze, W.E.

    1983-07-01

    In this paper, we survey some of the ideas that have been proposed regarding the production of intense beams of low energy positrons. Various facilities to produce beams of this type are already under design or construction and other methods beyond those in use have been previously discussed. Moreover, a variety of potential experiments utilizing intense positron beams have been suggested. It is to be hoped that this paper can serve as a useful summary of some of the current ideas, as well as a stimulation for new ideas to be forthcoming at the workshop. 31 references

  16. Intense particle beam and multiple applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Machida, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Multiple Application Intense Particle Beam project is an experiment in which an injector of high energy neutral or ionized particles will be used to diagnose high density and high temperature plasmas. The acceleration of the particles will be carried out feeding a diode with a high voltage pulse produced by a Marx generator. Other apllications of intense particle beam generated by this injector that could be explored in the future include: heating and stabilization of compact toroids, treatment of metallic surfaces and ion implantation. (author) [pt

  17. Beam-intensity limitations in linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent demand for high-intensity beams of various particles has renewed interest in the investigation of beam current and beam quality limits in linear RF and induction accelerators and beam-transport channels. Previous theoretical work is reviewed, and new work on beam matching and stability is outlined. There is a real need for extending the theory to handle the time evolution of beam emittance; some present work toward this goal is described. The role of physical constraints in channel intensity limitation is emphasized. Work on optimizing channel performance, particularly at low particle velocities, has resulted in major technological advances. The opportunities for combining such channels into arrays are discussed. 50 references

  18. Does intensity of physical activity moderate interrelationships among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to determine whether perceived intensity of training ... intensity of training and functional capacity with various measures of health. Perceived intensity of training had marginally moderating effects on physical ...

  19. Locating irregularly shaped clusters of infection intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Yiannakoulias

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease may take on irregular geographic shapes, especially when features of the physical environment influence risk. Identifying these patterns can be important for planning, and also identifying new environmental or social factors associated with high or low risk of illness. Until recently, cluster detection methods were limited in their ability to detect irregular spatial patterns, and limited to finding clusters that were roughly circular in shape. This approach has less power to detect irregularly-shaped, yet important spatial anomalies, particularly at high spatial resolutions. We employ a new method of finding irregularly-shaped spatial clusters at micro-geographical scales using both simulated and real data on Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm infection intensities. This method, which we refer to as the “greedy growth scan”, is a modification of the spatial scan method for cluster detection. Real data are based on samples of hookworm and S. mansoni from Kitengei, Makueni district, Kenya. Our analysis of simulated data shows how methods able to find irregular shapes are more likely to identify clusters along rivers than methods constrained to fixed geometries. Our analysis of infection intensity identifies two small areas within the study region in which infection intensity is elevated, possibly due to local features of the physical or social environment. Collectively, our results show that the “greedy growth scan” is a suitable method for exploratory geographical analysis of infection intensity data when irregular shapes are suspected, especially at micro-geographical scales.

  20. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Nonunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkman Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonunions occur in 5-10% of fractures and are characterized by the failure to heal without further intervention. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy has been developed as an alternative to surgery in the treatment of nonunions. We describe a systematic review on trials of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy for healing of nonunions. We searched the electronic databases Medline and the Cochrane library for articles on ultrasound and healing of nonunions published up to 2008. Trials selected for the review met the following criteria: treatment of at least one intervention group with low intensity pulsed ultrasound; inclusion of patients (humans with one or more nonunions (defined as "established" or as a failure to heal for a minimum of eight months after initial injury; and assessment of healing and time to healing, as determined radiographically. The following data were abstracted from the included studies: sample size, ultrasound treatment characteristics, nonunion location, healing rate, time to fracture healing, fracture age, and demographic information. We found 79 potentially eligible publications, of which 14 met our inclusion criteria. Of these, eight studies were used for data abstraction. Healing rates averaged 87%, (range 65.6%-100% among eight trials. Mean time to healing was 146.5 days, (range 56-219 days. There is evidence from trials that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound may be an effective treatment for healing of nonunions. More homogeneous and larger controlled series are needed to further investigate its efficacy.

  1. Particle theory and intense hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, J.N.

    1989-05-01

    A brief overview of particle physics that can be done at an intense hadron facility (IHF) is given. The emphasis is placed on testing the standard model, light Higgs boson searches and CP violation, which are areas an IHF can do especially well

  2. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  3. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The stud......-ICU patients to gradually construct or reconstruct their own illness narrative, which is pieced together by their fragmented memory, the diary, the pictures, the hospital chart and the accounts from family and friends.......The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...... that the diary alone provided incomplete information and reading the diary did not necessarily bring back memories, but helped complete their story. The patients needed to know what they had gone through in ICU and wished to share their story with their family. We conclude that diaries might help post...

  4. Application of superconductivity to intense proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrichs, H.

    1996-01-01

    Three examples of proposed superconducting linacs for intense particle beams are presented, and in two cases compared to normal conducting counterparts. Advantages and disadvantages of both types are discussed. Suggestions for future developments are presented. Finally a comparison of estimated operational costs of the normal and the superconducting linac for the ESS is given. (R.P.)

  5. Engineering Education in Research-Intensive Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, E.; Jones, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of engineering education in research-intensive institutions are reported and key areas for developmental focus identified. The work is based on a questionnaire and session summaries used during a two-day international conference held at Imperial College London. The findings highlight several common concerns, such as…

  6. Spectral intensity distribution of trapped fermions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Trapped fermions; local density approximation; spectral intensity distribution function. ... Thus, cold atomic systems allow us to study interesting ... In fermions, synthetic non-Abelian gauge ... energy eigenstates of the isotropic harmonic oscillator [26–28]. ... d i=1. (ni + 1. 2. )ω0. In calculating the SIDF exactly these eigenfunc-.

  7. Early intensive rehabilitation after oral cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschorer, Maximilian; Schneider, Daniel; Hennig, Matthias; Frank, Bernd; Schön, Gerhard; Heiland, Max; Bschorer, Reinhard

    2018-06-01

    The treatment of oral cancer requires an effective rehabilitation strategy such as an early intensive rehabilitation (EIR) program. The medical records and data of 41 patients who participated in an EIR program and 20 control group patients were analyzed. These patients all underwent surgical resection of the primary tumor followed by microsurgical reconstruction using free flaps. The length of stay (LOS) at the acute care hospital was compared between the two groups. Four indexes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the EIR program. EIR patients stayed an average of 11.6 fewer days at the acute care hospital. All indexes showed significant improvements (p < 0.001). The Barthel Index (BI) and the Early Intensive Rehabilitation Barthel Index (EIR-BI) improved by 36.0 and 103.6 points, respectively. At discharge, the Bogenhausener Dysphagia Score (BODS) had improved to a score of 11.0 compared to the 13.9 at admission. EIR patients had a Work Ability Index (WAI) score of 25.7. Length of stay at the acute care hospital can be reduced using early intensive rehabilitation if patients are transferred to an intensive rehabilitation clinic early. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The determinants of subjective emotional intensity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijda, N.H.; Sonnemans, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that emotional intensity is determined jointly by variables from the following 4 classes: concerns (strength and relevance), appraisal, regulation, and individual response propensities. For 6 wks, 37 college students reported an emotion every week and answered questions on a

  9. Moderately acurate oscillator strengths from NBS intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    An earlier paper explored the calibration of NBS Monograph 145 intensity measurements for the purpose of obtaining useful oscillator strengths. In the present work we investigate the question of a single 'temperature' for the copper arc light sources. Statistical arguments support rejection of the null hypothesis of a single temperature. Evidence is found for a mild correction to the intensity scale, but there is no indication that the intensities drift with wave length. We reinforce earlier findings that very useful gf-values can be derived from Monograph 145 intensities for any spectrum in which there are enough accurate measurements for a calibration. For the present, it seems that such calibrations must be made individually for each spectrum, and the predictions should not be extrapolated beyond the calibration domains. A table lists interpolation coefficients for Fe I, Co I, Ni I, Ti I, Zr II, Y II, Nd II and U II. An improved formula is given to transform the Corliss-Tech Fe I oscillator strengths to the Oxford system. (author)

  10. An intensive tree-ring experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Salguero, Raúl; Hevia, Andrea; Camarero, J.J.; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, Dave; Crivellaro, Alan; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta; Hellman, Lena; Kaczka, Ryszard J.; Kaye, Margot; Akhmetzyanov, Linar; Ashiq, Muhammad Waseem; Bhuyan, Upasana; Bondarenko, Olesia; Camisón, Álvaro; Camps, Sien; García, Vicenta Constante; Vaz, Filipe Costa; Gavrila, Ionela G.; Gulbranson, Erik; Huhtamaa, Heli; Janecka, Karolina; Jeffers, Darren; Jochner, Matthias; Koutecký, Tomáš; Lamrani-Alaoui, Mostafa; Lebreton-Anberrée, Julie; Seijo, María Martín; Matulewski, Pawel; Metslaid, Sandra; Miron, Sergiu; Morrisey, Robert; Opdebeeck, Jorgen; Ovchinnikov, Svyatoslav; Peters, Richard; Petritan, Any M.; Popkova, Margarita; Rehorkova, Stepanka; Ariza, María O.R.; Sánchez-Miranda, Ángela; Linden, Van der Marjolein; Vannoppen, Astrid; Volařík, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The European Dendroecologial Fieldweek (EDF) provides an intensive learning experience in tree-ring research that challenges any participant to explore new multidisciplinary dendro-sciences approaches within the context of field and laboratory settings. Here we present the 25th EDF, held in

  11. Intrinsic intensity fluctuations in random lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molen, Karen L. van der; Mosk, Allard P.; Lagendijk, Ad

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantitative experimental and theoretical study of intensity fluctuations in the emitted light of a random laser that has different realizations of disorder for every pump pulse. A model that clarifies these intrinsic fluctuations is developed. We describe the output versus input power graphs of the random laser with an effective spontaneous emission factor (β factor)

  12. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit

  13. Heating of underdense plasmas by intense lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1972-08-01

    In this note we show that two intense driving fields with frequency much greater than the electron plasma frequency (ω/sub pe/), but with a frequency separation of nearly ω/sub pe/, will couple electron and ion plasma waves and drive them unstable. 6 refs

  14. Knowledge Sharing in Knowledge-Intensive Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Akshey; Michailova, Snejina

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a study of the knowledge-sharing difficulties experienced by three departments in a knowledge-intensive firm. The case organization is a global consulting firm that has been on the forefront of knowledge management and has won several knowledge management related international accla...

  15. [Medication errors in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Martín, M C; Alonso, A; Gutiérrez, I; Alvarez, J; Becerril, F

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of medication errors in Spanish intensive care units. Post hoc study of the SYREC trial. A longitudinal observational study carried out during 24 hours in patients admitted to the ICU. Spanish intensive care units. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit participating in the SYREC during the period of study. Risk, individual risk, and rate of medication errors. The final study sample consisted of 1017 patients from 79 intensive care units; 591 (58%) were affected by one or more incidents. Of these, 253 (43%) had at least one medication-related incident. The total number of incidents reported was 1424, of which 350 (25%) were medication errors. The risk of suffering at least one incident was 22% (IQR: 8-50%) while the individual risk was 21% (IQR: 8-42%). The medication error rate was 1.13 medication errors per 100 patient-days of stay. Most incidents occurred in the prescription (34%) and administration (28%) phases, 16% resulted in patient harm, and 82% were considered "totally avoidable". Medication errors are among the most frequent types of incidents in critically ill patients, and are more common in the prescription and administration stages. Although most such incidents have no clinical consequences, a significant percentage prove harmful for the patient, and a large proportion are avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum release boosts sweetness intensity in gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Stieger, M.A.; Velde, van de F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of serum release on sweetness intensity in mixed whey protein isolate/gellan gum gels. The impact of gellan gum and sugar concentration on microstructure, permeability, serum release and large deformation properties of the gels was determined. With increasing gellan

  17. Alexithymia and Affect Intensity of Fine Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Marion; Zenasni, Franck; Lubart, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Research on creative artists has examined mainly their personality traits or cognitive abilities. However, it seems important to explore also their emotional traits to complete the profile. This study examines two emotional characteristics: alexithymia and affect intensity. Even if most research suggests that artists are less alexithymic and…

  18. State of the Profession: Intensive English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the current state of the ESL profession for teachers in Intensive English Programs (IEPs). Because the IEP context may be unfamiliar to some readers, the author first gives an overview of the characteristics and goals of these types of programs. Second, an examination of how administrators and programs are striving to…

  19. Message Control Intensity: Rationale and Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L. Edna; And Others

    The discussions of four family-related topics by 85 married couples were recorded and analyzed to test the validity of an expanded version of the relational communication coding system developed by L. Edna Rogers and Richard V. Farace. The expanded version of the system is based on the implicit intensity continuum that underlies the communication…

  20. Material properties under intensive dynamic loading

    CERN Document Server

    Cherne, Frank J; Zhernokletov, Mikhail V; Glushak, B L; Zocher, Marvin A

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the physical and thermomechanical response of materials subjected to intensive dynamic loading is a challenge of great significance in engineering today. This volume assumes the task of gathering both experimental and diagnostic methods in one place, since not much information has been previously disseminated in the scientific literature.

  1. On calculating intensity from XPS spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, Janos

    2006-01-01

    The intensity calculation is the basis for all quantitative applications of electron spectroscopy. Unfortunately, some misinterpreted terms are used and correctly interpreted terms are misused in the overwhelming majority of publications in XPS, including most textbooks as well as accepted and proposed standards. Due to this mistake the number of the detected electrons is given as having dimension of energy (?) and also the formulas for calculating the peak area and its standard deviation are wrong. Since in all other spectroscopic fields the number of the detected particles is dimensionless, continuing this practice leads to isolating XPS from both other measurement sciences and theory, because the measured total intensity in XPS is simply not comparable to the ones derived with other spectroscopic methods or theoretically. Therefore, the basic measuring processes and terms are critically reviewed and their physically correct interpretation is given. This interpretation reveals that the error is hidden in the incorrect interpretation of both the measurement process and the measured quantity. It is shown that through using the correct interpretation both the dimensions of the intensity calculated from electron spectroscopic measurements as well as the formulas related to the intensity and its standard deviation will agree with all other spectroscopic fields

  2. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  3. Photonuclear physics with low intensity photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments in photonuclear physics are discussed that require a low intensity photon beam and large acceptance detectors. This combination is especially suitable for the investigation of photoprocesses on nucleons and light nuclei. A specific experimental setup for the electron stretcher ring ELSA is presented. (orig.)

  4. Cofactors Influencing Prevalence and Intensity of Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urine samples were collected from 657 individuals and analyzed by centrifugation, and the number of ova was determined by microscopy. ... Cattle rearing (OR=9.01; CI=4.00-20.75; P=0.00) and farming (OR=3.14; CI=1.82-5.43; P=0.00) showed significant association with the prevalence and intensity of the disease.

  5. Power curve report - with turbulence intensity normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn; Vesth, Allan

    , additional shear and turbulence intensitity filters are applied on the measured data. Secondly, the method for normalization to a given reference turbulence intensity level (as described in Annex M of the draft of IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2 [3]) is applied. The measurements have been performed using DTU...

  6. Radiologic protection in intensive therapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, H.; Juliana, C.; Gerusa, R.; Laurete, M.B.; Suelen, S.; Derech, Rodrigo D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of X-ray was a great achievement for humanity, especially for the medical community. In Intensive Care Units (ICUs), the RX tests, performed with mobile devices, add immense value to the diagnosis of inpatients who do not have the option to carry them out of bed. Following the technology and its improvements, fatalities arose from misuse of ionizing radiation, which mostly gave up for lack of knowledge of the biological effects caused by them, which leads to fear among professionals and often prevents a quick job and effectively by professionals of radiological techniques. The research it is a systematic review of the literature and justified by the scarcity of materials that reflect on the radiological protection in ICUs. For this study we found the Virtual Health Library (VHL) and Pubmed were indexed terms radiological protection and intensive care units, the search in Portuguese and English terms were used radiological protection and intensive care unit. The study aims to inform professionals of ICUs on the main aspects that refer to X-rays in hospital beds, the standards of radiological protection and personal protective equipment, thus avoiding possible damage to the biological health of workers, addressing subjects in rules and laws about the X radiation, emphasizing the protection of professionals in intensive care. It is clear, finally, that little research is conducted in the context of radiological protection of workers ICU's and this is a place that receives daily RX equipment, deserving more attention to protect the worker. (author)

  7. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 x 10 13 ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented

  8. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  9. Intensity attenuation for active crustal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Trevor I.; Wald, David J.; Worden, C. Bruce

    2012-07-01

    We develop globally applicable macroseismic intensity prediction equations (IPEs) for earthquakes of moment magnitude M W 5.0-7.9 and intensities of degree II and greater for distances less than 300 km for active crustal regions. The IPEs are developed for two distance metrics: closest distance to rupture ( R rup) and hypocentral distance ( R hyp). The key objective for developing the model based on hypocentral distance—in addition to more rigorous and standard measure R rup—is to provide an IPE which can be used in near real-time earthquake response systems for earthquakes anywhere in the world, where information regarding the rupture dimensions of a fault may not be known in the immediate aftermath of the event. We observe that our models, particularly the model for the R rup distance metric, generally have low median residuals with magnitude and distance. In particular, we address whether the direct use of IPEs leads to a reduction in overall uncertainties when compared with methods which use a combination of ground-motion prediction equations and ground motion to intensity conversion equations. Finally, using topographic gradient as a proxy and median model predictions, we derive intensity-based site amplification factors. These factors lead to a small reduction of residuals at shallow gradients at strong shaking levels. However, the overall effect on total median residuals is relatively small. This is in part due to the observation that the median site condition for intensity observations used to develop these IPEs is approximately near the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program CD site-class boundary.

  10. Collimator setting optimization in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.; Hoban, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of collimator angle and bixel size settings in IMRT when using the step and shoot method of delivery. Of particular interest is minimisation of the total monitor units delivered. Beam intensity maps with bixel size 10 x 10 mm were segmented into MLC leaf sequences and the collimator angle optimised to minimise the total number of MU's. The monitor units were estimated from the maximum sum of positive-gradient intensity changes along the direction of leaf motion. To investigate the use of low resolution maps at optimum collimator angles, several high resolution maps with bixel size 5 x 5 mm were generated. These were resampled into bixel sizes, 5 x 10 mm and 10 x 10 mm and the collimator angle optimised to minimise the RMS error between the original and resampled map. Finally, a clinical IMRT case was investigated with the collimator angle optimised. Both the dose distribution and dose-volume histograms were compared between the standard IMRT plan and the optimised plan. For the 10 x 10 mm bixel maps there was a variation of 5% - 40% in monitor units at the different collimator angles. The maps with a high degree of radial symmetry showed little variation. For the resampled 5 x 5 mm maps, a small RMS error was achievable with a 5 x 10 mm bixel size at particular collimator positions. This was most noticeable for maps with an elongated intensity distribution. A comparison between the 5 x 5 mm bixel plan and the 5 x 10 mm showed no significant difference in dose distribution. The monitor units required to deliver an intensity modulated field can be reduced by rotating the collimator and aligning the direction of leaf motion with the axis of the fluence map that has the least intensity. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  11. Intensive meditation for refractory pain and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Madhav; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer; Levine, David; Becker, Diane; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Ford, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess patient interest in intensive meditation training for chronic symptoms. This was a cross-sectional anonymous survey among six chronic disease clinics in Baltimore including Chronic Kidney Disease, Crohn's Disease, Headache, Renal Transplant Recipients, General Rheumatology, and lupus clinic. Subjects were 1119 consecutive patients registering for their appointments at these clinics. Outcome measures were 6-month pain, global symptomatology, four-item perceived stress scale, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, and attitudes toward use of meditation for managing symptoms. We then gave a scripted description of an intensive, 10-day meditation training retreat. Patient interest in attending such a retreat was assessed. Seventy-seven percent (77%) of patients approached completed the survey. Fifty-three percent (53%) of patients reported moderate to severe pain over the past 6 months. Eighty percent (80%) reported use of some CAM therapy in the past. Thirty-five percent (35%) thought that learning meditation would improve their health, and 49% thought it would reduce stress. Overall, 39% reported interest in attending the intensive 10-day meditation retreat. Among those reporting moderate to severe pain or stress, the percentages were higher (48% and 59%). In a univariate analysis, higher education, nonworking/disabled status, female gender, higher stress, higher pain, higher symptomatology, and any CAM use were all associated with a greater odds of being moderately to very interested in an intensive 10-day meditation retreat. A multivariate model that included prior use of CAM therapies as predictors of interest in the program fit the data significantly better than a model not including CAM therapies (p = 0.0013). Over 50% of patients followed in chronic disease clinics complain of moderate to severe pain. Patients with persistent pain or stress are more likely to be interested in intensive meditation.

  12. [Intensive care medicine-survival and prospect of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, A

    2017-10-01

    Intensive care medicine has achieved a significant increase in survival rates from critical illness. In addition to short-term outcomes like intensive care unit or hospital mortality, long-term prognosis and prospect of life of intensive care patients have recently become increasingly important. Pure survival is no longer a sole goal of intensive care medicine. The prediction of an intensive care patient's individual course should include the period after intensive care. A relevant proportion of all intensive care patients is affected by physical, psychological, cognitive, and social limitations after discharge from the intensive care unit. The prognosis of the status of the patient after discharge from the intensive care unit is an important part of the decision-making process with respect to the implementation or discontinuation of intensive care measures. The heavy burden of intensive care treatment should not solely be argued by pure survival but an anticipated sound prospect of life.

  13. Exercise intensity of cycle-touring events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayr, G; Pfister, R; Mitterbauer, G; Gaenzer, H; Sturm, W; Eibl, G; Hoertnagl, H

    2002-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the exercise intensity of recreational cyclists participating in a cycling-touring event. In 14 male healthy recreational cyclists heart rate (HR) monitoring was performed during the Otztal Radmarathon 1999 (distance: 230 km; altitude difference: 5500 m) in order to evaluate the HR response and to estimate the cardiopulmonary strains for the less-trained athlete confronted with such a marathon. Four different exercise intensities were defined as percentages of maximal HR (HR(max)) as follows: recovery HR (HR(re)) 90 %. All athletes finished the competition successfully. The mean racing time was 10 h 14 min, the average speed 22.5 km/h. The mean HR(max) was 188 bpm, the average value of the measured HRs (HR(average)) was 145 bpm resulting in a mean HR(average)/HR(max) ratio of 0.77. Athletes spent 18.5 % (1 h 54 min) of total race time within HR(re), 28 % (2 h 52 min) within HR(ma), 39.5 % (4 h 02 min) within HR(ia), and 14 % (1 h 26 min) within HR(an). The vast majority of exercise was done under "aerobic conditions" (HR(re) + HR(ma) + HR(ia) = 86 % or 8 h 48 min) - confirming the knowledge that the aerobic energy supply is crucial for the performance of long-term exercise. The large amount of high exercise intensities (HR(ia) + HR(an) = 53.5 % or 5 h 30 min), however, features the intense cardiopulmonary strains evoked by such competitions. The HR response was related to the course profile with HRs significantly declining in all subjects to an extent of 10 % during the course of race. Our findings show that the exercise intensity borne by recreational cyclists during a cycle-touring event is high and very similar to that of professionals. With respect to the high cardiovascular strains a thorough medical screening is advisable for any participant of such an event combining both high volume and high intensity loads.

  14. SALIVARY CORTISOL RESPONSES AND PERCEIVED EXERTION DURING HIGH INTENSITY AND LOW INTENSITY BOUTS OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison D. Egan

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure the salivary cortisol response to different intensities of resistance exercise. In addition, we wanted to determine the reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE scale to monitor resistance exercise intensity. Subjects (8 men, 9 women completed 2 trials of acute resistance training bouts in a counterbalanced design. The high intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of six, ten-repetition sets using 75% of one repetition maximum (RM on a Smith machine squat and bench press exercise (12 sets total. The low intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of three, ten-repetition sets at 30% of 1RM of the same exercises as the high intensity protocol. Both exercise bouts were performed with 2 minutes of rest between each exercise and sessions were repeated to test reliability of the measures. The order of the exercise bouts was randomized with least 72 hours between each session. Saliva samples were obtained immediately before, immediately after and 30 mins following each resistance exercise bout. RPE measures were obtained using Borg's CR-10 scale following each set. Also, the session RPE for the entire exercise session was obtained 30 minutes following completion of the session. There was a significant 97% increase in the level of salivary cortisol immediately following the high intensity exercise session (P<0.05. There was also a significant difference in salivary cortisol of 145% between the low intensity and high intensity exercise session immediately post-exercise (P<0.05. The low intensity exercise did not result in any significant changes in cortisol levels. There was also a significant difference between the session RPE values for the different intensity levels (high intensity 7.1 vs. low intensity 1.9 (P<0.05. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the session RPE measure was 0.95. It was concluded that the session RPE method is a valid and reliable method of

  15. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XIII

    CERN Document Server

    III, Wendell; Paulus, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This thirteenth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field and high-order harmonics generation and their applications. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, the interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries.   .

  16. Symmetry tests with intense hadron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    The Government of Canada has pulled the plug on funding of the KAON facility in Canada. But the science opportunities for symmetry tests with the kinds of beams that KAON would have provided remain. For example, the full intensity of kaons, which KAON would have provided, is needed to find the magnitude and phase of V td and therefore to describe direct CP violation. The combination of K + → π + ν ν - and K L o → π o ν ν - serve this purpose. A variety of other symmetry tests are possible with the kind of intense beams of kaons, antinucleons, other hadrons and neutrinos which KAON would have provided. A perspective will be given for such experiments and their future prospects, now that KAON will not be built. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  17. The Tianlai 21cm intensity mapping experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuelei

    2015-08-01

    The Tianlai 21cm intensity mapping experiment is aimed at surveying the northern sky 21cm intensity at mid-redshifts, thus map out the neutral hydrogen distribution. The experiment is named "Tianlai" which means "heavenly sound" in classic Chinese, because its ultimate goal is to use the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the correlation function or power spectrum of large scale structure to constrain the cosmic expansion rate, and determine the nature of dark energy.The pathfinder experiment consists three cylinder reflectors of 15m wide x 40m long, and 16 dishes of 6 meter aperture, for testing the basic principle and key technologies. A radio-quiet site in Hongliuxia, Xinjiang of north-west China is selected, currently the facilities are under construction, and the prototype is expected to start commissioning later this year. The experiment is run by NAOC, with members from France, USA and Canada.

  18. Plasma mirrors for ultrahigh-intensity optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaury, C.; Quere, F.; Levy, A.; Ceccotti, T.; Monot, P.; Bougeard, M.; Reau, F.; D'Oliveira, P.; Martin, PH.; Geindre, J.P.; Audebert, P.; Marjoribanks, R.; Marjoribanks, R.

    2007-01-01

    Specular reflection is one of the most fundamental processes of optics. At moderate light intensities generated by conventional light sources this process is well understood. But at those capable of being produced by modern ultrahigh-intensity lasers, many new and potentially useful phenomena arise. When a pulse from such a laser hits an optically polished surface, it generates a dense plasma that itself acts as a mirror, known as a plasma mirror (PM). PMs do not just reflect the remainder of the incident beam, but can act as active optical elements. Using a set of three consecutive PMs in different regimes, we significantly improve the temporal contrast of femtosecond pulses, and demonstrate that high-order harmonics of the laser frequency can be generated through two distinct mechanisms. A better understanding of these processes should aid the development of laser-driven atto-second sources for use in fields from materials science to molecular biology. (authors)

  19. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    Critical data science applications requiring frequent access to storage perform poorly on today's computing architectures. This project addresses efficient computation of data-intensive problems in national security and basic science by exploring, advancing, and applying a new form of computing called storage-intensive supercomputing (SISC). Our goal is to enable applications that simply cannot run on current systems, and, for a broad range of data-intensive problems, to deliver an order of magnitude improvement in price/performance over today's data-intensive architectures. This technical report documents much of the work done under LDRD 07-ERD-063 Storage Intensive Supercomputing during the period 05/07-09/07. The following chapters describe: (1) a new file I/O monitoring tool iotrace developed to capture the dynamic I/O profiles of Linux processes; (2) an out-of-core graph benchmark for level-set expansion of scale-free graphs; (3) an entity extraction benchmark consisting of a pipeline of eight components; and (4) an image resampling benchmark drawn from the SWarp program in the LSST data processing pipeline. The performance of the graph and entity extraction benchmarks was measured in three different scenarios: data sets residing on the NFS file server and accessed over the network; data sets stored on local disk; and data sets stored on the Fusion I/O parallel NAND Flash array. The image resampling benchmark compared performance of software-only to GPU-accelerated. In addition to the work reported here, an additional text processing application was developed that used an FPGA to accelerate n-gram profiling for language classification. The n-gram application will be presented at SC07 at the High Performance Reconfigurable Computing Technologies and Applications Workshop. The graph and entity extraction benchmarks were run on a Supermicro server housing the NAND Flash 40GB parallel disk array, the Fusion-io. The Fusion system specs are as follows

  20. Plasma mirrors for ultrahigh-intensity optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaury, C; Quere, F; Levy, A; Ceccotti, T; Monot, P; Bougeard, M; Reau, F; D' Oliveira, P; Martin, PH [CEA, DSM, DRECAM, Serv Photons Atomes and Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Geindre, J P; Audebert, P [Ecole Polytech, CNRS, Lab Utilisat Lasers Inst, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Marjoribanks, R [Univ Toronto, Dept Phys, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7, (Canada); Marjoribanks, R [Univ Toronto, Inst Opt Sci, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7, (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Specular reflection is one of the most fundamental processes of optics. At moderate light intensities generated by conventional light sources this process is well understood. But at those capable of being produced by modern ultrahigh-intensity lasers, many new and potentially useful phenomena arise. When a pulse from such a laser hits an optically polished surface, it generates a dense plasma that itself acts as a mirror, known as a plasma mirror (PM). PMs do not just reflect the remainder of the incident beam, but can act as active optical elements. Using a set of three consecutive PMs in different regimes, we significantly improve the temporal contrast of femtosecond pulses, and demonstrate that high-order harmonics of the laser frequency can be generated through two distinct mechanisms. A better understanding of these processes should aid the development of laser-driven atto-second sources for use in fields from materials science to molecular biology. (authors)

  1. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Li, Ruxin; Chin, See Leang

    2009-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fourth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on strong field ionization of atoms; excitation, ionization and fragmentation of molecules; nonlinear intense optical phenomena and attosecond pulses; and laser - solid interactions and photoemission.

  2. ELISE, a code for intensity dependent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1991-01-01

    The Electron ring Limits on Intensity, Stability, and Emittance (ELISE) code described in this paper computes many of the intensity dependent effects of interest to the builder of a small electron storage ring. ELISE is a program, developed largely for the author's own use, which duplicates many of the functions provided by the more general program ZAP developed by the Berkeley group. The motivation for the code was to provide an interactive system for quick answers that could be used during accelerator commissioning. A lattice program, IDA, developed earlier by the author while at Brookhaven National Laboratory, provides a good model of the type of user friendly interaction that would be desirable in such a code

  3. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science III

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2008-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This third volume covers a diverse range of disciplines, focusing on such topics as strong field ionization of atoms, ionization and fragmentation of molecules and clusters, generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses, filamentation and laser plasma interaction, and the development of ultrashort and ultrahigh-intensity light sources.

  4. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  5. Energetic particle pressure in intense ESP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We study three intense energetic storm particle (ESP) events in which the energetic particle pressure PEP exceeded both the pressure of the background thermal plasma Pth and the pressure of the magnetic field PB. The region upstream of the interplanetary shocks associated with these events was characterized by a depression of the magnetic field strength coincident with the increase of the energetic particle intensities and, when plasma measurements were available, a depleted solar wind density. The general feature of cosmic-ray mediated shocks such as the deceleration of the upstream background medium into which the shock propagates is generally observed. However, for those shocks where plasma parameters are available, pressure balance is not maintained either upstream of or across the shock, which may result from the fact that PEP is not included in the calculation of the shock parameters.

  6. Radiation control through licensing and intensive training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-H.; Yang, Y.-C.; Wu, T.-Y.; Weng, P.-S.

    1982-01-01

    Various types of intensive training courses to suit radiation workers in different fields were sponsored by both the Atomic Energy Council of Executive Yuan and the National Health Administration of Executive Yuan, Republic of China during the past seven years. During the years 1974-79, the number of radiation workers attending each training course, their age, sex and educational background are presented in detail. The typical course contents for both medical and non-medical radiation workers are given. A summary of the percentage of passes and failures of the final examination given at the end of each training course is also given. The present status of licensing for radiation facilities and workers is described, and its results are indicated. The successful control of ionizing radiation through this kind of intensive training and licensing is evidenced in the film badge records given by a centralized service laboratory located at the National Tsing Hua University. (author)

  7. Intensive integrated therapy of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    The macro- and microvascular burden of type 2 diabetes is well established. A number of recent single risk factor intervention trials targeting hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, procoagulation, microalbumuria, and existing cardiovascular disorders have, however, shown major beneficial...... effects on long-term outcome. The results from these studies are anticipated to change the future management of type 2 diabetes, and most of the updated national guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes recommend a multipronged approach driven by ambitious treatment targets. The outcome...... of this intensive integrated therapy has, however, only been investigated in a few studies of patients with type 2 diabetes. One of these trials, the Steno-2 Study, showed that intensive intervention for an average of 7.8 years cuts cardiovascular events as well as nephropathy, retinopathy, and autonomic neuropathy...

  8. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Nisoli, Mauro; Hill, Wendell; III, III

    2012-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand. These are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This eighth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on molecules interacting with ultrashort and intense laser fields, advanced technologies for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses and their applications, laser plasma formation and laser acceleration.

  9. Resolving Tropical Cyclone Intensity in Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. A.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, global weather forecast models and global climate models have begun to depict intense tropical cyclones, even up to category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. In light of the limitation of horizontal resolution in such models, the author performs calculations, using the extended Best Track data for Atlantic tropical cyclones, to estimate the ability of models with differing grid spacing to represent Atlantic tropical cyclone intensity statistically. Results indicate that, under optimistic assumptions, models with horizontal grid spacing of one fourth degree or coarser should not produce a realistic number of category 4 and 5 storms unless there are errors in spatial attributes of the wind field. Furthermore, the case of Irma (2017) is used to demonstrate the importance of a realistic depiction of angular momentum and to motivate the use of angular momentum in model evaluation.

  10. Very high intensity reaction chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, J.J.

    1975-09-01

    The problem of achieving very high intensity irradiation by light in minimal regions was studied. Three types of irradiation chamber are suggested: the common laser-reaction chamber, the folded concentric or near-concentric resonator, and the asymmetric confocal resonator. In all designs the ratio of high-intensity illuminated volume to other volume is highly dependent (to the 3 / 2 power) on the power and fluence tolerances of optical elements, primarily mirrors. Optimization of energy coupling is discussed for the common cavity. For the concentric cavities, optimization for both coherent and incoherent beams is treated. Formulae and numerical examples give the size of chambers, aspect ratios, maximum pass number, image sizes, fluences, and the like. Similarly for the asymmetric confocal chamber, formulae and numerical examples for fluences, dimensions, losses, and totally contained pass numbers are given

  11. Development of high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, M.; Kusano, J.; Hasegawa, K.; Ouchi, N.; Oguri, H.; Kinsho, M.; Touchi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Mukugi, K.; Ino, H.; Noda, F.; Akaoka, N.; Kaneko, H.; Chishiro, E.; Fechner, B.

    1997-01-01

    The high-intensity proton linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 5.33mA has been proposed for the Neutron Science Project (NSP) at JAERI. the NSP is aiming at exploring nuclear technologies for nuclear waste transmutation based on a proton induced spallation neutrons. The proposed accelerators facilities will be also used in the various basic research fields such as condensed matter physics in combination with a high intensity proton storage ring. The R and D work has been carried out for the components of the front-end of the proton accelerator. For the high energy portion above 100 MeV, superconducting (SC) accelerator linac has been designed and developed as a major option. (Author) 7 refs

  12. Reducing nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eileen; Alderdice, Fiona; McCall, Emma; Jenkins, John; Craig, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    Nosocomial infection is a common problem in neonatal intensive care. A pilot quality improvement initiative focussing on hand hygiene and aimed at reducing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants was introduced in five Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Line associated laboratory confirmed bloodstream infection (LCBSI) and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) were chosen as main outcome measures. In VLBW infants, the rate of line associated LCBSI per 1000 central venous catheter days fell by 24%. The rate of VAP per 1000 ventilator days in VLBW infants fell by 38%. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires showed a statistically significant increase in use of alcohol-based gels and increased knowledge of hand hygiene.

  13. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji' an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); Chen, Zhong-Ping [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Mahajan, Swadesh M., E-mail: mahajan@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 201314 (India)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • Breaking up of an intense EM pulse into filaments is a spectacular demonstration of the nonlinear wave-plasma interaction. • Filaments are spectacularly sharper, highly extended and longer lived at relativistic temperatures. • EM energy concentration can trigger new nonlinear phenomena with absolute consequences for high energy density matter. - Abstract: Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The “relativistic” filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  14. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Bandrauk, André D

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This sixth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on responses of molecules to ultrashort intense laser pulses, generation and characterization of attosecond pulses and high-order harmonics, and filamentation and laser-plasma interaction.

  15. Computed radiography in neonatal intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.M.; Lupi, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Authors report their experience in the employment of a computerized digital radiographic system in Neonatal Intensive Care. The analog screen-film system is replaced by photosensitive imaging plates, scanned after X-ray exposure by a laser that releases the digital image, which can then be manipulated on computer work-stations. In a period of twelve months about 200 chest-abdomen X-ray examinations in Neonatal Intensive Care have been performed using this method with good technical and diagnostic results. The use of digital radiography in the neonatal area is of high interest: this system produces good quality images, there is a reduction in radiation dose and 'retakes', the system allows selective enhancement of different structures and their magnification. (orig.)

  16. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XII

    CERN Document Server

    Roso, Luis; Li, Ruxin; Mathur, Deepak; Normand, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This  volume covers a broad range of topics focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field, laser induced filamentation, and laser plasma interaction and application. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. .

  17. Energy intensity, target level of energy intensity, and room for improvement in energy intensity: An application to the study of regions in the EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ming-Chung

    2014-01-01

    While the previous literature shows that a decline in energy intensity represents an improvement in energy use efficiency, it does not provide a target level of energy intensity, nor what room for improvement in terms of energy intensity could entail. This study establishes an indicator of such room for improvement in terms of energy intensity by measuring the difference between the target level of energy intensity and the actual energy intensity and thereby monitors energy use efficiency. The traditional indicator of energy intensity, defined as energy use over GDP, mainly estimates energy use efficiency, but is a partial effect between the energy input and GDP output. However, our proposed indicator of the room for improvement in terms of energy intensity is the total-factor effects based on the multiple-inputs model. By taking the 27 EU members to investigate their energy use efficiency using the indicator of the room for improvement in terms of energy intensity, this study concludes that an improvement in energy intensity does not fully depend on a decline in energy intensity, and we instead need to confirm whether the room for improvement in terms of energy intensity decreases. This finding is particularly relevant for energy policy-makers. - Highlights: • This paper establishes an indicator for the room for improvement in terms of energy intensity. • This study takes the 27 EU members to investigate their energy use efficiency. • A different result appears by using our proposed indicator

  18. An intense transmission spectrometer for ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport, R.J.; Howells, W.S.

    1986-07-01

    The report seeks to outline a design for an intense transmission spectrometer (ITS) suitable for installation on the pulsed neutron source ISIS. The performance of the instrument is evaluated and several examples of the areas of science made accessible are discussed. It is shown that the proposed design will represent a scientifically valuable and cost-effective addition to the present suite of ISIS instruments. (author)

  19. Intensive Care Nursing And Time Management

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZCANLI, Derya; İLGÜN, Seda

    2008-01-01

    Time is not like other resources, because it can not be bought, sold, stolen, borrowed, stored, saved, multiplied or changed. All it can be done is spent. Time management means the effective use of resources, including time, in such a way that indi- viduals are effective in achieving important personal goals. With the increasing emphasis on efficiency in health care, how a nurse manages her time is an important consideration. Since intensive care nurs- ing is focused on the care and tr...

  20. Theory of atomic spectral emission intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yngstroem, S.

    1989-02-01

    The theoretical derivation of a new spectral line intensity formula for atomic radiative emission is presented. The theory is based on first principles of quantum physics and statistical physics. It is argued that the formulation of the theory provides a very good example of the manner in which quantum logic transforms into common sense logic. The theory is strongly supported by experimental evidence. (author) (16 refs.)

  1. Making thermodynamic functions of nanosystems intensive

    OpenAIRE

    Nassimi, Ali Mohammad; Parsafar, Gholamabbas

    2006-01-01

    The interaction potential energy among particles in many systems is of the form of r^-(alpha), at least at long distances. It has been argued that, in systems for which (alpha) < d (d is the space dimension) we encounter with nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions. A scaling parameter N~ has been introduced to make nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions of such systems extensive (intensive) functions. Our simulation results show that this parameter is not capable of ...

  2. Frontiers of particle beams: Intensity limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, M.; Month, M.; Turner, S.

    1992-01-01

    The present volume is the proceedings of the latest of these joint schools, held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in 1990. This course dealt with intensity limitations and was centered on a series of lectures which could be divided into the following main categories: Self and environmental fields, Coherent instabilities and their simulation, Beam-beam interaction, Other multiparticle effects, Beam source limitations, Engineering limitations. (orig.)

  3. Unconventional Use of Intense Pulsed Light

    OpenAIRE

    Piccolo, D.; Di Marcantonio, D.; Crisman, G.; Cannarozzo, G.; Sannino, M.; Chiricozzi, A.; Chimenti, S.

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, intense pulsed light (IPL) represents a versatile tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions (i.e., pigmentation disorders, hair removal, and acne), due to its wide range of wavelengths. The authors herein report on 58 unconventional but effective uses of IPL in several cutaneous diseases, such as rosacea (10 cases), port-wine stain (PWS) (10 cases), disseminated porokeratosis (10 cases), pilonidal cyst (3 cases), seborrheic keratosis (10 cases), hype...

  4. Burnout Among Anesthetists and Intensive Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalauskas, Audrius; Benetis, Rimantas; Širvinskas, Edmundas; Andrejaitienė, Judita; Kinduris, Šarūnas; Macas, Andrius; Padaiga, Žilvinas

    2018-01-01

    Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and low personal accomplishment. Little is known about burnout in physicians. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of burnout among anesthetists and intensive care physicians, and associations between burnout and personal, as well as professional, characteristics. In total, 220 anesthetists and intensive care physicians were contacted by email, asking them to participate in the study. For depression screening the PHQ-2 questionnaire, for problem drinking, CAGE items were used. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Overall, 34% anesthetists and intensive care physicians indicated high levels of emotional exhaustion, 25% indicated high levels of depersonalization, and 38% showed low personal accomplishment. Burnout was found more frequent among subjects with problem drinking (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5-6.8), depressiveness (OR 10.2, 95% CI 4.6-22.6), cardiovascular disorders (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.7-7.1), and digestive disorders (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0). Some favorite after-work activities positively correlated with burnout, such as sedative medications abuse (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.8-12.5), alcohol abuse (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.5), eating more than usual (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.5), and transferring the accumulated stress to relatives (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.5). In contrast, reading of non-medical literature seemed to have a protective effect (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). Burnout was highly prevalent among anesthetists and intensive care physicians with two fifths of them meeting diagnostic criteria. It was strongly correlated with problem drinking, depressiveness, cardiovascular and digestive disorders, use of sedatives and overeating.

  5. Trade Exposure of Energy Intensive Sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korteland, M.H.; Nelissen, D.; De Bruyn, S.M.

    2010-04-01

    In this report we analysed the origin and destinations of trade flows between EU and non-EU countries with respect to eight industrial sectors. In addition we looked at the political pledges made during the Copenhagen negotiations last December. If we combine these two types of insights, we get an idea of the risk of carbon leakage due to EU climate policies. Our analysis shows that the EU often trades with countries that have climate policy in place. As these major trading partners of the EU can be expected to adopt similar stringent climate policies, CO2 might get a price in these markets as well and the risk of carbon leakage is reduced/absent. Trade intensities should be corrected for that. In case the EU will adopt a -30% emission reduction target, trade with Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Switzerland, Brazil and Mexico, need to be excluded from the calculation of trade intensities since those countries will adopt comparable climate policies. The average downward correction on trade intensities is 3%. If the EU eventually decides to adopt a -20% reduction scenario, trade flows with Russia, Canada and the USA should also be excluded. Those countries will then have policies of similar stringency. The average correction on trade intensities is then -8,5%. These findings have direct consequences on the allocation mechanism for some sectors, which will no longer receive free emission rights as they do not qualify as 'exposed' to international competition anymore. These sectors are listed in Table 4 (-30% scenario) and Table 5 (-20% scenario) on page 31. Yet, those sectors that are expected to face large cost increases (>5%) due to EU ETS, will still receive free allocation.

  6. Circular Intensity Differential Scattering of chiral molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, C.J.

    1980-12-01

    In this thesis a theory of the Circular Intensity Differential Scattering (CIDS) of chiral molecules as modelled by a helix oriented with respect to the direction of incidence of light is presented. It is shown that a necessary condition for the existence of CIDS is the presence of an asymmetric polarizability in the scatterer. The polarizability of the scatterer is assumed generally complex, so that both refractive and absorptive phenomena are taken into account.

  7. Statistics of spatially integrated speckle intensity difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Yura, Harold

    2009-01-01

    We consider the statistics of the spatially integrated speckle intensity difference obtained from two separated finite collecting apertures. For fully developed speckle, closed-form analytic solutions for both the probability density function and the cumulative distribution function are derived...... here for both arbitrary values of the mean number of speckles contained within an aperture and the degree of coherence of the optical field. Additionally, closed-form expressions are obtained for the corresponding nth statistical moments....

  8. Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Laura

    2014-08-13

    Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

  9. Health, Work Intensity, and Technological Innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Raouf Boucekkine; Natali Hritonenko; Yuri Yatsenko

    2013-01-01

    Work significantly affects human life and health. Overworking may decrease the quality of life and cause direct economic losses. Technological innovations encourage modernization of firms' capital and improve labor productivity in the workplace. The paper investigates the optimal individual choice of work intensity under improving technology embodied in new equipment leading to shorter lifetime of capital goods (obsolescence). The balanced growth trajectories are analyzed in this context to f...

  10. Knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship and financial capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøllingtoft, Anne; Neergaard, Helle; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses various financial issues of relevance in the context of knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship. The study can be seen as an empirical test of parts of a theoretical framework previously developed which aims at identifying and explaining some of the key factors affecting...... investigated (IT and life sciences). In closing, the paper briefly touches upon implications for policy makers, investors and business managers and for research....

  11. Intensity-modulated arc therapy simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eugene; Chen, Jeff Z.; Greenland, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present a treatment planning strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using gantry arcs with dynamic multileaf collimator, previously termed intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: The planning strategy is an extension of the photon bar arc and asymmetric arc techniques and is classified into three levels of complexity, with increasing number of gantry arcs. This principle allows us to generalize the analysis of the number of arcs required for intensity modulation for a given treatment site. Using a phantom, we illustrate how the current technique is more flexible than the photon bar arc technique. We then compare plans from our strategy with conventional three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for three sites: prostate (prostate plus seminal vesicles), posterior pharyngeal wall, and chest wall. Results: Our strategy generates superior IMAT treatment plans compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal plans. The IMAT plans spare critical organs well, and the trade-off for simplicity is that the dose uniformity in the target volume may not rival that of true inverse treatment plans. Conclusions: The analyses presented in this paper give a better understanding of IMAT plans. Our strategy is easier to understand and more efficient in generating plans than inverse planning systems; our plans are also simpler to modify, and quality assurance is more intuitive

  12. Carbohydrate Dependence During Prolonged, Intense Endurance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, John A; Leckey, Jill J

    2015-11-01

    A major goal of training to improve the performance of prolonged, continuous, endurance events lasting up to 3 h is to promote a range of physiological and metabolic adaptations that permit an athlete to work at both higher absolute and relative power outputs/speeds and delay the onset of fatigue (i.e., a decline in exercise intensity). To meet these goals, competitive endurance athletes undertake a prodigious volume of training, with a large proportion performed at intensities that are close to or faster than race pace and highly dependent on carbohydrate (CHO)-based fuels to sustain rates of muscle energy production [i.e., match rates of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis with rates of resynthesis]. Consequently, to sustain muscle energy reserves and meet the daily demands of training sessions, competitive athletes freely select CHO-rich diets. Despite renewed interest in high-fat, low-CHO diets for endurance sport, fat-rich diets do not improve training capacity or performance, but directly impair rates of muscle glycogenolysis and energy flux, limiting high-intensity ATP production. When highly trained athletes compete in endurance events lasting up to 3 h, CHO-, not fat-based fuels are the predominant fuel for the working muscles and CHO, not fat, availability becomes rate limiting for performance.

  13. LHC Report: Intensity ramp-up

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The first stable beams at 4 TeV were declared on Thursday, 5 April with 3 bunches per beam. This marked the start of the intensity ramp-up, which aims to get back up to 1380 bunches per beam as quickly as is safely possible.   The next couple of days saw fills with 47, 84 and 264 bunches per beam and on Sunday, 8 April the move was made to 624 bunches. With the squeeze to 60 cm in place, 624 bunches with reasonably high bunch intensities of around 1.3 to 1.4 x1011 protons per bunch have already yielded respectable peak luminosities of up to 2.5 x1033 cm-2s-1. Following a lot of hard work during the Christmas technical stop, machine availability is very good at the moment. The ramp-up in the number of bunches is accompanied by a series of checks aimed to make sure the machine protection systems and operational procedures are in a good enough shape to safely deal with the beam intensity. 624 bunches at 4 TeV already represents an energy over 50 MJ and serious damage potential. The next few days sh...

  14. Intense ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense beams of light of heavy ions are being studied as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers for high yield and energy. Heavy and light ions have common interests in beam transport, targets, and alternative accelerators. Self-pinched transport is being jointly studied. This article reviews the development of intense ion beams for ICF. Light-ion drivers are highlighted because they are compact, modular, efficient and low cost. Issues facing light ions are: (1) decreasing beam divergence; (2) increasing beam brightness; and (3) demonstrating self-pinched transport. Applied-B ion diodes are favored because of efficiency, beam brightness, perceived scalability, achievable focal intensity, and multistage capability. A light-ion concept addressing these issues uses: (1) an injector divergence of ≤ 24 mrad at 9 MeV; (2) two-stage acceleration to reduce divergence to ≤ 12 mrad at 35 MeV; and (3) self-pinched transport accepting divergences up to 12 mrad. Substantial progress in ion-driven target physics and repetitive ion diode technology is also presented. Z-pinch drivers are being pursued as the shortest pulsed power path to target physics experiments and high-yield fusion. However, light ions remain the pulsed power ICF driver of choice for high-yield fusion energy applications that require driver standoff and repetitive operation. 100 refs

  15. High intensity hadron facility, AGS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.Y.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    There is a large and growing community of particle and nuclear physicists around the world who are actively lobbying for the construction of an accelerator that could provide 1-2 orders of magnitude increase in proton intensity above that of the present AGS. There have been a series of proposals from Canada, Europe, Japan, and the USA. They can all be characterized as machines varying in energy from 12-60 GeV and intensities of 30-100 μA. The community of physicists using the AGS are in a unique position however. The AGS is the only machine available that can provide the beams to execute the physics program that this large international community is interested in. The BNL approach to the communities interests involves a stepwise intensity upgrade program. At present the AGS slow extracted beam current is 1 μA. With the completion of the Booster in 1990 and the associated AGS modifications, the current will rise to 4-5 μA. With the subsequent addition of the Stretcher which is under design, the current will rise to 8-10 μA and approximately 100% duty factor. The possibility of a further enhancement to a current level of 40-50 μA CW is now being examined. 2 figures, 6 tables

  16. Multicharged and intense heavy ion beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutner, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron plasma-are source (PIG), duoplasmatron (DP), laser source (LS), electron beam ion source (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance source (ECRS) from the viewpoint of generating intense and high charge state beams are considered. It is pointed out that for the last years three types of multicharged ion sources-EBIS, ECR and LS have been essentially developed. In the EBIS source the Xe 48+ ions are produced. The present day level of the development of the electron-beam ionization technique shows that by means of this technique intensive uranium nuclei beams production becomes a reality. On the ECR source Xe 26+ approximately 4x10 10 h/s, Asub(r)sup(12+) approximately 10 12 h/s intensive ion beams are produced. In the laser source a full number of C 6+ ions during one laser pulse constitutes not less than 10 10 from the 5x10mm 2 emission slit. At the present time important results are obtained pointing to the possibility to separate the ion component of laser plasma in the cyclotron central region. On the PIG source the Xe 15+ ion current up to 10μA per pulse is produced. In the duoplasmatron the 11-charge state of xenon ion beams is reached [ru

  17. Intensity dependence of focused ultrasound lesion position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Paul M.; Cahill, Mark D.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    1998-04-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of intensity loss from an ultrasonic beam is critical to predicting lesion formation in focused ultrasound surgery. To date most models have used linear propagation models to predict the intensity profiles needed to compute the temporally varying temperature distributions. These can be used to compute thermal dose contours that can in turn be used to predict the extent of thermal damage. However, these simulations fail to adequately describe the abnormal lesion formation behavior observed for in vitro experiments in cases where the transducer drive levels are varied over a wide range. For these experiments, the extent of thermal damage has been observed to move significantly closer to the transducer with increasing transducer drive levels than would be predicted using linear propagation models. The simulations described herein, utilize the KZK (Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov) nonlinear propagation model with the parabolic approximation for highly focused ultrasound waves, to demonstrate that the positions of the peak intensity and the lesion do indeed move closer to the transducer. This illustrates that for accurate modeling of heating during FUS, nonlinear effects must be considered.

  18. A Methodological Approach to Quantifying Plyometric Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Mark M; Graham-Smith, Phil; Comfort, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Jarvis, MM, Graham-Smith, P, and Comfort, P. A Methodological approach to quantifying plyometric intensity. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2522-2532, 2016-In contrast to other methods of training, the quantification of plyometric exercise intensity is poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of a range of neuromuscular and mechanical variables to describe the intensity of plyometric exercises. Seven male recreationally active subjects performed a series of 7 plyometric exercises. Neuromuscular activity was measured using surface electromyography (SEMG) at vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF). Surface electromyography data were divided into concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) phases of movement. Mechanical output was measured by ground reaction forces and processed to provide peak impact ground reaction force (PF), peak eccentric power (PEP), and impulse (IMP). Statistical analysis was conducted to assess the reliability intraclass correlation coefficient and sensitivity smallest detectable difference of all variables. Mean values of SEMG demonstrate high reliability (r ≥ 0.82), excluding ECC VL during a 40-cm drop jump (r = 0.74). PF, PEP, and IMP demonstrated high reliability (r ≥ 0.85). Statistical power for force variables was excellent (power = 1.0), and good for SEMG (power ≥0.86) excluding CON BF (power = 0.57). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in CON SEMG between exercises. Eccentric phase SEMG only distinguished between exercises involving a landing and those that did not (percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction [%MVIC] = no landing -65 ± 5, landing -140 ± 8). Peak eccentric power, PF, and IMP all distinguished between exercises. In conclusion, CON neuromuscular activity does not appear to vary when intent is maximal, whereas ECC activity is dependent on the presence of a landing. Force characteristics provide a reliable and sensitive measure enabling precise description of intensity

  19. River flooding due to intense precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, James C.

    2014-01-01

    River stage can rise and cause site flooding due to local intense precipitation (LIP), dam failures, snow melt in conjunction with precipitation or dam failures, etc. As part of the re-evaluation of the design basis as well as the PRA analysis of other external events, the likelihood and consequence of river flooding leading to the site flooding need to be examined more rigorously. To evaluate the effects of intense precipitation on site structures, the site watershed hydrology and pond storage are calculated. To determine if river flooding can cause damage to risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSC), water surface elevations are analyzed. Typically, the amount and rate of the input water is determined first. For intense precipitation, the fraction of the rainfall in the watershed drainage area not infiltrated into the ground is collected in the river and contributes to the rise of river water elevation. For design basis analysis, the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) is evaluated using the Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) based on the site topography/configuration. The peak runoff flow rate and water surface elevations resulting from the precipitation induced flooding can then be estimated. The runoff flow hydrograph and peak discharge flows can be developed using the synthetic hydrograph method. The standard step method can then be used to determine the water surface elevations along the river channel. Thus, the flood water from the local intense precipitation storm and excess runoff from the nearby river can be evaluated to calculate the water surface elevations, which can be compared with the station grade floor elevation to determine the effects of site flooding on risk-significant SSCs. The analysis needs to consider any possible diversion flow and the effects of changes to the site configurations. Typically, the analysis is performed based on conservative peak rainfall intensity and the assumptions of failure of the site drainage facilities

  20. Provincial energy intensity in China: The role of urbanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Huijie

    2015-01-01

    Chinese policymakers have attached great importance to energy intensity reduction. However, the unprecedented urbanization process exercises additional pressure on the realization of energy intensity reduction targets. A better understanding of the impacts of urbanization is necessary for designing effective policies aimed at reaching the next energy intensity reduction targets. This paper empirically investigates the impacts of urbanization on China's aggregate and disaggregated energy intensities using a balanced panel dataset of 30 provinces covering the period from 2000 to 2012 and panel estimation techniques. The results show that urbanization significantly increases aggregate energy intensity, electricity intensity and coal intensity. - Highlights: • This paper investigates the determinants of China's energy intensity. • Urbanization is responsible for the increase in China's energy intensity. • The fluctuation in China's energy intensity is also affected by other key factors.

  1. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-12-14

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-{beta} region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the {phi}{sub s}=0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs

  2. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  3. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-β region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the φ s =0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs, no beam

  4. Intense harmonic generation from various ablation media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, T.; Elouga, L.; Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H.; Ganeev, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. High-order harmonic generation (HHG) is a unique source of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation, which can produce soft x-rays within the spectral 'water-window' (between 2.3 and 4.4 nm), and ultimately short pulses with attosecond duration. However, the intensity of present-day harmonics is still low, and serious applications will need an increase of the conversion efficiency. Instead of using gas media, one can also use ablation material, produced on solid targets using a low-intensity prepulse, as the nonlinear medium to generate high-order harmonics. Recently, we have successfully demonstrated the generation of up to the 63 rd harmonic (λ = 12.6 nm) of a Ti:sapphire laser radiation using boron ablation, and a strong enhancement in the intensity of the 13 th harmonic from indium ablation. These harmonics were generated with a modest laser (10 mJ, 150 fs) and with the pre-pulse to main pulse energy ratio constant. In this paper, we perform systematic investigations of ablation harmonics, using the 200 mJ, 30 fs Ti:sapphire beam line of the Canadian Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility. ALLS allows studying ablation harmonics over wider experimental parameters, and with independent control over the pre-pulse and main pulse energies. The 10 Hz, 200 mJ Ti:sapphire beam line of ALLS is divided into two beams. Each beam has its own energy control system, which allows independent control over the energy of each beam. One of the beams is used as a pre-pulse for creating ablation, which is focused onto the solid target without pulse compression, with pulse duration of 200 ps. The second beam is used as the main pulse for harmonic generation. The main pulse is delayed in time relative to the pre-pulse by propagating through an optical delay line, and then sent through a pulse compressor. The compressed pulse duration have typical pulse duration of 30 fs FWHM, which is then focused onto the ablation medium using MgF 2

  5. Active Provenance in Data-intensive Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Mihajlovski, Andrej; Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm

    2017-04-01

    Scientific communities are building platforms where the usage of data-intensive workflows is crucial to conduct their research campaigns. However managing and effectively support the understanding of the 'live' processes, fostering computational steering, sharing and re-use of data and methods, present several bottlenecks. These are often caused by the poor level of documentation on the methods and the data and how users interact with it. This work wants to explore how in such systems, flexibility in the management of the provenance and its adaptation to the different users and application contexts can lead to new opportunities for its exploitation, improving productivity. In particular, this work illustrates a conceptual and technical framework enabling tunable and actionable provenance in data-intensive workflow systems in support of reproducible science. It introduces the concept of Agile data-intensive systems to define the characteristic of our target platform. It shows a novel approach to the integration of provenance mechanisms, offering flexibility in the scale and in the precision of the provenance data collected, ensuring its relevance to the domain of the data-intensive task, fostering its rapid exploitation. The contributions address aspects of the scale of the provenance records, their usability and active role in the research life-cycle. We will discuss the use of dynamically generated provenance types as the approach for the integration of provenance mechanisms into a data-intensive workflow system. Enabling provenance can be transparent to the workflow user and developer, as well as fully controllable and customisable, depending from their expertise and the application's reproducibility, monitoring and validation requirements. The API that allows the realisation and adoption of a provenance type is presented, especially for what concerns the support of provenance profiling, contextualisation and precision. An actionable approach to provenance

  6. Nitrification inhibitors mitigated reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity in intensive vegetable soils from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changhua; Li, Bo; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2018-01-15

    Nitrification inhibitors, a promising tool for reducing nitrous oxide (N 2 O) losses and promoting nitrogen use efficiency by slowing nitrification, have gained extensive attention worldwide. However, there have been few attempts to explore the broad responses of multiple reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions of N 2 O, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH 3 ) and vegetable yield to nitrification inhibitor applications across intensive vegetable soils in China. A greenhouse pot experiment with five consecutive vegetable crops was performed to assess the efficacies of two nitrification inhibitors, namely, nitrapyrin and dicyandiamide on reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions, vegetable yield and reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity in four typical vegetable soils representing the intensive vegetable cropping systems across mainland China: an Acrisol from Hunan Province, an Anthrosol from Shanxi Province, a Cambisol from Shandong Province and a Phaeozem from Heilongjiang Province. The results showed soil type had significant influences on reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity, with reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and yield mainly driven by soil factors: pH, nitrate, C:N ratio, cation exchange capacity and microbial biomass carbon. The highest reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity were in Acrisol while the highest vegetable yield occurred in Phaeozem. Nitrification inhibitor applications decreased N 2 O and NO emissions by 1.8-61.0% and 0.8-79.5%, respectively, but promoted NH 3 volatilization by 3.2-44.6% across all soils. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were observed between inhibited N 2 O+NO and stimulated NH 3 emissions with nitrification inhibitor additions across all soils, indicating that reduced nitrification posed the threat of NH 3 losses. Additionally, reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity was significantly reduced in the Anthrosol and Cambisol due to the reduced reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and increased

  7. Kinetic Analysis of Horizontal Plyometric Exercise Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossow, Andrew J; Ebben, William P

    2018-05-01

    Kossow, AJ, DeChiara, TG, Neahous, SM, and Ebben, WP. Kinetic analysis of horizontal plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1222-1229, 2018-Plyometric exercises are frequently performed as part of a strength and conditioning program. Most studies assessed the kinetics of plyometric exercises primarily performed in the vertical plane. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the multiplanar kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises, which have a significant horizontal component. This study also sought to assess sex differences in the intensity progression of these exercises. Ten men and 10 women served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including the double-leg hop, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, bounding, skipping, power skipping, cone hops, and 45.72-cm hurdle hops. Subjects also performed the countermovement jump for comparison. All plyometric exercises were evaluated using a force platform. Dependent variables included the landing rate of force development and landing ground reaction forces for each exercise in the vertical, frontal, and sagittal planes. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated-measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type for all dependent variables (p ≤ 0.001). There was no significant interaction between plyometric exercise type and sex for any of the variable assessed. Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the dependent variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings should be used to guide practitioners in the progression of plyometric exercise intensity, and thus program design, for those who require significant horizontal power in their sport.

  8. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Garceau, Luke R; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-12-01

    Ebben, WP, Fauth, ML, Garceau, LR, and Petushek, EJ. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3288-3298, 2011-Quantification of plyometric exercise intensity is necessary to understand the characteristics of these exercises and the proper progression of this mode of exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises. This study also sought to assess gender differences in these variables. Twenty-six men and 23 women with previous experience in performing plyometric training served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including line hops, 15.24-cm cone hops, squat jumps, tuck jumps, countermovement jumps (CMJs), loaded CMJs equal to 30% of 1 repetition maximum squat, depth jumps normalized to the subject's jump height (JH), and single leg jumps. All plyometric exercises were assessed with a force platform. Outcome variables associated with the takeoff, airborne, and landing phase of each plyometric exercise were evaluated. These variables included the peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF) during takeoff, the time to takeoff, flight time, JH, peak power, landing rate of force development, and peak vertical GRF during landing. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type and all outcome variables (p ≤ 0.05) and for the interaction between gender and peak vertical GRF during takeoff (p ≤ 0.05). Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the outcome variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings can be used to guide the progression of plyometric training by incorporating exercises of increasing intensity over the course of a program.

  9. Development of a high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ito, Nobuo; Oguri, Hidetomo; Touchi, Yutaka; Mukugi, Ken; Ino, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    The high-intensity proton linear accelerator with a beam power of 15 MW has been proposed for various engineering tests for the nuclear waste transmutation system as one of the research plans in the Neutron Science Research Program (NSRP) in JAERI. High intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beam generated from the proton spallation reaction will be utilized at these facilities in each research field. The R and D work has been carried out for the components of the front-end part of the proton accelerator; ion source, RFQ, DTL and RF source. In the beam test, the current of 70 mA with a duty factor of 7% has been accelerated from the RFQ at the energy of 2 MeV. A hot test model of the DTL for the high power and high duty operation was fabricated and tested. For the high energy portion above 100 MeV, superconducting accelerating cavity is studied as a main option. The superconducting linac is expected to have several favourable characteristics for high intensity accelerator such as short accelerator length, large bore radius resulting in low beam losses and cost effectiveness for construction and operation. A test stand with equipment of cryogenics system, vacuum system, RF system and cavity processing and cleaning is prepared to test the physics issues and fabrication process. The proposed plan for accelerator design and construction will compose of two consecutive stages. The first stage will be completed in about 7 years with the beam power of 1.5 MW. As the second stage gradual upgrading of the beam power will be made up to 15 MW. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Capital effectiveness in a capital intensive project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarossi, M.E. (IPA Institute, The Hague (Netherlands))

    2009-07-01

    The technical difficulty of incorporating new technology in capital intensive projects has been underestimated. Bio-refineries projects are no exemption. These projects in many occasions have assigned inadequate project resources, such as lean project teams and overly optimistic contingencies. Furthermore, project developers have set unrealistic expectations; for example: aggressive schedule duration, low cost targets and optimistic operability targets. These project drivers set before project's authorization compromise the project's outcome. In many cases, this translates into lower return on investment, higher costs, and lower operability. In order to counteract these outcomes, it is critical for capital intensive projects, like bio-refineries, to have a well define project which will enable to increase its chance of success. IPA's research has shown that bio-refineries projects have poor project performance due to poor project practices, lack of owner project controls and inadequate change management. An adequate risk analysis during definition is a critical component of a project's success, especially when there is new technology, like biomass conversion. It is of outmost importance to asses this technology and set realistic expectations. parallel to this, there is a need to have a well established execution strategy, which should be maintained throughout the execution of the project. In conclusion, IPA's research has indicated that bio-refineries, as any other capital intensive project, need to assign adequate resources at an early state of project development, by making sure there is and adequate team in place, reasonable schedule, technical difficulties evaluation, and keeping control during execution. Although these elements might be seen as common practices that should be taken into account when developing a project, many projects being their execution without having a proper foundation, and thus affecting the project

  11. Origin of transient cosmic ray intensity variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggal, S.P.; Pomerantz, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    A new approach to determining the solar progenitor of transient cosmic ray intensity variations has revealed that in a statistical sense, solar flares, heretofore regarded as the predominant source of the modulation, actually do not precede the reduction in flux observed at earth. Superposed epoch analysis of the cosmic ray data with respect to the time of occurrence of all 379 solar flares of importance (Imp) < or =2 observed during solar cycle 20 (1964-1974 inclusive) shows that the onset of a decrease in the composite nucleonic intensity at polar stations occurs prior to the zero day (i.e., time of the flare) well before the arrival in the vicinity of earth of the associated solar plasma. The statistical significance of this result is confirmed by comparing the pooled variance determined from Chree analysis of an equal number of random epochs with that of the curve representing the flare epochs. Subdivision of the latter into three groups according to the heliographic longitude of the flares shows that whereas eastern flares might be associated with cosmic ray decreases, central (30degree to -30degree) and western flares cannot be thus related. A similar analysis of all flares of Imp< or =2 that occurred in a selected set of 24 extraordinary flare-rich active centers during 1964--1974 confirms these results and shows that the observed cosmic ray intensity decrease is, in fact, associated with the central meridian passage ( +- 1 day) of the active regions. Thus earlier conclusions concerning relationships between the heliolongitude of flares and their apparent effectiveness in producing Forbush decreases require reevaluation. The specific feature associated with solar active centers that is actually the principal source of transient modulations remanins to be identified

  12. Hand hygiene in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Pargger, Hans; Widmer, Andreas F

    2010-08-01

    Healthcare-associated infections affect 1.4 million patients at any time worldwide, as estimated by the World Health Organization. In intensive care units, the burden of healthcare-associated infections is greatly increased, causing additional morbidity and mortality. Multidrug-resistant pathogens are commonly involved in such infections and render effective treatment challenging. Proper hand hygiene is the single most important, simplest, and least expensive means of preventing healthcare-associated infections. In addition, it is equally important to stop transmission of multidrug-resistant pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene in health care, alcohol-based handrub should be used as the preferred means for routine hand antisepsis. Alcohols have excellent in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a variety of fungi, and most viruses. Some pathogens, however, such as Clostridium difficile, Bacillus anthracis, and noroviruses, may require special hand hygiene measures. Failure to provide user friendliness of hand hygiene equipment and shortage of staff are predictors for noncompliance, especially in the intensive care unit setting. Therefore, practical approaches to promote hand hygiene in the intensive care unit include provision of a minimal number of handrub dispensers per bed, monitoring of compliance, and choice of the most attractive product. Lack of knowledge of guidelines for hand hygiene, lack of recognition of hand hygiene opportunities during patient care, and lack of awareness of the risk of cross-transmission of pathogens are barriers to good hand hygiene practices. Multidisciplinary programs to promote increased use of alcoholic handrub lead to an increased compliance of healthcare

  13. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  14. Moderate and high intensity pulsed electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Timmermans, Rian Adriana Hendrika

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) processing has gained a lot of interest the last decades as mild processing technology as alternative to thermal pasteurisation, and is suitable for preservation of liquid food products such as fruit juices. PEF conditions typically applied at industrial scale for pasteurisation are high intensity pulsed electric fields aiming for minimal heat load, with an electric field strength (E) in the range of 15 − 20 kV/cm and pulse width (τ) between 2 − 20 μs. Alternativel...

  15. Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W.; Worlton, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1981 the average proton currents at IPNS has increased substantially. The reliability has averaged 91%. The moderator has changed from a room temperature polyethylene to cryogenic methane. This report details progress made at IPNS (Intense Pulsed Neutron Source) during the last two years. The topics discussed are the operating status of the accelerator systems, other accelerator activities (such as, IPNS participation in SDI), instrumentation operating at IPNS, chopper development at IPNS, data acquisition, Booster target, moderators and examples of recent scientific results. The ever increasing instrument capability, the Booster target and the very active involvement with the scientific user community guarantees a productive scientific future at IPNS. 9 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science II

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This book series addresses a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field, Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. Its progress is being stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Highlights of this second volume include Coulomb explosion and fragmentation of molecules, control of chemical dynamics, high-order harmonic generation, propagation and filamentation, and laser-plasma interaction. All chapters are authored by foremost experts in their fields and the texts are written at a level accessible to newcomers and graduate students, each chapter beginning with an introductory overview.

  17. Cloud computing for data-intensive applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a range of cloud computing platforms for data-intensive scientific applications. It covers systems that deliver infrastructure as a service, including: HPC as a service; virtual networks as a service; scalable and reliable storage; algorithms that manage vast cloud resources and applications runtime; and programming models that enable pragmatic programming and implementation toolkits for eScience applications. Many scientific applications in clouds are also introduced, such as bioinformatics, biology, weather forecasting and social networks. Most chapters include case studie

  18. Interaction of Intense Lasers with Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvets, Gennady

    1995-01-01

    This thesis addresses two important topics in nonlinear laser plasma physics: the interaction of intense lasers with a non thermal homogeneous plasma, the excitation of laser wakefields in hollow plasma channels, and the stability of channel guided propagation of laser pulses. In the first half of this thesis a new theoretical approach to the nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with underdense plasmas is developed. Unlike previous treatments, this theory is three-dimensional, relativistically covariant, and does not assume that astudied. An experimental check of this calculation is suggested, based on the predicted non-linear polarization rotation (the second harmonic is emitted polarized perpendicularly to polarization of the incident signal). The concept of renormalization is applied to the plasma and electromagnetic radiation (photons and plasmons). To the lowest order, this corresponds to relativistically correcting the electron mass for its oscillation in an intense EM field and to replacing the vacuum dispersion relation by the usual relativistic plasma dispersion relation. This renormalization procedure is then carried to higher order in epsilon=omega_sp{p} {2}a^2/[(1+a^2/2)^ {3/2}omega^2]. This yields the nonlinear modification of the index of refraction of a strong electromagnetic wave and the dispersion of a weak probe in the presence of the wave. In the second part of this thesis the stability of short laser pulses propagating through parabolic channels and the wake excitation of hollow plasma channels are studied. The stability of a channel guided short laser pulse propagation is analyzed for the first time. Perturbations to the laser pulse are shown to modify the ponderomotive pressure, which distorts the dielectric properties of the plasma channel. The channel perturbation then further distorts the laser pulse. A set of coupled mode equations is derived, and a matrix dispersion relation is obtained analytically. The ponderomotive excitation

  19. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Martin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  20. Particle physics in intense electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurilin, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    The quantum field theory in the presence of classical background electromagnetic field is reviewed giving a pedagogical introduction to the Feynman-Furry method of describing non-perturbative interactions with very strong electromagnetic fields. A particular emphasis is given to the case of the plane-wave electromagnetic field for which the charged particles' wave functions and propagators are presented. Some general features of quantum processes proceeding in the intense electromagnetic background are argued. The possibilities of searching new physics through the investigations of quantum phenomena induced by a strong electromagnetic environment are also discussed