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Sample records for intelligence ei instrument

  1. EI competencies as a related but different characteristic than intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Batista-Foguet, Joan M.; Fernández-i-Marín, Xavier; Truninger, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Amid the swarm of debate about emotional intelligence (EI) among academics are claims that cognitive intelligence, or general mental ability (g), is a stronger predictor of life and work outcomes as well as the counter claims that EI is their strongest predictor. Nested within the tempest in a teapot are scientific questions as to what the relationship is between g and EI. Using a behavioral approach to EI, we examined the relationship of a parametric measure of g as the person’s GMAT scores and collected observations from others who live and work with the person as to the frequency of his or her EI behavior, as well as the person’s self-assessment. The results show that EI, as seen by others, is slightly related to g, especially for males with assessment from professional relations. Further, we found that cognitive competencies are more strongly related to GMAT than EI competencies. For observations from personal relationships or self-assessment, there is no relationship between EI and GMAT. Observations from professional relations reveal a positive relationship between cognitive competencies and GMAT and EI and GMAT for males, but a negative relationship between EI and GMAT for females. PMID:25713545

  2. The Influence of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on Coping and Mental Health in Adolescence: Divergent Roles for Trait and Ability EI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sarah K.; Humphrey, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Theoretically, trait and ability emotional intelligence (EI) should mobilise coping processes to promote adaptation, plausibly operating as personal resources determining choice and/or implementation of coping style. However, there is a dearth of research deconstructing if/how EI impacts mental health via multiple coping strategies in adolescence.…

  3. Emotional intelligence (EI) and nursing leadership styles among nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyczkowski, Brenda; Vandenhouten, Christine; Reilly, Janet; Bansal, Gaurav; Kubsch, Sylvia M; Jakkola, Raelynn

    2015-01-01

    Less than 12.5% of nurses aspire to leadership roles, noting lack of support and stress as major factors in their decision not to pursue this area of practice. Psychological resiliency, described as the ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity, is key to successful nurse managers. Emotional intelligence (EI) is a related concept to resiliency and is another noteworthy predictor of leadership and management success. This study was undertaken to determine the level of and relationship between EI and leadership style of nurse managers employed in Wisconsin and Illinois facilities. A descriptive, exploratory study design was utilized, with a convenience sample of nurse managers working in 6 large Midwestern health systems. Nurse managers were invited to participate in the study by their employer, completing the online consent form and the demographic, Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) Form 5X and the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i 2.0) surveys. Statistically significant positive relationships were noted between EI and transformational leadership and the outcomes of leadership (extra effort, effectiveness, and satisfaction). No statistically significant relationships were noted between EI and transactional or laissez-faire leadership styles.

  4. Why does self-reported emotional intelligence predict job performance? A meta-analytic investigation of mixed EI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dana L; Jin, Jing; Newman, Daniel A; O'Boyle, Ernest H

    2015-03-01

    Recent empirical reviews have claimed a surprisingly strong relationship between job performance and self-reported emotional intelligence (also commonly called trait EI or mixed EI), suggesting self-reported/mixed EI is one of the best known predictors of job performance (e.g., ρ = .47; Joseph & Newman, 2010b). Results further suggest mixed EI can robustly predict job performance beyond cognitive ability and Big Five personality traits (Joseph & Newman, 2010b; O'Boyle, Humphrey, Pollack, Hawver, & Story, 2011). These criterion-related validity results are problematic, given the paucity of evidence and the questionable construct validity of mixed EI measures themselves. In the current research, we update and reevaluate existing evidence for mixed EI, in light of prior work regarding the content of mixed EI measures. Results of the current meta-analysis demonstrate that (a) the content of mixed EI measures strongly overlaps with a set of well-known psychological constructs (i.e., ability EI, self-efficacy, and self-rated performance, in addition to Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, Extraversion, and general mental ability; multiple R = .79), (b) an updated estimate of the meta-analytic correlation between mixed EI and supervisor-rated job performance is ρ = .29, and (c) the mixed EI-job performance relationship becomes nil (β = -.02) after controlling for the set of covariates listed above. Findings help to establish the construct validity of mixed EI measures and further support an intuitive theoretical explanation for the uncommonly high association between mixed EI and job performance--mixed EI instruments assess a combination of ability EI and self-perceptions, in addition to personality and cognitive ability. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Intelligent instrumentation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bhuyan, Manabendra

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of microprocessors and digital-processing technologies as catalyst, classical sensors capable of simple signal conditioning operations have evolved rapidly to take on higher and more specialized functions including validation, compensation, and classification. This new category of sensor expands the scope of incorporating intelligence into instrumentation systems, yet with such rapid changes, there has developed no universal standard for design, definition, or requirement with which to unify intelligent instrumentation. Explaining the underlying design methodologies of intelligent instrumentation, Intelligent Instrumentation: Principles and Applications provides a comprehensive and authoritative resource on the scientific foundations from which to coordinate and advance the field. Employing a textbook-like language, this book translates methodologies to more than 80 numerical examples, and provides applications in 14 case studies for a complete and working understanding of the material. Beginn...

  6. Emotional Intelligence (EI): A Therapy for Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machera, Robert P.; Machera, Precious C.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the need to design and develop emotional intelligence curriculum for students in higher education. Emotional intelligence curriculum may be used as a therapy that provides skills to manage high emotions faced by generation "Y", on a day-to-day basis. Generation "Y" is emotionally challenged with: drug…

  7. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems.

  8. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not Available

    2005-01-01

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems

  9. Model SH intelligent instrument for thickness measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Juntao; Jia Weizhuang; Zhao Yunlong

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce Model SH Intelligent Instrument for thickness measuring by using principle of beta back-scattering and its application range, features, principle of operation, system design, calibration and specifications

  10. Intelligent type sodium instrumentations for LMFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daolong Chen

    1996-01-01

    The constructions and their performances of a lot of newly developed intelligent type sodium instrumentations that consist of the intelligent type sodium flowmeter, the intelligent type immersed sodium flowmeter, the intelligent type sodium manometer and the intelligent type sodium level gauge are described. The graduation characteristic equations for corresponding transducer using the medium temperature as the parameter are given. Because the operating temperature limit of measured medium (sodium) is wide, so the on-line compensation of the temperature effect of their graduation characteristics much be considered. The tests show that these intelligent type sodium instrumentations possess of good linearity. The accurate sodium process parameter (flowrate, pressure and level) measurement data can be obtained by means of their on-line compensation function of the temperature effect. Moreover, these intelligent type sodium instrumentations possess of the self-inspection, the electric shutoff protection, the setting of full-scale, the setting of alarm limits (two upper limits and two lower limits alarms), the thermocouple breaking alarm, each other isolative the 0-10V direct-current analogue output and CENTRONICS standard digital output, and the alarm relay contact output. These intelligent type sodium instrumentations are suitable particularly for the instrument, control and protective systems of LMFR by means of these excellent functions based on microprocessor. The basic error of the intelligent type sodium flowmeter, immersed sodium flowmeter, sodium manometer and sodium level gauge is respectively ±2%, ±2.3%, ±0.3% and ±1.9% of measuring range. (author). 4 refs, 9 figs

  11. Intelligent type sodium instrumentations for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1996-07-01

    The constructions and performances of lots of newly developed intelligent type sodium instrumentations are described. The graduation characteristic equations for corresponding transducer using the medium temperature as the parameter are given. These intelligent type sodium instrumentations are possessed of good linearity. The accurate measurement data of sodium process parameters (flowrate, pressure and level) can be obtained by means of their on-line compensation function of the temperature effect. Moreover, these intelligent type sodium instrumentations are possessed of the self-inspection, the electric shutoff protection, the setting of full-scale, the setting of alarm limits (two upper limits and two lower limits alarms), the thermocouple breaking alarm, mutual isolative the 0∼10 V direct-current analogue output and the CENTRONICS standard digital output, and the alarm relay contact output. Theses intelligent type sodium instrumentations are suitable particularly for the instrument, control and protective systems of LMFBR by means of these excellent functions based on microprocessor. The basic errors of the intelligent type sodium flowmeter, immersed sodium flowmeter, sodium manometer and sodium level gauge are +-2%, +-2.3%, +-0.3% and +-1.9% of measuring ranges respectively. (9 figs.)

  12. Development of intelligent system for a thermal analysis instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoli; Wu Guoxin; Shi Yongchao

    2005-01-01

    The key techniques for the intelligent analysis instrument developed are proposed. Based on the technique of virtual instrumentation, the intelligent PID control algorithm to control the temperature of thermal analysis instrument is described. The dynamic character and the robust performance of traditional PID controls are improved through the dynamic gain factor, temperature rate change factor, the forecast factor, and the temperature correction factor is introduced. Using the graphic development environment of LabVIEW, the design of system modularization and the graphic display are implemented. By means of multiple mathematical modules, intelligent data processing is realized

  13. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE INSTRUMENTS FOR HR MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulescu Magdalena

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Business Intelligence is the combination of the information from several sources, and presenting results in a form that can be used in taking business decisions. Processed and presented in an intelligent way, this information gives the company the advanta

  14. Development of NPTC-11 intelligence control instrument with digital display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chengming; Pu Li; Yu Jiang; Xue Yuping; Zhang Bo; Chen Yong

    2007-01-01

    The accurate of the process control gauge has direct influence on the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Therefore it is necessary to accumulate experiences for the domestic development of this Instrument. In this paper, NPTC-11 intelligence control Instrument with digital display is developed based on the design code for nuclear Instrument, considering the actual application requirements and technical redundancy. Its application in nuclear power plant for almost one year indicates that this Instrument satisfies the development purpose and requirements. (authors)

  15. An intelligent instrument for measuring the dynamic parameters of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Guoping

    2002-01-01

    An intelligent instrument was developed for measuring direction and velocity of the groundwater, permeability coefficient, hydraulic transmitting coefficient, static level, hydraulic gradient and flow direction of each layer. The instrument can be widely applied for detecting seepage of abutment and river bank, exploitation of groundwater, conservation of water and soil, water surging in mine, survey of groundwater resource and environment protection etc

  16. The strategy for intelligent integrated instrumentation and control system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Ham, Chang Shik

    1995-01-01

    All of the nuclear power plants in Korea are operating with analog instrumentation and control ( I and C) equipment which are increasingly faced with frequent troubles, obsolescence and high maintenance expenses. Electrical and computer technology has improved rapidly in recent years and has been applied to other industries. So it is strongly recommended we adopt modern digital and computer technology to improve plant safety and availability. The advanced I and C system, namely, Integrated Intelligent Instrumentation and Control System (I 3 Cs) will be developed for beyond the next generation nuclear power plant. I 3 CS consists of three major parts, the advanced compact workstation, distributed digital control and protection system including Automatic Start-up/Shutdown Intelligent Control System (ASICS) and the computer-based alarm processing and operator support system, namely, Diagnosis, Response, and operator Aid Management System (DREAMS)

  17. An intelligent identification algorithm for the monoclonal picking instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Zhang, Rongfu; Yuan, Xujun; Wang, Qun

    2017-11-01

    The traditional colony selection is mainly operated by manual mode, which takes on low efficiency and strong subjectivity. Therefore, it is important to develop an automatic monoclonal-picking instrument. The critical stage of the automatic monoclonal-picking and intelligent optimal selection is intelligent identification algorithm. An auto-screening algorithm based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed in this paper, which uses the supervised learning method, which combined with the colony morphological characteristics to classify the colony accurately. Furthermore, through the basic morphological features of the colony, system can figure out a series of morphological parameters step by step. Through the establishment of maximal margin classifier, and based on the analysis of the growth trend of the colony, the selection of the monoclonal colony was carried out. The experimental results showed that the auto-screening algorithm could screen out the regular colony from the other, which meets the requirement of various parameters.

  18. An intelligent instrument for measuring exhaust temperature of marine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan-Qi; Su, Hua; Liu, Jun

    2006-12-01

    Exhaust temperature of the marine engine is commonly measured through thermocouple. Measure deviation will occur after using the thermocouple for some time due to nonlinearity of thermocouple itself, high temperature and chemical corrosion of measure point. Frequent replacement of thermocouple will increase the operating cost. This paper designs a new intelligent instrument for solving the above-mentioned problems of the marine engine temperature measurement, which combines the conventional thermocouple temperature measurement technology and SCM(single chip microcomputer). The reading of the thermocouple is simple and precise and the calibration can be made automatically and manually.

  19. Development and validity of mathematical learning assessment instruments based on multiple intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmiah Suryani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to develop and produce an assessment instrument of mathematical learning results based on multiple intelligence. The methods in this study used Borg & Gall-Research and Development approach (Research & Development. The subject of research was 289 students. The results of research: (1 Result of Aiken Analysis showed 58 valid items were between 0,714 to 0,952. (2 Result of the Exploratory on factor analysis indicated the instrument consist of three factors i.e. mathematical logical intelligence-spatial intelligence-and linguistic intelligence. KMO value was 0.661 df 0.780 sig. 0.000 with valid category. This research succeeded to developing the assessment instrument of mathematical learning results based on multiple intelligence of second grade in elementary school with characteristics of logical intelligence of mathematics, spatial intelligence, and linguistic intelligence.

  20. Convergent and Divergent Validity of Integrative versus Mixed Model Measures of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christian A.; Schwab, Zachary J.; Weber, Mareen; DelDonno, Sophie; Kipman, Maia; Weiner, Melissa R.; Killgore, William D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The construct of emotional intelligence (EI) has garnered increased attention in the popular media and scientific literature. Several competing measures of EI have been developed, including self-report and performance-based instruments. The current study replicates and expands on previous research by examining three competing EI measures…

  1. Intelligence Assessment Instruments in Adult Prison Populations: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, A Y M; Denzel, A D; Scherder, E J A; Masthoff, E D M

    2017-10-01

    Detection of intellectual disability (ID) in the penitentiary system is important for the following reasons: (a) to provide assistance to people with ID in understanding their legal rights and court proceedings; (b) to facilitate rehabilitation programs tailored to ID patients, which improves the enhancement of their quality of life and reduces their risk of reoffending; and (c) to provide a reliable estimate of the risk of offence recidivism. It requires a short assessment instrument that provides a reliable estimation of a person's intellectual functioning at the earliest possible stage of this process. The aim of this systematic review is (a) to provide an overview of recent short assessment instruments that provide a full-scale IQ score in adult prison populations and (b) to achieve a quality measurement of the validation studies regarding these instruments to determine which tests are most feasible in this target population. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement is used to ensure reliability. The Satz-Mögel, an item-reduction short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, shows the highest correlation with the golden standard and is described to be most reliable. Nevertheless, when it comes to applicability in prison populations, the shorter and less verbal Quick Test can be preferred over others. Without affecting these conclusions, major limitations emerge from the present systematic review, which give rise to several important recommendations for further research.

  2. The Effects of Emotional Intelligence (EI Items Education on Job Related Stress in Physicians and Nurses who Work in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Nooryan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Intensive care units (ICUs are recognized as stressful environments. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of emotional intelligence education items on job related stress on physicians and nurses who work in intensive care units at hospitals of Yerevan, Armenia. Methods: A interventional study design was implemented with 106 registered hospital physicians and nurses, who were widely distributed all the way through. Case group was taught about 15 E.I items. For data collection, the 20-question Berger situational (overt anxiety questionnaire, the 20-item personality (covert anxiety questionnaire, and the Bar-on emotional intelligence questionnaire with 133 questions were used. Statistical descriptive methods, chi-square (X2 and t-tests were used to analyze data. Results: The research achievements revealed that the average score of the case group`s situational anxiety was 46.59 before intervention, which decreased to 39.95 after the training of the items of emotional intelligence. The average score of situational anxiety of control group was 44.32 before intervention which increased to 44.76 after examination. There was a meaningful statistical difference between case and control group after education of emotional intelligence`s items (p=0.001. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that physicians and nurses experience high level of stress. The ability to effectively deal with emotion intelligence and emotional information in the workplace assists employees in coping with occupational stress and should be developed in stress managing trainings.

  3. Instrumentation for Scientific Computing in Neural Networks, Information Science, Artificial Intelligence, and Applied Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    include Security Classification) Instrumentation for scientific computing in neural networks, information science, artificial intelligence, and...instrumentation grant to purchase equipment for support of research in neural networks, information science, artificail intellignece , and applied mathematics...in Neural Networks, Information Science, Artificial Intelligence, and Applied Mathematics Contract AFOSR 86-0282 Principal Investigator: Stephen

  4. Integrated intelligent instruments using supercritical fluid technology for soil analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebman, S.A.; Phillips, C.; Fitzgerald, W.; Levy, E.J.

    1994-01-01

    Contaminated soils pose a significant challenge for characterization and remediation programs that require rapid, accurate and comprehensive data in the field or laboratory. Environmental analyzers based on supercritical fluid (SF) technology have been designed and developed for meeting these global needs. The analyzers are designated the CHAMP Systems (Chemical Hazards Automated Multimedia Processors). The prototype instrumentation features SF extraction (SFE) and on-line capillary gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with chromatographic and/or spectral identification detectors, such as ultra-violet, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometers. Illustrations are given for a highly automated SFE-capillary GC/flame ionization (FID) configuration to provide validated screening analysis for total extractable hydrocarbons within ca. 5--10 min, as well as a full qualitative/quantitative analysis in 25--30 min. Data analysis using optional expert system and neural networks software is demonstrated for test gasoline and diesel oil mixtures in this integrated intelligent instrument approach to trace organic analysis of soils and sediments

  5. Proceedings of symposium on intelligent nuclear instrumentation-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataria, S.K.; Vaidya, P.P.; Das, Debashis; Narurkar, P.V.

    2001-02-01

    Advances in the field of instrumentation are relevant to many areas of importance such as nuclear and accelerator based research, reactor monitoring and control, non-destructive testing and evaluation, laser programme and health and environment monitoring etc. The nuclear instrumentation is a specialized field with very specific expertise in detection, processing and its analysis. The symposium covers various fields of nuclear interest such as radiation detectors, application of ASICs and FPGA in instruments, field instruments, nuclear instrumentation for basic research, accelerator, reactor, health and environmental monitoring instrumentation, medical instrumentation, instrument net working inclusive of field buses, WEB based and wireless technologies, software tools, AI technique in instrumentation etc., in this specialized area. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  6. The single chip microcomputer technique in an intelligent nuclear instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tieliu; Sun Punan; Wang Ying

    1995-01-01

    The authors present that how to acquire and process the output signals from the nuclear detector adopting single chip microcomputer technique, including working principles and the designing method of the computer's software and hardware in the single chip microcomputer instrument

  7. An Intelligent Hand-Held Microsurgical Instrument for Improved Accuracy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ang, Wei

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the development and initial experimental results of the first prototype of Micron, an active hand-held instrument to sense and compensate physiological tremor and other unwanted...

  8. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation aims at evaluating the potentials of new instrumentation technologies under the severe constraints of a nuclear application. It focuses on the tolerance of sensors to high radiation doses, including optical fibre sensors, and on the related intelligent data processing needed to cope with the nuclear constraints. Main achievements in these domains in 1999 are summarised

  9. Measuring emotional intelligence of medical school applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrothers, R M; Gregory, S W; Gallagher, T J

    2000-05-01

    To discuss the development, pilot testing, and analysis of a 34-item semantic differential instrument for measuring medical school applicants' emotional intelligence (the EI instrument). The authors analyzed data from the admission interviews of 147 1997 applicants to a six-year BS/MD program that is composed of three consortium universities. They compared the applicants' scores on traditional admission criteria (e.g., GPA and traditional interview assessments) with their scores on the EI instrument (which comprised five dimensions of emotional intelligence), breaking the data out by consortium university (each of which has its own educational ethos) and gender. They assessed the EI instrument's reliability and validity for assessing noncognitive personal and interpersonal qualities of medical school applicants. The five dimensions of emotional intelligence (maturity, compassion, morality, sociability, and calm disposition) indicated fair to excellent internal consistency: reliability coefficients were .66 to .95. Emotional intelligence as measured by the instrument was related to both being female and matriculating at the consortium university that has an educational ethos that values the social sciences and humanities. Based on this pilot study, the 34-item EI instrument demonstrates the ability to measure attributes that indicate desirable personal and interpersonal skills in medical school applicants.

  10. Intelligent data-acquisition instrumentation for special nuclear material assay data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethridge, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Detection, Surveillance, Verification, and Recovery Group of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Energy Division/Nuclear Safeguards Programs is now utilizing intelligent data-acquisition instrumentation for assay data analysis of special nuclear material. The data acquisition and analysis are enabled by the incorporation of a number-crunching microprocessor sequenced by a single component microcomputer. Microcomputer firmware establishes the capability for processing the computation of several selected functions and also the ability of instrumentation self-diagnostics

  11. Study on virtual instrument developing system based on intelligent virtual control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Baoping; Cheng Fabin; Qin Shuren

    2005-01-01

    The paper introduces a non-programming developing system of a virtual instrument (VI), i.e., a virtual measurement instrument developing system (VMIDS) based on intelligent virtual control (IVC). The background of the IVC-based VMIDS is described briefly, and the hierarchical message bus (HMB)-based software architecture of VMIDS is discussed in detail. The three parts and functions of VMIDS are introduced, and the process of non-programming developing VI is further described

  12. Study on virtual instrument developing system based on intelligent virtual control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Baoping; Cheng Fabin; Qin Shuren [Test Center, College of Mechanical Engineering, Chongqing University , Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2005-01-01

    The paper introduces a non-programming developing system of a virtual instrument (VI), i.e., a virtual measurement instrument developing system (VMIDS) based on intelligent virtual control (IVC). The background of the IVC-based VMIDS is described briefly, and the hierarchical message bus (HMB)-based software architecture of VMIDS is discussed in detail. The three parts and functions of VMIDS are introduced, and the process of non-programming developing VI is further described.

  13. Design of embedded hardware platform in intelligent γ-spectrometry instrument based on ARM9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Tianqi; Fang Fang

    2008-01-01

    This paper described the design of embedded hardware platform based on ARM9 S3C2410A, emphases are focused on analyzing the methods of design the circuits of memory, LCD and keyboard ports. It presented a new solution of hardware platform in intelligent portable instrument for γ measurement. (authors)

  14. Application of instrument platform based embedded Linux system on intelligent scaler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jikun; Yang Run'an; Xia Minjian; Yang Zhijun; Li Lianfang; Yang Binhua

    2011-01-01

    It designs a instrument platform based on embedded Linux system and peripheral circuit, by designing Linux device driver and application program based on QT Embedded, various functions of the intelligent scaler are realized. The system architecture is very reasonable, so the stability and the expansibility and the integration level are increased, the development cycle is shorten greatly. (authors)

  15. Design of an intelligent flight instrumentation unit using embedded RTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Marmolejo, R.; García-Torales, G.; Torres-Ortega, H. H.; Flores, J. L.

    2011-09-01

    Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (MUAV) must calculate its spatial position to control the flight dynamics, which is done by Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). MEMS Inertial sensors have made possible to reduce the size and power consumption of such units. Commonly the flight instrumentation operates independently of the main processor. This work presents an instrumentation block design, which reduces size and power consumption of the complete system of a MUAV. This is done by coupling the inertial sensors to the main processor without considering any intermediate level of processing aside. Using Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS) reduces the number of intermediate components, increasing MUAV reliability. One advantage is the possibility to control several different sensors with a single communication bus. This feature of the MEMS sensors makes a smaller and less complex MUAV design possible.

  16. The Role of Students’ Emotional Intelligence: Empirical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalio Extremera Pacheco

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence (EI has attracted great interest in the field of education as a vehicle to improve the socioemotional development of students. The first publications that appeared made a great number of claims about the positive influence of emotional intelligence in the classroom. The only problem was that not all these claims were coupled with empirical research to show, on the one hand, the predictive level of EI, and on the other hand, the actual role of EI in different areas of life. It has been only recently that the effect of a high level of EI exercises on people has been investigated. The object of this article is to examine the most relevant empirical research done within the educational setting, in order to collect the existing evidence for the influence of EI, evaluated by different instruments, in the personal, social and scholastic functioning of students.

  17. Confirming the factor structure of the 41-item version of the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale / Salemon Marais Bester

    OpenAIRE

    Bester, Salemon Marais

    2012-01-01

    The research on Emotional Intelligence (EI) has advanced considerably over the past 20 years because of the construct’s scientific and practical relevance. However, in South Africa, a measurement instrument of EI that is valid, reliable, standardised, has a consistent factor structure, in a homogeneous working sample and that can be utilised for research and practical purposes is still elusive. EI plays a fundamental role in the quality of service rendered by nurses (Murphy & J...

  18. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation aims at evaluating the potentials of new instrumentation technologies under the severe constraints of a nuclear application. It focuses on the tolerance of sensors to high radiation doses, including optical fibre sensors, and on the related intelligent data processing needed to cope with the nuclear constraints. Main achievements in these domains in 1999 are summarised.

  19. Development of intelligent control system for X-ray streak camera in diagnostic instrument manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Chengquan [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wu, Shengli, E-mail: slwu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tian, Jinshou [Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); Liu, Zhen [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Fang, Yuman [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Gao, Guilong; Liang, Lingliang [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wen, Wenlong [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-11-01

    An intelligent control system for an X ray streak camera in a diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIM) is proposed and implemented, which can control time delay, electric focusing, image gain adjustment, switch of sweep voltage, acquiring environment parameters etc. The system consists of 16 A/D converters and 16 D/A converters, a 32-channel general purpose input/output (GPIO) and two sensors. An isolated DC/DC converter with multi-outputs and a single mode fiber were adopted to reduce the interference generated by the common ground among the A/D, D/A and I/O. The software was designed using graphical programming language and can remotely access the corresponding instrument from a website. The entire intelligent control system can acquire the desirable data at a speed of 30 Mb/s and store it for later analysis. The intelligent system was implemented on a streak camera in a DIM and it shows a temporal resolution of 11.25 ps, spatial distortion of less than 10% and dynamic range of 279:1. The intelligent control system has been successfully used in a streak camera to verify the synchronization of multi-channel laser on the Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility.

  20. Development of intelligent control system for X-ray streak camera in diagnostic instrument manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Chengquan; Wu, Shengli; Tian, Jinshou; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Yuman; Gao, Guilong; Liang, Lingliang; Wen, Wenlong

    2015-01-01

    An intelligent control system for an X ray streak camera in a diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIM) is proposed and implemented, which can control time delay, electric focusing, image gain adjustment, switch of sweep voltage, acquiring environment parameters etc. The system consists of 16 A/D converters and 16 D/A converters, a 32-channel general purpose input/output (GPIO) and two sensors. An isolated DC/DC converter with multi-outputs and a single mode fiber were adopted to reduce the interference generated by the common ground among the A/D, D/A and I/O. The software was designed using graphical programming language and can remotely access the corresponding instrument from a website. The entire intelligent control system can acquire the desirable data at a speed of 30 Mb/s and store it for later analysis. The intelligent system was implemented on a streak camera in a DIM and it shows a temporal resolution of 11.25 ps, spatial distortion of less than 10% and dynamic range of 279:1. The intelligent control system has been successfully used in a streak camera to verify the synchronization of multi-channel laser on the Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility

  1. Problems of Terminology in the Field of Measuring Instruments with Elements of Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roald TAYMANOV

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines some problems that concern terminology in the field of measuring instruments which include sensors and elements of artificial intelligence. At present, a "common language" in this area does not exist. It is shown that application of an evolutionary method helps to systematize the concepts and creates a basis facilitating understanding of the relations between terms. Proposals on terms and their definitions in the field considered are given.

  2. Measuring Emotional Intelligence in Early Adolescence with the MSCEIT-YV: Psychometric Properties and Relationship with Academic Performance and Psychosocial Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Susan E.; Brackett, Marc A.; Reyes, Maria R.; Mayer, John D.; Caruso, David R.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) theory provides a framework to study the role of emotion skills in social, personal, and academic functioning. Reporting data validating the importance of EI among youth have been limited due to a dearth of measurement instruments. In two studies, the authors examined the reliability and validity of the…

  3. Examining Perception of Emotional Intelligence in Online Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Diane

    2018-01-01

    The perceptions of the knowledge and value online instructors place on emotional intelligence (EI), warrants scholarly attention. Thirty-eight adjunct faculty members who were recruited through LinkedIn completed an instrument developed for this purpose. Instructors ranked their perception of the importance of the factors associated with EI…

  4. Thinking style preference, emotional intelligence and leadership effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessie H. Herbst

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the researchers investigate the relationship between thinking style preference, emotional intelligence and leadership effectiveness in an institution of higher education. The measuring instruments used were the Neethling Brain Preference Profle (NBPP and the Mayer, Salovey and Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT, as well as the Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI. The sample comprised 138 managers within a higher education institution. The researchers found some evidence to support the relationship between thinking style, emotional intelligence (EI and leadership effectiveness. The researchers concluded that facets of brain dominance and emotional intelligence may be potentially useful predictors of transformational leadership behaviours.

  5. The overall impact of emotional intelligence on nursing students and nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Michelangelo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare employers often criticize the lack of emotional competency and critical thinking skills demonstrated by newly licensed nurses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether emotional intelligence (EI training for nurses improves critical thinking and emotional competence enough to justify including EI in nursing curricula. A meta-analysis was conducted inclusive of EI related nursing abilities and traits such as leadership, health, reflection, ethical behavior, nursing student performance, and job retention/satisfaction. Studies of EI constructs, test instruments, and contrary viewpoints were also examined. The analysis included 395 EI studies of approximately 65,300 participants. All the studies reported a positive correlation with EI ranging from weak to strong with a moderate cumulative effect size of r = 0.3022 across all studies. This study may contribute to positive social change by reducing employers time and cost for training newly licensed nurses, thereby decreasing the overall cost of health care to the public.

  6. An integrated approach for integrated intelligent instrumentation and control system (I3CS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, C.H.; Kim, J.T.; Kwon, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power plants to guarantee the safety of public should be designed to reduce the operator intervention resulting in operating human errors, identify the process states in transients, and aid to make a decision of their tasks and guide operator actions. For the sake of this purpose, MMIS(MAN-Machine Interface System) in NPPs should be the integrated top-down approach tightly focused on the function-based task analysis including an advanced digital technology, an operator support function, and so on. The advanced I and C research team in KAERI has embarked on developing an Integrated Intelligent Instrumentation and Control System (I 3 CS) for Korea's next generation nuclear power plants. I 3 CS bases the integrated top-down approach on the function-based task analysis, modern digital technology, standardization and simplification, availability and reliability, and protection of investment. (author). 4 refs, 6 figs

  7. An Enhanced Intelligent Handheld Instrument with Visual Servo Control for 2-DOF Hand Motion Error Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Naing Aye

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The intelligent handheld instrument, ITrem2, enhances manual positioning accuracy by cancelling erroneous hand movements and, at the same time, provides automatic micromanipulation functions. Visual data is acquired from a high speed monovision camera attached to the optical surgical microscope and acceleration measurements are acquired from the inertial measurement unit (IMU on board ITrem2. Tremor estimation and canceling is implemented via Band-limited Multiple Fourier Linear Combiner (BMFLC filter. The piezoelectric actuated micromanipulator in ITrem2 generates the 3D motion to compensate erroneous hand motion. Preliminary bench-top 2-DOF experiments have been conducted. The error motions simulated by a motion stage is reduced by 67% for multiple frequency oscillatory motions and 56.16% for pre-conditioned recorded physiological tremor.

  8. An integrated approach for integrated intelligent instrumentation and control system (I{sup 3}CS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, C H; Kim, J T; Kwon, K C [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusong, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear power plants to guarantee the safety of public should be designed to reduce the operator intervention resulting in operating human errors, identify the process states in transients, and aid to make a decision of their tasks and guide operator actions. For the sake of this purpose, MMIS(MAN-Machine Interface System) in NPPs should be the integrated top-down approach tightly focused on the function-based task analysis including an advanced digital technology, an operator support function, and so on. The advanced I and C research team in KAERI has embarked on developing an Integrated Intelligent Instrumentation and Control System (I{sup 3}CS) for Korea`s next generation nuclear power plants. I{sup 3}CS bases the integrated top-down approach on the function-based task analysis, modern digital technology, standardization and simplification, availability and reliability, and protection of investment. (author). 4 refs, 6 figs.

  9. Nurses’ burnout and counterproductive work behavior in a Nigerian sample: The moderating role of emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard I. Ugwu

    Full Text Available This study examined the moderating role of EI in the relationship between burnout and CWB among 401 nurses drawn from various hospitals within South-eastern Nigeria. Three instruments were used for the collection of data, namely: Counterproductive Work Behaviour Checklist, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Brief Emotional Intelligence scale. Moderated multiple regression results showed that emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment, positively predicted CWB. In addition, EI significantly and negatively predicted CWB. Results also showed that EI moderated the positive relationship between emotional exhaustion and CWB and between depersonalization and CWB such that the positive relationship between these two dimensions of burnout and CWB was stronger for nurses with low EI compared to those with high EI. The implications of the findings and limitations of the study were discussed. Keywords: Nurses, Burnout, Counterproductive work behaviour, Emotional intelligence

  10. THE INCREASING OF PRESCHOOL MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES BY EDUCATIVE PLAYING INSTRUMENT STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Sufyanti Arief

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple Intelligences can be incresed by playing stimulation with educative playing instrument. Educative playing is the activity that uses educate ways and instrument. Educative playing very important to increase speech development, cognitive, socialisation with the environment and also increse the streght and skill of child’s body. Method: Design used in this study was quasy experiment design. The population was preschool children 4–5 years old in working area of Mojo Public Health Centre of Surabaya. The sample was preschool children 4–5 years old that spesific in inclution criteria of this study. Data were analyzed by wilcoxon signed rank test to compare the ordinal data pre and post intervention and mann withney u-test that compare between intervention group and control  group with level of signifi cance of α ≤ 0.05. Result: The result of speech development that analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that controlled group had p = 0.157 and intervention group had p = 0.005 and the result of mann whitney test was p = 0.03. The result of kinesthetic development by wilcoxon signed rank test showed that controlled group has p = 0.317 and intervention group has p = 0.005, and analyzed by mann whitney test in kinesthetic development showed the result of p = 0.02. Discussion: Educative playing instrument (picture cards, play dough, origami and meronce increased speech and fine motoric development of preschool children 4–5 years old in Mojo Indah Kindergarten of Surabaya. Educative playing instrument is the activity that makes the playing function optimally in child development and this activity can increase the child development such as physical, speech, cognitive and social adaptation.

  11. EDITORIAL: Advances in Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments for Production Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Gao, Yongsheng; Krystek, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Measurement and instrumentation have long played an important role in Production Engineering, through supporting both the traditional field of manufacturing and the new field of micro/nano-technology. Papers published in this special feature were selected and updated from those presented at The 8th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2007) held at Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, on 24-27 September 2007. ISMTII 2007 was organized by ICMI (The International Committee on Measurements and Instrumentation), Japan Society for Precision Engineering (JSPE, Technical Committee of Intelligent Measurement with Nanoscale), Korean Society for Precision Engineering (KSPE), Chinese Society for Measurement (CSM) and Tohoku University. The conference was also supported by Center for Precision Metrology of UNC Charlotte and Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology. A total of 220 papers, including four keynote papers, were presented at ISMTII 2007, covering a wide range of topics, including micro/nano-metrology, precision measurement, online & in-process measurement, surface metrology, optical metrology & image processing, biomeasurement, sensor technology, intelligent measurement & instrumentation, uncertainty, traceability & calibration, and signal processing algorithms. The guest editors recommended publication of updated versions of some of the best ISMTII 2007 papers in this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology. The first two papers were presented in ISMTII 2007 as keynote papers. Takamasu et al from The University of Tokyo report uncertainty estimation for coordinate metrology, in which methods of estimating uncertainties using the coordinate measuring system after calibration are formulated. Haitjema, from Mitutoyo Research Center Europe, treats the most often used interferometric measurement techniques (displacement interferometry and surface interferometry) and their major sources of errors. Among

  12. A meta-analysis of emotional intelligence and work attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Chao; Humphrey, Ronald; Qian, Shanshan

    2017-01-01

    Our meta-analysis of emotional intelligence (EI) demonstrates that: First, all three types of EI are significantly related with job satisfaction (ability EI: ρ ̂ = .08; self-report EI: ρ ̂ = .32; and mixed EI: ρ ̂ = .39). Second, both self-report EI and mixed EI exhibit modest yet statistically significant incremental validity (ΔR2 = .03 for self-report EI and ΔR2 = .06 for mixed EI) and large relative importance (31.3% for self-report EI and 42.8% for mixed EI) in the presence of cognitive a...

  13. Competitive intelligence: An instrument to enhance South Africa’s competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Viviers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The case for Competitive Intelligence (CI as an instrument that can enhance the competitiveness of South African companies and South Africa as a country is strong. Various global competitive rankings measurements have indicated over a number of years the areas in which competitiveness is lacking. Moreover, these rankings have indicated that South Africa has failed to improve its position year on year. The fact that the world is becoming increasingly competitive for South African entities is undisputed. Coupled with a fluctuating exchange rate and the country’s geographical proximity, this poses unique challenges facing South African managers who have to deal with various regulations and legislative matters. In order to create and sustain an effective knowledge economy and to enhance global competitiveness, South Africa however has to put appropriate strategies/measures in place to stimulate, encourage and grow knowledge practices. Competitive Intelligence (CI as a means of making more sense of the competitive business environment and to identify opportunities and risks in time to act upon can be effectively used as a means to enhance competitiveness. Valuable lessons from successful CI practices in the business sector and government can be learnt from elsewhere in the world. CI should be investigated and adapted for South Africa’s business environment. It is therefore the aim of this article to first attempt to describe the role of CI in enhancing competitiveness, specifically in South Africa and secondly, to stimulate thought on how to secure momentum in enhancing CI as an academic field by developing relevant CI courses as well as demonstrating the value of CI to companies in South Africa through research and collaboration between academics and the private and public sectors.

  14. Emotionele intelligentie gemeten: Pretenties en prestaties. Measuring emotional intelligence: Claims and achievements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a critical discussion of the claims and achievements regarding various types of tests of emotional intelligence (EI). The construct of EI, the reception given to EI tests, EI as a new type of intelligence, EI as self-efficacy in the social-emotional sphere, and factors determining

  15. Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from experience and to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Intelligence as measured by (raw scores on) conventional standardized tests varies across the lifespan, and also across generations. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain—especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex—and also correlates with brain size, at least within humans. Studies of the effects of genes and environment suggest that the heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between .4 and .8, although heritability varies as a function of socioeconomic status and other factors. Racial differences in measured intelligence have been observed, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable, so such differences are difficult to interpret. PMID:22577301

  16. Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from experience and to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Intelligence as measured by (raw scores on) conventional standardized tests varies across the lifespan, and also across generations. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain-especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex-and also correlates with brain size, at least within humans. Studies of the effects of genes and environment suggest that the heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between .4 and .8, although heritability varies as a function of socioeconomic status and other factors. Racial differences in measured intelligence have been observed, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable, so such differences are difficult to interpret.

  17. Artificial intelligence for enhancing energy efficiency. Fundamentals, instruments, practice; Kuenstliche Intelligenz zur Steigerung der Energie-Effizienz. Grundlagen, Instrumente, Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brammer, R.

    2006-07-01

    In a time of rising energy prices and a growing field for information technology, its worth to take a glance of how to combine the two fields of energy efficiency and artificial intelligence. Aim of this combination is to support human beings in their energy consuming habits and to adjust the usage to the individual requirement. An artificial intelligence today is able to mine data, plan actions and make decisions on a rational basis. Thus an intelligent agent can help to lower energy wastage by controlling and regulating a heating system. For this application only few sensors and a control for the heating power are sufficient to support the artificial intelligence with enough information about its environment and enough actuators to manipulate it. On the basis of the collected information the software is able to deduce knowledge, which in turn is stored in a database for later access. This knowledge is used to take in states, which consume less heating power by still keeping the temperature on the same level. Because the acceptance by the user, next to saving energy, is the prime target of the artificial intelligence, its success is measured on how little intervention by humans occur. With the help of probability and benefit based algorithms, several training runs before the applied operation and given performance standard the software is able to reduce calculating times to practicables times. Considering the application possibilities given in this thesis, it is feasible to devolve the use of artificial intelligence and its ability to save energy for many different process controls. (orig.)

  18. Emotional Intelligence and At-Risk Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Maria Chong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationships between emotional intelligence (EI and the delinquent behavior (DB of the students. The level of DB reported by the students is categorized under the headings of crime, drugs, vandalism, pornography and sexual behavior, other misbehavior, and dishonesty. Meanwhile, EI is investigated by looking at the level of EI domains, such as self-awareness, self-regulation, self-motivation, empathy, social skills, maturity, and spiritual awareness. Data were gathered from a sample of 300 secondary school students aged 15 to 18 years in Selangor. The schools they attended were selected from the so-called “hardcore schools,” which were identified by Schools Division in the State of Selangor. Two instruments, namely, surveys on the “Behavior of Students” and “Malaysian Emotional Quotient Inventory (R–Adolescence (MEQI,” were utilized to collect the research data and were analyzed using SPSS 19.0. The data showed that the highest delinquency among the adolescents was misbehavior in school, followed by crime, vandalism, pornography, dishonesty, and drugs. Results also revealed a negative linear relationship between EI (r = −.208, n = 300, p = .001 and DB, implying that adolescents with better EI had lower levels of delinquency. Multiple regression analysis revealed that EI is a significant predictor of DB and self-awareness is the main factor of DB. This study contributes to the knowledge of the importance of EI in understanding DB. EI can be used to identify and discriminate emotional skills among those adolescents who exhibit DB. Addressing the role of EI as a predictor would probably prove to be effective in reducing DB.

  19. Ei viitsi! / Aado Luik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Luik, Aado, 1937-

    2002-01-01

    Põhjus-tagajärg diagramm (Ishikawa diagramm) annab piltliku ülevaate põhjustest, miks õpilased ei viitsi õppida. Pareto diagramm kajastab näitlikult erinevate põhjuste osa halva tagajärje kujunemises

  20. The Contribution of Emotional Intelligence to Decisional Styles among Italian High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Kenny, Maureen E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and styles of decision making. Two hundred and six Italian high school students completed two measures of EI, the Bar-On EI Inventory, based on a mixed model of EI, and the Mayer Salovey Caruso EI Test, based on an ability-based model of EI, in addition to the General…

  1. Emotional Intelligence and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Sophia K; Phitayakorn, Roy

    2015-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is an established concept in the business literature with evidence that it is an important factor in determining career achievement. There is increasing interest in the role that EI has in medical training, but it is still a nascent field. This article reviews the EI literature most relevant to surgical training and proposes that simulation offers many benefits to the development of EI. Although there are many unanswered questions, it is expected that future research will demonstrate the effectiveness of using simulation to develop EI within surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Cool and Hot Cognitive Processes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María José; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Although emotion and cognition were considered to be separate aspects of the psyche in the past, researchers today have demonstrated the existence of an interplay between the two processes. Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand, and regulate emotions, is a relatively young concept that attempts to connect both emotion and cognition. While EI has been demonstrated to be positively related to well-being, mental and physical health, and non-aggressive behaviors, little is known about its underlying cognitive processes. The aim of the present study was to systematically review available evidence about the relationship between EI and cognitive processes as measured through “cool” (i.e., not emotionally laden) and “hot” (i.e., emotionally laden) laboratory tasks. We searched Scopus and Medline to find relevant articles in Spanish and English, and divided the studies following two variables: cognitive processes (hot vs. cool) and EI instruments used (performance-based ability test, self-report ability test, and self-report mixed test). We identified 26 eligible studies. The results provide a fair amount of evidence that performance-based ability EI (but not self-report EI tests) is positively related with efficiency in hot cognitive tasks. EI, however, does not appear to be related with cool cognitive tasks: neither through self-reporting nor through performance-based ability instruments. These findings suggest that performance-based ability EI could improve individuals’ emotional information processing abilities. PMID:27303277

  3. Scholastic Success: Fluid Intelligence, Personality, and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Luke A.; Lomas, Justine; Billings, Clare; Hansen, Karen; Stough, Con

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the role of fluid intelligence, personality traits, and emotional intelligence (EI) in predicting female Year 9 students' grade point average (GPA) and to determine whether any differences in scholastic performance were related to differences in EI or Personality. Two-hundred and forty-three female…

  4. A study of emotional intelligence and perceived parenting styles among adolescents in a rural area in Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Neethu; Shanbhag, Deepthi N; George, Meera; Shaju, Ann Christy; Johnson, Reuben C; Mathew, P Thomas; Golapalli, Chaitanya Prasad; Goud, Ramakrishna

    2017-01-01

    Adolescence is the time which is crucial for the overall development of a person both mentally and physically. In this period, along with academic intelligence, emotional intelligence (EI) also plays an equal or strong role in student life. This study was to assess EI, parental bonding, and their association among adolescents in high schools under Sarjapur PHC area. This was a cross-sectional study conducted among high school students under Sarjapur PHC area. The EI was assessed using EI scale which measured self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. The parental bonding instrument was utilized to determine the parental styles of both the parents and was interpreted in terms of care and protection as neglectful parenting, affectionless control, optimal parenting, and affectionate control. A total of 300 adolescents were interviewed. It was seen that most of them had low EI in self-awareness, i.e., 92 (30.7%), motivation 99 (33%), and social skills 101 (33.7%). It was also observed that most of them had high EI in self-regulation, i.e., 98 (32.7%) and moderately high EI in empathy 117 (39%). The study group perceived that 147 (49%) of the fathers and 109 (36.3%) of the mothers had affectionless control. Along with poor parenting, most of the respondents also have low EI in self-awareness, motivation, and social skills which has to be addressed for the future of the country.

  5. Predicting automatic speech recognition performance over communication channels from instrumental speech quality and intelligibility scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, L.F.; Möller, S.; Beerends, J.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of automatic speech recognition based on coded-decoded speech heavily depends on the quality of the transmitted signals, determined by channel impairments. This paper examines relationships between speech recognition performance and measurements of speech quality and intelligibility

  6. NCU-SWIP Space Weather Instrumentation Payload - Intelligent Sensors On Efficient Real-Time Distributed LUTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tse-Liang; Dmitriev, Alexei; Chu, Yen-Hsyang; Jiang, Shyh-Biau; Chen, Li-Wu

    The NCU-SWIP - Space Weather Instrumentation Payload is developed for simultaneous in-situ and remote measurement of space weather parameters for cross verifications. The measurements include in-situ electron density, electron temperature, magnetic field, the deceleration of satellite due to neutral wind, and remotely the linear cumulative intensities of oxygen ion air-glows at 135.6nm and 630.0nm along the flight path in forward, nader, and backward directions for tomographic reconstruction of the electron density distribution underneath. This instrument package is suitable for micro satellite constellation to establish nominal space weather profiles and, thus, to detect abnormal variations as the signs of ionospheric disturbances induced by severe atmospheric weather, or earth quake - mantle movement through their Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Mechanism. NCU-SWIP is constructed with intelligent sensor modules connected by common bus with their functionalities managed by an efficient distributed real-time system LUTOS. The same hierarchy can be applied to the level of satellite constellation. For example SWIP's in a constellation in coordination with the GNSS Occultation Experiment TriG planned for the Formosa-7 constellation, data can be cross correlated for verification and refinement for real-time, stable and reliable measurements. A SWIP will be contributed to the construction of a MAI Micro Satellite for verification. The SWIP consists of two separate modules: the SWIP main control module and the SWIP-PMTomo sensor module. They are respectively a 1.5kg W120xL120xH100 (in mm) box with forward facing 120mmPhi circular disk probe on a boom top edged at 470mm height and a 7.2kg W126xL590x372H (in mm) slab containing 3 legs looking downwards along the flight path, while consuming the maximum electricity of 10W and 12W. The sensors are 1) ETPEDP measuring 16bits floating potentials for electron temperature range of 1000K to 3000K and 24bits electron

  7. Global EiBI-monopole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Xinghua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A global EiBI-monopole problem is studied under EiBI gravitational theory.The equations of global EiBI-monopole are derived in the curved spacetime and the relation between the spacetime metric and auxiliary metric is found.In the case of a very small parameter,an asymptotic form of equations is given.The series solutions of global EiBI-monopole at infinity are found.

  8. Engineering Information System (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-31

    be availabe and usefu for creating powerful tailored contro and mangeen functions. Mode and Framwork Wirth further elaboration of the EIS portio of...control data and activities of the engineering process. The EIM is a conceptual model of administrative and electroic design information. It records...of the access opeations are derived from the instance variable name and type. An attribute conceptually holds one or more instances of a basic type

  9. Artificial intelligence programming with LabVIEW: genetic algorithms for instrumentation control and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J H

    1995-06-01

    A genetic algorithm for instrumentation control and optimization was developed using the LabVIEW graphical programming environment. The usefulness of this methodology for the optimization of a closed loop control instrument is demonstrated with minimal complexity and the programming is presented in detail to facilitate its adaptation to other LabVIEW applications. Closed loop control instruments have variety of applications in the biomedical sciences including the regulation of physiological processes such as blood pressure. The program presented here should provide a useful starting point for those wishing to incorporate genetic algorithm approaches to LabVIEW mediated optimization of closed loop control instruments.

  10. Emotional intelligence and coping styles: An intervention in geriatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia-Cobo, Carmen María; Suárez, Soraya González; Menéndez Crispín, Ernesto J; Sarabia Cobo, A Belén; Pérez, Victoria; de Lorena, Pablo; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Cristina; Sanlúcar Gross, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Current research indicates a relationship between EI, stress, coping strategies, well-being and mental health. Emotional intelligence skills and knowledge, and coping strategies can be increased with training. The aims of this study were to use a controlled design to test the impact of theoretically based training on the different components of EI and coping styles in a sample of nurses working with older adults. A group of 92 professionals (RN and CAN) who attended a workshop on EI were included in the study. They completed a self-reported measure of EI and coping styles on three occasions: pre- and post-workshop and at one year follow-up. The EI workshop consisted of four 4-h sessions conducted over a four-week period. Each session was held at the one-week interval. This interval allowed participants to apply what was taught during the session to their daily life. The instruments to measure the EI and coping were the Trait Meta-Mood Scale and the CAE test. There were significant differences between the pre- and post-workshop measures both at the end of the workshop and up to one year for both the Trait Meta-Mood Scale scores and the CAE test. There was a significant increase in the EI and coping styles after the workshop and one year thereafter. The workshop was useful for developing EI in the professionals. The immediate impact of the emotional consciousness of individuals was particularly significant for all participants. The long-term impact was notable for the significant increase in EI and most coping styles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ECONOMIC INTELLIGENCE - THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIRGIL - ION POPOVICI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic Intelligence (EI may be a solution in knowledge management as involves collecting, evaluating, processing, analysis and dissemination of economic data within organizations. The ultimate goal of economic intelligence (EI is to take advantage of this opportunity to develop and improve methods for identifying relevant information sources, analysis of information collected and manipulation, to give the user all the necessary decisions. Scope of the Economic Intelligence focused on information available outside the organization, covering wide areas from technology to market or legal issues. Economic Intelligence (EI is closely related to other approaches to information management, and knowledge management and business intelligence, excelling in the use of software tools.

  12. Emotional Intelligence: Popular but Elusive Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2001-01-01

    Important work of Daniel Goleman, Peter Salovey and John Mayer on emotional intelligence (EI) is discussed to illustrate recent theorizing on EI. The article discusses conceptual and measurement problems that presently challenge the usefulness of the EI construct and urges further research. (Author/CR)

  13. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE APPLICATIONS – POSSIBLE INSTRUMENTS FOR ECONOMIC INTEGRATION WITHIN THE EASTERN PARTNERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Ovidiu TOFAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Eastern Partnership includes, in addition to bilateral components (Association Agreements, Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Areas/DCFTA, also a multilateral dimension as "economic integration and convergence with EU policies". This stated purpose of the partnership involves the need for adaptability to regional conditions and a differentiated approach to economies in the region in order to establish common objectives. Partner countries have aspirations that vary by geographic location, state of relations with the European Union and Russia, foreign policy objectives in medium and long term, real prospects of joining the European Union, or internal stability in economic and social aspects. Macroeconomic indicators specific to each country must undergo a dynamic analysis aimed on current situations and also on evolution of economic life. Thus, it requires processing a huge volume of historical data, creating possible scenarios based on policies implemented or being implemented to reach comprehensive information to provide a realistic picture of the economic growth at the macro level. Successfully implemented in enterprises, Business Intelligence (BI applications can be used to analyze large volume of data required to be processed to reach full and useful reports for the process of negotiation between the partners involved in the agreements referred and, very importantly, to establish a common language for all bodies and institutions co-opted into negotiations. Differences between the EU and other Eastern Partnership countries are obvious but economic common terms and methods or techniques of similar work can help plan positive developments in the negotiations and the desired convergence of economic policies. Business Intelligence tools simplify the presentation of needed information for discussions and provide a foundation in starting up joint analysis of economic dynamics in the area to reach complete and actual lines of future possible

  14. Developing Intelligent System Dynamic Management Instruments on Water-Food-Energy Nexus in Response to Urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, W. P.; Chang, F. J.; Lur, H. S.; Fan, C. H.; Hu, M. C.; Huang, T. L.

    2016-12-01

    Water, food and energy are the most essential natural resources needed to sustain life. Water-Food-Energy Nexus (WFE Nexus) has nowadays caught global attention upon natural resources scarcity and their interdependency. In the past decades, Taiwan's integrative development has undergone drastic changes due to population growth, urbanization and excessive utilization of natural resources. The research intends to carry out interdisciplinary studies on WFE Nexus based on data collection and analysis as well as technology innovation, with a mission to develop a comprehensive solution to configure the synergistic utilization of WFE resources in an equal and secure manner for building intelligent dynamic green cities. This study aims to establish the WFE Nexus through interdisciplinary research. This study will probe the appropriate and secure resources distribution and coopetition relationship by applying and developing techniques of artificial intelligence, system dynamics, life cycle assessment, and synergy management under data mining, system analysis and scenario analysis. The issues of synergy effects, economic benefits and sustainable social development will be evaluated as well. First, we will apply the system dynamics to identify the interdependency indicators of WFE Nexus in response to urbanization and build the dynamic relationship among food production, irrigation water resource and energy consumption. Then, we conduct comparative studies of WFE Nexus between the urbanization and the un-urbanization area (basin) to provide a referential guide for optimal resource-policy nexus management. We expect to the proposed solutions can help achieve the main goals of the research, which is the promotion of human well-being and moving toward sustainable green economy and prosperous society.

  15. Correlating Emotional Intelligence and Job Performance Among Jordanian Hospitals' Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Oweidat, Islam Ali; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim; Codier, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is an ability to recognize our and others' emotions, and manage emotions in ourselves and in relationships with other people. A large body of research evidence outside nursing shows that measured (EI) abilities correlated with employee performance, motivation, and job satisfaction; and preliminary nursing research evidence shows the correlation between EI ability and nurses' clinical performance. There is less research on the EI ability of Jordanian nurses, and the present study was undertaken to address this gap. A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation comparative design (nonexperimental) was employed. Six Jordanian hospitals were included in the study. Two hundred fifty questionnaires were distributed to prospective participants. One hundred ninety-four questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 78%. EI was measured using the Genos Instrument. Clinical performance was measured using a self-report measure. Findings demonstrated significant positive relationships between all subscales of EI and job performance, ranging from r = .250, p = .000 to r = .193, p = .007. Regression analysis indicated working in medical-surgical wards, recognizing and expressing emotions scores (β = 0.186, p = .048), and controlling emotions (β = 0.255, p = .027) explained 19.1% of variance in nurses' job performance. The study findings confirm the correlation between nurse EI ability and clinical performance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, G.; Nadi, M.; Hedjiedj, A.; Weber, S.

    1995-01-01

    This second chapter on instrumentation gives little general consideration on history and classification of instrumentation, and two specific states of the art. The first one concerns NMR (block diagram of instrumentation chain with details on the magnets, gradients, probes, reception unit). The first one concerns precision instrumentation (optical fiber gyro-meter and scanning electron microscope), and its data processing tools (programmability, VXI standard and its history). The chapter ends with future trends on smart sensors and Field Emission Displays. (D.L.). Refs., figs

  17. Learning Emotional Intelligence: Training & Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This core assessment provides an overview and training of the use of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the workplace. It includes a needs analysis for a local Chamber of Commerce, and outlines the importance of improving their organizational communication with the improvement of their EI. Behavioral objectives related to the skills needed are…

  18. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  19. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor

  20. Emotional intelligence and clinical performance/retention of nursing students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvos, Chelsea; Hale, Frankie B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This exploratory, quantitative, descriptive study was undertaken to explore the relationship between clinical performance and anticipated retention in nursing students. Methods: After approval by the university's Human Subjects Committee, a sample of 104 nursing students were recruited for this study, which involved testing with a valid and reliable emotional intelligence (EI) instrument and a self-report survey of clinical competencies. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that although the group average for total EI score and the 6 score subsets were in the average range, approximately 30% of the individual total EI scores and 30% of two branch scores, identifying emotions correctly and understanding emotions, fell in the less than average range. This data, as well as the analysis of correlation with clinical self-report scores, suggest recommendations applicable to educators of clinical nursing students. Conclusions: Registered nurses make-up the largest segment of the ever-growing healthcare workforce. Yet, retention of new graduates has historically been a challenge for the profession. Given the projected employment growth in nursing, it is important to identify factors which correlate with high levels of performance and job retention among nurses. There is preliminary evidence that EI a nontraditional intelligence measure relates positively not only with retention of clinical staff nurses, but with overall clinical performance as well. PMID:27981096

  1. Emotional intelligence and clinical performance/retention of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Marvos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This exploratory, quantitative, descriptive study was undertaken to explore the relationship between clinical performance and anticipated retention in nursing students. Methods: After approval by the university′s Human Subjects Committee, a sample of 104 nursing students were recruited for this study, which involved testing with a valid and reliable emotional intelligence (EI instrument and a self-report survey of clinical competencies. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that although the group average for total EI score and the 6 score subsets were in the average range, approximately 30% of the individual total EI scores and 30% of two branch scores, identifying emotions correctly and understanding emotions, fell in the less than average range. This data, as well as the analysis of correlation with clinical self-report scores, suggest recommendations applicable to educators of clinical nursing students. Conclusions: Registered nurses make-up the largest segment of the ever-growing healthcare workforce. Yet, retention of new graduates has historically been a challenge for the profession. Given the projected employment growth in nursing, it is important to identify factors which correlate with high levels of performance and job retention among nurses. There is preliminary evidence that EI "a nontraditional intelligence measure" relates positively not only with retention of clinical staff nurses, but with overall clinical performance as well.

  2. Emotional intelligence as an aspect of general intelligence: what would David Wechsler say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A S; Kaufman, J C

    2001-09-01

    R. D. Roberts, M. Zeidner, and G. Matthews (2001) have carefully examined the controversial issue of whether emotional intelligence (EI) should be classified as an intelligence and whether EI's constructs meet the same psychometric standards as general intelligence's constructs. This article casts their efforts into the framework of both historical and modern IQ-testing theory and research. It details David Wechsler's attempts to integrate EI into his tests and how his conception of a good clinician would be that of an emotionally intelligent clinician. Current theories and research on IQ also have a role in EI beyond what Roberts et al. described, including J. L. Horn's (1989) expanded model and A. R. Luria's (1966) neuropsychological research, and better criteria than the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery should be used in future EI studies. The authors look forward to more research being conducted on EI, particularly in future performance-based assessments.

  3. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described

  4. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described.

  5. Intelligent quotient estimation of mental retarded people from different psychometric instruments using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nuovo, Alessandro G; Di Nuovo, Santo; Buono, Serafino

    2012-02-01

    The estimation of a person's intelligence quotient (IQ) by means of psychometric tests is indispensable in the application of psychological assessment to several fields. When complex tests as the Wechsler scales, which are the most commonly used and universally recognized parameter for the diagnosis of degrees of retardation, are not applicable, it is necessary to use other psycho-diagnostic tools more suited for the subject's specific condition. But to ensure a homogeneous diagnosis it is necessary to reach a common metric, thus, the aim of our work is to build models able to estimate accurately and reliably the Wechsler IQ, starting from different psycho-diagnostic tools. Four different psychometric tests (Leiter international performance scale; coloured progressive matrices test; the mental development scale; psycho educational profile), along with the Wechsler scale, were administered to a group of 40 mentally retarded subjects, with various pathologies, and control persons. The obtained database is used to evaluate Wechsler IQ estimation models starting from the scores obtained in the other tests. Five modelling methods, two statistical and three from machine learning, that belong to the family of artificial neural networks (ANNs) are employed to build the estimator. Several error metrics for estimated IQ and for retardation level classification are defined to compare the performance of the various models with univariate and multivariate analyses. Eight empirical studies show that, after ten-fold cross-validation, best average estimation error is of 3.37 IQ points and mental retardation level classification error of 7.5%. Furthermore our experiments prove the superior performance of ANN methods over statistical regression ones, because in all cases considered ANN models show the lowest estimation error (from 0.12 to 0.9 IQ points) and the lowest classification error (from 2.5% to 10%). Since the estimation performance is better than the confidence interval of

  6. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Academic and/or Professional Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Smith, Kelly M.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of “emotional intelligence” has been extensively popularized in the lay press and corporate world as individuals purport the potential ability of emotional intelligence to predict various markers of success. Emotional intelligence (EI) most commonly incorporates concepts of emotional expression and regulation, self-awareness, and empathy. The concept has been criticized by some for its loose definition and parallels to personality traits. Additionally, several limitations to the instruments used to measure emotional intelligence have been identified. This review examines the foundations of the definitions of emotional intelligence as well as existing educational research involving emotional intelligence, both within the health professions and externally. Recommendations for future research and research potential are discussed. PMID:17136189

  7. Self-Assessing of the Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Intelligence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagiene, Valentina; Juškeviciene, Anita; Carneiro, Roberto; Child, Camilla; Cullen, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Organisational Intelligence (OI) competences self-assessment tools developed and applied by the IGUANA project. In the paper Emotional Intelligence and Organisational Intelligence competences are discussed, their use in action research experiments to assess and…

  8. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umminger, K.

    2008-01-01

    A proper measurement of the relevant single and two-phase flow parameters is the basis for the understanding of many complex thermal-hydraulic processes. Reliable instrumentation is therefore necessary for the interaction between analysis and experiment especially in the field of nuclear safety research where postulated accident scenarios have to be simulated in experimental facilities and predicted by complex computer code systems. The so-called conventional instrumentation for the measurement of e. g. pressures, temperatures, pressure differences and single phase flow velocities is still a solid basis for the investigation and interpretation of many phenomena and especially for the understanding of the overall system behavior. Measurement data from such instrumentation still serves in many cases as a database for thermal-hydraulic system codes. However some special instrumentation such as online concentration measurement for boric acid in the water phase or for non-condensibles in steam atmosphere as well as flow visualization techniques were further developed and successfully applied during the recent years. Concerning the modeling needs for advanced thermal-hydraulic codes, significant advances have been accomplished in the last few years in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow by the application of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. This paper will give insight into the current state of instrumentation technology for safety-related thermohydraulic experiments. Advantages and limitations of some measurement processes and systems will be indicated as well as trends and possibilities for further development. Aspects of instrumentation in operating reactors will also be mentioned.

  9. Instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehrer, W.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper mediates a basic knowledge of the most commonly used experimental techniques. We discuss the principles and concepts necessary to understand what one is doing if one performs an experiment on a certain instrument. (author) 29 figs., 1 tab., refs

  10. Emotional skills and competence questionnaire (ESCQ as a self-report measure of emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Takšić

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies of emotional intelligence (EI initially appeared in academic journals in the early 1990s. The majority of studies on emotional intelligence have relied on self-ratings. In spite of the critics of self-report scales, there are a large number of self-report measures of EI present in recent literature. The main aim of this paper is to present the constructing procedure, together with the basic psychometric properties of Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire (ESCQ as a self-report measure of EI. Originally, this measure was developed in Croatian settings, using the theoretical framework from the Mayer-Salovey emotional intelligence model. The ESCQ instrument has been translated into several languages. The results have showed that ESCQ has three subscales with decent reliability. They share some amount of common variance with similar well-established constructs such as alexithymia, social skills, and personality traits, but they are not correlated with cognitive abilities. However, due to its sufficient reliability, a great deal of unique variance remains. This unique variance of the ESCQ scales has an incremental contribution in explaining life satisfaction and empathy (as the crucial criteria for EI, and has significant relations with relevant real-life criteria such as quality of leadership, health risk behaviors, and school achievement.

  11. Trait Emotional Intelligence of Greek Special Education Teachers in Relation to Burnout and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platsidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates perceived emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to burnout syndrome and job satisfaction in primary special education teachers from Greece. EI was measured by the EIS developed by Schutte et al. (1998). Factor analysis revealed that four factors can be identified in the EIS. Results showed that Greek teachers reported…

  12. Emotional intelligence and criminal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megreya, Ahmed M

    2015-01-01

    A large body of research links criminality to cognitive intelligence and personality traits. This study examined the link between emotional intelligence (EI) and criminal behavior. One hundred Egyptian adult male offenders who have been sentenced for theft, drug dealing or murder and 100 nonoffenders were administered the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i). The offenders had lower levels of EI than the nonoffenders. In addition, EI varied as a function of the types of offenses. Namely, it decreased in magnitude with crime severity (lowest for murder, higher for drug dealing, and highest for theft). These results converged with the direct/ indirect aggression theory suggesting that indirect aggression requires more social intelligence than physical aggression. Forensic intervention programs should therefore include EI training, especially when violence is involved. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reviews the parameters which are important to positron-imaging instruments. It summarizes the options which various groups have explored in designing tomographs and the methods which have been developed to overcome some of the limitations inherent in the technique as well as in present instruments. The chapter is not presented as a defense of positron imaging versus single-photon or other imaging modality, neither does it contain a description of various existing instruments, but rather stresses their common properties and problems. Design parameters which are considered are resolution, sampling requirements, sensitivity, methods of eliminating scattered radiation, random coincidences and attenuation. The implementation of these parameters is considered, with special reference to sampling, choice of detector material, detector ring diameter and shielding and variations in point spread function. Quantitation problems discussed are normalization, and attenuation and random corrections. Present developments mentioned are noise reduction through time-of-flight-assisted tomography and signal to noise improvements through high intrinsic resolution. Extensive bibliography. (U.K.)

  14. A study of emotional intelligence and perceived parenting styles among adolescents in a rural area in Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neethu George

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Adolescence is the time which is crucial for the overall development of a person both mentally and physically. In this period, along with academic intelligence, emotional intelligence (EI also plays an equal or strong role in student life. Aims: This study was to assess EI, parental bonding, and their association among adolescents in high schools under Sarjapur PHC area. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among high school students under Sarjapur PHC area. The EI was assessed using EI scale which measured self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. The parental bonding instrument was utilized to determine the parental styles of both the parents and was interpreted in terms of care and protection as neglectful parenting, affectionless control, optimal parenting, and affectionate control. Results: A total of 300 adolescents were interviewed. It was seen that most of them had low EI in self-awareness, i.e., 92 (30.7%, motivation 99 (33%, and social skills 101 (33.7%. It was also observed that most of them had high EI in self-regulation, i.e., 98 (32.7% and moderately high EI in empathy 117 (39%. The study group perceived that 147 (49% of the fathers and 109 (36.3% of the mothers had affectionless control. Conclusion: Along with poor parenting, most of the respondents also have low EI in self-awareness, motivation, and social skills which has to be addressed for the future of the country.

  15. Beyond fluid intelligence and personality traits in social support: the role of ability based emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, Annamaria Di

    2015-01-01

    Social support represents an important individual resource that has been associated with multiple indices of adaptive functioning and resiliency. Existing research has also identified an association between emotional intelligence (EI) and social support. The present study builds on prior research by investigating the contributions of ability based EI to social support, beyond the effects of fluid intelligence and personality traits. The Advanced Progressive Matrices, the Big Five Questionnaire, the Mayer Salovey Caruso EI test (MSCEIT), and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were administered to 149 Italian high school students. The results showed that ability based EI added significant incremental variance in explaining perceived social support, beyond the variance due to fluid intelligence and personality traits. The results underline the role of ability based EI in relation to perceived social support. Since ability based EI can be increased through specific training, the results of the present study highlight new possibilities for research and intervention in a preventive framework.

  16. Emotional Intelligence: What Does the Research Really Indicate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniss, Cary; Extein, Melissa; Goleman, Daniel; Weissberg, Roger P.

    2006-01-01

    In her critique of emotional intelligence (EI) theory and research, Waterhouse (2006) makes several claims. First, she argues that there are "many conflicting constructs of EI," implying that it cannot be a valid concept given this multiplicity of views. Second, she cites some research and opinion suggesting that "EI has not been differentiated…

  17. Exploring Emotional Intelligence among Master's-Level Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Mullen, Patrick R.; Fox, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between counseling trainees' emotional intelligence (EI), empathy, stress, distress, and demographics. Results indicated that higher levels of EI were associated with lower stress and distress, higher affective and cognitive empathy, and age. These findings suggest curricular integration of EI and potential…

  18. A New Layered Model on Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigas, Athanasios S.

    2018-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) has been an important and controversial topic during the last few decades. Its significance and its correlation with many domains of life has made it the subject of expert study. EI is the rudder for feeling, thinking, learning, problem-solving, and decision-making. In this article, we present an emotional–cognitive based approach to the process of gaining emotional intelligence and thus, we suggest a nine-layer pyramid of emotional intelligence and the gradual development to reach the top of EI. PMID:29724021

  19. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-04-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing.

  20. CONTRIBUTION OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN OUR EDUCATION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    K.Vijayalakshmi

    2017-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) also known as Emotional Quotient (EQ) is one of the hot topics among Teachers and learners. Emotional Intelligence (EI) has had a huge impact on management since Daniel Goleman (1995) published his book popular book on EI for a wider audience. From fairly humble beginnings. EI has come into its own as one of the most popular psychological concepts of the last decade. EI has been used by some as an umbrella term that comprises elements such as ‘soft skills’, ‘people...

  1. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers

  2. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  3. Erapooletuid ei olnud / Reet Roos

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roos, Reet, 1973-

    2006-01-01

    Menetlusest langes välja eelnõu, mille mõte oli, et riik tagaks elatise lapsele, kelle ühelt vanemalt on elatis kohtulikult välja mõistetud, kuid kes seda ise maksta ei taha või ei saa. Sama ka Koit 23. mai 2006, lk. 6 ; Valgamaalane 23. mai 2006, lk. 2 ; Järva Teataja 23. mai 2006, lk. 2 ; Elva Postipoiss 20. mai 2006, lk. 2 ; Vooremaa 16. mai 2006, lk. 2 ; Vali Uudised 17. mai 2006, lk. 2 ; Nädaline 16. mai 2006, lk. 2

  4. The Development, Testing, and Evaluation of an Emotional Intelligence Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald G.; Fischer, Jerome M.

    2003-01-01

    Adult students using an emotional intelligence (EI) curriculum (n=13) and 15 controls in a composition class completed the Emotional Intelligence Test and Emotional Content Quality Index. Significant pre- to posttest changes in the EI group suggest the curriculum positively increased their ability to identify, reflect on, process, and manage…

  5. Emotional Intelligence and Cognitive Moral Development in Undergraduate Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines relationships between emotional intelligence (EI) and cognitive moral development (CMD) in undergraduate business students. The ability model of emotional intelligence was used in this study, which evaluated possible relationships between EI and CMD in a sample of 82 undergraduate business students. The sample population was…

  6. President ei pruugi uuesti kandideerida

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Proua Ingrid Rüütel viitas Kanal 2 uudistesaates "Reporter" võimalusele, et Arnold Rüütel enam uueks ametiajaks ei kandideeri. Ilmunud ka Eesti Päevaleht, 2006/Mar/1, lk. 5 ; Koit, 2006/Mar/2, lk. 2

  7. Emotional intelligence, personality and sales performance

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöberg, Lennart; Littorin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    In this study, salespersons in a telecommunications company were tested for emotional intelligence (EI), additional dimensions of work motivation and personality, and work performance. It was found that EI was related as expected to other variables, most noticeably to life/work balance (positively), to positive affective tone (positively), and to materialistic values and money obsession (negatively). EI was most clearly related to citizenship behavior and less to core task performance, as exp...

  8. Measurement of ability emotional intelligence: results for two new tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Elizabeth J

    2010-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has attracted considerable interest amongst both individual differences researchers and those in other areas of psychology who are interested in how EI relates to criteria such as well-being and career success. Both trait (self-report) and ability EI measures have been developed; the focus of this paper is on ability EI. The associations of two new ability EI tests with psychometric intelligence, emotion perception, and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso EI test (MSCEIT) were examined. The new EI tests were the Situational Test of Emotion Management (STEM) and the Situational Test of Emotional Understanding (STEU). Only the STEU and the MSCEIT Understanding Emotions branch were significantly correlated with psychometric intelligence, suggesting that only understanding emotions can be regarded as a candidate new intelligence component. These understanding emotions tests were also positively correlated with emotion perception tests, and STEM and STEU scores were positively correlated with MSCEIT total score and most branch scores. Neither the STEM nor the STEU were significantly correlated with trait EI tests, confirming the distinctness of trait and ability EI. Taking the present results as a starting-point, approaches to the development of new ability EI tests and models of EI are suggested.

  9. EL : Iiri "ei" Lissaboni lepingut ei surmanud / Kaivo Kopli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kopli, Kaivo

    2008-01-01

    Iirlased hääletasid Lissaboni lepingu vastu. EL-i välisministrite nõupidamisel Luksemburgis ütles Iiri välisminister, et rahva tahet tuleb austada. Enamik EL-i riike soovib, et lepingu ratifitseeriksid ka need riigid, kes pole veel seda teinud, Tšehhi asepeaministri Alexander Vondra on seisukohal, et riikidele ei tohi survet avaldada. Vt. samas: Pariis süüdistab juba Brüsselit

  10. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists), whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists). The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688), implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI) may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people’s implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training. PMID:26052309

  11. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSARIO eCABELLO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists, whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists. The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688, implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT. Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people’s implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training.

  12. Muutuv kommunikatsioon kultuuri ei ohusta / Annika Poldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Poldre, Annika

    2011-01-01

    Tallinna Konverentside poolt Sokos Hotel Virus 28. aprillil 2011 korraldatud kommunikatsiooni aastakonverentsist "Muutuv kommunikatsioon: vana ei taha ja uut ei oska. Kuidas edasi?", kus esinesid Ahto Lobjakas, Priit Põiklik, Piia Tamm ja Marju Lauristin

  13. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Petrides, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if the linkages between trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) and the Five-Factor Model of personality were invariant between men and women. Five English-speaking samples (N = 307-685) of mostly undergraduate students each completed a different measure of the Big Five personality traits and either the full form or short form of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue). Across samples, models predicting global TEIQue scores from the Big Five were invariant between genders, with Neuroticism and Extraversion being the strongest trait EI correlates, followed by Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Openness. However, there was some evidence indicating that the gender-specific contributions of the Big Five to trait EI vary depending on the personality measure used, being more consistent for women. Discussion focuses on the validity of the TEIQue as a measure of trait EI and its psychometric properties, more generally. PMID:25866439

  14. The Three Models of Emotional Intelligence and Performance in a Hot and Cool go/no-go Task in Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María J.; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand and regulate emotions, appears to be helpful in the performance of “hot” (i.e., emotionally laden) cognitive tasks when using performance-based ability models, but not when using self-report EI models. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between EI (as measured through a performance-based ability test, a self-report mixed test and a self-report ability test) and cognitive control ability during the performance of hot and “cool” (i.e., non-emotionally laden) “go/no-go” tasks. An experimental design was used for this study in which 187 undergraduate students (25% men) with a mean age of 21.93 years (standard deviation [SD] = 3.8) completed the three EI tests of interest (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test [MSCEIT], Trait Meta-Mood Scale [TMMS] and Emotional Quotient Inventory–Short Form [EQi:S]) as well as go/no-go tasks using faces and geometric figures as stimuli. The results provide evidence for negative associations between the “managing” branch of EI measured through the performance-based ability test of EI and the cognitive control index of the hot go/no-go task, although similar evidence was not found when using the cool task. Further, the present study failed to observe consistent results when using the self-report EI instruments. These findings are discussed in terms of both the validity and implications of the various EI models. PMID:28275343

  15. Emotional intelligence in non-psychotic first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacete, Auria; Bosque, Clara; Custal, Nuria; Crespo, José M; Gilabert, Ester; Albiach, Angela; Menchón, José M; Contreras, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Subtle social cognitive deficits in unaffected relatives of schizophrenia patients have received increasing attention over the last few years, supporting their potential endophenotypic role for this disorder. The current study assessed non-psychotic first-degree relatives' performance on a multidimensional measure of emotional intelligence (EI): the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test 2.0 (MSCEIT). Endorsed by the National Institute of Mental Health, the MSCEIT is a valid and reliable instrument for detecting emotion-processing deficits among schizophrenia patients and people high in schizotypy. Thirty-seven first-degree relatives, 37 schizophrenia outpatients and 37 healthy controls completed the MSCEIT, which comprises eight subscales aimed to assess the four branches of EI: Identifying, Facilitating, Understanding and Managing Emotions. Potential associations with cognitive function and schizotypy levels, measured with the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief, were further evaluated. Relatives had significantly lower MSCEIT total scores than controls and also significantly lower scores on the Identifying emotions branch. Nevertheless, schizophrenia patients still had the poorest global EI performance. The strongest positive correlations were found in relatives and controls with measures of executive function, processing speed and general intelligence. A higher level of schizotypy correlated significantly with lower MSCEIT scores among controls, but not among relatives. Contrary to expectations in the general population, the current study observed subtle EI impairment in non-psychotic first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients. These findings support the hypothesis that these EI deficiencies may be potential endophenotypes located between the clinical phenotype and the genetic predisposition for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Wireless Transmission Intelligent Instrument Design and Development of the FSC Racing Car%FSC赛车无线通讯智能仪表的设计与开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建国; 甘永超; 王保华

    2014-01-01

    FSC赛车智能仪表是反映赛车技术水平的内容之一。基于无线传输技术,设计了一种无线传输的赛车智能仪表,开发了智能仪表硬件控制器和软件程序,并进行了智能仪表功能调试和性能调试,完成了智能仪表的实车性能测试和功能评价。经过一系列试验和测试,智能仪表工作可靠,达到了设计要求,实现了设计目标。%FSC racing intelligent instrument is a reflection of the technical level of the contents of the car. Based on wireless transmission technology, a kind of intelligent instrument of the racing car has been designed. Its hardware controller and software program have been developed. Further the function and performance testing of the intelligent instrument have been carried out. And the vehicle performance testing and functional evaluation of intelligent instrument have been completed. The result of the experiments and tests shows that the intelligent instrument works reliable and meets the design requirements;the design goal is achieved.

  17. The relationship between emotional intelligence competencies and preferred conflict-handling styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jeanne

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between emotional intelligence (EI) and preferred conflict-handling styles of registered nurses. Conflict cannot be eliminated from the workplace therefore learning appropriate conflict-handling skills is important. Ninety-four registered nurses working in three south Mississippi healthcare facilities participated in this quantitative study. Ninety-two valid sets of data instruments were collected for this study. Higher levels of EI positively correlated with collaborating and negatively with accommodating. The issue of occupational stress and conflict among nurses is a major concern. It is imperative nurses learn how to effectively handle conflict in the work environment. Developing the competencies of EI and understanding how to effectively handle conflict is necessary for nurses working in a highly stressful occupation. Effective leadership management includes conflict management and collaboration. The art of relationship management is necessary when handling other people's emotions. When conflict is approached with high levels of EI, it creates an opportunity for learning effective interpersonal skills. Understanding how EI levels and conflict skills correlate can be used to improve interpersonal relationships in a healthcare facility.

  18. Learning Disabilities and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysberg, Leehu; Kasler, Jon

    2017-07-04

    The literature is conflicted around the subject of the emotional abilities of individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLDs): While many claim cognitive challenges are associated with emotional difficulties, some suggest emotional and interpersonal abilities are not compromised in such disorders and may help individuals compensate and cope effectively with the challenges they meet in learning environments. Two studies explored differences in emotional intelligence (EI) between young adults with and without SLD. Two samples (matched on gender, approximate age, and program of study; n = 100, and unmatched; n = 584) of college students took self-report and performance-based tests of EI (Ability-EI) as well as a measure of self-esteem and demographics associated with college performance (e.g.: SAT scores, gender, etc.). The results showed that while SAT scores and ability emotional intelligence (Ability-EI) were associated with college GPA, Ability-EI did not differ between the two groups, while self-report measures of EI and self-esteem did show differences, with the group with learning disabilities ranking lower. The effects remained stable when we controlled for demographics and potential intervening factors. The results suggest that EI may play a protective role in the association between background variables and college attainment in students with SLD. The results may provide a basis for interventions to empower students with SLD in academia.

  19. Um estudo de caso envolvendo Business Intelligence como instrumento de apoio à controladoria A case study of Business Intelligence as instrument to support controllership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Reginato

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa buscou investigar a contribuição das ferramentas da tecnologia da informação, especificamente as de Business Intelligence (BI, para a área de controladoria exercer sua função de suprir o processo decisório com as informações úteis por ele requeridas. O estudo foi conduzido através de pesquisa de campo, especialmente de um estudo de caso, em que o assunto pôde ser analisado em detalhes. Para tanto, foram aplicadas entrevistas, orientadas por um roteiro construído para esse fim e por um protocolo previamente elaborado para o estudo, bem como foram analisados documentos internos, registros em arquivos e observação direta como fonte de evidências. O período de abrangência da análise dos dados foi de agosto de 2003 a dezembro de 2005, tendo sido possível observar a situação da empresa objeto do estudo antes e depois da implementação das ferramentas de BI. Após a análise das entrevistas, dos indicadores das áreas e de seu impacto no resultado global da empresa, concluiu-se que as referidas ferramentas podem auxiliar a controladoria na função de prover informações confiáveis, úteis e tempestivas ao processo decisório, por meio de sua flexibilização e dinamicidade, proporcionando, como conseqüência, a melhoria dos resultados das áreas organizacionais, bem como da empresa como um todo.This research examined the contribution of tools provided by Information Technology and specifically Business Intelligence (BI, for the controllership area to perform its function of supporting the decision-making process with useful information. The study was carried out through a field research, specifically a case study, in which the subject could be analyzed in detail. Therefore, interviews were held, guided by a structured script and by a previously elaborated form. Internal documents, files and direct observations were also analyzed as sources of evidence. The period covered by data analysis was from August 2003

  20. Emotional intelligence is a second-stratum factor of intelligence: evidence from hierarchical and bifactor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Carolyn; Joseph, Dana L; Newman, Daniel A; Roberts, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    This article examines the status of emotional intelligence (EI) within the structure of human cognitive abilities. To evaluate whether EI is a 2nd-stratum factor of intelligence, data were fit to a series of structural models involving 3 indicators each for fluid intelligence, crystallized intelligence, quantitative reasoning, visual processing, and broad retrieval ability, as well as 2 indicators each for emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion management. Unidimensional, multidimensional, hierarchical, and bifactor solutions were estimated in a sample of 688 college and community college students. Results suggest adequate fit for 2 models: (a) an oblique 8-factor model (with 5 traditional cognitive ability factors and 3 EI factors) and (b) a hierarchical solution (with cognitive g at the highest level and EI representing a 2nd-stratum factor that loads onto g at λ = .80). The acceptable relative fit of the hierarchical model confirms the notion that EI is a group factor of cognitive ability, marking the expression of intelligence in the emotion domain. The discussion proposes a possible expansion of Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory to include EI as a 2nd-stratum factor of similar standing to factors such as fluid intelligence and visual processing.

  1. Emotionally intelligent teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Cabello

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the importance of complementing teachers’ training with the learning and development of social and emotional aspects. It is in this way that Emotional Intelligence (EI –understood as a complement of the cognitive development of teachers and students– is to play a role in the educational context. We review Mayer & Salovey’s ability model (1997, some of the programmes of socio-emotional improvement that are also designed for teachers and several activities for the development of teachers’ EI. In addition, we examine the implications for teachers derived from the development of their EI to enhance their capacity to appropriately perceive, understand and manage one’s own emotions and those of others.

  2. An Exploration of Adolescent Emotional Intelligence in Relation to Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrod, Nicholas R.; Scheer, Scott D.

    2005-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) was measured in 200 youth ages 16-19. EI scores were compared to demographic characteristics of the individuals (age, sex, household income, parents' level of education, and location of residence). Findings indicate that EI levels were positively related to females, parents' education, and household income. The study…

  3. Using Emotional Intelligence and Social Support to Predict Job Performance of Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscum, Paul; Haider, Taj; Brown, David; Sharma, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The theory of emotional intelligence (EI) has been developed to evaluate and highlight the importance of emotional health, especially on job performance. Purpose: No study has examined EI's role on the performance of public health educators; therefore, this study examined the role of EI and social support on the performance of health…

  4. Emotional Intelligence: The Contribution to Leadership Skills in Female Catholic Elementary School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewior, Jane M.

    2009-01-01

    Past research was not clear what the relationship was between emotional intelligence (EI) and leadership style for school principals. This researcher examined EI and its contribution to leadership skills of 22 female Catholic elementary school principals. The method included a self-reported questionnaire of leadership style and EI to explore if…

  5. Leading to Learning and Competitive Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Trong Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine whether there is the chain effect from corporate social responsibility (CSR) and emotional intelligence (EI) to organizational learning and competitive intelligence in chemical companies in a Vietnam business setting. Design/methodology/approach: Structural equation modeling (SEM) approach was used to analyze…

  6. Are the Emotionally Intelligent Happier? Associations Between the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQUE) and External Measures of Happiness and Well-Being.

    OpenAIRE

    Raithatha, Sonal

    2009-01-01

    This study used self-report questionnaires to investigate emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to happiness and well-being. Previous research has supported the links between well-being and life satisfaction to EI. This study aimed to look specifically at associations between the full version of the ‘Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire’ (TEIQue) (Petrides, 2009) for trait EI and an external measure of happiness. A student sample (N=187) completed 4 questionnaires online; The TEIQue f...

  7. Jack Deverell : NATO ei kao kuhugi / Jack Deverell ; interv. Margus Kolga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Deverell, Jack

    2005-01-01

    NATO põhjapiirkonna vägede endise juhi arvates võiks NATO olla endiselt peamine sõjalise jõu instrument, olgu tegemis siis NATO või EL-i juhitud sõjalise operatsiooniga, ta ei usu, et NATO ja EL muutuvad sõjaliselt ning poliitiliselt omavahel võistlevateks organisatsioonideks. Riigid peaksid tegutsema koos selliste sõjaliste võimete loomisel, milleks nad üksi suutelised ei ole

  8. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S.; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as "CADS," which stands for "Complete Automation of Distribution System." CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN (Local

  9. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S.; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as “CADS,” which stands for “Complete Automation of Distribution System.” CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN

  10. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Maity, Tanmoy [Department of MME, Indian School of Mines (ISM), Dhanbad 826004 (India)

    2015-12-15

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as “CADS,” which stands for “Complete Automation of Distribution System.” CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN

  11. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup--The hardware, firmware, and software implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D S; Datta, T S; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as "CADS," which stands for "Complete Automation of Distribution System." CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN (Local

  12. OpenEIS. Developer Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutes, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neubauer, Casey C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haack, Jereme N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carpenter, Brandon J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monson, Kyle E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Allwardt, Craig H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sharma, Poorva [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Akyol, Bora A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) is supporting the development of an open-source software tool for analyzing building energy and operational data: OpenEIS (open energy information system). This tool addresses the problems of both owners of building data and developers of tools to analyze this data. Building owners and managers have data but lack the tools to analyze it while tool developers lack data in a common format to ease development of reusable data analysis tools. This document is intended for developers of applications and explains the mechanisms for building analysis applications, accessing data, and displaying data using a visualization from the included library. A brief introduction to the visualizations can be used as a jumping off point for developers familiar with JavaScript to produce their own. Several example applications are included which can be used along with this document to implement algorithms for performing energy data analysis.

  13. Strategies to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes five initiatives to foster emotional intelligence (EI) education throughout institutions of Christian higher education. Goleman (1995) identifies self-awareness, managing emotions, motivation, empathy, and social intelligence as the hallmark skills of emotional intelligence. The importance of mastering these skills and their…

  14. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Siegling, Alexander B.; Furnham, Adrian; Petrides, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if the linkages between trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) and the Five-Factor Model of personality were invariant between men and women. Five English-speaking samples (N = 307-685) of mostly undergraduate students each completed a different measure of the Big Five personality traits and either the full form or short form of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue). Across samples, models predicting global TEIQue scores from the Big Five were invari...

  15. Bateria Multidimensional de Inteligência Infantil: desenvolvimento de instrumento Multidimensional Battery for Children's Intelligence: development of an instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Waltz Schelini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou elaborar um conjunto de testes, denominado "Bateria Multidimensional de Inteligência Infantil" ou BMI, para avaliar capacidades do Modelo Cattell-Horn-Carroll. Entre as capacidades avaliadas estão as de inteligência cristalizada, inteligência fluida, velocidade de processamento cognitivo, memória a curto prazo, armazenamento e recuperação associativa a longo prazo e conhecimento quantitativo. A BMI foi composta por nove testes, apresentados a duas amostras de participantes. A primeira foi formada por 240 crianças, com idade entre sete e 12 anos. Constituída para que novos itens fossem testados, a segunda amostra foi formada por outras 206 crianças. Os resultados demonstraram a influência altamente significativa da idade sobre o desempenho dos testes. Os testes Informação Geral, Indução, Desempenho em Matemática, Vocabulário Geral e Vocabulário Ilus-trado apresentaram elevados coeficientes de precisão. A análise dos índices de dificuldade e do poder discriminativo permitiu a seleção do conjunto mais adequado de questões para compor a configuração final da Bateria.The goal of this study was elaborate a set of tests, "Multidimensional Battery for Children's Intelligence" or "BMI", according to the abilities included in the Cattell-Horn-Carroll's Model. Among these abilities are the ability of crystallized intelligence, fluid intelligence, processing speed, short-term memory, long-term storage and retrieval and quantitative knowledge. The BMI was composed by nine tests, presented to two samples of participants. The first sample comprised 240 children whose age ranged from seven to 12 years old. Constituted for the testing of new items, the second sample comprised another 206 children. The results demonstrated that the age had a high influence on the tests performance. Were found high reliability coefficients for the tests General Information, Induction, Mathematics Achievment, General Vocabulary and

  16. Misconceptions about emotional intelligence: Deploying emotional intelligence in one’s life dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anobé Badenhorst

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence (EI has become a buzz-word over the past ten years, yet misconceptions with regard to the concept abound. This leads to confusion among the general public, the scientific community, as well as to unfounded claims being made as to what the development of EI can accomplish in a person’s life. In this article the aim is to clarify the concept EI by making a sharper demarcation between the Emotional Life Dimension and the other life dimensions. Based on this clarification, the conceptualisation of EI in the literature is reviewed in more depth.

  17. Shortened OR time and decreased patient risk through use of a modular surgical instrument with artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David J; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2009-05-01

    With a limited number of access ports, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) often requires the complete removal of one tool and reinsertion of another. Modular or multifunctional tools can be used to avoid this step. In this study, soft computing techniques are used to optimally arrange a modular tool's functional tips, allowing surgeons to deliver treatment of improved quality in less time, decreasing overall cost. The investigators watched University Medical Center surgeons perform MIS procedures (e.g., cholecystectomy and Nissen fundoplication) and recorded the procedures to digital video. The video was then used to analyze the types of instruments used, the duration of each use, and the function of each instrument. These data were aggregated with fuzzy logic techniques using four membership functions to quantify the overall usefulness of each tool. This allowed subsequent optimization of the arrangement of functional tips within the modular tool to decrease overall time spent changing instruments during simulated surgical procedures based on the video recordings. Based on a prototype and a virtual model of a multifunction laparoscopic tool designed by the investigators that can interchange six different instrument tips through the tool's shaft, the range of tool change times is approximately 11-13 s. Using this figure, estimated time savings for the procedures analyzed ranged from 2.5 to over 32 min, and on average, total surgery time can be reduced by almost 17% by using the multifunction tool.

  18. Emotional intelligence in sport and exercise: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, S; Dosseville, F; Allen, M S

    2016-08-01

    This review targets emotional intelligence (EI) in sport and physical activity. We systematically review the available literature and offer a sound theoretical integration of differing EI perspectives (the tripartite model of EI) before considering applied practice in the form of EI training. Our review identified 36 studies assessing EI in an athletic or physical activity context. EI has most often been conceptualized as a trait. In the context of sport performance, we found that EI relates to emotions, physiological stress responses, successful psychological skill usage, and more successful athletic performance. In the context of physical activity, we found that trait EI relates to physical activity levels and positive attitudes toward physical activity. There was a shortage of research into the EI of coaches, officials, and spectators, non-adult samples, and longitudinal and experimental methods. The tripartite model proposes that EI operates on three levels - knowledge, ability, and trait - and predicts an interplay between the different levels of EI. We present this framework as a promising alternative to trait and ability EI conceptualizations that can guide applied research and professional practice. Further research into EI training, measurement validation and cultural diversity is recommended. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Turkish Prospective Early Childhood Teachers' Emotional Intelligence Level and Its Relationship to Their Parents' Parenting Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaman, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    The current study explored Turkish prospective early childhood teachers' emotional intelligence scores in order to determine whether levels indicated differentiations according to grade level, and parenting style. Participants responded to the Turkish version of the Parenting Style Inventory and Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS). EIS also…

  20. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, B.R.; Gignac, G.; Manocha, R.; Stough, C.

    2005-01-01

    and discussed.There has been some debate recently over the scoring, reliability and factor structure of ability measures of emotional intelligence (EI). This study examined these three psychometric properties with the most recent ability test of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT V2.0; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso,…

  1. Discriminant Validity of Self-Reported Emotional Intelligence: A Multitrait-Multisource Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dana L.; Newman, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    A major stumbling block for emotional intelligence (EI) research has been the lack of adequate evidence for discriminant validity. In a sample of 280 dyads, self- and peer-reports of EI and Big Five personality traits were used to confirm an a priori four-factor model for the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) and a five-factor…

  2. Ameerika ei ole Jaapan / Michael Craig

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Craig, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Kuidas Jaapani ärimees Minoru Isutani 1981. aastal ei arvestnud, et ameeriklased ei osta golfiklubi eluaegset liikmekaarti 750 000 dollari eest, ning kaotas USA kuulsaima Pebble Beachi golfiväljaku. Katkend raamatust "50 parimat ja halvimat tehingut läbi aegade"

  3. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limited to factual corrections and responses to comments, the proponent and EPF may, with the prior..., the EPF must submit the Draft EIS and all of the above documents, with a new cover sheet indicating... more extensive modifications are required, the EPF must prepare a preliminary final EIS incorporating...

  4. A STUDY ON THE LINKAGE BETWEEN EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND JOB PERFORMANCE OF SOFTWARE PROFESSIONALS IN TAMILNADU

    OpenAIRE

    B. Rajkumar

    2018-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI), a recent construct which predicts various performance and leadership traits helps companies to deploy quality work force. Emotional Intelligence (EI) has emerged as a theme of widespread interest in psychological research in recent years. It affects the day-to-day life of everyone. EI is the ability to recognize our own potential as well manages everything as per situation. At work place, emotions are mainly based on two prospectors, namely, sociological and psych...

  5. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael H; Fierke, Kerry K; Sucher, Brandon J; Janke, Kristin K

    2015-05-25

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI experts for structuring and planning EI development. Finally, we make 9 recommendations' to inform the process of including EI in pharmacy curricula.

  6. Manipulative emotional behaviour and delinquency: sex differences and links to emotional intelligence.

    OpenAIRE

    Bacon, AM; Regan, L

    2016-01-01

    Trait emotional intelligence (EI) encompasses high levels of emotional understanding and is generally associated with positive outcomes. However research has suggested that high EI might predispose some young females to delinquency. The present study investigated whether this relationship can be accounted for by a tendency towards emotionally manipulative behaviours, facilitated by high EI. Two hundred and fifty two young adults (125 female) completed measures of EI, Machiavellianism, managin...

  7. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael H.; Fierke, Kerry K.; Sucher, Brandon J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI exper...

  8. Surgical robotics beyond enhanced dexterity instrumentation: a survey of machine learning techniques and their role in intelligent and autonomous surgical actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassahun, Yohannes; Yu, Bingbin; Tibebu, Abraham Temesgen; Stoyanov, Danail; Giannarou, Stamatia; Metzen, Jan Hendrik; Vander Poorten, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    robotics. Current devices possess no intelligence whatsoever and are merely advanced and expensive instruments.

  9. Intelligence in Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Shoumen Palit Austin

    2016-01-01

    The elusive quest for intelligence in artificial intelligence prompts us to consider that instituting human-level intelligence in systems may be (still) in the realm of utopia. In about a quarter century, we have witnessed the winter of AI (1990) being transformed and transported to the zenith of tabloid fodder about AI (2015). The discussion at hand is about the elements that constitute the canonical idea of intelligence. The delivery of intelligence as a pay-per-use-service, popping out of ...

  10. Emotional Intelligence Abilities and Traits in Different Career Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Aikaterini; Zammuner, Vanda L.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Vouzas, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about differences in emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and traits between followers of different career paths. Compared to their social science peers, science students had higher scores in adaptability and general mood traits measured with the Emotion Quotient Inventory, but lower scores in strategic EI abilities…

  11. Creativity, Emotional Intelligence, and School Performance in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansenne, Michel; Legrand, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that both creativity and emotional intelligence (EI) were related to children school performance. In this study, we investigated the incremental validity of EI over creativity in an elementary school setting. Seventy-three children aged from 9 to 12 years old were recruited to participate in the study. Verbal and…

  12. Emotional Intelligence and Social-Emotional Learning: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anamitra; Mermillod, Martial

    2011-01-01

    The term "EI (emotional intelligence)" was first used in 1990 by Salovey and Mayer. EI involves: (1) the ability to perceive accurately, appraise and express emotion; (2) the ability to access and/or generate feelings when they facilitate thought; (3) the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge; and (4) the ability to regulate…

  13. Emotional Intelligence Levels and Counselling Skills of Prospective Psychological Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaci, Hatice; Degerli, Fatma Irem; Bolat, Neslihan

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the correlation between emotional intelligence (EI) and counselling skills of Turkish prospective psychological counsellors and to investigate differences in both EI and counselling skills in terms of sex, previous experience of group studies, and class levels. Within a correlational pattern, the sample of the…

  14. Emotional Intelligence as Educational Goal: A Case for Caution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietti, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Originally conceptualised as a set of capacities for understanding and managing emotions, emotional intelligence (EI) has become associated, mainly due to the work of Daniel Goleman, with life success skills, prosocial attitudes and moral and civic virtues. But EI, which may not in itself be teachable, need not lead to these outcomes, which may…

  15. Assessing Workplace Emotional Intelligence: Development and Validation of an Ability-based Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Sukumarakurup; Hopkins, Kay; Szmerekovsky, Joseph G; Robinson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Existing measures of Emotional Intelligence (EI), defined as the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions for productive purposes, have displayed limitations in predicting workplace outcomes, likely in part because they do not target this context. Such considerations led to the development of an ability EI measure with work-related scenarios in which respondents infer the likely emotions (perception) and combinations of emotion (understanding) that would occur to protagonists while rating the effectiveness of ways of responding (management). Study 1 (n = 290 undergraduates) used item-total correlations to select scenarios from a larger pool and Study 2 (n = 578) reduced the measure-termed the NEAT-to 30 scenarios on the basis of structural equation modeling. Study 3 (n = 96) then showed that the NEAT had expected correlations with personality and cognitive ability and Study 4 (n = 85) demonstrated convergent validity with other ability EI measures. Last, study 5 (n = 91) established that the NEAT had predictive validity with respect to job satisfaction, job stress, and job performance. The findings affirm the importance of EI in the workplace in the context of a valid new instrument for assessing relevant skills.

  16. Training emotional intelligence improves both emotional intelligence and depressive symptoms in inpatients with borderline personality disorder and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangard, Leila; Haghighi, Mohammad; Bajoghli, Hafez; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad; Ghaleiha, Ali; Zarrabian, Mohammad Kazem; Brand, Serge

    2012-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is defined as a pervasive pattern of instability in emotion, mood and interpersonal relationships, with a comorbidity between PBD and depressive disorders (DD). A key competence for successful management of interpersonal relationships is emotional intelligence (EI). Given the low EI of patients suffering from BPD, the present study aimed at investigating the effect on both emotional intelligence and depression of training emotional intelligence in patients with BPD and DD. A total of 30 inpatients with BPD and DD (53% females; mean age 24.20 years) took part in the study. Patients were randomly assigned either to the treatment or to the control group. Pre- and post-testing 4 weeks later involved experts' rating of depressive disorder and self-reported EI. The treatment group received 12 sessions of training in components of emotional intelligence. Relative to the control group, EI increased significantly in the treatment group over time. Depressive symptoms decreased significantly over time in both groups, though improvement was greater in the treatment than the control group. For inpatients suffering from BPD and DD, regular skill training in EI can be successfully implemented and leads to improvements both in EI and depression. Results suggest an additive effect of EI training on both EI and depressive symptoms.

  17. The role of trait and ability emotional intelligence in bulimic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kathryn Jane; Quinton, Stephanie; Qualter, Pamela

    2014-04-01

    Bulimia is characterized by poor affect regulation, yet the role of emotional intelligence (EI) is little understood. This study examined associations between EI and bulimic symptoms using 235 women from community and student populations. They completed measures of trait and ability EI, and the Eating Disorders Diagnostic Scale. Results showed that deficiencies in different aspects of trait EI and/or ability EI are a function of symptom type: binge eating, compensatory behaviours or weight and shape concerns. Consistent with affect regulation models, self-regulatory aspects of trait EI were related to two bulimic symptoms: binge eating and weight and shape concerns. Ability-based self-emotion management was not important, and explanatory power of lower-level EI facets (traits or abilities) was not superior to more broadly defined EI factors. Results support the conclusion that trait and ability EI may maintain subclinical levels of bulimic symptoms but have different paths. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Implications of State Dental Board Disciplinary Actions for Teaching Dental Students About Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Lyle Kris

    2016-01-01

    The primary emphasis in dental education is on developing students' cognitive intelligence (thinking) and technical intelligence (doing), while emotional intelligence (being) receives less emphasis. The aim of this study was to explore a potential consequence of the paucity of emotional intelligence education by determining the level of emotional intelligence-related (EI-R) infractions in state dental board disciplinary actions and characterizing the types of those infractions. For this study, 1,100 disciplinary action reports from 21 state dental boards were reviewed, and disciplinary infractions were classified as cognitive intelligence-related (CI-R) infractions, technical intelligence-related (TI-R) infractions, and EI-R infractions. EI-R infractions were then subcategorized into emotional intelligence clusters and competencies using the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI). The results showed that 56.6% of the infractions were EI-R. When the EI-R infractions were subcategorized, the four competencies most frequently violated involved transparency, teamwork and collaboration, organizational awareness, and accurate self-assessment. Understanding the frequency and nature of EI-R infractions may promote awareness of the need for increased attention to principles of emotional intelligence in dental education and may encourage integration of those principles across dental curricula to help students understand the impact of emotional intelligence on their future well-being and livelihood.

  19. Emotional Intelligence and its Relation to Job Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Dua Dauti-Kadriu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Until three decades ago the importance of Emotional Intelligence, now on referred as EI, was not very well known. Existing as a concept EI was not unanimously defined, not in its merited place in science and not well known in society opinion. The concept of EI for the first time arose in 1990 by Peter Salovey and John Mayer. It evolved later and achieved its peak with the work of Daniel Goldman in 1995, where his book on EI named: “EI, why it Matters” sold millions of copies. Nowadays after many researches done in EI field, EI with its main components has been rightly acknowledged as an engine of a human body toward achieving one’s self-satisfaction and success. However this still has not happened in Kosova. This is one of the first articles written in Kosova about EI, the new concept of Intelligence. The paper will try to give the contribution on the field of bringing EI in its merited place in Kosova society, and so will positively affect the investment of individuals into their EI, being one of the main factors that bring you towards success and overall wellbeing.

  20. Emotional Intelligence and Graduates - Employers' Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, Ailish; Carthy, Aiden; McGuinness, Colm; McSweeney, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that employers favour graduates who possess higher levels of emotional intelligence. Many initiatives to increase students’ levels of EI have involved ‘whole school’ approaches, whereby generic EI skills programmes are delivered to all students in a third level institute. This paper details an initial survey of employers’ (n = 500) opinions on the importance and current level of graduates’ social and emotional competencies. The survey was completed across fi...

  1. Kui õppimine ei edene / Tiia Lister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lister, Tiia

    2006-01-01

    Soome Instituudis toimus 27. veebruaril õppepäev "Kui õppimine ei edene", et tutvustada, kuidas Soomes on nii riiklikul kui ka koolisisesel tasandil liigutud õpilasele kõige sobivama ja kasulikuma abistamisvormi otsingul

  2. Predictive and construct validity of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence with the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, For-Wey; Chen, Po-Fei; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the concurrent validity of the parent-report Taiwan Birth Cohort Study Developmental Instrument (TBCS-DI) with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Second Edition (BSID-II) and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised (WPPSI-R) at 6, 18, 36, and 60 months. 100 children were recruited at 6 months, 88 children followed-up at 18 months, 71 at 36 months, and 53 at 60 months. Longitudinally, the parent-report TBCS-DI, with the professional psychological assessments of the BSID-II and the WPPSI-R showed predictive validity. Looking at each time point in cross section, at 6 and 18 months the TBCS-DI had good concurrent validity with the BSID-II, and at 36 and 60 months the TBCS-DI was correlated only with the motor and performance domains of the BSID-II and WPPSI-R. With further investigation, the TBCS-DI may be used both in research and in clinical settings.

  3. Borderline personality disorder and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Mathell; Schuurmans, Hanneke; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M; Smeets, Guus; Verkoeijen, Peter; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigated emotional intelligence (EI) in borderline personality disorder (BPD). It was hypothesized that patients with BPD (n = 61) compared with patients with other personality disorders (PDs; n = 69) and nonpatients (n = 248) would show higher scores on the ability to perceive emotions and impairments in the ability to regulate emotions. EI was assessed with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso [New York: MHS, 2002]). As compared with the PD group and the nonpatient group, the patients with BPD displayed the anticipated deficits in their ability to understand, whereas no differences emerged with respect to their ability to perceive, use, and regulate emotions. In addition, a negative relationship was found between the severity of BPD and total EI score. However, this relationship disappeared when intelligence quotient was partialled out. These results suggest that BPD is associated with emotion understanding deficits, whereas temporary severity of BPD is associated with emotion regulation deficits.

  4. Do emergency nurses have enough emotional intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codier, Estelle; Codier, David

    2015-06-01

    A significant body of research suggests there is a correlation between measured emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and performance in nursing. The four critical elements of EI, namely the abilities to identify emotions correctly in self and others, using emotions to support reasoning, understanding emotions and managing emotions, apply to emergency care settings and are important for safe patient care, teamwork, retention and burnout prevention. This article describes 'emotional labour' and the importance of EI abilities for emergency nurses, and suggests that such abilities should be considered core competencies for the profession.

  5. Artificial Intelligence and Moral intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the thesis that the implementation of a moral code in the behaviour of artificial intelligent systems needs a specific form of human and artificial intelligence, not just an abstract intelligence. We present intelligence as a system with an internal structure and the structural levels of the moral system, as well as certain characteristics of artificial intelligent agents which can/must be treated as 1- individual entities (with a complex, specialized, autonomous or selfdetermined, even unpredictable conduct, 2- entities endowed with diverse or even multiple intelligence forms, like moral intelligence, 3- open and, even, free-conduct performing systems (with specific, flexible and heuristic mechanisms and procedures of decision, 4 – systems which are open to education, not just to instruction, 5- entities with “lifegraphy”, not just “stategraphy”, 6- equipped not just with automatisms but with beliefs (cognitive and affective complexes, 7- capable even of reflection (“moral life” is a form of spiritual, not just of conscious activity, 8 – elements/members of some real (corporal or virtual community, 9 – cultural beings: free conduct gives cultural value to the action of a ”natural” or artificial being. Implementation of such characteristics does not necessarily suppose efforts to design, construct and educate machines like human beings. The human moral code is irremediably imperfect: it is a morality of preference, of accountability (not of responsibility and a morality of non-liberty, which cannot be remedied by the invention of ethical systems, by the circulation of ideal values and by ethical (even computing education. But such an imperfect morality needs perfect instruments for its implementation: applications of special logic fields; efficient psychological (theoretical and technical attainments to endow the machine not just with intelligence, but with conscience and even spirit; comprehensive technical

  6. Is the Emotional Intelligence of Secondary School Principals Correlated with the Job Satisfaction or Performance of Their Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the association between secondary school administrators' emotional intelligence (EI) and teacher job satisfaction. Two separate questions guided the study. First, does the emotional intelligence of secondary school administrators relate to teacher job satisfaction and secondly, is there a relationship between EI of…

  7. Teachers’ emotional intelligence: The impact of training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Dolev

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies have suggested that teachers' personal competencies, and more specifically Emotional Intelligence (EI, are particularly important for teacher effectiveness. Recently, there has also been a growing recognition of the importance of social-emotional competencies to students' learning and academic achievement. However, there has been a neglect of emotions in the field of teaching, and little is known about the impact of training aimed at developing teachers' EI on their EI levels and their practice. The current study investigates the impact of a teacher- centered EI training on teachers' EI in Israel. The study followed a two-year EI training in one school, employing group workshops and personal coaching. The study used a mixed methodology, making use of pre-post EQ-i assessment and semi-structured interviews. The findings illustrate that the training programme was perceived by the participants to have enhanced their EI competencies, as defined by the Bar-On model. Most participants integrated these competencies into their personal, professional and group identities and modified their EI-related behaviours.

  8. Emotional intelligence as a crucial component to medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Debbi R

    2015-12-06

    The primary focus of this review was to discover what is already known about Emotional Intelligence (EI) and the role it plays within social relationships, as well as its importance in the fields of health care and health care education. This article analyzes the importance of EI in the field of health care and recommends various ways that this important skill can be built into medical programs. Information was gathered using various database searches including EBSCOHOST, Academic Search Premier and ERIC. The search was conducted in English language journals from the last ten years. Descriptors include: Emotional Intelligence, medical students and communication skills, graduate medical education, Emotional Intelligence and graduate medical education, Emotional Intelligence training programs, program evaluation and development. Results of the study show a direct correlation between medical education and emotional intelligence competencies, which makes the field of medical education an ideal one in which to integrate further EI training. The definition of EI as an ability-based skill allows for training in specific competencies that can be directly applied to a specialized field. When EI is conceptualized as an ability that can be taught, learned, and changed, it may be used to address the specific aspects of the clinician-patient relationship that are not working well. For this reason, teaching EI should be a priority in the field of medical education in order to better facilitate this relationship in the future.

  9. Relationship between general intelligence, emotional intelligence, stress levels and stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Sharma, Ratna

    2012-07-01

    Stressful life events and daily life stresses have both deleterious and cumulative effects on human body. In several studies, stress has been shown to affect various parameter of higher mental function like attention, concentration, learning and memory. Present study was designed to explore the relationship among GI level, EI level, psychological stress levels and acute stress reactivity in young normal healthy subjects. The study was conducted on thirty four healthy male student volunteers to study a) acute stress reactivity in subjects with varying levels of General Intelligence (GI) and Emotional Intelligence (EI) and b) correlation between GI, EI, acute stress and perceived stress. Baseline GI and EI and acute stress and perceived stress scores were measured by standard assessment scales. Using median value of GI and EI scores as cutoff values, subjects were categorized into four groups. Among different GI-EI groups, acute stress reactivity was similar but salivary Cortisol (especially post stressor level) and perceived stress level was a differentiating factor. High level of EI was associated inversely with acute and chronic perceived stress level. Significant correlation was found between acute and chronic perceived stress levels. Level of general intelligence showed no relation to acute or chronic stress levels as well as acute stress reactivity. The differences in various groups of GI and EI had no effect on the baseline and post stress performance on Sternberg memory test and all the three conditions of Stroop test. In conclusion emotional intelligence as an attribute is better suited to handle day to day acute stress and chronic perceived stress.

  10. 'Emotional Intelligence': Lessons from Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeveen, J; Salvi, C; Grafman, J

    2016-10-01

    'Emotional intelligence' (EI) is one of the most highly used psychological terms in popular nomenclature, yet its construct, divergent, and predictive validities are contentiously debated. Despite this debate, the EI construct is composed of a set of emotional abilities - recognizing emotional states in the self and others, using emotions to guide thought and behavior, understanding how emotions shape behavior, and emotion regulation - that undoubtedly influence important social and personal outcomes. In this review, evidence from human lesion studies is reviewed in order to provide insight into the necessary brain regions for each of these core emotional abilities. Critically, we consider how this neuropsychological evidence might help to guide efforts to define and measure EI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Emotional intelligence in nurse management and nurse job satisfaction and retention: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jacqueline; Harris, Janet

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this review is to map what is known about emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to staff job satisfaction and retention in nursing, and the tools that are used to measure EI in this context. The primary question of this review is: What is known about nurse managers' EI as it relates to staff job satisfaction and retention in nursing?Sub-question 1: What tools are being used to measure nurse managers' EI and what theoretical frameworks are they based on?Sub-question 2: What gaps exist in the research related to nurse managers' EI as it relates to staff job satisfaction and retention in nursing?

  12. Emotional Intelligence predicts individual differences in social exchange reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Deidre L; Brackett, Marc A; Shamosh, Noah A; Kiehl, Kent A; Salovey, Peter; Gray, Jeremy R

    2007-04-15

    When assessed with performance measures, Emotional Intelligence (EI) correlates positively with the quality of social relationships. However, the bases of such correlations are not understood in terms of cognitive and neural information processing mechanisms. We investigated whether a performance measure of EI is related to reasoning about social situations (specifically social exchange reasoning) using versions of the Wason Card Selection Task. In an fMRI study (N=16), higher EI predicted hemodynamic responses during social reasoning in the left frontal polar and left anterior temporal brain regions, even when controlling for responses on a very closely matched task (precautionary reasoning). In a larger behavioral study (N=48), higher EI predicted faster social exchange reasoning, after controlling for precautionary reasoning. The results are the first to directly suggest that EI is mediated in part by mechanisms supporting social reasoning and validate a new approach to investigating EI in terms of more basic information processing mechanisms.

  13. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  14. Different aspects of emotional intelligence of borderline personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, Mathell; Arntz, Arnoud R; Klimstra, T.A.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The present study investigated deficiencies in different components of emotional intelligence in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Method: The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) were used to assess EI dimensions. BPD

  15. How Emotionally Intelligent Are Pre-Service Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Roisin P.; Tormey, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Although there is evidence that teacher emotional intelligence is important for pupil adjustment and learning and for teachers in managing the emotional demands of their work, little is known about the levels of emotional skill of teachers and beginning teachers. Using Mayer and Salovey's emotional intelligence (EI) model and the MSCEIT test of…

  16. Emotional Intelligence Profiles and Learning Strategies in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglés, Cándido J.; Martínez-Monteagudo, María C.; Pérez Fuentes, Maria C.; García-Fernández, José M.; Molero, María del Mar; Suriá-Martinez, Raquel; Gázquez, José J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship among emotional intelligence (EI) and learning strategies, identifying different emotional intelligence profiles and determining possible statistically significant differences in learning strategies through the identified profiles. Thousand and seventy-one Spaniards secondary school students…

  17. Emotional Intelligence Tests: Potential Impacts on the Hiring Process for Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Shane; Wegener, Matt; Bay, Darlene; Cook, Gail Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Emotional intelligence is increasingly recognized as being important for professional career success. Skills related to emotional intelligence (e.g. organizational commitment, public speaking, teamwork, and leadership) are considered essential. Human resource professionals have begun including tests of emotional intelligence (EI) in job applicant…

  18. "Kurgibakter" ei tulnudki importkurgiga? / Kaivo Kopli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kopli, Kaivo

    2011-01-01

    Nakkuspuhang Saksamaal ei pruugi olla põhjustatud Hispaaniast toodud kurkidest. Mitmed riigid on peatanud kurkide ja mõnede muude köögiviljade impordi Hispaaniast, Hispaania tahab nõuda Euroopa Komijonilt kompensatsiooni müümata jäänud köögiviljade eest

  19. Hispaania ei usu ETA rahupakkumisse / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Baski terrorirühmitus kutsus uut peaministrit Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapaterot dialoogile, hiljuti valimised võitnud Sotsialistlik Töölispartei teatas vastuseks, et ETA on terroristlik rühmitus ja selle avaldustele tähelepanu ei osutata. Vt. samas: Vaherahule järgnes terrorilaine

  20. Euroopa põllumehed ei taha muutusi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Euroopa põllumajandusühistuid koondava ühenduse COGECA ja Euroopa põllumeeste suurima esindusorganisatsiooni COPA seisukoht on, et praegu ei ole õige aeg võtta Euroopa põllumehelt tootmiseks ette nähtud toetust ning suunata see ümber maaelu arenguks

  1. Challenges and Possibilities of EIS on PEMEC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsøe, Katrine; Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær; Hjelm, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been proven a very strong electrochemical characterization tool in electrochemical research in general and in the areas of fuel cell and battery research in particular. However, this is not the case for polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cells...

  2. Ekskantslerit ei kollita huvide konflikt / Nils Niitra

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Niitra, Nils, 1975-

    2010-01-01

    Kaitseministeeriumi vastuse kohaselt vaatasid sealsed audiitorid üle teadus-arendustegevususe uurimistoetuste maksmise ja seni sõlmitud lepingud ning selgus, et kahtlustused, nagu oleks kaitseministeeriumi endine kantsler Lauri Almann oma eraäri juba kantslerina ette valmistanud, ei vasta tõele. Autor vabandab Lauri Almanni ees

  3. Kes ei maga, see vaatab / Jaanus Kulli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kulli, Jaanus, 1955-

    2004-01-01

    Peale mängufilmi "Täna öösel me ei maga" esilinastust Coca-Cola Plazas : režissöör Ilmar Taska : produtsent ning üks stsenariste Kristian Taska. Lisaks vastavad Signe Kivi ja Urmas Paet küsimusele "Millised on teie esmamuljed filmist?"

  4. Tallinna Ülikool ei kiida riiki

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Tallinna Ülikool teatas läbi kõneisiku, et juhtkonna otsusel ei laulda tänasel avaaktusel, kus osalevad keskerakondlased, üliõpilashümni "Gaudeamus" neljandat salmi - "Elagu vabariik ja need, kes teda juhivad"

  5. E-I 90. Proceedings. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The developments and technology trends taking place in the power industry in South Africa were examined at the E-I 90 conference. Some of the developments in local nuclear power technology were also discussed. Separate abstracts were prepared for five of the papers presented at the conference. The remaining papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS

  6. Madal palk ei ole konkurentsieelis / Kristo Kiviorg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiviorg, Kristo

    2007-01-01

    Seminaril "Peidetud väärtus: kuidas ettevõtted saavutavad tavaliste inimeste abiga erakordseid tulemusi" ettekannetega esinenud Stanfordi Ülikooli professor Jeffrey Pfeffer ning inimressursside juhtimise konsultant David Russo tõdesid, et madal palk ei taga firmadele konkurentsieelist, kuigi paljud juhid nõnda arvavad

  7. Vale, mis ei taha surra / Urmas Kiil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiil, Urmas

    2005-01-01

    Juuditar Hadassa Ben-Itto raamatu "Vale, mis ei taha surra" (The Lie That Wouldn't Die: the Protocols of the Elders of Zion) sünniloost. Autor, kes oli Iisraelis kõrge kohtunik, loobus oma karjäärist, et tuua avalikkuse ette tõde XX sajandil palju surma külvanud plagiaadist "Siioni tarkade protokollid"

  8. Developing the Emotional Intelligence of Undergraduate Music Education Majors: An Exploratory Study Using Bradberry and Greaves' (2009) "Emotional Intelligence 2.0"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Emily J.

    2018-01-01

    Research focused on the relationship of emotional intelligence (EI) to academic and professional success in education, and whether and how it might be taught and learned, is inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which undergraduate music education majors experienced a change in EI after implementing strategies from…

  9. Borderline personality disorder and emotional intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, M.; Schuurmans, H.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.; Smeets, G.; Verkoeijen, P.; Arntz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated emotional intelligence (EI) in borderline personality disorder (BPD). It was hypothesized that patients with BPD (n = 61) compared with patients with other personality disorders (PDs; n = 69) and nonpatients (n = 248) would show higher scores on the ability to perceive

  10. A Systematic Review of Physician Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Laura Janine; Stoller, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review evaluates the current understanding of emotional intelligence (EI) and physician leadership, exploring key themes and areas for future research. Literature Search We searched the literature using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Business Source Complete for articles published between 1990 and 2012. Search terms included physician and leadership, emotional intelligence, organizational behavior, and organizational development. All abstracts were reviewed. Full articles were evaluated if they addressed the connection between EI and physician leadership. Articles were included if they focused on physicians or physicians-in-training and discussed interventions or recommendations. Appraisal and Synthesis We assessed articles for conceptual rigor, study design, and measurement quality. A thematic analysis categorized the main themes and findings of the articles. Results The search produced 3713 abstracts, of which 437 full articles were read and 144 were included in this review. Three themes were identified: (1) EI is broadly endorsed as a leadership development strategy across providers and settings; (2) models of EI and leadership development practices vary widely; and (3) EI is considered relevant throughout medical education and practice. Limitations of the literature were that most reports were expert opinion or observational and studies used several different tools for measuring EI. Conclusions EI is widely endorsed as a component of curricula for developing physician leaders. Research comparing practice models and measurement tools will critically advance understanding about how to develop and nurture EI to enhance leadership skills in physicians throughout their careers. PMID:24701306

  11. Emotional intelligence, trauma severity, and emotional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Min C; Chen, Yung Y

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated Emotional Intelligence (EI) as a moderator for the association between emotional expression and adaptive trauma processing, as measured by depressive symptoms. Using Pennebaker's written emotional expression paradigm, 105 participants were assigned to either a conventional trauma-writing or religious trauma-writing condition. Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and again at one-month post writing. No significant association between EI and religiousness was found at baseline. Results indicated a three-way interaction among EI, trauma severity, and writing condition on depressive symptoms at follow-up. For the religious trauma-writing condition only, there was a significant difference between high- versus low-EI participants who experienced more severe trauma in depressive symptoms at follow-up, such that low-EI participants registered less depressive symptoms than high-EI participants; while there was no significant difference between low versus high EI for participants with less severe trauma. These findings encourage further investigation of the conditions under which religion may be a beneficial factor in trauma adaptation.

  12. Kohtunik, ma ei saa teist aru! / Marko Mägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mägi, Marko

    2007-01-01

    Kohtuasjast USAs Arizonas kolme inimsmugeldamises kahtlustatava Mehhiko mehe üle, kelle suhtes ei saa kohtuotsust langetada, kuna ei suudeta tuvastada keelt, mida kohtualused on võimelised mõistma süüdistusest aru saamiseks

  13. Emotional intelligence and learning & teaching in higher education : implications for bioscience education

    OpenAIRE

    Armour, William

    2012-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) was popularised in 1990s by Daniel Goleman’s bestselling book of the same name (Goleman 1996). EI has been criticised by scholars in the psychological community for lack of a clear definition or empirical evidence that it is anything more than a combination of already known cognitive and personality factors. Despite this controversy, there are many proponents of EI in higher education who highlight the folly of trying to separate the cognitive from the emotional. T...

  14. The relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction amongst Westcol FET lecturers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The main objective of any service organisation should be to make a profit. This objective can only be achieved by increasing the employees’ performance, which is subsequently related to Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Job Satisfaction. The studies on the relationship between EI and Job Satisfaction are becoming prevalent in the academic literature. Currently, a debate is on as to determine the extent of the relationship between EI and Job Satisfaction amongst d...

  15. IT ei loe / Nicholas G. Carr

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Carr, Nicholas G.

    2003-01-01

    Harvard Business Review endise toimetaja arvates on infotehnoloogia (IT) strateegiline tähtsus ettevõtetes oluliselt vähenenud ning innovaatilised IT lahendused ei anna enam konkurentsieeliseid, mille tõttu peab muutuma ka juhtide suhtumine IT riskidesse, investeeringutesse ja juhtimisse. Vt. samas: Kuidas vältida üleinvesteerimist IT-sse?; Liiga palju head; Mis saab müüjatest?; Uued reeglid IT juhtimises. Kommenteerivad Henn Sarv, Avo Kokk, Olli Heinonen ja Jüri Kaljundi

  16. Examining the Effects of Jyoti Meditation on Stress and the Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Conley, Abigail H.; Young, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined whether Jyoti meditation (JM), a spiritually based meditation (Singh, 2012), influenced student counselors' (N = 60) level of stress and emotional intelligence (EI). Results from a randomized controlled trial and growth curve analysis provided a multilevel model in which JM reduced stress and EI moderated the effect.

  17. Emotional intelligence and job performance: The role of enactment and focus on others’ emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekaar, K.A. (Keri A.); D. van der Linden (Dimitri); A.B. Bakker (Arnold); M.Ph. Born (Marise)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe link between emotional intelligence (EI) and job performance was examined focusing on the interplay between self- and other-focused EI dimensions. Two diary studies were conducted among divorce lawyers and salespersons. We adopted a two-level perspective including individual

  18. Training Employees of a Public Iranian Bank on Emotional Intelligence Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadehbeigi, Mina; Shirmohammadi, Melika

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the possibility of developing emotional intelligence (EI) as conceptualized in Boyatzis et al.'s competency model. Design/methodology/approach: Designing a context-based EI training program, the study utilized a sample of 68 fully-employed members of five branches of a public bank in Iran; each…

  19. A Comparative Analysis of the Emotional Intelligence Levels of American and Chinese Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margavio, Thomas M.; Margavio, Geanie W.; Hignite, Michael A.; Moses, Duane R.

    2012-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a characteristic of business students that has been the subject of significant research. This study was designed to extend that prior research by comparing the EI scores of American business students with those of Chinese business students. The study further focuses on those factors which may be related to ways in…

  20. Evaluation of Leadership Styles and Emotional Intelligence on Job Satisfaction of Community College Faculty Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Alwyn

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of leadership styles and emotional intelligence (EI) factors have on job satisfaction could help address leadership issues within community college leadership teams. The purpose of this quantitative, nonexperimental study was to determine what effective leadership styles, in conjunction with level of EI, have in relation to job…

  1. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in the Academic Success of United Arab Emirates University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammed, Shaima; Abdullah, Abdullah S.; Hassane, Sofoh H.

    2011-01-01

    Psycho-educational researchers have often suggested that Emotional Intelligence (EI) is critical to academic success (Drago, 2004; La Civita, 2003), yet there is hardly any research that has ever addressed the question in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between EI as conceptualized by Mayer…

  2. Effect of Emotional Intelligence and Gender on Job Satisfaction of Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhagat; Kumar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to find out the effect of EI and gender on job satisfaction of primary school teachers. A total of 300 (150 male and 150 female) primary school teachers were selected randomly for the study. Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS) and Teachers' Job Satisfaction Scale (TJSS) were used to collect the data. The study found a…

  3. Exploring the Emotional Intelligence of Student Leaders in the SI Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Cindy; Templeman, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory study of the emotional intelligence (EI) of student leaders participating in a Supplemental Instruction (SI) program was conducted to determine whether a significant relationship exists between leadership effectiveness and EI as measured by the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and to assess the impact of the leadership…

  4. Psychosocial Predictors of Relationship Conflict Styles as Mediated by Emotional Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole M. Monteiro; Shyngle K. Balogun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of age, gender, and emotional intelligence (EI) on conflict management styles among dating age adults in Botswana. A mixed survey and quasi-experimental design was used to assess the relationship between age and gender and the mediating influence of EI on participants’ preferred conflict management strategies (avoidance, competition, compromise, accommodation, and collaboration) in...

  5. Emotional Intelligence and Perceived Social Support among Italian High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Kenny, Maureen E.

    2012-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has emerged in recent research as a teachable skill that is distinct from personality and is relevant to scholastic and work success and progress in career development. This study adds to that research by examining the relationship of performance and self-report measures of EI and personality traits with perceived…

  6. Intelligible Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Weld, Daniel S.; Bansal, Gagan

    2018-01-01

    Since Artificial Intelligence (AI) software uses techniques like deep lookahead search and stochastic optimization of huge neural networks to fit mammoth datasets, it often results in complex behavior that is difficult for people to understand. Yet organizations are deploying AI algorithms in many mission-critical settings. In order to trust their behavior, we must make it intelligible --- either by using inherently interpretable models or by developing methods for explaining otherwise overwh...

  7. UNDERFLIGHT CALIBRATION OF SOHO/CDS AND HINODE/EIS WITH EUNIS-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Tongjiang; Brosius, Jeffrey W. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences (IACS) in the Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Thomas, Roger J.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Davila, Joseph M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Young, Peter R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Del Zanna, Giulio, E-mail: tongjiang.wang@nasa.gov [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01

    Flights of Goddard Space Flight Center's Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket in 2006 and 2007 provided updated radiometric calibrations for Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (SOHO/CDS) and Hinode/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (Hinode/EIS). EUNIS carried two independent imaging spectrographs covering wavebands of 300-370 A in first order and 170-205 A in second order. After each flight, end-to-end radiometric calibrations of the rocket payload were carried out in the same facility used for pre-launch calibrations of CDS and EIS. During the 2007 flight, EUNIS, SOHO/CDS, and Hinode/EIS observed the same solar locations, allowing the EUNIS calibrations to be directly applied to both CDS and EIS. The measured CDS NIS 1 line intensities calibrated with the standard (version 4) responsivities with the standard long-term corrections are found to be too low by a factor of 1.5 due to the decrease in responsivity. The EIS calibration update is performed in two ways. One uses the direct calibration transfer of the calibrated EUNIS-07 short wavelength (SW) channel. The other uses the insensitive line pairs, in which one member was observed by the EUNIS-07 long wavelength (LW) channel and the other by EIS in either the LW or SW waveband. Measurements from both methods are in good agreement, and confirm (within the measurement uncertainties) the EIS responsivity measured directly before the instrument's launch. The measurements also suggest that the EIS responsivity decreased by a factor of about 1.2 after the first year of operation (although the size of the measurement uncertainties is comparable to this decrease). The shape of the EIS SW response curve obtained by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the one measured in laboratory prior to launch. The absolute value of the quiet-Sun He II 304 A intensity measured by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the radiance measured by CDS NIS in quiet regions

  8. The Role of Intelligence Quotient and Emotional Intelligence in Cognitive Control Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Purificación; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and cognitive control processes has been extensively established. Several studies have shown that IQ correlates with cognitive control abilities, such as interference suppression, as measured with experimental tasks like the Stroop and Flanker tasks. By contrast, there is a debate about the role of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in individuals' cognitive control abilities. The aim of this study is to examine the relation between IQ and EI, and cognitive control abilities evaluated by a typical laboratory control cognitive task, the Stroop task. Results show a negative correlation between IQ and the interference suppression index, the ability to inhibit processing of irrelevant information. However, the Managing Emotions dimension of EI measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), but not self-reported of EI, negatively correlates with the impulsivity index, the premature execution of the response. These results suggest that not only is IQ crucial, but also competences related to EI are essential to human cognitive control processes. Limitations and implications of these results are also discussed. PMID:26648901

  9. The role of Intelligence Quotient and Emotional Intelligence in cognitive control processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación eCheca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ and cognitive control processes has been extensively established. Several studies have shown that IQ correlates with cognitive control abilities, such as interference suppression, as measured with experimental tasks like the Stroop and Flanker tasks. By contrast, there is a debate about the role of Emotional Intelligence (EI in individuals’ cognitive control abilities. The aim of this study is to examine the relation between IQ and EI, and cognitive control abilities evaluated by a typical laboratory control cognitive task, the Stroop task. Results show a negative correlation between IQ and the interference suppression index, the ability to inhibit processing of irrelevant information. However, the Managing Emotions dimension of EI measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, but not self-reported of EI, negatively correlates with the impulsivity index, the premature execution of the response. These results suggest that not only is IQ crucial, but also competences related to EI are essential to human cognitive control processes. Limitations and implications of these results are also discussed

  10. Divine Emotions: On the Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Religious Belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łowicki, Paweł; Zajenkowski, Marcin

    2017-12-01

    There have been only few attempts to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and religiosity. However, none of them included measures of ability EI. In two studies, we investigated the potential associations between various aspects of religious belief and ability and trait EI. In Study 1 (N = 240), we found that ability EI was positively associated with general level of religious belief. Study 2, conducted among Polish Christians (N = 159), replicated the previous result on the connection between ability EI and religion. Moreover, both trait and ability EI were negatively correlated with extrinsic religious orientation and negative religious coping. Additional analysis showed that extrinsic orientation mediated the relationship between ability EI and religiosity.

  11. Exploring the validity of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) with established emotions measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Richard D; Schulze, Ralf; O'Brien, Kristin; MacCann, Carolyn; Reid, John; Maul, Andy

    2006-11-01

    Emotions measures represent an important means of obtaining construct validity evidence for emotional intelligence (EI) tests because they have the same theoretical underpinnings. Additionally, the extent to which both emotions and EI measures relate to intelligence is poorly understood. The current study was designed to address these issues. Participants (N = 138) completed the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), two emotions measures, as well as four intelligence tests. Results provide mixed support for the model hypothesized to underlie the MSCEIT, with emotions research and EI measures failing to load on the same factor. The emotions measures loaded on the same factor as intelligence measures. The validity of certain EI components (in particular, Emotion Perception), as currently assessed, appears equivocal. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Exploring the Implications of Emotional Intelligence to Enhance Employees’ Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Bashir Khan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence (EI is an effective tool to increase organizational productivity. This study depicts the impact of EI on employees’ performance who are engaged with customer services by using four elements i.e. self awareness, self management, social awareness and relationship management. A sample of 120 respondents was selected from four paint manufacturing companies in Pakistan. The primary data was collected through the structured questionnaire and simple regression method was used to investigate the relationship between employee’s performance and emotional intelligence. The results illustrate that EI has positive impact on employee’s performance. It is suggested that the implication of EI be ensured as contemporary need of customer services in paint industries so that organization productivity may be enhanced with efficient employees’ performance.

  13. Age and Gender Differences in Ability Emotional Intelligence in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Rosario; Sorrel, Miguel A.; Fernández-Pinto, Irene; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the current investigation was to analyze ability emotional intelligence (EI) in a large cross-sectional sample of Spanish adults (N = 12,198; males, 56.56%) aged from 17 to 76 years (M = 37.71, SD = 12.66). Using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), which measures ability EI according to the 4 branches of the…

  14. Towards a Developing Construct in Dance Education--Exploring the Relation of Emotional Intelligence to Teacher's Sense of Efficacy and Teaching Experience among Dance Education Student Teachers in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenn, Britta; Mulholland, Rosemary; Timmons, Wendy; Zanker, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    Theories of emotional intelligence (EI) have already been applied successfully in the field of education, and EI has been found to predict different aspects of teaching such as influencing teachers' self-efficacy beliefs (TSEB). This study aims to explore potential associations between EI, TSEB, and length of teaching experience amongst dance…

  15. Age and gender differences in ability emotional intelligence in adults: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Rosario; Sorrel, Miguel A; Fernández-Pinto, Irene; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the current investigation was to analyze ability emotional intelligence (EI) in a large cross-sectional sample of Spanish adults (N = 12,198; males, 56.56%) aged from 17 to 76 years (M = 37.71, SD = 12.66). Using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), which measures ability EI according to the 4 branches of the Mayer and Salovey EI model. The authors examined effects of gender on ability EI, as well as the linear and quadratic effects of age. Results suggest that gender affects the total ability EI score as well as scores on the 4 EI branches. Ability EI was greater in women than men. Ability EI varied with age according to an inverted-U curve: Younger and older adults scored lower on ability EI than middle-aged adults, except for the branch of understanding emotions. These findings strongly support the idea that both gender and age significantly influence ability EI during aging. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Emotional Intelligence Measured in a Highly Competitive Testing Situation

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    This is a study in which emotional intelligence (EI) as well as several other personality dimensions were studied in a real, high-stakes, selection situation, N=190. Forty-one trait oriented personality scales were measured and factor analyzed. A factor pattern with four secondary factors was found: EI, emotional stability, rigidity/perfectionism and energy/dominance. These factors were related to standard FFM (Five Factor Model) dimensions, to Hogan's Development Survey ("the dark side of pe...

  17. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Resident Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dana T; Liebert, Cara A; Tran, Jennifer; Lau, James N; Salles, Arghavan

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing recognition that physician wellness is critical; it not only benefits the provider, but also influences quality and patient care outcomes. Despite this, resident physicians suffer from a high rate of burnout and personal distress. Individuals with higher emotional intelligence (EI) are thought to perceive, process, and regulate emotions more effectively, which can lead to enhanced well-being and less emotional disturbance. This study sought to understand the relationship between EI and wellness among surgical residents. Residents in a single general surgery residency program were surveyed on a voluntary basis. Emotional intelligence was measured using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form. Resident wellness was assessed with the Dupuy Psychological General Well-Being Index, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form. Emotional intelligence and wellness parameters were correlated using Pearson coefficients. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors predictive of well-being. Seventy-three residents participated in the survey (response rate 63%). Emotional intelligence scores correlated positively with psychological well-being (r = 0.74; p emotional exhaustion (r = -0.69; p emotional exhaustion (β = -0.63; p Emotional intelligence is a strong predictor of resident well-being. Prospectively measuring EI can identify those who are most likely to thrive in surgical residency. Interventions to increase EI can be effective at optimizing the wellness of residents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership in Nurse Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano-Szekely, Lauraine; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Clavelle, Joanne; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-02-01

    This study describes the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and transformational leadership (TL) in nurse managers (NMs). Effective NM leadership is important as they have direct influence over RN performance and patient outcomes. Research has demonstrated that a TL style generates greater commitment from followers than other leadership styles. EI is 1 potential characteristic of TL. A descriptive exploratory research study was conducted to correlate EI and TL practices of NMs. EI was significantly positively correlated with TL and outcome measures of extra-effort, effectiveness, and satisfaction and significantly negatively correlated with laissez-faire leadership. A positive relationship was found between TL and NMs with advanced education and administrative certification. Nursing administrators should consider EI characteristics when hiring NMs and lead efforts to advance education to align with organization needs for business and strategic essentials necessary for NM effectiveness.

  19. Autobiographical remembering and individual differences in emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohsuke; Toyota, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between individual differences in Emotional Intelligence (EI) and self-reported arousal from remembering an autobiographical emotional or neutral event was examined. Participants (N = 235; 75 men; M age = 18.7 yr., SD = 0.9, range = 18-22) were required to complete the Japanese version of the Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire to assess EI. Participants were then asked to recall personal episodes from autobiographical memory, and then completed the Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ). A group with high EI-rated, emotionally neutral episodes higher than did a group with low EI on several MCQ subscales: sound, participants, overall memory, and doubt/certainty. However, differences in ratings between the two groups were not observed for emotionally positive episodes. These results suggest that high EI is related to more effective use of weak retrieval cues when recalling neutral autobiographical memories.

  20. Emotional Intelligence and its consequences for occupational and life satisfaction - Emotional Intelligence in the context of irrational beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Welpe, Isabell; Tumasjan, Andranik; Stich, Jennifer; Spörrle, Matthias; Försterling, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    According to Albert Ellis' theory of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy irrational beliefs (IB) lead to maladaptive emotions. A central component of irrationality is the denial of one's own possibilities to control important aspects of life. A specific IB is that one cannot control and thus cannot avoid certain emotion states. Emotion research considers regulative emotion control a pivotal component of the concept of emotional intelligence (EI). A negative association between IB and EI can thu...

  1. Emotional Intelligence and Callous-Unemotional Traits in Incarcerated Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Rachel E; Ermer, Elsa; Salovey, Peter; Kiehl, Kent A

    2016-12-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to perceive, manage, and reason about emotions and to use this information to guide thinking and behavior adaptively. Youth with callous-unemotional (CU) traits demonstrate a variety of affective deficits, including impairment in recognition of emotion and reduced emotional responsiveness to distress or pain in others. We examined the association between ability EI and CU traits in a sample of incarcerated adolescents (n = 141) using an expert-rater device (Psychopathy Checklist Youth Version (PCL-YV; Manual for the Hare psychopathy checklist: Youth version. Multi-Health Systems, Toronto, 2003) and self-report assessments of CU traits. EI was assessed using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test-Youth Version, Research Version (MSCEIT-YV-R; MSCEIT YV: Mayer-Salovey-Caruso emotional intelligence test: Youth version, research version 1.0. Multi-Health Systems, Toronto, Ontario, 2005). Similar to findings in adult forensic populations, high levels of CU traits in incarcerated adolescents were associated with lower EI, particularly higher order EI skills. Identifying impairment on EI abilities may have important implications for emerging treatment and intervention developments for youth with high levels of CU traits.

  2. Classroom emotional intelligence and its relationship with school performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor Aritzeta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of emotions in classrooms, no measurements have been developed to assess group emotional intelligence (EI. The aim of this work was to develop a questionnaire for measuring group EI (G-TMMS in educational contexts. The psychometric properties of G-TMMS were examined in a sample of 794 participants (47% female; mean age = 16; SD = 1.4, divided into 59 classrooms. The G-TMMS showed a one-factor structure. It also demonstrated to have adequate internal consistency, temporal stability, and convergent validity. Moreover, group EI was associated with higher group school performance. The implications of this new scale in educational contexts are discussed.

  3. Four EIS Perspectives: A literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Svejvig, Per

    A literature review of the Enterprise Information Systems literature reveals a number of recurring issues. We identify and detail four different perspectives that together categorizes the topics found. The first being a technical-rational perspective. The second being a social perspective....... The third being a more political and emergent perspective. Fourth, we identify a design-oriented perspective. We categorize the literature on EIS using these four perspectives, and for each perspective we identify core issues. Finally we discuss how the four perspectives complement each other....

  4. EIS Response of MIC on Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Maahn, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion of carbon steel under sulphate reducing (sulphide-producing) bacterial activity (SRB) results in the formation of both ferrous sulphides as well as biofilm on the metal surface. The electrochemical characteristics of the ferrous sulphide/steel interface...... as compared to the biofilm/ferrous sulphide/steel interface has been studied with EIS, DC polarisations (Tafel, LPR) and a potentiostatic step technique. The electrochemical response is related to a threshold sulphide concentration above which very characteristic changes such as indications of finite...

  5. Validity of transactional analysis and emotional intelligence in training nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley-Hunter, Brandi L

    2014-10-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is considered a critical component of a nurse's characteristic trait which is known as a significant predictor of a person's job performance and life success. Transactional Analysis (TA) plays a fundamental role in nurse-patient communication and managing emotions during difficult dialect with patients. The aim of this review is to discuss the framework of EI and TA, and how the combined theories can be utilized to further educate nurses and enhance the patient's experience. Exploring the idea of combining EI, TA, and other theories and adding these addendums to the nursing curriculum may advance the empathy and communication skills of nursing students. The method used in this review is a literature search using databases, such as Medline, EBSCO, and Google Scholar, etc. to form a critical discussion of this area. Key words such as emotional intelligence, transactional analysis, nursing curriculum, and relating theoretical models were used to identify applicable documents. Four studies involving EI and TA were sampled. A combination of data collection tools, such as lecture series and intervention programs, were used to authenticate the results. Other instruments used were ego state questionnaires, empathy, and five point Likert scales. No study design or type of literature was excluded in healthcare to substantiate the application of EI and TA into the nursing curriculum. Sixteen nurses attended a six-week psycho-education program using communication and empathy scales, and patient satisfaction surveys to improve their empathetic and communication skills. The result of the mean communication score (177.8±20) increased to (198.8±15) after training (p=0.001). The empathy score increased from 25.7±7 to 32.6±6 (p=0.001). The overall result reflects that training can improve emergency nurse's communication and empathy skills. The data suggests there are under-researched theories with futuristic topics that have value to the nursing

  6. Validity of transactional analysis and emotional intelligence in training nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANDI L WHITLEY-HUNTER

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional intelligence (EI is considered a critical component of a nurse’s characteristic trait which is known as a significant predictor of a person’s job performance and life success. Transactional Analysis (TA plays a fundamental role in nurse-patient communication and managing emotions during difficult dialect with patients. The aim of this review is to discuss the framework of EI and TA, and how the combined theories can be utilized to further educate nurses and enhance the patient’s experience. Exploring the idea of combining EI, TA, and other theories and adding these addendums to the nursing curriculum may advance the empathy and communication skills of nursing students. Methods: The method used in this review is a literature search using databases, such as Medline, EBSCO, and Google Scholar, etc. to form a critical discussion of this area. Key words such as emotional intelligence, transactional analysis, nursing curriculum, and relating theoretical models were used to identify applicable documents. Four studies involving EI and TA were sampled. A combination of data collection tools, such as lecture series and intervention programs, were used to authenticate the results. Other instruments used were ego state questionnaires, empathy, and five point Likert scales. No study design or type of literature was excluded in healthcare to substantiate the application of EI and TA into the nursing curriculum. Results: Sixteen nurses attended a six-week psycho-education program using communication and empathy scales, and patient satisfaction surveys to improve their empathetic and communication skills. The result of the mean communication score (177.8±20 increased to (198.8±15 after training (p=0.001. The empathy score increased from 25.7±7 to 32.6±6 (p=0.001. The overall result reflects that training can improve emergency nurse’s communication and empathy skills. Conclusion: The data suggests there are under

  7. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  8. Intelligent mechatronics; Intelligent mechatronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1995-10-01

    Intelligent mechatronics (IM) was explained as follows: a study of IM essentially targets realization of a robot namely, but in the present stage the target is a creation of new values by intellectualization of machine, that is, a combination of the information infrastructure and the intelligent machine system. IM is also thought to be constituted of computers positively used and micromechatronics. The paper next introduces examples of IM study, mainly those the author is concerned with as shown below: sensor gloves, robot hands, robot eyes, tele operation, three-dimensional object recognition, mobile robot, magnetic bearing, construction of remote controlled unmanned dam, robot network, sensitivity communication using neuro baby, etc. 27 figs.

  9. Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinian, Simin; Yazdi, Seyedeh-Monavar; Zahraie, Shaghayegh; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali

    This study aims to investigate the effect of training some aspects of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on job satisfaction and productivity of employees. The results can help organizations to realize human capabilities and the way to improve them by paying more attention to psychological issues. We used a quasi-experimental method using a pre-test and a post-test designed with control group and a four-month follow-up. Study population consists of employees of Marine Installations and Construction Company. Considering variables like age, education and job rank, we selected 28 employees who earned the lowest score for EI. They were then randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Each employee got job satisfaction and productivity questionnaires and their managers were given employee evaluation questionnaire. Then some aspects of EI were taught to the experimental group once a week for 10 sessions. Four months later, both groups were evaluated by managers. The results show that education did not increase employees` job satisfaction nor did it improve managers` evaluation. However, employees` productivity score after training sessions and managers` evaluation improved in the long run. The results reveal that training EI by further controlling the above-mentioned variables is effective and essential to improve human resources.

  10. Emotional Intelligence and the ACGME Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Anita R; Young, Richard A; Baumer, Joane G

    2010-12-01

    Residency programs desire assessment tools for teaching and measuring resident attainment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, including interpersonal and communication skills. We sought to evaluate the use of emotional intelligence (EI) assessment and training tools in assessing and enhancing interpersonal and communication skills. We used a quasi-experimental design, with an intervention and control group composed of 1 class each of family medicine residents. The intervention was EI coaching. The assessment used the Emotional and Social Competence Inventory, a 360-degree EI survey consisting of self and other (colleague) ratings for 12 EI competencies. There were 21 participants in each of the 3 assessments (test, posttest, and control). Our EI coaching intervention had very limited participation due to a lack of protected time for EI coaching and residents' competing obligations. Return rates for self surveys were 86% to 91% and 66% to 68% for others. On all 3 trials, ratings by others were significantly higher than self ratings for every competence (range, P competencies. None of the intervention group self ratings increased significantly on posttesting, whereas ratings by others increased significantly for coach/mentor (P coaching intervention was unsuccessful, the effects of coaching on interpersonal and communication skills could not be assessed.

  11. Impact of adoption of yoga way of life on the emotional intelligence of managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmukh Adhia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The popular perception that a high intelligence quotient (IQ is not necessarily a good predictor of professional and personal success has led to a growing interest in understanding the role of emotional intelligence (EI in improving the performance of business managers. This paper studies the impact of the yoga way of life on EI using data collected from 60 managers in a business enterprise and reports enhanced EI as a result of the practice of yoga. The results indicate the importance of yoga as an integral element in improving managerial performance in organisations and the need to further explore this construct in greater detail.

  12. A measurement model of multiple intelligence profiles of management graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Heamalatha; Awang, Siti Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    In this study, developing a fit measurement model and identifying the best fitting items to represent Howard Gardner's nine intelligences namely, musical intelligence, bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence are the main interest in order to enhance the opportunities of the management graduates for employability. In order to develop a fit measurement model, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was applied. A psychometric test which is the Ability Test in Employment (ATIEm) was used as the instrument to measure the existence of nine types of intelligence of 137 University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM) management graduates for job placement purposes. The initial measurement model contains nine unobserved variables and each unobserved variable is measured by ten observed variables. Finally, the modified measurement model deemed to improve the Normed chi-square (NC) = 1.331; Incremental Fit Index (IFI) = 0.940 and Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.049 was developed. The findings showed that the UTeM management graduates possessed all nine intelligences either high or low. Musical intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence contributed highest loadings on certain items. However, most of the intelligences such as bodily kinaesthetic intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence interpersonal intelligence and intrapersonal intelligence possessed by UTeM management graduates are just at the borderline.

  13. Artificial Intelligence and Moral intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Pana

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the thesis that the implementation of a moral code in the behaviour of artificial intelligent systems needs a specific form of human and artificial intelligence, not just an abstract intelligence. We present intelligence as a system with an internal structure and the structural levels of the moral system, as well as certain characteristics of artificial intelligent agents which can/must be treated as 1- individual entities (with a complex, specialized, autonomous or selfdetermined,...

  14. Workplace Culture Emotional Intelligence and Trust in the Prediction of Workplace Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stough, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There were two aims of this study. The first was to assess the reliability of a new measure of emotional intelligence (EI, the Workplace Culture version of the Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test (SUEIT which was designed to measure EI at a group level. The second aim of the study was to investigate the pre-conditions required for the formation of an emotionally intelligent group culture. Specifically, the study proposed that team leader trustworthiness at the leader/member dyad level was required for the formation of an emotionally intelligent culture at the group level. The sample comprised of 142 participants, of which 54 were male and 88 were female. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceptions of group EI, leader trustworthiness, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Results of the study showed that the Workplace Culture SUEIT was reliable and predicted job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, trustworthiness of the team leader was found to be significantly correlated to dimensions of group level EI, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. It was concluded that the Workplace Culture SUEIT is a valid and useful tool for measuring group level EI. Furthermore, it was concluded that there is a significant relationship between group level EI and leader/member trust. Implications of the results and future research concerning group and leader EI are discussed.

  15. Psychometric properties of the French version of a scale measuring perceived emotional intelligence : the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, Léna; Duclos, Jeanne; Ringuenet, Damien; Berthoz, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS), a 30-item self-assessment questionnaire, has been developed to measure perceived emotional intelligence (EI) level in 3 dimensions: Attention, Clarity and Repair. This study aimed to explore the psychometric properties of the French version of this instrument. Method: The instrument factor structure, normality, internal consistency, stability and concurrent validity were assessed in a sample of 824 young adults (456 female). Besides TMMS, participants completed self-assessment questionnaires for affectivity (Shortened Beck Depression Inventory, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Positive and Negative emotion scale), alexithymia (Bermond-Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire-B) and interpersonal functioning (Empathy Quotient). Discriminant validity was tested in 64 female patients with anorexia nervosa, identified in literature as having difficulties with introspection, expression and emotional regulation. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis results replicate the 3-factor structure. Internal consistency and reliability indices are adequate. Direction and degree of correlation coefficients between TMMS dimensions and other questionnaires support the instrument concurrent validity. TMMS allows to highlight differences in perceived EI levels between men and women (Attention: p < 0.001 ; Clarity: p < 0.05) as well as between patients with anorexia nervosa and control subjects (p < 0.001 for all 3 dimensions). Conclusion: This first validation study shows satisfying psychometric properties for TMMS French version. PMID:27310229

  16. The role of trait emotional intelligence in predicting networking behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Torres-Coronas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The purpose of this paper is to obtain evidence of the relation between entrepreneur proactive networking behavior and trait emotional intelligence to support transition towards entrepreneurial careers. Design/methodology/approach – The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short form (TEIQue-SF, developed by Cooper and Petrides (2010, was used to test hypotheses on the factors that define a proactive use of a professional network and their relationship with the individual level of trait emotional intelligence and its four components (well-being, self-control, emotionality and sociability. A questionnaire was sent to local entrepreneurs to verify whether trait emotional intelligence act as a predictor of proactive networking behavior. Theoretical foundation – We will be using Petrides and Furnham’s (2001 trait EI definition and EI will be studied within a personality framework (Petrides, 2001, Petrides & Furnham, 2001, 2006, 2014. Findings – Final findings partially confirms research hypothesis, with some components of EI (well-being and self-control factors showing a significant positive correlation with proactive networking behavior. This indicates that entrepreneurs’ ability to regulate emotions influences their networking behavior helping them to succeed in their business relationships. Practical implications – The present study provides a clear direction for further research by focusing on how trait emotional intelligence affects social networking behavior amongst entrepreneurs, thus demonstrating the utility of using trait EI to evaluate high potential entrepreneurs.

  17. Promoting Well-Being: The Contribution of Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Kenny, Maureen E

    2016-01-01

    Adopting a primary prevention perspective, this study examines competencies with the potential to enhance well-being and performance among future workers. More specifically, the contributions of ability-based and trait models of emotional intelligence (EI), assessed through well-established measures, to indices of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being were examined for a sample of 157 Italian high school students. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test was used to assess ability-based EI, the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Inventory and the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire were used to assess trait EI, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the Satisfaction With Life Scale were used to assess hedonic well-being, and the Meaningful Life Measure was used to assess eudaimonic well-being. The results highlight the contributions of trait EI in explaining both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, after controlling for the effects of fluid intelligence and personality traits. Implications for further research and intervention regarding future workers are discussed.

  18. Ability of university-level education to prevent age-related decline in emotional intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Rosario; Navarro Bravo, Beatriz; Latorre, José Miguel; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that educational history, as a proxy measure of active cognitive reserve, protects against age-related cognitive decline and risk of dementia. Whether educational history also protects against age-related decline in emotional intelligence (EI) is unclear. The present study examined ability EI in 310 healthy adults ranging in age from 18 to 76 years using the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We found that older people had lower scores than younger people for total EI and for the EI branches of perceiving, facilitating, and understanding emotions, whereas age was not associated with the EI branch of managing emotions. We also found that educational history protects against this age-related EI decline by mediating the relationship between age and EI. In particular, the EI scores of older adults with a university education were higher than those of older adults with primary or secondary education, and similar to those of younger adults of any education level. These findings suggest that the cognitive reserve hypothesis, which states that individual differences in cognitive processes as a function of lifetime intellectual activities explain differential susceptibility to functional impairment in the presence of age-related changes and brain pathology, applies also to EI, and that education can help preserve cognitive-emotional structures during aging. PMID:24653697

  19. A comparative analysis of emotional intelligence in the UK and Australian radiographer workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, S.J.; Baker, R.; Collier, D.; Lewis, S.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) in the UK radiographer workforce has been benchmarked using the trait emotional intelligence model and the profile of the profession in the UK has begun to emerge. There are cultural differences between countries that have been shown to have an effect on EI, therefore this paper aims to benchmark the Global and four factor scores of Trait EI in the Australian radiographer population; to explore any differences within the two main professional groupings, diagnostic and therapeutic radiographers, and to compare the Australian radiographer workforce scores with those of the UK previously published. The published and validated trait EI questionnaire of Petrides was used as the survey tool for the Global EI and the four factors of Well-being, Emotionality, Self-control and Sociability. There was only one difference found in the five factors studied between the UK and Australian radiographer workforce, that of Well-being (p ≤ 0.01). No differences emerged between the diagnostic and therapy disciplines nor was a relationship found between EI and the Australian leadership in contrast to the UK workforce findings. Differences were found in the demographic profiles of the two countries and the implications of the above findings are discussed. This paper has benchmarked the EI of the Australian workforce and found a difference in well-being between the UK and Australian radiographer workforce. The Australian diagnostic and therapy disciplines were no different in their EI profiles. No relationship was found between EI and leadership in the Australian radiographer workforce

  20. Emotional intelligence in surgery is associated with resident job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Robert H; Theiss, Lauren M; Gullick, Allison A; Richman, Joshua S; Morris, Melanie S; Grams, Jayleen M; Porterfield, John R; Chu, Daniel I

    2017-03-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with improved work performance and job satisfaction in several industries. We evaluated whether EI was associated with higher measures of work performance and job satisfaction in surgical residents. We distributed the validated Trait EI Questionnaire and job satisfaction survey to all general surgery residents at a single institution in 2015. EI and job satisfaction scores were compared with resident performance using faculty evaluations of clinical competency-based surgical milestones and standardized test scores including the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE). Statistical comparison was made using Pearson correlation and simple linear regression adjusting for postgraduate year level. The survey response rate was 68.9% with 31 resident participants. Global EI was associated with scores on USMLE Step 2 (r = 0.46, P = 0.01) and Step 3 (r = 0.54, P = 0.01) but not ABSITE percentile scores (r = 0.06, P = 0.77). None of the 16 surgical milestone scores were significantly associated with global EI or EI factors before or after adjustment for postgraduate level. Global EI was associated with overall job satisfaction (r = 0.37, P = 0.04). Of the facets of job satisfaction, global EI was significantly associated with views of supervision (r = 0.42, P = 0.02) and nature of work (r = 0.41, P = 0.02). EI was associated with job satisfaction and USMLE performance but not ACGME competency-based milestones or ABSITE scores. EI may be an important factor for fulfillment in surgical training that is not currently captured with traditional in-training performance measures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Rasch Analysis of Lebanese Nurses’ Responses to the EIS Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Clinton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the psychometric characteristics of a 32-item modified version of the Ethical Issues Scale (EIS. Data were collected from 59 registered nurses at the American University of Beirut Medical Centre (AUBMC. Data were analyzed using WINSTEPS Rasch analysis software. The four-category EIS rating scale needs modification for future studies in Lebanon. All EIS scale items need rewording prior to translation into Arabic to avoid confusion among Lebanese nurses. Principal component analysis (PCA of residuals indicated the possible presence of additional dimensions. Additional EIS items are needed to improve targeting.

  2. Engaging Students Emotionally: The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Predicting Cognitive and Affective Engagement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Rebecca; Egan, Arlene; Hyland, Philip; Maguire, Phil

    2017-01-01

    Student engagement is a key predictor of academic performance, persistence and retention in higher education. While many studies have identified how aspects of the college environment influence engagement, fewer have specifically focused on emotional intelligence (EI). In this study, we sought to explore whether EI could predict cognitive and/or…

  3. Reliability, construct and criterion-related validity of the Serbian adaptation of the trait emotional intelligence questionnaire (TEIQue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolić-Marjanović Zorana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents evidence on the reliability and validity of the Serbian adaptation of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue, an instrument designed to comprehensively assess emotional intelligence conceived as a constellation of emotionrelated self-perceptions. Study participants were 254 adults, who completed the Serbian TEIQue, NEO-FFI, MSCEIT, EQ-short, and RSPWB. The results indicate that the adapted TEIQue is a psychometrically sound assessment tool: internal consistencies were mostly acceptable at facet, generally good at factor, and excellent at whole-scale level; the fourfactor structure was confirmed by means of CFA; convergent-discriminant validity was established through meaningful associations with related constructs, indicating that trait EI is closely aligned with affect and self-efficacy related constructs from the realm of personality (i.e., E, N, C, and Empathy, but shows only moderate overlap with ability EI; finally, incremental validity was demonstrated in the prediction of psychological wellbeing, over and above the Big Five. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018

  4. EI: A Program for Ecological Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary King

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The program EI provides a method of inferring individual behavior from aggregate data. It implements the statistical procedures, diagnostics, and graphics from the book A Solution to the Ecological Inference Problem: Reconstructing Individual Behavior from Aggregate Data (King 1997. Ecological inference, as traditionally defined, is the process of using aggregate (i.e., "ecological" data to infer discrete individual-level relationships of interest when individual-level data are not available. Ecological inferences are required in political science research when individual-level surveys are unavailable (e.g., local or comparative electoral politics, unreliable (racial politics, insufficient (political geography, or infeasible (political history. They are also required in numerous areas of ma jor significance in public policy (e.g., for applying the Voting Rights Act and other academic disciplines ranging from epidemiology and marketing to sociology and quantitative history.

  5. Narbalek uranium mine: from EIS to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggitt, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Nabarlek uranium mine operated in Northern Australia from 1979 until 1989 and was the first of the 'new generation' of uranium mines to go through the cycle of EIS, operation and decommissioning. The paper describes the environmental and operational approval processes, the regulatory regime and the decommissioning procedures at the mine. The mine was located on land owned by indigenous Aboriginal people and so there were serious cultural considerations to be taken into account throughout the mine's life. Site work for decommissioning and rehabilitation was completed in 1995 but revegetation assessment has continued until the present time (1999). The paper concludes with the latest assessment and monitoring data and discusses the lessons learned by all parties from the completion of the cycle of mine life 'from cradle to grave'. (author)

  6. Trait emotional intelligence influences on academic achievement and school behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroveli, Stella; Sánchez-Ruiz, María José

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND. Trait emotional intelligence (trait EI or trait emotional self-efficacy) refers to individuals' emotion-related self-perceptions (Petrides, Furnham, & Mavroveli, 2007). The children's trait EI sampling domain provides comprehensive coverage of their affective personality. Preliminary evidence shows that the construct has important implications for children's psychological and behavioural adjustment. AIMS. This study investigates the associations between trait EI and school outcomes, such as performance in reading, writing, and maths, peer-rated behaviour and social competence, and self-reported bullying behaviours in a sample of primary school children. It also examines whether trait EI scores differentiate between children with and without special educational needs (SEN). SAMPLE. The sample comprised 565 children (274 boys and 286 girls) between the ages of 7 and 12 (M((age)) = 9.12 years, SD= 1.27 years) attending three English state primary schools. METHOD. Pupils completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Child Form (TEIQue-CF), the Guess Who peer assessment, the Peer-Victimization Scale, and the Bullying Behaviour Scale. Additional data on achievement and SEN were collected from the school archives. RESULTS. As predicted by trait EI theory, associations between trait EI and academic achievement were modest and limited to Year 3 children. Higher trait EI scores were related to more nominations from peers for prosocial behaviours and fewer nominations for antisocial behaviour as well as lower scores on self-reported bulling behaviours. Furthermore, SEN students scored lower on trait EI compared to students without SEN. CONCLUSIONS. Trait EI holds important and multifaceted implications for the socialization of primary schoolchildren. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  7. The Positive Effects of Trait Emotional Intelligence during a Performance Review Discussion – A Psychophysiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Performance review discussions of real manager–subordinate pairs were examined in two studies to investigate the effects of trait emotional intelligence (EI) on dyad member’s felt and expressed emotions. Altogether there were 84 managers and 122 subordinates in two studies using 360 measured and self-reported trait EI. Facial electromyography, and frontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry were collected continuously. Manager’s high trait EI was related to increased positive valence emotional facial expressions in the dyad during the discussions. The managers also had more EEG frontal asymmetry indicating approach motivation, than the subordinates. In addition, actor and partner effects and actor × partner interactions, and interactions between the role and actor or partner effect of trait EI were observed. Both actor and partner trait EI were related to more positive self-reported emotional valence. The results imply that trait EI has a role in organizational social interaction. PMID:28400747

  8. The person who eases your mind "Ibasyo" and emotional intelligence in interpersonal adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Toyota

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to examine the effect of the "Ibasyo" (the person who eases one's mind and emotional intelligence (EI on self-esteem and loneliness. Five hundred and eight Japanese undergraduates were asked to choose one of the alternatives (e. g., myself, mother, friend to answer the question "Who is the person that eases your mind?" Then, they were asked to rate items from scales corresponding to EI, self-esteem and loneliness. Multiple regression analyses indicated that both Ibasyo and EI explained 25% of loneliness, but only EI explained 25% of self-esteem. The analyses also showed differences of sub-abilities in EI that determined the level of loneliness and self-esteem among Ibasyo groups. These results are interpreted as showing the importance of EI in adaptation.

  9. Prerequisites for Emotional Intelligence Formation in Second Language Learning and Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklashova, Tatiana A.; Galishnikova, Elena M.; Khafizova, Liliya A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the topic is due to the enhancing role of emotional intelligence in second language learning. The article aims to substantiate that emotional intelligence (EI) strengthens training quality of future professionals, gives it an emotional color, and thereby increases a variety of intellectual skills. The leading methodical approaches…

  10. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Entrepreneurs' Perceptions of Success : An Exploratory Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah-Zhou, Haibo; Maria Bojica, Ana

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by introducing emotional intelligence (EI) as an additional factor that explains how entrepreneurs perceive their own success. Using survey data from a sample of Dutch entrepreneurs, we find that emotionally intelligent entrepreneurs are more

  11. Trait Emotional Intelligence and the Big Five: A Study on Italian Children and Preadolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paolo Maria; Mancini, Giacomo; Trombini, Elena; Baldaro, Bruno; Mavroveli, Stella; Petrides, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Trait emotional intelligence (EI) is a constellation of emotion-related self-perceptions located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. This article examines the validity of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Child Form and investigates its relationships with Big Five factors and cognitive ability. A total of 690 children (317…

  12. Measures of Emotional Intelligence and Social Acceptability in Children: A Concurrent Validity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, Sunny; McCallum, R. Steve; Bell, Sherry Mee; Dunn, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The concurrent validity of two measures of Emotional Intelligence (EI), one considered a trait measure, the other an ability measure, was examined by administering the Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (EQi:YV; Bar-On & Parker, 2000), the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test: Youth Version (MSCEIT:YV; Mayer, Salovey, &…

  13. What Has Personality and Emotional Intelligence to Do with "Feeling Different" while Using a Foreign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanska-Ponikwia, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the link between personality traits (OCEAN Personality test), emotional intelligence (EI) (Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire) and the notion of "feeling different" while using a foreign language among 102 Polish-English bilinguals and Polish L2 users of English who were immersed in a foreign language and…

  14. Examining the Relation between Emotional Intelligence and Happiness Status of Wellness Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Ercan; Pala, Adem; Göksel, Ali Gürel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is examining the relation between the emotional intelligence and happiness of the wellness coaches. 390 wellness coaches 282 of whom were women and 108 of whom were men participated voluntarily in the study. The participants were actively working as wellness coaches. The Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS) whose Turkish…

  15. Is trait-emotional intelligence simply or more than just a trait?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, K; Wabeke, R

    The present study examined the usefulness of trait-Emotional Intelligence (EI) among a sample of 1186 top managers who filled out questionnaires for Emotional Intelligence and the Big Five and were evaluated by a consultant on their competencies. Three higher-order factors were found to underlie the

  16. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  17. Competitive Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Pierrette; Hiller, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of competitive intelligence since 1994, including terminology and definitions and analytical techniques. Addresses the issue of ethics; explores how information technology supports the competitive intelligence process; and discusses education and training opportunities for competitive intelligence, including core competencies…

  18. Emotional intelligence in incarcerated men with psychopathic traits

    OpenAIRE

    Ermer, Elsa; Kahn, Rachel E.; Salovey, Peter; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2012-01-01

    The expression, recognition, and communication of emotional states are ubiquitous features of the human social world. Emotional intelligence (EI) is defined as the ability to perceive, manage, and reason about emotions, in oneself and others. Individuals with psychopathy have numerous difficulties in social interaction and show impairment on some emotional tasks. Here we investigate the relation between emotional intelligence and psychopathy in a sample of incarcerated men (n=374), using the ...

  19. Emotional Intelligence and Life Adjustment: A Validation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    Emotional intelligence was hypothesized to be a factor in successful life adjustment, among them the successful achievement of a well-balanced life with little interference between work and family and leisure. Data from a sample of 153 respondents who were roughly representative of the population were obtained, including measurement of emotional intelligence, life/work balance and other indices of adjustment and social/psychological skills, and salary. EI was measured by both questionnaire it...

  20. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-09-02

    Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 33 CFR 230.13 - Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental Impact Statement..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING NEPA § 230.13 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). An EIS... issues and impacts. The transmittal letter to EPA as well as the cover sheet should clearly identify the...

  2. Piirivalve : radar piiritusevoolikut ei püüa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Piirivalvet kritiseeriti selle eest, et see ei märganud salapiirituse veoks paigaldatud voolikut Narva veehoidlas. Ida-Viru piirkonnaülema Roland Peetsi sõnul ei ole ükski radar võimeline fikseerima liikumist vee all

  3. Euroopa paindumatus Eestile eurot ei luba / Hindrek Riikoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Riikoja, Hindrek

    2006-01-01

    Vt. ka Postimees : na russkom jazõke 17. juuli lk. 9. 14. juulil Eesti rahandusministri Aivar Sõerdi ja peaminister Andrus Ansipiga kohtunud Euroopa Komisjoni rahandusvolinik Joaquin Almunia kinnitas, et Eestil ei maksa loota eurokriteeriumide muutmisele, rahandusvoliniku hinnangul Eesti krooni devalveerimine enne eurole üleminekut ei ole vajalik

  4. Exploring emotional intelligence in a Caribbean medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, B; Baboolal, N; Williams, S; Ramsewak, S

    2014-03-01

    To explore the emotional intelligence (EI) in medical students in a Caribbean medical school and investigate its association with gender, age, year of study and ethnicity. A cross-sectional design using convenient sampling of 304 years two to five undergraduate medical students at the School of Medicine, the University of the West Indies (UWI), St Augustine campus, was conducted. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT-V2.0) was administered to test four branches of EI: perceiving emotions, facilitating thought, understanding emotions and managing emotions. Data were analysed using SPSS version 19. T-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and r (product moment correlation) were calculated to establish the effects of selected variables (gender, age, year of study and ethnicity) on total and sub-scales EI scores and tested against 0.05 and 0.01 significance levels. The total mean score for EI fell within the average according to MSCEIT standards. Gender analysis showed significantly higher scores for males and for younger age groups (maturity and emotional stability. It would be valuable to widen this study by including other UWI campuses and offshore medical schools in the Caribbean. This preliminary study examined a sample of medical students from a well-established Caribbean medical school. Since EI is considered to be important in the assessment and training of medical undergraduates, consideration should be given to introducing interventions aimed at increasing EI.

  5. Exploring the relationships among attachment, emotional intelligence and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M Gemma; Fletcher, Ian; O'Sullivan, Helen

    2013-03-01

    Attachment style has been shown to influence both emotional intelligence (EI) and the clinical communication of medical students and doctors. No research has assessed the relationships among attachment, EI and clinical communication in medical students. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of EI on the relationship between medical students' attachment style and clinical communication. Medical students were invited to complete measures of attachment (using the Experiences in Close Relationships-Short Form [ECR-SF], a 12-item measure that provides attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety dimensional scores) and EI (using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test [MSCEIT], a 141-item measure of the perception, use, understanding and management of emotions) at the end of Year 1, prior to a summative objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Clinical communication was assessed using OSCE scores. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse a hypothetical model of the relationships among attachment style, EI and clinical communication. A total of 200 of 358 (55.9%) students participated. Attachment avoidance was significantly negatively correlated with total EI scores (r=-0.28, pcommunication. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  6. Exploring an Emotional Intelligence Model With Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Traci T

    A lack of emotional skills may affect a nurse's personal well-being and have negative effects on patient outcomes. To compare psychiatric-mental health nurses' (PMHN) scores on the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to a normed population and compare the emotional intelligence (EI) scores of PMHNs using two tools, MSCEIT and Self-Rated Emotional Intelligence Scale (SREIS). Comparative descriptive and correlational study. PMHNs in the study had a higher mean EI compared with that of 5,000 participants in the normed MSCEIT sample. Significant weak correlations were seen between the perceiving and understanding emotion branches of the MSCEIT and SREIS. The current study added data about a sample of PMHN's EI levels in the United States, which may encourage dialog about EI among PMHNs. Future research is needed to examine the relationship between self-report EI tools (e.g., SREIS) and performance tools (e.g., MSCEIT) to determine if they are measuring the same construct.

  7. Intelligence Ethics:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Kira Vrist

    2016-01-01

    Questions concerning what constitutes a morally justified conduct of intelligence activities have received increased attention in recent decades. However, intelligence ethics is not yet homogeneous or embedded as a solid research field. The aim of this article is to sketch the state of the art...... of intelligence ethics and point out subjects for further scrutiny in future research. The review clusters the literature on intelligence ethics into two groups: respectively, contributions on external topics (i.e., the accountability of and the public trust in intelligence agencies) and internal topics (i.......e., the search for an ideal ethical framework for intelligence actions). The article concludes that there are many holes to fill for future studies on intelligence ethics both in external and internal discussions. Thus, the article is an invitation – especially, to moral philosophers and political theorists...

  8. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  9. Promoting well-being: The contribution of emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Di Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Adopting a primary prevention perspective, this study examines competencies with the potential to enhance well-being and performance among future workers. More specifically, the contributions of ability-based and trait models of emotional intelligence (EI, assessed through well-established measures, to indices of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being were examined for a sample of 157 Italian high school students. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT was used to assess ability-based EI, the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Inventory (EQ-i and the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TeiQue were used to assess trait EI, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS were used to assess hedonic well-being, and the Meaningful Life Measure (MLM was used to assess eudaimonic well-being. The results highlight the contributions of trait emotional intelligence in explaining both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, after controlling for the effects of fluid intelligence and personality traits. Implications for further research and intervention regarding future workers are discussed.

  10. Intelligent Governmentality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem de Lint

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, within liberal democracies, the post-Westphalian consolidation of security and intelligence has ushered in the normalization not only of security in ‘securitization’ but also of intelligence in what is proposed here as ‘intelligencification.’ In outlining the features of intelligencified governance, my aim is to interrogate the view that effects or traces, and productivity rather than negation is as persuasive as commonly thought by the constructivists. After all, counter-intelligence is both about purging and reconstructing the archive for undisclosed values. In practice, what is being normalized is the authorized and legalized use of release and retention protocols of politically actionable information. The intelligencification of governmentality affords a sovereignty shell-game or the instrumentalization of sovereign power by interests that are dependent on, yet often inimical to, the power of state, national, and popular sovereignty. On voit le politique et le social comme dépendant de contingences exclusives. Récemment, au sein des démocraties libérales, la consolidation de la sécurité et des services de renseignements de sécurité qui a suivi les traités de la Westphalie a donné lieu à la normalisation non seulement de la sécurité en «sécurisation» mais aussi des services de renseignements de sécurité en ce qui est proposé ici comme «intelligencification» [terme anglais créé par l’auteur, dérivé du mot anglais «intelligence» dans le sens de renseignements des écurité]. En particulier, ce que l’on normalise dans le but de contourner des contingences exclusives est l’utilisation autorisée et légalisée de protocoles de communication et de rétention d’information qui, politiquement, pourrait mener à des poursuites. En esquissant les traits de la gouvernance «intelligencifiée», mon but est d’interroger le point de vue que les effets ou les traces, et la productivité plutôt que la

  11. Emotional intelligence in medical laboratory science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Travis

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In addition to demographic-based questions, the survey contained a list of 16 items, three skills traditionally considered important for successful work in the medical laboratory as well as 13 EI-related items. Laboratory administrators were asked to rate each item for its importance for job performance, their satisfaction with the item's demonstration among currently working medical laboratory scientists (MLS) and the amount of responsibility college-based medical laboratory science programs should assume for the development of each skill or attribute. Participants were also asked about EI training in their laboratories and were given the opportunity to express any thoughts or opinions about EI as it related to medical laboratory science. This study revealed that each EI item, as well as each of the three other items, was considered to be very or extremely important for successful job performance. Administrators conveyed that they were satisfied overall, but indicated room for improvement in all areas, especially those related to EI. Those surveyed emphasized that medical laboratory science programs should continue to carry the bulk of the responsibility for the development of technical skills and theoretical knowledge and expressed support for increased attention to EI concepts at the individual, laboratory, and program levels.

  12. Intelligence Naturelle et Intelligence Artificielle

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cet article présente une approche systémique du concept d’intelligence naturelle en ayant pour objectif de créer une intelligence artificielle. Ainsi, l’intelligence naturelle, humaine et animale non-humaine, est une fonction composée de facultés permettant de connaître et de comprendre. De plus, l'intelligence naturelle reste indissociable de la structure, à savoir les organes du cerveau et du corps. La tentation est grande de doter les systèmes informatiques d’une intelligence artificielle ...

  13. Emotional Intelligence Research within Human Resource Development Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Forouzan; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review and synthesize pertinent emotional intelligence (EI) research within the human resource development (HRD) scholarship. Design/methodology/approach: An integrative review of literature was conducted and multiple electronic databases were searched to find the relevant resources. Using the content…

  14. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Krysta

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to recognize, assess, and control one's emotions, as well as the emotions of others, and even groups. It also allows people to handle added pressures, as they often experience in higher education. Occasionally clinicians report a small number of senior veterinary medicine students lack the ability to…

  15. Choosing among Tests of Emotional Intelligence: What Is the Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnrue, Mary Pat; Groves, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of research regarding five types of validity for each of four major tests used to measure emotional intelligence (EI). It culls and synthesizes information scattered among a host of articles in academic journals, technical reports, chapters, and books, as well as unpublished papers and manuscripts. It…

  16. Emotional intelligence competences of three different ethnic groups in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewi, Z.L.; Halim, M.S.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2018-01-01

    This study attempts to provide a portrayal of emotional intelligence (EI) of the Indonesians, one of the fourth most populous countries and multiethnic societies in the world, specifically across the 404 Bataks, 430 Minangkabau, and 479 Javanese ethnics. The result indicated that the Indonesian

  17. The Impact of Counsellor Training on Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Anne; Weinberg, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of counsellor training on emotional intelligence (EI) in 45 undergraduates and 58 postgraduates. Significant improvements were recorded by students on completion of both programmes, suggesting that these were attributable to training which enhanced intra- and interpersonal aspects of emotional functioning. As a…

  18. Street Smarts and a Scalpel: Emotional Intelligence in Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Mary Kate; Bonaroti, Alisha; Provenzano, Gina; Appelbaum, Rachel; Browne, Marybeth

    To evaluate trends of emotional intelligence (EI) in surgical education and to compare the incorporation of EI in surgical education to other fields of graduate medical education. A MEDLINE search was performed for publications containing both "surgery" and "emotional intelligence" with at least one term present in the title. Articles were included if the authors deemed EI in surgical education to be a significant focus. A separate series of MEDLINE searches were performed with the phrase "emotional intelligence" in any field and either "surg*," "internal medicine," "pediatric," "neurology," "obstetric," "gynecology," "OBGYN," "emergency," or "psychiat*" in the title. Articles were included if they discussed resident education as the primary subject. Next, a qualitative analysis of the articles was performed, with important themes from each article noted. Lehigh Valley Health Network in Allentown, PA. Eight articles addressed surgical resident education and satisfied inclusion criteria with 0, 1, and 7 articles published between 2001 and 2005, 2005 and 2010, and 2010 and 2015, respectively. The comparative data for articles on EI and resident education showed the following : 8 in surgery, 2 in internal medicine, 2 in pediatrics, 0 in neurology, 0 in OBGYN, 1 in emergency medicine, and 3 in psychiatry. Integration of EI principles is a growing trend within surgical education. A prominent theme is quantitative assessment of EI in residents and residency applicants. Further study is warranted on the integration process of EI in surgical education and its effect on patient outcomes and long-term job satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-reported emotional dysregulation but no impairment of emotional intelligence in borderline personality disorder: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beblo, Thomas; Pastuszak, Anna; Griepenstroh, Julia; Fernando, Silvia; Driessen, Martin; Schütz, Astrid; Rentzsch, Katrin; Schlosser, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Emotional dysfunction is a key feature of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) but emotional intelligence (EI) has rarely been investigated in this sample. This study aimed at an investigation of ability EI, general intelligence, and self-reported emotion regulation in BPD. We included 19 patients with BPD and 20 healthy control subjects in the study. EI was assessed by means of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso emotional intelligence test and the test of emotional intelligence. For the assessment of general intelligence, we administered the multidimensional "Leistungsprüfsystem-Kurzversion." The emotion regulation questionnaire and the difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale were used to assess emotion regulation. The patients with BPD did not exhibit impairments of ability EI and general intelligence but reported severe impairments in emotion regulation. Ability EI was related both to general intelligence (patients and controls) and to self-reported emotion regulation (patients). In conclusion, emotional dysfunction in BPD might primarily affect self-perceived behavior rather than abilities. Intense negative emotions in everyday life may trigger dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies in BPD although patients possess sufficient theoretical knowledge about optimal regulation strategies.

  20. Application of Structural Equations Modeling to assess relationship among Emotional Intelligence, General Health and Occupational Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    MOAMMAD KHANDAN; AMIR KAVOUSI; ALIREZA KOOHPAEI

    2015-01-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLEEmotional intelligence (EI) has been subject of significant amounts of literature over the past two decades. However, little has been contributed to how emotional intelligence may be practically applied to enhance both accident prevention program and general health in workplaces. Purpose of this paper is to survey relationship among these variables in working society of Iran in 2014. As well as identify practical approaches to application of emotional intelligence skills to ma...

  1. Does the level of emotional intelligence affect the degree of success in nursing studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dganit; Grinberg, Keren

    2018-05-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) reflects the general capacity to comprehend emotions (in ourselves and in others), to regulate emotions, and to cope effectively with emotional situations. The study program in nursing is varied, and includes theoretical and practical aspects, but teaching EI is not part of the core curriculum. We argue that teaching EI should not only be included in the curriculum, but that EI tests should be included in the admissions process. This study reviews the relationship between EI level and the degree of success in nursing studies, and its importance. A convenience sample of 110 academic nursing students was examined. Three data collection methods were employed: 1) A socio-demographic questionnaire; 2) Schutte Self-Report Inventory (SSRI); 3) Psychometric scores and grade transcripts. A positive correlation between the level of EI and the degree of success in nursing studies among nursing students was found. EI levels improved during the second year of learning. Among nursing students, the annual average grade was related to emotional intelligence rather than psychometric scores at the time of admission. There is a need to increase the importance of EI in the terms of nursing student's admission and basic nursing curriculums. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Emotional intelligence levels in baccalaureate-prepared early career registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemts, Glenda S

    2015-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the healthcare environment calls for increasing emotional intelligence (EI) competence in nurses. This study assessed the EI competence of 164 baccalaureate nursing alumni who graduated during the years 2007-2010 from three Benedictine institutions located in the Midwestern United States to see if there was growth of EI with experience as a registered nurse (RN), and to determine if age, gender, grade point average (GPA), and years of total healthcare work experience prior to graduation predicted EI. Participants completed the web-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and a demographic survey. Findings indicated 79.4% of participants were competent or higher on the MSCEIT total EI score. Percentages of nurses scoring in the competent or higher range on each of the four branch scores of perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions were 80.6%, 72.7%, 84.2%, and 84.9% respectively. There were no significant differences on EI scores between graduates with 1-2 years compared to 3-5 years of experience as a RN. Results of a linear stepwise regression indicated being female was a significant predictor on the MSCEIT total EI score ( P = 0.015) and using emotions branch ( P = 0.047). Findings also indicated GPA ( P nursing graduates. Continued research on the topic of EI and nursing is needed to build the knowledge base on how to promote positive patient outcomes.

  3. Emotional Intelligence and resilience in mental health professionals caring for patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Pardeller, Silvia; Kemmler, Georg; Hofer, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) and resilience may be considered as prerequisites for mental health professionals caring for patients with serious mental illness (SMI), since they are often exposed to severe emotional stress during daily work. Accordingly, this cross-sectional study assessed both EI and resilience and their interrelationship in 61 individuals belonging to an assertive outreach team for patients suffering from SMI compared 61 control subjects without healthcare-related working conditions. EI was assessed by means of the German version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), resilience was assessed using the German version of the Resilience Scale. Both groups showed an average level of EI in all categories of the MSCEIT and indicated high levels of resilience. They did not differ significantly from each other, neither in terms of EI nor resilience. Correlation analysis revealed a positive association between EI and resilience, albeit small in magnitude. Our results suggest that mental health professionals are not more resilient and therefore not more 'protected' from stressors than the general population. Though this finding warrants cautious interpretation, the positive correlation between EI and resilience suggests that EI may be a potential target for education and training in order to strengthen resilience even in healthy individuals and vice versa.

  4. Leading nurses: emotional intelligence and leadership development effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowne, Kerri Anne; Young, Thomas M; Goldman, Beryl; Patterson, Barbara; Krouse, Anne M; Proenca, Jose

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of an emotional intelligence (EI) and leadership development education program involving 20 nurse leaders at nursing homes. Also, it investigates the relationship between EI and transformational leadership. Design/methodology/approach Three research questions are posed. Correlation analysis and t-tests were conducted to answer the questions posed. Findings The findings of this paper indicate that the EI educational development was effective, while the personal leadership development was not. The data also showed a positive significant relationship between EI and transformational leadership. Research limitations/implications This paper is limited by the small sample size; thus, a causal relationship between EI and leadership could not be investigated. Additionally, the sample was not randomly selected because of the commitment needed from the participants. Furthermore, the paper was focused on nurse leaders in nursing homes, so it may not be generalizable to other populations. Practical implications With the increasing need for nursing home facilities and the limited training generally provided to nurses who move into managerial roles in these facilities, it is critical for organizations to understand the effectiveness of educational programs that exist. Moreover, the findings of this paper may provide information that would be useful to others who wish to develop EI and/or leadership education for nurses. Originality/value While much research exists on EI and transformational leadership, little of this research focuses on nurses in nursing home facilities. Thus, this paper fills a gap in the literature.

  5. How Emotional Intelligence Might Get You the Job: The Relationship Between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Faking on Personality Tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.M. Pelt (Dirk); D. van der Linden (Dimitri); M.Ph. Born (Marise)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis study examined trait emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to the ability to fake on personality tests. Undergraduate students (N = 129) were first instructed to fill out a personality inventory honestly, and subsequently in such a way as to maximize their chances of obtaining two

  6. Aggressiveness and intelligence in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Munique de Souza Siqueira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse the aggressiveness and intelligence in adolescence, and to verify if exists association through these variables. The aggressiveness is inherent in human nature and collaborates in the construction of personality by influencing the behaviors positively or negatively. Intelligence refers to the cognitive skill that every individual has and contributes to the establishment of social relations. As a teenager the aggressiveness and the intelligence become more evident due to change in this phase of development. The sample of 35 adolescents of both sexes participated in this survey. The instruments used were the batch of reasoning tests – BPR-5 and the Aggressiveness scale for children and young people. The results indicated that there is no relationship between aggression and intelligence. However, based on the literature these variables interrelate. Therefore, it is suggested that this research be expanded with the use of other psychological instruments.

  7. Association Between Dental Students' Emotional Intelligence and Academic Performance: A Study at Six Dental Colleges in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Puranik, Manjunath P; Sowmya, K R

    2016-05-01

    Since the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in achieving academic excellence requires further research, the aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess EI and its associated factors and to determine any association between EI and academic performance among final-year dental students in Bengaluru, India. In 2015, 208 dental students from six dental colleges in Bengaluru were invited to participate in the study. Their demographic and lifestyle data were collected, and EI was assessed with the 30-item Emotional Quotient Self-Assessment Checklist developed by Sterrett. Academic performance was assessed using grades obtained in the final-year undergraduate examination. The response rate was 96% (N=200). Overall, 54.5% of the participants had high EI scores (≥120), although only 51 (25.5%) had a high EI score in all the domains (≥20). EI was significantly greater in females than males. Gender, sleep, meeting friends, physical exercise, recreational activities, and academic performance were significantly associated with EI and accounted for 42% variance in hierarchical regression analysis. EI was also positively associated with academic performance. Gender and healthy lifestyle habits were positively associated with EI, which in turn influenced these students' academic performance. These findings suggest a possible need for attention to developing dental students' EI.

  8. Effects of an emotional intelligence program in variables related to the prevention of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Peña-Sarrionandia, Ainize

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, numerous studies have shown a significant increase in violence during childhood and adolescence. These data suggest the importance of implementing programs to prevent and reduce violent behavior. The study aimed to design a program of emotional intelligence (EI) for adolescents and to assess its effects on variables related to violence prevention. The possible differential effect of the program on both genders was also examined. The sample comprised 148 adolescents aged from 13 to 16 years. The study used an experimental design with repeated pretest-posttest measures and control groups. To measure the variables, four assessment instruments were administered before and after the program, as well as in the follow-up phase (1 year after the conclusion of the intervention). The program consisted of 20 one-hour sessions. The pretest-posttest ANCOVAs showed that the program significantly increased: (1) EI (attention, clarity, emotional repair); (2) assertive cognitive social interaction strategies; (3) internal control of anger; and (4) the cognitive ability to analyze negative feelings. In the follow-up phase, the positive effects of the intervention were generally maintained and, moreover, the use of aggressive strategies as an interpersonal conflict-resolution technique was significantly reduced. Regarding the effect of the program on both genders, the change was very similar, but the boys increased assertive social interaction strategies, attention, and emotional clarity significantly more than the girls. The importance of implementing programs to promote socio-emotional development and prevent violence is discussed.

  9. An Exploratory Study of the Ways in Which Elementary School Principals Use Their Emotional Intelligence to Address Conflict in Their Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Lorissa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study described the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and strategies associated with emotional intelligence (EI) that elementary school principals used to address conflict in their organizations. This study also determined the impact EI had on elementary school principals' perceptions of their ability to lead their organizations. This…

  10. Students' Self-Determined Motivation, Emotional Intelligence and Academic Persistence: An Examination of Second Year Students at a Public and a Private Historically Black University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts-Martinez, Evanda Shentelle

    2015-01-01

    Self-determined Motivation, Emotional Intelligence, Persistence Attitudes, and Persistence Behaviors are non-cognitive factors that influence students' academic progression. This study examined the associations between Self-determined Motivation, EI, Persistence Attitudes, and Persistence Behaviors and the degree to which EI, as a mediating…

  11. Swedbank ei pikenda Rumeenia fondi võlakirju / Piret Reiljan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reiljan, Piret, 1983-

    2010-01-01

    Swedbank ei pikendanud IPC Investment Groupi poolt hallatava Rumeenia kinnisvarafondi Nord Hill Land Portfolio tähtaega ning fond peab vara müüki panema. IPC Investment Groupi omanikud on Indrek Elhi ja rumeenlane Ciprian Lopata

  12. Turundajad ei oska kasutada kogutud kliendiinfot / Eda-Liis Kann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kann, Eda-Liis, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti kaupmehed koguvad kliendiinfot, kuid klientide kasumlikkust ei arvutata. Lisa: Kliendid pole motiveeritud oma ostu registreerima; Tesco põhilised erinevused võrreldes Eesti lojaalsusprogrammidega; Partnerkaart; Säästukaart; Stockmanni püsikliendikaart

  13. Pärt, Arvo: "Beatus". Statuit ei Dominus / Patric Wiklacz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Wiklacz, Patric

    1997-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt, Arvo: "Beatus". Statuit ei Dominus. Missa syllabica. Beatus Petronius. 7 Magnificat-Antiphonen. De profundis. Memento. Cantate Domino. Solfeggio. Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, T. Kaljuste". Virgin Classics 545 276-2 (CD:167F)

  14. Kui parimast ei piisa, siis piisab erinevast / Gustav Hafren

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hafren, Gustav

    2003-01-01

    Autor leiab, et turul, kus ei võida mitte kvaliteetsemad tooted, vaid tooted, mis omavad kindlat kohta klientide teadvuses, on kõige olulisem eristuda konkurentidest. Lisa: Milline on kliendi teadvus? Kokkuvõte autori ettekandest turunduskonverentsil "Password 2003".

  15. "Live 8" tähti ei auhinnata

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Briti muusikapreemia Brit Awards žürii ei võtnud parima kontsertesituse auhinnapretendentide nimekirja ansamblit Pink Floyd ja lauljat Robbie Williamsi, kuna nende 20-minutiline esitus polevat auhinna saamiseks veenev

  16. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Personality: Gender-Invariant Linkages Across Different Measures of the Big Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegling, Alexander B; Furnham, Adrian; Petrides, K V

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated if the linkages between trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) and the Five-Factor Model of personality were invariant between men and women. Five English-speaking samples ( N = 307-685) of mostly undergraduate students each completed a different measure of the Big Five personality traits and either the full form or short form of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue). Across samples, models predicting global TEIQue scores from the Big Five were invariant between genders, with Neuroticism and Extraversion being the strongest trait EI correlates, followed by Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Openness. However, there was some evidence indicating that the gender-specific contributions of the Big Five to trait EI vary depending on the personality measure used, being more consistent for women. Discussion focuses on the validity of the TEIQue as a measure of trait EI and its psychometric properties, more generally.

  17. Emotionally intelligent leadership as a key determinant of strategic and effective management of human capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Viskupičová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to outline the strategic importance of Emotional Intelligence (EI in contemporary approaches to management of Human resources (HR. The aim of this study is to provide a conceptual theoretical insight of the relationship between EI and leadership. The paper also reflects the conditions within the present business environment in Slovakia with the emphasis on leadership in the context of EI (based on the research conducted in this field, while answering the following question: To what extent do Slovak organizations incorporate EI measures into the hiring process for managerial positions? The answer to this question would consequently disclose whether organizations in Slovakia consider Emotional Intelligence as a factor determining effective performance of managers – leaders.

  18. Association between level of emotional intelligence and severity of anxiety in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Madeline; Snow, Joseph; Geraci, Marilla; Vythilingam, Meena; Blair, R J R; Charney, Dennis S; Pine, Daniel S; Blair, Karina S

    2008-12-01

    Generalized social phobia (GSP) is characterized by a marked fear of most social situations. It is associated with an anomalous neural response to emotional stimuli, and individuals with the disorder frequently show interpretation bias in social situations. From this it might be suggested that GSP involves difficulty in accurately perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Here we applied the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to medication-free GSP (n=28) and no pathology (n=21) individuals. Patients with GSP performed within the normal range on the measure however severity of social anxiety significantly correlated with emotional intelligence (EI). Specifically, there was a negative correlation between social anxiety severity and Experiential (basic-level emotional processing) EI. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between social anxiety severity and Strategic (higher-level conscious emotional processing) EI. These results suggest that EI may index emotional processing systems that mitigate the impact of systems causally implicated in GSP.

  19. Trait Emotional Intelligence Is Related to Risk Taking when Adolescents Make Deliberative Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Panno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most forms of risky behavior reach their peak during adolescence. A prominent line of research is exploring the relationship between people’s emotional self-efficacy and risk taking, but little is known about this relationship in the cognitive-deliberative domain among adolescents. The main aim of the present study consists in investigating whether trait EI (Emotional Intelligence is positively related to risk taking under predominantly cognitive-deliberative conditions among adolescents. Ninety-four adolescents played the cold version of the Columbia Card Task one month following an assessment of their trait EI. Results showed that trait EI is associated with risk taking under cognitive-deliberative conditions among adolescents. Moreover, the present research showed that trait EI is related to risk taking through the decision makers’ self-motivation. These results provide novel insights into research investigating the connections between emotional intelligence, decision science and adolescence research.

  20. Uuring : neljandik elanikke ei tea Ilvese tegevusest midagi / Dannar Leitmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Leitmaa, Dannar, 1982-

    2007-01-01

    Uuringufirma Faktum & Ariko korraldatud küsitlusest selgus, et 23 % elanikest ei oska öelda, millega on president Toomas Hendrik Ilves viimase aasta jooksul silma paistnud. Eesti Päevalehe poolt tellitud küsitluse tulemusi kommenteerib politoloog Rein Toomla. Ilmunud ka: Harju Ekspress 16. nov. 2007, lk. 2, pealk.: Presidendi tegevusest ei tea iga neljas eestimaalane midagi (lüh.)

  1. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  2. Intelligent Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2005-01-01

    Forestillingen om at naturen er designet af en guddommelig 'intelligens' er et smukt filosofisk princip. Teorier om Intelligent Design som en naturvidenskabeligt baseret teori er derimod helt forfærdelig.......Forestillingen om at naturen er designet af en guddommelig 'intelligens' er et smukt filosofisk princip. Teorier om Intelligent Design som en naturvidenskabeligt baseret teori er derimod helt forfærdelig....

  3. Association between Ability Emotional Intelligence and Left Insula during Social Judgment of Facial Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Maddalena, Chiara; Viscanti, Giovanna; Lanciano, Tiziana; Soleti, Emanuela; Mangiulli, Ivan; Taurisano, Paolo; Fazio, Leonardo; Bertolino, Alessandro; Curci, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    The human ability of identifying, processing and regulating emotions from social stimuli is generally referred as Emotional Intelligence (EI). Within EI, Ability EI identifies a performance measure assessing individual skills at perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Previous models suggest that a brain "somatic marker circuitry" (SMC) sustains emotional sub-processes included in EI. Three primary brain regions are included: the amygdala, the insula and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Here, our aim was to investigate the relationship between Ability EI scores and SMC activity during social judgment of emotional faces. Sixty-three healthy subjects completed a test measuring Ability EI and underwent fMRI during a social decision task (i.e. approach or avoid) about emotional faces with different facial expressions. Imaging data revealed that EI scores are associated with left insula activity during social judgment of emotional faces as a function of facial expression. Specifically, higher EI scores are associated with greater left insula activity during social judgment of fearful faces but also with lower activity of this region during social judgment of angry faces. These findings indicate that the association between Ability EI and the SMC activity during social behavior is region- and emotion-specific.

  4. Validity evidence for the situational judgment test paradigm in emotional intelligence measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbrecht, Nele; Lievens, Filip

    2012-01-01

    To date, various measurement approaches have been proposed to assess emotional intelligence (EI). Recently, two new EI tests have been developed based on the situational judgment test (SJT) paradigm: the Situational Test of Emotional Understanding (STEU) and the Situational Test of Emotion Management (STEM). Initial attempts have been made to examine the construct-related validity of these new tests; we extend these findings by placing the tests in a broad nomological network. To this end, 850 undergraduate students completed a personality inventory, a cognitive ability test, a self-report EI test, a performance-based EI measure, the STEU, and the STEM. The SJT-based EI tests were not strongly correlated with personality and fluid cognitive ability. Regarding their relation with existing EI measures, the tests did not capture the same construct as self-report EI measures, but corresponded rather to performance-based EI measures. Overall, these results lend support for the SJT paradigm for measuring EI as an ability.

  5. Association between Ability Emotional Intelligence and Left Insula during Social Judgment of Facial Emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Quarto

    Full Text Available The human ability of identifying, processing and regulating emotions from social stimuli is generally referred as Emotional Intelligence (EI. Within EI, Ability EI identifies a performance measure assessing individual skills at perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Previous models suggest that a brain "somatic marker circuitry" (SMC sustains emotional sub-processes included in EI. Three primary brain regions are included: the amygdala, the insula and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC. Here, our aim was to investigate the relationship between Ability EI scores and SMC activity during social judgment of emotional faces. Sixty-three healthy subjects completed a test measuring Ability EI and underwent fMRI during a social decision task (i.e. approach or avoid about emotional faces with different facial expressions. Imaging data revealed that EI scores are associated with left insula activity during social judgment of emotional faces as a function of facial expression. Specifically, higher EI scores are associated with greater left insula activity during social judgment of fearful faces but also with lower activity of this region during social judgment of angry faces. These findings indicate that the association between Ability EI and the SMC activity during social behavior is region- and emotion-specific.

  6. The relationship between emotional intelligence, previous caring experience and mindfulness in student nurses and midwives: a cross sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Austyn; Stenhouse, Rosie; Young, Jenny; Carver, Hannah; Carver, Fiona; Brown, Norrie

    2015-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI), previous caring experience and mindfulness training may have a positive impact on nurse education. More evidence is needed to support the use of these variables in nurse recruitment and retention. To explore the relationship between EI, gender, age, programme of study, previous caring experience and mindfulness training. Cross sectional element of longitudinal study. 938year one nursing, midwifery and computing students at two Scottish Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) who entered their programme in September 2013. Participants completed a measure of 'trait' EI: Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF); and 'ability' EI: Schutte's et al. (1998) Emotional Intelligence Scale (SEIS). Demographics, previous caring experience and previous training in mindfulness were recorded. Relationships between variables were tested using non-parametric tests. Emotional intelligence increased with age on both measures of EI [TEIQ-SF H(5)=15.157 p=0.001; SEIS H(5)=11.388, p=0.044]. Females (n=786) scored higher than males (n=149) on both measures [TEIQ-SF, U=44,931, z=-4.509, pemotional intelligence. Mindfulness training was associated with higher 'ability' emotional intelligence. Implications for recruitment, retention and further research are explored. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Measuring and Validating Emotional Intelligence as Performance or Self-Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöberg, Lennart; Engelberg, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    This is a study of emotional intelligence (EI). EI was measured by performance and self-report tasks. Data were also obtained on basic values, some standard personality dimensions such as those specified in the five-factor model, social adjustment and several scales of impression management. Criteria were loneliness, work-family life balance and Internet addiction, and also measures of emotional and value deviance. Participants were college students in a business education program who partici...

  8. Emotional intelligence predicts peer-rated social competence above and beyond personality traits

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Szczygieł; Joanna Weber

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the relationship between trait emotional intelligence (EI) and social competences (SC), which determine effective functioning in three types of social situations: intimate situations, situations of social exposure and situations requiring self-assertion. Social competences were assessed using a peer nomination method. It was hypothesized that trait EI predicts SC above and beyond personality traits. Participants and procedure Data were co...

  9. Cultural Perspective on Parenting, Trait Emotional Intelligence and Mental Health in Taiwanese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ching Yu; Shen, A.C.T.; Hsieh, Y.P.; Feng, J.Y.; Wei, H.S.; Hwa, H.L.; Feng, J.Y.

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to clarify the associations as well as the pathways through which parenting and children's emotional intelligence (EI) may influence children's mental health with a cross-sectional sample of 675 school pupils (fourth grade, mean age = 10.4 years, 310 boy, 356 girls and 9 unidentified) in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression and path analyses were used to examine the relationships between parenting styles, children's trait EI, and their psychological symptoms, wit...

  10. Does Trait Emotional Intelligence Predict Unique Variance in Early Career Success Beyond IQ and Personality?

    OpenAIRE

    Haro García, José Manuel de; Castejón Costa, Juan Luis

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the contribution of emotional intelligence (EI) to career success, in this study, we analyzed the relationship between trait EI (TEI), general mental ability (GMA), the big five personality traits, and career success indicators, in a sample of 130 graduates who were in the early stages of their careers. Results from hierarchical regression analyses indicated that TEI, and especially its dimension “repair,” has incremental validity in predicting one of the career success ...

  11. Emotional Intelligence and cognitive abilities - associations and sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeller, Silvia; Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Kemmler, Georg; Hofer, Alex

    2017-09-01

    In order to expand on previous research, this cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and cognitive abilities in healthy adults with a special focus on potential sex differences. EI was assessed by means of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), whereas cognitive abilities were investigated using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS), which measures key aspects of cognitive functioning, i.e. verbal memory, working memory, motor speed, verbal fluency, attention and processing speed, and reasoning and problem solving. 137 subjects (65% female) with a mean age of 38.7 ± 11.8 years were included into the study. While males and females were comparable with regard to EI, men achieved significantly higher BACS composite scores and outperformed women in the BACS subscales motor speed, attention and processing speed, and reasoning and problem solving. Verbal fluency significantly predicted EI, whereas the MSCEIT subscale understanding emotions significantly predicted the BACS composite score. Our findings support previous research and emphasize the relevance of considering cognitive abilities when assessing ability EI in healthy individuals.

  12. Emotional intelligence score and performance of dental undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yuh; Ninomiya, Kazunori; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and undergraduate dental students' ability to deal with different situations of communication in a clinical dentistry practical training course of communication skills. Fourth-year students in 2012 and in 2013 at the Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata participated in the survey. The total number of participating students was 129 (88 males and 41 females). The students were asked to complete the Japanese version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test in communication skills. Female students tended to have significantly higher EI score than males. The EI score in the group with high-grade academic performers was higher than in the low-grade group. The influence of EI on academic performance appeared to be mainly due to the students' ability to accurately perceiving emotions and to their ability to understand emotional issues. The importance of EI may also lie in its ability to parse out personality factors from more changeable aspects of a person's behavior. Although further studies are required, we believe that dental educators need to assume the responsibility to help students develop their emotional competencies that they will need to prosper in their chosen careers. In our conclusion, dental educators should support low achievers to increase their levels of self-confidence instead of concentrating mainly on improving their technical skill and academic performance. This may lead to upgrading their skills for managing emotions and to changing their learning approach.

  13. Higher emotional intelligence is related to lower test anxiety among students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpanah, Mohammad; Keshavarz, Mohammadreza; Haghighi, Mohammad; Jahangard, Leila; Bajoghli, Hafez; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Background For students attending university courses, experiencing test anxiety (TA) dramatically impairs cognitive performance and success at exams. Whereas TA is a specific case of social phobia, emotional intelligence (EI) is an umbrella term covering interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, along with positive stress management, adaptability, and mood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that higher EI and lower TA are associated. Further, sex differences were explored. Method During an exam week, a total of 200 university students completed questionnaires covering sociodemographic information, TA, and EI. Results Higher scores on EI traits were associated with lower TA scores. Relative to male participants, female participants reported higher TA scores, but not EI scores. Intrapersonal and interpersonal skills and mood predicted low TA, while sex, stress management, and adaptability were excluded from the equation. Conclusion The pattern of results suggests that efforts to improve intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, and mood might benefit students with high TA. Specifically, social commitment might counteract TA. PMID:26834474

  14. Integrating emotion regulation and emotional intelligence traditions: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Sarrionandia, Ainize; Mikolajczak, Moïra; Gross, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively independent research traditions have developed that address emotion management. The first is the emotion regulation (ER) tradition, which focuses on the processes which permit individuals to influence which emotions they have, when they have them, and how they experience and express these emotions. The second is the emotional intelligence (EI) tradition, which focuses—among other things—on individual differences in ER. To integrate these two traditions, we employed the process model of ER (Gross, 1998b) to review the literature on EI. Two key findings emerged. First, high EI individuals shape their emotions from the earliest possible point in the emotion trajectory and have many strategies at their disposal. Second, high EI individuals regulate their emotions successfully when necessary but they do so flexibly, thereby leaving room for emotions to emerge. We argue that ER and EI traditions stand to benefit substantially from greater integration. PMID:25759676

  15. Emotional intelligence, teamwork effectiveness, and job performance: the moderating role of job context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farh, Crystal I C Chien; Seo, Myeong-Gu; Tesluk, Paul E

    2012-07-01

    We advance understanding of the role of ability-based emotional intelligence (EI) and its subdimensions in the workplace by examining the mechanisms and context-based boundary conditions of the EI-performance relationship. Using a trait activation framework, we theorize that employees with higher overall EI and emotional perception ability exhibit higher teamwork effectiveness (and subsequent job performance) when working in job contexts characterized by high managerial work demands because such contexts contain salient emotion-based cues that activate employees' emotional capabilities. A sample of 212 professionals from various organizations and industries indicated support for the salutary effect of EI, above and beyond the influence of personality, cognitive ability, emotional labor job demands, job complexity, and demographic control variables. Theoretical and practical implications of the potential value of EI for workplace outcomes under contexts involving managerial complexity are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Integrating emotion regulation and emotional intelligence traditions: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainize ePeña-Sarrionandia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two relatively independent research traditions have developed that address emotion management. The first is the emotion regulation (ER tradition, which focuses on the processes which permit individuals to influence which emotions they have, when they have them, and how they experience and express these emotions. The second is the emotional intelligence (EI tradition, which focuses – among other things - on individual differences in ER. To integrate these two traditions, we employed the process model of ER (Gross, 1998 to review the literature on EI. Two key findings emerged. First, high EI individuals shape their emotions from the earliest possible point in the emotion trajectory and have many strategies at their disposal. Second, high EI individuals regulate their emotions successfully when necessary but they do so flexibly, thereby leaving room for emotions to emerge. We argue that ER and EI traditions stand to benefit substantially from greater integration.

  17. Integrating emotion regulation and emotional intelligence traditions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Sarrionandia, Ainize; Mikolajczak, Moïra; Gross, James J

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively independent research traditions have developed that address emotion management. The first is the emotion regulation (ER) tradition, which focuses on the processes which permit individuals to influence which emotions they have, when they have them, and how they experience and express these emotions. The second is the emotional intelligence (EI) tradition, which focuses-among other things-on individual differences in ER. To integrate these two traditions, we employed the process model of ER (Gross, 1998b) to review the literature on EI. Two key findings emerged. First, high EI individuals shape their emotions from the earliest possible point in the emotion trajectory and have many strategies at their disposal. Second, high EI individuals regulate their emotions successfully when necessary but they do so flexibly, thereby leaving room for emotions to emerge. We argue that ER and EI traditions stand to benefit substantially from greater integration.

  18. Emotional intelligence increases over time: A longitudinal study of Australian pre-registration nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kim; Fethney, Judith; McKenzie, Heather; Fisher, Murray; Harkness, Emily; Kozlowski, Desirée

    2017-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with positive outcomes for nursing students. Higher EI is associated with personal wellbeing and stress management, higher academic performance, stronger nursing leadership and practice performance, and greater patient safety. While there is an increasing body of evidence on nursing students' EI, there is minimal evidence on EI over time during pre-registration programs. To measure EI in pre-registration nursing students from program commencement to conclusion to ascertain EI over time and examine the relationship between EI and academic performance. Longitudinal repeated measures study between March 2010-February 2013 at a metropolitan university in Australia. 111 nursing students (74.8% female) contributed data on at least two occasions. Participants were enrolled in a pre-registration Master of Nursing degree. Half the cohort (55.0%) comprised Graduate Entry students who completed the course in two years full time. The other 45% were enrolled in an undergraduate degree in arts, science or health science, combined with the same pre-registration Master of Nursing Degree. These students completed their Combined Degree program in four years full time. Participants had a mean age of 24.7years (SD=7.36). EI was measured for commencing students (T1) using the Assessing Emotions Scale (AES), then a further three times: end of first year (T2; 9 months follow up); beginning of second year (12 months follow up; T3) and end of the program (T4; 24/36 months follow up). Students' EI was found to increase across the program; one subscale of EI (managing others' emotions) was related to higher academic performance; and there was a significant increase in the Utilising Emotions subscale scores over time. Pre-registration nurse education contributes to strengthening students' EI over time. Specific EI education scaffolded throughout programs is recommended in pre-registration curricula. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Investigation of the construct of trait emotional intelligence in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroveli, Stella; Petrides, K V; Shove, Chloe; Whitehead, Amanda

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses the construct of trait emotional intelligence (trait EI or trait emotional self-efficacy) with emphasis on measurement in children. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Child Form (TEIQue-CF) is introduced and its development and theoretical background are briefly explained. It is shown in two independent studies that the TEIQue-CF has satisfactory levels of internal consistency (alpha = 0.76 and alpha = 0.73, respectively) and temporal stability [r = 0.79 and r ((corrected)) = 1.00]. Trait EI scores were generally unrelated to proxies of cognitive ability, as hypothesized in trait EI theory (Petrides et al. in Matthews et al. (eds) Emotional intelligence: knowns and unknowns -- series in affective science. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp 151-166). They also differentiated between pupils with unauthorized absences or exclusions from school and controls. Trait EI correlated positively with teacher-rated positive behavior and negatively with negative behavior (emotional symptoms, conduct problems, peer problems, and hyperactivity).

  20. Intelligent playgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines play, gaming and learning in regard to intelligent playware developed for outdoor use. The key questions are how does these novel artefacts influence the concept of play, gaming and learning. Up until now play and game have been understood as different activities. This paper...... examines if the sharp differentiation between the two can be uphold in regard to intelligent playware for outdoor use. Play and game activities will be analysed and viewed in conjunction with learning contexts. This paper will stipulate that intelligent playware facilitates rapid shifts in contexts...

  1. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  2. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  3. Emotional intelligence levels in baccalaureate-prepared early career registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda S Reemts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The increasing complexity of the healthcare environment calls for increasing emotional intelligence (EI competence in nurses. This study assessed the EI competence of 164 baccalaureate nursing alumni who graduated during the years 2007-2010 from three Benedictine institutions located in the Midwestern United States to see if there was growth of EI with experience as a registered nurse (RN, and to determine if age, gender, grade point average (GPA, and years of total healthcare work experience prior to graduation predicted EI. Methods: Participants completed the web-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT and a demographic survey. Results: Findings indicated 79.4% of participants were competent or higher on the MSCEIT total EI score. Percentages of nurses scoring in the competent or higher range on each of the four branch scores of perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions were 80.6%, 72.7%, 84.2%, and 84.9% respectively. There were no significant differences on EI scores between graduates with 1-2 years compared to 3-5 years of experience as a RN. Results of a linear stepwise regression indicated being female was a significant predictor on the MSCEIT total EI score (P = 0.015 and using emotions branch (P = 0.047. Findings also indicated GPA (P < 0.001 and being female (P = 0.023 were significant predictors of EI on the understanding emotions branch. Conclusions: The findings indicate there is work to be done to improve the EI competence of nursing graduates. Continued research on the topic of EI and nursing is needed to build the knowledge base on how to promote positive patient outcomes.

  4. Are there gender differences in the emotional intelligence of resident physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Sophia K; Petrusa, Emil R; Fiedeldey-Van Dijk, Carina; Mullen, John T; Smink, Douglas S; Scott-Vernaglia, Shannon E; Kent, Tara S; Black-Schaffer, W Stephen; Phitayakorn, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Because academic literature indicates that emotional intelligence (EI) is tied to work performance, job satisfaction, burnout, and client satisfaction, there is great interest in understanding physician EI. To determine whether gender differences in resident EI profiles mirror EI gender differences in the general population. A total of 325 residents in 3 types of residency programs (pathology, pediatrics, and general surgery) at 3 large academic institutions were invited electronically to complete the validated Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue), a tool consisting of 153 items that cluster to 15 independent facets, 4 composite factors, and 1 global EI score. The response rate was 42.8% (n = 139, women = 84). Global EI was not significantly different between men and women resident physicians (p = 0.74). Women scored higher than men in the TEIQue facets impulse control (p = 0.004) and relationships (p = 0.004). Men scored higher than women in 2 facets, stress management (p = 0.008) and emotion management (p = 0.023). Within surgery (n = 85, women = 46), women scored higher than men in impulse control (p = 0.006), whereas men scored higher in stress management (p = 0.008). Men and women residents across 3 specialties demonstrated near-identical global EI scores. However, gender differences in specific TEIQue facets suggest that similar to the general population, men and women residents may benefit from specific training of different EI domains to enhance well-rounded development. The lack of significant gender differences within surgery may indicate that surgery attracts individuals with particular EI profiles regardless of gender. Future research should focus on the functional relationship between educational interventions that promote targeted EI development and enhanced clinical performance. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emotional intelligence as a moderator in the stress-burnout relationship: a questionnaire study on nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgens-Ekermans, Gina; Brand, Tamari

    2012-08-01

    To investigate inter-relationships between emotional intelligence (EI), work stress and burnout in a group of nurses in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. The moderating effect of EI in the stress-burnout relationship and group differences (nurses working in different wards) in burnout were also investigated. Stress and subsequent burnout commonly threaten the occupational health and well-being of nurses in South Africa and elsewhere. Developing EI in nurses may increase individual stress resistance and combat burnout. A cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires was conducted. Self-report data were used. Survey data were collected from 122 nurses working in different wards at four hospitals from a private hospital group. The Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test, Sources of Work Stress Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to measure EI, stress and burnout, respectively. Consistent inverse relationships between emotional control and management as dimensions of EI, and stress and burnout emerged. A differential effect of high vs. low EI on the stress-burnout relationship was evident. Workload and the work/family interface emerged as significant predictors of burnout. Respondents working in maternity, paediatric and ER wards reported more feelings of personal accomplishment than those working in general wards. Higher EI is significantly related with lower stress and burnout in a sample of South African nurses. The moderator effect of EI in the stress-burnout relationship suggests that enhanced EI may help diminish burnout development when chronic stress is experienced. EI developmental interventions, if introduced in nursing curricula, may increase emotional coping resources and enhanced social skills, which may benefit the long-term occupational health of nurses. This may be relevant in developing countries, where environmental stressors related to the organisational context (budget constraints) and wider social

  6. Emotional intelligence, perceived stress and academic performance of Sri Lankan medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, P; Wathurapatha, W S; Mathangasinghe, Y; Ponnamperuma, G

    2017-02-20

    Previous research has shown that higher Emotional Intelligence (EI) is associated with better academic and work performance. The present study intended to explore the relationship between EI, perceived stress and academic performance and associated factors among medical undergraduates. This descriptive cross-sectional research study was conducted among 471 medical undergraduates of 2nd, 4th and final years of University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Students were rated on self administered Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SEIT). Examination results were used as the dichotomous outcome variable in a logistic regression analysis. Females had higher mean EI scores (p = 0.014). A positive correlation was found between the EI score and the number of extracurricular activities (r = 0.121, p = 0.008). Those who were satisfied regarding their choice to study medicine, and who were planning to do postgraduate studies had significantly higher EI scores and lower PSS scores (p <0.001). Among final year undergraduates, those who passed the Clinical Sciences examination in the first attempt had a higher EI score (p <0.001) and a lower PSS score (p <0.05). Results of the binary logistic-regression analysis in the entire study population indicated that female gender (OR:1.98) and being satisfied regarding their choice of the medical undergraduate programme (OR:3.69) were significantly associated with passing the examinations. However, PSS Score and engagement in extracurricular activities were not associated with 'Examination Results'. Higher EI was associated with better academic performance amongst final year medical students. In addition a higher EI was observed in those who had a higher level of self satisfaction. Self-perceived stress was lower in those with a higher EI. Enhancing EI might help to improve academic performance among final year medical student and also help to reduce the stress levels and cultivate

  7. Emotional intelligence and non-social cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, B; Kemmler, G; Pardeller, S; Plass, T; Mühlbacher, M; Welte, A-S; Fleischhacker, W W; Hofer, A

    2017-01-01

    The different patterns of Emotional Intelligence (EI) deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are are not yet well understood. This study compares EI levels among these groups and highlights the potential impact of non-social cognition on EI. Fifty-eight schizophrenia and 60 bipolar outpatients were investigated using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Analyses of covariance were performed with adjustment for the BACS composite score. Compared to bipolar subjects, schizophrenia patients showed significantly lower levels in both EI and non-social cognition. After adjustment for the BACS composite score, the difference in EI was lost. The mediation analysis revealed that differences between schizophrenia and bipolar patients in strategic EI are almost fully attributable to the mediating effect of non-social cognition. Our findings suggest that in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients EI is strongly influenced by non-social cognitive functioning. This has to be taken into account when interpreting MSCEIT data in comparative studies in serious mental illness and emphasizes the importance of cognitive remediation.

  8. Exploring the emotional intelligence of Florence Nightingale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magpantay-Monroe, Edna Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) within nursing appears to be a growing interest as evidenced by the expanding number of literature reviews conducted on the subject. The inquiry for this historical research is to understand the work and characteristics of Florence Nightingale and EI. The assumption is that nurses who are emotionally intelligent are the most likely to not only survive the nursing profession but to thrive and make compassionate future leaders. Nightingale's letters, pictures and other writings were used to evaluate her viewpoints as an inspirational nurse and leader. Nightingale was a catalyst for change; internally motivated to be a great nurse and had the zeal to develop others as well. Exploring Nightingale's characteristics of EI such her confidence, determination, integrity and compassion, her teachings and beliefs can transcend time to mold successful nurses more than a century later. "The voice of a leader. It is as resounding as the heart it encourages, as far-reaching as the change it invokes. It is tuned by its keen sense of the voices around it and speaks back in a language they can understand. Its breath enters all that truly hear it, and when it no longer speaks, it can still be heard."-Mae Taylor Moss.

  9. Predicting stress from the ability to eavesdrop on feelings: Emotional intelligence and testosterone jointly predict cortisol reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N; Schneider, Vanessa K

    2016-09-01

    While emotional intelligence (EI) is recognized as a resource in social interactions, we hypothesized a positive association with stress in socially evaluative contexts. In particular, we expected emotion recognition, the core component of EI, to inflict stress on individuals in negatively valenced interactions. We expected this association to be stronger for status-driven individuals, that is, for individuals scoring high on basal testosterone. In a laboratory experiment, N = 166 male participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (Kirschbaum, Pirke, & Hellhammer, 1993). As expected, EI measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT V2.0; Mayer et al., 2003) predicted higher cortisol reactivity, including slower recovery from stress. The effect was moderated by basal testosterone, such that the association was positive when basal testosterone was high but not when it was low. On the component level of EI, the interaction was replicated for negative emotion recognition. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that EI is associated with higher activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in contexts where social status is at stake, particularly for those individuals who are more status-driven. Thus, the effects of EI are not unequivocally positive: While EI may positively affect the course of social interactions, it also inflicts stress on the emotionally intelligent individuals themselves. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. The relationship of certified flight instructors' emotional intelligence levels on flight student advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokeness, Mark Merrill

    Aviation researchers estimate airline companies will require nearly 500,000 pilots in the next 20 years. The role of a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) is to move student pilots to professional pilots with training typically conducted in one-on-one student and instructor sessions. The knowledge of aviation, professionalism as a teacher, and the CFI’s interpersonal skills can directly affect the successes and advancement of a student pilot. A new and emerging assessment of people skills is known as emotional intelligence (EI). The EI of the CFI can and will affect a flight students’ learning experiences. With knowledge of emotional intelligence and its effect on flight training, student pilot dropouts from aviation may be reduced, thus helping to ensure an adequate supply of pilots. Without pilots, the growth of the commercial aviation industry will be restricted. This mixed method research study established the correlation between a CFI’s measured EI levels and the advancement of flight students. The elements contributing to a CFI’s EI level were not found to be teaching or flight-related experiences, suggesting other life factors are drawn upon by the CFI and are reflected in their emotional intelligence levels presented to flight students. Students respond positively to CFIs with higher levels of emotional intelligence. Awareness of EI skills by both the CFI and flight student contribute to flight student successes and advancement.

  11. Lesion Mapping the Four-Factor Structure of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operskalski, Joachim T.; Paul, Erick J.; Colom, Roberto; Barbey, Aron K.; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to an individual’s ability to process and respond to emotions, including recognizing the expression of emotions in others, using emotions to enhance thought and decision making, and regulating emotions to drive effective behaviors. Despite their importance for goal-directed social behavior, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying specific facets of EI. Here, we report findings from a study investigating the neural bases of these specific components for EI in a sample of 130 combat veterans with penetrating traumatic brain injury. We examined the neural mechanisms underlying experiential (perceiving and using emotional information) and strategic (understanding and managing emotions) facets of EI. Factor scores were submitted to voxel-based lesion symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. The results indicate that two facets of EI (perceiving and managing emotions) engage common and distinctive neural systems, with shared dependence on the social knowledge network, and selective engagement of the orbitofrontal and parietal cortex for strategic aspects of emotional information processing. The observed pattern of findings suggests that sub-facets of experiential and strategic EI can be characterized as separable but related processes that depend upon a core network of brain structures within frontal, temporal and parietal cortex. PMID:26858627

  12. Intelligent Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Pinedo, Edilfredo Eliot

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Advertisement diseña e implementa un sistema de publicidad para dispositivos móviles en un centro comercial, donde los clientes reciben publicidad de forma pasiva en sus dispositivos mientras están dentro.

  13. An international study of emotional intelligence in first year radiography students: The relationship to age, gender and culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, J.P.; Mackay, S.J.; Lewis, S.J.; Lane, S.; White, P.

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is an important personality trait in healthcare professionals and students. This study aims to identify gender, age or culture differences in trait EI scores between student radiographers across four countries. The short form of the trait EI questionnaire (TEIQue-SF) was used to collect data from first year radiography students in Australia, Hong Kong, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Global EI and Sociability scores of the first year radiography students were in keeping with published norm data in terms of gender differences, however, Self-Control and Emotionality scores did not follow the gender-based norms. Statistically significant differences in Global EI (p = 0.02), Wellbeing (p = 0.002) and Sociability (p = 0.003) were found with Western versus Asian cultures being a key factor. This study highlights a number of EI findings of importance to health-related professional programmes and the potential impact of cultural background on this key personality trait. - Highlights: • Emotional intelligence is a key trait for healthcare professionals and healthcare students. • Gender, age and culture impact on trait emotional intelligence scores of radiography students. • Differences in trait emotional intelligence scores exist between Western and Asian radiography students.

  14. Intelligence Assessment: Gardner Multiple Intelligence Theory as an Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Leandro S.; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Bermejo, Maria Rosario; Ferrando, Mercedes; Ferrandiz, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    In the multiple intelligence framework, newer and more contextualized cognitive tasks are suggested as alternative to more traditional psychometric tests. The purpose of this article is to examine whether or not these two types of instruments converge into a general factor of cognitive performance. Thus, the Battery of General and Differential…

  15. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Mohor Dumitrita

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present business intelligence systems. These systems can be extremely complex and important in modern market competition. Its effectiveness also reflects in price, so we have to exlore their financial potential before investment. The systems have 20 years long history and during that time many of such tools have been developed, but they are rarely still in use. Business intelligence system consists of three main areas: Data Warehouse, ETL tools and tools f...

  16. Intelligent indexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the relevance of artificial intelligence to the automatic indexing of natural language text. We describe the use of domain-specific semantically-based thesauruses and address the problem of creating adequate knowledge bases for intelligent indexing systems. We also discuss the relevance of the Hilbert space ι 2 to the compact representation of documents and to the definition of the similarity of natural language texts. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs

  17. Intelligent indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, J

    1993-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the relevance of artificial intelligence to the automatic indexing of natural language text. We describe the use of domain-specific semantically-based thesauruses and address the problem of creating adequate knowledge bases for intelligent indexing systems. We also discuss the relevance of the Hilbert space {iota}{sup 2} to the compact representation of documents and to the definition of the similarity of natural language texts. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Does emotional intelligence change during medical school gross anatomy course? Correlations with students' performance and team cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Michelle A; Porter, Samuel G; Pawlina, Wojciech; Juskewitch, Justin E; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with increased academic achievement, but its impact on medical education is relatively unexplored. This study sought to evaluate change in EI, performance outcomes, and team cohesion within a team-based medical school anatomy course. Forty-two medical students completed a pre-course and post-course Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SSEIT). Individual EI scores were then compared with composite course performance grade and team cohesion survey results. Mean pre-course EI score was 140.3 out of a possible 160. During the course, mean individual EI scores did not change significantly (P = 0.17) and no correlation between EI scores and academic performance was noted (P = 0.31). In addition, EI did not correlate with team cohesion (P = 0.16). While business has found significant utility for EI in increasing performance and productivity, its role in medical education is still uncertain. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. Emotional intelligence scale for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional Intelligence has been associated with positive outcome process in varied professions. There is paucity of Indian literature on the subject; especially involving medical undergraduates; and presently there is no scale available to measure the same in the Indian scenario. Objective: To develop a scale to measure Emotional Intelligence among medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four domains of Emotional intelligence were selected, viz. Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness & Social-Skills and these were included for the purpose of domains of the scale. On the basis of focused group discussions and in-depth deliberations with experts, undergraduate and postgraduate medical students a pool of 50 items was generated. The items were reduced to 27 based on expert consensus and on the basis of frequency of endorsement by expert reviews. It was followed by a pilot study of 50 undergraduates. This completed the preparation of the preliminary draft based on content analysis. The questionnaire was then administered in 480 students and the data was analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. For the purpose of concurrent validity, emotional intelligence scale developed by Dr. Ekta was used. Results: The Cronbach′s Alpha for Internal Consistency Reliability was 0.68. The EIS had a significant correlation with social awareness domain of Emotional Intelligence Test (EIT establishing Concurrent Validity. Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence Scale for medical undergraduates was constructed. Reliability and concurrent validity were also established for the same.

  20. Validating relationships among attachment, emotional intelligence and clinical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M Gemma; Fletcher, Ian; O'Sullivan, Helen

    2014-10-01

    In a previous study, we found that emotional intelligence (EI) mediates the negative influences of Year 1 medical students' attachment styles on their provider-patient communication (PPC). However, in that study, students were examined on a relatively straightforward PPC skill set and were not assessed on their abilities to elicit relevant clinical information from standardised patients. The influence of these psychological variables in more demanding and realistic clinical scenarios warrants investigation. This study aimed to validate previous research findings by exploring the mediating effect of EI on the relationship between medical students' attachment styles and their PPC across an ecologically valid PPC objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Year 2 medical students completed measures of attachment (the Experiences in Close Relationships-Short Form [ECR-SF], a 12-item measure which provides attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety dimensional scores) and EI (the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test [MSCEIT], a 141-item measure on the perception, use, understanding and management of emotions), prior to their summative PPC OSCE. Provider-patient communication was assessed using OSCE scores. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to validate our earlier model of the relationships between attachment style, EI and PPC. A total of 296 of 382 (77.5%) students participated. Attachment avoidance was significantly negatively correlated with total EI scores (r = -0.23, p < 0.01); total EI was significantly positively correlated with OSCE scores (r = 0.32, p < 0.01). Parsimonious SEM confirmed that EI mediated the negative influence of attachment avoidance on OSCE scores. It significantly predicted 14% of the variance in OSCE scores, twice as much as the 7% observed in the previous study. In more demanding and realistic clinical scenarios, EI makes a greater contribution towards effective PPC. Attachment is perceived to be stable

  1. Does Emotions Communication Ability Affect Psychological Well-Being? A Study with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) v2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Tiziana; Curci, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the current study was to provide evidence regarding the relationship between emotions communication ability--in terms of emotional intelligence (EI)--and psychological well-being. Additionally, the study explored the moderating effect of sex on this relationship. Participants filled in the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, General Health Questionnaire, Psychological General Well-Being Index, and Depression Questionnaire. Results showed the moderating role of sex in the relationship between EI ability and psychological well-being. Furthermore, the associations between EI and psychological well-being measures were generally higher for men than for women, supporting the idea that sex needs to be taken into account when considering EI measures. The potential helpfulness of EI and emotions communications ability in promoting mental health is discussed.

  2. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  3. Intelligence in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Nader

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial results of an investigation are presented whose primary objective is to adapt and to standardize the neurocognitive assessment battery C.A.S. of Das and Naglieri (1997 in a child sample. The test is an operationalization of a non traditional intelligence model (PASS that considers the intelligent behaviors as a group of four cognitive basic processes (planning, attention, simultaneous and successive processing. The objectives of this work are to obtain the psychometric properties of the instrument and also, to analyze if differences exist according to sex and age. The study type is crosswise - transactional. It was administered the CAS to 150 children residents in Buenos Aires among the ages of 6 to 12 years (population general non consultant and the WISC-III to a sample of 50 children. 

  4. Trait emotional intelligence in initial teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Molero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the emotional intelligence (EI in teachers during their initial training following the trait EI model, namely the wellness model Bar-On (2002; 2006. 460 students participated (age in years M=22.57, SD=±3.39 of the University of Jaen (Spain who responded to the scale EQ-i Short Form Spanish version (López-Zafra, Pulido-Martos, & Berrios-Martos, 2014, that includes 4 factors (Interpersonal, Adaptability, Stress management and Intrapersonal. There are significant differences (p<.05 on various factors based on gender, age, degree of participants and the educational level of the same. The variables considered in the regression analysis that most predict global IE are Stress Management, Adaptability followed, Intrapersonal and Interpersonal. The results are consistent with those obtained in other studies in similar contexts.

  5. The location of the Trait Emotional Intelligence in the Zuckerman's Personality Model space and the role of General Intelligence and social status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Eduardo; García, Luis Francisco; Aluja, Anton

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) measured by the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue) and personality measured by the Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire (ZKA-PQ) with the purpose of analyzing similarities and differences of both psychological constructs. Additionally, we studied the relationship among EI, personality, General Intelligence (GI) and a social position index (SPI). Results showed that the ZKA-PQ predicts the 66% (facets) and the 64% (factors) of the TEIQue. High scores in EI correlated negatively with Neuroticism (r: -0.66) and Aggressiveness (r: -0.27); and positively with Extraversion (r: 0.62). Oblique factorial analyses demonstrated that TEIQue scales were located basically in the Neuroticism and Extraversion factors. The SPI and GI no loaded in any factor. These findings showed that EI is a not a distinct construct of personality and it cannot be isolated in the ZKA-PQ personality space. GI is related with the SPI (r: 0.26), and EI correlated with GI (r: 0.18) and SPI (r: 0.16). Nevertheless, we found differences between GI high groups and the TEIQue and ZKA-PQ factors when controlling age and sex. These findings are discussed in the individual differences context. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The validation of Huffaz Intelligence Test (HIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mohd Azrin Mohammad; Ahmad, Tahir; Awang, Siti Rahmah; Safar, Ajmain

    2017-08-01

    In general, a hafiz who can memorize the Quran has many specialties especially in respect to their academic performances. In this study, the theory of multiple intelligences introduced by Howard Gardner is embedded in a developed psychometric instrument, namely Huffaz Intelligence Test (HIT). This paper presents the validation and the reliability of HIT of some tahfiz students in Malaysia Islamic schools. A pilot study was conducted involving 87 huffaz who were randomly selected to answer the items in HIT. The analysis method used includes Partial Least Square (PLS) on reliability, convergence and discriminant validation. The study has validated nine intelligences. The findings also indicated that the composite reliabilities for the nine types of intelligences are greater than 0.8. Thus, the HIT is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the multiple intelligences among huffaz.

  7. A User's Guide to the SNF ampersand INEL EIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This User's Guide is intended to help you find information in the SNF and INEL EIS (that's short for US Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement). The first section of this Guide gives you a brief overview of the SNF ampersand INEL EIS., The second section is organized to help you find specific information in the Environmental Impact Statement -- whether you're interested in a management alternative, a particular site (such as Hanford), or a discipline (such as land use or water quality)

  8. Developing emotional intelligence in student nurse leaders: a mixed methodology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeles, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this mixed method, exploratory study was to measure the impact of a peer coaching program on the measured emotional intelligence (EI) of a group of student nurse leaders. Methods Participation in the study was offered to nurses in the Student Ambassador program. Students who consented received instruction on EI and its importance in leadership. Participants then took a preintervention EI test (The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso EI Test, version 2 [MSCEIT]) to obtain a baseline EI ability score. Students then participated in a series of peer coaching sessions across a semester. Participants then completed a postintervention MSCEIT test, and also a qualitative survey. Results: The analysis of the paired sample t-test showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the total group EI scores from pre to posttest, t (8) = 0.036 >0.05; however, 80% of participants reported perceived changes in EI ability due to the intervention and 90% reported that peer coaching was beneficial to their leadership development. Conclusions: This study contributes to the body of EI literature and research on nursing education and leadership development. PMID:27981099

  9. Developing emotional intelligence in student nurse leaders: a mixed methodology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Szeles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this mixed method, exploratory study was to measure the impact of a peer coaching program on the measured emotional intelligence (EI of a group of student nurse leaders. Methods Participation in the study was offered to nurses in the Student Ambassador program. Students who consented received instruction on EI and its importance in leadership. Participants then took a preintervention EI test (The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso EI Test, version 2 [MSCEIT] to obtain a baseline EI ability score. Students then participated in a series of peer coaching sessions across a semester. Participants then completed a postintervention MSCEIT test, and also a qualitative survey. Results: The analysis of the paired sample t-test showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the total group EI scores from pre to posttest, t (8 = 0.036 >0.05; however, 80% of participants reported perceived changes in EI ability due to the intervention and 90% reported that peer coaching was beneficial to their leadership development. Conclusions: This study contributes to the body of EI literature and research on nursing education and leadership development.

  10. Does emotional intelligence predict breaking bad news skills in pediatric interns? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suzanne; Kassis, Karyn; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Mahan, John D; Shell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    While both patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as an area of great challenge, the factors underlying this often complex task remain largely unknown. Emotional intelligence (EI) has been positively correlated with good general communication skills and successful leadership, but there is no literature relating EI to the delivery of bad news. Our objectives were to determine: 1) performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news in a standardized patient (SP) setting; and 2) the role of EI in these assessments. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trainees with higher EI would demonstrate more advanced skills in this communication task. Forty first-year residents participated. Skill in bad news delivery was assessed via SP encounters using a previously published assessment tool (GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol). Residents completed the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI) as a measure of EI. Residents scored poorly on bad news delivery skills but scored well on EI. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to substantial inter-rater reliability among raters using the delivering bad news assessment tool. However, no correlation was found between bad news delivery performance and EI. We concluded that first-year pediatric residents have inadequate skills in the delivery of bad news. In addition, our data suggest that higher EI alone is not sufficient to effectively deliver death news and more robust skill training is necessary for residents to gain competence and acquire mastery in this important communication domain.

  11. Does emotional intelligence predict breaking bad news skills in pediatric interns? A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Reed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: While both patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as an area of great challenge, the factors underlying this often complex task remain largely unknown. Emotional intelligence (EI has been positively correlated with good general communication skills and successful leadership, but there is no literature relating EI to the delivery of bad news. Purpose: Our objectives were to determine: 1 performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news in a standardized patient (SP setting; and 2 the role of EI in these assessments. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trainees with higher EI would demonstrate more advanced skills in this communication task. Methods: Forty first- year residents participated. Skill in bad news delivery was assessed via SP encounters using a previously published assessment tool (GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol. Residents completed the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI as a measure of EI. Results: Residents scored poorly on bad news delivery skills but scored well on EI. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to substantial inter-rater reliability among raters using the delivering bad news assessment tool. However, no correlation was found between bad news delivery performance and EI. Conclusions: We concluded that first-year pediatric residents have inadequate skills in the delivery of bad news. In addition, our data suggest that higher EI alone is not sufficient to effectively deliver death news and more robust skill training is necessary for residents to gain competence and acquire mastery in this important communication domain.

  12. The effects of emotional intelligence training on the job performance of Australian aged care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Leila; Leggat, Sandra G; Bartram, Timothy; Rada, Jiri

    2018-05-09

    Emotional intelligence (EI) training is popular among human resource practitioners, but there is limited evidence of the impact of such training on health care workers. In the current article, we examine the effects of EI training on quality of resident care and worker well-being and psychological empowerment in an Australian aged care facility. We use Bar-On's (1997) conceptualization of EI. We used a quasiexperimental design in 2014-2015 with experimental (training) and control (nontraining) groups of 60 participants in each group in two geographically separate facilities. Our final poststudy sample size was 27 participants for the training group and 17 participants for the control group. Over a 6-month period, we examined whether staff improved their well-being, psychological empowerment, and job performance measured as enhanced quality of care (self-rated and client-rated) by applying skills in EI. The results showed significant improvement among workers in the training group for EI scores, quality of care, general well-being, and psychological empowerment. There were no significant differences for the control group. Through examining the impact of EI training on staff and residents of an aged care facility, we demonstrate the benefits of EI training for higher quality of care delivery. This study demonstrates the practical process through which EI training can improve the work experiences of aged care workers, as well as the quality of care for residents.

  13. Impact of emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence on the caring behavior of nurses: a dimension-level exploratory study among public hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Devinder; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the impact of individual factors such as emotional intelligence (EI) and spiritual intelligence (SI) on the caring behavior of nurses. A cross-sectional survey using questionnaire was conducted by sampling 550 nurses working in seven major public hospitals in Malaysia. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The main findings are: (1) critical existential thinking and transcendental awareness dimensions of SI have significant impacts on assurance of human presence dimension of caring behavior; (2) personal meaning production and conscious state expansion dimensions of SI have significant impacts on perception of emotion and managing own emotions dimensions of EI; and (3) managing own emotions dimension of EI has significant impacts on respectful deference to other and assurance of human presence dimensions of caring behavior of nurses. The results can be used to recruit and educate nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of an emotional intelligence development programme on accountants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara S. Jonker

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The  objective  of  this  research was to compile and  evaluate  a development programme  aimed at emotional  intelligence (EI  in the accounting profession. A two-group design (pre- and post-test was used. An accidental  sample  (experimental and control group was taken from future employees within a financial management environment. The  BarOn-EQ-i was administered and further data were gathered qualitatively by means of diary entries. The results showed an improvement in total EI level. The specific areas of EI that were developed due to the programme included the following subscales: interpersonal, adaptability and general mood. The specific EI factors that showed improvement included self-regard, self-actualisation, interpersonal relations, reality testing, problem solving, flexibility, stress tolerance and optimism.

  15. Emotional intelligence as a competence for the animal science professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Padilha Alves

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Corporations started to invest in human capital to employ professionals that presented a holistic view of the commercial area and that were able to utilize the available resources in each demanded situation consciously. Moreover, professionals should also be emotionally centered regarding emotional intelligence (EI and should have personal and vocational skills. In addition, the labor market demands zootechnicians to be competent at having satisfactory work performance together with the EI abilities. The EI contributes to the presence of a precise particularity in the zootechnician, which will act in different contexts, including the organizational area to promote the training, management of human capital and the physical resources of the agroindustrial organizations.

  16. The use of emotional intelligence capabilities in clinical reasoning and decision-making: A qualitative, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Kozlowski, Desirée; Whitehair, Leeann

    2018-02-01

    To explore clinical nurses' experiences of using emotional intelligence capabilities during clinical reasoning and decision-making. There has been little research exploring whether, or how, nurses employ emotional intelligence (EI) in clinical reasoning and decision-making. Qualitative phase of a larger mixed-methods study. Semistructured qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of registered nurses (n = 12) following EI training and coaching. Constructivist thematic analysis was employed to analyse the narrative transcripts. Three themes emerged: the sensibility to engage EI capabilities in clinical contexts, motivation to actively engage with emotions in clinical decision-making and incorporating emotional and technical perspectives in decision-making. Continuing to separate cognition and emotion in research, theorising and scholarship on clinical reasoning is counterproductive. Understanding more about nurses' use of EI has the potential to improve the calibre of decisions, and the safety and quality of care delivered. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Mathematical Competency among Secondary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Adibah Khairiyah Mohd Nor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety towards mathematics among secondary school students have been reported. Anxiety creates strong negative emotions and can hinder a person's cognitive, learning and academic performance. Fear of mathematics came early in the educational process and if this is not handled properly, it will negatively affect the students to adulthood. In learning mathematics, emotional intelligence (EI impacts on how a person deals with emotions, mathematics and the general self-regulations strategies that the person adopts. A study was carried out to access secondary students’ EI and their mathematical competency (MC. The EI was tested using an EI questionnaire for adolescents (IKEM-R/MEQI consisting of 7 domains, while the MC was tested using selected questions from PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment 2012 released items. Analysis shows that EI predict significantly students MC, but with low correlational value. Most of the respondents have moderate level of EI in all 7 domains whereby self awareness and self-regulation are the two domains with lowest scores. On the other hand, most of the students’ MC are poor. This particular research shows that EI is not a good predictor of MC which contradicts other reports. However it is suggested that the data collection can be improved by examining students’ EI while they are engaging in activities that call for MCs rather than doing it before or after the tasks. Keywords: Emotional Intelligence (EI, emotion, Mathematical Competency (MC, PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment, anxiety DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.7.2.3534.91-100

  18. Neon-like Iron Ion Lines Measured in NIFS/Large Helical Device (LHD) and Hinode /EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa [National Astronomical Observatory, National Institutes of Natural Sciences 2-21-1 Osawa Mitaka Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru [SOKENDAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies) Hayama, Miura-gun, Kanagawa, 240-0193 (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai Aichi, 487-0027 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: watanabe@uvlab.mtk.nao.ac.jp [The University of Electro-Communications 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan)

    2017-06-10

    Line intensities emerging from the Ne-sequence iron ion (Fe xvii) are measured in the laboratory, by the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, and in the solar corona by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode mission. The intensity ratios of Fe xvii λ 204.6/ λ 254.8 are derived in the laboratory by unblending the contributions of the Fe xiii and xii line intensities. They are consistent with theoretical predictions and solar observations, the latter of which endorses the in-flight radiometric calibrations of the EIS instrument. The still remaining temperature-dependent behavior of the line ratio suggests the contamination of lower-temperature iron lines that are blended with the λ 204.6 line.

  19. ADAA: new software for intelligent instrument control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butman, M.; Wannberg, A.; Mellergaard, A.; Zetterstroem, P.; McGreevy, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Automated data acquisition and analysis (ADAA) is a new platform for automation of experiments, including data reduction, analysis and feedback. The objective of ADAA is to develop software that enables scientific control of the progress of an experiment, e.g. monitoring in terms of analysed data as opposed to measured data, one obvious aim being to maximize the scientific output from a given period of beam time. Basic design considerations will be outlined and discussed in the context of several types of experiments

  20. Balti riikide vabadus ei ohusta Venemaad / Daniel Fried

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fried, Daniel, 1952-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: The Baltic Times, 21. juuni 2007, lk. 15. Ameerika Ühendriikide asevälisminister Euroopa ja Euraasia asjus Daniel Fried Balti riikide tunnustamisest, vabadusest ja suveräänsusest. Venemaa huvides on olla ümbritsetud rahulikest ja jõukatest demokraatiatest, ähvardustele ja sanktsioonidele ei tohi jätta ruumi

  1. Turvalisust ei taga vaid sinine vilkur / Ken-Marti Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Ken-Marti, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Kuritegevuse vastasest võitlusest. Sama ka Pärnu Postimees 8. juuni 2005, lk. 15 ; Hiiu Leht 10. juuni 2005, lk. 2 ; Vali Uudised 8. juuni 2005, lk. 2 artiklis pealkiri kujul: Turvalisust ei taga ainuüksi sinine vilkur ; Nädaline 14. juuni 2005, lk. 4 ; Koit 14. juuni 2005, lk. 6 ; Valgamaalane 5. juuli 2005, lk. 2

  2. Somaalia piraadid ei taha Saksamaale minna / Evelyn Kaldoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldoja, Evelyn, 1980-

    2010-01-01

    Saksa kaubalaeva Taipan kaaperdamiselt tabatud somaallased ei taha, et neid antaks välja Saksamaale. Siiani on suurem osa tabatud Somaalia piraatidest saadetud Kenya kohtutesse. Rotterdamis algab järgmisel nädalal üle mitme sajandi esimene Euroopa piraadiprotsess

  3. Maksuamet ei välista Concordia pankrotti / Alo Lõhmus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lõhmus, Alo

    2003-01-01

    Maksuamet nendib, et kui Concordia ülikool ei tule toime oma võlgade maksmisega esmaspäevaks, võib kõne alla tulla ka kooli pankroti algatamine. Eesti Üliõpilaskondade Liit ja Concordia Ülikooli Eesis Üliõpilasesindus korraldavad Concordia probleeme käsitleva konverentsi "Kes vastutab Concordia tudengite eest?"

  4. Eesti valitsuse argumendid ei pea vett / Indrek Veiserik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veiserik, Indrek

    2008-01-01

    Autori väitel püsib Iraak lõhestatuna ja mingit rahvuslikku leppimist ei ole seal toimunud, seetõttu on Eesti valitsuse loodud ettekujutus peatsest rahu saabumisest vale. USA nädalalehe Newsweek kolumnist Fareed Zakaria leiab, et USA jaoks oleks mõistlik strateegia Iraagis luua rahvusvaheliste institutsioonide poolt sanktsioneeritud rahutagamismissioon

  5. Natura 2000 ei lõpeta elu maal / Aleksei Lotman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotman, Aleksei, 1960-

    2004-01-01

    Natura alade kaitsekorralduse alused sätestab loodusdirektiivi paragrahv 6. Selle põhimõte on vältida elupaikade kahjustamist Natura aladel. Mingi ala kandmine Natura 2000 võrgustikku ei tähenda sugugi igasuguse inimtegevuse automaatset keelamist

  6. Pärnu ATP ei usu streigisse / Tõnu Kann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kann, Tõnu, 1957-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti transpordi- ja teetöötajate ametiühing ähvardab uuest aastast üldstreigiga, kui autoettevõtjate liit ei allkirjasta uut üldtöökokkulepet, mis tõstaks tööliste tunnipalga alammäära kuni 150 protsenti. Arvamust avaldab Pärnu bussipargi direktor Andrus Kärpuk

  7. Suitsetamisega võitlemisel ei aita inimeste kiusamine / Silver Meikar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meikar, Silver, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Suitsetamise vastu võitlemisel ei tohiks kasutada rangelt seadusi vaid võimaldada soodsalt osta suitsetamisvastaseid vahendeid, leiab autor. Vt. ka: Silver Meikar: Olen valmis hoidma Eesti edu; Silver Meikar saatis lugejakirja Saksamaa päevalehtedele; Arvamusi Silver Meikarist; Silver Meikar loobus paberkandjale trükitud seaduseelnõudest

  8. Utilization Status of Electronic Information Sources (EIS) for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tesfa

    HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment in Specialized Teaching Hospitals of. Ethiopia, 2016. Senait Samuel Bramo. 1. , Tesfamichael Alaro Agago. 2*. OPEN ACCESS. Citation: Senait Samuel Bramo,. Tesfamichael Alaro Agago. Utilization. Status of Electronic Information Sources. (EIS) for HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment.

  9. EI2N 2009 PC Co-chairs' Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetto, Hervé; Bernus, Peter; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Goranson, Ted

    After the successful third edition in 2008, the fourth edition of the Enterprise Integration, Interoperability and Networking workshop (EI2N 2009) was organized as part of the OTM 2009 Federated Conferences and was supported by the IFAC Technical Committee 5.3 "Enterprise Integration and Networking" and the IFIP Working Group 5.12 "Architectures for Enterprise Integration."

  10. Maestro ei või õnneta elada / Silja Joon

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Joon, Silja, 1966-

    2005-01-01

    Helilooja Veljo Tormise 75. aasta juubelikontserdist "Ei või õnneta elada" 13. aug. Pärnu kontserdimajas (korraldaja Ave Sopp), helilooja palvest õnnitlemiseks mõeldud lillede ja kingituste raha temanimelisse rahvusliku koorimuusika väärtustamiseks loodud fondi kandmisest

  11. Linnugripp ei ole biorelv / Kevin Probert-Ehaver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Probert-Ehaver, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Vastukaja 10. juulil Eesti Ekspressis ilmunud artiklile "Linnugripp - surm katseklaasist", milles väidetakse, et linnugripp ning teised uued nakkushaigused on biorelvad. Kriisireguleerimise konsultant selgitab, et nii Eesti kui ka Ameerika spetsialistide hinnangul ei ole linnugripp kuidagi seotud biorelvade programmiga

  12. Neutron multiplication measurement instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, K.V.; Dowdy, E.J.; France, S.W.; Millegan, D.R.; Robba, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Nuclear Technology Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is now using intelligent data-acquisition and analysis instrumentation for determining the multiplication of nuclear material. Earlier instrumentation, such as the large NIM-crate systems, depended on house power and required additional computation to determine multiplication or to estimate error. The portable, battery-powered multiplication measurement unit, with advanced computational power, acquires data, calculates multiplication, and completes error analysis automatically. Thus, the multiplication is determined easily and an available error estimate enables the user to judge the significance of results

  13. The impact of stroke on emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Bronwyn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI is important for personal, social and career success and has been linked to the frontal anterior cingulate, insula and amygdala regions. Aim To ascertain which stroke lesion sites impair emotional intelligence and relation to current frontal assessment measurements. Methods One hundred consecutive, non aphasic, independently functioning patients post stroke were evaluated with the Bar-On emotional intelligence test, "known as the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i" and frontal tests that included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and Frontal Systems Behavioral Inventory (FRSBE for correlational validity. The results of a screening, bedside frontal network syndrome test (FNS and NIHSS to document neurological deficit were also recorded. Lesion location was determined by the Cerefy digital, coxial brain atlas. Results After exclusions (n = 8, patients tested (n = 92, mean age 50.1, CI: 52.9, 47.3 years revealed that EQ-i scores were correlated (negatively with all FRSBE T sub-scores (apathy, disinhibition, executive, total, with self-reported scores correlating better than family reported scores. Regression analysis revealed age and FRSBE total scores as the most influential variables. The WCST error percentage T score did not correlate with the EQ-i scores. Based on ANOVA, there were significant differences among the lesion sites with the lowest mean EQ-i scores associated with temporal (71.5 and frontal (87.3 lesions followed by subtentorial (91.7, subcortical gray (92.6 and white (95.2 matter, and the highest scores associated with parieto-occipital lesions (113.1. Conclusions 1 Stroke impairs EI and is associated with apathy, disinhibition and executive functioning. 2 EI is associated with frontal, temporal, subcortical and subtentorial stroke syndromes.

  14. Intelligent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, J David

    2011-01-01

    Technology has now progressed to the point that intelligent systems are replacing humans in the decision making processes as well as aiding in the solution of very complex problems. In many cases intelligent systems are already outperforming human activities. Artificial neural networks are not only capable of learning how to classify patterns, such images or sequence of events, but they can also effectively model complex nonlinear systems. Their ability to classify sequences of events is probably more popular in industrial applications where there is an inherent need to model nonlinear system

  15. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  16. Artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret-Galix, D.

    1992-01-01

    A vivid example of the growing need for frontier physics experiments to make use of frontier technology is in the field of artificial intelligence and related themes. This was reflected in the second international workshop on 'Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics' which took place from 13-18 January at France Telecom's Agelonde site at La Londe des Maures, Provence. It was the second in a series, the first having been held at Lyon in 1990

  17. Do narcissism and emotional intelligence win us friends? : modeling dynamics of peer popularity using inferential network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Czarna, Anna; Leifeld, Philip; Śmieja-Nęcka, Magdalena; Dufner, Michael; Salovey, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated effects of narcissism and emotional intelligence (EI) on popularity in social networks. In a longitudinal field study, we examined the dynamics of popularity in 15 peer groups in two waves (N = 273). We measured narcissism, ability EI, and explicit and implicit self-esteem. In addition, we measured popularity at zero acquaintance and 3 months later. We analyzed the data using inferential network analysis (temporal exponential random graph modeling, TERGM) accounting...

  18. Emotional intelligence in South African women leaders in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude-Hélène Mayer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This study contributes to an in-depth understanding of emotional intelligence (EI in women leaders in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs in South Africa from an inside perspective. Research purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore EI in South African women leaders working in HEIs to identify women leader’s strengths, foci and their possible areas of development. The aim is to get deeper insights in EI in women leaders because EI is associated with effective leadership qualities, creativity and innovation, as well as empathetic communication which is needed in the challenging HEI workplaces. Motivation for the study: Emotional intelligence is an important source for women leaders to increase leadership qualities. This study is motivated by a deep interest to explore aspects of EI in women leaders in this specific professional context. Research design, approach and method: The study uses a qualitative research design and an approach based on Dilthey’s modern hermeneutics of ‘Verstehen’ (understanding. Twenty-three women leaders of the Higher Education Research Service (HERS-SA network were interviewed through semi-structured interviews. One researcher observed behaviour in one HEI to support the interpretation of the data. Data were analysed through content analysis. Main findings: Findings show that women leaders mainly refer to intrapersonal emotional quotient (EQ, followed by interpersonal EQ, adaptability, stress management and, finally, general mood. The most highly rated components of EQ are self-regard, followed by interpersonal relationships, problem solving, empathy, emotional self-awareness, assertiveness, impulse control and social responsibility. Findings also provide ideas on what EQ components can be further developed. Practical/managerial implications: New insights are provided on what components of EI should be developed in women leaders to increase overall EI, on cognitive and behavioural levels

  19. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Personality: Gender-Invariant Linkages Across Different Measures of the Big Five.

    OpenAIRE

    Siegling, A. B.; Furnham, A.; Petrides, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if the linkages between trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) and the Five-Factor Model of personality were invariant between men and women. Five English-speaking samples (N = 307-685) of mostly undergraduate students each completed a different measure of the Big Five personality traits and either the full form or short form of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue). Across samples, models predicting global TEIQue scores from the Big Five were invari...

  20. A Study On Relationship Between Emotional Intelligence And Self-Esteem Among Secondary School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha, B.

    2015-01-01

    The major objective of this article is to establish a relationship between emotional intelligence and self-esteem among secondary school students. Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to recognize one's own and other people's emotions, to discriminate between different feelings and label them appropriately, and to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior (by Daniel Goleman). Self-esteem reflects a person's overall subjective emotional evaluation of his or her own worth. ...

  1. Emotional intelligence and spiritual well-being: implications for spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Audrey; Stewart, Julie G; DeNisco, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence spiritual well-being may improve nurses' spiritual caregiving. This study examined relationships between emotional intelligence (EI) and spiritual well-being (SWB) in undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the spiritual well-being scale (SWBS) relationships were found between managing emotion and spiritual well-being, and managing emotion and existential well-being. Implications for education and practice are discussed.

  2. Emotional intelligence in anorexia nervosa: is anxiety a missing piece of the puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrook, David; Brown, Gary; Tchanturia, Kate

    2012-11-30

    Problematic emotional processing has been implicated in the genesis and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN). This study built on existing research and explored performance-based emotional intelligence (EI) in people with AN. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) was administered to 32 women diagnosed with AN and 32 female healthy controls (HC). Compared to HC women, the AN group demonstrated significantly lower total EI scores and poorer ability to understand how emotions can progress and change over time. Despite scores within the broadly average range compared to published EI norms, there was a general pattern of poorer performance in the AN sample. Self-reported anxiety symptoms were the strongest predictor of EI, over and above a diagnosis of AN. This study adds to the literature documenting the socioemotional phenotype of AN, suggesting this group of individuals may find it relatively difficult to carry out accurate reasoning about emotions, and to use emotions and emotional knowledge to enhance thought. Anxiety was highlighted as a putative variable partially explaining why people with AN demonstrated lower EI compared to controls. Implications for further research are discussed, including the need to explore the specificity of EI difficulties in AN using larger samples and additional control groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Importance of the Alternative Five and Trait Emotional Intelligence for Agentic and Communal Domains of Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Avsec

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies supported the importance of trait emotional intelligence (EI for subjective well-being but specific domains of life-satisfaction were rarely of interest. Our study investigated whether emotional intelligence is more important for interpersonal or communal-related domains (e.g. satisfaction with friends, intimate partners than for agentic domains of satisfaction (e.g. satisfaction with finances, work. Due to the problematic differential validity of trait EI from personality, the relationship between trait EI and domains of satisfaction was controlled for by personality. Slovene students and young adults (N=442 completed the Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire and the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, and rated their satisfaction with 12 aspects of life. Principal component analysis of these domains revealed three components, explaining 62% of total variance. The communal domains included self-reported satisfaction with popularity, respect, influence on others, family relationships, and intimate relationship. The agentic domains included satisfaction with professional carrier, financial situation, academic education, and achieved goals. The physical domains component was comprised of satisfaction with appearance, fitness, and health. After accounting for personality, trait EI explained 16% of variance in communal domain and 10% of variance in agentic domain, thus suggesting greater importance of trait EI for interpersonal domains. However, trait EI seems to play an important role for satisfaction in the agentic domains also, as successful management of our emotions can help us reach our goals and thus be more satisfied.

  4. Trait emotional intelligence and mental distress: the mediating role of positive and negative affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Feng; Zhao, Jingjing; You, Xuqun

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, emotional intelligence (EI) has received much attention in the literature. Previous studies indicated that higher trait or ability EI was associated with greater mental distress. The present study focused on mediating effects of positive and negative affect on the association between trait EI and mental distress in a sample of Chinese adults. The participants were 726 Chinese adults (384 females) with an age range of 18-60 years. Data were collected by using the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that EI was a significant predictor of positive affect, negative affect and mental distress. Further mediation analysis showed that positive and negative affect acted as partial mediators of the relationship between EI and mental distress. Furthermore, effect contrasts showed that there was no significant difference between the specific indirect effects through positive affect and through negative affect. This result indicated that positive affect and negative affect played an equally important function in the association between EI and distress. The significance and limitations of the results are discussed.

  5. Plant intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipavská, Helena; Žárský, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The concept of plant intelligence, as proposed by Anthony Trewavas, has raised considerable discussion. However, plant intelligence remains loosely defined; often it is either perceived as practically synonymous to Darwinian fitness, or reduced to a mere decorative metaphor. A more strict view can be taken, emphasizing necessary prerequisites such as memory and learning, which requires clarifying the definition of memory itself. To qualify as memories, traces of past events have to be not only stored, but also actively accessed. We propose a criterion for eliminating false candidates of possible plant intelligence phenomena in this stricter sense: an “intelligent” behavior must involve a component that can be approximated by a plausible algorithmic model involving recourse to stored information about past states of the individual or its environment. Re-evaluation of previously presented examples of plant intelligence shows that only some of them pass our test. “You were hurt?” Kumiko said, looking at the scar. Sally looked down. “Yeah.” “Why didn't you have it removed?” “Sometimes it's good to remember.” “Being hurt?” “Being stupid.”—(W. Gibson: Mona Lisa Overdrive) PMID:19816094

  6. Speech Intelligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas

    Speech intelligibility (SI) is important for different fields of research, engineering and diagnostics in order to quantify very different phenomena like the quality of recordings, communication and playback devices, the reverberation of auditoria, characteristics of hearing impairment, benefit using hearing aids or combinations of these things.

  7. APCI as an innovative ionization mode compared with EI and CI for the analysis of a large range of organophosphate esters using GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloum, Wafaa; Cariou, Ronan; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Jaber, Farouk; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs) are chemical compounds incorporated into materials as flame-proof and/or plasticizing agents. In this work, 13 non-halogenated and 5 halogenated OPEs were studied. Their mass spectra were interpreted and compared in terms of fragmentation patterns and dominant ions via various ionization techniques [electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) under vacuum and corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)] on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The novelty of this paper relies on the investigation of APCI technique for the analysis of OPEs via favored protonation mechanism, where the mass spectra were mostly dominated by the quasi-molecular ion [M + H] + . The EI mass spectra were dominated by ions such as [H 4 PO 4 ] + , [M-R] + , [M-Cl] + , and [M-Br] + , and for some non-halogenated aryl OPEs, [M] +● was also observed. The CI mass spectra in positive mode were dominated by [M + H] + and sometimes by [M-R] + , while in negative mode, [M-R] - and more particularly [X] - and [X 2 ] -● were mainly observed for the halogenated OPEs. Both EI and APCI techniques showed promising results for further development of instrumental method operating in selective reaction monitoring mode. Instrumental detection limits by using APCI mode were 2.5 to 25 times lower than using EI mode for the non-brominated OPEs, while they were determined at 50-100 times lower by the APCI mode than by the EI mode, for the two brominated OPEs. The method was applied to fish samples, and monitored transitions by using APCI mode showed higher specificity but lower stability compared with EI mode. The sensitivity in terms of signal-to-noise ratio varying from one compound to another. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. What Makes Nations Intelligent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Earl

    2012-05-01

    Modern society is driven by the use of cognitive artifacts: physical instruments or styles of reasoning that amplify our ability to think. The artifacts range from writing systems to computers. In everyday life, a person demonstrates intelligence by showing skill in using these artifacts. Intelligence tests and their surrogates force examinees to exhibit some of these skills but not others. This is why test scores correlate substantially but not perfectly with a variety of measures of socioeconomic success. The same thing is true at the international level. Nations can be evaluated by the extent to which their citizens score well on cognitive tests, including both avowed intelligence tests and a variety of tests of academic achievement. The resulting scores are substantially correlated with various indices of national wealth, health, environmental quality, and schooling and with a vaguer variable, social commitment to innovation. These environmental variables are suggested as causes of the differences in general cognitive skills between national populations. It is conceivable that differences in gene pools also contribute to international and, within nations, group differences in cognitive skills, but at present it is impossible to evaluate the extent of genetic influences. © The Author(s) 2012.

  9. Do Narcissism and Emotional Intelligence Win Us Friends? Modeling Dynamics of Peer Popularity Using Inferential Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarna, Anna Z; Leifeld, Philip; Śmieja, Magdalena; Dufner, Michael; Salovey, Peter

    2016-09-27

    This research investigated effects of narcissism and emotional intelligence (EI) on popularity in social networks. In a longitudinal field study, we examined the dynamics of popularity in 15 peer groups in two waves (N = 273). We measured narcissism, ability EI, and explicit and implicit self-esteem. In addition, we measured popularity at zero acquaintance and 3 months later. We analyzed the data using inferential network analysis (temporal exponential random graph modeling, TERGM) accounting for self-organizing network forces. People high in narcissism were popular, but increased less in popularity over time than people lower in narcissism. In contrast, emotionally intelligent people increased more in popularity over time than less emotionally intelligent people. The effects held when we controlled for explicit and implicit self-esteem. These results suggest that narcissism is rather disadvantageous and that EI is rather advantageous for long-term popularity. © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  10. Cyberbullying Victimization, Self-Esteem and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescence: Does Emotional Intelligence Play a Buffering Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extremera, Natalio; Quintana-Orts, Cirenia; Mérida-López, Sergio; Rey, Lourdes

    2018-01-01

    Cyberbullying has been linked to social, physical and psychological problems for adolescent victims but there has been no analysis of the specific role of emotional intelligence in protecting against the negative symptoms associated with cyberbullying victimization. This study examined the interaction between cyberbullying victimization and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors of psychological maladjustment (operationalized as high suicidal ideation and low self-esteem) in 1,660 Spanish adolescents. We also investigated whether levels of EI moderated the relationship between cyberbullying victimization and mental health problems. The cyberbullying victimization x EI interaction contributed to variance in suicidal ideation and self-esteem in our sample of adolescent victims. Adolescent victims of cyberbullying with high EI scores reported lower suicidal ideation and higher self-esteem than their less emotionally intelligent counterparts. Thus, our data provide empirical support for theoretical and conceptual work connecting victimization, EI abilities and mental health associated with cyberbullying. This suggests that alone, but also in combination, EI may be particularly relevant in leading to increased levels of mental health issues in cyberbullying victims. Finally, the theoretical implications of our findings on the relationship between these variables and the mental health issues of adolescent victims of cyberbullying are discussed. PMID:29623058

  11. Cyberbullying Victimization, Self-Esteem and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescence: Does Emotional Intelligence Play a Buffering Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalio Extremera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying has been linked to social, physical and psychological problems for adolescent victims but there has been no analysis of the specific role of emotional intelligence in protecting against the negative symptoms associated with cyberbullying victimization. This study examined the interaction between cyberbullying victimization and emotional intelligence (EI as predictors of psychological maladjustment (operationalized as high suicidal ideation and low self-esteem in 1,660 Spanish adolescents. We also investigated whether levels of EI moderated the relationship between cyberbullying victimization and mental health problems. The cyberbullying victimization x EI interaction contributed to variance in suicidal ideation and self-esteem in our sample of adolescent victims. Adolescent victims of cyberbullying with high EI scores reported lower suicidal ideation and higher self-esteem than their less emotionally intelligent counterparts. Thus, our data provide empirical support for theoretical and conceptual work connecting victimization, EI abilities and mental health associated with cyberbullying. This suggests that alone, but also in combination, EI may be particularly relevant in leading to increased levels of mental health issues in cyberbullying victims. Finally, the theoretical implications of our findings on the relationship between these variables and the mental health issues of adolescent victims of cyberbullying are discussed.

  12. Cyberbullying Victimization, Self-Esteem and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescence: Does Emotional Intelligence Play a Buffering Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extremera, Natalio; Quintana-Orts, Cirenia; Mérida-López, Sergio; Rey, Lourdes

    2018-01-01

    Cyberbullying has been linked to social, physical and psychological problems for adolescent victims but there has been no analysis of the specific role of emotional intelligence in protecting against the negative symptoms associated with cyberbullying victimization. This study examined the interaction between cyberbullying victimization and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors of psychological maladjustment (operationalized as high suicidal ideation and low self-esteem) in 1,660 Spanish adolescents. We also investigated whether levels of EI moderated the relationship between cyberbullying victimization and mental health problems. The cyberbullying victimization x EI interaction contributed to variance in suicidal ideation and self-esteem in our sample of adolescent victims. Adolescent victims of cyberbullying with high EI scores reported lower suicidal ideation and higher self-esteem than their less emotionally intelligent counterparts. Thus, our data provide empirical support for theoretical and conceptual work connecting victimization, EI abilities and mental health associated with cyberbullying. This suggests that alone, but also in combination, EI may be particularly relevant in leading to increased levels of mental health issues in cyberbullying victims. Finally, the theoretical implications of our findings on the relationship between these variables and the mental health issues of adolescent victims of cyberbullying are discussed.

  13. The Relationship of Emotional Intelligence of Managers and Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Asghar Moshabaki; Vahab Khalili Shojaei

    2009-01-01

    AbstractThe pupose implementation of the present study is investigating the Relationship between EmotionalIntelligence (EI) of Managers and Organization Climate with Organizational learning culture of which NIOC1 has been chosen as case study. In this article, 30 managers of NIOC and suborganizations have been chosenby clusterly method base that using interview and questionnaire for gatering information. In this articlesubjects are splited for two classify. Fistyly, deal with emotional intell...

  14. A study on relationship between cultural intelligence and cross-cultural adjustment in tour management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Karroubi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of cultural intelligence (CQ and emotional intelligence (EI on a tour leader’s adjustment in a different cultural environment. Data were collected from 330 outgoing tour leaders in Tehran, Iran. The construct validity was confirmed by using confirmatory factor analysis. The data were analyzed using correlation analysis and path analysis to test the effect of CQ on cross-cultural adjustment, and the moderating effect of EI on the relationship between CQ and cross-cultural adjustment. The results showed that CQ had a positive effect on cross-cultural adjustment. In addition, we found that CQ had a positive effect on EI. The findings of the research showed that emotional intelligence in not significantly the mediator variable. Emotional intelligence has a positive and significant effect on cross-cultural adjustment. The findings of this study contribute to the body of knowledge in the field of CQ and cross-cultural research, and it provides practical implications for individuals seeking to improve their cross-cultural effectiveness, enhancing their cultural intelligence and emotional intelligence, specifically in tourism industry.

  15. Clinical teaching with emotional intelligence: A teaching toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar Omid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional intelligence (EI helps humans to perceive their own and others′ emotions. It helps to make better interpersonal communication that consequently leads to an increase in everyday performance and professional career. Teaching, particularly teaching in the clinical environment, is among the professions that need a high level of EI due to its relevance to human interactions. Materials and Methods: We adopted EI competencies with characteristics of a good clinical teacher. As a result, we extracted 12 strategies and then reviewed the literatures relevant to these strategies. Results: In the present article, 12 strategies that a clinical teacher should follow to use EI in her/his teaching were described. Conclusion: To apply EI in clinical settings, a teacher should consider all the factors that can bring about a more positive emotional environment and social interactions. These factors will increase students′ learning, improve patients′ care, and maintain her/his well-being. In addition, he/she will be able to evaluate her/his teaching to improve its effectiveness.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Health Risk Behaviors in Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Alberto; Baizán, Eva María; Faya-Ornia, Goretti; López, María Luisa

    2015-08-01

    To explore the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and risky health behaviors in nursing students at the University of Oviedo (Spain). This cross-sectional study of 275 students used a validated questionnaire to measure EI level, nine risky behaviors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, unhealthy diet, being overweight, sedentarism, risky sun exposure, occupational risk, and unsafe sex), and other factors that may influence EI. Students with the highest EI score had a lower probability of drinking too much alcohol (odds ratio [OR], 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.19, 0.67]), eating too few fruits and vegetables (OR, 0.60; 95% CI [0.34, 0.99]), and having unsafe sex (OR, 0.10; 95% CI [0.01, 0.74]). A dose-response effect was found for those three behaviors (p for trend excessive alcohol consumption, unhealthy diet, and unsafe sex. Training nursing students about EI could improve health behaviors, and thus the role of nurses as health promoters. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. VALIDITY OF THE EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SCALE FOR USE IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Lane

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the factorial validity of the 33-item self-rated Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS: Schutte et al., 1998 for use with athletes. In stage 1, content validity of the EIS was assessed by a panel of experts (n = 9. Items were evaluated in terms of whether they assessed EI related to oneself and EI focused on others. Content validity further examined items in terms of awareness, regulation, and utilization of emotions. Content validity results indicated items describe 6-factors: appraisal of own emotions, regulation of own emotions, utilization of own emotions, optimism, social skills, and appraisal of others emotions. Results highlighted 13-items which make no direct reference to emotional experiences, and therefore, it is questionable whether such items should be retained. Stage 2 tested two competing models: a single factor model, which is the typical way researchers use the EIS and the 5-factor model (optimism was discarded as it become a single-item scale fiolliwng stage 1 identified in stage 1. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA results on EIS data from 1,681 athletes demonstrated unacceptable fit indices for the 33-item single factor model and acceptable fit indices for the 6-factor model. Data were re-analyzed after removing the 13-items lacking emotional content, and CFA results indicate partial support for single factor model, and further support for a five-factor model (optimism was discarded as a factor during item removal. Despite encouraging results for a reduced item version of the EIS, we suggest further validation work is needed

  18. Emotional intelligence in incarcerated men with psychopathic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, Elsa; Kahn, Rachel E.; Salovey, Peter; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2012-01-01

    The expression, recognition, and communication of emotional states are ubiquitous features of the human social world. Emotional intelligence (EI) is defined as the ability to perceive, manage, and reason about emotions, in oneself and others. Individuals with psychopathy have numerous difficulties in social interaction and show impairment on some emotional tasks. Here we investigate the relation between emotional intelligence and psychopathy in a sample of incarcerated men (n=374), using the Psychopathy Checklist—Revised (PCL-R; Hare, 2003) and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2002). The MSCEIT is a well-validated ability-based emotional intelligence measure that does not rely on self-report judgments of emotional skills. The Hare PCL-R is the gold-standard for the assessment of psychopathy in clinical populations. Controlling for general intelligence, psychopathy was associated with lower emotional intelligence. These findings suggest individuals with psychopathy are impaired on a range of emotional intelligence abilities and that emotional intelligence is an important area for understanding deficits in psychopathy. PMID:22329657

  19. A reflective framework to foster emotionally intelligent leadership in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, Birgit; Schols, Jos M G A; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2015-09-01

    To propose a reflective framework based on the perspective of emotional intelligence (EI) in nurse leadership literature. Emotional intelligence is a self-development construct aimed at enhancing the management of feelings and interpersonal relationships, which has become increasingly popular in nurse leadership. Reflection is an established means to foster learning. Integrating those aspects of emotional intelligence pertinent to nurse leadership into a reflective framework might support the development of nurse leadership in a practical context. A sample of 22 articles, retrieved via electronic databases (Ovid/Medline, BNI, psycArticles, Zetoc and CINAHL) and published between January 1996 and April 2009, was analysed in a qualitative descriptive content analysis. Three dimensions that characterise emotional intelligence leadership in the context of nursing - the nurse leader as a 'socio-cultural architect', as a 'responsive carer' and as a 'strategic visionary' - emerged from the analysis. To enable practical application, these dimensions were contextualised into a reflective framework. Emotional intelligence skills are regarded as essential for establishing empowering work environments in nursing. A reflective framework might aid the translation of emotional intelligence into a real-world context. The proposed framework may supplement learning about emotional intelligence skills and aid the integration of emotional intelligence in a clinical environment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Emotional intelligence--essential for trauma nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbery, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Patients and their relatives are increasingly considered partners in health and social care decision-making. Numerous political drivers in the UK reflect a commitment to this partnership and to improving the experience of patients and relatives in emergency care environments. As a Lecturer/Practitioner in Emergency Care I recently experienced the London Trauma System as a relative. My dual perspective, as nurse and relative, allowed me to identify a gap in the quality of care akin to emotional intelligence. This paper aims to raise awareness of emotional intelligence (EI), highlight its importance in trauma care and contribute to the development of this concept in trauma nursing and education across the globe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Como obter vantagem competitiva utilizando business intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanilde Kemczinski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to define Business Intelligence and to identify the information and communication technologies that support to this type of information system. A context is made about the concept and typologies of information systems (IS. Data Warehouse, Data Mart and Data Mining are the technological resources of Back-end system, used to store important data and to extract patterns of behavior and tendencies of the organizational processes. DSS (Decision Support Systems, EIS (Executive Information Systems and OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing tools are Front-end systems for Business Intelligence solutions. Through these systems the user transforms the information in strategic knowledge for the obtaining competitive advantages.

  2. The Factor Structure of Trait Emotional Intelligence in Hong Kong Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroveli, Stella; Siu, Angela F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Trait emotional intelligence ("trait EI" or "trait emotional self-efficacy") refers to individuals' emotion-related self-perceptions (Petrides, Furnham, & Mavroveli, 2007). A growing number of studies are looking at cross-cultural differences in the structure of the construct. Aims: This study investigates the…

  3. Quantitative Correlational Study: Emotional Intelligence and Project Outcomes among Hispanics in Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The present quantitative correlational research study explored relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) competencies, such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management, and project management outcomes: scope creep, in-budget project cost, and project timeliness. The study was conducted within the…

  4. The Relative Importance of Psychological Acceptance and Emotional Intelligence to Workplace Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson-Feilder, Emma J.; Bond, Frank W.

    2004-01-01

    Psychological acceptance (acceptance) and emotional intelligence (EI) are two relatively new individual characteristics that are hypothesised to affect well-being and performance at work. This study compares both of them, in terms of their ability to predict various well-being outcomes (i.e. general mental health, physical well-being, and job…

  5. Emotional Intelligence, Communication Competence, and Student Perceptions of Team Social Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troth, Ashlea C.; Jordan, Peter J.; Lawrence, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Students generally report poor experiences of group work in university settings. This study examines whether individual student perceptions of team social cohesion are determined by their level of emotional intelligence (EI) and whether this relationship is mediated by their communication skills. Business students (N = 273) completed the 16-item…

  6. Effects of the Spock Videogame on Improving Emotional Intelligence in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejudo, Javier; Latorre, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present research is to experimentally assess the effects of a videogame program ("Spock") for improving emotional intelligence (EI) as an ability among a sample of adolescents. Method: The sample was made up of 92 adolescents, aged 17 to 19, who were currently studying the second year of…

  7. Emotional Intelligence and Beliefs about Children, Discipline and Classroom Practices among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Maryclare E.

    2009-01-01

    This research sought to explore how emotional intelligence (EI) shapes the beliefs of pre-service teachers with respect to issues such as classroom management and student behavior. 101 pre-service teachers were recruited from undergraduate and graduate education courses at a private, mid-sized university. The Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i),…

  8. What We Know about Emotional Intelligence: How It Affects Learning, Work, Relationships, and Our Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Moshe; Matthews, Gerald; Roberts, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (or EI)--the ability to perceive, regulate, and communicate emotions, to understand emotions in ourselves and others--has been the subject of best-selling books, magazine cover stories, and countless media mentions. It has been touted as a solution for problems ranging from relationship issues to the inadequacies of local…

  9. Cultural Perspective on Parenting, Trait Emotional Intelligence and Mental Health in Taiwanese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Shen, April Chiung-Tao; Hsieh, Yi-Ping; Feng, Jui-Ying; Wei, Hsi-Sheng; Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Feng, Joyce Yen

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to clarify the associations as well as the pathways through which parenting and children's emotional intelligence (EI) may influence children's mental health with a cross-sectional sample of 675 school pupils (fourth grade, mean age = 10.4 years, 310 boy, 356 girls and 9 unidentified) in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression and…

  10. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence Awareness-Raising Activities on L2 Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Reza; Sadr, Sajjad Aref

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) awareness-raising on Iranian university students' overall as well as variable-specific L2 motivation. The 136 participants (107 males, 29 females) were divided into a control group and an experimental group, both of which completed the same motivation…

  11. Differences in the Emotional Intelligence between Undergraduate Therapy and Business Students and the Population Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Nigel; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Parsons, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Students occasionally experience difficulties during work-integrated learning and clinical placements. The authors reasoned that these placement difficulties might be related to the students' emotional intelligence (EI) being underdeveloped before they commence full-time clinical placements. A cross-sectional survey design was used to measure the…

  12. Understanding and Applying Emotional Intelligence: A Qualitative Study of Tampa Veterans Administration Hospital Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brenda Webb

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has not been studied extensively within the Veterans' Health Administration (VHA). The VHA is the largest healthcare organization in America with over 360,000 employees and the organization invests heavily in competency development. The Tampa VA is a level 1 facility with over 5,000 employees in the Tampa Bay area. The…

  13. Successful Graduate Students: The Roles of Personality Traits and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grehan, Patrick M.; Flanagan, Rosemary; Malgady, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Given the complex role of school psychologists, it is in the interest of stakeholders to identify characteristics related to student success in graduate training, which is suggestive of their effectiveness as practitioners. This study explores the relationship of personality traits and Emotional Intelligence (EI) to graduate students' performance…

  14. A Mindful Approach to Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Undergraduate Students Online and in Person

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotler, Jami L.; DiTursi, Dan; Goldstein, Ira; Yates, Jeff; DelBelso, Deb

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we examine whether emotional intelligence (EI) can be taught online and, if so, what key variables influence the successful implementation of this online learning model. Using a 3 x 2 factorial quasi-experimental design, this mixed-methods study found that a team-based learning environment using a blended teaching approach, supported…

  15. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Learning Styles: The Case of Iranian English for Academic Purposes Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Abol-Nejadian, Rezvan

    2015-01-01

    Although a large body of research has been dedicated to examining emotional intelligence (EI) and learning styles in relation to different factors in academic setting, the relationship between these two variables still necessitates more exploration and deeper study, especially in the Iranian context. To this end, 60 English for Academic Purposes…

  16. Emotional Intelligence as a Salient Predictor for Collegians' Career Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Among the plethora of career theories and counseling practices, human emotion continues to be underrepresented. The paucity is evoking discontentment. For many career specialists, a distal role for emotionality has become untenable. This study demonstrated emotional intelligence (EI) associates with familiar constructs within the career…

  17. A Comparison of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Profiles of Individuals with and without Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, K. V.; Hudry, Kristelle; Michalaria, Georgia; Swami, Viren; Sevdalis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which the socioemotional impairments of Asperger syndrome (AS) might be extreme manifestations of individual differences within the general population remains under-explored. We compared the trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) profiles of 30 individuals with AS against the profiles of 43 group-matched controls using the Trait…

  18. The Multifaceted Nature of Mentors' Authentic Leadership and Mentees' Emotional Intelligence: A Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly; Levy-Gazenfrantz, Tania

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, from a critical perspective, mentees' perceptions regarding the persons they view as their influential mentors--whether they regard them as authentic leaders and whether these mentors affect the development of mentees' emotional intelligence (EI). Using a sample of 62 teacher-mentees from different school…

  19. Too Much of a Good Thing? Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Conflict Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Christin; Kwantes, Catherine T

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that the outcomes of interpersonal conflict are determined not only by the conflict itself, but also by the way in which it is handled. Confrontational and domineering tactics have been found to magnify the adverse impact of conflict. Thus, investigations of determinants of aggressive conflict management behaviors are of considerable interest. This study extends the literature by examining the relationship between conflict management preferences and conflict management behaviors and by examining how emotional intelligence (EI) shapes this preference-behavior relationship. Individuals' conflict management preferences predicted actual conflict management behaviors. EI was found to moderate this relationship. However, some of these moderating effects run contrary to the popular view of EI as a prosocial concept. Specifically, some EI facets were found to strengthen the link between aggressive conflict management preferences and subsequent conflict management behaviors.

  20. Associations between emotional intelligence and doctor burnout, job satisfaction and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Yi-Tien; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Chang, Chi-Chang; Huang, Chih-Kun

    2011-08-01

    The occupational health literature has long been dominated by stress-related topics. A more contemporary perspective suggests using a positive approach in the form of a health model focused on what is right with people, such as feelings of well-being and satisfaction. Using a positive perspective and multi-source data collection, this study investigated the inter-relationships among emotional intelligence (EI), patient satisfaction, doctor burnout and job satisfaction. In this observational study, 110 internists and 2872 out-patients were surveyed in face-to-face interviews. Higher self-rated EI was significantly associated with less burnout (pdefinition of EI and the construct validity of EI as rated by others require further examination. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  1. 1st International Conference on Intelligent Computing, Communication and Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Patnaik, Srikanta; Ichalkaranje, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    In the history of mankind, three revolutions which impact the human life are the tool-making revolution, agricultural revolution and industrial revolution. They have transformed not only the economy and civilization but the overall development of the society. Probably, intelligence revolution is the next revolution, which the society will perceive in the next 10 years. ICCD-2014 covers all dimensions of intelligent sciences, i.e. Intelligent Computing, Intelligent Communication and Intelligent Devices. This volume covers contributions from Intelligent Communication which are from the areas such as Communications and Wireless Ad Hoc & Sensor Networks, Speech & Natural Language Processing, including Signal, Image and Video Processing and Mobile broadband and Optical networks, which are the key to the ground-breaking inventions to intelligent communication technologies. Secondly, Intelligent Device is any type of equipment, instrument, or machine that has its own computing capability. Contributions from ...

  2. Mathematical literacy in undergraduates: role of gender, emotional intelligence and emotional self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Vicki N.; Qualter, Pamela; Roberts, Sian; Appleby, Yvon; Barnes, Lynne

    2013-12-01

    This empirical study explores the roles that Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Emotional Self-Efficacy (ESE) play in undergraduates' mathematical literacy, and the influence of EI and ESE on students' attitudes towards and beliefs about mathematics. A convenience sample of 93 female and 82 male first-year undergraduates completed a test of mathematical literacy, followed by an online survey designed to measure the students' EI, ESE and factors associated with mathematical literacy. Analysis of the data revealed significant gender differences. Males attained a higher mean test score than females and out-performed the females on most of the individual questions and the associated mathematical tasks. Overall, males expressed greater confidence in their mathematical skills, although both males' and females' confidence outweighed their actual mathematical proficiency. Correlation analyses revealed that males and females attaining higher mathematical literacy test scores were more confident and persistent, exhibited lower levels of mathematics anxiety and possessed higher mathematics qualifications. Correlation analyses also revealed that in male students, aspects of ESE were associated with beliefs concerning the learning of mathematics (i.e. that intelligence is malleable and that persistence can facilitate success), but not with confidence or actual performance. Both EI and ESE play a greater role with regard to test performance and attitudes/beliefs regarding mathematics amongst female undergraduates; higher EI and ESE scores were associated with higher test scores, while females exhibiting higher levels of ESE were also more confident and less anxious about mathematics, believed intelligence to be malleable, were more persistent and were learning goal oriented. Moderated regression analyses confirmed mathematics anxiety as a negative predictor of test performance in males and females, but also revealed that in females EI and ESE moderate the effects of anxiety on test

  3. Teacher Effectiveness in Relation to Emotional Intelligence Among Medical and Engineering Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeya Jha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies have revealed that emotional intelligence (EI influences an individual's job performance in terms of organizational commitment and job satisfaction. But prior studies were limited mostly to the corporate sector. Therefore the present study was conducted to understand the correlation between EI and teaching performance in the case of faculty members at medical and engineering colleges, as courses related to these two fields are quite extensive and demanding which often leads to stress among students (Saipanish, 2003; Foster & Spencer, 2003; Schneider, 2007; Ray and Joseph, 2010. A total of 250 faculty members from three medical and four private engineering colleges of Uttar Pradesh, India, participated in the study. Emotional intelligence scale (EIS, 2007, Teacher Effectiveness Scale (TES, 2010 and Teacher Rating Scale (TRS, 2003 were administered to measure the emotional intelligence, self-reported teacher effectiveness and student rated teacher effectiveness of the faculty members respectively. All materials used in the study are constructed and standardized on Indian population. The study revealed a positive correlation between EI and teacher effectiveness, both self-reported and students rated. Among ten components of EI considered in the study; emotional stability, self-motivation, managing relations, self-awareness and integrity emerged as the best predictors of teacher effectiveness. Gender differences on the scores of EI and Teacher Effectiveness was insignificant. The EI and self-reported teacher effectiveness of engineering faculty members were relatively higher than those of medical faculty. However, according to students’ rating there was no significant difference in teacher effectiveness among the two groups. Implications of this research from the perspective of training faculty members are discussed.

  4. Ei Compendex: A new database makes life easier for engineers

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Library is expanding its range of databases. The latest arrival, called Ei Compendex, is the world's most comprehensive engineering database, which indexes engineering literature published throughout the world. It also offers bibliographic entries for articles published in scientific journals and for conference proceedings and covers an extensive range of subjects from mechanical engineering to the environment, materials science, solid state physics and superconductivity. Moreover, it is the most relevant quality control and engineering management database. Ei Compendex contains over 4.6 million references from over 2600 journals, conference proceedings and technical reports dating from 1966 to the present. Every year, 220,000 new abstracts are added to the database which is also updated on a weekly basis. In the case of articles published in recent years, it provides an electronic link to the full texts of all major publishers. The database also contains the full texts of Elsevier periodicals (over 250...

  5. Keegi ei tea mu nime : [luuletused] / Veiko Märka

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Märka, Veiko, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    Tõlgitud Veiko Märka luulekogust "Tühja aju korinad". Sisu: Keegi ei tea mu nime = Kukaan ei tiedä mun nimee ; "Kui ma kuulen sõnu..." = "Kun kuulen ilmauksen..." ; "Esimese..." = "Ensimmäisenä..." ; "Igal hommikul..." = "Joka aamu..." / tlk. Hannu Oittinen. Väike perenaine = Pikku perheenäiti / tlk. Hannu Oittinen ja Tuglas-seuran kääntäjäpiiri. Progressi triumf : (Poeem) = Kehityksen voitto : (Runoelma) / tlk. Hannu Oittinen. Minimalistlikud muinasjutud = Minimalistisia satuja / tlk. Heli Laaksonen ja Hannu Oittinen. Kõige turvalisem seks = Turvallisinta seksiä ; Abistame Aafrikat! = Autetaan Afrikkaa! ; "Taome..." = "Taotaan..." ; "Edasi..." = "Eteenpäin..." ; "Isegi juhus..." = "Edes sattuma..." ; "Miinus ja miinus..." = "Miinus ja miinus..." / tlk. Hannu Oittinen. Leijonien pakottaja ; Kotka ja Vaasa: Ystävyyskaupunkit

  6. CORONAL MASS EJECTION INDUCED OUTFLOWS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, M.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Imada, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the outflows associated with two halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred on 2006 December 13 and 14 in NOAA 10930, using the Hinode/EIS observations. Each CME was accompanied by an EIT wave and coronal dimmings. Dopplergrams in the dimming regions are obtained from the spectra of seven EIS lines. The results show that strong outflows are visible in the dimming regions during the CME eruption at different heights from the lower transition region to the corona. It is found that the velocity is positively correlated with the photospheric magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the dimming. We estimate the mass loss based on height-dependent EUV dimmings and find it to be smaller than the CME mass derived from white-light observations. The mass difference is attributed partly to the uncertain atmospheric model, and partly to the transition region outflows, which refill the coronal dimmings.

  7. Piinamise välistanud Rice ei täpsustanud, mis piinamine on / Ahto Lobjakas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lobjakas, Ahto, 1970-

    2005-01-01

    USA välisminister Condoleezza Rice ütles Brüsselis, et USA võimud ei rakenda vangide piinamist ei kodu- ega välismaal. Samas ei selgitanud ta, mida USA loeb piinamiseks. NATO peasekretäri Jaap de Hoop Schefferi kommentaare

  8. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  9. Feasibility of an EIS Follow-up Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, I.C.; Jaquish, R.E.; Watson, D.G.

    1982-12-01

    The proposed level of an EIS Follow-up Program is believed to be feasible and that it can and should be implemented. Guidance to authors should result in fewer, but more important, commitments for mitigating adverse environmental impacts. Selecting the significant commitments from Records of Decisions published since July 1, 1979 for tracking to satisfaction should result in conformance with regulations, orders, and the intent of the NEPA

  10. Iraagi raport ei veennud sõjavastaseid / Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke, 12. sept. 2007, lk. 7. USA vägede ülemjuhataja kindral David Petraeus ja USA Iraagi suursaadik Ryuan Crocker kirjeldasid Kongressile Iraagi olukorda, mis ei suutnud sõja suhtes selgelt negatiivsetel positsioonidel rahvaesindajaid veenda, et operatsioonide jätkamine on vajalik. Vt. samas: Ingvar Bärenklau. Riigikogu peab otsustama Eesti missiooni saatuse

  11. Reformierakond ei kauple põhimõtetega / Meelis Atonen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Atonen, Meelis, 1966-

    2001-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Hiiu Leht, 11. dets. 2001, lk. 2; Nädaline, 11. dets. 2001, lk. 4; Valgamaalane, 11. dets. 2001, lk. 2; Järva Teataja, 11. dets. 2001, lk. 2; Kesknädal, 19. dets. 2001, lk. 5. Tallinna võimuliidu lagunemise peapõhjus oli Tallinna 2002. aasta eelarvesse kavandatud 900 mln kuni 1,5 mld krooni suurune laen, millega Reformierakond ei ole kunagi nõustnud. Autor: Reformierakond. Parlamendisaadik

  12. Eesti ei pea ümberasujatele midagi tagastama / Helle Kalda

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kalda, Helle, 1950-

    2006-01-01

    Omandireformi aluste seaduse 7 paragrahvi lõikest 3 ja varade tagastamisest nn. järelümberasunutele. Sama ka Meie Maa 12. jaan. 2006, lk. 2 ; Vooremaa 17. jaan. 2006, lk. 2 ; Virumaa Teataja 2. veeb. 2006, lk. 11 ; Pärnu Postimees 9. veeb. 2006, lk. 15 ; Pärnu Postimees 9. veeb. 2006, lk. 15, pealkiri kujul : Ümberasujatele ei pea midagi tagastama

  13. EIS immunosensor based on magnetic nanoparticles for ochratoxim A determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biraruti, Irina; Tudorache, Madalina; Rotariu, Lucian; Bala, Camelia; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium fungi. It occurs in a variety of foodstuff, including cereals, coffee, wine, grape juice and fruits juice. Maximum permitted levels have been established by the EU and several countries. Currently, there are several methods available for OTA monitoring in real samples, e.g. TLC, HPLC, ELISA immunosensors. Liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD), coupled with immunoaffinity column or solid phase extraction as pretreatment method, has been validated and adopted as official standard for OTA determination. Also, an immunosensor based on electrochemical detection has been reported for rapid analysis of OTA in food and beverages. Our work proposes the development of a new sensitive immunosensor combining the use of magnetic nanoparticles and EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) detection principle. Anti-OTA antibody immobilised on magnetic nanoparticles were deposited on the EIS electrode surface by applying a magnetic field. Then, OTA sample solutions were added in the detection cell. Quantitative determination of OTA content was performed based on EIS detection. Experimental parameters of the immunosensor were set-up at the optimum values. Based on those values, the immunosensor allows to detect OTA in the range 1-10 ng/mL. The future perspective is to validate this immunochemical method using HPLC-FLD. (authors)

  14. Epilepsy, E/I balance and GABAA receptor plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Fritschy

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors mediate most of the fast inhibitory transmission in the CNS. They form heteromeric complexes assembled from a large family of subunit genes. The existence of multiple GABAA receptor subtypes differing in subunit composition, localization and functional properties underlies their role for fi ne-tuning of neuronal circuits and genesis of network oscillations. The differential regulation of GABAA receptor subtypes represents a major facet of homeostatic synaptic plasticity and contributes to the excitation/inhibition (E/I balance under physiological conditions and upon pathological challenges. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent fi ndings highlighting the signifi cance of GABAA receptor heterogeneity for the concept of E/I balance and its relevance for epilepsy. Specifi cally, we address the following issues: (1 role for tonic inhibition, mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, for controlling neuronal excitability; (2 signifi cance of chloride ion transport for maintenance of the E/I balance in adult brain; and (3 molecular mechanisms underlying GABAA receptor regulation (traffi cking, posttranslational modifi cation, gene transcription that are important for homoeostatic plasticity. Finally, the relevance of these fi ndings is discussed in light of the involvement of GABAA receptors in epileptic disorders, based on recent experimental studies of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and absence seizures and on the identifi cation of mutations in GABAA receptor subunit genes underlying familial forms of epilepsy.

  15. Intelligent Tutor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA also seeks to advance American education by employing the technology utilization process to develop a computerized, artificial intelligence-based Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) to help high school and college physics students. The tutoring system is designed for use with the lecture and laboratory portions of a typical physics instructional program. Its importance lies in its ability to observe continually as a student develops problem solutions and to intervene when appropriate with assistance specifically directed at the student's difficulty and tailored to his skill level and learning style. ITS originated as a project of the Johnson Space Center (JSC). It is being developed by JSC's Software Technology Branch in cooperation with Dr. R. Bowen Loftin at the University of Houston-Downtown. Program is jointly sponsored by NASA and ACOT (Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow). Other organizations providing support include Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the National Research Council, Pennzoil Products Company and the George R. Brown Foundation. The Physics I class of Clear Creek High School, League City, Texas are providing the classroom environment for test and evaluation of the system. The ITS is a spinoff product developed earlier to integrate artificial intelligence into training/tutoring systems for NASA astronauts flight controllers and engineers.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Mismatching Expressive and Verbal Messages: A Contribution to Detection of Deception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception. PMID:24658500

  17. Emotional intelligence predicts peer-rated social competence above and beyond personality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Szczygieł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This study investigated the relationship between trait emotional intelligence (EI and social competences (SC, which determine effective functioning in three types of social situations: intimate situations, situations of social exposure and situations requiring self-assertion. Social competences were assessed using a peer nomination method. It was hypothesized that trait EI predicts SC above and beyond personality traits. Participants and procedure Data were collected from among 111 adolescents (46.95% girls. The study was conducted among five classes from three public high schools. Participants first completed the Personality Inventory NEO-FFI and the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF. Subsequently, the descriptions of three different persons were presented to the participants. Each description concerned one of the SC: intimate competence, social exposure competence and assertive competence. Participants were asked to nominate three classmates who suited each description best. Results A series of hierarchical regression analyses was performed. Personality traits and trait EI were regressed on each competence. Analyses involved two-step hierarchical regressions, entering personality traits at step 1 and adding trait EI at step 2. The results demonstrated that personality traits explained a substantial portion of the variance in each SC. Beyond these variables, trait EI was significant as a predictor of nominations for each SC, explaining an additional amount of the unique variance. Conclusions The results complement existing evidence that trait EI contributes to successful social functioning. The relationships between trait EI and SC remained statistically significant even after controlling for Big Five variance. The results demonstrate incremental validity of trait EI over and above personality traits.

  18. Emotional intelligence and mismatching expressive and verbal messages: a contribution to detection of deception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Wojciechowski

    Full Text Available Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI. However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception.

  19. Emotional intelligence education in pre-registration nursing programmes: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kim; McCloughen, Andrea; Delgado, Cynthia; Kefalas, Claudia; Harkness, Emily

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the state of knowledge on emotional intelligence (EI) education in pre-registration nursing programmes. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and Web of Knowledge electronic databases were searched for abstracts published in English between 1992-2014. Data extraction and constant comparative analysis of 17 articles. Three categories were identified: Constructs of emotional intelligence; emotional intelligence curricula components; and strategies for emotional intelligence education. A wide range of emotional intelligence constructs were found, with a predominance of trait-based constructs. A variety of strategies to enhance students' emotional intelligence skills were identified, but limited curricula components and frameworks reported in the literature. An ability-based model for curricula and learning and teaching approaches is recommended. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Intelligent Design and Intelligent Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerman, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Good Evening, my name is Greg Jerman and for nearly a quarter century I have been performing failure analysis on NASA's aerospace hardware. During that time I had the distinct privilege of keeping the Space Shuttle flying for two thirds of its history. I have analyzed a wide variety of failed hardware from simple electrical cables to cryogenic fuel tanks to high temperature turbine blades. During this time I have found that for all the time we spend intelligently designing things, we need to be equally intelligent about understanding why things fail. The NASA Flight Director for Apollo 13, Gene Kranz, is best known for the expression "Failure is not an option." However, NASA history is filled with failures both large and small, so it might be more accurate to say failure is inevitable. It is how we react and learn from our failures that makes the difference.

  1. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  2. The relationship between emotional intelligence and job stress in the faculty of medicine in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIKOO YAMANI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: health care professionals especially clinicians, undergo lots of job stress (JS. Emotional intelligence (EI is among the variables that appear to be associated with stress. It is also included among the ways adopted by the individuals in order to resist JS in the workplace. Thus, this study aims to investigate the relationship between EI and JS in the faculty members of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS. Methods: This was a correlational study performed on 202 faculty members of IUMS. The data was gathered through two valid and reliable questionnaires (Bradberry EI questionnaire and JS questionnaire, being analyzed by SPSS software using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analysis (α=0.05. Results: 142 individuals (70.30% filled out the questionnaires. 75% of the respondents were male and 98% were married. There was an inverse correlation between the total score of EI and the level of JS (r=-0.235, p=0.005. Moreover, among the factors of EI, self-awareness and self-management scores had significant inverse relationship with the level of JS. Linear regression analysis showed that the EI factors explained approximately 7% of the variance of JS levels of the teachers. Conclusions: Individuals with high EI have less JS. Since the EI can be taught, it can be expected that the JS of faculty members can be reduced through training them on emotional intelligence. Therefore, it is recommended that short-term training courses be scheduled and designed based on the concepts of EI for teachers, particularly clinicians.

  3. Radioisotope instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, J F; Silverleaf, D J

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Nuclear Energy, Volume 107: Radioisotope Instruments, Part 1 focuses on the design and applications of instruments based on the radiation released by radioactive substances. The book first offers information on the physical basis of radioisotope instruments; technical and economic advantages of radioisotope instruments; and radiation hazard. The manuscript then discusses commercial radioisotope instruments, including radiation sources and detectors, computing and control units, and measuring heads. The text describes the applications of radioisotop

  4. The measurement of perceived emotional intelligence for Spanish adolescents with Social Anxiety Disorder Symptoms : La medición de la inteligencia emocional en adolescentes españoles con trastorno de ansiedad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díaz-Castela, M.; Hale III, W.W.; Muela, J.A.; Espinosa-Fernandez, L.; Klimstra, T.A.; Garcia-Lopez, L.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a concept that has been discussed for decades in Psychology but has received very little empirical study until recently. And with this growing interest, its accompanying concept, Perceived Emotional Intelligence (PEI), has also received more attention. It is due to

  5. Business Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Anders

    2001-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je seznámení s Business Intelligence a zpracování vývojového trendu, který ovlivňuje podobu řešení Business Intelligence v podniku ? Business Activity Monitoring. Pro zpracování tohoto tématu byla použita metoda studia odborných pramenů, a to jak v českém, tak v anglickém jazyce. Hlavním přínosem práce je ucelený, v českém jazyce zpracovaný materiál pojednávající o Business Activity Monitoring. Práce je rozdělena do šesti hlavních kapitol. Prvních pět je věnováno p...

  6. COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE: THE ENHANCING ROLE OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING CAPABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    HAMAD, Zaina Mustafa Mahmoud; YOZGAT, Ugur

    2017-01-01

    Performinga strong intelligence grants an organization a guaranteeof long-term success. This paper investigates the enhancing effect of organizational learning capabilities on competitive intelligence atthe commercial banks in Jordan. A sample within top and middle managements was used.Measurement instrument validity and model fit were assessed before testinghypotheses. This study emphasizes the role learning capability plays inenhancing intelligence. Key findings support importance of organi...

  7. Web Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devedzic, Vladan

    2004-01-01

    This paper surveys important aspects of Web Intelligence (WI) in the context of Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) research. WI explores the fundamental roles as well as practical impacts of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced Information Technology (IT) on the next generation of Web-related products, systems, services, and…

  8. Draft Executive Summary Hawaii Geothermal Project - EIS Scoping Meetings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-03-01

    After introductions by the facilitator and the program director from DOE, process questions were entertained. It was also sometimes necessary to make clarifications as to process throughout the meetings. Topics covered federal involvement in the HGP-EIS; NEPA compliance; public awareness, review, and access to information; Native Hawaiian concerns; the record of decision, responsibility with respect to international issues; the impacts of prior and on-going geothermal development activities; project definition; alternatives to the proposed action; necessary studies; Section 7 consultations; socioeconomic impacts; and risk analysis. Presentations followed, in ten meetings, 163 people presented issues and concerns, 1 additional person raised process questions only.

  9. Investigating links between emotional intelligence and observer performance by radiologists in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah J.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Cumming, Steven; MacKay, Stuart J.; McEntee, Mark F.; Keane, Kevin; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.

    2014-03-01

    A novel direction of radiology research is better understanding the links between cognitive and personality factors and radiologists' accuracy and performance. This study examines relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) scores and observer performance by radiologists in breast cancer detection. Three separate samples were collected with Australian and US breast imaging radiologists. The radiologists were asked to undertake a mammographic interpretation task to identify malignant breast lesions and localise them, in addition to use a confidence rating scale to report confidence in the decision. Following this activity, the radiologists were administered the EI Trait (TEIQue-SF) questionnaire. The Trait EI test gives a Global EI score and 4 sub-scores in Well-being, Self-Control, Emotionality and Sociability. Sample 1 (Sydney 2012) radiologists were divided into 2 experience bands; radiologists practicing emotionality" and "sociability" to Location Sensitivity and JAFROC. Our preliminary results indicate EI is correlated to observer performance in lesser experienced radiologists. It is suggested that tasks perceived as more difficult by less experienced radiologists may evoke more emotion (uncertainty, frustration, pressure). As experience increases, radiologists may develop an ability to control their emotions or emotional intelligence becomes less important in decision making.

  10. The correlation between emotional intelligence and gray matter volume in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yafei; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated the neurological substrates of emotional intelligence (EI), but none of them have considered the neural correlates of EI that are measured using the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale (SSREIS). This scale was developed based on the EI model of Salovey and Mayer (1990). In the present study, SSREIS was adopted to estimate EI. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate the gray matter volume (GMV) of 328 university students. Results found positive correlations between Monitor of Emotions and VBM measurements in the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, Utilization of Emotions was positively correlated with the GMV in the parahippocampal gyrus, but was negatively correlated with the VBM measurements in the fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, Social Ability had volume correlates in the vermis. These findings indicate that the neural correlates of the EI model, which primarily focuses on the abilities of individuals to appraise and express emotions, can also regulate and utilize emotions to solve problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The relation between emotional intelligence and criminal behavior: A study among convicted criminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of emotional intelligence (EI may lead to maladjustment and inability to achieve desired goals. A relationship between low levels of EI and crime has been proposed. Aim: The aim was to assess the relationship between EI and criminal behavior. Materials and Methods: Study sample consisted of 202 subjects, in whom 101 subjects were convicted offenders, and 101 were matched normal controls. Offender group comprised of individuals convicted for different crimes such as murder, rape, and robbery, selected from Birsa Munda Central Jail, Hotwar, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India based on purposive sampling. Sample of the normal control group was taken from Ranchi and nearby areas. All subjects gave informed consent for participating in the study. Both the groups were matched on age, gender, education, occupation, and marital status. All participants were assessed on General Health Questionnaire-12 and Mangal Emotional Intelligence Inventory (MEII. The results were analyzed using statistical package SPSS-version 20. Results: The group of convicted offenders obtained significantly lower scores on all the domains of MEII such as intrapersonal awareness (own emotions, interpersonal awareness (others emotions, intrapersonal management (own emotions and interpersonal management (others emotions, and aggregate emotional quotient in comparison to their normal counterparts. Conclusion: The convicted offenders group had significantly lower EI compared to normal subjects. Starting EI enhancement program in prison can help the inmates better understand their feelings and emotions.

  12. Cyberbullying Victimization, Self-Esteem and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescence: Does Emotional Intelligence Play a Buffering Role?

    OpenAIRE

    Natalio Extremera; Cirenia Quintana-Orts; Sergio Mérida-López; Lourdes Rey

    2018-01-01

    Cyberbullying has been linked to social, physical and psychological problems for adolescent victims but there has been no analysis of the specific role of emotional intelligence in protecting against the negative symptoms associated with cyberbullying victimization. This study examined the interaction between cyberbullying victimization and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors of psychological maladjustment (operationalized as high suicidal ideation and low self-esteem) in 1,660 Spanish ...

  13. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of an Eis Family Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Keith D.; Biswas, Tapan; Chang, Changsoo; Wu, Ruiying; Chen, Wenjing; Janes, Brian K.; Chalupska, Dominika; Gornicki, Piotr; Hanna, Philip C.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-05-26

    Proteins from the enhanced intracellular survival (Eis) family are versatile acetyltransferases that acetylate amines at multiple positions of several aminoglycosides (AGs). Their upregulation confers drug resistance. Homologues of Eis are present in diverse bacteria, including many pathogens. Eis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Eis_Mtb) has been well characterized. In this study, we explored the AG specificity and catalytic efficiency of the Eis family protein from Bacillus anthracis (Eis_Ban). Kinetic analysis of specificity and catalytic efficiency of acetylation of six AGs indicates that Eis_Ban displays significant differences from Eis_Mtb in both substrate binding and catalytic efficiency. The number of acetylated amines was also different for several AGs, indicating a distinct regiospecificity of Eis_Ban. Furthermore, most recently identified inhibitors of Eis_Mtb did not inhibit Eis_Ban, underscoring the differences between these two enzymes. To explain these differences, we determined an Eis_Ban crystal structure. The comparison of the crystal structures of Eis_Ban and Eis_Mtb demonstrates that critical residues lining their respective substrate binding pockets differ substantially, explaining their distinct specificities. Our results suggest that acetyltransferases of the Eis family evolved divergently to garner distinct specificities while conserving catalytic efficiency, possibly to counter distinct chemical challenges. The unique specificity features of these enzymes can be utilized as tools for developing AGs with novel modifications and help guide specific AG treatments to avoid Eis-mediated resistance.

  14. Emotional Intelligence in a Group of Patients with First-Episode Psychosis in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Pooretemad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to evaluate the Emotional Intelligence (EI of a group of patients with first episode psychosis in Iran as compared with a healthy control group. A case-control design was used. EI was assessed using Persian version of Bar-On Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i administered on 25 patients with history of a single psychotic episode in the last two years, as well as 64 healthy participants. The mean (±SD of EI scores of patients and healthy controls group was 319.8 (±40.9 and 328.8 (±33.3, respectively. Two-independent sample t-test revealed no significant difference in the EI scores of two groups (P=0.29. In contrast with chronic schizophrenia, the patients with first-episode psychosis were not different from the healthy subjects in terms of emotional intelligence score. It might be implied that the low emotional intelligence of the patients with chronic psychotic disorders is an accumulative result of the underlying disease over time.

  15. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Clinical Competencies of Nursing Students in Tabriz Nursing and Midwifery School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahkar Farshi Mahni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preparing students to take over job responsibilities is one of the most challenging duties of nursing schools. The focus of nursing education should be on helping students to achieve high levels of competence in nursing care and identify factors for reinforcing it. Since desirable results have not been reported on clinical competencies of nursing students, achieving skills to control their emotions could be effective. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI and clinical competencies. Methods: In this correlational study, all nursing students in semesters 6, 7 and 8 were studied after determining the sample size in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The data were collected using three questionnaires of demographic data, the Emotional Intelligence Sharing – Sybrya and a short clinical competence. The data analysis was done through descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS 18. Results: The results of the present study showed that the total EI score and clinical competence of students was more than moderate. The relationship between total EI and clinical competence was significant. Among the subscales of EI, there was a significant relationship between social skills and clinical competence. Conclusion: The relationship between the total emotional intelligence score and clinical competence of students in this study indicated the necessity and importance of emotions in decision-making to act properly within a clinical setting. Therefore, taking part in courses designed for learning skills of emotion perception and stress management in the workplace seem to be essential.

  16. A UK-wide analysis of trait emotional intelligence within the radiography profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, S.J.; Hogg, P.; Cooke, G.; Baker, R.D.; Dawkes, T.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to profile the Trait emotional intelligence (EI) of the radiography profession, explore any differences between subgroups, compare the profession with a normative group and investigate the relationship between EI and the leaders of the profession. An online UK-wide survey was conducted using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire, a self-report measure. Three main analyses were undertaken to investigate any differences between the sample and population, the radiographer subgroups and the sample and a normative group. The sample had similar characteristics to the population. There were differences between types of radiographer, with nuclear medicine radiographers scoring consistently lower than other groups. There were differences between the leaders and other members of the profession particularly in the Sociability factor. Radiographers scored higher than the TEIQue normative group for Global EI and three of the four factors. The study has benchmarked the Trait EI of one healthcare profession and identified areas for future research to develop our understanding of emotional intelligence.

  17. Intelligence and negotiating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of US intelligence during arms control negotiations between 1982 and 1987. It also covers : the orchestration of intelligence projects; an evaluation of the performance of intelligence activities; the effect intelligence work had on actual arms negotiations; and suggestions for improvements in the future

  18. Intelligent products : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, G.G.; Främling, K.; Holmström, J.

    This paper presents an overview of the field of Intelligent Products. As Intelligent Products have many facets, this paper is mainly focused on the concept behind Intelligent Products, the technical foundations, and the achievable practical goals of Intelligent Products. A novel classification of

  19. Intelligence Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    open source information— osint (newspapers...by user agencies. Section 1052 of the Intelligence Reform Act expressed the sense of Congress that there should be an open source intelligence ...center to coordinate the collection, analysis, production, and dissemination of open source intelligence to other intelligence agencies. An Open Source

  20. NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s 2 3p 5 4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

  1. Pathogen intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSteinert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behaviour, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behaviour, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies.

  2. Intelligent Routines

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassiou, George A

    Intelligent Routines II: Solving Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry with Sage” contains numerous of examples and problems as well as many unsolved problems. This book extensively applies the successful software Sage, which can be found free online http://www.sagemath.org/. Sage is a recent and popular software for mathematical computation, available freely and simple to use. This book is useful to all applied scientists in mathematics, statistics and engineering, as well for late undergraduate and graduate students of above subjects. It is the first such book in solving symbolically with Sage problems in Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry. Plenty of SAGE applications are given at each step of the exposition.

  3. Automated Intelligent Assistant for mass spectrometry operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filby, E.E.; Rankin, R.A.; Yoshida, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Automated Intelligent Assistant is designed to insure that our mass spectrometers produce timely, high-quality measurement data. The design combines instrument interfacing and expert system technology to automate an adaptable set-point damage prevention strategy. When shutdowns occur, the Assistant can help guide troubleshooting efforts. Stored real-time data will help our development program upgrade and improve the system, and also make it possible to re-run previously-observed instrument problems as ''live'' training exercises for the instrument operators. Initial work has focused on implementing the Assistant for the instrument ultra-high vacuum components. 14 refs., 5 figs

  4. Social cognition in bipolar disorder: Focus on emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varo, C; Jimenez, E; Solé, B; Bonnín, C M; Torrent, C; Valls, E; Morilla, I; Lahera, G; Martínez-Arán, A; Vieta, E; Reinares, M

    2017-08-01

    The present study aims to characterize emotional intelligence (EI) variability in a sample of euthymic bipolar disorder (BD) patients through the Mayer- Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). A total of 134 euthymic BD outpatients were recruited and divided into three groups according to the total Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EIQ) score of the MSCEIT, following a statistical criterion of scores 1.5SDs above/below the normative group mean, as follows: a low performance (LP) group (EIQ 115). Afterwards, main sociodemographic, clinical, functional and neurocognitive variables were compared between the groups. Three groups were identified: 1) LP group (n=16, 12%), 2) NP group (n=93, 69%) and 3) HP group (n=25, 19%). There were significant differences between the groups in premorbid intelligence quotient (IQ) (p=0.010), axis II comorbidity (p=0.008), subthreshold depressive symptoms (p=0.027), general functioning (p=0.013) and in four specific functional domains: autonomy, occupation, interpersonal relations and leisure time. Significant differences in neurocognitive performance were found between groups with the LP group showing the lowest attainments. The cross-sectional design of the study. Our results suggest that EI variability among BD patients, assessed through MSCEIT, is lower than expected. EI could be associated with premorbid IQ, subthreshold depressive symptoms, neurocognitive performance and general functioning. The identification of different profiles of SC may help guide specific interventions for distinct patient subgroups aimed at improving social cognition, neurocognitive performance and psychosocial functioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  6. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    OpenAIRE

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally r...

  7. Associations of Trait Emotional Intelligence with Social Support, Work Engagement, and Creativity in Japanese Eldercare Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Toyama, Hiroyuki; Mauno, Saija

    2017-01-01

    Work-related resources can be positive antecedents of employee work engagement (WE) and creativity. Although trait emotional intelligence (EI) and social support may be crucial resources in nursing, their relationships with WE and creativity remain unclear. Hence, with special focus on the role of trait EI, we examined this relationship by applying the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. The participants were 489 eldercare nurses in Japan (female: n = 401; male: n = 88; age = 39.5 ± 11.0 year...

  8. Preliminary Data on the Role of Emotional Intelligence in Moderating the Link between Psychopathy and Aggression in a Nonforensic Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Tiziana; Curci, Antonietta; Guglielmi, Francesca; Soleti, Emanuela; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2018-05-01

    This short report presents preliminary data on the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in moderating the relationship between psychopathy and aggression in a nonforensic sample. A sample of 109 volunteer men was administered the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R), the Reactive-Proactive Aggression Questionnaire, and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso emotional intelligence Test in individual sessions. Correlation and moderation analyzes showed that, at low levels of EI (in terms of strategic ability to understand and manage one's own and others' emotions), people scoring high on the total PPI-R and impulsivity dimension seemed to be both reactively and proactively aggressive. By contrast, at high levels of strategic ability, the relationships between psychopathy and aggression were no longer significant. These preliminary results encourage further investigation into the role of EI ability in mitigating aggressive outcomes in psychopathic subjects. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Neural correlates of emotional intelligence in a visual emotional oddball task: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Sivan; Dan, Orrie; Zysberg, Leehu

    2014-11-01

    The present study was aimed at identifying potential behavioral and neural correlates of Emotional Intelligence (EI) by using scalp-recorded Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). EI levels were defined according to both self-report questionnaire and a performance-based ability test. We identified ERP correlates of emotional processing by using a visual-emotional oddball paradigm, in which subjects were confronted with one frequent standard stimulus (a neutral face) and two deviant stimuli (a happy and an angry face). The effects of these faces were then compared across groups with low and high EI levels. The ERP results indicate that participants with high EI exhibited significantly greater mean amplitudes of the P1, P2, N2, and P3 ERP components in response to emotional and neutral faces, at frontal, posterior-parietal and occipital scalp locations. P1, P2 and N2 are considered indexes of attention-related processes and have been associated with early attention to emotional stimuli. The later P3 component has been thought to reflect more elaborative, top-down, emotional information processing including emotional evaluation and memory encoding and formation. These results may suggest greater recruitment of resources to process all emotional and non-emotional faces at early and late processing stages among individuals with higher EI. The present study underscores the usefulness of ERP methodology as a sensitive measure for the study of emotional stimuli processing in the research field of EI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The state of the science of emotional intelligence related to nursing leadership: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerjordet, Kristin; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    To explore the state of the science of emotional intelligence (EI) related to nursing leadership and its critiques. The phenomenon of EI has emerged as a potential new construct of importance for nursing leadership that enhances educational, organizational, staff and patient outcomes. Nevertheless, important questions and critical reflections related to exaggerated claims, conceptualizations and measurements exist. A literature search was conducted using international databases covering the period January 1999 to December 2009. A manual search of relevant journals and significant references increased the data. Critical reflection seems to be associated with the unsubstantiated predictive validity of EI in the area of nursing leadership. In addition, important moral issues are called into question. It is important to possess in-depth knowledge of EI and its scientific critique when integrating the concept into nursing research, education and practical settings. More attention to the nature of emotion in EI is necessary. Implications for nursing leadership The dynamics of EI should be explored in the context of both the surrounding environment and individual differences, as the latter can be adaptive in some settings but harmful in others.

  11. Does emotional intelligence have a ‘dark’ side? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Davis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence (EI was once touted as the ‘panacea’ for a satisfying and successful life. Consequently, there has been much emphasis on developing interventions to promote this personal resource in applied settings. Despite this, a growing body of research has begun to identify particular contexts when EI does not appear helpful and may even be deleterious to a person, or those they have contact with, suggesting a ‘dark’ side to the construct. This paper provides a review of emergent literature to examine when, why and how trait and ability EI may contribute to negative intrapersonal (psychological ill-health; stress reactivity and interpersonal outcomes (emotional manipulation; antisocial behaviour. Negative effects were found to operate across multiple contexts (health, academic, occupational however these were often indirect, suggesting that outcomes depend on pre-existing qualities of the person. Literature also points to the possibility of ‘optimal’ levels of EI – both within and across EI constructs. Uneven profiles of self-perceptions (trait facets or actual emotional skills contribute to poorer outcomes, particularly emotional awareness and management. Moreover, individuals who possess high levels of skill but have lower self-perceptions of their abilities fare worse that those with more balanced profiles. Future research must now improve methodological and statistical practices to better capture EI in context and the negative corollary associated with high levels.

  12. Does the physician's emotional intelligence matter? Impacts of the physician's emotional intelligence on the trust, patient-physician relationship, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Much of the literature pertinent to management indicates that service providers with high emotional intelligence (EI) receive higher customer satisfaction scores. Previous studies offer limited evidence regarding the impact of physician's EI on patient-physician relationship. Using a multilevel and multisource data approach, the current study aimed to build a model that demonstrated the impact of a physician's EI on the patient's trust and the patient-physician relationship. The survey sample included 983 outpatients and 39 physicians representing 11 specialties. Results of path analyses demonstrated that the ratio of patient's follow-up visits (p impact of patient's trust on patient's satisfaction was mediated by the patient-physician relationship at a significant level (p relationship had a significantly positive effect on patient's satisfaction (p relationship; however, mutual trust and professional respect between nurses and physicians play a critical role in reinforcing the patient-physician relationship to effect improvements in the provision of patient-centered care.

  13. Positioning of Emotional Intelligence Skills within the Overall Skillset of Practice-Based Accountants: Employer and Graduate Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Peggy; Byrne, Seán; Casey, John

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents evidence of employer and graduate attitudes on the skill set requirements for professional accountants, and whether university accounting programs develop these skills, and in particular emotional intelligence (EI) skills. We use priority indices and strategic mapping to evaluate the positioning of 31 skills. This analysis…

  14. Effect of Middle-Level Leader and Teacher Emotional Intelligence on School Teachers' Job Satisfaction: The Case of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi-Sum; Wong, Ping-Man; Peng, Kelly Z.

    2010-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been an emerging topic for educational, psychological and management researchers and consultants in recent years. Despite the emerging consensus of its definition and evidence reported in business organizations, relatively little empirical evidence have been reported in the education literature. We conducted two…

  15. High Level of Emotional Intelligence Is Related to High Level of Online Teaching Self-Efficacy among Academic Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nagia; Ali, Omar; Jones, James

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and online teaching self-efficacy among 115 academic nurse educators who teach online (totally, blended, or both). The sample was randomly drawn from the list of nursing schools accredited by Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) with baccalaureate, master's…

  16. An Analysis of Independent, Non-Academic Characteristics of Chinese and American Business Students Associated with Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margavio, Thomas M.; Margavio, Geanie W.; Hignite, Michael A.; Moses, Duane R.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuation of their prior research which focused on the differences in Emotional Intelligence (EI) levels between Chinese and American business students and the academic variables associated with those scores, the authors extend their efforts to investigate those personal (non-academic) characteristics of both American and Chinese business…

  17. A pilot study on early home-based intervention through an intelligent baby gym (CareToy) in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Bartalena, Laura; Cecchi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CareToy is an intelligent system, inspired by baby gyms, aimed to provide an intensive, individualized, home-based and family-centred early intervention (EI) program. AIMS: A pilot study was carried out to explore the feasibility of CareToy intervention in preterm infants, aged 3....... An adequately powered randomized clinical trial is warranted....

  18. The Role of Personality Traits, Core Self-Evaluation, and Emotional Intelligence in Career Decision-Making Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia; Bar-On, Reuven

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the role of personality traits, core self-evaluation, and emotional intelligence (EI) in career decision-making difficulties. Italian university students (N = 232) responded to questions on the Big Five Questionnaire, Core Self-Evaluation Scale, Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties…

  19. The Intention to Quit Smoking: The Impact of Susceptibility, Self-Efficacy, Social Norms and Emotional Intelligence Embedded Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Mannan, Mahafuz; Rahman, Mohammad Mahboob

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: From the perspective of developing countries, studies regarding the behavioral effects of quitting tobacco consumption on emerging psychological determinants are limited. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of emotional intelligence (EI), social norms, susceptibility and self-efficacy on the behavioral effects of…

  20. Retrospective evaluation of exposure index (EI) values from plain radiographs reveals important considerations for quality improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Robinson, John; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Following X-ray exposure, radiographers receive immediate feedback on detector exposure in the form of the exposure index (EI). To identify whether radiographers are meeting manufacturer-recommended EI (MREI) ranges for routine chest, abdomen and pelvis X-ray examinations under a variety of conditions and to examine factors affecting the EI. Data on 5000 adult X-ray examinations including the following variables were collected: examination parameters, EI values, patient gender, date of birth, date and time of examination, grid usage and the presence of implant or prosthesis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize each data set and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine significant differences, with P < 0.05 indicating significance for all tests. Most examinations demonstrated EI values that were outside the MREI ranges, with significantly higher median EI values recorded for female patient radiographs than those for male patients for all manufacturers, indicating higher detector exposures for all units except for Philips digital radiography (DR), where increased EI values indicate lower exposure (P = 0.01). Median EI values for out of hours radiography were also significantly higher compared with normal working hours for all technologies (P ≤ 0.02). Significantly higher median EI values were demonstrated for Philips DR chest X-rays without as compared to those with the employment of a grid (P = 0.03), while significantly lower median EI values were recorded for Carestream Health computed radiography (CR) chest X-rays when an implant or prosthesis was present (P = 0.02). Non-adherence to MREIs has been demonstrated with EI value discrepancies being dependent on patient gender, time/day of exposure, grid usage and the presence of an implant or prosthesis. Retrospective evaluation of EI databases is a valuable tool to assess the need of quality improvement in routine DR

  1. Retrospective evaluation of exposure index (EI) values from plain radiographs reveals important considerations for quality improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Robinson, John; Lewis, Sarah J [Medical Imaging Optimisation and Perception Group (MIOPeG), Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Moran, Bernadette [Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Medical Imaging Optimisation and Perception Group (MIOPeG), Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Following X-ray exposure, radiographers receive immediate feedback on detector exposure in the form of the exposure index (EI). To identify whether radiographers are meeting manufacturer-recommended EI (MREI) ranges for routine chest, abdomen and pelvis X-ray examinations under a variety of conditions and to examine factors affecting the EI. Data on 5000 adult X-ray examinations including the following variables were collected: examination parameters, EI values, patient gender, date of birth, date and time of examination, grid usage and the presence of implant or prosthesis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize each data set and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine significant differences, with P < 0.05 indicating significance for all tests. Most examinations demonstrated EI values that were outside the MREI ranges, with significantly higher median EI values recorded for female patient radiographs than those for male patients for all manufacturers, indicating higher detector exposures for all units except for Philips digital radiography (DR), where increased EI values indicate lower exposure (P = 0.01). Median EI values for out of hours radiography were also significantly higher compared with normal working hours for all technologies (P ≤ 0.02). Significantly higher median EI values were demonstrated for Philips DR chest X-rays without as compared to those with the employment of a grid (P = 0.03), while significantly lower median EI values were recorded for Carestream Health computed radiography (CR) chest X-rays when an implant or prosthesis was present (P = 0.02). Non-adherence to MREIs has been demonstrated with EI value discrepancies being dependent on patient gender, time/day of exposure, grid usage and the presence of an implant or prosthesis. Retrospective evaluation of EI databases is a valuable tool to assess the need of quality improvement in routine DR.

  2. Recommendations for an Executive Information System (EIS) for the NASA Accounting and Financial Information System (NAFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Ernest Preston

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to: (1) survey state-of-the-art computing architectures, tools, and technologies for implementing an Executive Information System (EIS); (2) review MSFC capabilities and efforts in developing an EIS for Shuttle Projects Office and the Payloads Project Office; (3) review management reporting requirements for the NASA Accounting and Financial Information System (NAFIS) Project in the areas of cost, schedule, and technical performance, and insure that the EIS fully supports these requirements; and (4) develop and implement a pilot concept for a NAFIS EIS. A summary of the findings of this work is presented.

  3. Multiple Intelligences - Based Planning of EFL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanan Shero Malo Zebari

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to set a plan for teaching EFL classes based on the identification of university students’ dominant multiple intelligences in EFL classes, and the differences in the types of intelligence between female and male students in terms of their gender. The problem the present study aimed to address is that the traditional concept that “one size fits all” is still adopted by many EFL teachers, and that EFL students’ differences and preferences are noticeably unheeded. It is believed that identifying students’ dominant intelligences is a sound remedial solution for such a problem before embarking on any teaching program. Moreover, getting students aware of their different types of intelligence will motivate and encourage them in the classroom. The researchers used a questionnaire as a research instrument for data collection.  The results arrived at showed that there were no significant differences in the types of intelligence between female and male students in terms of their gender, except for bodily- kinesthetic intelligence. They also showed that the dominant intelligences were ranked from the highest to the lowest as follows interpersonal, linguistic, spatial, logical-mathematical, bodily kinesthetic, intrapersonal, musical, and naturalistic.

  4. Emotional intelligence, perceived stress and academic performance of Sri Lankan medical undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ranasinghe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown that higher Emotional Intelligence (EI is associated with better academic and work performance. The present study intended to explore the relationship between EI, perceived stress and academic performance and associated factors among medical undergraduates. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional research study was conducted among 471 medical undergraduates of 2nd, 4th and final years of University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Students were rated on self administered Perceived Stress Scale (PSS and Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SEIT. Examination results were used as the dichotomous outcome variable in a logistic regression analysis. Results Females had higher mean EI scores (p = 0.014. A positive correlation was found between the EI score and the number of extracurricular activities (r = 0.121, p = 0.008. Those who were satisfied regarding their choice to study medicine, and who were planning to do postgraduate studies had significantly higher EI scores and lower PSS scores (p <0.001. Among final year undergraduates, those who passed the Clinical Sciences examination in the first attempt had a higher EI score (p <0.001 and a lower PSS score (p <0.05. Results of the binary logistic-regression analysis in the entire study population indicated that female gender (OR:1.98 and being satisfied regarding their choice of the medical undergraduate programme (OR:3.69 were significantly associated with passing the examinations. However, PSS Score and engagement in extracurricular activities were not associated with ‘Examination Results’. Conclusions Higher EI was associated with better academic performance amongst final year medical students. In addition a higher EI was observed in those who had a higher level of self satisfaction. Self-perceived stress was lower in those with a higher EI. Enhancing EI might help to improve academic performance among final year medical

  5. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Students` Academic Achievements in General EFL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Berenji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional Intelligence, the ability to be aware of, understand, and express oneself, the ability to be aware of, understand, and relate to others, the ability to deal with strong emotions, and the ability to adapt to change and solve problems of a social or personal nature, can be considered an important factor in learning a language as it enhances the verbal fluency which is the ultimate goal in FLL. The present study intended to consider the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic performance in Osku-Iran Islamic Azad University`s EFL classes. For this purpose, 110 undergraduate EFL sophomore and junior students participated in this study. First, in the middle of the term they were required to complete Bar-On (1997 Emotional Intelligence Inventory and their EI scores were computed based on the guidelines Bar-On (1997 provided. At the end of the term the academic course final exam was administered to the students to achieve their academic mean score which was computed out of 20. After that the degree of correlation between EI and academic mean score was found. It became evident that there is no meaningful relationship between total EI score and academic mean score but there is a meaningful and positive relationship between some sub-scales of emotional intelligence and academic mean score. Therefore, material developers and syllabus designers are required to take emotional factors into account when they want to design syllabuses or make materials ready for teaching.

  6. Planeeringut ei saadud 8 päevaga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Tartu Ringkonnakohtu otsusest Ain Seppiku, Sulev Seppiku ja Siim Seppiku ning ajalehe Äripäev vahel. Äripäev lükkab ümber andmed selle kohta, nagu oleks nn Antennideväljaku krundi detailplaneering kehtestatud 8 päevaga. Vastukaja artiklitele: Soe, Ralf-Martin. Sulev Seppik tegi Viimsis imet. // Äripäev (2007/Mar/1), lk. 4-5 ; Arumäe, Urmas. Viimsi võim ei tegele maaäriga. // Äripäev (2007/Mar/13), lk. 27 ; Soe, Ralf-Martin. Viimsi võtmeisikute tehingutel kahtlane maik. // Äripäev (2007/Mar/23), lk. 12-13

  7. Corrosion behavior of boride layers evaluated by the EIS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, I. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional. SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: icampos@ipn.mx; Palomar-Pardave, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Materials Department, Avenue San Pablo 180 Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, Mexico D.F. 02200 (Mexico); Amador, A. [Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222 Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, Mexico D.F. 14380 (Mexico); VillaVelazquez, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional. SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Hadad, J. [Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222 Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, Mexico D.F. 14380 (Mexico)

    2007-09-30

    The corrosion behavior of boride layers at the AISI 304 steel surface is evaluated in the present study. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique was used for the evaluation of the polarization resistance at the steel surface, with the aid of AUTOLAB potentiostat. Samples were treated with boron paste thickness of 4 and 5 mm, in the range of temperatures 1123 {<=} T {<=} 1273 K and exposed time of 4 and 6 h. The electrochemical technique employed 10 mV AC with a frequency scan range from 8 kHz to 3 mHz in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl solution. Nyquist diagrams show that the highest values of corrosion resistance are present in the samples borided at the temperature of 1273 K, with treatment time of 4 h and 4 mm of boron paste thickness. The values of corrosion resistance on borided steels are compared with the porosity exhibited in the layers.

  8. Meie julgeolek ei ole automaatselt kindlustatud / Juhan Parts

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Parts, Juhan, 1966-

    2004-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Nädaline, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Harjumaa, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Järva Teataja, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Lääne Elu, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Sakala, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Virumaa Teataja, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 7; Pärnu Postimees, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 15; Meie Maa, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Vooremaa, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Koit, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 6; Võrumaa Teataja, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2; Hiiumaa, 7. sept. 2004, lk. 2. Lihula ausambast, selle sobimatusest rahvusvahelisse konteksti, meedia reageeringust. Minevikukäsitluses ei saa toetuda Teise maailmasõja aegsele Saksa armee mundrile, sest demokraatlikus maailmas samastub see natsismiga, tõdeb peaminister.

  9. 1992 Columbia River salmon flow measures Options Analysis/EIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described

  10. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  11. Como obter vantagem competitiva utilizando business intelligence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanilde Kemczinski

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo definir Business Intelligence e identificar as tecnologias de informação e comunicação que dão suporte a este tipo de sistema de informação. Faz-se uma contextualização sobre o conceito e as tipologias de sistemas de informação (SI. Data Warehouse, Data Mart e Data Mining são os recursos tecnológicos denominados de Back-end system, utilizados para armazenar dados relevantes e extrair padrões de comportamento e tendências dos processos organizacionais. Os DSS (Decision Support Systems, EIS (Executive Information Systems e ferramentas de OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing são caracterizados como Front-end systems para os sistemas de Business Intelligence, requerendo-se ampla funcionalidade, flexibilidade e usabilidade para que o usuário possa fazer a transformação das informações em conhecimento estratégico que apóie a tomada de decisão organizacional, objetivando a vantagem competitiva. Palavras-chave: Sistemas de Informação, Business Intelligence, Data Mining, Data Warehouse, OLAP.

  12. Are developing countries ready for first world waste policy instruments?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Godfrey, Linda K

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available behavior Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium 2.2 Economic instruments In contrast with command-and-control approaches, which mandate specific behaviours, economic instruments (EIs) (such as taxes, subsidies..., and marketable permits) aim to change behaviour indirectly by changing the prices (and hence incentives) that individuals and businesses face. For example, taxes per unit of waste collected or disposed of, create incentives to reduce waste generation...

  13. Geothermal Exploration Case Studies on OpenEI (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K.; Bennett, M.; Atkins, D.

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2008) outlined a mean 30 GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western United States. One goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. DOE has focused efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont and Foster, 1990-1992) will give developers central location for information gives models for identifying new geothermal areas, and guide efficient exploration and development of these areas. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been working with GTO to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In 2012, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In 2013, ten additional case studies were completed, and Semantic MediaWiki features were developed to allow for more data and the direct citations of these data. These case studies are now in the process of external peer review. In 2014, NREL is working with universities and industry partners to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough data set to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  14. "Kui Eesti ütleb gaasitorule ei, võib ka Rootsi öelda ei" / Carl B. Hamilton ; interv. Argo Ideon

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hamilton, Carl B.

    2007-01-01

    Nord Stream on avaldanud soovi gaasijuhtme teenindusplatvormi rajamiseks Gotlandi juurde. Parlamendiliikme hinnangul peaks Rootsi valitsus ütlema ei nii teenindusplatvormile kui ka gaasitorule. Gaasijuhe on tema sõnul Venemaa projekt

  15. Educational Programs for Intelligence Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jerry P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for education programs for competitive intelligence professionals. Highlights include definitions of intelligence functions, focusing on business intelligence; information utilization by decision makers; information sources; competencies for intelligence professionals; and the development of formal education programs. (38…

  16. A New Dimension of Business Intelligence: Location-based Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Zeljko Panian

    2012-01-01

    Through the course of this paper we define Locationbased Intelligence (LBI) which is outgrowing from process of amalgamation of geolocation and Business Intelligence. Amalgamating geolocation with traditional Business Intelligence (BI) results in a new dimension of BI named Location-based Intelligence. LBI is defined as leveraging unified location information for business intelligence. Collectively, enterprises can transform location data into business intelligence applic...

  17. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  18. Instrumentation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides instrumentation support for flight tests of prototype weapons systems using a vast array of airborne sensors, transducers, signal conditioning and encoding...

  19. Neon-like Iron Ion Lines Measured in NIFS/Large Helical Device (LHD) and Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hara, Hirohisa; Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Morita, Shigeru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-06-01

    Line intensities emerging from the Ne-sequence iron ion (Fe XVII) are measured in the laboratory, by the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, and in the solar corona by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode mission. The intensity ratios of Fe XVII λ 204.6/λ 254.8 are derived in the laboratory by unblending the contributions of the Fe XIII and XII line intensities. They are consistent with theoretical predictions and solar observations, the latter of which endorses the in-flight radiometric calibrations of the EIS instrument. The still remaining temperature-dependent behavior of the line ratio suggests the contamination of lower-temperature iron lines that are blended with the λ 204.6 line.

  20. Intelligent Extruder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlperEker; Mark Giammattia; Paul Houpt; Aditya Kumar; Oscar Montero; Minesh Shah; Norberto Silvi; Timothy Cribbs

    2003-04-24

    ''Intelligent Extruder'' described in this report is a software system and associated support services for monitoring and control of compounding extruders to improve material quality, reduce waste and energy use, with minimal addition of new sensors or changes to the factory floor system components. Emphasis is on process improvements to the mixing, melting and de-volatilization of base resins, fillers, pigments, fire retardants and other additives in the :finishing'' stage of high value added engineering polymer materials. While GE Plastics materials were used for experimental studies throughout the program, the concepts and principles are broadly applicable to other manufacturers materials. The project involved a joint collaboration among GE Global Research, GE Industrial Systems and Coperion Werner & Pleiderer, USA, a major manufacturer of compounding equipment. Scope of the program included development of a algorithms for monitoring process material viscosity without rheological sensors or generating waste streams, a novel detection scheme for rapid detection of process upsets and an adaptive feedback control system to compensate for process upsets where at line adjustments are feasible. Software algorithms were implemented and tested on a laboratory scale extruder (50 lb/hr) at GE Global Research and data from a production scale system (2000 lb/hr) at GE Plastics was used to validate the monitoring and detection software. Although not evaluated experimentally, a new concept for extruder process monitoring through estimation of high frequency drive torque without strain gauges is developed and demonstrated in simulation. A plan to commercialize the software system is outlined, but commercialization has not been completed.