WorldWideScience

Sample records for intense world syndrome

  1. The intense world syndrome - an alternative hypothesis for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Markram

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder with a polygenetic predisposition that seems to be triggered by multiple environmental factors during embryonic and/or early postnatal life. While significant advances have been made in identifying the neuronal structures and cells affected, a unifying theory that could explain the manifold autistic symptoms has still not emerged. Based on recent synaptic, cellular, molecular, microcircuit, and behavioral results obtained with the valproic acid (VPA rat model of autism, we propose here a unifying hypothesis where the core pathology of the autistic brain is hyper-reactivity and hyper-plasticity of local neuronal circuits. Such excessive neuronal processing in circumscribed circuits is suggested to lead to hyper-perception, hyper-attention, and hyper-memory, which may lie at the heart of most autistic symptoms. In this view, the autistic spectrum are disorders of hyper-functionality, which turns debilitating, as opposed to disorders of hypo-functionality, as is often assumed. We discuss how excessive neuronal processing may render the world painfully intense when the neocortex is affected and even aversive when the amygdala is affected, leading to social and environmental withdrawal. Excessive neuronal learning is also hypothesized to rapidly lock down the individual into a small repertoire of secure behavioral routines that are obsessively repeated. We further discuss the key autistic neuropathologies and several of the main theories of autism and re-interpret them in the light of the hypothesized Intense World Syndrome.

  2. Impact of mobile intensive care unit use on total ischemic time and clinical outcomes in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients - real-world data from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koifman, Edward; Beigel, Roy; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Shlomo, Nir; Biton, Yitschak; Sabbag, Avi; Asher, Elad; Atar, Shaul; Gottlieb, Shmuel; Alcalai, Ronny; Zahger, Doron; Segev, Amit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Strugo, Rafael; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic time has prognostic importance in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Mobile intensive care unit use can reduce components of total ischemic time by appropriate triage of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Data from the Acute Coronary Survey in Israel registry 2000-2010 were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with mobile intensive care unit use and its impact on total ischemic time and patient outcomes. The study comprised 5474 ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients enrolled in the Acute Coronary Survey in Israel registry, of whom 46% ( n=2538) arrived via mobile intensive care units. There was a significant increase in rates of mobile intensive care unit utilization from 36% in 2000 to over 50% in 2010 ( pcare unit use were Killip>1 (odds ratio=1.32, pcare units benefitted from increased rates of primary reperfusion therapy (odds ratio=1.58, pcare unit benefitted from shorter median total ischemic time compared with non-mobile intensive care unit patients (175 (interquartile range 120-262) vs 195 (interquartile range 130-333) min, respectively ( pcare unit use was the most important predictor in achieving door-to-balloon time care unit group (odds ratio=0.79, 95% confidence interval (0.66-0.94), p=0.01). Among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, the utilization of mobile intensive care units is associated with increased rates of primary reperfusion, a reduction in the time interval to reperfusion, and a reduction in one-year adjusted mortality.

  3. The Intense World Theory – A Unifying Theory of the Neurobiology of Autism

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    Markram, Kamila; Markram, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Autism covers a wide spectrum of disorders for which there are many views, hypotheses and theories. Here we propose a unifying theory of autism, the Intense World Theory. The proposed neuropathology is hyper-functioning of local neural microcircuits, best characterized by hyper-reactivity and hyper-plasticity. Such hyper-functional microcircuits are speculated to become autonomous and memory trapped leading to the core cognitive consequences of hyper-perception, hyper-attention, hyper-memory and hyper-emotionality. The theory is centered on the neocortex and the amygdala, but could potentially be applied to all brain regions. The severity on each axis depends on the severity of the molecular syndrome expressed in different brain regions, which could uniquely shape the repertoire of symptoms of an autistic child. The progression of the disorder is proposed to be driven by overly strong reactions to experiences that drive the brain to a hyper-preference and overly selective state, which becomes more extreme with each new experience and may be particularly accelerated by emotionally charged experiences and trauma. This may lead to obsessively detailed information processing of fragments of the world and an involuntarily and systematic decoupling of the autist from what becomes a painfully intense world. The autistic is proposed to become trapped in a limited, but highly secure internal world with minimal extremes and surprises. We present the key studies that support this theory of autism, show how this theory can better explain past findings, and how it could resolve apparently conflicting data and interpretations. The theory also makes further predictions from the molecular to the behavioral levels, provides a treatment strategy and presents its own falsifying hypothesis. PMID:21191475

  4. The intense world syndrome--an alternative hypothesis for autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markram, Henry; Rinaldi, Tania; Markram, Kamila

    2007-01-01

    , leading to social and environmental withdrawal. Excessive neuronal learning is also hypothesized to rapidly lock down the individual into a small repertoire of secure behavioral routines that are obsessively repeated. We further discuss the key autistic neuropathologies and several of the main theories...

  5. Exercise Intensity and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome: The SUN Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Santamaria, María; Fernandez-Montero, Alejandro; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Moreno-Galarraga, Laura; Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena; Barrio-Lopez, María T; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira

    2017-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that vigorous physical activity may be associated with higher cardioprotective benefits than moderate physical activity. This study aimed to assess the long-term relationship between the intensity of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS) in a prospective cohort study. The Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Project comprises Spanish university graduates. Participants (n=10,145) initially free of MS were followed for a minimum of 6 years (2008-2014). Analysis was conducted in 2015. Physical activity was assessed though a validated questionnaire. The intensity of each physical activity was measured in METs. The intensity of LTPA was estimated by the ratio between total METs/week and total hours of LTPA/week, obtaining the mean METs/hour of LTPA. MS was defined according to the harmonizing definition. The association between the intensity of LTPA (METs/hour) and MS was assessed with logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders. Among 10,145 participants initially free of any MS criteria, 412 new MS cases were observed. Vigorous LTPA was associated with a 37% relatively lower risk (AOR=0.63, 95% CI=0.44, 0.89) compared with light LTPA. For a given total energy expenditure, independent of the time spent on it, participants who performed vigorous LTPA exhibited a higher reduction in the risk of MS than those who performed light to moderate LTPA. Vigorous LTPA was significantly associated with lower risk of developing MS after a 6-year follow-up period. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuromuscular Strain Increases Symptom Intensity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Rowe

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a complex, multisystem disorder that can be disabling. CFS symptoms can be provoked by increased physical or cognitive activity, and by orthostatic stress. In preliminary work, we noted that CFS symptoms also could be provoked by application of longitudinal neural and soft tissue strain to the limbs and spine of affected individuals. In this study we measured the responses to a straight leg raise neuromuscular strain maneuver in individuals with CFS and healthy controls. We randomly assigned 60 individuals with CFS and 20 healthy controls to either a 15 minute period of passive supine straight leg raise (true neuromuscular strain or a sham straight leg raise. The primary outcome measure was the symptom intensity difference between the scores during and 24 hours after the study maneuver compared to baseline. Fatigue, body pain, lightheadedness, concentration difficulties, and headache scores were measured individually on a 0-10 scale, and summed to create a composite symptom score. Compared to individuals with CFS in the sham strain group, those with CFS in the true strain group reported significantly increased body pain (P = 0.04 and concentration difficulties (P = 0.02 as well as increased composite symptom scores (all P = 0.03 during the maneuver. After 24 hours, the symptom intensity differences were significantly greater for the CFS true strain group for the individual symptom of lightheadedness (P = 0.001 and for the composite symptom score (P = 0.005. During and 24 hours after the exposure to the true strain maneuver, those with CFS had significantly higher individual and composite symptom intensity changes compared to the healthy controls. We conclude that a longitudinal strain applied to the nerves and soft tissues of the lower limb is capable of increasing symptom intensity in individuals with CFS for up to 24 hours. These findings support our preliminary observations that increased mechanical

  7. Strategic intensity: a conversation with world chess champion Garry Kasparov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparov, Garry

    2005-04-01

    It's hard to find a better exemplar for competition than chess. The image of two brilliant minds locked in a battle of skill and will-in which chance plays little or no apparent role-is compelling. Even people who have scant knowledge of the game instinctively recognize that chess is unusual in terms of its intellectual complexity and the strategic demands it places on players. Can strategists learn anything from chess players about what it takes to win? To find out, H BR senior editor Diane L. Coutu talked with Garry Kasparov, the world's number one player since 1984. Kasparov believes that success in both chess and business is very much a question of psychological advantage; the complexity of the game demands that players rely heavily on their instincts and on gamesmanship. In this wide-ranging interview, Kasparov explores the power of chess as a model for business competition; the balance that chess players strike between intuition and analysis; the significance of his loss to IBM's chess-playing computer, Deep Blue; and how his legendary rivalry with Anatoly Karpov, Kasparov's predecessor as World Chess Champion, affected his own success. Kasparov also shares his solution to what he calls the champion's dilemma, a question for all world masters, whether they are in business, sports, or chess: Where does a virtuoso go after he has accomplished everything he's ever wanted to, even beyond his wildest imagination? If you are lucky, says Kasparov, your enemies will push you to be passionate about staying at the top.

  8. More Intense Mega Heat Waves in the Warmer World

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    Choi, G.; Robinson, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, changes in the occurrences of heat waves on the globe since the mid- 20th century and the synoptic characteristics of mega heat waves at regional scales in the warmer climate are examined. The NCEP-NCAR reanalysis surface data show that there have been no obvious linear changes in the heat wave frequencies at the continental scales since the mid-20th century, but amplified interdecadal variations led to unprecedented intense heat waves in the recent decades at the regional scales. Such mega heat waves have been more frequently observed in the poleward subtropical climate belts as well as in the interior region of continents. According to the analyses of upper tropospheric data, the occurrences of more intense mega heat waves since the late 20th century may be associated with the expansion of subtropical high pressures. These results suggest that populous cities near the subtropical climate zones should provide proactive mega heat wave warning systems for residents due to their vulnerability to the sudden attack of human lives harvest by mega heat waves in the warmer 21st century.

  9. The decline of sectorial components of the world's energy intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, José; Siqueira Prado, Luiz Tadeo

    2013-01-01

    The world's primary energy consumption in the last 40 years has been increasing at 2.2%/year while GDP growth has been 3.4%/years over the same period. The decline of the energy intensity (I=E/GDP) has been, therefore, of 1.2%/year. In order to reduce the world's consumption growth proposal have been made to reduce the world's energy intensity by 40% by 2030 which corresponds to a reduction of 2.5%/year, roughly the double of the historical decline. Our analysis shoes that such goal could only be achieved by an unprecedented reduction of the energy intensity of “services” (which represent less than half the world energy consumption) since energy intensity of industry has remained practically constant in the last 40 years. - Highlights: ► GDP and world's energy consumption are split in 2 main sectors: industry and “services”, etc. ► The evolution of the energy intensity for these sectors since 1971 is calculated. ► The energy intensity of the industry sector is practically constant since 1971. ► All the decline of the energy intensity since 1971 comes from the “services” sector

  10. Cauda equina syndrome: A rare complication in intensive care

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    Jagatsinh Yogendrasinh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old married retired woman with a history of myocardial infarction and primary biliary cirrhosis was admitted to intensive care unit with complaints of chest pain. She was suspected to have pulmonary embolism (PE and was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH and aspirin. She had computerized tomographic pulmonary angiography on next day, which ruled out any evidence of PE, until she was continued on LMWH. Three days later, she developed progressive right leg weakness and loss of sphincter control and patchy loss of sensation from T10 and below. She was seen by neurologist and had an MRI scan, which showed extensive subdural clot compressing the conus and lower half of the thoracic cord. She underwent T9-L1, L3, L5-S1 laminectomies, and evacuation and decompression of the clot. She showed very slight recovery following the surgery and left with residual paraparesis. This case is reported to raise awareness among intensivists to be cautious in establishing the diagnosis before prescribing the LMWH and be vigilant to diagnose cauda equina syndrome and treat promptly to avoid residual neurological problems.

  11. Recognition of Facial Expressions and Prosodic Cues with Graded Emotional Intensities in Adults with Asperger Syndrome

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    Doi, Hirokazu; Fujisawa, Takashi X.; Kanai, Chieko; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yokoi, Hideki; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of adults with Asperger syndrome to recognize emotional categories of facial expressions and emotional prosodies with graded emotional intensities. The individuals with Asperger syndrome showed poorer recognition performance for angry and sad expressions from both facial and vocal information. The group…

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: an audit of incidence and outcome in Scottish intensive care units.

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    Hughes, M; MacKirdy, F N; Ross, J; Norrie, J; Grant, I S

    2003-09-01

    This prospective audit of incidence and outcome of the acute respiratory distress syndrome was conducted as part of the national audit of intensive care practice in Scotland. All patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome in 23 adult intensive care units were identified using the diagnostic criteria defined by the American-European Consensus Conference. Daily data collection was continued until death or intensive care unit discharge. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients were diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome over the 8-month study period. The frequency of acute respiratory distress syndrome in the intensive care unit population was 8.1%; the incidence in the Scottish population was estimated at 16.0 cases.100,000(-1).year(-1). Intensive care unit mortality for acute respiratory distress syndrome was 53.1%, with a hospital mortality of 60.9%. In our national unselected population of critically ill patients, the overall outcome is comparable with published series (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II standardised mortality ratio = 0.99). However, mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome in Scotland is substantially higher than in recent other series suggesting an improvement in outcome in this condition.

  13. Donation intensity and metabolic syndrome in active whole-blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Swinkels, D.W.; Geurts-Moespot, A.J.; den Heijer, M.; Atsma, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Increased iron and metabolic syndrome (MetS) go hand in hand. Frequent blood donation depletes iron stores. This study investigates whether high-intensity blood donation is associated with lower MetS prevalence compared with low-intensity blood donation, and whether iron

  14. [Professional Burnout Syndrome of intensive care physicians from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil].

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    Tironi, Márcia Oliveira Staffa; Nascimento Sobrinho, Carlito Lopes; Barros, Dalton de Souza; Reis, Eduardo José Farias Borges; Marques Filho, Edson Silva; Almeida, Alessandro; Bitencourt, Almir; Feitosa, Ana Isabela Ramos; Neves, Flávia Serra; Mota, Igor Carlos Cunha; França, Juliana; Borges, Lorena Guimarães; Lordão, Manuela Barreto de Jesus; Trindade, Maria Valverde; Teles, Marcelo Santos; Almeida, Mônica Bastos T; Souza, Ygor Gomes de

    2009-01-01

    Describe prevalence of the Burnout syndrome in intensive care physicians of Salvador, associated to demographic data and aspects of the work environment (psychological demand and job control). This cross sectional study has investigated the association between work conditions and Burnout Syndrome in a population of 297 Intensive Care Physicians from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. An individual, self-report questionnaire evaluated the physicians' psychological aspects of work, using the demand-control model (Job Content Questionnaire) and their mental health, using the Maslash Burnout Inventory (MBI). The study found work overload,a high proportion of on duty physicians and low income for the hours worked. Prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 7.4% and it was more closely associated with aspects of the job's psychological demand than with its control. Physicians under great stress (high demand and low control) presented prevalence of the Bornout Syndrome 10.2 times higher than those under low stress (low demand and high control) jobs.

  15. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jorge Luiz Lima; Soares, Rafael da Silva; Costa, Felipe dos Santos; Ramos, Danusa de Souza; Lima, Fabiano Bittencourt; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to evaluate the burnout syndrome dimensions, and the Self Reporting Questionnaire was used to evaluate common mental disorders. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 55.3% (n = 72). In the quadrants of the demand-control model, low-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 64.5% of suspected cases of burnout, whereas high-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 72.5% of suspected cases (p = 0.006). The prevalence of suspected cases of common mental disorders was 27.7%; of these, 80.6% were associated with burnout syndrome (stress levels - active work (OR = 0.26; 95%CI = 0.09 - 0.69) and passive work (OR = 0.22; 95%CI = 0.07 - 0.63) - were protective factors for burnout syndrome. Psychosocial factors were associated with the development of burnout syndrome in this group. These results underscore the need for the development of further studies aimed at intervention and the prevention of the syndrome.

  16. Burnout syndrome indices in Greek intensive care nursing personnel.

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    Karanikola, Maria N K; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E; Mpouzika, Meropi; Lemonidou, Chrysoula

    2012-01-01

    Burnout symptoms in Greek intensive care unit (ICU) nurses have not been explored adequately. The aim of this descriptive, correlational study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of burnout symptoms in Greek ICU nursing personnel and any potential associations with professional satisfaction, as well as with demographic, educational, and vocational characteristics. Findings showed that the overall burnout level reported by Greek ICU nursing personnel was at a moderate to high degree. The most pronounced symptom of burnout was depersonalization, whereas emotional exhaustion was found to be a strong predictor of job satisfaction. This is a factor connected with the nurses' intention to quit the job. It appears that work factors have a more powerful influence over the development of burnout in comparison to personality traits.

  17. Recognition of facial expressions and prosodic cues with graded emotional intensities in adults with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hirokazu; Fujisawa, Takashi X; Kanai, Chieko; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yokoi, Hideki; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the ability of adults with Asperger syndrome to recognize emotional categories of facial expressions and emotional prosodies with graded emotional intensities. The individuals with Asperger syndrome showed poorer recognition performance for angry and sad expressions from both facial and vocal information. The group difference in facial expression recognition was prominent for stimuli with low or intermediate emotional intensities. In contrast to this, the individuals with Asperger syndrome exhibited lower recognition accuracy than typically-developed controls mainly for emotional prosody with high emotional intensity. In facial expression recognition, Asperger and control groups showed an inversion effect for all categories. The magnitude of this effect was less in the Asperger group for angry and sad expressions, presumably attributable to reduced recruitment of the configural mode of face processing. The individuals with Asperger syndrome outperformed the control participants in recognizing inverted sad expressions, indicating enhanced processing of local facial information representing sad emotion. These results suggest that the adults with Asperger syndrome rely on modality-specific strategies in emotion recognition from facial expression and prosodic information.

  18. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-06-05

    "World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

  19. Determining the anaerobic threshold in postpolio syndrome: comparison with current guidelines for training intensity prescription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, Eric L.; Gerrits, Karin H.; Koopman, Fieke S.; Nollet, Frans; Beelen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether the anaerobic threshold (AT) can be identified in individuals with postpolio syndrome (PPS) using submaximal incremental exercise testing, and to compare current guidelines for intensity prescription in PPS with the AT. Cohort study. Research laboratory. Individuals with PPS

  20. Growth hormone treatment in Turner's syndrome: A real world experience

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    Vijay Sheker Reddy Danda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Short stature is a universal clinical feature of Turner's syndrome (TS. Growth failure begins in fetal life, and adults with TS are on an average 20 cm shorter than the normal female population. Since there is a paucity of data from India regarding the effect of growth hormone (GH on TS patients, we retrospectively analyzed the data of TS patients who are on GH treatment. Methods: This hospital-based observational retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Hyderabad. The data such as height, weight, and bone age of 16 patients who are diagnosed with TS on GH therapy for at least 6 months were included in the study. All the patients were treated with human recombinant GH at the dose of 0.3 mg/kg/week administered as daily subcutaneous injections. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.7 years. The mean height at the start of GH therapy was 1.26 m, and mean height standard deviation score (HSDS was-0.61 when compared to Turner's specific reference data. With a mean duration of GH therapy of 25 months, the mean height at the end of therapy was 1.37 m and the mean height as per HSDS was + 0.37 resulting in a mean height gain of + 0.99 HSDS. Conclusion: Our observation shows that girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with GH.

  1. Burnout syndrome in nurses in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino Eduardo dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify if nurses working in cardiac and general Intensive Care Units are subject to burnout, correlating it with demographic and occupational information. Methods: This is a descriptive exploratory, cross-sectional, prospective and correlational study utilizing  quantitative resources. The sample was composed of 34 nurses who answered the Maslach and Jackson inventory (MBI-HSS, which consists of 22 questions plus a questionnaire on demographic and occupational data. The study was carried out at a large private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Rresults: Of 34 nurses, nine had high emotional exhaustion, nine high depersonalization, ten had a high score of reduced professional accomplishment (decreased personal fulfillment at work. Most nurses presented alterations in more than one dimension regarding burnout. Cconclusions: The majority of nurses presented burnout and there was a positive correlation between burnout and the variables: sex, advanced professional degrees, time working in nursing, workload and working at more than one hospital.

  2. Reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senent, Leonor; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Ruiz, Juan C; Sanz, Guillermo; Florensa, Lourdes

    2013-04-01

    The reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is uncertain and its assessment was the major aim of this study. The different peripheral blood and bone marrow variables required for an adequate morphological classification were blindly evaluated by four cytomorphologists in samples from 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The degree of agreement among observers was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters. The degree of agreement for the percentages of blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, ring sideroblasts in bone marrow, and erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic dysplastic cells was strong (P<0.001 in all instances). After stratifying the percentages according to the categories required for the assignment of World Health Organization subtypes, the degree of agreement was not statistically significant for cases with 5-9% blasts in bone marrow (P=0.07), 0.1-1% blasts in peripheral blood (P=0.47), or percentage of erythroid dysplastic cells (P=0.49). Finally, the interobserver concordance for World Health Organization-defined subtypes showed a moderate overall agreement (P<0.001), the reproducibility being lower for cases with refractory anemia with excess of blasts type 1 (P=0.05) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (P=0.09). In conclusion, the reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is acceptable but the defining criteria for blast cells and features of erythroid dysplasia need to be refined.

  3. High intensity aerobic interval training improves peak oxygen consumption in patients with metabolic syndrome: CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Espinoza Salinas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A number of cardiovascular risk factors characterizes the metabolic syndrome: insulin resistance (IR, low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides. The aforementioned risk factors lead to elevated levels of abdominal adipose tissue, resulting in oxygen consumption deficiency. Purpose To verify the validity and applicability of using high intensity interval training (HIIT in subjects with metabolic syndrome and to answer the following question: Can HIIT improve peak oxygen consumption? Method The systematic review "Effects of aerobic interval training on exercise capacity and metabolic risk factors in individuals with cardiometabolic disorders" was analyzed. Results Data suggests high intensity aerobic interval training increases peak oxygen consumption by a standardized mean difference of 3.60 mL/kg-1/min-1 (95% confidence interval, 0.28-4.91. Conclusion In spite of the methodological shortcomings of the primary studies included in the systematic review, we reasonably conclude that implementation of high intensity aerobic interval training in subjects with metabolic syndrome, leads to increases in peak oxygen consumption.

  4. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  5. Determining the anaerobic threshold in post-polio syndrome: comparison with current guidelines for training intensity prescription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, E.L.; Gerrits, K.H.L.; Koopman, F.S.; Nollet, F.; Beelen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the anaerobic threshold (AT) can be identified in individuals with postpolio syndrome (PPS) using submaximal incremental exercise testing, and to compare current guidelines for intensity prescription in PPS with the AT. Design Cohort study. Setting Research

  6. World Federation of Pediatric Intensive Care and Critical Care Societies: Global Sepsis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Niranjan; Carcillo, Joseph A; Espinosa, Victor; Argent, Andrew; Devictor, Denis; Madden, Maureen; Singhi, Sunit; van der Voort, Edwin; Latour, Jos

    2011-09-01

    According to World Health Organization estimates, sepsis accounts for 60%-80% of lost lives per year in childhood. Measures appropriate for resource-scarce and resource-abundant settings alike can reduce sepsis deaths. In this regard, the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive Care and Critical Care Societies Board of Directors announces the Global Pediatric Sepsis Initiative, a quality improvement program designed to improve quality of care for children with sepsis. To announce the global sepsis initiative; to justify some of the bundles that are included; and to show some preliminary data and encourage participation. The Global Pediatric Sepsis Initiative is developed as a Web-based education, demonstration, and pyramid bundles/checklist tool (http://www.pediatricsepsis.org or http://www.wfpiccs.org). Four health resource categories are included. Category A involves a nonindustrialized setting with mortality rate 30 of 1,000 children. Category B involves a nonindustrialized setting with mortality rate children. Category C involves a developing industrialized nation. In category D, developed industrialized nation are determined and separate accompanying administrative and clinical parameters bundles or checklist quality improvement recommendations are provided, requiring greater resources and tasks as resource allocation increased from groups A to D, respectively. In the vanguard phase, data for 361 children (category A, n = 34; category B, n = 12; category C, n = 84; category D, n = 231) were successfully entered, and quality-assurance reports were sent to the 23 participating international centers. Analysis of bundles for categories C and D showed that reduction in mortality was associated with compliance with the resuscitation (odds ratio, 0.369; 95% confidence interval, 0.188-0.724; p Initiative is online. Success in reducing pediatric mortality and morbidity, evaluated yearly as a measure of global child health care quality improvement, requires ongoing

  7. Refeeding syndrome influences outcome of anorexia nervosa patients in intensive care unit: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignaud, Marie; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Ruivard, Marc; Villemeyre-Plane, Michele; Futier, Emmanuel; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Annane, Djillali

    2010-01-01

    Data on the epidemiology and management of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the intensive care unit (ICU) are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and associated morbidity and mortality of AN in French ICUs. We randomly selected 30 ICUs throughout France. Thereafter, we retrospectively analyzed all patients with AN admitted to any of these 30 ICUs between May 2006 and May 2008. We considered demographic data, diagnosis at admission and complications occurring during the stay, focusing on refeeding syndrome and management of refeeding. Eleven of the 30 ICUs participated in the retrospective study, featuring 68 patients, including 62 women. Average body mass index at the admission was 12 ± 3 kg/m2. Twenty one were mechanically ventilated, mainly for neurological reasons. The reported average calorie intake was 22.3 ± 13 kcal/kg/24 h. Major diagnoses at admission were metabolic problems, refeeding survey and voluntary drug intoxication and infection. The most common complications were metabolic, hematological, hepatic, and infectious events, of which 10% occurred during refeeding. Seven patients developed refeeding syndrome. At day one, the average calorie intake was higher for patients who developed refeeding syndrome (23.2 ± 5 Kcal/kg/j; n = 7) versus patients without refeeding syndrome (14.1 ± 3 Kcal/kg/j; n = 61) P = 0.02. Seven patients died, two from acute respiratory distress syndrome and five from multiorgan-failure associated with major hydroelectrolytic problems. The frequency of AN in ICU patients is very low and the crude mortality in this group is about 10%. Prevention and early-detection of refeeding syndrome is the key point.

  8. Just world beliefs moderate the relationship of pain intensity and disability with psychological distress in chronic pain support group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, Joanna L; Knussen, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The impact of pain beliefs on coping and adjustment is well established. However, less is known about how beliefs unrelated to pain might impact upon this experience. In particular, just world beliefs could impact upon and be influenced by chronic pain, given that pain is not experienced in a vacuum but instead is experienced in a social context where justice issues are potentially salient. The focus of this study was the ability of personal and general just world beliefs to moderate the relationships psychological distress held with pain intensity and disability in chronic pain. The sample (N=95) was recruited from members of arthritis and fibromyalgia support groups to investigate these social beliefs in a controlled community pain context. A cross-sectional, questionnaire design was adopted. The personal just world belief was endorsed significantly more than the general just world belief, and endorsement of the personal just world belief was negatively correlated with pain intensity, disability and psychological distress, while the general just world belief was unrelated to these variables. When interaction terms relating to personal and general just world beliefs were entered simultaneously into regression analyses, the personal just world belief did not predict psychological distress. However, pain intensity positively predicted psychological distress at low but not high levels of the general just world belief, while disability predicted psychological distress at low and high levels of this belief. This suggests that a strong general just world belief has implications for psychological well-being in chronic pain, and as such this belief may occupy a potential coping function in this context.

  9. Effect of different exercise intensities on the pancreas of animals with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Fernanda; Lima, Nathalia Ea; Ornelas, Elisabete; Simardi, Lucila; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Maifrino, Laura Beatriz Mesiano

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) comprises several metabolic disorders that are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and has its source connected to the accumulation of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and development of insulin resistance. Despite studies showing beneficial results of exercise on several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, studies evaluating the effects of different intensities of exercise training on the pancreas with experimental models are scarce. In total, 20 Wistar rats were used, divided into four groups: control (C), metabolic syndrome (MS and without exercise), metabolic syndrome and practice of walking (MSWalk), and metabolic syndrome and practice of running (MSRun). The applied procedures were induction of MS by fructose in drinking water; experimental protocol of walking and running; weighing of body mass and VAT; sacrifice of animals with blood collection and removal of organs and processing of samples for light microscopy using the analysis of volume densities (Vv) of the studied structures. Running showed a reduction of VAT weight (-54%), triglyceride levels (-40%), Vv[islet] (-62%), Vv[islet.cells] (-22%), Vv[islet.insterstitial] (-44%), and Vv[acinar.insterstitial] (-24%) and an increase of Vv[acini] (+21%) and Vv[acinar.cells] (+22%). Regarding walking, we observed a decrease of VAT weight (-34%) and triglyceride levels (-27%), an increase of Vv[islet.cells] (+72%) and Vv[acinar.cells] (+7%), and a decrease of Vv[acini] (-4%) and Vv[acinar.insterstitial] (-16%) when compared with those in the MS group. Our results suggest that the experimental model with low-intensity exercise (walking) seems to be more particularly recommended for preventing morphological and metabolic disorders occurring in the MS.

  10. Implementing a Mobility Program to Minimize Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Mitchell, Lorie; Thomsen, George E; Schafer, Michele; Link, Maggie; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Immobility in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with neuromuscular weakness, post-intensive care syndrome, functional limitations, and high costs. Early mobility-based rehabilitation in the ICU is feasible and safe. Mobility-based rehabilitation varied widely across 5 ICUs in 1 health care system, suggesting a need for continuous training and evaluation to maintain a strong mobility-based rehabilitation program. Early mobility-based rehabilitation shortens ICU and hospital stays, reduces delirium, and increases muscle strength and the ability to ambulate. Long-term effects include increased ability for self-care, faster return to independent functioning, improved physical function, and reduced hospital readmission and death. Factors that influence early mobility-based rehabilitation include having an interdisciplinary team; strong unit leadership; access to physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists; a culture focused on patient safety and quality improvement; a champion of early mobility; and a focus on measuring performance and outcomes.

  11. Effect of different exercise intensities on the pancreas of animals with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda Amaral,1 Nathalia EA Lima,1 Elisabete Ornelas,1 Lucila Simardi,2 Fernando Luiz Affonso Fonseca,2,3 Laura Beatriz Mesiano Maifrino1,4 1Laboratório de Estudos Morfoquantitativo e Imunohistoquímico, Universidade São Judas Tadeu, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, Brazil Introduction: Metabolic syndrome (MS comprises several metabolic disorders that are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and has its source connected to the accumulation of visceral adipose tissue (VAT and development of insulin resistance. Despite studies showing beneficial results of exercise on several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, studies evaluating the effects of different intensities of exercise training on the pancreas with experimental models are scarce. Methods: In total, 20 Wistar rats were used, divided into four groups: control (C, metabolic syndrome (MS and without exercise, metabolic syndrome and practice of walking (MSWalk, and metabolic syndrome and practice of running (MSRun. The applied procedures were induction of MS by fructose in drinking water; experimental protocol of walking and running; weighing of body mass and VAT; sacrifice of animals with blood collection and removal of organs and processing of samples for light microscopy using the analysis of volume densities (Vv of the studied structures. Results: Running showed a reduction of VAT weight (–54%, triglyceride levels (–40%, Vv[islet] (–62%, Vv[islet.cells] (–22%, Vv[islet.insterstitial] (–44%, and Vv[acinar.insterstitial] (–24% and an increase of Vv[acini] (+21% and Vv[acinar.cells] (+22%. Regarding walking, we observed a decrease of VAT weight (–34% and triglyceride levels (–27%, an increase of Vv[islet.cells] (+72% and Vv[acinar.cells] (+7%, and a decrease of Vv

  12. Introducing chinese treatment experience of Budd-Chiari syndrome to world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun

    2008-01-01

    During the latest 20 years, the crucial progress has been made in the field of treatment for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS)in China with therapeutic methods transferring from surgical to interventional and achieving successful rate of 96%. Our unique contribution to the BCS interventional therapy should have made ourselves proud for being as a superior world position on account of large number of cases, abundant therapeutic contents and consummate skills. What a pity is that our achievement was not appreciated by international colleagues because of only a few papers published in SCI journals. So that, Chinese scholars ought to have doing more necessarily through diligently learning English, doing long term follow-up and performing more basic researches and actively joining international academic exchanges, let our good experiences of treatment for BCS be introduced to the world-wide. (authors)

  13. Radiation-induced liver injury showing low intensity on T2-weighted images noted in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Harushi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Mori, Kensaku [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Ahmadi, T. [Shahid Beheshti Univ. of Medical Sciences, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Okumura, Toshiyuki [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Although it is documented that radiation can cause density or intensity changes on computed tomography or MR imaging in the irradiated hepatic parenchyma, few researchers have reported or understood the MR presentation of changes in hepatic parenchyma following radiotherapy in the patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MR appearance of hepatic radiation injury in Budd-Chiari syndrome and to consider the underlying pathophysiology. The MR examinations of two patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome was compared with those of 11 patients without Budd-Chiari syndrome. The two groups, both of which suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma, underwent 50-72 Gy of proton-beam irradiation during a period of 14-43 days. Examinations including T1- and T2-weighted imaging, superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced imaging, and dynamic study were performed 3-10 weeks after the end of irradiation. Radiation-induced hepatic injury was observed as a low-intensity area on T2-weighted images and on delayed phase images of dynamic study in the Budd-Chiari patients, and as iso- or high-intensity areas on both images in the patients without Budd-Chiari syndrome. US-guided needle biopsy from the irradiated area in one patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed mostly necrotic tissue and fibrous tissue. These MR features of hepatic radiation injury in Budd-Chiari syndrome were considered to be due to severe hepatic fibrosis. (author)

  14. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  15. High-intensity interval training improves inflammatory and adipokine profiles in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckling, Flávia Mariel; Farinha, Juliano Boufleur; Figueiredo, Felipe da Cunha; Santos, Daniela Lopes Dos; Bresciani, Guilherme; Kretzmann, Nélson Alexandre; Stefanello, Sílvio Terra; Courtes, Aline Alves; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Sangoi Cardoso, Manuela; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes

    2018-02-12

    This study investigate the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on systemic levels of inflammatory and hormonal markers in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Fifteen postmenopausal women with MS completed the training on treadmills. Functional, body composition parameters, maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max), and lipid profile were assessed before and after HIIT. Serum or plasma levels of cytokines and hormonal markers were measured along the intervention. The analysis of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of these cytokines was performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). VO 2 max and some anthropometric parameters were improved after HIIT, while decreased levels of proinflammatory markers and increased levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) were also found. Adipokines were also modulated after 12 weeks or training. The mRNA expression of the studied genes was unchanged after HIIT. In conclusion, HIIT benefits inflammatory and hormonal axis on serum or plasma samples, without changes on PBMC of postmenopausal MS patients.

  16. Asperger syndrome and the supposed obligation not to bring disabled lives into the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Pat

    2010-09-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autistic spectrum condition that shares the range of social impairments associated with classic autism widely regarded as disabling, while also often giving rise to high levels of ability in areas such as maths, science, engineering and music. The nature of this striking duality of disability and ability is examined, along with its implications for our thinking about disability and the relevance of levels and kinds of disability to reproductive choices. In particular, it may be seen as posing a challenge to John Harris's influential position in reproductive ethics relating to disability. The paper argues that if, as Harris maintains, there is a quite general moral obligation to avoid bringing disabled lives into the world regardless of the level of disability, then AS must be seen as having a strong claim to be exempt from such an obligation. However, a broader critique of Harris's position leads to the conclusion that, in fact, this putative obligation does not exist.

  17. Acute Hypotension after High-Intensity Interval Exercise in Metabolic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Palomo, Felix; Ramirez-Jimenez, Miguel; Ortega, Juan Fernando; Pallarés, Jesús G; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the magnitude of post-exercise hypotension (PEH) after a bout of cycling exercise using high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in comparison to a bout of traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise (CE). After supine rest 14 obese (31±1 kg·m -2 ) middle-age (57±2 y) metabolic syndrome patients (50% hypertensive) underwent a bout of HIIT or a bout of CE in a random order and then returned to supine recovery for another 45 min. Exercise trials were isocaloric and compared to a no-exercise trial (CONT) of supine rest for a total of 160 min. Before and after exercise we assessed blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Q), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), intestinal temperature (T INT ), forearm skin blood flow (S K BF) and percent dehydration. HIIT produced a larger post-exercise reduction in systolic blood pressure than CE in the hypertensive group (-20±6 vs. -5±3 mmHg) and in the normotensive group (-8±3 vs. -3±2 mmHg) while HIIT reduced SVR below CE (Pexercise T INT and S K BF increased only after HIIT (all Pexercise method to CE to acutely reduce blood pressure in MSyn subjects. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. High Intensity Interval Training Reduces the Levels of Serum Inflammatory Cytokine on Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckling, F M; Farinha, J B; Santos, D L D; Bresciani, G; Mortari, J A; Stefanello, S T; Courtes, A A; Duarte, T; Duarte, M M M F; Moresco, R N; Cardoso, M S; Soares, F A A

    2016-11-01

    Objectives: This study investigate the effects of a high intensity interval training (HIIT) and 2 weeks of detraining in functional and body composition parameters, lipoproteins, glucose metabolismand inflammation markers in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Design: 17 untrained women with MS underwent a HIIT program for 12 weeks. Methods: The training was performed in treadmills, 3 days per week, with intensity ranging from 70-90% of the maximum heart rate (HR max ) and 2 weeks untrained (inactive). Functional and body composition parameters were evaluated before and after the training, while maximal oxygen uptake, lipoprotein and inflammation markers were analyzed before, after training and also in detraining. Results: The HITT program resulted in changesparameters as glucose, HbA1cand NOx after training. In addition, a reduction in pro-inflammatory interleukins and an increase in IL-10 after the HIIT program were found. However, an increase in plasma levels of lipoprotein was found and body composition parameters remain unaltered.Besides, only 2 weeks of detraining are able to revert the effects on inflammatory parameters afforded by the HIIT program. Conclusions: The HIIT program used here positively affected inflammatory profile and other parameters, as glucose, HbA1cand NOx, on postmenopausal women with MS. Moreover, 2 weeks of detraining can reverse the beneficial effects of HIIT program. Our results point out the necessity to aply acontinuous HITT program, in order maintain the benefits detected, to post menopausal women with MS. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Mutual influence of intensity of pain syndrome and borderline mental disorders in patients with coxarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Spirina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the mutual influence of pain syndrome and borderline psychiatric disorders depending on its intensity and tolerability in patients with coxarthrosis who need endoprosthetics. 76 patients with coxarthrosis aged from 25 to 68 who were hospitalized in the Department of Endoprosthetics at Mechnikov Regional Clinical Hospital in Dnipro City in the period from November 2015 to September 2016 were observed. For diagnosis of psychopathological disorders, and for evaluation of the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, the following methods were used in our research: clinical and psychopathological (technique SCL-90-R, Tаylor anxiety scale, study of the type of attitude to the disease (LOBI, Dembo-Rubinstein self-esteem scale, Leonhard-Schmieschek questionnaire for assessment of accentuation of personality traits, the Luscher 8-colour test and the Toronto alexithymia scale (TAS. Severity of pain syndrome was assessed using a visual analogue scale of pain (VAS. Forms of borderline mental disorders were diagnosed in 51 patients with coxarthrosis, such as depressive disorder (F 32 – 19 (24.8%, neurasthenia (F 48 – 12 (16.2, anxiety and phobic disorders (F 40–41 – 14 (18.1%, and personality disorders (F 60.5, F 60.6, F 60.7 – 6 (7.6%. In 25 (33.3% patients clinically-defined forms of mental disorders were identified. Leading syndromes in these disorders were depression – 19 (24.8% patients, anxiety and phobic – 15 (20.0%, asthenic – 10 (12.4%, hypochondriacal – 7 (9.5% patients. According to the results of the correlation analysis, a close correlation between the severity of pain syndrome and borderline mental disorders (r = 0.779 was established for patients in the preoperative stage. The average level of pain syndrome on the VAS scale in patients with borderline mental disorders was twice as high as in patients without these disorders (63.4 vs. 32.4 points, but it does not depend on the

  20. The wondrous world of transport and acceleration of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebenlist, F.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the transport, bunching and acceleration of intense ion beams in periodic focusing channels is described. The aim is to show the feasibility of accelerating high current ion beams with a Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear ACcelerator (MEQALAC). 83 refs.; 51 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Total physical activity volume, physical activity intensity, and metabolic syndrome: 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilla, James R; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2012-02-01

    This study examined the association of total physical activity volume (TPAV) and physical activity (PA) from three domains [leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), domestic, transportation] with metabolic syndrome. We also investigated the relationship between LTPA intensity and metabolic syndrome risk. Sample included adults who participated in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Physical activity measures were created for TPAV, LTPA, domestic PA, and transportational PA. For each, a six-level measure based upon no PA (level 1) and quintiles (levels 2-6) of metabolic equivalents (MET)·min·wk(-1) was created. A three-level variable associated with the current Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) PA recommendation was also created. SAS and SUDAAN were used for the statistical analysis. Adults reporting the greatest volume of TPAV and LTPA were found to be 36% [odds ratio (OR) 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49-0.83] and 42% (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.43-0.77), respectively, less likely to have metabolic syndrome. Domestic and transportational PA provided no specific level of protection from metabolic syndrome. Those reporting a TPAV that met the DHHS PA recommendation were found to be 33% (OR 0.67; 95%; CI 0.55-0.83) less likely to have metabolic syndrome compared to their sedentary counterparts. Adults reporting engaging in only vigorous-intensity LTPA were found to be 37% (OR 0.63; 95 CI 0.42-0.96) to 56% (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.29-0.67) less likely to have metabolic syndrome. Volume, intensity, and domain of PA may all play important roles in reducing the prevalence and risk of metabolic syndrome.

  2. Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome in dynamical small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Konno, Norio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-03-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is still threatening the world because of a possible resurgence. In the current situation that effective medical treatments such as antiviral drugs are not discovered yet, dynamical features of the epidemics should be clarified for establishing strategies for tracing, quarantine, isolation, and regulating social behavior of the public at appropriate costs. Here we propose a network model for SARS epidemics and discuss why superspreaders emerged and why SARS spread especially in hospitals, which were key factors of the recent outbreak. We suggest that superspreaders are biologically contagious patients, and they may amplify the spreads by going to potentially contagious places such as hospitals. To avoid mass transmission in hospitals, it may be a good measure to treat suspected cases without hospitalizing them. Finally, we indicate that SARS probably propagates in small-world networks associated with human contacts and that the biological nature of individuals and social group properties are factors more important than the heterogeneous rates of social contacts among individuals. This is in marked contrast with epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases or computer viruses to which scale-free network models often apply.

  3. Impact of triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in real-world practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Xiao; Fan, Jing-Yao; Nie, Shao-Ping; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Henriques, Jose P. Simao; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Saucedo, Jorge; González-Juanatey, José R.; Wilton, Stephen B.; Kikkert, Wouter J.; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xian-Tao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Moretti, Claudio; Huczek, Zenon; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis Cl; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Kedev, Sasko

    2017-01-01

    The optimal antithrombotic regimen for patients on oral anticoagulation (OAC) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains debated. This study sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of OAC plus clopidogrel with or without aspirin in a real-world

  4. Scenarios with an intensive contribution of the nuclear energy to the world energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Heuer, D.; Huffer, E.; David, S.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Meplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; Martin, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Temperature stabilization requires that CO 2 emissions be limited to less than 3 Gt Carbon equivalent, from the present level of more than 6 Gt. Despite an increase of primary energy demand by 250% in 2050 we find that a nuclear intensive scenario assuming the development of a 3000 GWe pool of PWR reactors by 2030 and of an additional 6000 GWe pool of U-Pu or Th-U reactors by 2050 would lead to temperature stabilization at a level 2 degrees above the pre-industrial level. (authors)

  5. Scenarios with an intensive contribution of nuclear energy to the world energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Heuer, D.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Meplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; David, S.; Martin, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature stabilization requires that Co2 emissions be limited to less than 3 Gt Carbon equivalent, from the present level of more than 6 Gt. Despite an increase of primary energy demand by 250% in 2050 we find that a nuclear intensive scenario assuming the development of a 3000 GW pool of PWR reactors by 2030 and of an additional 6000 GW pool of U-Pu or Th-U reactors by 2050 would lead to temperature stabilization at a level 2 degrees above the pre-industrial level. (author)

  6. Intensive care unit bugs in India: How do they differ from the western world?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruva Chaudhry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections continue to play a significant role in the overall global mortality and disability more so in Intensive Care Units (ICUs and plague developing countries more intensively. The ICUs are often called “the hubs” of infections owing to highly vulnerable patients’ profile. The most important nosocomial infections in the ICU are catheter-related bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. The epidemiology of ICU infections in India is different from its Western counterparts in terms of prevalence and nature of microorganisms causing it. While Gram-positive infections are more prevalent in Western ICUs, Indian ICUs are commonly afflicted with Gram-negative bugs showing a high degree of antimicrobial resistance with blurring of traditional boundaries of early drug sensitive and later drug resistance infections. Increasing number of multidrug resistance organism infections in ICUs is a big public health threat and challenge both from the perspective of prevention and treatment. Therefore, blindly following the Western guidelines may not provide the optimum results in India. The need of the hour is to develop and implement an antimicrobial stewardship program based on the local epidemiological data and international guidelines to optimize the antimicrobial use among the hospitalized patients and improve their outcomes.

  7. Low Intensity laser therapy in patients with burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Nobuo SUGAYA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of low intensity laser therapy in patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS. Thirty BMS subjects were randomized into two groups – Laser (LG and Placebo (CG. Seven patients dropped out, leaving 13 patients in LG and 10 patients in CG. Each patient received 4 irradiations (laser or placebo twice a week, for two consecutive weeks (blinded to the type of irradiation received. Infrared laser (AsGaAI irradiations were applied to the affected mucosa in scanning mode, wavelength of 790 nm, output power of 20 mW and fluence of 6 J/cm2. A visual analogue scale (VAS was used to assess the therapeutic effect before and after each irradiation, and at all the control time periods: 7, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days after the last irradiation. One researcher delivered irradiation and another recorded the results. Both researchers were blinded, the first to the results, and the second to the type of radiation applied. The results were categorized according to the percentage of symptom level variation, and showed a statistically better response in LG in only two categories of the control checkpoints (p=0.02; Fisher’s Exact Test. According to the protocol used in this study, low intensity laser therapy is as beneficial to patients with BMS as placebo treatment, indicating a great emotional component of involvement in BMS symptomatology. Nevertheless, there were positive results in some statistical analyses, thus encouraging further research in BMS laser therapy with other irradiation parameters.

  8. Synthetic graph generation for data-intensive HPC benchmarking: Scalability, analysis and real-world application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Sarah S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lothian, Joshua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allows the emulation of a broad spectrum of application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report described the in-depth analysis of the generated synthetic graphs' properties at a variety of scales using different generator implementations and examines their applicability to replicating real world datasets.

  9. Lessons from two high CO2 worlds - future oceans and intensive aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert P; Urbina, Mauricio A; Wilson, Rod W

    2017-06-01

    Exponentially rising CO 2 (currently ~400 μatm) is driving climate change and causing acidification of both marine and freshwater environments. Physiologists have long known that CO 2 directly affects acid-base and ion regulation, respiratory function and aerobic performance in aquatic animals. More recently, many studies have demonstrated that elevated CO 2 projected for end of this century (e.g. 800-1000 μatm) can also impact physiology, and have substantial effects on behaviours linked to sensory stimuli (smell, hearing and vision) both having negative implications for fitness and survival. In contrast, the aquaculture industry was farming aquatic animals at CO 2 levels that far exceed end-of-century climate change projections (sometimes >10 000 μatm) long before the term 'ocean acidification' was coined, with limited detrimental effects reported. It is therefore vital to understand the reasons behind this apparent discrepancy. Potential explanations include 1) the use of 'control' CO 2 levels in aquaculture studies that go beyond 2100 projections in an ocean acidification context; 2) the relatively benign environment in aquaculture (abundant food, disease protection, absence of predators) compared to the wild; 3) aquaculture species having been chosen due to their natural tolerance to the intensive conditions, including CO 2 levels; or 4) the breeding of species within intensive aquaculture having further selected traits that confer tolerance to elevated CO 2 . We highlight this issue and outline the insights that climate change and aquaculture science can offer for both marine and freshwater settings. Integrating these two fields will stimulate discussion on the direction of future cross-disciplinary research. In doing so, this article aimed to optimize future research efforts and elucidate effective mitigation strategies for managing the negative impacts of elevated CO 2 on future aquatic ecosystems and the sustainability of fish and shellfish

  10. Competences required for the delivery of high and low-intensity cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome/ME and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimes, Katharine A; Wingrove, Janet; Moss-Morris, Rona; Chalder, Trudie

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive behavioural interventions are effective in the treatment of chronic fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome (sometimes known as ME or CFS/ME) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such interventions are increasingly being provided not only in specialist settings but in primary care settings such as Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. There are no existing competences for the delivery of "low-intensity" or "high-intensity" cognitive behavioural interventions for these conditions. To develop "high-intensity" and "low-intensity" competences for cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic fatigue, CFS/ME and IBS. The initial draft drew on a variety of sources including treatment manuals and other information from randomized controlled trials. Therapists with experience in providing cognitive behavioural interventions for CF, CFS/ME and IBS in research and clinical settings were consulted on the initial draft competences and their suggestions for minor amendments were incorporated into the final versions. Feedback from experienced therapists was positive. Therapists providing low intensity interventions reported that the competences were also helpful in highlighting training needs. These sets of competences should facilitate the training and supervision of therapists providing cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic fatigue, CFS/ME and IBS. The competences are available online (see table of contents for this issue: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_BCP) or on request from the first author.

  11. Detecting cardiometabolic syndrome using World Health Organization public health action points for Asians and Pacific Islanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Andrew; Kaholokula, Joseph K; Mau, Marjorie K; Chow, Dominic C

    2010-01-01

    To assess the screening characteristics of World Health Organization (WHO) body mass index action points for cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) in Native Hawaiians and people of Asian ancestry (ie, Filipino and Japanese). Cross-sectional data were collected from 1,452 residents of a rural community of Hawai'i between 1997 and 2000, of which 1,198 were analyzed in this study. Ethnic ancestry was determined by self-report. Metabolic status was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Screening characteristics of WHO criteria for overweight and obesity were compared to WHO public health action points or to WHO West Pacific Regional Office (WPRO) cut-points. Among Asian-ancestry participants, WHO public health action points improved both sensitivity and specificity for detecting CMS. However, similar improvements were not observed for WPRO criteria for Native Hawaiians. Moreover, predictive values were high regardless of which criteria were utilized due to high CMS prevalence. WHO public health actions points for Asians provide a significant improvement in sensitivity in detection of CMS. However, predictive value, which varies greatly with disease prevalence, should be considered when deciding which criteria to apply.

  12. Effects of intense aerobic exercise and/or antihypertensive medication in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Jimenez, M; Morales-Palomo, F; Ortega, J F; Mora-Rodriguez, R

    2018-05-17

    We studied the blood pressure lowering effects of a bout of exercise and/or antihypertensive medicine with the goal of studying if exercise could substitute or enhance pharmacologic hypertension treatment. Twenty-three hypertensive metabolic syndrome patients chronically medicated with angiotensin II receptor 1 blockade antihypertensive medicine underwent 24-hr monitoring in four separated days in a randomized order; a) after taking their habitual dose of antihypertensive medicine (AHM trial), b) substituting their medicine by placebo medicine (PLAC trial), c) placebo medicine with a morning bout of intense aerobic exercise (PLAC+EXER trial) and d) combining the exercise and antihypertensive medicine (AHM+EXER trial). We found that in trials with AHM subjects had lower plasma aldosterone/renin activity ratio evidencing treatment compliance. Before exercise, the trials with AHM displayed lower systolic (130±16 vs 133±15 mmHg; P=0.018) and mean blood pressures (94±11 vs 96±10 mmHg; P=0.036) than trials with placebo medication. Acutely (i.e., 30 min after treatments) combining AHM+EXER lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP) below the effects of PLAC+EXER (-8.1±1.6 vs -4.9±1.5 mmHg; P=0.015). Twenty-four hour monitoring revealed no differences among trials in body motion. However, PLAC+EXER and AHM lowered SBP below PLAC during the first 10 hours, time at which PLAC+EXER effects faded out (i.e., at 19 PM). Adding exercise to medication (i.e., AHM+EXER) resulted in longer reductions in SBP than with exercise alone (PLAC+EXER). In summary, one bout of intense aerobic exercise in the morning cannot substitute the long-lasting effects of antihypertensive medicine in lowering blood pressure, but their combination is superior to exercise alone. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Horner's syndrome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit that have undergone central venous catheterization: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butty, Z; Gopwani, J; Mehta, S; Margolin, E

    2016-01-01

    PurposeCentral venous catheterization (CVC) is estimated to be performed in millions of patients per year. Swan-Ganz catheters used for CVC are most often inserted into the internal jugular vein and during this procedure they may come into contact with the sympathetic chain. This study aims to determine the incidence of Horner's syndrome in patients admitted to intensive care unit that have undergone internal jugular CVC insertion during their admission and to determine whether ultrasonography-assisted insertion has decreased the frequency of this complication.Patients and methodsA total of 100 prospective patients admitted to the ICU were examined for the presence of anisocoria and ptosis after undergoing recent CVC. Presence of Horner's syndrome was confirmed by testing with 0.5% apraclonidine and looking for the reversal of anisocoria.ResultsFrequency of Horner's syndrome after CVC was 2% in a sample of 100 prospectively examined patients.ConclusionHorner's syndrome remains a relatively rare but definitive complication of CVC. ICU physicians should be educated about its existence and prevalence and ophthalmologists should inquire about any history of ICU admission necessitating CVC insertion in any patient presenting with Horner's syndrome.

  14. Emotion Recognition in Children with Down Syndrome: Influence of Emotion Label and Expression Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, Katie R.; Wishart, Jennifer G.; Willis, Diane S.; Pitcairn, Tom K.

    2017-01-01

    Some children with Down syndrome may experience difficulties in recognizing facial emotions, particularly fear, but it is not clear why, nor how such skills can best be facilitated. Using a photo-matching task, emotion recognition was tested in children with Down syndrome, children with nonspecific intellectual disability and cognitively matched,…

  15. High- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption in men with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, I; Welde, B; Martins, C; Tjønna, A E

    2014-06-01

    Physical activity is central in prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome. High-intensity aerobic exercise can induce larger energy expenditure per unit of time compared with moderate-intensity exercise. Furthermore, it may induce larger energy expenditure at post-exercise recovery. The aim of this study is to compare the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in three different aerobic exercise sessions in men with metabolic syndrome. Seven men (age: 56.7 ± 10.8) with metabolic syndrome participated in this crossover study. The sessions consisted of one aerobic interval (1-AIT), four aerobic intervals (4-AIT), and 47-min continuous moderate exercise (CME) on separate days, with at least 48 h between each test day. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured pre-exercise and used as baseline value. EPOC was measured until baseline metabolic rate was re-established. An increase in O2 uptake lasting for 70.4 ± 24.8 min (4-AIT), 35.9 ± 17.3 min (1-AIT), and 45.6 ± 17.3 min (CME) was observed. EPOC were 2.9 ± 1.7 L O2 (4-AIT), 1.3 ±  .1 L O2 (1-AIT), and 1.4 ± 1.1 L O2 (CME). There were significant differences (P exercise intensity has a significant positive effect on EPOC in men with metabolic syndrome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to intensities of occupational mechanical exposures across 10-year exposure time windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to identify intensities of occupational mechanical exposures (force, arm elevation and repetition) that do not entail an increased risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) even after prolonged durations of exposure. Additionally, we wanted to evaluate...... if exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) is an independent risk factor. METHODS: We used data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (n=2 374 403). During follow-up (2003-2008), 14 118 first-time events of surgery for SIS occurred. For each person, we linked register...... of exposure at specific intensities above minimal (low, medium and high). We used a logistic regression technique equivalent to discrete survival analysis adjusting for cumulative effects of other mechanical exposures. RESULTS: We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition (median angular...

  17. Research Thinking of Low-intensity laser For the Treatment of Menopausal Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G Z; Wang, X Y; Xu, Y X; Li, L J; Liu, S H

    2011-01-01

    Female climacteric syndrome is a clinical syndrome due to autonomic nerve dysfunction occurring in women during climacteric period, which may affect their physical and mental health. Therefore, how to pass climacteric period for women without any problems, avoid or reduce the occurrence of climacteric syndrome, prevent geriatric diseases and improve life quality is a key issue now for great attention. Looking for a convenient, effective, and safer method without toxic-side effects to control the disease is a modern medical problem. By analyzing the relationship between laser technology and traditional acupuncture and moxibustion, the advantage and the existing problems on acupuncture and moxibustion for the treatment of menopausal syndrome, the application of laser methods for the mechanism research on TCM diagnosis and treatment of menopausal syndrome was discussed. It's pointed out that the laser acupuncture is safe and effective to treat menopausal syndrome. Breakthrough will be achieved from the research of the selection of the acupoint prescription and mechanism of Acupuncture and Moxibustion for the treatment of menopausal syndrome by utilizing the advantage of interdisciplinary intersection. Laser technology will make the development of acupuncture and moxibustion science possess an unprecedented field.

  18. Research Thinking of Low-intensity laser For the Treatment of Menopausal Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G Z; Wang, X Y [Second Clinical Medical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, 510405 (China); Xu, Y X; Li, L J [Acupuncture and Massage College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, 510405 (China); Liu, S H, E-mail: xuyx1968@163.com [South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510631 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Female climacteric syndrome is a clinical syndrome due to autonomic nerve dysfunction occurring in women during climacteric period, which may affect their physical and mental health. Therefore, how to pass climacteric period for women without any problems, avoid or reduce the occurrence of climacteric syndrome, prevent geriatric diseases and improve life quality is a key issue now for great attention. Looking for a convenient, effective, and safer method without toxic-side effects to control the disease is a modern medical problem. By analyzing the relationship between laser technology and traditional acupuncture and moxibustion, the advantage and the existing problems on acupuncture and moxibustion for the treatment of menopausal syndrome, the application of laser methods for the mechanism research on TCM diagnosis and treatment of menopausal syndrome was discussed. It's pointed out that the laser acupuncture is safe and effective to treat menopausal syndrome. Breakthrough will be achieved from the research of the selection of the acupoint prescription and mechanism of Acupuncture and Moxibustion for the treatment of menopausal syndrome by utilizing the advantage of interdisciplinary intersection. Laser technology will make the development of acupuncture and moxibustion science possess an unprecedented field.

  19. Nasogastric Tube Syndrome: Why Is It Important in the Intensive Care Unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehyun Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the nasogastric tube (NGT is widely used in critically ill patients, most intensivists do not give much thought to it or its possible complications. NGT syndrome is a rare but fatal complication characterized by throat pain and vocal cord paralysis in the presence of NGT. Recently, we experienced a case of NGT syndrome developed in an 86-year-old female twelve days after NGT insertion. We immediately removed the NGT and secured the airway by tracheostomy. She was treated successfully with an intravenous antibiotic, steroid and proton pump inhibitor and the syndrome did not recur after reinsertion of the NGT.

  20. Distribution of Behçet's Syndrome in the World and in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorna Ghafari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives : Behçet's syndrome is an inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology that has a unique worldwide prevalence and distribution. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Behçet's syndrome in the world and in Iran using a systematic review and meta-analysis approach. Material and Methods: Data banks of Ovid, MEDLINE, Rheumatology, Google scholar, Springer, PubMed, Science direct, Wiley, Magiran, SID, Iranmedex and Irandoc from 1990 onwards were searched. All cross-sectional studies relevant to the prevalence of Behçet's in the world and in Iran were studied. Prevalence rate of Behçet's syndrome with 95% confidence limits was calculated. For statistical analysis, prevalence rates were entered in the Comprehensive Meta Analysis (CMA software. The prevalence of Behçet's was mapped with the Geographic Information Systems (GIS. Results: In this study, 23 articles were finally accepted. The overall prevalence of Behçet's syndrome in the world was 42.4 per 100000 (95% CI: 0.382 -0.465. Heterogeneity rate with 23 studies was 1127.5, and with 21 studies were 490.3. The highest rates were reported from Turkey with the overall prevalence of 4.2 per 1000 (95% CI: 4.073- 4.327. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the highest occurrence of Behçet's disease was observed in Turkey, Palestine and Iran. It is also, however, common in Europe, America and other Asian countries.

  1. 'Sometimes it feels as if the world goes on without me': adolescents' experiences of living with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, Anette; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Wyller, Vegard B; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-09-01

    To explore the experience of being an adolescent with chronic fatigue syndrome. Despite ample research, chronic fatigue syndrome is still poorly understood, and there are still controversies related to the illness. Adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome are often unable to attend school and lose social relations with friends. The challenges they face will affect their quality of life. A qualitative, phenomenological hermeneutical design. Six boys and twelve girls, aged 12-18, were interviewed, emphasising their own experiences living with chronic fatigue syndrome. Analyses were performed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The core theme, 'Sometimes it feels as if the world goes on without me', encompasses the feelings an adolescent living with chronic fatigue syndrome might have about life. The core theme was supported by four subthemes: 'On the side of life--locked in and shut out'; 'the body, the illness and me'; 'if the illness is not visible to others, does it exist?'; and 'handling life while hoping for a better future'. The subthemes reflect the experience of social isolation, their own and others' understanding of the illness and hope for the future. Not being able to be with friends, or attend school, made the adolescents feel different and forgotten. They felt alienated in their own bodies and were struggling to be visible to themselves and to their surroundings. Spending less time with friends and more time with their parents constituted a threat to independence and development. Yet they managed to envision a better future despite all the difficulties. To provide effective support and constructive relations to adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome, all health professions involved need insight from the persons who are themselves ill. Health centres could function as resource centres for patients and healthcare professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to intensities of occupational mechanical exposures across 10-year exposure time windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to identify intensities of occupational mechanical exposures (force, arm elevation and repetition) that do not entail an increased risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) even after prolonged durations of exposure. Additionally, we wanted to evaluate if exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) is an independent risk factor. We used data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (n=2 374 403). During follow-up (2003-2008), 14 118 first-time events of surgery for SIS occurred. For each person, we linked register-based occupational codes (1993-2007) to a general population job exposure matrix to obtain year-by-year exposure intensities on measurement scales for force, upper arm elevation >90° and repetition and expert rated intensities of exposure to HAV. For 10-year exposure time windows, we calculated the duration of exposure at specific intensities above minimal (low, medium and high). We used a logistic regression technique equivalent to discrete survival analysis adjusting for cumulative effects of other mechanical exposures. We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition (median angular velocity 90° >2 min/day implied an increased risk reaching ORs of 1.7 and 1.5 after 10 years at low intensities. No associations were found for HAV. We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition. Any intensities of force and upper arm elevation >90° above minimal implied an increased risk across 10-year exposure time windows. No independent associations were found for HAV. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. The relation between intensity and complexity of coronary artery lesion and oxidative stress in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Turhan; Menteşe, Ümit; Ağaç, Mustafa Tarık; Akyüz, Ali Rıza; Kul, Selim; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Bektaş, Hüseyin; Korkmaz, Levent; Öztaş Menteşe, Seda; Dursun, İhsan; Çelik, Şükrü

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between oxidative stress and complexity and intensity of coronary artery disease is less clear. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between oxidative stress markers and the complexity and intensity of coronary artery disease in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Sixty-seven consecutive patients with an early phase of ACS (=22). Likewise patients were divided into two CAD severity groups according to the median Gensini score of 64: less intensive CAD with Gensini score (=64. Blood samples were taken in 1 hour within administration in order to measure total oxidative status (TOS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels determined by Erel method. Oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated by TOS /TAC. There was no significant difference between the two SYNTAX groups for oxidative stress markers. Median TOS and OSI values were significantly high in the intensive CAD group (p=0.005, p=0.04, respectively). The Gensini score was positively correlated with TOS and OSI (p=0.003, p=0.02, respectively). Oxidative stress markers may be considered supportive laboratory parameters related to CAD intensity but not complexity in ACS patients.

  4. Emotion Recognition in Children With Down Syndrome: Influence of Emotion Label and Expression Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, Katie R; Wishart, Jennifer G; Willis, Diane S; Pitcairn, Tom K

    2017-03-01

    Some children with Down syndrome may experience difficulties in recognizing facial emotions, particularly fear, but it is not clear why, nor how such skills can best be facilitated. Using a photo-matching task, emotion recognition was tested in children with Down syndrome, children with nonspecific intellectual disability and cognitively matched, typically developing children (all groups N = 21) under four conditions: veridical vs. exaggerated emotions and emotion-labelling vs. generic task instructions. In all groups, exaggerating emotions facilitated recognition accuracy and speed, with emotion labelling facilitating recognition accuracy. Overall accuracy and speed did not differ in the children with Down syndrome, although recognition of fear was poorer than in the typically developing children and unrelated to emotion label use. Implications for interventions are considered.

  5. Comparative effectiveness of recommended versus less intensive drug combinations in secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezin, Julien; Groenwold, Rolf; Ali, M Sanni; Lassalle, Régis; Robinson, Philip; de Boer, Anthonius; Moore, Nicholas; Klungel, Olaf H; Pariente, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The secondary prevention treatment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is based on the combined use of drugs from four therapeutic classes (beta-blockers, antiplatelet agents, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers). The objective of this study

  6. Comparative effectiveness of recommended versus less intensive drug combinations in secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezin, Julien; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Ali, M. Sanni; Lassalle, Régis; Robinson, Philip; de Boer, A.; Moore, Nicholas; Klungel, Olaf H.; Pariente, Antoine

    Purpose: The secondary prevention treatment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is based on the combined use of drugs from four therapeutic classes (beta-blockers, antiplatelet agents, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers). The objective of this study

  7. The First World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders: Controversies and Hot Topics in Etiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A.; Stern, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    The first World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders was held in London, June 2016 by the Tourette Association of America, Tourettes Action (UK), and the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome. Presentations arising from large-scale collaborative projects were an important component of the scientific programme. This article focuses on areas raised in the hot topics session and two moderated debates, which covered emerging research in etiology and treatment. The hot topics ranged across genetics, arguably including the first confirmed Tourette Syndrome (TS) susceptibility gene NRXN1, neurocognition, and neurophysiology, including the possibility of a neurocognitive endophenotype for TS and the use of depth and cortical surface electrodes to investigate the neurophysiology of tics on the background of the evolving field of deep brain stimulation (DBS), to novel treatment approaches such as dental orthotics and an online behavioral intervention. The debates aired controversies in treatment; pharmacotherapy vs. behavioral treatment and the place of medical cannabinoids. These sessions demonstrate the vibrancy of a field that has considerably expanded in the last decade, the significant progress that has been made, and the direction that some of the most fruitful next phases of research will take. PMID:27375411

  8. A global perspective on irritable bowel syndrome: a consensus statement of the World Gastroenterology Organisation Summit Task Force on irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-08-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common in western Europe and North America, and many aspects of its epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history have been described in these regions. Recent data suggest, however, that IBS is also common in the rest of the world and there has been some evidence to suggest some differences in demographics and presenting features between IBS in the west and as it is experienced elsewhere. The World Gastroenterology Organization, therefore, established a Task Force comprising experts on the topic from all parts of the world to examine IBS from a global perspective. IBS does, indeed, seem to be common worldwide though with some significant variations in prevalence rates between regions and countries and there may well be some potentially interesting variations in presenting symptoms and sex distribution. The global map of IBS is far from complete; community-based prevalence data is not available from many areas. Furthermore, while some general trends are evident in terms of IBS impact and demographics, international comparisons are hampered by differences in diagnostic criteria, study location and methodology; several important unanswered questions have been identified that should form the basis for future collaborative research and have the potential to shed light on this challenging disorder.

  9. Scrub Typhus - A Major Cause of Pediatric Intensive Care Admission and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome: A Single-Center Experience from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Prabahs Prasun; Roy, Joydeb; Saha, Agnisekhar

    2018-02-01

    Scrub typhus has been globally recognized as an emerging infectious disease contributing significantly to pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and a potential cause of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). We studied the incidence of scrub typhus as a cause of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission and MODS in our hospital and its clinical and laboratory characteristics to measure the incidence of MODS caused by scrub typhus. This study was done in a pediatric teaching hospital in Kolkata, India. Records of patients admitted with PUO from March 2012 to December 2015 were reviewed. Rathi-Goodman-Aghai scoring system was used to identify potential ST patients and confirmed by serological testing. Clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, and treatment response were noted of those needing PICU admissions. Ninety-seven cases of scrub typhus have been identified during that period. PICU admission was needed in 30 of them (31%) which contributed 8.43% of total PICU admissions. Among these 30 patients, 16 (53%) developed MODS which contributed 18.29% of total MODS admitted in PICU. Septic shock was the most common manifestation in as many as 18 (60%) patients followed by encephalopathy in 13 (43%). Patients were treated with either doxycycline alone or in combination with azithromycin. Mean time to complete defervescence was 32 h after first dose of doxycycline. The outcome was excellent without a single mortality. Scrub typhus is an important cause of MODS in this part of the world, especially in fevers associated with features as identified and not responding to conventional antibiotics.

  10. Burnout syndrome--assessment of a stressful job among intensive care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubrilo-Turek, Mirjana; Urek, Roman; Turek, Stjepan

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the degree of burnout experienced by intensive care staff particularly, in Medical (MICU) and Surgical Intensive Care Units (SICU) General Hospital "Sveti Duh", Zagreb. A sample group of 41 emergency physicians and nurses from MICU and 30 from SICU was tested. The survey included demographic data and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) scoring test identified by the three main components associated with burnout: emotional exhaustion (MBI-EE), depersonalization (MBI-DEP), and personal accomplishment (MBI-PA) were assessed using 22-item questionnaire. The degrees of burnout were stratified into low, moderate, and high range. Mean total MBI (X +/- SD) were high in both groups: higher for the MICU (65.5 +/- 6.7) than for SICU staff (55.7 +/- 3.8, p burnout represented in a moderate degree. The presence of burnout is a serious phenomenon, because it can lead to psychosomatic complaints, work-associated withdrawal behaviour, and a lower quality of care at intensive care units. Early recognition of burnout phenomenon as a result of prolonged stress and frustration among intensive care staff, contributes to better professional behavior, organizational structure changes in the work environment and better health care quality for critically ill patients.

  11. Remifentanil in the intensive care unit: tolerance and acute withdrawal syndrome after prolonged

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delvaux, B.; Ryckwaert, Y.; Boven, van R.M.; Kock, M.; Capdevila, X.

    2005-01-01

    SEDATION in the intensive care unit should be minimized to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and its related complications.1 The drug regimen would ideally allow rapid awakening, to perform neurologic and respiratory evaluation on a daily basis.2,3 In this context, remifentanil, with its

  12. Case Study of High-Dose Ketamine for Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Tracy Ann; Crowley, Kelli; Campese, Catherine; Lauer, Rachel; Yang, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a life-altering and debilitating chronic pain condition. The authors are presenting a case study of a female who received high-dose ketamine for the management of her CRPS. The innovative treatment lies not only within the pharmacologic management of her pain, but also in the fact that she was the first patient to be admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit solely for pain control. The primary component of the pharmacotherapy treatment strategy plan was escalating-dose ketamine infusion via patient-controlled-analgesia approved by the pharmacy and therapeutics committee guided therapy for this patient. The expertise of advanced practice nurses blended exquisitely to ensure patient and family-centered care and the coordination of care across the illness trajectory. The patient experienced positive outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiting Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS.

  14. An intense and short-lasting burst of neutrophil activation differentiates early acute myocardial infarction from systemic inflammatory syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Maugeri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils are involved in thrombus formation. We investigated whether specific features of neutrophil activation characterize patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS compared to stable angina and to systemic inflammatory diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The myeloperoxidase (MPO content of circulating neutrophils was determined by flow cytometry in 330 subjects: 69 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS, 69 with chronic stable angina (CSA, 50 with inflammation due to either non-infectious (acute bone fracture, infectious (sepsis or autoimmune diseases (small and large vessel systemic vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis. Four patients have also been studied before and after sterile acute injury of the myocardium (septal alcoholization. One hundred thirty-eight healthy donors were studied in parallel. Neutrophils with normal MPO content were 96% in controls, >92% in patients undergoing septal alcoholization, 91% in CSA patients, but only 35 and 30% in unstable angina and AMI (STEMI and NSTEMI patients, compared to 80%, 75% and 2% of patients with giant cell arteritis, acute bone fracture and severe sepsis. In addition, in 32/33 STEMI and 9/21 NSTEMI patients respectively, 20% and 12% of neutrophils had complete MPO depletion during the first 4 hours after the onset of symptoms, a feature not observed in any other group of patients. MPO depletion was associated with platelet activation, indicated by P-selectin expression, activation and transactivation of leukocyte β2-integrins and formation of platelet neutrophil and -monocyte aggregates. The injection of activated platelets in mice produced transient, P-selectin dependent, complete MPO depletion in about 50% of neutrophils. CONCLUSIONS: ACS are characterized by intense neutrophil activation, like other systemic inflammatory syndromes. In the very early phase of acute myocardial infarction only a subpopulation of neutrophils is massively activated, possibly via

  15. Refeeding syndrome influences outcome of anorexia nervosa patients in intensive care unit: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Vignaud, Marie; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Ruivard, Marc; Villemeyre-Plane, Michele; Futier, Emmanuel; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Annane, Djillali

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Data on the epidemiology and management of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the intensive care unit (ICU) are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and associated morbidity and mortality of AN in French ICUs. Methods We randomly selected 30 ICUs throughout France. Thereafter, we retrospectively analyzed all patients with AN admitted to any of these 30 ICUs between May 2006 and May 2008. We considered demographic data, diagnosis at admission and complications occurr...

  16. Intensive rehabilitative approach to eosinophilia myalgia syndrome associated with severe polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draznin, E; Rosenberg, N L

    1993-07-01

    We report a case of the eosinophilia myalgia syndrome (EMS) with incapacitating myalgias, weakness secondary to a severe polyneuropathy, and contractures in all four extremities requiring aggressive rehabilitation treatment. A 55-year-old woman was admitted to a rehabilitation hospital 11 months after the onset of EMS. At that time, she had severe weakness secondary to peripheral neuropathy and painful contractures in all extremities and required high doses of narcotics for pain control. A continuous passive range of motion machine was used in order to maintain range of motion obtained during active exercise therapy. The patient showed functional improvement in basic mobility and ADL skills. She was withdrawn from narcotics and successfully learned pain management techniques. An aggressive rehabilitation approach in the treatment of EMS associated with peripheral neuropathy may improve functional outcome even when instituted late in the clinical course.

  17. [Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 in the intensive coronary care unit of the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preza, Paul M; Hurtado, Abdías; Armas, Victoria; Cárcamo, César P

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 1 in a coronary care unit and its association with hospital mortality within 30 days of admission, as well as other epidemiological characteristics. The medical records of all the patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute heart failure in a 4-year period were reviewed. CRS type 1 was characterized by the presence of acute heart failure and an elevation of serum creatinine ≥0.3mg/dL in comparison to the baseline creatinine calculated by the MDRD75 equation and/or the elevation of ≥50% of the admission serum creatinine within a 48 h period. The incidence of CRS type 1 was 27.87%, 95% CI: 20.13-36.71 (34 of 122). There was a higher frequency of CRS type 1 in those patients who were admitted with the diagnosis of cardiogenic shock (adjusted RR 2.02, 95% CI: 1.20-3.93, p=0.0378) and in those with higher hemoglobin levels (p=0.0412). The CRS type 1 was associated with an increase of 30-day mortality (HR: 4.11, 95% CI: 1.20-14.09, p=0.0244). The incidence of CRS type 1 in the coronary care unit found in our study is similar to those found in foreign studies. The history of stroke and the higher values of hemoglobin were associated with a higher incidence of cardiorenal syndrome type 1. Patients with CRS type 1 had a higher hospital mortality within 30 days of admission. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of linaclotide in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation in a real‑world setting - results from a German noninterventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Viola; Miehlke, Stephan; Beck, Elmar; Wiseman, Gwen; Layer, Peter

    2018-05-09

     Linaclotide is a minimally absorbed peptide guanylate cyclase-C agonist approved for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). This study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of linaclotide in IBS-C in routine clinical practice in Germany.  This was a 52-week, noninterventional study of linaclotide in patients aged ≥ 18 years with moderate to severe IBS-C. Severity of abdominal pain and bloating and frequency of bowel movements were assessed over 5 study visits. Treatment-related adverse events were recorded.  The study enrolled 375 patients; the mean observation duration was 4.4 months. Linaclotide marketing was halted during the study period for economic reasons, accounting for low patient numbers and short observation duration. Linaclotide significantly reduced mean (standard deviation [SD]) scores between treatment start (visit 1) and study end (visit 5) for abdominal pain intensity (visit 1: 4.87 [2.63] vs. visit 5: 2.40 [2.20], p < 0.0001), mean [SD] bloating intensity (visit 1: 5.30 [2.70] vs. visit 5: 2.86 [2.34], p < 0.0001), and increased mean [SD] bowel movement frequency (visit 1: 2.71 [1.80] vs. 4.38 [1.86], p < 0.0001). Diarrhea, occurring in 5.1 % of patients, was the most common adverse event.  Linaclotide is effective in improving the major symptoms of IBS-C and demonstrates a favorable safety profile in the real-world environment of routine clinical practice. DRKS (www.drks.de/): DRKS00005088. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Effect of short-term intensive atorvastatin treatment on interventional treatment effect and cardiac function of patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of short-term intensive atorvastatin treatment on interventional treatment effect and cardiac function of patients with acute coronary syndrome. Methods: A total of 104 cases of patients with acute coronary syndrome who received PCI treatment in Emergency Department of our hospital from May 2014 to November 2015 were retrospectively analyzed and divided into intensive group and routine group according to different atorvastatin treatment methods, and then biochemical indexes, cardiac ultrasound indicators and inflammatory indexes of two groups were compared. Results: Serum TG, TC, LDL-C, hs- CRP, LDH, α-HBDH, CK and CK-MB content of intensive group were significantly lower than those of routine group while HDL-C content was higher than that of routine group; E/ A ratio and LVEF of intensive group were higher than those of routine group while Tei index, systolic index and diastolic index were lower than those of routine group; TLR4 and NF-kB expression levels in peripheral blood as well as TNF-α and IL-6 content in serum of intensive group were significantly lower than those of routine group. Conclusion: Short-term intensive atorvastatin treatment improves the interventional treatment effect of patients with acute coronary syndrome, and can reduce myocardial injury, improve cardiac diastolic and systolic function and inhibit the inflammation mediated by TLR4/NF-kB.

  20. Evaluation of CT findings in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome in intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Ryoichi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Morihito; Yoshida, Masashi; Ura, Nobuyuki; Kaneko, Masamitsu

    1996-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of 19 critically ill patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in ICU were analyzed retrospectively. ARDS was diagnosed according to Murray's criteria (Lung Injury Score> 2.5). The CT findings obtained were diffuse increased lung opacities [100%] (ground-glass opacity [100%] and air-space consolidation [74%]), lobular distributions of increased opacity [53%], loss of lung volume [53%], bronchiectasis and bronchioloectasis [42%] , fine reticular opacity [26%] and peribronchovascular distributions of increased density [11%]. Among those findings, diffuse increased lung opacities were seen in almost all patients. Especially ground-glass opacity was seen in all patients and distributed in the whole lung. Air-space consolidation was observed in 14 patients and involved mainly lower lung fields. Loss of lung volume and bronchiectasis and bronchioloectasis were likely to exist in the same area of air-space consolidation. Lobular distributions of increased opacity was seen in 10 patients without specific distribution. Those findings were thought to be relatively specific CT findings of ARDS. It is concluded that CT findings provide more information than bedside plain roentgenograms and was useful for clinical management of patients with ARDS. (author)

  1. High-intensity focused ultrasound for potential treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome: toward a noninvasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Islam A; Ballard, John R; Casper, Andrew J; Hennings, Leah J; Cressman, Erik; Ebbini, Emad S

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), under dual-mode ultrasound arrays (DMUAs) guidance, to induce localized thermal damage inside ovaries without damage to the ovarian surface. Laboratory feasibility study. University-based laboratory. Ex vivo canine and bovine ovaries. DMUA-guided HIFU. Detection of ovarian damage by ultrasound imaging, gross pathology, and histology. It is feasible to induce localized thermal damage inside ovaries without damage to the ovarian surface. DMUA provided sensitive imaging feedback regarding the anatomy of the treated ovaries and the ablation process. Different ablation protocols were tested, and thermal damage within the treated ovaries was histologically characterized. The absence of damage to the ovarian surface may eliminate many of the complications linked to current laparoscopic ovarian drilling (LOD) techniques. HIFU may be used as a less traumatic tool to perform LOD. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of GnRH agonist triggering and intensive luteal steroid support on live-birth rates and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Lan, Vuong Thi Ngoc; Tuong, Ho Manh

    2013-01-01

    Conventional luteal support packages are inadequate to facilitate a fresh transfer after GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger in patients at high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). By providing intensive luteal-phase support with oestradiol and progesterone satisfactory implanta......Conventional luteal support packages are inadequate to facilitate a fresh transfer after GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger in patients at high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). By providing intensive luteal-phase support with oestradiol and progesterone satisfactory...... implantation rates can be sustained. The objective of this study was to assess the live-birth rate and incidence of OHSS after GnRHa trigger and intensive luteal steroid support compared to traditional hCG trigger and conventional luteal support in OHSS high risk Asian patients....

  3. Management of Marfan Syndrome during pregnancy: A real world experience from a Joint Cardiac Obstetric Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joanna C E-S; Cauldwell, Matthew; Patel, Roshni R; Uebing, Anselm; Curry, Ruth A; Johnson, Mark R; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Swan, Lorna

    2017-09-15

    Pregnancy in Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is associated with increased maternal risk of cardiovascular events. Given the maternal and genetic risks, pre-conception counselling is essential to facilitate informed choices. Multidisciplinary antenatal care with regular imaging is mandatory and best delivered through a Joint Cardiac Obstetric Service (JCOS). The aim of this study was to compare the care delivered in a JCOS against recognised international standards (European Society of Cardiology (ESC)). Pregnancies in women with MFS from 2005 to 2015 were identified from our institutional database. Patient records were reviewed and practice assessed against pre-determined standards based on ESC guidelines. There were 23 pregnancies in 15 women with MFS. 13/23 (57%) occurred in women with aortic dilatation at baseline. There were 3 important maternal cardiac events (type A dissection; deterioration in left ventricular function; significant left ventricular and progressive aortic dilatation). Four women did not have access to expert pre-conception counselling. These women were all referred to the JCOS late in established pregnancy. Imaging was often delayed and only 7/23 cases (30%) met the standard for minimum frequency of echocardiographic surveillance. Only 12/23 (52%) had pre-conception imaging of the whole aorta with CT/MRI. Distal aortic dilatation was identified in 7/23 cases but none of these underwent further MRI evaluation during pregnancy. Despite having a dedicated JCOS, our data show that facilitating complete obstetric and cardiac care for this group remains challenging. Education of local care providers and timely referral for expert pre-conception counselling in a JCOS are key. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Studying Acute Coronary Syndrome Through the World Wide Web: Experiences and Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Angelo A

    2017-10-13

    This study details my viewpoint on the experiences, lessons, and assessments of conducting a national study on care-seeking behavior for heart attack in the United States utilizing the World Wide Web. The Yale Heart Study (YHS) was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Grounded on two prior studies, the YHS combined a Web-based interview survey instrument; ads placed on the Internet; flyers and posters in public libraries, senior centers, and rehabilitation centers; information on chat rooms; a viral marketing strategy; and print ads to attract potential participants to share their heart attack experiences. Along the way, the grant was transferred from Ohio State University (OSU) to Yale University, and significant administrative, information technology, and personnel challenges ensued that materially delayed the study's execution. Overall, the use of the Internet to collect data on care-seeking behavior is very time consuming and emergent. The cost of using the Web was approximately 31% less expensive than that of face-to-face interviews. However, the quality of the data may have suffered because of the absence of some data compared with interviewing participants. Yet the representativeness of the 1154 usable surveys appears good, with the exception of a dearth of African American participants. ©Angelo A Alonzo. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 13.10.2017.

  5. Improving the Patient Experience by Implementing an ICU Diary for Those at Risk of Post-intensive Care Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Taylor A Blair BA, RN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The critical care literature in the US has recently brought attention to the impact an ICU experience can have long after the patient survives critical illness, particularly if delirium was present. Current recommendations to mitigate post-intensive care syndrome (PICS are embedded in patient and family-centered care and aim to promote family presence in the ICU, provide support for decision-making, and enhance communication with the health-care team. Evidence-based interventions are few in number but include use of an ICU diary to minimize the psychological and emotional sequelae affecting patients and family members in the months following the ICU stay. In this paper we describe our efforts to implement an ICU diary and solicit feedback on its role in fostering teamwork and communication between patients, family members, and ICU staff. Next steps will involve a PICS follow-up clinic where trained staff will coordinate specialty referrals and perform long-term monitoring of mental health and other quality of life outcomes.

  6. Improving the Patient Experience by Implementing an ICU Diary for Those at Risk of Post-intensive Care Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, K Taylor A; Eccleston, Sarah D; Binder, Hannah M; McCarthy, Mary S

    2017-03-01

    The critical care literature in the US has recently brought attention to the impact an ICU experience can have long after the patient survives critical illness, particularly if delirium was present. Current recommendations to mitigate post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) are embedded in patient and family-centered care and aim to promote family presence in the ICU, provide support for decision-making, and enhance communication with the health-care team. Evidence-based interventions are few in number but include use of an ICU diary to minimize the psychological and emotional sequelae affecting patients and family members in the months following the ICU stay. In this paper we describe our efforts to implement an ICU diary and solicit feedback on its role in fostering teamwork and communication between patients, family members, and ICU staff. Next steps will involve a PICS follow-up clinic where trained staff will coordinate specialty referrals and perform long-term monitoring of mental health and other quality of life outcomes.

  7. Shell's Big Dirty Secret. Insight into the world's most carbon intensive oil company and the legacy of CEO Jeroen van der Veer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, L.; Rowell, A.; Kretzmann, S.

    2009-06-01

    Royal Dutch Shell plc is the largest oil operator in Nigeria, and holds more acreage in Canada's oil sands than any other corporation. Because of these facts, and several others, Shell is also the most carbon intensive oil company in the world. In short, for every barrel of oil it produces in the future, Shell will contribute more to global warming than any other oil company. This report documents Shell's record investment in dirty forms of energy, and it illuminates the corporate strategy and lobbying for regulations that indicate it intends to profit from that position for a long time to come (authors' abstract)

  8. Effects of High Intensity Interval Training and Strength Training on Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Hormonal Outcomes in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Almenning

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common endocrinopathy in reproductive-age women, and associates with insulin resistance. Exercise is advocated in this disorder, but little knowledge exists on the optimal exercise regimes. We assessed the effects of high intensity interval training and strength training on metabolic, cardiovascular, and hormonal outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.Three-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Thirty-one women with polycystic ovary syndrome (age 27.2 ± 5.5 years; body mass index 26.7 ± 6.0 kg/m2 were randomly assigned to high intensity interval training, strength training, or a control group. The exercise groups exercised three times weekly for 10 weeks.The main outcome measure was change in homeostatic assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. HOMA-IR improved significantly only after high intensity interval training, by -0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.45, -0.20, equal to 17%, with between-group difference (p = 0.014. After high intensity interval training, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.2 (95% CI, 0.02, 0.5 mmol/L, with between group difference (p = 0.04. Endothelial function, measured as flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, increased significantly after high intensity interval training, by 2.0 (95% CI, 0.1, 4.0 %, between-group difference (p = 0.08. Fat percentage decreased significantly after both exercise regimes, without changes in body weight. After strength training, anti-Müllarian hormone was significantly reduced, by -14.8 (95% CI, -21.2, -8.4 pmol/L, between-group difference (p = 0.04. There were no significant changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, adiponectin or leptin in any group.High intensity interval training for ten weeks improved insulin resistance, without weight loss, in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Body composition improved significantly after both strength training and high intensity interval training. This pilot

  9. Effects of High Intensity Interval Training and Strength Training on Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Hormonal Outcomes in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenning, Ida; Rieber-Mohn, Astrid; Lundgren, Kari Margrethe; Shetelig Løvvik, Tone; Garnæs, Kirsti Krohn; Moholdt, Trine

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common endocrinopathy in reproductive-age women, and associates with insulin resistance. Exercise is advocated in this disorder, but little knowledge exists on the optimal exercise regimes. We assessed the effects of high intensity interval training and strength training on metabolic, cardiovascular, and hormonal outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Three-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Thirty-one women with polycystic ovary syndrome (age 27.2 ± 5.5 years; body mass index 26.7 ± 6.0 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to high intensity interval training, strength training, or a control group. The exercise groups exercised three times weekly for 10 weeks. The main outcome measure was change in homeostatic assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). HOMA-IR improved significantly only after high intensity interval training, by -0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.45, -0.20), equal to 17%, with between-group difference (p = 0.014). After high intensity interval training, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.2 (95% CI, 0.02, 0.5) mmol/L, with between group difference (p = 0.04). Endothelial function, measured as flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, increased significantly after high intensity interval training, by 2.0 (95% CI, 0.1, 4.0) %, between-group difference (p = 0.08). Fat percentage decreased significantly after both exercise regimes, without changes in body weight. After strength training, anti-Müllarian hormone was significantly reduced, by -14.8 (95% CI, -21.2, -8.4) pmol/L, between-group difference (p = 0.04). There were no significant changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, adiponectin or leptin in any group. High intensity interval training for ten weeks improved insulin resistance, without weight loss, in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Body composition improved significantly after both strength training and high intensity interval training. This pilot study

  10. Successful Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Transplant With Full Donor Chimerism and Good Quality of Life in Adolescent Patient With Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Salah; Gacsadi, Anna; McDougall, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Christine; Krueger, Joerg; Schechter, Tal; Ali, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked disease characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, immune deficiency, and autoimmune phenomena. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment. Myeloablative conditioning is the most common regimen used for HSCT in patients with WAS to avoid the risk of mixed donor chimerism and autoimmunity post-HSCT. There is limited data on the use of reduced intensity conditioning for HSCT in patients with WAS. Here, we report a case with severe phenotype of WAS transplanted successfully with reduced intensity conditioning, which is an acceptable conditioning regimen and can be considered in patients with WAS with significantly impaired organ functions.

  11. The role of burnout syndrome as a mediator for the effect of psychosocial risk factors on the intensity of musculoskeletal disorders: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Tahereh; Pahlavian, Ahmad Heidari; Akbarzadeh, Mahdi; Motamedzade, Majid; Moghaddam, Rashid Heidari

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that burnout syndrome mediates effects of psychosocial risk factors and intensity of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among hospital nurses. The sample was composed of 415 nurses from various wards across five hospitals of Iran's Hamedan University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected through three questionnaires: job content questionnaire, Maslach burnout inventory and visual analogue scale. Results of structural equation modeling with a mediating effect showed that psychosocial risk factors were significantly related to changes in burnout, which in turn affects intensity of MSDs.

  12. Timing of low tidal volume ventilation and intensive care unit mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Dale M; Yang, Ting; Dinglas, Victor D; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Brower, Roy G; Pronovost, Peter J; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2015-01-15

    Reducing tidal volume decreases mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the effect of the timing of low tidal volume ventilation is not well understood. To evaluate the association of intensive care unit (ICU) mortality with initial tidal volume and with tidal volume change over time. Multivariable, time-varying Cox regression analysis of a multisite, prospective study of 482 patients with ARDS with 11,558 twice-daily tidal volume assessments (evaluated in milliliter per kilogram of predicted body weight [PBW]) and daily assessment of other mortality predictors. An increase of 1 ml/kg PBW in initial tidal volume was associated with a 23% increase in ICU mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.44; P = 0.008). Moreover, a 1 ml/kg PBW increase in subsequent tidal volumes compared with the initial tidal volume was associated with a 15% increase in mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02-1.29; P = 0.019). Compared with a prototypical patient receiving 8 days with a tidal volume of 6 ml/kg PBW, the absolute increase in ICU mortality (95% CI) of receiving 10 and 8 ml/kg PBW, respectively, across all 8 days was 7.2% (3.0-13.0%) and 2.7% (1.2-4.6%). In scenarios with variation in tidal volume over the 8-day period, mortality was higher when a larger volume was used earlier. Higher tidal volumes shortly after ARDS onset were associated with a greater risk of ICU mortality compared with subsequent tidal volumes. Timely recognition of ARDS and adherence to low tidal volume ventilation is important for reducing mortality. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00300248).

  13. Effect of Means of Problem-Oriented Physical Rehabilitation on Pain and Tactile Sensitivity and Pain Syndrome Intensity in Women with Post-Mastectomy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Є. Одинець

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to determine the effectiveness of problem-oriented physical rehabilitation of women with post-mastectomy syndrome in terms of normalization of their sensitivity and lessening of the pain syndrome. Materials and methods. The paper provides a review of the related literary sources and empirical data analyzed and summarized, offers definitions of pain by the Visual Analogue Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Verbal Rating Scale, evaluates tactile and pain sensitivity, and uses the methods of mathematical statistics. The participants in the study were 50 women with diagnosed with the post-mastectomy syndrome and at the stage of residential treatment. Results: The developed problem-oriented physical rehabilitation experimentally proved effective by showing improvements in tactile and pain sensitivity, and pain lessening by the sensory, affective and rating scales in women with post-mastectomy syndrome at the stage of residential treatment.

  14. Risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients according to World Health Organization, Third Report National Cholesterol Education Program, and International Diabetes Federation definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Angel Rodríguez1, Helena Delgado-Cohen1, Jesús Reviriego1, Manuel Serrano-Ríos21Clinical Research Department, Eli Lilly and Company, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Internal Medicine II, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainBackground: The availability of several definitions of the metabolic syndrome has created potential confusion concerning its prognostic utility. At present, little data exist about the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients.Aim: To identify risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to three diagnostic criteria: World Health Organization (WHO, Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF.Subjects and methods: A logistic regression model was used to identify demographic, clinical, and lifestyle variables related with metabolic syndrome (N = 1259.Results: Hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥7% were associated with increased risk of WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60–3.40; OR, 1.79 95% CI: 1.25–2.55; and OR, 1.58; 95% CI: 1.12–2.22, respectively. The risk of presenting metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATP III criteria was increased in female patients (OR, 2.02; 95% CI: 1.37–2.97, elevated fasting glucose levels (OR, 5.99; 95% CI: 3.56–10.07, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.28; 95% CI: 1.57–3.32, hypertension (OR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.59–3.53, and endocrine disorders (OR, 1.64; 95% CI: 1.06–2.57. For the IDF criteria, female patients and patients with left ventricular hypertrophy or insulin treatment were at higher risk of metabolic syndrome (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 2.35–6.80; OR, 2.72 95% CI: 1.22–6.04; and OR, 1.96 95% CI: 1.24–3.11, respectively.Conclusions: The

  15. High Rate of Return to High-Intensity Interval Training After Arthroscopic Management of Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riff, Andrew J; Ukwuani, Gift; Clapp, Ian; Movassaghi, Kamran; Kelly, D Michael; Nho, Shane J

    2018-06-01

    Since the inception of CrossFit in 2000, the popularity of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in the United States has risen dramatically. While HIIT is a highly efficient exercise for weight loss and improved conditioning, some literature reports injuries in up to 34% of HIIT participants. We sought to evaluate the functional and sports-specific results of hip arthroscopic surgery in recreational HIIT participants. To evaluate patients' ability to return to HIIT after hip arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Consecutive patients with FAIS who had identified themselves as participating in HIIT and had undergone hip arthroscopic surgery for the treatment of FAIS by a single fellowship-trained surgeon between 2012 and 2015 were reviewed. Demographic data; preoperative physical examination findings; preoperative imaging results; preoperative patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL), Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; and postoperative examination and PRO scores at a minimum 2 years after surgery, including a HIIT-specific questionnaire, were assessed for all patients. Thirty-two patients (13 male, 19 female) with a mean age of 34.7 ± 6.9 years (range, 21-49 years) were identified with a minimum 24-month follow-up. Among these, 22 participated in CrossFit, 4 in Shred415, 3 in Orangetheory, and 3 in self-directed cross-training including plyometrics. Preoperatively, 14 patients had discontinued HIIT because of activity-related hip complaints, 17 patients had scaled back involvement in HIIT, and 1 patient maintained her baseline routine. Postoperatively, 28 of 32 patients (88%) returned to HIIT at a mean of 9.8 ± 5.7 months after surgery (range, 3-24 months); 96% returned to HIIT at the same level as or better than before the injury. Fear

  16. Multidisciplinary care in the intensive care unit for a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome: a dental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setti, Juliana Santiago; Pinto, Sérgio Felix; Gaetti-Jardim, Ellen Cristina; Manrique, Gustavo Rodrigues; Mendonça, José Carlos Garcia de

    2012-03-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a genetic neurobehavioral disease affecting children's development and resulting in obesity, reduced height, hypotonia, endocrine disorders and cognitive deficits, which may impair oral integrity. This study aims to report on a case involving a white male 15-year-old patient with Prader-Willi syndrome whose oral examination revealed bacterial plaque, gingivitis, poor occlusion, viscous salivation and multiple lip, jugal mucosa, inserted gum and tongue ulcerations. An excision biopsy revealed oral ulcerations typical of herpes, which were considered to be likely to correlate with herpes encephalitis. This result demonstrates that a large portion of the deleterious effects of Prader-Willi syndrome can be attenuated by appropriate diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention, highlighting the role of an integrated multidisciplinary team in the development of therapeutic protocols for Prader-Willi syndrome patients.

  17. Effect of Statin Intensity on the Risk of Epilepsy After Ischaemic Stroke: Real-World Evidence from Population-Based Health Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-Ju; Lin, Hung-Wei; Ho, Yunn-Fang

    2018-04-01

    Statins possess neuroprotective effects. However, real-world evidence supporting their utility in post-stroke epilepsy (PSE) prevention is limited. The association between statin use, including timing of prescribing (pre-stroke vs post-stroke), type (lipophilicity, intensity of therapy) and dose intensity, and risk of developing PSE were investigated by studying Taiwanese health claims (2003-2013). Patients with new-onset ischaemic stroke were identified. The main outcome was a diagnosis of epilepsy after ischaemic stroke. According to pre-stroke statin use, groups of current users, former users, and non-users were compared using ANOVA. An extended Cox regression model was utilized to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of PSE, with post-stroke statin use and certain comedications as time-dependent variables. Serial sensitivity analyses were performed to ensure study robustness. Of the 20,858 ischaemic stroke patients, 954 (4.6%) developed PSE. Post-stroke statin use (adjusted HR (aHR) 0.55; 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.67, p < 0.001), but not pre-stroke statin use was associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing PSE. A dose-response correlation was also observed between PSE risk reduction and quartiles of the statin cumulative defined daily dose (cDDD) (aHR 0.84, 0.67, 0.53, and 0.50 for the lowest, second, third, and highest quartiles of cDDD, respectively). Risk predictors and protectors against PSE were also characterized. The post-stroke use of statins after ischaemic stroke was associated with PSE risk reduction in a cDDD-dependent manner. Further clinical studies on the potential applications of statins for PSE prophylaxis, particularly among at-risk patients, are warranted.

  18. Comparison of the effects of knee and hip and single knee muscles strengthening/ stretching exercises on pain intensity and function in athletes with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common musculoskeletal condition among athletes. The evidence emphasizes on the importance of hip musculature strengthening exercises for such patients. Objective: To investigate the effects of strengthening-stretching knee muscles exercises and hip posterolateral musculature exercises in athletes with PFPS. Methods: In this clinical trial, 28 athletes with age average of 22.7±2.4 years with PFPS were allocated into conventional knee muscles exercises (CKME (n=14 and posterolateral hip muscles exercises (PHME (n=14. The subjects of both groups performed the supervised exercise protocols in 12 sessions. The Visual Analogue Scale and 6-minute walking tests were administrated respectively to evaluate pain intensity and function. The data were analyzed using Shapiro-wilk test, Independent-sample t test, and Repeated Measure ANOVA test. Findings: Demographic, pain intensity, and physical function data were similar between groups at baseline. Both groups significantly improved in pain intensity and function following a 4-week exercise program. Additionally, the athletes in PHME group had higher level of decreased pain intensity and improved function in follow-up assessment than the subjects in CKME group. Conclusion: Using hip posterolateral musculature exercises in addition to the knee conventional exercises is more effective for athletes with PFPS.

  19. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Symptoms Intensity, Quality of Life, and Mental Health in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrollah Ebrahimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder with chronic abdominal pain, bowel habit variations, and lack of structural causes. Symptom intensity has a statistical relation with patients' quality of life (QOL and mental health. The first objective of the present study was to develop and provide a therapeutic plan based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for IBS that was operated for the very first time in Iran. The second objective was to determine the effectiveness of these treatments on IBS symptoms intensity, health-related QOL, and psychological health among patients with IBS.Methods: The participants were 15 women with IBS. The participants were diagnosed on the basis of ROME-III diagnosis criteria. The data collection tools consisted of IBS Symptom Severity Scale (IBS-SSS, the Irritable Bowel Syndrome Quality of Life (IBS-QOL questionnaire, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R used to evaluate mental health. Data were collected during the weeks of 0, 4, 12, and 24, during the treatment process. The extracted data was examined statistically via repeated measures MANOVA in SPSS software.Results: CBT has a significant effect on IBS symptoms reduction, QOL improvement, and mental health promotion of the patients. The effect of the therapeutic plan persisted until the follow-up stage.Conclusion: According to the results, applied CBT can be specifically implemented as an effective treatment for IBS. Therefore, the use of this treatment is advised.

  20. Cost intensity of identifying contraindications to driving a company car through psychological tests on the basis of real-world data in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczyk, Grzegorz; Czerw, Aleksandra; Tatara, Tomasz; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Walusiak-Skorupa, Joanna; Słoniewski, Robert; Staniszewska, Anna; Olejniczak, Dominik; Religioni, Urszula

    2017-12-01

    The study objective was to determine the cost intensity of identifying contraindications to fleet car driving in preventive care. The objective of a psychological examination is to identify impaired psychomotor function as well as any intellectual, cognitive or emotional incapacities, which may seriously impede safety. Real-world data were collected from the healthcare provider in Poland. A total of 8111 anonymous records from psychomotor tests performed between January 1 and December 31, 2012 were analysed. The number needed to screen to identify one person with contraindications to driving was 737. An individual examination costs PLN 150, thus the estimated cost of identifying one case was PLN 110,550 (EUR 25,000). The average number of tests in a small enterprise with 20-50 fleet cars was estimated at 5-25 in a 5-year period and their cost at PLN 3750 (PLN 750 annually). Health check-ups include ophthalmological and neurological consultations; therefore, psychological examination of fleet car drivers may be considered excessive due to cost and limited preventive value. High costs may be burdensome mainly to larger companies. A final decision regarding necessity of psychological testing should be preceded by medical assessment of the risk of work accidents.

  1. Navigating the Social World: A Curriculum for Individuals with Asperger's Syndrome, High Functioning Autism and Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Jeanette L.

    This volume presents a curriculum developed specifically to develop the social, emotional, and organizational skills of individuals with Asperger's Syndrome or high functioning autism. The book offers ideas and techniques drawn from various disciplines including cognitive behavioral therapy, applied behavioral therapy, education, and occupational…

  2. Delirium the under-recognised syndrome: survey of healthcare professionals' awareness and practice in the intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Abeer A; Wesley Ely, E

    2017-03-01

    To survey intensive care unit healthcare professionals' awareness and practice related to delirium. Despite the current evidence revealing the risks linked to delirium and advances in practice guidelines promoting delirium assessment, healthcare professionals show little sensitivity towards delirium and evident training needs. The study had a cross-sectional survey design. A sample of 168 intensive care unit healthcare professionals including nurses and physicians completed a semistructured questionnaire to survey their awareness, screening and management of delirium in intensive care units. The survey took place at 11 intensive care units from academic (university) and nonacademic (nonuniversity) governmental hospitals in Mansoura, Egypt. The mean score of delirium awareness was 64·4 ± 14·0 among intensive care unit healthcare professionals. Awareness of delirium was significantly lower when definition of delirium was not provided, among diploma nurses compared to bachelor degree nurses and physicians, among those who did not attend any workshop/lecture or read an article related to delirium and lastly, those who work in an intensive care unit when delirium. The survey found that only 26·8% of the healthcare professionals screen for delirium on a routine basis, and 14·3% reported attending workshops or lectures or reading an article related to delirium in the last year. In screening delirium, healthcare professionals did not use any tools, nor did they follow adopted protocols or guidelines to manage delirium. To manage delirium, 52·4% of the participants reported using sedatives, 36·9% used no drugs, and 10·7% reported using antipsychotics (primarily haloperidol). Intensive care unit healthcare professionals do not have adequate training or routine screening of delirium. There is an evident absence of using standardised tools or adapting protocols to monitor and manage delirium. This study has the potentials to shed some lights on the variables that

  3. High intensity interval training in a real world setting: a randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lunt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. METHODS: Participants were allocated into one of three groups. The two interventions, aerobic interval training and maximal volitional interval training, were compared with an active control group undertaking walking based exercise. Supervised group sessions (36 per intervention were held outdoors. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using VO2max (maximal oxygen uptake, results expressed in ml/min/kg, before and after the 12 week interventions. RESULTS: On ITT (intention to treat analyses, baseline (N = 49 and exit (N = 39 [Formula: see text]O2 was 25.3±4.5 and 25.3±3.9, respectively. Participant allocation and baseline/exit VO2max by group was as follows: Aerobic interval training N =  16, 24.2±4.8/25.6±4.8; maximal volitional interval training N = 16, 25.0±2.8/25.2±3.4; walking N = 17, 26.5±5.3/25.2±3.6. The post intervention change in VO2max was +1.01 in the aerobic interval training, -0.06 in the maximal volitional interval training and -1.03 in the walking subgroups. The aerobic interval training subgroup increased VO2max compared to walking (p = 0.03. The actual (observed, rather than prescribed time spent exercising (minutes per week, ITT analysis was 74 for aerobic interval training, 45 for maximal volitional interval training and 116 for walking (p =  0.001. On descriptive analysis, the walking subgroup had the fewest adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to earlier studies, the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness in a

  4. Effect of Atorvastatin intensive therapy on the serum inflammatory factors, platelet activity and fibrinolytic activity in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of Atorvastatin intensive therapy on the serum inflammatory factors, platelet activity and fibrinolytic activity in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Methods: A total of 92 patients with ACS were randomly divided into observation group (47 cases and control group (45 cases. The control group was given Atorvastatin (10mg/d based on the conventional therapy, while the observation group was given Atorvastatin at an intensive dose (40 mg/d based on the conventional therapy. Half a month later, the changes of IL-6, IL-8, hs-CRP, TNF-α, TXB2, GMP-140, PAI-1 and t-PA were observed and compared between the two groups. Results: After treatment, the inflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-8, hs-CRP and TNF-α and the indicators of platelet activity (TXB2, GMP-140 and PAI-1 were obviously decreased, while the indicator of fibrinolytic activity (t-PA was apparently increased in the two groups. Besides, the amplitudes of change referring to these indicators in the observation group were bigger than those in the control group after treatment, and the differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: The intensive therapy with the administration of Atorvastatin at a dose of 40 mg/d was better than the conventional therapy (Atorvastatin: 10 mg/d in aspects of reducing inflammatory factors, inhibiting platelet activity and correcting the high coagulation state of fibrinolytic system.

  5. The influence of moderate-intensity physical effort on peripheral blood in adults with Down syndrome - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksander-Szymanowicz, P; Marchewka, A; Dabrowski, Z; Teleglow, A; Bac, A; Glodzik, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a six-week aerobic training on peripheral blood in adults with Down syndrome. Fifteen men with Down syndrome (average age 22.4 years ± 0.91) with moderate or severe intellectual disability took part in the study. Patients underwent a training program three times a week for six weeks. Venous blood samples of 10 ml were collected from every examined patient, 24 hours before and after the exercise. The blood samples were submitted to hematological examination (hematocrit, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, red blood cell (RBC) number, RBC indicators: mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH)), reduced glutathione (GSH) level and number of macrocytes, polikilocytrometric examination of RBC and rheological blood examination (elongation index (EI), aggregation index (AI), syllectogram amplitude (AMP), aggregation half time (t1/2)) was made by LORCA. Amoderate six-week physical training performed on a cycloergometer resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the MCV value, hematocrit and plasma viscosity. The six-week cycloergometer training caused a statistically significant increase in the GSH level and erythrocyte pliability at a shear stress of 0.58 Pa.

  6. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit—II: clinical syndromes and special considerations in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Rello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU or the emergency department. This document is a cooperative effort between members of two European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID study groups and was coordinated by Hakan Leblebicioglu and Jordi Rello for ESGITM (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Travellers and Migrants and ESGCIP (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Critically Ill Patients, respectively. A relevant expert on the subject of each section prepared the first draft which was then edited and approved by additional members from both ESCMID study groups. This article summarizes considerations regarding clinical syndromes requiring ICU admission in travellers, covering immunocompromised patients.

  7. The Vastus Medialis Oblique: Vastus Lateralis Electromyographic Intensity Ratio During Squat with Hip Adduction in Athletes with and Without Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Reza-zadeh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to compare vastus medialis oblique (VMO: vastus lateralis longus (VLL electromyographic intensity ratio during squat with hip adduction in athletes with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. Materials & Methods: In this non-experimental and case-control study, 16 male athletes with PFPS were selected purposefully and 16 healthy male athletes aged 18-30 years from national teams (Volleyball, Handball and Taekwondo were matched based on variables such as weight, height, age, dominancy. All subjects selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. EMG activity of VMO and VLL muscles was recorded by surface electrodes with Telemetric EMG System at 15, 30 and 45 degrees of squat and VMO: VLL ratio was calculated. One way ANOVA was used to compare these muscles ratio between two groups. Results: The ratio of VMO: VLL in both groups with and without PFPS in almost all angles were lower than one. However, healthy athletes had lower ratios. Also, there were no significant differences in VMO: VLL ratio at various angles. Conclusion: It seems that sports activities prevent VMO weakening in athletes. However, VMO: VLL ratio in athletes with and without patellofemoral pain does not influence by this syndrome.

  8. Ill-lighting syndrome: prevalence in shift-work personnel in the anaesthesiology and intensive care department of three Italian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanatta Paolo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Light is one of the most important factors in our interaction with the environment; it is indispensable to visual function and neuroendocrine regulation, and is essential to our emotional perception and evaluation of the environment. Previous studies have focussed on the effects of prolonged anomalous exposure to artificial light and, in the field of work-related illness. Studies have been carried out on shift-work personnel, who are obliged to experience alterations in the physiological alternation of day and night, with anomalous exposure to light stimuli in hours normally reserved for sleep. In order to identify any signs and symptoms of the so-called ill-lighting syndrome, we carried out a study on a sample of anaesthesiologists and nurses employed in the operating theatres and Intensive Care Departments of three Italian hospitals. We measured the subjective emotional discomfort (stress experienced by these subjects, and its correlation with environmental discomfort factors, in particular the level of lighting, in their workplace. Methods We used a questionnaire developed by the Scandinavian teams who investigated Sick-Building Syndrome, that was self-administered on one day in the environments where the degree of illumination was measured according to UNIEN12464-1 regulations. Results Upon comparison of the types of exposure with the horizontal luminance values (lux measured ( 1500 lux and the degree of stress reported, (Intensive Care: mean stress = 55.8%, high stress = 34.6%; Operating Theatres: mean stress = 51.5%, high stress = 33.8%, it can be observed that the percentage of high stress was reduced as the exposure to luminance was increased, although this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusion We cannot share other authors' enthusiasm regarding the effects on workers well-being correlated to the use of fluorescent lighting. The stress level of our workers was found to be more heavily influenced by

  9. Chondrosarcoma of right 1st rib presenting as neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome; A 13th case report in world literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravisagar Patel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic outlet syndrome [TOS] caused by a tumor of the rib is rare and has been reported only 12 times in the literature over the past one and one-half centuries, with the majority of cases due to osteochondroma. We report a case of chondrosarcoma of right 1st rib causing neurogenic TOS that was resected via posterolateral thoracotomy and biopsy confirmed a grade I chondrosarcoma. In the treatment of chondrosarcoma, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are less effective, and appropriate surgery is needed.

  10. 12 min/week of high-intensity interval training reduces aortic reservoir pressure in individuals with metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Joyce S; Dalleck, Lance C; Ramos, Maximiano V; Borrani, Fabio; Roberts, Llion; Gomersall, Sjaan; Beetham, Kassia S; Dias, Katrin A; Keating, Shelley E; Fassett, Robert G; Sharman, James E; Coombes, Jeff S

    2016-10-01

    Decreased aortic reservoir function leads to a rise in aortic reservoir pressure that is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Although there is evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would be useful to improve aortic reservoir pressure, the optimal dose of high-intensity exercise to improve aortic reservoir function has yet to be investigated. Therefore, this study compared the effect of different volumes of HIIT and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on aortic reservoir pressure in participants with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Fifty individuals with MetS were randomized into one of the following 16-week training programs: MICT [n = 17, 30 min at 60-70% peak heart rate (HRpeak), five times/week]; 4 × 4-min high-intensity interval training (4HIIT) (n = 15, 4 × 4 min bouts at 85-95% HRpeak, interspersed with 3 min of active recovery at 50-70% HRpeak, three times/week); and 1 × 4-min high-intensity interval training (1HIIT) (n = 18, 1 × 4 min bout at 85-95% HRpeak, three times/week). Aortic reservoir pressure was calculated from radial applanation tonometry. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for a small-to-medium group × time interaction effect on aortic reservoir pressure, indicating a positive adaptation following 1HIIT compared with 4HIIT and MICT [F (2,46) = 2.9, P = 0.07, η = 0.06]. This is supported by our within-group analysis wherein only 1HIIT significantly decreased aortic reservoir pressure from pre to postintervention (pre-post: 1HIIT 33 ± 16 to 31 ± 13, P = 0.03; MICT 29 ± 9-28 ± 8, P = 0.78; 4HIIT 28 ± 10-30 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.10). Three sessions of 4 min of high-intensity exercise per week (12 min/week) was sufficient to improve aortic reservoir pressure, and thus may be a time-efficient exercise modality for reducing cardiovascular risk in individuals with MetS.

  11. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed.......This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  12. Evaluation of spinal cord stimulation on the symptoms of anxiety and depression and pain intensity in patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, L P; Cooney, J M; McCrory, C R

    2017-08-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is now established as the primary treatment for failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Commonly, patients with chronic pain and FBSS often report symptoms of anxiety and depression resulting from this condition. These factors can modulate and amplify the pain experience, therefore, further challenging treatment success. This study examined the efficacy of SCS on alleviating the symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with chronic pain as well as pain intensity in a group of patients with FBSS. A convenience sample (n = 26) was selected for participation. Questionnaires [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF)] were completed and examined pre and post spinal cord implant. Analysis of the data 1 year following SCS indicates that there was a statistical significant improvement in the symptoms of depression and anxiety reported as well as pain intensity in all participants (p anxiety and depression scores on the HADS were significantly lower compared to baseline (p anxiety and depression with an associated reduction in opioid consumption.

  13. Factors among patients receiving prone positioning for the acute respiratory distress syndrome found useful for predicting mortality in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrykamien, Ariel M; Daoud, Yahya

    2018-01-01

    Optimal mechanical ventilation management in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) involves the use of low tidal volumes and limited plateau pressure. Refractory hypoxemia may not respond to this strategy, requiring other interventions. The use of prone positioning in severe ARDS resulted in improvement in 28-day survival. To determine whether mechanical ventilation strategies or other parameters affected survival in patients undergoing prone positioning, a retrospective analysis was conducted of a consecutive series of patients with severe ARDS treated with prone positioning. Demographic and clinical information involving mechanical ventilation strategies, as well as other variables associated with prone positioning, was collected. The rate of in-hospital mortality was obtained, and previously described parameters were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. Forty-three patients with severe ARDS were treated with prone positioning, and 27 (63%) died in the intensive care unit. Only three parameters were significant predictors of survival: APACHE II score ( P = 0.03), plateau pressure ( P = 0.02), and driving pressure ( P = 0.04). The ability of each of these parameters to predict mortality was assessed with receiver operating characteristic curves. The area under the curve values for APACHE II, plateau pressure, and driving pressure were 0.74, 0.69, and 0.67, respectively. In conclusion, in a group of patients with severe ARDS treated with prone positioning, only APACHE II, plateau pressure, and driving pressure were associated with mortality in the intensive care unit.

  14. Beyond the others’ world : An essay about the experience of social work with a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Shavrina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents a reflection on being a foreign and inexperienced social worker within a Norwegian social work context. I discuss challenges I have met in my work with when Asperger syndrome is diagnosed and reflect on power relations and the issue of self-determination within the field, in addition to analysing some critical incidents that made me rethink and reconstruct all of my experiences. I view my story from different angles and find different perspectives that show various ways of perceiving one thing. I discover the dangerousness of thinking in “black and white” and placing things in exclusive extremes, and lastly, I understand that I need to learn to solve problems by changing attitudes towards them.

  15. Tracheomalacia associated with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome in the Intensive Care Unit: treatment with Freitag stent. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, S; Benassai, C; Allori, O; Valeri, E; Ferri, L; Dragotto, A

    2004-09-01

    Tracheomalacia is a process characterized by softness of the supporting tracheal cartilages, by the extension of the posterior membranous wall and by reduction of the tracheal antero-posterior diameter. Exceptionally, tracheomalacia can be associated with tracheobronchomegaly or Mounier-Kuhn syndrome. Fibro-bronchoscopy represents the ''gold standard'' for diagnosis. The case of a 79-year-old male observed after hospitalization in a medical ward for chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD) decompensation, and with basal left bronchopulmonary focus, is described. During this period, a progressive worsening of clinical conditions occurred, despite cortisone and antibiotic therapy, and the patient was transferred to the ICU for dyspnea, hypoxia, hypocapnia and with a diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis. Bronchoscopy, performed during spontaneous breathing, revealed tracheomalacia which was responsible for tracheal dynamic complete stenosis during expiration and dynamic subtotal stenosis of the left primary bronchus in the first tract, together with sputum retention. Moreover, this investigation confirmed the diagnosis of tracheobronchomegaly already seen on CT. It was suggested to place a Freitag stent, since the insertion of another model would not have had enough chance of stability, due to the enormous extension of the tracheal lumen and could not have guaranteed good clearance of the secretions. Seven days after this intervention, performed in an outpatients' setting, the patient was dismissed from the ICU, without the help of O2, with good ventilation, saturation in line with his age and good expectoration.

  16. Azacitidine in the 'real-world': an evaluation of 1101 higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome/low blast count acute myeloid leukaemia patients in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozessohn, Lee; Cheung, Matthew C; Fallahpour, Saber; Gill, Tripat; Maloul, Asmaa; Zhang, Liying; Lau, Olivia; Buckstein, Rena

    2018-06-01

    The outcome of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with uniformly higher-risk disease treated with azacitidine (AZA) in the 'real-world' remains largely unknown. We evaluated 1101 consecutive higher-risk MDS patients (International Prognostic Scoring System intermediate-2/high) and low-blast count acute myeloid leukaemia (AML; 21-30% blasts) patients treated in Ontario, Canada. By dosing schedule, 24·7% received AZA for seven consecutive days, 12·4% for six consecutive days and 62·9% by 5-2-2. Overall, median number of cycles was 6 (range 1-67) and 8 (range 6-14) when restricted to the 692 (63%) patients who received at least 4 cycles. The actuarial median survival was 11·6 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 10·7-12·4) for the entire cohort and 18·0 months (landmark analysis; 95% CI 16·6-19·1 months) for those receiving at least 4 cycles. There was no difference in overall survival (OS) between the 3 dosing schedules (P = 0·87). In our large 'real-world' evaluation of AZA in higher-risk MDS/low-blast count AML, we demonstrated a lower than expected OS. Reassuringly, survival did not differ by dosing schedules. The OS was higher in the 2/3 of patients who received at least 4 cycles of treatment, reinforcing the necessity of sustained administration until therapeutic benefits are realised. This represents the largest 'real-world' evaluation of AZA in higher-risk MDS/low-blast count AML. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effect of Intensive Versus Standard Blood Glucose Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Different Regions of the World: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Partha; Udell, Jacob A; Chatterjee, Saurav; Bansilal, Sameer; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Farkouh, Michael E

    2015-05-05

    Regional variation in type 2 diabetes mellitus care may affect outcomes in patients treated with intensive versus standard blood glucose control. We sought to evaluate these differences between North America and the rest of the world. Databases were searched from their inception through December 2013. Randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of intensive therapy with standard therapy for macro- and microvascular complications in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected. We calculated summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs with the random-effects model. The analysis included 34 967 patients from 17 randomized controlled trials (7 in North America and 10 in the rest of the world). There were no significant differences between intensive and standard therapy groups for all-cause mortality (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.13) and cardiovascular mortality (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.32). For trials conducted in North America, intensive therapy compared with standard glycemic control resulted in significantly higher all-cause mortality (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.40) and cardiovascular mortality (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.90) than trials conducted in the rest of the world (all-cause mortality OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.03; interaction P=0.006; cardiovascular mortality OR 0.89, 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.00; interaction P=0.007). Analysis of individual macro- and microvascular outcomes revealed no significant regional differences; however, the risk of severe hypoglycemia was significantly higher in trials of intensive therapy in North America (OR 3.52, 95% CI 3.07 to 4.03) compared with the rest of the world (OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.85 to 2.47; interaction P=0.001). Randomization to intensive glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients was associated with increases in all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and severe hypoglycemia in North America compared with the rest of the world. Further investigation into the pathobiology or patient variability underlying

  18. The Fight for Oman 1963-1975 Analysis of Civil-Military Operations in Low-Intensity Conflict and its Relevance to Current World Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarnoski, Robert

    1995-01-01

    .... While often overlooked, the government response to the 1963-1975 insurgency in Oman provides excellent examples of both ineffective and effective national-military strategies for combating a low intensity threat...

  19. Massage therapy in cortisol circadian rhythm, pain intensity, perceived stress index and quality of life of fibromyalgia syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe Rodrigues; Visnardi Gonçalves, Laura Cristina; Borghi, Filipy; da Silva, Larissa Gabriela Rocha Ventura; Gomes, Anne Elise; Trevisan, Gustavo; Luiz de Souza, Aglécio; Grassi-Kassisse, Dora Maria; de Oliveira Crege, Danilo Roberto Xavier

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the effects of a massage therapy program (MTP) in cortisol concentration (CC), intensity of pain, quality of life and perceived stress index of fibromyalgia patients. Volunteers (n = 24, aged 26-55 years) were treated with MT, twice a week for three months. They answered the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ-Br), and collected saliva to evaluate CC before and after the end of each month. The MT had improvement in quality of life, according to the FIQ results, and promoted reduction in PSQ values after the second (PSQ2-0.62 ± 0.04vsPSQ0-0.71 ± 0.04) and third month (PSQ3-0.64 ± 0.04vsPSQ0-0.71 ± 0.04). The MTP also promoted reduction in pain after the third month (MQP-Br1-44.50 ± 2.15vsMQP-Br4-35.38 ± 3.71). Despite PSQ reduction, the CC were not affected by the program. This pilot suggests that this treatment improved quality of life, reduced perceived stress index and pain in these volunteers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Moderate-to-high-intensity training and a hypocaloric Mediterranean diet enhance endothelial progenitor cells and fitness in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Juan Marcelo; Rosado-Álvarez, Daniel; Da Silva Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol Alberto; Landaeta-Díaz, Leslie Lorena; Caballero-Villarraso, Javier; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; Fuentes-Jiménez, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    A reduction in EPC (endothelial progenitor cell) number could explain the development and progression of atherosclerosis in the MetS (metabolic syndrome). Although much research in recent years has focused on the Mediterranean dietary pattern and the MetS, the effect of this diet with/without moderate-to-high-intensity endurance training on EPCs levels and CrF (cardiorespiratory fitness) remains unclear. In the present study, the objective was to assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet hypocaloric model with and without moderate-to-high-intensity endurance training on EPC number and CrF of MetS patients. Thus 45 MetS patients (50-66 years) were randomized to a 12-week intervention with the hypocaloric MeD (Mediterranean diet) or the MeDE (MeD plus moderate-to-high-intensity endurance training). Training included two weekly supervised sessions [80% MaxHR (maximum heart rate); leg and arm pedalling] and one at-home session (65-75% MaxHR; walking controlled by heart rate monitors). Changes in: (i) EPC number [CD34(+)KDR(+) (kinase insert domain-containing receptor)], (ii) CrF variables and (iii) MetS components and IRH (ischaemic reactive hyperaemia) were determined at the end of the study. A total of 40 subjects completed all 12 weeks of the study, with 20 in each group. The MeDE led to a greater increase in EPC numbers and CrF than did the MeD intervention (P ≤ 0.001). In addition, a positive correlation was observed between the increase in EPCs and fitness in the MeDE group (r=0.72; r(2)=0.52; P ≤ 0.001). Body weight loss, insulin sensitivity, TAGs (triacylglycerols) and blood pressure showed a greater decrease in the MeDE than MeD groups. Furthermore, IRH was only improved after the MeDE intervention. In conclusion, compliance with moderate-to-high-intensity endurance training enhances the positive effects of a model of MeD on the regenerative capacity of endothelium and on the fitness of MetS patients.

  1. Antiatherosclerotic effects of long-term maximally intensive statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome: insights from Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Ballantyne, Christie M; Barter, Philip J; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Libby, Peter; Raichlen, Joel S; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) display diffuse coronary atheroma instability and heightened risk of early and late recurrent coronary events. We compared the long-term antiatherosclerotic efficacy of high-intensity statins in patients with ACS when compared with stable disease. Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin (SATURN) used serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The overall effect of high-intensity statins on the change in coronary percent atheroma volume and major adverse cardiovascular events (death/nonfatal myocardial infarction/coronary revascularization) were evaluated in this post hoc analysis. When compared with non-ACS patients (n=678), patients with ACS (n=361) were younger, actively smoking, and have had a previous myocardial infarction (all P<0.001). At baseline, patients with ACS exhibited lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (43.5±11 versus 45.8±11 mg/dL; P=0.002), a higher apolipoprotein B: apolipoprotein A-1 ratio (0.90±0.24 versus 0.83±0.24; P<0.001) and greater percent atheroma volume (37.3±8.5% versus 35.9±8.1%; P=0.01) when compared with non-ACS patients. Despite similar achieved levels of lipid and inflammatory markers after high-intensity statin therapy, patients with ACS demonstrated greater percent atheroma volume regression than non-ACS patients (-1.46±0.14 versus -0.89±0.13; P=0.003). After propensity-weighted multivariable adjustment, baseline percent atheroma volume (P<0.001) and an ACS clinical presentation (P=0.02) independently associated with plaque regression. The 24-month major adverse cardiovascular events-free survival was similar between patients with ACS and non-ACS (90.6 versus 92.9%; P=0.25). Long-term high-intensity statin therapy caused greater plaque regression and comparable major adverse cardiovascular events rates in

  2. Mortality in adult intensive care patients with severe systemic inflammatory response syndromes is strongly associated with the hypo-immune TNF -238A polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappachan, John V; Coulson, Tim G; Child, Nicholas J A; Markham, David J; Nour, Sarah M; Pulletz, Mark C K; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; de Courcey-Golder, Kim; Barton, Sheila J; Yang, Ian A; Holloway, John W

    2009-10-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is associated with activation of innate immunity. We studied the association between mortality and measures of disease severity in the intensive care unit (ICU) and functional polymorphisms in genes coding for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA). Two hundred thirty-three patients with severe SIRS were recruited from one general adult ICU in a tertiary centre in the UK. DNA from patients underwent genotyping by 5' nuclease assay. Genotype was compared to phenotype. Primary outcome was mortality in ICU. Minor allele frequencies were TLR4 +896G 7%, MIF 173C 16%, TNF -238A 10% and LTA +252G 34%. The frequency of the hypoimmune minor allele TNF -238A was significantly higher in patients who died in ICU compared to those who survived (p = 0.0063) as was the frequency of the two haplotypes LTA +252G, TNF -1031T, TNF -308G, TNF -238A and LTA +252G, TNF-1031T, TNF-308A and TNF-238A (p = 0.0120 and 0.0098, respectively). These findings re-enforce the view that a balanced inflammatory/anti-inflammatory response is the most important determinant of outcome in sepsis. Genotypes that either favour inflammation or its counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory response are likely to influence mortality and morbidity.

  3. Contemporary data on treatment practices for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in 3867 patients who had suffered an acute coronary syndrome across the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm K. Gitt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DYSIS II ACS was a longitudinal, observational study in 3867 patients from 18 countries. They were being hospitalized after suffering an acute coronary syndrome. Evaluations were performed at the time of admission and again 120±15 days following the date of admission (the follow-up time point. 2521 patients were on active lipid lowering treatment (LLT at admission. Mean atorvastatin dose was 22 mg per day and 2.7% received ezetimibe in combination with a statin. At discharge from hospital, 3767 patients received LLT expressed as a mean atorvastatin dose of 36 mg per day with 4.8% receiving ezetimibe on top of a statin. After 120 days, intensity in lipid lowering treatment was reduced to 32 mg per day with 4.9% of the patients receiving ezetimibe and a statin. Of note, during this 4-month follow up period, only 32% of all patients received laboratory lipid testing. 37% attained the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C target value of <70 mg/dl after 120 days. There are differences in the therapy administered as well as in the switch strategies when comparing the data from the respective countries studied. Conclusions: Only one in three patients achieved the LDL-C target value following only marginal improvements in atorvastatin dose or combination therapy after an ACS event. Keywords: Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Treatment target, Global, Region, Statins

  4. Filling some black holes: modeling the connection between urbanization, infrastructure, and global service intensity in 112 metropolitan regions across the world

    OpenAIRE

    Van De Vijver, Elien; Derudder, Ben; Bassens, David; Witlox, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This empirical article combines insights from previous research on the level of knowledge-intensive service in metropolitan areas with the aim to develop an understanding of the spatial structure of the global service economy. We use a stepwise regression model with GaWC’s measure of globalized service provisioning as the dependent variable and a range of variables focusing on population, infrastructure, urban primacy, and national regulation as independent variables. The discussion of the re...

  5. The effect of different volumes of high-intensity interval training on proinsulin in participants with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Joyce S; Dalleck, Lance C; Borrani, Fabio; Mallard, Alistair R; Clark, Bronwyn; Keating, Shelley E; Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2016-11-01

    The continuous demand for insulin in the face of insulin resistance, coupled with the glucolipotoxic environment associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), adversely affects the quality of insulin produced and secreted by the pancreatic beta cells. This is depicted by increased circulating intact proinsulin concentration, which is associated with increased MetS severity and risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been shown to reduce insulin resistance and other CV disease risk factors to a greater degree than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). We therefore aimed to investigate the impact of MICT and different volumes of HIIT on circulating intact proinsulin concentration. This was a substudy of the 'Exercise in prevention of Metabolic Syndrome' (EX-MET) multicentre trial. Sixty-six individuals with MetS were randomised to 16 weeks of: (1) MICT (n = 21, 30 min at 60-70% peak heart rate [HRpeak], five times/week); (2) 4HIIT (n = 22, 4 × 4 min bouts at 85-95% HRpeak, interspersed with 3 min of active recovery at 50-70% HRpeak, three times/week); or (3) 1HIIT (n = 23, 1 × 4 min bout at 85-95% HRpeak, three times/week). A subanalysis investigated the differential impact of these training programmes on intact proinsulin concentration in MetS individuals with type 2 diabetes (MICT, n = 6; 4HIIT, n = 9; 1HIIT, n = 12) and without type 2 diabetes (MICT, n = 15; 4HIIT, n = 13; 1HIIT, n = 11). Intact proinsulin, insulin and C-peptide concentrations were measured in duplicate via ELISA, following a 12 h fast, before and after the exercise programme. Fasting intact proinsulin concentration was also expressed relative to insulin and C-peptide concentrations. Following the exercise training, there were no significant (p > 0.05) changes in fasting intact proinsulin concentration indices in all participants (pre- vs post-programme proinsulin, proinsulin

  6. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Malaysians using the International Diabetes Federation, National Cholesterol Education Program and Modified World Health Organization Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Ying Tan; Haresh, Kumar Kantilal; Rajibans, Singh

    2008-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Program Adults Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have proposed different criteria to diagnose metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, there is no single definition to accurately diagnose MetS. The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of MetS using WHO, NCEP ATP III and IDF in the Malaysian community, and to determine the concordance between these definitions for MetS. 109 men and women aged > 30 years participated in the study, and the prevalence of MetS was determined according to the three definitions. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip circumference, blood pressure, blood lipid profile and plasma fasting glucose were measured. In order to determine the concordance between IDF and the other two definitions, the kappa index (κ-test) was used. The prevalence of MetS (95% confidence interval) was 22.9% (22.8-23.1) by IDF definition, 16.5% (16.3-16.9) by NCEP ATP III definition and 6.4% (6.2-6.6) by modified WHO definition. The sensitivity and specificity of IDF against NCEP ATP III were 88.9% and 90.1% respectively, IDF against WHO definition were 85.7% and 81.4%. The κ statistics for the agreement of the IDF definition was 68.3 ± 0.1 with the NCEP ATP III, and 30.5 ± 0.1 with the modified WHO definition. The prevalence of the MetS among respondents using the IDF definition was highest, followed by NCEP ATP III, and finally modified WHO definition. There was a good concordance between the IDF and NCEP ATP III definitions, and a low concordance between IDF and modified WHO definitions.

  7. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  8. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento,Luiz Augusto; Oliveira,Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  9. Our World Their World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Build, create, make, blog, develop, organize, structure, perform. These are just a few verbs that illustrate the visual world. These words create images that allow students to respond to their environment. Visual culture studies recognize the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world. This…

  10. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  11. Mechanical ventilation strategies for intensive care unit patients without acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Nana; Guo, Libo; Chi, Chunjie; Hou, Wei; Wu, Anqi; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Changsong; Li, Enyou

    2016-07-22

    It has been shown that the application of a lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy can improve the prognosis of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy for intensive care unit (ICU) patients without ALI or ARDS is uncertain. Therefore, we performed a network meta-analysis to identify the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy for these patients. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Web of Science for studies published up to July 2015 in which pulmonary compliance or the partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FIO2) ratio was assessed in ICU patients without ALI or ARDS, who received mechanical ventilation via different strategies. The data for study characteristics, methods, and outcomes were extracted. We assessed the studies for eligibility, extracted the data, pooled the data, and used a Bayesian fixed-effects model to combine direct comparisons with indirect evidence. Seventeen randomized controlled trials including a total of 575 patients who received one of six ventilation strategies were included for network meta-analysis. Among ICU patients without ALI or ARDS, strategy C (lower tidal volume (VT) + higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)) resulted in the highest PaO2/FIO2 ratio; strategy B (higher VT + lower PEEP) was associated with the highest pulmonary compliance; strategy A (lower VT + lower PEEP) was associated with a shorter length of ICU stay; and strategy D (lower VT + zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP)) was associated with the lowest PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary compliance. For ICU patients without ALI or ARDS, strategy C (lower VT + higher PEEP) was associated with the highest PaO2/FiO2 ratio. Strategy B (higher VT + lower PEEP) was superior to the other strategies in improving pulmonary

  12. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part II. Quality-improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    The success of quality-improvement projects relies heavily on both project design and the metrics chosen to assess change. In Part II of this three-part American Thoracic Society Seminars series, we begin by describing methods for determining which data to collect, tools for data presentation, and strategies for data dissemination. As Avedis Donabedian detailed a half century ago, defining metrics in healthcare can be challenging; algorithmic determination of the best type of metric (outcome, process, or structure) can help intensive care unit (ICU) managers begin this process. Choosing appropriate graphical data displays (e.g., run charts) can prompt discussions about and promote quality improvement. Similarly, dashboards/scorecards are useful in presenting performance improvement data either publicly or privately in a visually appealing manner. To have compelling data to show, ICU managers must plan quality-improvement projects well. The second portion of this review details four quality-improvement tools-checklists, Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen. Checklists have become commonplace in many ICUs to improve care quality; thinking about how to maximize their effectiveness is now of prime importance. Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen are techniques that use multidisciplinary teams to organize thinking about process improvement, formalize change strategies, actualize initiatives, and measure progress. None originated within healthcare, but each has been used in the hospital environment with success. To conclude this part of the series, we demonstrate how to use these tools through an example of improving the timely administration of antibiotics to patients with sepsis.

  13. The Effect of High-Intensity Interval Training Versus Strength Training to Improve Body Composition in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Almenning, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting 6-20% of reproductive-age women. Women with PCOS tend to accumulate more upper body fat, and the syndrome is often present with abdominal obesity and visceral adiposity which is further associated with metabolic – and cardiovascular complications. Despite well-established benefits of exercise and its recommendation in PCOS management, few randomized controlled trials have evaluated the...

  14. Prognostic implications of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay in a real-world population with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoni, Marco; Gallone, Guglielmo; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Vergani, Vittoria; Giorgio, Daniela; Angeloni, Giulia; Maseri, Attilio; Cianflone, Domenico

    2018-09-01

    High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hsTnT) was recently approved for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration. The transition from contemporary to hsTnT assays requires a thorough understanding of the clinical differences between these assays. HsTnT may provide a more accurate prognostic stratification than contemporary cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). HsTnT and cTnI were measured in 644 patients with CK-MB negative NSTE-ACS who were enrolled in the prospective multicenter SPAI (Stratificazione Prognostica dell'Angina Instabile) study. Patients were stratified at the 99th percentile reference limit for each assay. The primary endpoint was cardiovascular death (CVD) or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI); the secondary endpoint was the occurrence of unstable angina (UA). Follow-up lasted 180 days. Patients with hsTnT ≥99th percentile were at higher risk of CVD/MI (30-day: 5.9% vs 0.8%, p  = 0.001; 180-day: 11.1% vs 4.7%, p  = 0.004), also after adjusting for TIMI Risk Score. No significant difference in CVD/MI at 180-day was found between hsTnT-positive/cTnI-negative and hsTnT-negative/cTnI-negative patients (adjHR 1.61, 95% CI 0.74-3.49, p  = 0.232). Occurrence of UA was not differently distributed between hsTnT groups dichotomized at the 99th percentile (12.4% vs 12.5% p  = 0.54). Our investigation on a real-world NSTE-ACS population showed good prognostic performance of hsTnT in the risk stratification of the hard endpoint, but did not demonstrate the improved prognostic ability of hsTnT over contemporary cTn. Neither troponin assay predicted the recurrence of UA, suggesting the acute rise of cardiac troponin as a marker of severity, but not the occurrence of future coronary instability.

  15. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  16. Intensive glucose regulation in hyperglycemic acute coronary syndrome: Results of the randomized BIOMarker study to identify the acute risk of a coronary syndrome-2 (BIOMArCS-2) glucose trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mulder (Maarten); V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); J.H. Cornel (Jan); F.M. van der Zant (F.); F. Stam (Frank); R.M. Oemrawsingh (Rohit); K.M. Akkerhuis (Martijn); H. Boersma (Eric)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIMPORTANCE: Elevated plasma glucose levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) on hospital admission are associated with increased mortality. Clinical trials of glucose regulation have provided inconsistent results with respect to cardiovascular outcomes, perhaps because

  17. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggu Cai

    Full Text Available Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2 and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3. Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  18. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  19. Transmission of white spot syndrome virus in improved-extensive and semi-intensive shrimp production systems: A molecular epidemiology study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyet Hoa, T.T.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Vlak, J.M.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) can be transmitted horizontally through water, via carrier organisms and/or by cannibalism of infected shrimp, but also vertically through infected broodstock. However the mode(s) of WSSV transmission in shrimp farming systems and

  20. Effects of intensive glucose control on platelet reactivity in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Results of the CHIPS Study ("Control de Hiperglucemia y Actividad Plaquetaria en Pacientes con Sindrome Coronario Agudo").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased platelet reactivity and impaired prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Whether platelet reactivity can be reduced by lowering glucose in this setting is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the functional impact of intensive glucose control with insulin on platelet reactivity in patients admitted with ACS and hyperglycaemia. This is a prospective, randomised trial evaluating the effects of either intensive glucose control (target glucose 80-120 mg/dl) or conventional control (target glucose 180 mg/dl or less) with insulin on platelet reactivity in patients with ACS and hyperglycaemia. The primary endpoint was platelet aggregation following stimuli with 20 μM ADP at 24 h and at hospital discharge. Aggregation following collagen, epinephrine and thrombin receptor-activated peptide, as well as P2Y₁₂ reactivity index and surface expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin were also measured. Of the 115 patients who underwent random assignment, 59 were assigned to intensive and 56 to conventional glucose control. Baseline platelet functions and inhospital management were similar in both groups. Maximal aggregation after ADP stimulation at hospital discharge was lower in the intensive group (47.9 ± 13.2% vs 59.1 ± 17.3%; p=0.002), whereas no differences were found at 24 h. Similarly all other parameters of platelet reactivity measured at hospital discharge were significantly reduced in the intensive glucose control group. In this randomised trial, early intensive glucose control with insulin in patients with ACS presenting with hyperglycaemia was found to decrease platelet reactivity. Clinical Trial Registration Number http://www.controlledtrials.com/ISRCTN35708451/ISRCTN35708451.

  1. Enteral Nutrition Support for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Morbidly Obese Patient : A Case Report from a Medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Huda Razalli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Compartment syndrome occurs when pressure within a closed muscle or bone compartment builds to dangerous levels. This pressure can decrease blood flow to nerve and muscle cells, leading to ischemia and organ dysfunction. Challenges in providing enteral nutrition for abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS patients include the increase risk for developing gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and distention. There are limited reports available on the nutritional management of ACS patients in the ICU especially those with morbid obesity condition to guide dietitians in providing nutritional support for these patients.  Here, we report the enteral nutrition management of a mechanically ventilated, morbidly obese patient with ACS in a critical care setting by adopting postpyloric feeding, using prokinetic agents and implementing PO2/FiO2 ratio calculation for prescription of most suitable enteral formula.

  2. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  3. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling versus myofascial release on pain pressure thresholds, quality of life, fatigue, pain intensity, quality of sleep, anxiety, and depression in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Sánchez, Adelaida M; García López, Hector; Fernández Sánchez, Manuel; Pérez Mármol, José Manuel; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación; Luque Suárez, Alejandro; Matarán Peñarrocha, Guillermo Adolfo

    2018-04-23

    To compare the effectiveness of dry needling versus myofascial release on myofascial trigger points pain in cervical muscles, quality of life, impact of symptoms pain, quality of sleep, anxiety, depression, and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Sixty-four subjects with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to a dry needling group or a myofascial release group. Pain pressure thresholds of myofascial trigger points were evaluated in the cervical muscles. In addition, quality of life, impact of fibromyalgia symptoms, quality of sleep, intensity of pain, anxiety and depression symptoms, impact of fatigue at baseline and post treatment after four weeks of intervention were evaluated. Significant improvement was found in most pain pressure thresholds of the myofascial trigger points in cervical muscles in the dry needling group compared to myofascial release (p quality of life of physical function (F = 12.74, p = 0.001), physical role (F = 11.24, p = 0.001), body pain (F =30.26, p quality of sleep (F = 11.96, p = 0.001), state anxiety (F = 7.40, p = 0.009), and trait anxiety (F = -14.63, p quality of life of physical role, body pain, vitality and social function, as well as the total impact of FMS symptoms, quality of sleep, state and trait anxiety, hospital anxiety-depression, general pain intensity and fatigue. Implications for rehabilitation Dry needling therapy reduces myofascial trigger point pain in the short term in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. This therapeutic approach improves anxiety, depression, fatigue symptoms, quality of life, and sleep after treatment. Dry needling and myofascial release therapies decrease intensity of pain, and the impact of fibromyalgia symptoms in this population. These intervention approaches should be considered in an independent manner as complementary therapies within a multidisciplinary setting.

  4. Trabalho e síndrome da estafa profissional (Síndrome de Burnout em médicos intensivistas de Salvador Professional Burnout Syndrome among intensive care physicians in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Oliveira Staffa Tironi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a prevalência da Síndrome de Burnout em médicos intensivistas de Salvador, associando-a a dados demográficos e aspectos da situação de trabalho (demanda psicológica e controle sobre o trabalho. MÉTODOS: Um estudo de corte transversal investigou a associação entre aspectos psicossocias do trabalho e a síndrome da estafa profissional em uma população de 297 médicos intensivistas de Salvador, Bahia. Um questionário individual autoaplicável avaliou aspectos psicossociais do trabalho, utilizando o modelo demanda-controle (Job Content Questionnaire e a saúde mental dos médicos, usando Inventário de Burnout de Maslach (MBI. RESULTADOS: Constatou-se elevada sobrecarga de trabalho e de trabalho em regime de plantão. A prevalência da Síndrome da Estafa Profissional (Burnout foi de 7,4% e estava mais fortemente associada com aspectos da demanda psicológica do trabalho do que com o controle deste por parte dos médicos intensivistas. CONCLUSÃO: Médicos com trabalho de alta exigência (alta demanda e baixo controle apresentaram 10,2 vezes mais burnout que aqueles com trabalho de baixa exigência (baixa demanda e alto controle.OBJECTIVE: Describe prevalence of the Burnout syndrome in intensive care physicians of Salvador, associated to demographic data and aspects of the work environment (psychological demand and job control. METHODS: This cross sectional study has investigated the association between work conditions and Burnout Syndrome in a population of 297 Intensive Care Physicians from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. An individual, self-report questionnaire evaluated the physicians' psychological aspects of work, using the demand-control model (Job Content Questionnaire and their mental health, using the Maslash Burnout Inventory (MBI. RESULTS: The study found work overload,a high proportion of on duty physicians and low income for the hours worked. Prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 7.4% and it was more closely

  5. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  6. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  7. The stress ulcer syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. van Essen

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous

  8. Epidemiology and Management of Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes in Contemporary Real-World Practice: Evolving Trends From the EYESHOT Study to the START-ANTIPLATELET Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Paolo; Gragnano, Felice; di Maio, Marco; Patti, Giuseppe; Antonucci, Emilia; Cirillo, Plinio; Gresele, Paolo; Palareti, Gualtiero; Pengo, Vittorio; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Pennacchi, Mauro; Granatelli, Antonino; De Servi, Stefano; De Luca, Leonardo; Marcucci, Rossella

    2018-01-01

    The epidemiology and management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) have evolved. We aimed to describe recent demographics and therapeutic changes in the Italian ACS population. We analyzed data from 2 multicenter consecutive Italian registries (the EYESHOT [EmploYEd antithrombotic therapies in patients with acute coronary Syndromes HOspitalised in iTalian cardiac care units] and START-ANTIPLATELET registries) enrolling patients with ACS between December 2013 and June 2016. An overall population of 3756 patients with ACS was enrolled: 2585 in the EYESHOT and 1171 in the START-ANTIPLATELET. Compared with the EYESHOT, patients in the START-ANTIPLATELET registry presented more frequently with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and were more often smokers and dyslipidemic (all P START-ANTIPLATELET (all P START-ANTIPLATELET compared with the EYESHOT. The START-ANTIPLATELET and EYESHOT registries provide consecutive snapshots in the contemporary management of patients with ACS in Italy, showing important changes in both demographic characteristics and treatment strategies.

  9. Prevalencia de síndrome metabólico según las nuevas recomendaciones de la OMS: Estudio HERMEX Prevalence of metabolic syndrome estimated with the new World Health Organization recommendations: The HERMEX study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fernández-Bergés

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: La unificación de criterios para el diagnóstico del síndrome metabólico, junto con la propuesta de la Organización Mundial de la Salud de eliminar de ellos a los pacientes con diabetes o con enfermedades cardiovasculares, cambiará la estimación de su prevalencia. Nuestro objetivo fue determinar la prevalencia del síndrome metabólico en un área de salud extremeña siguiendo ambas recomendaciones. Métodos: Estudio transversal, poblacional, con selección aleatoria de individuos entre 25 y 79 años de edad, en un Área de Salud de Badajoz. Se recogieron los antecedentes de factores de riesgo cardiovascular, la presión arterial y el perímetro abdominal, y una muestra de sangre en ayunas. Se comparó la prevalencia del síndrome metabólico siguiendo los recientes criterios, por sexo y edad. Resultados: Se reclutaron 2.833 personas, el 46,5% eran hombres, y la edad media 51,2 años. La prevalencia del síndrome metabólico fue del 33,6%, significativamente mayor en los hombres (36,7% frente a 30,9%; pObjectives: The unification of criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, together with the subsequent World Health Organization (WHO proposal to eliminate diabetes and cardiovascular diseases from the diagnostic criteria, will change estimates of the known prevalence of this syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a health area of Badajoz (Spain using the latest consensus criteria and eliminating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional population-wide study of randomly selected individuals aged between 25 and 79 years old in a health area of Badajoz. In all patients, data on their history of cardiovascular risk factors were gathered, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured and a fasting blood sample was collected. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, following recent criteria, was compared by age and gender. Results: We

  10. Acute coronary syndromes: is there a place for a real pre-hospital treatment for patients "en route" to the coronary intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assez, Nathalie; Smith, Grégoire; Adriansen, Christophe; Aboukais, Wissam; Wiel, Eric; Goldstein, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    Acute initial management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is based on a precise clinical and electrocardiographic diagnosis. Initial risk stratification in the pre-hospital phase is the key step. The last step, adequate patient routing, is decided based on emergency level and reperfusion strategies, considered right from the pre-hospital phase. The management of a patient with an ACS requires close collaboration between emergency physicians and cardiologists, according to simplified protocols for easier access to catheterisation. The next challenges for the pre-hospital management of ACS are based on: - precise knowledge of new antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs by the emergency physicians, in order to adjust their prescriptions to the patient profile; - developing co-operation between hospitals, according to regional specificities (geographic considerations and distribution of PCI centres) in order to reduce access time to catheterisation rooms; - organising the healthcare network, where the SAMU has an essential role in coordinating the different medical actors; - regular analysis of the evolution of our professional practices, considering, e.g., the guidelines of the "HAS" (French official healthcare guidelines institute);- integrating pre-hospital medicine in health prevention programmes; - improving our understanding of the population's presentations of coronary artery disease, in order to encourage the patients and their families to call the EMS as soon as possible. The challenge of the emergency physician is to adapt the strategies to the patient's needs.

  11. Zespół Metaboliczny cz. II: Epidemiologia zespołu metabolicznego w Polsce i na świecie = Metabolic Syndrome part II: Epidemiology of metabolic syndrome in Poland and in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kalinowski

    2016-05-01

    2. Oddział Kardiologii – Pododdział Intensywnego Nadzoru Kardiologicznego, Wojewódzki Szpital Specjalistyczny im. Stefana Kardynała Wyszyńskiego, Al. Kraśnicka 100, 20-718 Lublin   Słowa kluczowe: zespół metaboliczny, insulinooporność, choroby sercowo-naczyniowe, choroba niedokrwienna serca Key words: metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, cardio-vascular diseases, coronary heart disease   Streszczenie Zespół metaboliczny jako czynnik ryzyka rozwoju chorób sercowo-naczyniowych i cukrzycy typu 2, jak pokazują liczne badania, jest znacznie rozpowszechniony zarówno w Polsce jak i w Europie oraz na innych kontynentach. Od lat prowadzone są badania, która definicja zespołu metabolicznego ma najlepszą wartość prognostyczną i diagnostyczną. W zależności od kryteriów stosowanych w różnych definicjach, a także od charakterystyki badanej populacji, częstość występowania zespołu metabolicznego jest różna. Niezależnie od kryteriów jest ona wysoka i wciąż rośnie. Celem pracy było przedstawienie rozpowszechnienia zespołu metabolicznego w Polsce i innych krajach, jako czynnika ryzyka chorób układu sercowo-naczyniowego na podstawie danych dostępnych z piśmiennictwa. Według badań przeprowadzonych w Polsce zespół metaboliczny dotyczy około 20% dorosłej populacji, czyli około 5,8 miliona mieszkańców Polski, częściej występuje u kobiet niż u mężczyzn. Na świecie problem ten może dotyczyć nawet 33% populacji Stanów Zjednoczonych, 27% populacji Chin, w Europie zawiera się pomiędzy ok. 15% (Francja do około 34 % populacji (Włochy, Finlandia. Zespół metaboliczny wiąże się ze zwiększoną częstością występowania cukrzycy, zdarzeń sercowo-naczyniowych i śmiertelności, według wielu badań 2,5-krotnie zwiększa ryzyko wystąpienia zawału mięśnia serca, powoduje 1,5-krotny wzrost śmiertelności całkowitej i 2-krotny wzrost incydentów sercowo-naczyniowych.   Summary As numerous studies have shown

  12. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  13. Eagle's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares, Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira, Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo, Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical. PMID:25992033

  14. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  15. [Assessment of rehabilitation progress in patients with cervical radicular pain syndrome after application of high intensity laser therapy - HILT and Saunders traction device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładaj, Robert; Pingot, Julia; Pingot, Mariusz

    2015-07-01

    Osteoarthritis of the spine is a major global health problem, it is an epidemic of our times. It affects all parts of the spine, but the hardest to treat is its cervical region. The cervical spine is most mobile, delicate and sensitive to any load. It requires special care in conservative treatment. To date the selection of effective therapeutic approaches has been controversial. The aim of the study was to assess the progress of rehabilitation in patients with cervical radicular pain syndrome after using two different methods of treatment: HILT and spinal axial traction with the use of Saunders device. The randomized study included 150 patients (81 women and 69 men, aged 24-67 years, mean age 45.5) divided into two groups of 75 patients each with characteristic symptoms of radicular pain. The measurement of the range of cervical spine movement of the cervical spine, visual analog scale for pain - VAS and a NDI questionnaire (Neck Disability Index - Polish version) - an indicator of functional disorders - were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the two different therapies. The results obtained by Saunders method remained significantly higher than those obtained when HILT laser therapy was used for most of the examined parameters. A thorough analysis of the results showed greater analgesic efficacy, improved global mobility and reduced functional impairment in patients treated with Saunders method. Both therapeutic methods manifest analgesic effect and a positive impact on the improvement of range of cervical spine movement in patients with radicular pain in this spine region. HILT laser therapy and Saunders traction device reduce neck disability index in the treated patients. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  16. What Are Common Symptoms of Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Pelvic Floor Disorders Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... for children with Down syndrome: A randomized trial. Physical Therapy , 91, 1463–1477. CDC. (2012). World Down syndrome ...

  17. Recruiting intensity

    OpenAIRE

    R. Jason Faberman

    2014-01-01

    To hire new workers, employers use a variety of recruiting methods in addition to posting a vacancy announcement. The intensity with which employers use these alternative methods can vary widely with a firm’s performance and with the business cycle. In fact, persistently low recruiting intensity helps to explain the sluggish pace of US job growth following the Great Recession.

  18. Intensidad del síndrome climatérico y su relación con algunos factores socioambientales Climateric syndrome intensity and its relation to some socio-environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margeris Yanes Calderón

    2009-12-01

    con la satisfacción de sus necesidades básicas, tienen una mayor incidencia de síndrome climatérico leve o asintomático.Introduction: Expressions like …I am in the menopause, I am old, and the problem is that I am in the climateric or it is the age change… are very common in the multidisciplinary consultation of climateric and menopause of "Ana Betancourt" University Polyclinic of Playa municipality. It was the reason to make this research, avoiding the biomedical approach with which the climateric period has been approached until nowadays moving forward to a medical-social approach. Objective: To determine how the socioenvironmental factors influence on the climateric syndrome intensity. Methods: A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in 192 climateric women seen in three medical consulting rooms from "Ana Betancourt" University Polyclinic of the Playa municipality from Ciudad de La Habana from June, 2006 to May, 2007. Results: Slight climateric syndrome was present in the 42,28% of study women, and those with a high schooling level have a major incidence of the asymptomatic climateric syndrome or slight; there was a close relation among the women presenting with a moderate climateric syndrome and the dysfunctional familiar performance; the workers women have a trend to present a less intensive climateric syndrome stayed by more than 33% of them, thus demonstrating that more than 30% women with a proper satisfaction of its basic needs and a good resident hygienic environment, have the greater incidence of the asymptomatic climateric syndrome or slight closely related to sociocultural and economic features of study health areas. Conclusions: Women with a higher schooling level, with conjugal stability and working link being part also of functional or moderately functional families and with a good resident hygienic environment in correspondence with satisfaction of their basic needs, have a higher incidence of slight climateric syndrome or

  19. High intensity hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics

  20. The E180splice mutation in the GHR gene causing Laron syndrome: witness of a Sephardic Jewish exodus from the Iberian Peninsula to the New World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Fernanda T; Fridman, Cintia; Pinto, Emília M; Guevara-Aguirre, Jaime; Shevah, Orit; Rosembloom, Arlan L; Hwa, Vivian; Cassorla, Fernando; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Lins, Theresa S S; Damiani, Durval; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Laron, Zvi; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2014-05-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene. The most frequent GHR mutation is E180splice (rs121909360), which was initially found in an inbred population of Spanish descent in Ecuador and subsequently in Israel, Brazil, Chile, and the United States. The aim of the present study is to determine if the E180splice mutation arose from a common origin. We studied 22 patients with LS from Ecuador, Israel (of Moroccan origin), Brazil, Chile, and the United States (of Mexican origin) who were homozygous for the E180splice mutation and compared them to control individuals for markers surrounding the GHR, intragenic polymorphisms, and Y-chromosome STR. An identical haplotype was found in all but one of the subjects carrying the E180splice mutation: D5S665: 150/150; D5S2082: 192/192; D5S2087: 246/246; rs6179 G/G; and rs6180 C/C. One patient differed from the others only at D5S2082 (168/192). This haplotype is rare (~1%) in control individuals and confirmed that the E180splice-associated haplotype was not derived from independent origins but represented recombination from a common ancestor. The analysis of paternal lineage markers showed that 50% belong to haplogroup R1b (found in Portugal and Spain) and 40% to haplogroups J and E (typical in the Middle East and in Eastern European Jews). The germline E180Splice mutation appears to have originated from a single common ancestor. The presence of Y-chromosome markers associated with Sephardic populations in persons harboring the E180splice mutation provides genetic evidence in support of the historical tracking of the exodus of this specific population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. World lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Waser Jürgen; Fuchs Raphael; Ribicic Hrvoje; Schindler Benjamin; Blöschl Günther; Gröller Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation visualization and...

  2. Command World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Leah Y; Lange, Douglas S; Sebastyn, Jerome T; Roof, William H

    2006-01-01

    .... The Command World scenario was expressly designed as a crisis action planning exercise in order to replicate the communications, collaboration, and information requirements inherent in a military...

  3. [Arreflexic coma and MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Guillén, N; León-López, R; Ferrer-Higueras, M J; Vargas-Vaserot, F J; Dueñas-Jurado, J M

    2009-01-01

    MELAS is a progressive neurodegenerative and fatal disease characterized by mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. It is the result of a mitochondrial DNA mutation. Although the incidence of MELAS is currently unknown, it is suspected that approximately 1 out of every 5,000 persons world-wide have some type of defect in mitochondrial DNA. Cardinal clinical features observed in more than 90% of the patients include severe headache that may be associated with stroke-like episodes, seizures and the onset of symptoms before the age of 40 years. Diagnosis is established through genetic test or by with muscle biopsies that reveal the presence of ragged-red fibers. Prognosis is poor, with death at an early age. In this article, we present the clinical case of a 31-year old women diagnosed of MELAS syndrome who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of our hospital with arreflexic coma.

  4. Superhabitable worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world.

  5. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  6. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  7. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  8. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  9. An under-active or over-active internal world? An exploration of parallel dynamics within psyche and soma, and the difficulty of internal regulation, in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Christine

    2005-04-01

    This paper explores the dynamics brought into analytic work when there is a symmetric fusion between psyche and soma within the patient. It will consider how such a fusion may emerge from reverberations between physical constitution and a lack of maternal attunement, containment and reflective function. I will describe the work with a patient, Jane, who was diagnosed with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) during the course of her analysis. The dynamic of her physical symptoms within the analytic work, and the impact of her internal affects and internal 'objects' within the transference and countertransference, indicated a difficulty in finding an homeostatic balance resulting in overactivity and underactivity at both somatic and psychological levels. Using the clinical work with Jane this paper will also examine the interrelationship between mother-infant attachment, an inadequate internalized maternal reflective function, affect dysregulation, unconscious fusion, the lack of psyche-soma differentiation and the impact of the latter in relation to internal regulation systems, or lack of, in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME). I will draw on similar work carried out by Holland (1997), Simpson (1997) and Simpson et al. (1997). The paper will also employ the concept of the reflective function (Fonagy 2001; Knox 2003), and consider Matte-Blanco's (1999) concepts of generalization and unconscious symmetry in relation to the patient's internal world. I go on to consider how analysis provides a point outside the 'fusion' that can enable the 'deadlock' to be broken.

  10. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  11. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  12. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  13. World science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Third World Network of Scientific Organizations (TWNSO), established last year with its headquarters in Trieste, Italy, is to promote the role of science and technology in developing countries. TWNSO, under the presidency of Abdus Salam, is an offshoot of the Third World Academy of Sciences, which has pushed the cause of international scientific collaboration since its establishment in 1983. (orig./HSI).

  14. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  15. Kounis syndrome: a narrative review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology. The lifetime ... It is difficult to estimate the incidence of Kounis syndrome. It is probably .... antibody and eosinophil levels will help to identify an allergic reaction. .... The World Allergy Organization recently published a consensus.

  16. World energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Three major concerns face mankind's future: the impending energy crisis as caused by the depletion of the world's fossil fuel reserves, world atmospheric pollution as caused by the burning of these fuels, and mankind's destruction if the vast energy contained in nuclear weapons stockpiles is released in a global conflict. This paper describes an ambitious, combined solution to these problems by the use of deep underground detonations of thermonuclear devices/bombs to provide a virtually pollution free, world energy source into the far distant future, while achieving a significant increase in mutual trust between the superpowers and all nations. The key is believed to be thermonuclear geothermal stimulation to produce the electrical power needed for a hydrogen economy

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance therapy in lumbar disc herniation with lumbar radicular syndrome: effects of the intervention on pain intensity, health-related quality of life, disease-related disability, consumption of pain medication, duration of sick leave and MRI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfinger, H; Salomonowitz, G; Friedrich, K M; Hahne, J; Holzapfel, J; Friedrich, M

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of therapeutic nuclear magnetic resonance (tNMR) as a conservative treatment for lumbar radicular syndrome (LRS) in patients with lumbar disc herniation. The prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included 94 patients, aged 20-60 years (44.79 ± 8.83), with LRS caused by lumbar disc herniation confirmed by MRI scans and with clinical signs of a radicular lesion without indication for surgical intervention. Treatment group (TG) and control group (CG) received standard non-surgical therapy. Additionally, the TG had seven sessions with the tNMR device with a magnetic flux density of 2.3 mT and a frequency of 85 kHz; the CG received 7 sham treatments. Outcome parameters were the treatment effect on pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale-VAS), health-related quality of life (36-item Short Form Health Survey-SF-36), disease-related disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMDQ), pain medication intake, duration of sick leave and morphological changes assessed by MRI scan analysis. VAS scores improved significantly in both groups (p Patients in the TG recorded significantly fewer days of sick leave in month 3 after treatment (p = 0.026). MRI scan summary scores improved significantly in both groups (L4/5 p treatment of lumbar disc herniation with LRS. The application of tNMR did not meet MCID criteria. It rendered few statistically significant differences between patient groups. The overall results of this trial make a clinical implementation of tNMR in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation with LRS appear premature. Further research is needed to better understand the mode of action of tNMR on compressed neural tissue and to elucidate the issue of the cost/benefit ratio.

  18. Intensive mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience......This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...

  19. World armament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolle, H.

    1977-01-01

    Summary of consequences on: Armament expenditure of the world, arms trade, arms race and nuclear weapon arsenals, nuclear weapon proliferation, nuclear safety controls, nuclear carrier systems, international nuclear trade, nuclear weapon accidents, chemical wars, war law, ecological wars, armament limitations. (HP) [de

  20. Spinning worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis "Spinning Worlds" is about the characterisation of two types of gas-giant exoplanets: Hot Jupiters, with orbital periods of fewer than five days, and young, wide-orbit gas giants, with orbital periods as long as thousands of years. The thesis is based on near-infrared observations of 1

  1. Topiramate Responsive Exploding Head Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Palikh, Gaurang M.; Vaughn, Bradley V.

    2010-01-01

    Exploding head syndrome is a rare phenomenon but can be a significant disruption to quality of life. We describe a 39-year-old female with symptoms of a loud bang and buzz at sleep onset for 3 years. EEG monitoring confirmed these events occurred in transition from stage 1 sleep. This patient reported improvement in intensity of events with topiramate medication. Based on these results, topiramate may be an alternative method to reduce the intensity of events in exploding head syndrome.

  2. Topiramate responsive exploding head syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palikh, Gaurang M; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2010-08-15

    Exploding head syndrome is a rare phenomenon but can be a significant disruption to quality of life. We describe a 39-year-old female with symptoms of a loud bang and buzz at sleep onset for 3 years. EEG monitoring confirmed these events occurred in transition from stage 1 sleep. This patient reported improvement in intensity of events with topiramate medication. Based on these results, topiramate may be an alternative method to reduce the intensity of events in exploding head syndrome.

  3. Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anoop; Khurana, Lokesh

    2008-11-01

    Prevalence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome is rapidly increasing in developing countries, leading to increased morbidity and mortality due to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. Literature search was carried out using the terms obesity, insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, dyslipidemia, nutrition, physical activity, and developing countries, from PubMed from 1966 to June 2008 and from web sites and published documents of the World Health Organization and Food and Agricultural Organization. With improvement in economic situation in developing countries, increasing prevalence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome is seen in adults and particularly in children. The main causes are increasing urbanization, nutrition transition, and reduced physical activity. Furthermore, aggressive community nutrition intervention programs for undernourished children may increase obesity. Some evidence suggests that widely prevalent perinatal undernutrition and childhood catch-up obesity may play a role in adult-onset metabolic syndrome and T2DM. The economic cost of obesity and related diseases in developing countries, having meager health budgets is enormous. To prevent increasing morbidity and mortality due to obesity-related T2DM and cardiovascular disease in developing countries, there is an urgent need to initiate large-scale community intervention programs focusing on increased physical activity and healthier food options, particularly for children. International health agencies and respective government should intensively focus on primordial and primary prevention programs for obesity and the metabolic syndrome in developing countries.

  4. Quantum Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Barrett

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2016v20n1p45 Because of the conceptual difficulties it faces, quantum mechanics provides a salient example of how alternative metaphysical commitments may clarify our understanding of a physical theory and the explanations it provides. Here we will consider how postulating alternative quantum worlds in the context of Hugh Everett III’s pure wave mechanics may serve to explain determinate measurement records and the standard quantum statistics. We will focus on the properties of such worlds, then briefly consider other metaphysical options available for interpreting pure wave mechanics. These reflections will serve to illustrate both the nature and the limits of naturalized metaphysics.

  5. Third World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K, Peng K

    1980-12-01

    The disparity between the consumption patterns of industrialized and Third World countries reflects an increase in the numbers of people living in poverty who have yet to achieve basic needs. Third World planning, encouraged by transnational companies, too often model their development goals on importing artificial life styles. This exploits poor nations by creating unrealistic demands as well as by creating a market for products that are unacceptable elsewhere. The health and environmental effects of these practices prompted the formation of consumers' association of Penang (CAP), which is trying to make people aware of the need to give basic needs the highest priority. The CAP handles complaints, tests products, and studies the socio-economic-environmental implications of development as well as conducting a far-ranging educational program. Its procedures can be adapted by any country to examine consumer awareness and to press for social reform. (DCK)

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  7. Aarskog syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskog disease; Aarskog-Scott syndrome; AAS; Faciodigitogenital syndrome; Gaciogenital dysplasia ... Aarskog syndrome is a genetic disorder that is linked to the X chromosome. It affects mainly males, but females ...

  8. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  9. Cushing's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    宗, 友厚; 伊藤, 勇; 諏訪, 哲也; 武田, 純; MUNE, Tomoatsu

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen cases of verified Cushing's syndrome, and twelve cases of probable Cushing's syndrome were reviewed and data on them were compared with various reports on Cushing's syndrome in the literature.

  10. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  11. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis regarding the competitive interactions between camels and caterpillars in the Sahara ecosystem. Methods Between 2005 and 2009, 44 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Sahrawi pastoralists in the territories administered by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, Western Sahara, using a snow-ball sampling design. Results Sahrawi pastoralists reported the existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome, known locally as duda, affecting their camels. On the basis of Sahrawi knowledge about duda and of a thorough literature review, we built the hypothesis that: 1) caterpillars of the family Lasiocampidae (genera Lasiocampa, Psilogaster, or Streblote) have sudden and rare outbreaks on Acacia treetops in the Western Sahara ecosystem after heavy rainfall; 2) during these outbreaks, camels ingest the caterpillars while browsing; 3) as a consequence of this ingestion, pregnant camels have sudden abortions or give birth to weaklings. This hypothesis was supported by inductive reasoning built on circumstantiated evidence and analogical reasoning with similar syndromes reported in mares in the United States and Australia. Conclusions The possible existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome among camels has been reported for the first time, suggesting that such syndromes might be more widespread than what is currently known. Further research is warranted to validate the reported hypothesis. Finally, the importance of studying folk livestock diseases is reinforced in light of its usefulness in revealing as yet unknown biological phenomena that would deserve further investigation. Resumen ‘Todos lo saben’, menos el resto del mundo: el caso de un s

  12. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volpato Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis regarding the competitive interactions between camels and caterpillars in the Sahara ecosystem. Methods Between 2005 and 2009, 44 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Sahrawi pastoralists in the territories administered by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, Western Sahara, using a snow-ball sampling design. Results Sahrawi pastoralists reported the existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome, known locally as duda, affecting their camels. On the basis of Sahrawi knowledge about duda and of a thorough literature review, we built the hypothesis that: 1 caterpillars of the family Lasiocampidae (genera Lasiocampa, Psilogaster, or Streblote have sudden and rare outbreaks on Acacia treetops in the Western Sahara ecosystem after heavy rainfall; 2 during these outbreaks, camels ingest the caterpillars while browsing; 3 as a consequence of this ingestion, pregnant camels have sudden abortions or give birth to weaklings. This hypothesis was supported by inductive reasoning built on circumstantiated evidence and analogical reasoning with similar syndromes reported in mares in the United States and Australia. Conclusions The possible existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome among camels has been reported for the first time, suggesting that such syndromes might be more widespread than what is currently known. Further research is warranted to validate the reported hypothesis. Finally, the importance of studying folk livestock diseases is reinforced in light of its usefulness in revealing as yet unknown biological phenomena that would deserve further investigation. Resumen ‘Todos lo saben’, menos el resto del

  13. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  14. World energy insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    The 21st World Energy Congress offers a unique opportunity for all stake-holders of the energy sector to meet and exchange visions, strategies and practices, during four days of very intensive and interesting sessions, round-tables and exhibitions. More than 3,000 energy leaders gather from around the world from both developed and developing countries, from all types of energy, from public and private companies and government organisations, in order to think together about how to bring about a sustainable and acceptable energy future. The truth is that nobody has the choice any longer. All energy leaders have to take decisions every day, and they need to have a clear analysis of what is at stake, what the risks are, and what the solutions can be.

  15. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. It may happen ... move the affected body part The cause of CRPS is unknown. There is no specific diagnostic test. ...

  16. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 153. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  17. Unusual Straatsma Syndrome - How dogmatic is a bad prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vide-Escada

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions and importance: Straatsma Syndrome can present with heterochromia iridum. When strabismus is present, early surgery should be withheld. Intensive treatment of Straatsma Syndrome can yield an unexpected good result, despite initial high degree anisometropia and low vision acuity.

  18. Recreating the World(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giseli do Prado Siqueira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Created in 2007 , the project extension Itinerant Workshops : recreating the world ( s of the Catholic University of Minas Gerais , Campus Poços de Caldas is an inseparable experience in research of teaching and extension. With this title " recreating worlds " seek to express the experience that has been possible for us to live over the years of execution of this project . Our experience is theoretically referenced by understanding that German thinkers Meister Eckhart (1260-1327 and Martin Heidegger (1889-1976 shows us about what is the man in they on existence. Such an understanding is expressed in the phenomenon of serenity ( Gelassenheit , let it be understood as simply what we are . Our research on this phenomenon Gelassenheit (Serenity , guide the relationships we establish with the external community , where we understand that the existence of man in his essential condition , is a shared existence. The other is imposed on us and we never fail to be sympathetic to their fears and anxieties , because these same fears and anxieties are also ours possibilities . This relationship of consideration makes us all ( teachers , students , community solidarity in our existential angst before the unexpected, the unknown . It is when we can see ourselves through another , in what we truly are and can be.

  19. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is to provide a medium for the dissemination of original works in Africa and other parts of the world about anaesthesia and intensive care including the application of basic sciences ...

  20. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Bruning mouth syndrome is a burning sensation of one or several oral soft tissues with the tongue being affected the most, and may be associated with some other symptoms outside the oral structures. The oral symptoms may appear suddenly or gradually within a time course, may be persistent throughout the day or get more intense as the day progresses in a complaint-free patient in the morning. The syndrome affects mostly women and those over 50 years old, and usually caused by multiple factors....

  1. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4: ... ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity ...

  3. Energy intensities: Prospects and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the previous chapter, the author described how rising activity levels and structural change are pushing toward higher energy use in many sectors and regions, especially in the developing countries. The extent to which more activity leads to greater energy use will depend on the energy intensity of end-use activities. In this chapter, the author presents an overview of the potential for intensity reductions in each sector over the next 10-20 years. It is not the author's intent to describe in detail the various technologies that could be employed to improve energy efficiency, which has been done by others (see, for example, Lovins ampersand Lovins, 1991; Goldembert et al., 1987). Rather, he discusses the key factors that will shape future energy intensities in different parts of the world, and gives a sense for the changes that could be attained if greater attention were given to accelerate efficiency improvement. The prospects for energy intensities, and the potential for reduction, vary among sectors and parts of the world. In the majority of cases, intensities are tending to decline as new equipment and facilities come into use and improvements are made on existing stocks. The effect of stock turnover will be especially strong in the developing countries, where stocks are growing at a rapid pace, and the Former East Bloc, where much of the existing industrial plant will eventually be retired and replaced with more modern facilities. While reductions in energy intensity are likely in most areas, there is a large divergence between the technical and economic potential for reducing energy intensities and the direction in which present trends are moving. In the next chapter, the author presents scenarios that illustrate where trends are pointing, and what could be achieved if improving energy efficiency were a focus of public policies. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  5. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  6. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  7. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  8. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  9. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP; also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the ... avoid exposure to inorganic dust. Alternative Names RP; Caplan syndrome; Pneumoconiosis - rheumatoid; Silicosis - rheumatoid pneumoconiosis; Coal worker's ...

  10. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  11. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  12. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ... have also been reported. × Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ...

  13. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  14. Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000308.htm Bartter syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bartter syndrome is a group of rare conditions that affect ...

  15. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible long-term consequences of the syndrome. Children with Pendred syndrome should start early treatment to gain communication skills, such as learning sign language or cued speech or learning to ...

  16. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects responsible for Dravet syndrome and related ... Publications Definition Dravet ...

  17. World energy scene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondi, H

    1980-01-01

    Coal will have an increasing role in world energy in the next three decades. The coming dependence on coal as the major fuel will radically affect international cooperation, as the US, USSR, and China account for approx. 85% of the known geological resources, and coal's likely economic marginality poses questions as to which producer will be capable of a profitable export trade. Energy transportability is becoming more important, as people can no longer move near to the sources. Also discussed are the uncompetitiveness of wasteful energy expenditure; the crucial relation of energy consumption to a country's gross national product; the energy intensities of selected industries; the necessity of elasticity in responding to changing energy supplies; the need for increased energy consumption in building up the developing countries; and good control, made achievable via advances in solid-state electronics, as the deciding factor in proper energy management.

  18. Dose intensity and efficacy of the combination of everolimus and exemestane (EVE/EXE) in a real-world population of hormone receptor-positive (ER+/PgR+), HER2-negative advanced breast cancer (ABC) patients: a multicenter Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Mariangela; Fabi, Alessandra; Moscetti, Luca; Cazzaniga, Maria Elena; Petrucelli, Luciana; Forcignanò, Rosachiara; Lupo, Laura Isabella; De Matteis, Elisabetta; Chiuri, Vincenzo Emanuele; Cairo, Giuseppe; Febbraro, Antonio; Giordano, Guido; Giampaglia, Marianna; Bilancia, Domenico; La Verde, Nicla; Maiello, Evaristo; Morritti, Maria; Giotta, Francesco; Lorusso, Vito; Latorre, Agnese; Scavelli, Claudio; Romito, Sante; Cusmai, Antonio; Palmiotti, Gennaro; Surico, Giammarco

    2017-06-01

    This retrospective analysis focused on the effect of treatment with EVE/EXE in a real-world population outside of clinical trials. We examined the efficacy of this combination in terms of PFS and RR related to dose intensity (5 mg daily versus 10 mg daily) and tolerability. 163 HER2-negative ER+/PgR+ ABC patients, treated with EVE/EXE from May 2011 to March 2016, were included in the analysis. The primary endpoints were the correlation between the daily dose and RR and PFS, as well as an evaluation of the tolerability of the combination. Secondary endpoints were RR, PFS, and OS according to the line of treatment. Patients were classified into three different groups, each with a different dose intensity of everolimus (A, B, C). RR was 29.8% (A), 27.8% (B) (p = 0.953), and not evaluable (C). PFS was 9 months (95% CI 7-11) (A), 10 months (95% CI 9-11) (B), and 5 months (95% CI 2-8) (C), p = 0.956. OS was 38 months (95% CI 24-38) (A), median not reached (B), and 13 months (95% CI 10-25) (C), p = 0.002. Adverse events were stomatitis 57.7% (11.0% grade 3-4), asthenia 46.0% (6.1% grade 3-4), hypercholesterolemia 46.0% (0.6% grade 3-4), and hyperglycemia 35.6% (5.5% grade 3-4). The main reason for discontinuation/interruption was grade 2-3 stomatitis. No correlation was found between dose intensity (5 vs. 10 mg labeled dose) and efficacy in terms of RR and PFS. The tolerability of the higher dose was poor in our experience, although this had no impact on efficacy.

  19. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older. Down syndrome cannot be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include ... occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many ... Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of ...

  20. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  1. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) × Definition Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) View Full Definition Treatment There is no ...

  2. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  3. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases...

  4. Dravets syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood. Most cases of Dravet syndrome seem to be due to a genetic defect causing the sodium channel to malfunction. We describe the main features of the syndrome. This epilepsy is medically intractable, but we call attention...... to the fact that some medications are of benefit and some could exacerbate the condition. Early recognition of the syndrome including by genetic testing could possibly improve outcome and reduce the need for other specialized investigations. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Feb-22...

  5. Low-Intensity Conflict in the Third World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    destiny long before the coming of Nasir. By the last decades of the nineteenth century, a new generation of Islamic thinkers had appeared in Egypt. They...In al-Banna’s movement, then, there existed the embryo of a new Islamic social order that faithfully replicated an older Islamic experience solidly...Islam’s relation to modernism, Egypt’s Arab destiny , and the right to determine the course ofthe pan-Arab polity. The competition was prolonged well into

  6. Studying Treatment Intensity: Lessons from Two Preliminary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Nicole; Jones, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Determining how best to meet the needs of learners with Down syndrome requires an approach to intervention delivered at some level of intensity. How treatment intensity affects learner acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of skills can help optimize the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of interventions. There is a growing body of research…

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 45 David, Age 65 Harold, Age 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do ...

  8. The Academic Life: Small Worlds, Different Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, William

    2010-01-01

    "The Academic Life: Small Worlds, Different Worlds" represented an impressive investigation of the largest and most complex national academic community in the world, which seriously attempted a detailed representation of the variations in its form. Its ethnographic orientation to understanding the internal academic life through exploratory…

  9. Some aspects of hemodynamic disorders in patients with severe withdrawal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Gozhenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension - the most common cardiovascular syndrome in many countries of the world. Up to 40-50% of the adult population of economically developed countries has an arterial pressure in excess of 140/90 mm Hg. Art. The author discusses the results of research conducted in 2010 -2012 inthe department of resuscitation and intensive care of theChernivtsiRegionalPsychiatric Hospital. 40 patients were examined: Group 1 - 20 patients diagnosed with withdrawal due to delirium alcohol. The results indicate significant hemodynamic disturbances in patients with withdrawal due to the use of delirium alcohol and patients with threatened delirium during hospitalization.

  10. Scenarios of future energy intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present scenarios of potential change in energy intensities in the OECD countries and in the Soviet Union. These scenarios are meant to illustrate how intensities might evolve over the next 20 years given different conditions with respect to energy prices, energy-efficiency policies, and other key factors. Changes in intensity will also be affected by the rates of growth and stock turnover in each sector. They have not tried to forecast how activity levels and structure will evolve. However, the OECD scenarios assume a world in which GDP averages growth in the 2-3%/year range, with some differences among countries. For the Soviet Union, the degree and pace of intensity decline will be highly dependent on the success of the transition to a market economy; each scenario explicitly envisions a different degree of success. They have not constructed comparable scenarios for the developing countries. The scenarios presented in this chapter do not predict what will happen in the future. They believe, however, that they illustrate a plausible set of outcomes if energy prices, policies, programs, and other factors evolve as described in each case. With higher energy prices and vigorous policies and programs, intensities in the OECD countries in 2010 could be nearly 50% less on average than the level where trends seem to be point. In the former Soviet Union, a combination of rapid, successful economic reform and extra effort to improve energy efficiency might result in average intensity being nearly 40% less than in a slow reform case. And in the LDCs, a mixture of sound policies, programs, and energy pricing reform could also lead to intensities being far lower than they would be otherwise. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  11. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  12. Refeeding syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal medical condition that may affect malnourished patients in response to an inappropriately rapid overfeeding. This commonly occurs following the institution of nutritional support, especially parenteral or enteral nutrition. The most characteristic pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome relates to the rapid consumption of phosphate after glucose intake and subsequent hypophosphatemia. Refeeding syndrome can manifest as either metabolic changes (hypokala...

  13. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  14. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volpato, G.; Nardo, Di A.; Rossi, D.; Lamin Saleh, S.; Broglia, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis

  15. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  16. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the French ... immediately. What's Life Like for Teens With Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome affects people differently, so life is not ...

  17. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most common inherited ... FAQ Top of page Additional Resources For Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Marfan ...

  18. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  19. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  20. World endocrinology news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available • Actuality of the problem of metabolic syndrome: expert opinion. • Chemerin is a novel adipokine associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. • Brothers of women with polycystic ovary syndrome are characterised by impaired glucose tolerance, reduced insulin sensitivity and related metabolic defects. • Microvascular dysfunction: a potential pathophysiological role in the metabolic syndrome. • Cardiotrophin-1 is expressed in adipose tissue and it is UP-regulated in the metabolic syndrome. • Magnesium Intake, Metabolic Abnormalities, and Inflammation. • Red meat in the diet. • Relationships of maternal and paternal birth weights to features of the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring: an inter-generation study in South India. • The truth about milk! • Therapeutic uses of aromatase inhibitors in men. • Reduction of body weight and co-morbidities by orlistat: The XXL - Primary Health Care Trial

  1. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  2. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  3. Worldwide distribution of Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chetan S; Isaacson, Glenn

    2003-09-01

    To clarify the multiracial occurrence of Waardenburg syndrome, we present a case series and literature review. A computerized review of the English-language literature was conducted to assess the distribution of reported occurrences of Waardenburg syndrome in populations around the world. We detail the clinical features of 2 family cohorts: one of Western European origin and the other from South Asia. A computerized literature review found sporadic cases of the syndrome in many ethnic groups, including Japanese, Taiwanese, and Middle Eastern families. The highest reported incidence is among Kenyan Africans. Waardenburg syndrome accounts for between 2% and 5% of cases of congenital deafness. It was first described in Northern European cohorts and is widely identified in fair-skinned populations. We hope to raise awareness of the worldwide distribution of this important cause of hearing loss.

  4. Médicos plantonistas de unidade de terapia intensiva: perfil sócio-demográfico, condições de trabalho e fatores associados à síndrome de burnout Intensive care unit physicians: socio-demographic profile, working conditions and factors associated with burnout syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton de Souza Barros

    2008-09-01

    of this study was to describe socio-demographic characteristics of intensive care unit physicians and evaluate factors associated to the presence of Burnout syndrome in this population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate physicians who have worked in intensive care units from the city of Salvador (Bahia - Brazil with a minimum weekly workload of 12-hour. An anonymous self-reported questionnaire was used and it was divided into two parts: socio-demographic characteristics and evaluation of Burnout syndrome through Maslach Burnout Inventory. RESULTS: We studied 297 physicians and most of them were male (70%. The mean age and time of graduation were, respectively, 34.2 and 9 years. High levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment were found in respectively, 47.5%, 24.6% and 28.3%. The prevalence of Burnout syndrome, considered as high level in at least one dimension, was of 63.3%. This prevalence was statistically lower in physicians specialized on intensive care, those with more than nine years of graduation and those who intend to continue working in intensive care units for more than 10 years. The prevalence was higher in the doctors with more than 24-hours of uninterrupted intensive care work per week. CONCLUSIONS: Burnout syndrome was common among intensive care physicians and it was more frequent in the youngest doctors, with higher workload and without specialization on intensive care.

  5. Seckel syndrome: an overdiagnosed syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M

    1985-01-01

    Five children in whom a diagnosis of Seckel syndrome had previously been made were re-examined in the genetic unit. One child had classical Seckel syndrome, a sib pair had the features of the syndrome with less severe short stature, and in two children the diagnosis was not confirmed. Seckel syndrome is only one of a group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism and careful attention should be paid to fulfillment of the major criteria defined by Seckel before the diagnosis is made. There r...

  6. [About the Cotard's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Agnes; Vörös, Viktor; Tényi, Tamás

    2008-10-01

    INTRODUCTION, AIMS: The authors present the Cotard's syndrome, a rare psychiatric condition, pointing out the latest results in terms of etiology and psychoneurology. The central feature of the syndrome is a nihilistic delusion, in which the patient denies his or her own existence and that of the external world. We searched electronic databases using the appropriate search terms, relevant articles were carefully reviewed. We present three cases from our clinical practice. After the overview of the latest biological and neuropsychological findings, the historical aspects of the condition, the terminology, the nosology, the classification, the differential diagnostics and the etiology are discussed. The psychopathology and the phenomenology of Cotard's syndrome are also presented, shedding light on existential aspects as well. To sum up with useful information for the clinical practice, the possible treatment strategies, the course and the prognosis of the disease are also discussed. The presented theoretical and practical aspects give a lead on deeper understanding, easier recognition and more adequate therapy of the Cotard's syndrome.

  7. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  9. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  10. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  11. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  12. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  13. Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid ris...

  14. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A multicenter study on Leigh syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, Kalliopi; De Coo, Irenaeus F M; Isohanni, Pirjo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leigh syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, associated with primary or secondary dysfunction of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Despite the fact that Leigh syndrome is the most common phenotype of mitochondrial disorders in children, longitudinal natural...... history data is missing. This study was undertaken to assess the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of patients with Leigh syndrome, characterise the clinical course and identify predictors of survival in a large cohort of patients. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients with Leigh syndrome...... to thrive, brainstem lesions on neuroimaging and intensive care treatment were significantly associated with poorer survival. CONCLUSIONS: This is a multicenter study performed in a large cohort of patients with Leigh syndrome. Our data help define the natural history of Leigh syndrome and identify novel...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart Rate & Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion ( ... a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived ...

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, ... The table below lists examples of activities classified as moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity based upon the ...

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a breath. Absolute Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. ...

  20. Iowa Intensive Archaeological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file contains intensive level archaeological survey areas for the state of Iowa. All intensive Phase I surveys that are submitted to the State Historic...

  1. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome. Case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Carpio-Orantes, Luis; Martínez-Anaya, Chantall Citlally; Bonilla-Casas, Elías

    2017-01-01

    The present document is the report of a case of a very rare clinical entity, which presents with acute multiorganic failure after a thrombotic storm related to antiphospholipid antibodies, the so-called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, which began as a recurrent picture of mesenteric thrombosis, with a previous history of venous insufficiency and distal ulcers probably associated with an unidentified antiphospholipid; deserving management in intensive care and the consultation by the world expert, Dr. Ricard Cervera who confirmed the diagnosis and recommend treating as such entity, the patient's evolution was satisfactory so far. Final recommendations for diagnosis and current treatment options such as rituximab or eculizumab are made. The present case was added to the international registry that currently houses around 500 cases worldwide (International CAPS Registry). Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  2. Activity of processes of a lipoperoksidation at patients with a long postoperative pain syndrome against the combined application of application of low-intensive infrared laser therapy at impact on thymus area and pantovegin electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugieva M.Z.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to optimize the treatment of postoperative gynecological patients using physiotherapy method. Material and methods. It was examined 220 patients in postoperative period. It was investigated antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation. Results. It is demonstrated that patients with prolonged postoperative pain disorders are more pronounced as compared with the control group. The article presents data on the effectiveness of the impact on the antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation in postoperative period of combined use of low-intensity infrared laser therapy when exposed area of the thymus and in pantovegin electrophoresis in patients sustained postoperative pain after gynecological laparotomy. Conclusion. It is shown that this method helps to reduce pain in the postoperative wound.

  3. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  4. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  5. Costello syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukara J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome is a rare, distinctive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, characterized by soft, loose skin with deep palmar and plantar creases, loose joints, distinctive coarse facial features and skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. The affected patients have a predisposition to develop malignancy, developmental delays and mental retardation. Recently, a 7-year-old male child born to normal nonconsanguineous parents presented to us with abnormal facial features, arrhythmia, mitral valve dysfunction and growth retardation. His cutaneous examination revealed lax and pigmented skin over hands and feet with deep creases, acanthosis nigricans and short curly hairs. Its differentiation from other syndromes with similar clinical features is discussed in this article.

  6. Stochastic conditional intensity processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauwens, Luc; Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2006-01-01

    model allows for a wide range of (cross-)autocorrelation structures in multivariate point processes. The model is estimated by simulated maximum likelihood (SML) using the efficient importance sampling (EIS) technique. By modeling price intensities based on NYSE trading, we provide significant evidence......In this article, we introduce the so-called stochastic conditional intensity (SCI) model by extending Russell’s (1999) autoregressive conditional intensity (ACI) model by a latent common dynamic factor that jointly drives the individual intensity components. We show by simulations that the proposed...... for a joint latent factor and show that its inclusion allows for an improved and more parsimonious specification of the multivariate intensity process...

  7. World Hunger: Teaching about World Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jane

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of world hunger in the classroom. Controversial questions and map skills for students are discussed as well as activities for home economics and science classes. A list of resource materials is included. (AM)

  8. Executive functions in persons with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern man lyfestyle contributes to the increasing incidence of metabolic syndrome in the developed world. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults ranges from 20 to 25%, and it tends to increase. Each year, 3.2 million people around the world die from complications associated with this syndrome. Treatment involves cooperation of medical doctors of various specialties, but the decisive factor is patient motivation, given that the treatment requires significant lifestyle changes. Our hypothesis is that metabolic syndrome patients have reduced ability to plan, convert plan into action and effectively implement planned activities, showing signs of dysexecutive syndrome. The term executive functions comes from the English word 'executive', which also means the controlling, in neuropsychology reserved for high-level abilities that influence more basic abilities such as attention, perception, memory, thinking and speaking. The main objective of this study was to determine characteristics of executive functioning in patients with metabolic syndrome. The sample consisted of 61 subjects of both sexes, aged 20 to 60 years, divided into two groups - those with a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and those without this diagnosis. The results suggest that people with metabolic syndrome showed significantly poorer performance in almost all indicators of executive functions, represented by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test variables.

  9. A Nonfatal Case of Dobrava Hantavirus Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Combined with Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemsedin Dreshaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Among hantaviruses (HTNV, 22 are known as pathogenic for humans. HTNV can cause two clinical entities: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS. In most countries of Eastern Europe as well as in Kosovo, HTNV infection is presented mainly as HFRS. Here, we report a 20-year-old man with HFRS and HCPS caused by Dobrava hantavirus strain, successfully treated in Intensive Care Unit of Infectious Diseases Clinic, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. In HFRS endemic areas, patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome need to be evaluated for Dobrava hantavirus strain as a possible causative agent.

  10. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  11. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure to begin sexual changes expected during puberty Sexual development that "stalls" during teenage years Early end to menstrual cycles not due to pregnancy For most women with Turner syndrome, inability to ...

  13. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  14. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  15. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  16. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  17. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crowding, and osteoporosis (brittle bones). Because of their physical conditions, health concerns, and infertility, some girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? Physical features may ...

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  19. Levator Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse (See ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids , fissures , or abscesses ). The physical examination is often ...

  20. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  1. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not know you have the condition until it's discovered by accident, such as when a blood test ... chemotherapy drug Some protease inhibitors used to treat HIV If you have Gilbert's syndrome, talk to your ...

  2. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  3. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are unable to move their eyes back and forth. Decreased numbers of muscle fibers have been reported. Deformities of the tongue, jaw, and limbs, such ...

  4. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of...

  5. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy for seizures is usually necessary. Physical and occupational therapies, communication therapy, and behavioral therapies are important in allowing individuals with Angelman syndrome to reach their maximum developmental potential. × Treatment There ...

  6. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CEP290 . View Full Definition Treatment Treatment for Joubert syndrome is symptomatic and supportive. Infant stimulation and physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal breathing ...

  7. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  8. Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood — typically with an artificial kidney machine (dialyzer). Chronic kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome may cause your ... opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  9. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are more often affected than girls. View Full Definition Treatment Antiepileptic drugs are used to control seizures, but are unfortunately ... Other therapies are symptomatic and supportive. × ... Definition Ohtahara syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by ...

  10. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  11. World Health Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... introduce large-scale mDiabetes services using mobile phones. World Diabetes Day 2017 Feature: Senegal mobile phone project Fact sheet: diabetes World Antibiotic Awareness Week 13 November 2017 – Antibiotic resistance ...

  12. The World Airpower Compendium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackburn, Mark

    1996-01-01

    In today's rapidly changing world a current, accurate, and easily accessible data base of all the world's airpower assets is valuable to military students, educators, and war gaming professionals alike...

  13. The Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, John Sears

    1981-01-01

    Relates personal experiences about what constitutes the "real world." Shows how experiences from philosophy, history, literature, art, and the movies add meaning to "reality." Stresses a compromise of imagination and sensation to make the real world palatable. (RL)

  14. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  15. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, M.I.; Cheema, I.A.; Qasim, G.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  16. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  17. Syndrome or Difference: A Critical Review of Medical Conceptualisations of Asperger's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We live in a world of vast social differences. People of different ages, cultures, religions, gender and sexual orientation have, and indeed are expected to have, distinct differences in their behaviour, and in the way that they see the world. Asperger's syndrome (AS) is no different. People with AS have different personality types and have…

  18. The World of Nothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery A. Kayukov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative analysis of knowledge about the world of nothingness. J. Boehme pointed to the fact that the world of Nothing is everlasting emptiness, where and wherein the material world could emerge. But the thing is that the world of absolute emptiness did not vanish at the moment of beginning of the world, quite the reverse, it has somehow been permanently enlarging. What will happen next is still a question. Perhaps our world will begin to be moving back on a new spiral of development, perhaps a real transition to the world of nothing will have appeared in this subtle place. For the present it is clear that these two worlds have not touched each other in mutually beneficial communication so far, and everything from our world passes into the world of nothing, and in general, the world of nothing ontologically appears to be much more existential than the world of apparent reality. What can give us some kind of key point at least, be some kind of organon in interaction with these two worlds - with the world of Nothing in which there is no matter and which cannot be perceived by any senses, and with the world of matter in which all senses are unstable and changeable? In our opinion, the only beacon and the instrument of knowledge can be the mind. To understand this phenomenon, by benefiting from a comparative methodology, this study investigates opinions of a number of philosophers, J. Boehme, G.V.F. Hegel, M. Heidegger, and J.P. Sartre, on the existence of the world of nothing.

  19. [Poland's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  20. Validation and real-world assessment of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia-Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) scale in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Samsa, Greg P; Wolf, Steven P; Locke, Susan C; Cella, David F; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-08-01

    Patients with cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) suffer a significant symptom burden, impaired quality of life (QoL), and shorter survival. Measurement of QoL impairments related to CACS is thereby important both in clinical practice and in research. We aimed to further validate the Functional Assessment of Anorexia-Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) scale in an advanced lung cancer population. We tested the performance of the FAACT and its anorexia-cachexia subscale (ACS) within a dataset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (aNSCLC), using standard statistical methods. We then compared the performance of commonly used QoL measures stratified by CACS status and by patient self-report of appetite and weight loss. The FAACT and its ACS demonstrate internal validity consistent with acceptable published ranges for other QoL scales (Cronbach alpha = 0.9 and 0.79, respectively). Correlation coefficients demonstrate moderate correlations in the expected directions between FAACT and ACS and scales that measure related constructs. Comparing patients with and without CACS, the ACS is more sensitive to change than other QoL instruments (mean score 33.1 vs. 37.2, p = 0.011, ES = 0.58). In patients with aNSCLC, the FAACT and its ACS performed well compared with other instruments, further supporting their validity and value in clinical research. FAACT and ACS scores covaried with symptoms and other QoL changes that are typical hallmarks of CACS, lending further support to their use as QoL endpoints in clinical trials among patients with CACS.

  1. WHO: World Health Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, A

    1992-05-23

    1200 delegates from 175 member countries attended the 45th World Health Assembly in Geneva. Everyone at the Assembly ratified measures to prevent and control AIDS. 12 countries intended to do long term planning for community based care for AIDS patients. Further the Assembly denounced instances where countries and individuals denied the gravity of the AIDS pandemic. In fact, it expressed the importance for urgent and intensive action against HIV/AIDS. The assembly backed proposals to prevent and control sexually transmitted diseases that affect AIDS patients, especially hepatitis B. For example, in countries with hepatitis B prevalence 8% (many countries in Sub-Sahara Africa, Asia, the Pacific region, and South America), health officials should introduce hepatitis B vaccine into their existing immunization programs by 1995. By 1997, this vaccine should be part of all immunization programs. The Assembly was aware of the obstacles of establishing reliable cold chains for nationwide distribution, however. Delegates in Committee A objected to the fact that 50% of the populations of developing countries continued to have limited access to essential drugs. They also expressed disapproval in implementation of WHO's 1988 ethical criteria for promotion of drugs which WHO entrusted to the Council for International Organisations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS). CIOMS lacked WHO's status and thus could not effectively monitor drug advertising. In fact, the pharmaceutical industry as well as WHO provided the funds for a meeting of 25 experts to discuss principles included in the ethical criteria. At least 4 countries insisted that WHO have the ultimate authority in monitoring drug advertising. Delegates did adopt a compromise resolution on this topic which required that industry promotion methods be reported to the 1994 Assembly via the Executive Board. The Assembly requested WHO to establish an international advisory committee on nursing and midwifery and to improve the network of

  2. Semantic Game Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutenel, T.

    2012-01-01

    The visual quality of game worlds increased massively in the last three decades. However, the closer game worlds depict reality, the more noticeable it is for gamers when objects do not behave accordingly. An important problem is that the data of a game world is often scattered across different

  3. Functional and structural vascular adaptations following 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training in lower leg of type 2 diabetes patients and individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Møller; Thorup, Anne Cathrine Sønderstgaard; Overgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We wished to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT) on endothelial function of popliteal artery and circulating cell adhesion molecules in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients and matched controls (CON). Methods: Over 8 weeks, non-active T2D patients...... and CONs cycled three times per week (10 × 60 sec HIIT). Pre- and post-HIIT measurements of endothelial function were conducted by applying flow-mediated dilation (FMD) along with taking venous blood samples. Results: Baseline diameter of popliteal artery increased significantly from an average of 5.53 mm.......12% to 6.58% in the CON-group (p = 0.004) and 4.84% to 5.66% in the T2D-group: (p = 0.045). The shear rate reduced significantly in both groups (CON-group: p = 0.04; T2D-group: p = 0.002). Circulating cell adhesion molecules remained unchanged (p > 0.05). Conclusion: HIIT induced an improvement...

  4. The metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular mortality in US Air Force veterans of the Vietnam War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavuk, M. [SpecPro, Inc. (United States); Michalek, J.; Jackson Jr., W.; Ketchum, N. [Air Force Research Laboratory (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of risk factors such as disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism, obesity and visceral adiposity, low HDL cholesterol, hypertension, and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. Its subsequent association with development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes makes it a major health care issue. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the United States is roughly 25% for adults over 20 and up to 40% for those over 60 years old. Although the estimates on the prevalence differ and various criteria have been used in classification of metabolic syndrome, few seem to disagree that it has reached epidemic proportions. Two major definitions have been proposed by World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III). The exact definition of the syndrome and the importance of individual components in the etiology of the syndrome are still under intense investigation. The Air Force Health Study is a 25-year prospective study examining the health, mortality and reproductive outcomes in US Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand who sprayed herbicides, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) - contaminated Agent Orange, in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971. Veterans who flew or serviced C-130 transport aircraft in Southeast Asia during the same time period but did not spray herbicides served as comparisons. In this study we examined whether the NCEP-defined metabolic syndrome in Air Force veterans who attended the 1982 baseline examination was associated with their subsequent cardiovascular and any-cause mortality and whether exposure to herbicides had any effect on this association.

  5. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  6. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  8. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  9. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as " ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ...

  12. AGS intensity upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    After the successful completion of the AGS Booster and several upgrades of the AGS, a new intensity record of 6.3 x 10 13 protons per pulse accelerated to 24 GeV was achieved. The high intensity slow-extracted beam program at the AGS typically serves about five production targets and about eight experiments including three rare Kaon decay experiments. Further intensity upgrades are being discussed that could increase the average delivered beam intensity by up to a factor of four

  13. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the claude syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshima, Hiroko; Miyajima, Masayuki; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Shimojou, Sadatomo; Miyahara, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    A case of the Claude syndrome complicated by Parinaud's syndrome is reported. A 68-year-old male suddenly developed a diplopia and ataxic gait on June 16, 1985. On admission, he exhibited a right oculomotor palsy, an upward-gaze palsy, and left cerebellar ataxia. A brain CT was negative, but MRI performed on June 19 showed a low-intensity area in the left red nucleus of the midbrain on inversion recovery. The patient was thought to have a Claude syndrome due to an ischemic cerebral infarct. Since the first report, by Claude in 1912 of a case, with an unilateral oculomotor palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia, the lesions responsible for which were attributed to the red nucleus, many cases have been reported in the literature as the Claude syndrome or as a red-nucleus syndrome. In Japan 8 cases of the Claude syndrome have thus far been reported, but only one report refers to the CT findings of this syndrome. This is the first report to describe the MRI findings of a case of the Claude syndrome complicated with Parinaud's syndrome; a red-nucleus lesion of the homolateral midbrain has been clearly demonstrated. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the claude syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshima, Hiroko; Miyajima, Masayuki; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Shimojou, Sadatomo; Miyahara, Tadashi

    1988-04-01

    A case of the Claude syndrome complicated by Parinaud's syndrome is reported. A 68-year-old male suddenly developed a diplopia and ataxic gait on June 16, 1985. On admission, he exhibited a right oculomotor palsy, an upward-gaze palsy, and left cerebellar ataxia. A brain CT was negative, but MRI performed on June 19 showed a low-intensity area in the left red nucleus of the midbrain on inversion recovery. The patient was thought to have a Claude syndrome due to an ischemic cerebral infarct. Since the first report, by Claude in 1912 of a case, with an unilateral oculomotor palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia, the lesions responsible for which were attributed to the red nucleus, many cases have been reported in the literature as the Claude syndrome or as a red-nucleus syndrome. In Japan 8 cases of the Claude syndrome have thus far been reported, but only one report refers to the CT findings of this syndrome. This is the first report to describe the MRI findings of a case of the Claude syndrome complicated with Parinaud's syndrome; a red-nucleus lesion of the homolateral midbrain has been clearly demonstrated.

  16. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  17. Metabonomics and Intensive Care

    OpenAIRE

    Antcliffe, D; Gordon, AC

    2016-01-01

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency medicine 2016. Other selected articles can be found online at http://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2016. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901.

  18. Nutcracker syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta. 1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific. 3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies. 4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  19. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  20. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  1. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach…

  2. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  3. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  4. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  5. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  6. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  7. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  8. Reiter's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, S S; Fernandez, J C; Dhurandhar, M W; Fernandez, R J

    1979-01-01

    A case of Reiter's syndrome occurring in a young mate aged 20 years having extensive skin lesions of keratoderina blenoffhagica is presented along with a review of literature. Although urethritis was absent, other clinical and histopathological features of the cutaneous lesions led us to the diagnosis. The-possible relationship of postural psoriasis to Reiter's syndrome is discussed. Failure of the patient to respond satisfactorily to steroids, antibiotics etc, prompted the use of rnethotrexate in the case. The result was dramatic, as the patient completely recovered within ten days of starting treatment.

  9. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  10. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  11. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  12. Meigs' Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.; Khaskheli, M.; Farooq, S.

    2006-01-01

    Meigs' syndrome is a rare clinical condition commonly considered to be associated with malignant ovarian tumour. A case of unmarried female is presented who came with a slowly increasing abdominal mass. Clinical and ultrasonic investigations revealed a mobile, solid right adenexal tumour in the lower abdomen, along with ascites and pleural effusion of the right lung. The level of CA 125 was also raised. Diagnosis of Meigs' syndrome was confirmed after surgical intervention. The tumour was successfully removed and pleural effusion disappeared 15 days after the intervention. Cytomorphologic study of both the tumour and ascitic fluid was negative for malignancy. (author)

  13. [Elsberg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristine Esbjerg; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2013-12-16

    A syndrome involving acute urinary retention in combination with sacral radiculitis and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was first described by the American neurosurgeon Charles Elsberg in 1931. In many instances the aetiology is herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation from sensory neurons. In this case report we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman with previous undiagnosed sensory lumbosacral symptoms. She was hospitalized with HSV-2 meningitis and lumbosacral radiculitis but no genital rash. A week after the onset of symptoms she developed acute urinary retention, thus indicating Elsberg syndrome.

  14. Burning mouth syndrome: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage; Jaishankar Homberhalli Puttabuddi; Purnachandrarao Naik Nunsavath

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by an oral burning sensation in the absence of any organic disorders of the oral cavity. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and is characterized by an intense burning type of pain, preferably on the tongue and in other areas of the ...

  15. [Case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome caused by Fisher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Katsunori; Ando, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Osamu

    2018-01-26

    This report presents a case of a 71-year-old woman with Fisher syndrome who had posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) before the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment. She had symptoms of common cold 2 weeks before the onset of PRES. On the day of the onset, she began to stagger while walking. On day 2, she developed hypertension, vision impairment, and limb weakness and was admitted to the hospital. On day 3, she was provided steroid pulse therapy. On day 4, she developed convulsions and right imperfection single paralysis and was transferred to the our hospital. During the transfer, the patient was conscious. Her blood pressure was high at 198/107 mmHg. She had mild weakness in her limbs and face, light perception in both eyes, dilation of both pupils, total external ophthalmoplegia, no tendon reflexes, and limb and trunk ataxia. We diagnosed PRES because of the high signal intensities observed on T 2 -weighted MRI on both sides of the parietal and occipital lobes. We also diagnosed Fisher syndrome because of a positive anti-GQ1b immunoglobulin G antibody test and albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid. PRES showed prompt improvement with antihypertensive therapy, whereas Fisher syndrome slowly improved over a course of 2 months. This case is the first report of PRES without IVIg suggesting that Fisher syndrome induces hypertension and causes PRES.

  16. Magnetic brane-worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, John D; Hervik, Sigbjorn

    2002-01-01

    We investigate brane-worlds with a pure magnetic field and a perfect fluid. We extend earlier work to brane-worlds and find new properties of the Bianchi type I brane-world. We find new asymptotic behaviours on approach to singularity and classify the critical points of the dynamical phase space. It is known that the Einstein equations for the magnetic Bianchi type I models are in general oscillatory and are believed to be chaotic, but in the brane-world model this chaotic behaviour does not seem to be possible

  17. World History Workshop (1983).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    history appeared tenuous. While the study of American history was viewed as necessary to "indoctrinate kids ," world history is unable to make such a...world" which is hard to avoid in world history, where one examines China in 1500, China in 1800, and so on. A pedagogical goal in the new course was to...the historian to make intelligent decisions about what information he is going to talk about. Viewing world history as a scenario also has a pedagogic

  18. Bright new world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroó, Norbert; Rácz, Péter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, Pf. 49 (Hungary); Varró, Sándor [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, Pf. 49 (Hungary); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nonprofit Kft., Dugonics tér 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2016-02-15

    Surface plasmons (SPOs) have been excited by intense femtosecond laser pulses on a gold film at room temperature and their near field has been analyzed by the intensity dependent response of an STM and by studying the spectra of multiplasmon emitted electrons. Around 80 GW/cm{sup 2} laser intensity, anomalies have been found in both cases, interpreted as the stepping in of electron pairing, transition to a diamagnetic state, and by anomalous Faraday rotation.

  19. An association between diet, metabolic syndrome and lower urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diet is a key factor in the aetiology of many diseases, including metabolic syndrome and lower urinary tract disorders. Metabolic syndrome is a growing and increasingly expensive health problem in both the developed and the developing world, with an associated rise in morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, lower ...

  20. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Conclusion: Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome.

  1. Bringing real-world problems into the classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enserink, B.; De Haan, A.R.C.; Hermans, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Real world problems are a challenge and a motivator for students to learn understanding and using the concepts of systems and actors. But using real world problems in the classroom is not without challenges and dilemmas. In the paper we explicitly address the issue of the need for quite intense

  2. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  3. Hepatorenal syndrome: a review | Gadour | Sudan Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hepatorenal syndrome [HRS]is a reversible functional acute renal failure secondary to intense renal cortical vasoconstriction in a patient with liver disease. It affects around 40% of patients with cirrhosis and ascites1. The exact cause of the syndrome is not well understood. The state of liver dysfunction [Child-Pugh ...

  4. Developmental and Psychological Aspects of the Savant Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    This literature review examines the psychological aspects of the savant syndrome in people with intellectual disabilities, focusing on the means by which such abilities as calendar calculation are accomplished and highlighting variables (such as intense motivation in one area) postulated as important for development of the syndrome. (Author/DB)

  5. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or ...... LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician.......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  6. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  7. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of interest in normal play Delayed speech development or loss of previously acquired speech abilities Problem behavior or marked mood swings Any clear loss of previously gained milestones in gross motor or fine motor skills Causes Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. ...

  8. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  9. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can usually resume their normal activities. In some cases, exercise regimens may need to be modified in order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence or worsening. Clinical Trials Throughout the U.S. ... Definition Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that ...

  10. Hellp syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A 24 years old female presented with hypertension, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia in an unconscious state after undergoing an emergency caesarian section. A diagnosis of HELLP syndrome was made on the above findings. Patient made an uneventful recovery with conservative management. A brief review of the literature is included along with the case report. (author)

  11. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  12. Carraro syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, H.; Schwarz, R.

    1980-07-01

    The report concerns a girl aged 9 1/2 years who was deaf and dumb and had marked shortening of the calves with deformities of the feet and bilateral, congenital hypoplasia of the tibiae. This syndrome was first described by Carraro in 1931, but there have been no further reports since then.

  13. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  14. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3] Kamath BM, Loomes KM, Piccoli DA. Medical management of Alagille syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2010;50(6): ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  15. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neoplastic agents), exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome com prises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital ...

  16. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  17. Crest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, B.; Roedl, W.

    1988-01-01

    If a patient has peri- and intra-articular calcinosis, as well as acro-osteolysis and esophageal hypomotility, and rheumatic symptoms, Crest syndrome should be considered as a manifestation of progressive systemic sclerosis. In connection with relevant symptoms on the skin and visceral involvement, radiological studies offer the possibility of classifying progressive systemic sclerosis more accurately. (orig.) [de

  18. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  19. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can treat many of its symptoms. Thanks to new research and treatments, people with Marfan syndrome who are diagnosed early ... This helps doctors stay on top of any new problems. Doctors might also ... or kids with amblyopia or strabismus will probably need to wear glasses. ...

  20. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  1. Fermentation. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  2. The Two World Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    In the arenas where the two world histories have taken shape, educators vigorously debate among themselves intellectual, pedagogical, and policy issues surrounding world history as a school subject. The people in each arena tend to share, despite internal disagreements, a common set of premises and assumptions for ordering the discussion of world…

  3. World Music Ensemble: Kulintang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    As instrumental world music ensembles such as steel pan, mariachi, gamelan and West African drums are becoming more the norm than the exception in North American school music programs, there are other world music ensembles just starting to gain popularity in particular parts of the United States. The kulintang ensemble, a drum and gong ensemble…

  4. World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, G.; Schilling, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    After making some general remarks about goals, tasks, and works of the World Energy Conference the topics and the frame of the 11th World Energy Conference which will take place in Munich from 8th to 12th September 1980 are outlined. This conference is held under the general topic 'energy for our world' and deals with the reciprocal relation between energy supply, environment, and society. The main part of the publication presented here is the German version of the most important sections of the investigation 'World Energy-Looking Ahead to 2020' by the Conservation Commission (CC) of the World Energy Conference. Added to this is the German original brief version of a report by the Mining-Research Company (Bergbau-Forschung GmbH) to the CC which deals with the estimation of the world's coal resources and their future availability. This report was presented on the 10th World Energy Conference in Istanbul together with the corresponding reports concerning the other energy sources. Finally, an introduction to the technical programme for the 11th World Energy Conference 1980 is given. (UA) [de

  5. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  6. China in World Industrialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    XU, Yi; van Leeuwen, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Combining the sectoral accounting method of the System of National Accounts (SNA) with new statistical materials from the United Nations, as well as historical research into various countries around the world, this paper arrives at an estimate of value added of Chinese and world industries between

  7. Scriptures of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of "Research and Creative Activity" features 10 articles on Indiana University faculty members whose work on various campuses continues to broaden and advance knowledge about "Scriptures of the World" and their meaning in human life. The articles are as follows: "Why Scriptures of the World Still Matter…

  8. World War II Homefront.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  9. Representing Large Virtual Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kol, T.R.

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquity of large virtual worlds and their growing complexity in computer graphics require efficient representations. This means that we need smart solutions for the underlying storage of these complex environments, but also for their visualization. How the virtual world is best stored and how

  10. World-Class Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Future leaders' creativity and problem-solving skills have been honed in leadership courses, but that doesn't mean they are ready to use those skills to further a company's place in the world. With emerging markets in Asia, South America, and other areas of the world, a workforce needs to have an understanding of and interest in cultures beyond…

  11. Alterations in collagen structure in hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes detected by Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Carina K.; Gniadecka, Monika; Ullman, Susanne; Halberg, Poul; Kobayasi, Takasi; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2000-11-01

    Patients with hypermobility syndrome (HS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) were investigated by means of in vivo near- infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy. HS is a benign and common condition (up to 5 percent of the population of the Western World). EDS is a rare, inherited connective tissue disease characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and other, occasionally serious, organ changes. EDS and HS may be related disorders. We investigated 13 patients with HS, 8 patients with EDS, and 24 healthy volunteers by means of in vivo Raman spectroscopy. The patients were classified according to Beighton and Holzberg et al. No difference in age between the three groups was found (HS 41 (33-49), EDS 36 (25-47), controls 37 (31-42); mean, 95% confidence intervals, respectively). Spectral differences were found in the intensity of the amide-III bands around 1245 and 1270 cm-1 in HS and EDS compared with healthy skin (Kruskal-Wallis, p equals 0,02 for intensity ratios (I1245/I1270) between the investigated groups). To elucidate the character of the alterations in the amide-III bands a curve fitting procedure was applied. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy may aid in the diagnosis of HS and EDS. Moreover the technique may be useful for analyzing the molecular changes occurring in these syndromes.

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity ... Implementation Maintaining Interest Needs Assessment Evaluating Success CDC’s Example ... Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity Steps ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR ... Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity Steps to ...

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World ... Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton ...

  16. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  17. [Structure and functional organization of integrated cardiac intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherillo, Marino; Miceli, Domenico; Tubaro, Marco; Guiducci, Umberto

    2007-05-01

    The early invasive strategy for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and the increasing number of older and sicker patients requiring prolonged and more complex intensive care have induced many changes in the function of the intensive care units. These changes include the statement that specially trained cardiologists and cardiac nurses who can manage patients with acute cardiac conditions should staff the intensive care units. This document indicates the structure of the units and specific recommendations for the number of beds, monitoring system, respirators, pacemaker/defibrillators and additional equipment.

  18. [Chronic Koro-like Syndrome (KLS) in recurrent depressive disorder as a variant of Cotard's delusion in an italian male patient. A case report and historical review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandinelli, Pier Luca; Trevisi, Manuela; Kotzalidis, Giorgio Demetrio; Manfredi, Giovanni; Rapinesi, Chiara; Ducci, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Cotard’s syndrome is a delusional syndrome, first described in the 1880ies by Cotard, characterized by a nihilistic delusions about the self and/or the world. In same other cases there is an intense nihilistic belief that the patient’s entire body or parts of it are disintegrated or dead. The syndrome is often associated with severe depression, but are also described neurological cases. Koro was described a little later from Asia and consisted in the belief that one’s own genitalia are shrinking or disappearing and death will ensue thereafter, but there are many cultural variants and the syndrome may present in an incomplete form. We report on a KLS sharing more features with annihilation delusions, such as Cotard’s syndrome. In KLS, the délire de négation may be limited to localized systems or organs. We believe that some complete and incomplete forms of Koro, when embedded in a depressive core, may represent a variant of Cotard’s delusion. In fact, our patient did not reach a complete denial of his entire body, but rather focused on sexual identity. We analysed the psychosexual issues of our case according to Kretschmer’s 1918 view of a “bipolar setting” between sthenic and asthenic characters of a patient suffering from sensitive delusions of (self-) reference. This view may allow us to relate the personological character to the genetic comprehensibility of the delusion.

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... miles per hour Tennis (doubles) Ballroom dancing General gardening Vigorous Intensity Race walking, jogging, or running Swimming ... miles per hour or faster Jumping rope Heavy gardening (continuous digging or hoeing) Hiking uphill or with ...

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists examples ... of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, ... If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay ... State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ... RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road ...

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists ... upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate ...

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers ... required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their ...

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend ...

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10 miles per hour or faster Jumping rope Heavy gardening (continuous digging or hoeing) Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart ...

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated ... YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Perceived Exertion (Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale) Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email ... ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Absolute Intensity The ... site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  14. Atmospheric Chemistry in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, William H.

    The world is changing,and the atmosphere's composition is changing with it. Human activity is responsible for much of this. Global population growth and migration to urban centers, extensive biomass burning, the spread of fertilizer-intensive agribusiness, globalization of business and industry, rising standards of living in the developing world, and increased energy use fuels atmospheric change. If current practices continue, atmospheric increases are likely for the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide; and for the chemically active gases nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide,and ammonia. Increases in global tropospheric ozone and aerosols are a distinct possibility.

  15. [Intensive medicine in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Intensive care medicine is a medical specialty that was officially established in our country in 1978, with a 5-year training program including two years of common core training followed by three years of specific training in an intensive care unit accredited for training. During this 32-year period, intensive care medicine has carried out an intense and varied activity, which has allowed its positioning as an attractive and with future specialty in the hospital setting. This document summarizes the history of the specialty, its current situation, the key role played in the programs of organ donation and transplantation of the National Transplant Organization (after more than 20 years of mutual collaboration), its training activities with the development of the National Plan of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, with a trajectory of more than 25 years, its interest in providing care based on quality and safety programs for the severely ill patient. It also describes the development of reference registries due to the need for reliable data on the care process for the most prevalent diseases, such as ischemic heart disease or ICU-acquired infections, based on long-term experience (more than 15 years), which results in the availability of epidemiological information and characteristics of care that may affect the practical patient's care. Moreover, features of its scientific society (SEMICYUC) are reported, an organization that agglutinates the interests of more than 280 ICUs and more than 2700 intensivists, with reference to the journal Medicina Intensiva, the official journal of the society and the Panamerican and Iberian Federation of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care Societies. Medicina Intensiva is indexed in the Thompson Reuters products of Science Citation Index Expanded (Scisearch(®)) and Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition. The important contribution of the Spanish intensive care medicine to the scientific community is also analyzed, and in relation to

  16. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won; Song, Chang Joon; Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong; Kim, Man Deuk

    2001-01-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  17. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Joon [Chungnam National Univ. School of Medicine, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong [Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Myungji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Deuk [College of Medicine Pochon CHA Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  18. Data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Critchlow, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Data-intensive science has the potential to transform scientific research and quickly translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, and economic success. But this collaborative science is still lacking the effective access and exchange of knowledge among scientists, researchers, and policy makers across a range of disciplines. Bringing together leaders from multiple scientific disciplines, Data-Intensive Science shows how a comprehensive integration of various techniques and technological advances can effectively harness the vast amount of data being generated and significan

  19. The Quality of Mainstreaming in Preschool: The Views of Parents of Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Nilay; Özaydin, Latife

    2018-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), one of the developmental (cognitive) deficits, is the most common syndrome that arises from genetic disorders. The mothers of children with DS who encounter the most intense emotional situations since the tendency to take responsibility the children's care and development usually belongs them. Among these intensive feelings,…

  20. Metabolic syndrome in urban DRDO population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash P Bellubbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a common condition occurring all over the world which is also known by other terminology such as Dysmetabolic syndrome, Syndrome X, Insulin Resistance syndrome, Obesity syndrome, or Reaven′s syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is constituted by a group of Risk Factors such as Trunkal Obesity, Impaired or Altered Glucose Tolerance, Dyslipidemia and Hypertension. Individuals with these risk factors are at a greater risk of developing a cardiovascular disease or Type 2 Diabetes. NCEP, National Heart, lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health periodically publishes ATP clinical updates as warranted by advances in the cholesterol management. Each of the guideline reports -ATP I, II and III - has a major thrust in Cardiovascular Risk Management. While some of the features of ATP I and ATP II are shared by ATP III guidelines, there are some salient differences. ATP III focuses on Multiple risk factors and recommends the use ofFramingham projections of 10 year absolute risk, modifies lipid and lipoprotein classification and supports for implementation of a revised schedule for screening and Therapeutic Life-style Changes. DRDO has embarked upon a program to assess the occupational health risk and the coronary risk status of the DRDO and defence employees. The present paper describes incidence of Metabolic Syndrome amongst the DRDO and Defence employees, using the ATP III guidelines and importance of calculating the absolute coronary risk status of these personnel.

  1. Mutations in Genes Encoding Cardiac Ion Channels Previously Associated With Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Are Present With High Frequency in New Exome Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Refsgaard, Lena; Nielsen, Jonas B

    2013-01-01

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Grand Opportunity (NHLBI GO) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) provided important knowledge on genetic variation in the background population. Our aim was to identify all variants previously associated with SIDS in ESP to improve the discrimination between plausible......Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. The genetic contribution to SIDS has been investigated intensively and to date, 14 cardiac channelopathy genes have been associated with SIDS. Newly published data from...

  2. Towards higher intensities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 weeks, commissioning of the machine protection system has advanced significantly, opening up the possibility of higher intensity collisions at 3.5 TeV. The intensity has been increased from 2 bunches of 1010 protons to 6 bunches of 2x1010 protons. Luminosities of 6x1028 cm-2s-1 have been achieved at the start of fills, a factor of 60 higher than those provided for the first collisions on 30 March.   The recent increase in LHC luminosity as recorded by the experiments. (Graph courtesy of the experiments and M. Ferro-Luzzi) To increase the luminosity further, the commissioning crews are now trying to push up the intensity of the individual proton bunches. After the successful injection of nominal intensity bunches containing 1.1x1011 protons, collisions were subsequently achieved at 450 GeV with these intensities. However, half-way through the first ramping of these nominal intensity bunches to 3.5 TeV on 15 May, a beam instability was observed, leading to partial beam loss...

  3. World population problems: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, M

    1989-06-01

    Over 50% of the world's population is below the age of marriage, which indicates rapid expansion of the population into the next century. The developing countries produce 85% of the births, 95% of infant deaths, and in some, 99% of maternal deaths. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) will slow population growth but will not reverse the trend. Family planning programs have worked as evidenced by declining fertility rates. In the US there was a total fertility rate decline of 6 to 3.5 in 58 years. In Sri Lanka the same change took 30 years, in Thailand 15 years and in China 7 years. Family planning programs that are successful provide condoms cheaply, provide community distribution of pills, offer sterilization to male and females, and promote long periods of lactation. Abortion rates are often higher in countries where they are illegal and family planning is usually not offered. Social marketing and voluntary sterilization are the most cost effective birth control methods as proven in less developed countries. Management is the vital factor in more cost effective family planning programs. In sub-Saharan Africa and India there will be a need to subsidize contraceptives well into the next century. If the world is to be serious about family planning, many industrialized countries will have to contribute resources. Private sector involvement needs to be emphasized more in developing countries. Resources are low because of a lack of political will caused by a lack of understanding of the facts of demographic growth. There have been estimates that it will take $7.5 billion to satisfy the developing countries' birth control needs: there is only $1.5 billion being spent now. Many countries are not providing family planning quickly enough and may be forced to give up the freedom to choose family size. The choice of policy makers now is to increase the resources for contraceptive research, or to settle with abortion and sterilization as backup to inadequate methods.

  4. World energy resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clerici A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As energy is the main “fuel” for social and economic development and since energy-related activities have significant environmental impacts, it is important for decision-makers to have access to reliable and accurate data in an user-friendly format. The World Energy Council (WEC has for decades been a pioneer in the field of energy resources and every three years publishes its flagship report Survey of Energy Resources. A commented analysis in the light of latest data summarized in such a report, World Energy Resources (WER 2013, is presented together with the evolution of the world energy resources over the last twenty years.

  5. World energy resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, A.; Alimonti, G.

    2015-08-01

    As energy is the main "fuel" for social and economic development and since energy-related activities have significant environmental impacts, it is important for decision-makers to have access to reliable and accurate data in an user-friendly format. The World Energy Council (WEC) has for decades been a pioneer in the field of energy resources and every three years publishes its flagship report Survey of Energy Resources. A commented analysis in the light of latest data summarized in such a report, World Energy Resources (WER) 2013, is presented together with the evolution of the world energy resources over the last twenty years.

  6. World Energy Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, A.; Van der Linde, C.; Nicola, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the section World Energy Future of this magazine two articles, two interviews and one column are presented. The article 'A green example to the world' refers briefly to the second World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi, which was held from 18-21 January, 2009. The second article, 'Green Utopia in the desert' attention is paid to the Abu Dhabi government-driven Masdar Initiative. The two interviews concern an interview with BP Alternative Energy ceo Vivienne Cox, and an interview with the founder and CEO of New Energy Finance Michael Liebreich. The column ('An efficient response') focuses on the impact of the economic crisis on energy policy

  7. World energy insight 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    The World Energy Insight 2011 is the official publication of the World Energy Council. It includes interviews, articles and case studies from a distinguished panel of World Energy Council Officers, CEOs, government ministers, academics and opinion formers from all areas of the energy sector and provides perspectives from around the globe. Government, industry and NGO's offer both policy and technology perspectives. The insights within this publication add to the work that WEC is doing to provide the forum for energy leaders, along with the on-going WEC studies and programmes on Energy Policies, 2050 Energy Scenarios, Energy Resources & Technologies, Energy for Urban Innovation, Rules Of Energy Trade and Global Energy Access.

  8. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  9. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  10. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  11. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  12. Children Deserve Smoke Free World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remesh Kumar, R; Jayakumar, P R; Krishna Mohan, R

    2018-04-01

    Tobacco smoke, active or passive exposure was the major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the world during twentieth century and will continue to be the same in the twenty-first century also if the current trends continue. Both active and passive smoking are having significance in relation to child health. Exposure starts antenatally from placenta to the fetus and later phases through passive exposure to experimental and regular smoking and ultimately addiction and habitual smoking. Evidences are in favour of causal relationship with intrauterine growth restriction, sudden infant death syndrome, decreased pulmonary function, increased risk for respiratory tract infection, otitis media, wheeze, asthma, neurobehavioral disorders, cleft palate and triggering pathogenesis of fetal and childhood onset of adult diseases, especially pulmonary and cardio vascular diseases. All these facts stress the importance of behavioral changes in the population as well as stringent public health measures and legislation for ensuring smoke free work places, public places and households for children. M POWER- Package by WHO is a novel global initiative taking us closer to the target of achieving tobacco free environment for children in the near future.

  13. Paraneoplastiske syndromer

    OpenAIRE

    Røsbekk, Stein Helge

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years it has become clear that malignant tumours can induce symptoms unrelated to the mechanical effects of the primary tumour itself or its metastasis. Today, the name Paraneoplastic syndrome is given to those symptom complexes that may affect the blood cells, electrolytes, coagulation system, muscle, skin, nerve and the endocrine system. Endocrine symptoms were first recognised, and different hormones were isolated from the tumour tissue. However, tumour derived hormones ...

  14. Caroli's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numan, F; Cokyueksel, O; Camuscu, S; Demir, K; Dueren, M

    1986-07-01

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen.

  15. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  16. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  17. The Skill Bias of World Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Epifani; Gino Gancia

    2004-01-01

    We argue that, with an elasticity of substitution in consumption greater than one and higher scale economies in the skill-intensive sectors, the entire volume of world trade matters for wage inequality. This implies that trade intergration, even among identical countries, is likely to increase the skill premium. This result can also explain the increase in skill premia in developing countries that have experienced drastic trade liberalizations. Further, we argue that evidence of a falling rel...

  18. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. Detection of asymmetries in solar coronal emission lines is one example. Removal of line blends is another. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It can be used with any fitting function, but we employ a cubic spline in a new analysis routine called Intensity Conserving Spline Interpolation (ICSI). As the name implies, it conserves the observed intensity within each wavelength bin, which ordinary fits do not. Given the rapid convergence, speed of computation, and ease of use, we suggest that ICSI be made a standard component of the processing pipeline for spectroscopic data.

  19. World Magnetic Model 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  20. World Magnetic Model 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  1. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  2. ELEVENm WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of malaria, followed by smallpox, tuberculosis, syphilis and yaws, permitting WHO ... the world, and the initiation of eradication programmes in certain communicable .... Guatemala, India, Iran, Italy, Liberia, Mexico, Tunisia, USSR,'. United Arab ...

  3. Tomorrow's solar world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch, Meg.

    1996-01-01

    The largest privately funded solar power installation in the world is at the Florida Walt Disney World. It is the Universe of Energy exhibit at the Experimental Prototype Community of the World. The Universe of Energy shows the development and exploitation of energy sources and how energy is used and includes a recreation of the primeval world from which coal and oil deposits were formed. Visitors travel through two giant theatres in electrically powered cars. Most of the ride system is powered by a solar cell array on the roof of the building. The array is composed of 2,200 modules each made up of 36 cells and can generate 70kW of DC power which is fed through an inverter to convert it to AC. (UK)

  4. World energy outlook 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The World Energy Outlook is the most complete and authoritative energy publication and has received several prestigious awards from government and industry in recognition of its analytical excellence. The new edition offers: - Analysis: Over 550 pages of detailed analysis with 150 graphs and tables. - Projections: Supply and demand projections to 2030 for oil, gas, coal, renewables, nuclear and electricity, plus projections of energy related CO 2 emissions. -World Alternative Policy Scenario:A detailed assessment of the impact of possible climate change policies and energy efficient technologies. -Russia: An in-depth study of the 'most important energy country'. - Energy and Development: An analysis of energy's role in overcoming world poverty. - Reserves: A detailed analysis of world oil and gas reserves and of the problems involved in measuring them

  5. Brazil World Cup Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANSUR, R.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming the productivity challenge is the main benefit of the 2014 World Cup for Brazilian people. The sustainable development of our cultural tourism industry will catapult the new middle class growing up rate.

  6. World Glacier Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Glacier Inventory (WGI) contains information for over 130,000 glaciers. Inventory parameters include geographic location, area, length, orientation,...

  7. Virtual-World Naturalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reynolds

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes a player will stray from the path described by a game, moving into new spaces, developing new possible modes of interaction, and often discovering the rougher edges of the game world, where physics models break down, textures become incongruous, and the pieces don’t quite fit together. Gameplay that seeks out these spaces and these phenomena, that searches for such clues to the underlying construction of the virtual environment, is a kind of virtual-world naturalism, at once a return to an investigative urge that has been subsumed to the exhaustive mapping and description of the real world and a form of resistance to the very idea of pre-defined paths of action, of externally imposed limits, in virtual worlds as well as in our own.

  8. The subnuclear world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez-Lagos, R.

    1996-01-01

    The subnuclear world studies the fundamental constituents of the matter, traditionally nominated fundamental particles and their interactions. The author studies the history and standard models of fundamental particles: Leptons, quarks, and gauge bosons. (Author)

  9. The world's biggest experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Gregson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    According to CERN, our understanding of the Universe is about the change. Meet the Imperial alumni and staff who are involved in CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the world's biggest experiment. (3 pages)

  10. World of antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.

    1998-01-01

    Every particle in nature has an antimatter partner in a curious world. when the two meet, they vanish in a flash of radiation. Physicists create antiparticles for their experiments, and can even build antimatter atoms. (author). 4 Figs

  11. [PHACES syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo Azcárate, J; Bernabeu-Wittel, J; Fernández-Pineda, I; Conejo-Mir, M D; Tuduri Limousin, I; Aspiazu Salinas, D A; de Agustín Asensio, J C

    2010-04-01

    PHACES syndrome associates a segmental facial hemangioma with cerebral malformations, aortic branches/cranial arteries anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies or ventral wall defects. The aim of this study is to analyze our experience with this syndrome. Retrospective study of the cases seen at our unit in the last year. We treat 4 cases; 3 girls and 1 child. Besides the segmental hemangioma they presented: 3 vascular cerebral malformations; 2 structural cardiopathies; 2 cerebral malformations, 1 microftalmia. We did not find ventral wall defects. A case received treatment with two cycles of metilprednisolone i.v. and oral prednisone, with favourable course; two cases received initial treatment with oral prednisone continued of oral propanolol in rising pattern up to 2 mg/kg/day, Obtaining both the detention of the tumour growth and regression of the lesion, with very good tolerance. A 7-year-old patient has been treated with colouring pulse laser for her residual lesions. When we see a segmental facial hemangioma we must perform a wide diagnostic study in order to discard a PHACES syndrome. Multidisciplinar approach to the patient by a wide expert's group gets an earlier diagnose and improves the outcome. Propranolol is a promising therapeutic alternative.

  12. Anserine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Milton; Kuromoto, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB) has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome. Overweight and osteoarthritis seem to represent additional risk factors; however, their role in the pathophysiology of the disease is not yet understood. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses, from 10 days to 36 months to achieve recovery. The lack of knowledge about its epidemiological, etiological, and pathophysiological aspects requires future studies for this common and intriguing disorder.

  13. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs ...

  14. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  15. Prune belly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle-Barrett syndrome; Triad syndrome ... The exact causes of prune belly syndrome are unknown. The condition affects mostly boys. While in the womb, the developing baby's abdomen swells with fluid. Often, the cause is ...

  16. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  17. Marfan syndrome: clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John C S

    2007-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder usually associated with mutation in fibrillin, and occasionally with mutation in TGFBR1 or 2. The clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which will unequivocally diagnose or exclude Marfan syndrome in 86% of cases. Use of a care pathway can help implementation of the nosology in the clinic. The penetrance of some features is age dependent, so the nosology must be used with caution in children. Molecular testing may be helpful in this context. The nosology cannot be used in families with isolated aortic dissection, or with related conditions such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome, although it may help identify families for further diagnostic evaluation because they do not fulfill the nosology, despite a history of aneurysm. Prophylactic medical (eg beta-blockade) and surgical intervention is important in reducing the cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome. Musculoskeletal symptoms are common, although the pathophysiology is less clear--for example, the correlation between dural ectasia and back pain is uncertain. Symptoms in other systems require specialist review such as ophthalmology assessment of refractive errors and ectopia lentis. Pregnancy is a time of increased cardiovascular risk for women with Marfan syndrome, particularly if the aortic root exceeds 4 cm at the start of pregnancy. High-intensity static exercise should be discouraged although low-moderate intensity dynamic exercise may be beneficial. The diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome requires a multidisciplinary team approach, in view of its multisystem effects and phenotypic variability.

  18. World competitiveness and agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Zyl

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of a changing environment in which market factors and greater world trade and competitiveness are increasingly becoming the only criteria for success, a framework for the analysis of world competitiveness is initially developed. This is followed by a discussion on the growth of productivity in agriculture, as well as an exposition of the role of agricultural research. Thirdly, price factors and the terms of trade are discussed, followed by a summary of policy implications.

  19. Coal world market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    A brief analysis of major tendencies in the world market of coal is presented. It is pointed out that recent years, by and large, were favourable for the development of the world coal industry. Prices for coal (both for power-grade and coking one) in 1995 after many years of depressive state increased by nearly 20 % and reached a maximum of the last decade. International coal trading continues to grow and the tendency may persist in the mext two years

  20. Rethinking the World's energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wilson da

    2012-01-01

    Can we really shift the world completely away from fossil fuels in the next 20 years? In June 2011 at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Canada, forty physicists from around the world came together for the Equinox Summit: 2030. They discussed how to power modern civilisation this century without warming the planet to catastrophic levels, by using science. Five key solutions, dubbed 'exemplar pathways' emerged; large-scale storage, enhanced geothermal, advanced nuclear, off-grid electricity and smart urbanization.

  1. Perfil clínico, laboratorial e complicações de pacientes com síndrome HELLP admitidas em uma unidade de terapia intensiva obstétrica Clinical and laboratorial profile and complications of patients with HELLP syndrome admitted in an obstetric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Katz

    2008-02-01

    ,4 semanas. Entre as complicações, encontraram-se manifestações hemorrágicas em 36 pacientes (34,3%, oligúria em 49 (46,7% e os critérios de insuficiência renal aguda se aplicaram em 21 (20% dos casos. Hemotransfusão foi necessária em 35 (33,3% das pacientes. Sete (6,7% apresentaram edema agudo de pulmão. Quatro mulheres evoluíram para o óbito, correspondendo a 3,8% dos casos. O tempo médio entre o diagnóstico da síndrome HELLP e o egresso (alta ou óbito foi de 10,3 dias, variando de 1 a 33 dias. CONCLUSÕES: A SÍNDrome HELLP é uma doença grave, que cursa com elevada morbimortalidade materna. Dentre as complicações mais encontradas, destacam-se a oligúria e as manifestações hemorrágicas, com freqüente indicação de hemotransfusão. A letalidade foi de 3,8%.PURPOSE: to describe the clinical and laboratorial profile of HELLP syndrome patients admitted at an Obstetric Intensive Care Unit (ICU and included in a randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone in this clinical setting. METHODS: the present study is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial design to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone in patients with HELLP syndrome. This sample of patients was composed of patients in the puerperium, with the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome (diagnosis made before or after delivery who were not chronic corticosteroid users and not carriers of any chronic disease which could modify HELLP syndrome's laboratorial parameters. Patients who were too critical or whose condition did not allow them to consent to participate were not included. Data were extracted from the records used in the randomized clinical trial. Age, parity, gestational age at admission and delivery, time of diagnosis (before or after delivery, HELLP syndrome classification (partial or complete, arterial blood pressure, and diuresis at admission were considered for analysis. Among laboratorial findings, hemoglobin, platelet count, liver enzymes, LDH, and serum

  2. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults with Antiphospholipid syndrome: report of two cases and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Abid, Leila; Frikha, Faten; Bahloul, Zouhir; Kammoun, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rarely associated with antiphospholipid syndrome. The treatment of these patients is a clinical challenge. We report the observations of 2 young adults (1 woman and 1 man), admitted in our acute care unit for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A coagulopathy work-up concludes the existence of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in the 2 cases. APS syndrome was considered primary in 2 cases. All patients presented an intense inflammatory syndrome (high...

  3. /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA cholescintigraphy in Dubin-Johnson and Rotor syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Meir; Baron, J.; Seligson, U.; Gottesfeld, F.; Levy, R.; Gilat, T.

    1982-01-01

    /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA cholescintigraphy was performed in 6 patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome and 1 patient with Rotor syndrome. In the patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome, the cholescintigrams had a characteristic pattern of delayed visualization or nonvisualization of the gallbladder and bile ducts in the presence of intense, homogeneous, and prolonged visualization of the liver. In the patient with Rotor syndrome, the hepatobiliary system was not visualized at all. It is concluded that /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA cholescintigraphy may be helpful in the diagnosis of Dubin-Johnson syndrome and Rotor syndrome and in the differential diagnosis between these two conditions

  4. 99mTc-HIDA cholescintigraphy in Dubin-Johnson and Rotor syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Meir, S.; Baron, J.; Seligson, U.; Gottesfeld, F.; Levy, R.; Gilat, T.

    1982-01-01

    99mTc-HIDA cholescintigraphy was performed in 6 patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome and 1 patient with Rotor syndrome. In the patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome, the cholescintigrams had a characteristic pattern of delayed visualization or nonvisualization of the gallbladder and bile ducts in the presence of intense, homogeneous, and prolonged visualization of the liver. In the patient with Rotor syndrome, the hepatobiliary system was not visualized at all. It is concluded that 99mTc-HIDA cholescintigraphy may be helpful in the diagnosis of Dubin-Johnson syndrome and Rotor syndrome and in the differential diagnosis between these two conditions

  5. Endometriosis, a modern syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosens, Ivo; Benagiano, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The identification of endometriosis has been a subject of intense debate over the last decade. There is, however, no doubt that Thomas Cullen was the first to describe endometriosis and adenomyosis as one disease characterized by the presence of endometrium-like tissue outside the uterine cavity. With the introduction of laparoscopy in the early 1960s three different clinical presentations of endometriosis were distinguished: peritoneal, deep adenomyotic and cystic ovarian. As soon as synthetic steroids became available, pioneer clinicians started utilizing these in an attempt to replace radical surgery by a medical treatment. While medical therapy may resort in relief, in most cases the current approach consists of a combination of medical and surgical therapy. While the pathogenesis of endometriosis is still enigmatic and complex, there is increasing evidence that endometriosis is part of a uterine reproductive dysfunction syndrome. For prevention of complications, it is very important that diagnosis is made as early as possible in a woman's life. PMID:21727656

  6. The intense neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1966-07-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through {mu}-, {pi}- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  7. The intense neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1966-01-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through μ-, π- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  8. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  11. Emotion Regulation in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maureen C.; Walden, Tedra A.

    This study presents a preliminary exploration of emotion regulation in a sample of 20 children (ages 3-18 years) with Down Syndrome. Three aspects of emotion regulation (modulation, organization, flexibility) were predicted from emotion variables (affect intensity, affective expression, and autonomy-curiosity and motivation) in backward regression…

  12. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, S V; Lobakov, A I; Isakova, E V; Stashuk, G A; Volchenkova, T V

    To study the diagnosis and treatment of non-alcoholic Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Eight patients (5 men and 3 women), mean age 38,9±1,4 years, with WKS developed due to acute gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disease (3 patients), the exacerbation of chronic GIT disease with malabsorption (2 patients) and after surgery on the upper GIT (3 patients) were included in the study. The disease manifested with consciousness disturbance, symptoms of ataxia, eye movement disorders and bulbar syndrome that developed after 24-48 h. Treatment resistant tonic-clonic seizures were developed in 1 patient. MRI revealed hyper intensive signals on T2-weighted images in the hypothalamus, mamillar bodies, brain stem, hippocampus as well as contrast accumulation in the mamillar bodies. Treatment with vitamin B complex (neurobion) and thiamine exerted a positive effect. Patients with GIT disease with malabsorption are at risk of WKS. Consciousness disturbance, symptoms of ataxia, eye movement disorders indicate the necessity of treatment with thiamine that allows to prevent the development of stable cognitive deficit.

  13. Strongly intensive quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of fluctuations of hadron production properties in collisions of relativistic particles profits from use of measurable intensive quantities which are independent of system size variations. The first family of such quantities was proposed in 1992; another is introduced in this paper. Furthermore we present a proof of independence of volume fluctuations for quantities from both families within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. These quantities are referred to as strongly intensive ones. Influence of conservation laws and resonance decays is also discussed.

  14. Conformity to the surviving sepsis campaign international guidelines among physicians in a general intensive care unit in Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mung'ayi, V; Karuga, R

    2010-08-01

    There are emerging therapies for managing septic critically-ill patients. There is little data from the developing world on their usage. To determine the conformity rate for resuscitation and management bundles for septic patients amongst physicians in a general intensive care unit. Cross sectional observational study. The general intensive care unit, Aga Khan University Hospital,Nairobi. Admitting physicians from all specialties in the general intensive care unit. The physicians had high conformity rates of 92% and 96% for the fluid resuscitation and use of va so pressors respectively for the initial resuscitation bundle. They had moderate conformity rates for blood cultures prior to administering antibiotics (57%) and administration of antibiotics within first hour of recognition of septic shock (54%). There was high conformity rate to the glucose control policy (81%), use of protective lung strategy in acute lung injury/Acute respiratory distress syndrome, venous thromboembolism prophylaxis (100%) and stress ulcer prophylaxis (100%) in the management bundle. Conformity was moderate for use of sedation, analgesia and muscle relaxant policy (69%), continuous renal replacement therapies (54%) and low for steroid policy (35%), administration ofdrotrecogin alfa (0%) and selective digestive decontamination (15%). There is varying conformity to the international sepsis guidelines among physicians caring for patients in our general ICU. Since increased conformity would improve survival and reduce morbidity, there is need for sustained education and guideline based performance improvement.

  15. Acute nephritic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes in children ...

  16. Soft-tissue mineralization in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Costantini, Alessandro Maria; Brigida, Raffaela; Antoniol, Onorina Monica; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Universita Cattolica School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Antonelli-Incalzi, Raffaele [Universita Cattolica School of Medicine, Department of Geriatrics, Rome (Italy)

    2005-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by clinical signs of premature aging, short stature, scleroderma-like skin changes, endocrine abnormalities, cataracts, and an increased incidence of malignancies. We report on a 48-year-old woman with Werner syndrome associated with intracranial meningiomas who had extensive musculoskeletal manifestations including osteoporosis of the extremities, extensive tendinopathy about the ankles, osteomyelitis of the phalanges of the first left toe, abundant soft-tissue calcification, and two dense ossified soft-tissue masses, with cortical bone and trabeculae arising from the posterosuperior aspect of the calcanei and extending into Kager fat pads. A review of previous descriptions of the radiological abnormalities of Werner syndrome indicates that the presence of soft-tissue calcifications has either not been noted or been mentioned only briefly. Moreover, there is no mention of bony masses associated with Werner syndrome in the world literature, and this would appear to be the first report of this kind. (orig.)

  17. Why the world is a quantum world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lande, A.

    1976-01-01

    According to Einstein (1934) the supreme task of the theoretical physicist is to search for those most general and elementary laws from which the world picture can be obtained by pure deduction. However, there is no logical way leading to the elementary laws but only intuition and sound appraisal of general experience. Einstein here takes sides in the perennial dispute about induction or deduction as the principal method of science. In this paper the author illustrates the I-could-have-told-you-so story of deduction in two examples. The one describes a simple game of chance; it is quite trivial but, just because of its simplicity, exposes essential points in the raw and thereby offers an important lesson about the ultimate untenability of the doctrine of determinism. The other example deals with the sophisticated game of chance known as quantum mechanics. (Auth.)

  18. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit ... Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water aerobics Bicycling slower ...

  20. World nuclear energy paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, T.J.; Hansen, U.; Jaek, W.; Beckurts, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    In examing the world nuclear energy paths, the following assumptions were adopted: the world economy will grow somewhat more slowly than in the past, leading to reductions in electricity demand growth rates; national and international political impediments to the deployment of nuclear power will gradually disappear over the next few years; further development of nuclear power will proceed steadily, without serious interruption but with realistic lead times for the introduction of advanced technologies. Given these assumptions, this paper attempts a study of possible world nuclear energy developments, disaggregated on a regional and national basis. The scenario technique was used and a few alternative fuel-cycle scenarios were developed. Each is an internally consistent model of technically and economically feasible paths to the further development of nuclear power in an aggregate of individual countries and regions of the world. The main purpose of this modeling exercise was to gain some insight into the probable international locations of reactors and other nuclear facilities, the future requirements for uranium and for fuel-cycle services, and the problems of spent-fuel storage and waste management. The study also presents an assessment of the role that nuclear power might actually play in meeting future world energy demand

  1. Withdrawn Amidst the World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Mette Birkedal; Nørgaard, Lars Cyril; Nagelsmit, Eelco

    2017-01-01

    The pious Élisabeth d'Orléans, Mme de Guise, had a vivid correspondence with Armand-Jean de Rancé, abbot of the Cistercian abbey of La Trappe in Normandy. Rancé was considered a champion of unconditional isolation from the world by his contemporaries, but in fact he recommended quite diverse form...... horizon of Gaston d'Orléans's daughter and the pastoral practice of the abbot of La Trappe. Above all, it shows the intricacies and modulations of the withdrawal from the world prescribed to late seventeenth-century aristocratic dévots and, especially, dévotes.......The pious Élisabeth d'Orléans, Mme de Guise, had a vivid correspondence with Armand-Jean de Rancé, abbot of the Cistercian abbey of La Trappe in Normandy. Rancé was considered a champion of unconditional isolation from the world by his contemporaries, but in fact he recommended quite diverse forms...... in remarkable detail how the Duchess should balance her obligations to God and human beings by being a model of withdrawal. To this end she must constantly, in action and demeanour, display to the world her withdrawal from the world. Rancé's spiritual advice to Mme de Guise throws new light on the devotional...

  2. When Virtual Worlds Expand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    The future of a virtual world depends on whether it can grow in subjective size, cultural content, and numbers of human participants. In one form of growth, exemplified by Second Life, the scope of a world increases gradually as new sponsors pay for new territory and inhabitants create content. A very different form of growth is sudden expansion, as when World of Warcraft (WoW) added entire new continents in its Burning Crusade and Lich King expansions (Lummis and Kern 2006, 2008; Corneliussen and Rettberg 2008; Sims et al. 2008). Well-established gamelike worlds have often undergone many expansions. Both the pioneer science fiction game Anarchy Online, which was launched in 2001, and Star Wars Galaxies dating from 2003, have had three, and EVE Online also from 2003 has had nine, although smaller ones. This chapter reports research on WoW's 2008 Lich King expansion, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, in order to develop theoretical ideas of the implications of expansion for virtual worlds.

  3. Tight or sick building syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P; Shanmuganadan, S [Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India). Dept. of Geography; Uma, A [Madurai Medical Coll. (India). Dept. of Medicine and Microbiology

    1991-01-01

    Modern buildings are designed with the usual heating, air-conditioning and ventilation equipment. In most of these buildings, air is continuously recirculated and, as a result, workers suffer from tight or sick building syndrome. This syndrome is discussed with reference to symptoms of air contamination, ventilation system standards and research needs. The most common symptoms of tight building syndrome are eye, nose and throat irritation, headache, fatigue, sneezing, difficulty in wearing contact lenses, chest tightness, nausea, dizziness and dermatitis. Symptoms experienced by 50 doctors and 50 paramedical personnel working in an air-conditioned intensive care unit and operating theatres of the Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai in India were studied by means of a questionnaire survey. In the present study, respiratory and ocular symptoms were observed more in those working in operating theatres and were believed to be due to excessive use of formaldehyde used for sterilization. Various suggestions were made to prevent sick building syndrome. Moreover, the physicians treating sick individuals should be aware of the symptoms caused by indoor air pollutants as sufferers invariably require a change of environment rather than drugs. (orig.).

  4. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  5. Robinow syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Robinow syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive mesomelic dwarfism with just more than 100 cases reported in the literature so far. The lower extremity is spared with skeletal deformity usually confined to the forearm, hand, and the dorsal spine. Diagnosis is made easily in the early childhood by the typical "fetal facies" appearance, which disappears to a certain extent as the patient grows. The author reports two cases of this entity with vertebral segmentation defects, rib fusion, and typical severe brachymelia and facial features.

  6. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  7. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  8. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  9. The Emerging World Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETER COLLECOTT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is common ground amongst almost all commentators that the world has changed radically over the past 25 years – the 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall heralded the ending of the Cold War, the reunification of a tragically divided Europe, and the acceleration of the process of globalisation which has its only comparable period in the decades leading up to the First World War in 1914. When analyzing the Emerging World Order it is important to cover more than Brazil economy or any other individual BRICs or other Emerging Powers. Instead, our analysis will provide a global view about the economic and political global power structures which are evolving and forming before our eyes, and then to talk about the challenges these emerging realities pose for us in Europe, and in the West in general.

  10. Surfing the quantum world

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Frank S

    2017-01-01

    The ideas and phenomena of the quantum world are strikingly unlike those encountered in our visual world. Surfing the Quantum World shows why and how this is so. It does this via a historical review and a gentle introduction to the fundamental principles of quantum theory, whose core concepts and symbolic representations are used to explain not only "ordinary" microscopic phenomena like the properties of the hydrogen atom and the structure of the Periodic Table of the Elements, but also a variety of mind-bending phenomena. Readers will learn that particles such as electrons and photons can behave like waves, allowing them to be in two places simultaneously, why white dwarf and neutron stars are gigantic quantum objects, how the maximum height of mountains has a quantum basis, and why quantum objects can tunnel through seemingly impenetrable barriers. Included among the various interpretational issues addressed is whether Schrodinger's cat is ever both dead and alive.

  11. Designing Virtual Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Remzi Ates

    2014-01-01

    The online social platforms known as virtual worlds present their users various affordances for avatar based co-presence, social interaction and provide tools for collaborative content creation, including objects, textures and animations. The users of these worlds navigate their avatars as personal...... the audio-visual characteristics of designing in multi-user virtual environments generate experiential, interpersonal and textual meaning potentials....... mediators in 3D virtual space to collaborate and co-design the digital content. These co-designers are also the residents of these worlds, as they socialize by building inworld friendships. This article presents a social semiotic analysis of the three-dimensional virtual places and artifacts in the virtual...

  12. World Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, A.; Van der Linde, C.; Nicola, S.

    2009-03-15

    In the section World Energy Future of this magazine two articles, two interviews and one column are presented. The article 'A green example to the world' refers briefly to the second World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi, which was held from 18-21 January, 2009. The second article, 'Green Utopia in the desert' attention is paid to the Abu Dhabi government-driven Masdar Initiative. The two interviews concern an interview with BP Alternative Energy ceo Vivienne Cox, and an interview with the founder and CEO of New Energy Finance Michael Liebreich. The column ('An efficient response') focuses on the impact of the economic crisis on energy policy.

  13. World energy insight 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    The World Energy Insight 2011 is the official publication of the World Energy Council. It includes interviews, articles and case studies from a distinguished panel of World Energy Council Officers, CEOs, government ministers, academics and opinion formers from all areas of the energy sector and provides perspectives from around the globe. Government, industry and NGO's offer both policy and technology perspectives. The insights within this publication add to the work that WEC is doing to provide the forum for energy leaders, along with the on-going WEC studies and programmes on Energy Policies, 2050 Energy Scenarios, Energy Resources & Technologies, Energy for Urban Innovation, Rules Of Energy Trade and Global Energy Access.

  14. The world energy outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The oil and gas resources of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) will be critical to meeting the world's growing appetite for energy. The greater part of the world's remaining reserves lie in that region. They are relatively under-exploited and are sufficient to meet rising global demand for the next quarter century and beyond. The export revenues they would generate would help sustain the region's economic development. But there is considerable uncertainty about the pace at which investment in the region's upstream industry will occur, how quickly production capacity will expand and, given rising domestic energy needs, how much of the expected increase in supply will be available for export. The implications for both MENA producers and consuming countries are profound. The World Energy Outlook, published by the International Energy Agency (IEA), seeks to shed light on these very complex issues

  15. The world food problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R A

    1974-07-01

    Argument continues in the world press as to the urgency of the food problem. Some economists in equating world food production statistics with population figures have convinced themselves there is more than enough food per capita and, accordingly, no problem. Looking in greater depth than these gross averages, however, we find that there is indeed a prospective problem, and of such a nature and magnitude as to tax all of mankind's talents and resources in its resolution. It is true that certain of the developed countries of the world in the last generation acquired agricultural production capabilities that notably exceeded the resident population's capacity to consume. 'Surplus' in these areas became an ugly word during this period of a generally favorable weather cycle, and restrictions on the amount of and that could be devoted to graincrops were imposed to curb this tremendous capacity. A fickle Mother Nature, however, has turned things around during the early 1970's by one or another of her many vacillations in the form of local drought, excess moisture, shortened growing season, or other means, in some of the major producing areas. Inconsequence, the food grain surpluses are now gone and the world is looking at a three to four week reserve at any given moment. The cost of food products available from exporting countries has doubled and trebled in price during the past two years. The potential for famine exceeds in magnitude anything the world has ever known. It is against this background that the World Food Conference will be held in Rome during November of this year. (author)

  16. The new world disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Nicolas; Maguire, John; Barney, Jonathan

    2003-08-01

    On January 1, 1995, representatives from 76 countries signed the World Trade Organization charter, which for years had been part of a temporary trade agreement. The WTO's emergence as a fully empowered supranational body seemed to reflect the triumph of what the first President Bush had described as the "new world order." That order was based on two assumptions: that a healthy economy and a sound financial system make for political stability, and that countries in business together do not fight each other. The number one priority of U.S. foreign policy was thus to encourage the former Communist countries of Europe and the developing nations in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to adopt business-friendly policies. Private capital would flow from the developed world into these countries, creating economic growth. It sounded too good to be true, and so it proved. The new world order of Bush père and his successor, Bill Clinton, has been replaced by the new world disorder of Bush fils. Under the second Bush's administration, the economic and political rationale-behind the Washington consensus of the 1990s has unraveled, forcing a radical change in our perceptions of which countries are safe for business. Negotiating this new environment will require companies to more rigorously evaluate political events and more carefully assess the links between political, economic, and financial risk factors. They'll need to be more selective about which markets to enter, and they'll need to think differently about how to position themselves in those markets. The geopolitical events of the past year, the Bush administration's global war on terror, as well as ongoing convulsions in traditional political and economic relationships must be understood and managed by corporate leaders worldwide. With careful analysis, business leaders can increase their companies' visibility and better respond to the uncertainties of the new world disorder.

  17. The world food problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    Argument continues in the world press as to the urgency of the food problem. Some economists in equating world food production statistics with population figures have convinced themselves there is more than enough food per capita and, accordingly, no problem. Looking in greater depth than these gross averages, however, we find that there is indeed a prospective problem, and of such a nature and magnitude as to tax all of mankind's talents and resources in its resolution. It is true that certain of the developed countries of the world in the last generation acquired agricultural production capabilities that notably exceeded the resident population's capacity to consume. 'Surplus' in these areas became an ugly word during this period of a generally favorable weather cycle, and restrictions on the amount of and that could be devoted to graincrops were imposed to curb this tremendous capacity. A fickle Mother Nature, however, has turned things around during the early 1970's by one or another of her many vacillations in the form of local drought, excess moisture, shortened growing season, or other means, in some of the major producing areas. Inconsequence, the food grain surpluses are now gone and the world is looking at a three to four week reserve at any given moment. The cost of food products available from exporting countries has doubled and trebled in price during the past two years. The potential for famine exceeds in magnitude anything the world has ever known. It is against this background that the World Food Conference will be held in Rome during November of this year. (author)

  18. The world review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    A world-wide review of hydrocarbon processing is presented. Following a general introduction discussing issues such as the crisis in Asia, the mergers between the oil giants, the concern over carbon dioxide emissions in Europe, the expected decline in output of oil in the USA and the attraction of Latin America in terms of natural gas, the article goes on to review the situations and prospects in various parts of the world. Fifty-one countries are discussed individually in this 34-page article. The focus throughout is very much on the activities of individual companies and contracts rather than on technical details. (UK)

  19. Rapid world modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Charles; Jensen, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has designed and developed systems capable of large-scale, three-dimensional mapping of unstructured environments in near real time. This mapping technique is called rapid world modeling and has proven invaluable when used by prototype systems consisting of sensory detection devices mounted on mobile platforms. These systems can be deployed into previously unmapped environments and transmit real-time 3-D visual images to operators located remotely. This paper covers a brief history of the rapid world modeling system, its implementation on mobile platforms, and the current state of the technology. Applications to the nuclear power industry are discussed. (author)

  20. The World of Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    The world of the future will not be one without wars. The many hopes we have about a future peace governed by a more or less confederal state will not make wars obsolete. Regular wars and irregular wars will continue and probably about different subjects than we are used to. The article proposes...... that the form of war will be more about temporalities, i.e. fast interchanges or, rather, more risky protracted wars of attrition and exhaustion and less about tactical well defined territories. The West can neither dominate such wars nor establish one world that is ruled or even governed. The risk is that we...

  1. Real-world outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    -down model of feeding back research findings to subjects” (Roberts and Sarangi 2003, 340) although, arguably, making results applicable to a real-world context ought to be an essential goal of researcher-practitioner studies. This issue forms the background of the presentation, in which it will be discussed...... how the dissemination of research findings may take place to ensure the creation of real-world outcomes for practitioners (cf. e.g. Nørreklit et al. 1987; Puchta & Potter 2004). The presentation will be centered around the interview study of the discursive constructions of culture in a Danish cross...

  2. World geothermal congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarov, O.A.; Tomarov, G.V.

    2001-01-01

    The World geothermal congress took place in the period from 28 May up to 10 June 2000 in Japan. About 2000 men from 43 countries, including specialists in the area of developing geothermal fields, creating and operating geothermal electrical and thermal plants and various systems for the earth heat application, participated in the work of the Congress. It was noted at the Congress, that development of the geothermal power engineering in the world is characterized by the large-scale application of geothermal resources for the electrical energy generation [ru

  3. Burning mouth syndrome: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by an oral burning sensation in the absence of any organic disorders of the oral cavity. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and is characterized by an intense burning type of pain, preferably on the tongue and in other areas of the oral mucosa. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. This article provides an overview of the literature on this syndrome with special reference to the etiological factors, clinical aspects, diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management with reference to the most recent studies.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaeda, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Ryogo; Shionoya, Kaori; Kato, Hitoshi; Makino, Naoki

    1996-01-01

    Ulnocarpal abutment syndrome (UAS) is the impingement between lunate and ulnar head. Twenty-two wrists of 19 patients were diagnosed as UAS arthroscopically after having undergone MRI examination. Ten wrists had MRI both before and after ulnar recession arthroplasty. Spin-echo pulse sequences were taken. T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. On T1-weighted images, the focal signal intensity of the ulnar part of the lunate was decreased in 18 wrists. On T2-weighted images, the focal signal intensity of the ulnar aspect of the lunate were from high to low in 18 wrists. There was focal and abnormal signal intensity of the triquetrum found in 10 wrists and was abnormal signal intensity of the ulnar head in two wrists. After the operation, on the T1-weighted image signal intensity of the lunate shifted from low through slightly low to iso. On the T2-weighted images it shifted from low to high or iso. Focal low signal intensity of the lunate on T1-weighted images is diagnostic of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. The intensity of the signal from the lunate on T2-weighted images may indicate the severity of the disease. (author)

  5. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  6. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  7. Cotard Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Cotard's syndrome is often described as the delusional belief that one is dead or non-existent. However, Jules Cotard's initial description (1880) of the "delusion of negations" was much richer and also involved delusions and claims of immortality and enormity, feelings of damnation, and illusions of bodily dissolution and transformation. Alternatively conceived as an extreme case of depression, hypochondria, or psychosis, the condition is considered rare and remains poorly understood. Cotard himself provided a taxonomy and several explanations for the condition, focusing on its distinction from classical persecutory delusions and suggesting that it could be a kind of reversed grandiosity. He proposed a psychosensory basis in the dissolution of mental imagery, which he then extended to a more general psychomotor impairment of volition. Other early authors highlighted a disorder of the bodily self, and more recent theories postulated an impairment of right hemispheric functions, leading to perceptual and somatosensory feelings of unreality, which coupled with reasoning impairments and an internalized attributional style led in turn to beliefs of non-existence. However, despite its striking presentation and its relevance to our understanding of self-awareness, Cotard's syndrome remains an elusive condition, rarely reported and poorly researched. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  9. Elsberg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, Filippo; Kaufmann, Timothy J.; Flanagan, Eoin P.; Toledano, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Elsberg syndrome (ES) is an established but often unrecognized cause of acute lumbosacral radiculitis with myelitis related to recent herpes virus infection. We defined ES, determined its frequency in patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) with myelitis, and evaluated its clinical, radiologic, and microbiologic features and outcomes. Methods: We searched the Mayo Clinic medical records for ES and subsequently for combinations of index terms to identify patients with suspected CES and myelitis. Results: Our search yielded 30 patients, 2 diagnosed with ES and an additional 28 with clinical or radiologic evidence of CES retrospectively suspected of having ES. We classified patients in 5 groups according to diagnostic certainty. MRI and EMG confirmed that 2 had only myelitis, 5 only radiculitis, and 16 both. Two had preceding sacral herpes infection and 1 oral herpes simplex. Spinal cord lesions were commonly multiple, discontinuous, not expansile, and centrally or ventrally positioned. Lesions generally spared the distal conus. Nerve root enhancement was occasionally prominent and was smooth rather than nodular. Lymphocytic CSF pleocytosis was common. Thirteen patients (43%) had viral isolation studies, which were commonly delayed; the delay may have accounted for the low rate of viral detection. Acyclovir was administered to 6 patients. Most patients recovered with sequelae; 1 patient experienced encephalomyelitis and died. Conclusion: ES is a definable condition likely responsible for 10% of patients with combined CES and myelitis. Radiologic findings are not entirely specific but may help in differentiating ES from some competing diagnostic considerations. We propose criteria to facilitate diagnosis. PMID:28534040

  10. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  11. AGS intensity record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleser, Ed

    1994-01-01

    As flashed in the September issue, this summer the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) reached a proton beam intensity of 4.05 x 10 13 protons per puise, claimed as the highest intensity ever achieved in a proton synchrotron. It is, however, only two-thirds of the way to its final goal of 6 x 10 13 . The achievement is the resuit of many years of effort. The Report of the AGS II Task Force, issued in February 1984, laid out a comprehensive programme largely based on a careful analysis of the PS experience at CERN. The AGS plan had two essential components: the construction of a new booster, and major upgrades to the AGS itself.

  12. Intensities of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissell, David; Vannini, Phillip; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the intensities of long-distance commuting journeys in order to understand how bodily sensibilities become attuned to the regular mobilities which they undertake. More people are travelling farther to and from work than ever before, owing to a variety of factors which relate...... to complex social and geographical dynamics of transport, housing, lifestyle, and employment. Yet, the experiential dimensions of long-distance commuting have not received the attention that they deserve within research on mobilities. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in Australia, Canada, and Denmark...... this paper aims to further develop our collective understanding of the experiential particulars of long-distance workers or ‘supercommuters’. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in broad social patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions...

  13. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español Síndrome de Marfan What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body's ... bones , blood vessels, and organs. What Causes Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome happens because of an abnormality in one ...

  14. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  15. Turner Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Turner Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Turner Syndrome What's in this ... en español El síndrome de Turner What Is Turner Syndrome? Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic condition found ...

  16. Intensive culture”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2012-01-01

    Scott Lash argumenterer i bogen Intensive Culture for en vending fra ”ekstensiv” til ”intensiv” i den nutidige globalisering. Bogens udgangspunkt er en stadig mere ekstensiv og gennemtrængende globalisering af kultur, forbrugs- og vareformer, ”comtemporary culture, today’s capitalism – our global......, samlivsmøstre etc.; ”the sheer pace of life in the streets of today’s mega-city would seem somehow to be intensive”....

  17. Intense ion beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Sudan, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation

  18. Intense fusion neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10 15 -10 21 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10 20 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  19. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  20. The effects of exercise program on burnout and metabolic syndrome components in banking and insurance workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Han Hui; Yeh, Ching Ying; Su, Chien Tien; Chen, Chiou Jong; Peng, Shu Mei; Chen, Ruey Yu

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of exercise program for banking and insurance workers and clarify the association between exercise, burnout, and metabolic syndrome components. In the process of the study, a practicable worksite exercise program was developed for bank and insurance enterprises. A three-month (12-wk) exercise course was conducted, and its benefits evaluated. Levels of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed after exercise intervention. After intervention, the indicators of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were significantly improved in both low and high intensity groups, and the improvement were expressed in reduction of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, person burnout and work-related burnout. A dose-response of burnouts and metabolic syndrome components with exercise intensity are shown (psyndrome components were independently associated with burnout and exercise intensity in the crude model. After adjustment for potential confounders, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure differences showed significant associations with exercise intensity (pburnouts and metabolic syndrome components.