WorldWideScience

Sample records for integrates creative arts

  1. Enhancing creative problem solving in an integrated visual art and geometry program: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoevers, E.M.; Kroesbergen, E.H.; Pitta-Pantazi, D.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a new pedagogical method, an integrated visual art and geometry program, which has the aim to increase primary school students' creative problem solving and geometrical ability. This paper presents the rationale for integrating visual art and geometry education. Furthermore

  2. Fostering Creativity in the Classroom through Animated Storytelling - Challenges and Potentials for Arts-integration in 21st. Century Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    educators aware of the importance of integrating digital creativity in the teaching of the curriculum. However, in order to facilitate the integration of arts-based learning into the curriculum - not only as a subject but as a pathway to learning - new tools, competencies and mindsets are needed. This paper...... as a creative pathway to learning in primary education.......Creativity has been termed one of the most important skills of the 21st. Century classroom. While a traditional approach to education has not had a big emphasis on creativity in most subjects, the emerging learner-centered paradigm, as well as learners’ everday use of media, is making many...

  3. Creativity and folk art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2013-01-01

    This article explores creativity in craftwork using the case of Easter egg decoration, a folk art chosen for its traditional roots and diversity of artistic outcomes. This research contributes to the literature at (a) a theoretical level, by conceptualizing a pragmatist-inspired framework...... of creative activity; (b) a methodological level, by using, beside observation and interview, subjective cameras to record activity; and (c) an empirical level, considering the fact that creativity in folk art has often been a neglected topic. A total of 20 egg decorators of various ages from the village...... for, particularly in terms of expert–novice differences. These studies revealed the many ways in which creativity is intrinsic to Easter egg decoration, and the final discussion of the article summarizes them with reference to processes of combination and change, copying and translation, personal...

  4. An Investigation of Strategies for Integrated Learning Experiences and Instruction in the Teaching of Creative Art Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nompula, Yolisa

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the integrating possibilities within each creative arts subject. The objective was to optimize the limited teaching time, generally allocated to each art subject in schools, by developing a pedagogical strategy for its successful implementation. While the study was limited to South African schools, the results have global…

  5. Art education, Creativity and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Filip, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Title: Art education, Creativity and Society Author: Michal Filip Department: Department of Art Education Supervisor: doc. PaedDr. Pavel Šamšula, CSc. Abstract: The dissertation addresses the issue of creativity in art education. The theoretical part of the work first explains the general foundation of the social context, which plays a key role in education focused on the development of creativity. The author outlines the historical roots of the relationship between art education and creativi...

  6. An investigation of strategies for integrated learning experiences and instruction in the teaching of creative art subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolisa Nompula

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the integrating possibilities within each creative arts subject. The objective was to optimize the limited teaching time, generally allocated to each art subject in schools, by developing a pedagogical strategy for its successful implementation. While the study was limited to South African schools, the results have global relevance and significance in the ongoing global trendsetting and discourse on arts education. In South Africa the previous National Curriculum Statement (NCS, 2002 integrated music, dance, drama and visual arts where possible, while the new Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS, 2011 offers two elective art subjects in the senior phase (Grades 7-9, each taught separately an hour per week during school hours and one hour per week after school, thereby attempting to extend the teaching time. This qualitative enquiry used documentary analyses, teacher interviews, and student group discussions for the collection of data. Pre-determined and emergent codes based on grounded theory showed that it is possible to integrate theory with practice within one art subject by teaching theoretical work in the context of practical work, thus optimizing the limited time allocated to arts and culture education in school timetables.

  7. CREATIVE COLLISIONS: ARTS @CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In 2000, CERN hosted Signatures of the Invisible – one of the landmark initiatives in arts and science. In 2012, CERN is now initiating its own science/arts programme Collide@CERN in different arts disciplines. The first of these is in digital arts, and the international competition to find the winning artist is called the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN. It was announced September 2011 at CERN’s first collaboration with an international arts festival – Ars Electronica in Linz. The competition attracted over 395 entries from 40 countries around the world. The winning artist, Julius Von Bismarck, will begin his two month residency here at CERN next month. Ariane Koek who leads on this initiative, discusses the residency programme, as well as the background about Art@CERN. History has shown that particle physics and the arts are great inspiration partners. The publication of the paper by Max Planck which gave birth to quantum mechanics as well as those by Einstein, heavily influenced some of the grea...

  8. Art-Integration through Making Dioramas of Women Mathematicians' Lives Enhances Creativity and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C.; Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Edwards, Clayton M.; Gordon, Mindy M.

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is essential for solving problems in the workplace, natural environment, and everyday life, necessitating that creativity be nurtured in schools. Identification of factors that intrinsically motivate students to learn difficult or initially unappealing content is also important. This project, in which 24 racially diverse fifth grade…

  9. Creative Change: Art, Music, and Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, R. A.; Hoffman, J. S.; Maurakis, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    As part of ongoing climate science education initiatives, the Science Museum of Virginia hosted Creative Change in March 2017. The event featured multidisciplinary programming created by scientists, artists, and students reacting to and interpreting climate change and resiliency through a variety of artistic mediums and informal science education. Creative Change was developed in consideration of studies conducted at Columbia University that indicate traditional educational approaches, which rely heavily on scientific information and data literacy, fail to engage and inspire action in a majority of people. Our informal science education programming developed for Creative Change, by contrast, is inclusive to all ages and backgrounds, integrating scientific data and an artistic human touch. Our goal was to increase public awareness of climate change and resiliency through the humanities in support of the Museum's mission to inspire Virginians to enrich their lives through science. Visitors were invited to attend Coral Reef Fever, a dance performance of coral bleaching; high school and university art exhibitions; climate data performed by a string quartet; poetry, rap, and theater performances; and a panel discussion by artists and scientists on communicating science through the arts and humanities. Based on 26 post- event survey results, we found as a result that visitors enjoyed the event (mean of 9.58 out of 10), learned new information (9.07), and strongly agreed that the arts and humanities should be used more in communicating science concepts (9.77). Funded in part by Bond Bradley Endowment and NOAA ELG Award #NA15SEC0080009.

  10. [Visual art, creativity and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, C; Allegri, R F; Martelli, M; Taragano, F; Rinalli, P

    2005-01-01

    Visual art is an expression of neurological function and how it organizes and interprets perception. The art is predominantly in the right hemisphere, in contrast, the left side, have inhibitory effects on artistic expression. In normal subjects, inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms could interact in a complex harmony, reflecting a paradoxical functional facilitation. Brain diseases such as dementia could change this harmony and then, alter the artistic abilities. Evaluate the art expression in the degenerative diseases. Artistic abilities of 3 painters with degenerative diseases were assessment. Patient 1: A 83 - year old right handed female, diagnosis: Alzheimer's disease. Artistic description: low productivity, simplified versions of earlier and alteration of the visuospatial organization. Patient 2: A 78-year-old right handed female, diagnosis: Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA); Artistic description: oversimplified drawings which maintaining overall spatial organization, without impair artistic skills. Patient 3: A 68 year-old right handed woman, diagnosis: Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD). Artistic description: Increased artistic activity, originality, freedom, utilization of intense colours with perseverative and repetitive copying of similar paintings of her own work. Visual art in Alzheimer's disease is a consequence of visuospatial and constructive disabilities. In contrast, the conservation of this cognitive functions and left asymmetrical involved, in FTD and PPA respectively, suggest artistic preservation, independently of the language injury. The disproportionate functional prevalence of the right over the left could lead to a release of novelty - seeking in art and can contribute to emergent creativity. These observations suggest an organization for art in the brain and proposed bases for further investigations in dementias.

  11. Gardening for Homonyms: Integrating Science and Language Arts to Support Children's Creative Use of Multiple Meaning Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Melissa J.; Rye, James Andrew; Forinash, Melissa; Minor, Alana

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum integration can increase the presence of science at the elementary level. The purpose of this article is to share how two second-grade teachers have integrated language arts content as a part of science-language arts instruction in a garden-based learning context. One application was a teacher-designed "Gardening for Homonyms"…

  12. Creativity, Technology, Art, and Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillander, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Creativity serves an important role in culture, education, and the workforce as it "provides the impetus for any act, idea, or product that changes an existing domain or discipline into a new entity." In the 21st century, information technology is forming a powerful alliance with creative practices in the arts and design to establish new domains…

  13. Counseling as an Art: The Creative Arts in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    In this book counseling approaches with a variety of populations are examined using these creative arts: music; dance/movement; imagery; visual arts; literature; drama; and play and humor. It is noted that all of these arts are process-oriented, emotionally sensitive, socially directed, and awareness-focused. Chapter 1 discusses the history,…

  14. Creativity in Visual Arts Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maydel Angueira Gato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the creative skills which have to be developed in pre-school children. It points out the great importance of teachers for the accomplishment of this objective. Education in Cuba has, as main objective, the development of the student‟s wholesome personality since man is the only one capable of creating and transforming the en vironment. That is why it is very important to develop the creative capacities of children, which means, forming men with moral qualities to develop a creative work.

  15. Creative Approaches to Information Literacy for Creative Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo; Grandal Montero, Gustavo; Jones, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the information literacy requirements of art and design students, and how traditional approaches to information literacy education are not always appropriate for these particular students. The paper argues that different, creative, and innovative approaches to information literacy training need to be developed with the…

  16. Individual Difference Predictors of Creativity in Art and Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Batey, Mark; Booth, Tom W.; Patel, Vikita; Lozinskaya, Dariya

    2011-01-01

    Two studies are reported that used multiple measures of creativity to investigate creativity differences and correlates in arts and science students. The first study examined Divergent Thinking fluency, Self-Rated Creativity and Creative Achievement in matched groups of Art and Science students. Arts students scored higher than Science students on…

  17. Subjugated in the Creative Industries The Fine Arts in Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2011-01-01

    to economic value. Fine arts practices will not be as lucrative or popular as their counterparts in the other creative businesses; they will remain poor cousins in the creative industries. Essentially, the fine arts are being subjugated in the creative industries and the Singaporean art world is being changed....

  18. Revisiting the "Art Bias" in Lay Conceptions of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the "art bias"--the pervasive association between creativity and art in implicit theories of creativity. It also attempts to connect creativity research in this area with literature on the theory of social representations. The data comes from an online survey completed by 195 participants mainly from the United…

  19. Creative Turbulence: Experiments in Art and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Enrico; Dubois, R. Luke; Camnasio, Sara; Porfiri, Maurizio; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Serrano, Daniel; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Effective communication of basic research to non-experts is necessary to inspire the public and to justify support for science by the taxpayers. The creative power of art is particularly important to engage an adult audience, who otherwise might not be receptive to standard didactic material. Interdisciplinarity defines new trends in research, and works at the intersection of art and science are growing in popularity, even though they are often isolated experiments. We present a public-facing collaboration between physicists/engineers performing research in fluid dynamics, and audiovisual artists working in cutting-edge media installation and performance. The result of this collaboration is a curated exhibition, with supporting public programming. We present the artworks, the lesson learned from the interactions between artists and scientists, the potential outreach impact and future developments. This project is supported by the APS Public Outreach Mini Grant.

  20. Integrating Art and Creative Practices into a Programme of Support for Nigerian Students Studying in UK Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Achinewhu-Nworgu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This scoping paper explores the experiences of overseas students from Nigeria studying in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs in the United Kingdom. It considers the context for these students and some of the particular pressures and challenges they experience in making the transition from education in Nigeria to achieving academic success and adapting to life as a student in the UK. With reference to the work of Professor Claudio-Rafael Vásquez-Martínez, at the outset of a collaborative project to explore these issues further, this paper considers whether the use of painting and other creative practices could assist these students in managing the transition more effectively and ultimately in succeeding in their academic studies. For the present study, qualitative data was gathered using interviews with Nigerian students who came to study in the UK with the assistance of a London-based organisation, Focus Learning Support Ltd, which assists Nigerian students in their applications to UK HEIs, and which supports them throughout their studies.

  1. Creative arts linkages, historiography: means to global aesthetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper surveys linkages and historiography in creative arts and globalization. The appreciation and possession of other nations' creative art objects/artifacts links different cultures and nations together as they share common aesthetic experiences, history and knowledge which was unique to a particular nation.

  2. The Implementation of the Creative Arts Curriculum in Secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on the status of the implementation of the creative arts curriculum at the secondary school level. The New National Policy on Education recognized the creative Arts as core subjects at the junior secondary school level, but at the senior secondary school level, they are optional. With very good laid down ...

  3. Creativity, brain, and art: biological and neurological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Dahlia W

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is commonly thought of as a positive advance for society that transcends the status quo knowledge. Humans display an inordinate capacity for it in a broad range of activities, with art being only one. Most work on creativity's neural substrates measures general creativity, and that is done with laboratory tasks, whereas specific creativity in art is gleaned from acquired brain damage, largely in observing established visual artists, and some in visual de novo artists (became artists after the damage). The verb "to create" has been erroneously equated with creativity; creativity, in the classic sense, does not appear to be enhanced following brain damage, regardless of etiology. The turning to communication through art in lieu of language deficits reflects a biological survival strategy. Creativity in art, and in other domains, is most likely dependent on intact and healthy knowledge and semantic conceptual systems, which are represented in several pathways in the cortex. It is adversely affected when these systems are dysfunctional, for congenital reasons (savant autism) or because of acquired brain damage (stroke, dementia, Parkinson's), whereas inherent artistic talent and skill appear less affected. Clues to the neural substrates of general creativity and specific art creativity can be gleaned from considering that art is produced spontaneously mainly by humans, that there are unique neuroanatomical and neurofunctional organizations in the human brain, and that there are biological antecedents of innovation in animals.

  4. Creativity, brain, and art: biological and neurological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Dahlia W.

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is commonly thought of as a positive advance for society that transcends the status quo knowledge. Humans display an inordinate capacity for it in a broad range of activities, with art being only one. Most work on creativity’s neural substrates measures general creativity, and that is done with laboratory tasks, whereas specific creativity in art is gleaned from acquired brain damage, largely in observing established visual artists, and some in visual de novo artists (became artists after the damage). The verb “to create” has been erroneously equated with creativity; creativity, in the classic sense, does not appear to be enhanced following brain damage, regardless of etiology. The turning to communication through art in lieu of language deficits reflects a biological survival strategy. Creativity in art, and in other domains, is most likely dependent on intact and healthy knowledge and semantic conceptual systems, which are represented in several pathways in the cortex. It is adversely affected when these systems are dysfunctional, for congenital reasons (savant autism) or because of acquired brain damage (stroke, dementia, Parkinson’s), whereas inherent artistic talent and skill appear less affected. Clues to the neural substrates of general creativity and specific art creativity can be gleaned from considering that art is produced spontaneously mainly by humans, that there are unique neuroanatomical and neurofunctional organizations in the human brain, and that there are biological antecedents of innovation in animals. PMID:24917807

  5. Creativity, Brain, and Art: Biological and Neurological Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia W. Zaidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is commonly thought of as a positive advance for society that transcends the status quo knowledge. Humans display an inordinate capacity for it in a broad range of activities, with art being only one. Most work on creativity’s neural substrates measures general creativity, and that is done with laboratory tasks, whereas specific creativity in art is gleaned from acquired brain damage, largely in observing established visual artists, and some in visual de novo artists (became artists after the damage. The verb to create has been erroneously equated with creativity; creativity, in the classic sense, does not appear to be enhanced following brain damage, regardless of etiology. The turning to communication through art in lieu of language deficits reflects a biological survival strategy. Creativity in art, and in other domains, is most likely dependent on intact and healthy knowledge and semantic conceptual systems, which are represented in several pathways in the cortex. It is adversely affected when these systems are dysfunctional, for congenital reasons (savant autism or because of acquired brain damage (stroke, dementia, Parkinson’s, whereas inherent artistic talent and skill appear less affected. Clues to the neural substrates of general creativity and specific art creativity can be gleaned from considering that art is produced spontaneously mainly by humans, that there are unique neuroanatomical and neurofunctional organizations in the human brain, and that there are biological antecedents of innovation in animals.

  6. Creativity in art and science: are there two cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Nancy C; Ramchandran, Kanchna

    2012-03-01

    The study of creativity is characterized by a variety of key questions, such as the nature of the creative process, whether there are multiple types of creativity, the relationship between high levels of creativity ("Big C") and everyday creativity ("little c"), and the neural basis of creativity. Herein we examine the question of the relationship between creativity in the arts and the sciences, and use functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the neural basis of creativity in a group of "Big C" individuals from both domains using a word association protocol. The findings give no support for the notion that the artists and scientists represent "two cultures. " Rather, they suggest that very gifted artists and scientists have association cortices that respond in similar ways. Both groups display a preponderance of activation in brain circuits involved in higher-order socioaffective processing and Random Episodic Silent Thought /the default mode.

  7. ArtBreak: A Creative Group Counseling Program for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziff, Katherine; Pierce, Lori; Johanson, Susan; King, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the pilot of a school-based creative group-counseling program for children called ArtBreak, a choice-based studio art experience based on the restorative possibilities of art making delineated in the expressive therapies continuum (ETC; Kagin & Lusebrink, 1978). The ETC features a developmental hierarchy in relation to how…

  8. Community and Art: Creative Education Fostering Resilience through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsook

    2015-01-01

    While creativity is discussed as a core competence for talented people around the world in the twenty-first century, its exhibition is determined by one's character. Creativity and character education, therefore, should not be considered as separate matters, but the systematically related matters, and exhibition of creativity, can be carried away…

  9. Democratizing Creativity: How Arts/Philosophy Can Contribute to the Question of Arts Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocavert, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This article critically deconstructs the 21st-century economization and massification of creativity. It extends the discussion of arts bias and the associated ideas that artistic creativity is institutionalized, elitist, and an obstruction to more profitable applications of creativity. A tension is thus highlighted between the historically…

  10. Time for creative integration in medical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S

    1995-01-01

    The burgeoning of medical sociology has sometimes been accompanied by unfortunate parochialism and the presence of opposing intellectual camps that ignore and even impugn each other's work. We have lost opportunities to achieve creative discourse and integration of different perspectives, methods, and findings. At this stage we should consider how we can foster creative integration within our field.

  11. Creative and Aesthetic Responses to Picturebooks and Fine Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janet

    2009-01-01

    It has long been accepted that one can respond to fine art in a variety of different ways. However, it is only in the last decade or so that picturebooks have been attracting the kind of recognition that they have long deserved as art forms to be considered and responded to both creatively and aesthetically. There is a growing body of research…

  12. SYNTHESIS OF ARTS AS A FACTOR OF TEENAGE CREATIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Onofrichuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the method of teenage creative education by means of musical and theatrical arts at secondary comprehensive school. Showing school musical puppet theater «Fantasy» (secondary school No.12, Vinnytsia the author highlights the ways of pupils’ artistic and creative education during the study of the synthesis of the arts (music, singing, dance and recitation. The conditions affecting successful solution of the problem have been determined. Аmong them the author defines educational activities of a competent teacher who is capable to find out creative innovative solutions. The necessity and importance of using effective methods and techniques in terms of musical and theatrical activities for the development of pupils’ emotional sensitivity and overall creative development have been grounded. During music lessons, pupils successfully master creative abilities and skills (artistic speech, drama, puppet games, dancing, find innovate solutions to practical problems, interpret the original artistic images. Creative combinations of various forms and methods of work, rehearsals, spectacles, concert performances – promote the development of creativity, intensify artistic and performing activities of pupils. The awareness of the character’s motives is the impetus for creating the right stage feeling about reality and naturalness of stage action. It is noted that the art of musical theater helps them not only to acquire art knowledge and skills, but also strive for self-realization and self-improvement, better understanding of themselves and other people, awareness of the beauty of the life. The educational value of the theatrical activity lies in the understanding by teenagers their own attitude to the behavior of characters, developing the abilities to judge them critically, empathize and find alternatives for acquiring creative experience in future life situations.

  13. Arts-based and creative approaches to dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a review of arts-based and creative approaches to dementia care as an alternative to antipsychotic medications. While use of antipsychotics may be appropriate for some people, the literature highlights the success of creative approaches and the benefits of their lack of negative side effects associated with antipsychotics. The focus is the use of biographical approaches, music, dance and movement to improve wellbeing, enhance social networks, support inclusive practice and enable participation. Staff must be trained to use these approaches. A case study is presented to demonstrate how creative approaches can be implemented in practice and the outcomes that can be expected when used appropriately.

  14. Finding CreativeVoice: Applying Arts-Based Research in the Context of Biodiversity Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Rivera Lopez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The integration of creative arts–based methods into scientific research offers a host of advantages, including the ability to capture the complex texture of lived experience, explore interconnections between nature and culture, support nonhierarchical relations, and communicate insights in engaging and empowering new ways. In this article, we describe a new method—CreativeVoice—integrating the creative arts and qualitative research, which we developed and applied in a context of pursuing community-based conservation of agricultural biodiversity. We developed CreativeVoice as an integrative method to help us understand the local contexts, cultures, and perspectives from community members of different ages and genders, in two contrasting farming communities in Oaxaca, Mexico. CreativeVoice effectively adapts and extends the Photovoice method so as to retain its benefits but address some of its limitations. This includes allowing participants to choose a genre of artistic expression connected to their own specific individual or cultural contexts and providing the capacity to move beyond capturing present-day realities to directly bring in connections to the past and visions for the future. This article describes both the CreativeVoice approach and the significant value of integrating arts-based methods into research for advancing sustainability.

  15. Creativity with dementia patients. Can creativity and art stimulate dementia patients positively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Beat Ted

    2006-01-01

    Creative activities could be stimulating for dementia patients. This article gives a review of practical forms of treating dementia patients with art therapeutic indications. It is also a ground for long-term research objective: in brief, I take exception to such a view, contrary to the common belief in the society and some professionals in the healthcare of dementia patients, on the ground that the patients do not have the capacity to improve their own creativity. The theory of cognition tells us about the principle of being creative as a basis for human life. This specific principle is effective for the aged as well. In the long-term, the creative potential of old patients will be unblocked in individual and group therapy sessions. Creative activity has been shown to reduce depression and isolation, offering the power of choice and decisions. Towards the end of life, art and creativity offer a path of opening up the windows to people's emotional interiors. Creative- and art therapy provides possibilities that are mostly indicated to sharpen the capacity of the senses and the patients' propensity to act themselves. Nonverbal therapy methods, such as painting, music, etc., are able to influence the well-being of the patients positively, within the modern healthcare system in nursing homes. The elderly and some of the dementia patients take the initiative to combine creativity and arts and to define his/her feeling for aesthetical matters. Furthermore, group therapy sessions help against isolation and lack of life perspective and hope. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Reconceptualizing the Role of Creativity in Art Education Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Enid

    2009-01-01

    Reconceptualizing contemporary notions about creativity in visual arts education should be an important issue in art education today. Currently, creativity may not be a primary focus at National Art Education Association conferences or in its publications. There are recent indications that art education is a site where creativity can be developed…

  17. Utilizing the Arts for Healing from a Native American Perspective: Implications for Creative Arts Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This report on how Native American healing methods can be utilized in Western creative art therapy emphasizes that for Native Americans, art is an element of life--not a separate aesthetic ideal. Furthermore, American Indian philosophy does not separate healing from art or religion; the belief is that traditional healing, which uses shamanic…

  18. Meeting the Needs of Our Clients Creatively: The Impact of Art and Culture on Caregiving. Death, Value and Meaning Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John D., Ed.

    This book integrates traditional understandings of care of the dying and bereaved with the use of arts and other forms of cultural creativity in therapy and funeralization. Authors provide insights into the practical aspects of caring for the dying and bereaved as well as new understandings of creativity. Chapters include: (1) "The Knowledge…

  19. Science into art: A study of the creative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, M. [Cosumnes River Coll., Folsom Lake Center, CA (United States); Sesko, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-14

    Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.

  20. Pop Art Trends in Lady Gaga’s Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Zaytseva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the connection between the creative principles of the popular singer Lady Gaga and the cult personality of pop art – Andy Warhol. On the basis of analysis of Lady Gaga’s performance practice, the features of her performing style, formed under the influence of the aesthetics of pop art are revealed. The dynamics of formation and development of the performing style of Lady Gaga is followed.

  1. Leading Change: The Art Administrator's Role in Promoting Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veon, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    What role can district visual art administrators play in articulating an educationally valuable conception of creativity and in establishing a culture that targets creativity as an educational goal? How can art administrators help teachers implement creativity goals? How can they communicate creativity's importance to principals, parents, and…

  2. Photo art creativity in the education: Light drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acar Haci Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early ages, people live together with art, and create various branches of art. Painting, as one of the most important branches of art, occurs on the walls of the caves of prehistoric ages. By the nineteenth century, photography shows itself and come as a branch of art until today. Photographers have created new methods and techniques throughout history. Among these, we can say that “painting with light” is one of the techniques by which the artist can create original works of art and reflects his/her creativity freely. This study aims to cite the importance of creativity in art education by the applications of “painting with light”. First the history of art is touched briefly, and then the invention of photography is mentioned and the relationships of photography and painting is studied. In the final section by informing about the technique of “painting with light”, it is discoursed how to get a work of art with this technique.

  3. Local Integration Ontological Model of Creative Class Migrants for Creative Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangkakorn, Korawan; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Yodmongkol, Pitipong

    2015-01-01

    An innovative creative class drives creative cities, urban areas in which diverse cultures are integrated into social and economic functions. The creative city of Chiang Mai, Thailand is renowned for its vibrant Lan Na culture and traditions, and draws new migrants from other areas in Thailand seeking to become part of the creative class. This…

  4. Leading by Design: A Collaborative and Creative Leadership Framework for Dance Integration in P-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alison E.; Hellenbrand, Leah; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Mentorship, Integrated Curriculum, Collaboration, and Scholarship (MICCS) framework as an applicable model for transformative, creative, and curriculum-based K-12 dance education and arts integration. Developed and practiced by the authors--an artist/educator, a classroom teacher, and an arts education scholar and former…

  5. Integrating the Performing Arts in Grades K-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2012-01-01

    Research documents that the arts boost learning, build confidence, and motivate students to participate in class. How do we keep the performing arts alive in this era of increased accountability and decreased funding? Rekha S. Rajan sets the stage for a creative and practical solution with detailed, concrete examples of how to integrate the…

  6. Teaching Art and Design: Communicating Creative Practice through Embodied and Tacit Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    How do artists and designers teaching in universities communicate creative practice as they teach art/design? There is much discussion about the "mystery" of creativity, but little understanding of how teaching occurs in creative contexts. Understanding this topic better will develop greater knowledge within the academy of how art and…

  7. Revisiting the “Art Bias” in Lay Conceptions of Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the art bias—the pervasive association between creativity and art in implicit theories of creativity. It also attempts to connect creativity research in this area with literature on the theory of social representations. The data comes from an online survey completed by 195 p...

  8. Beijing 798 Art Zone: A Maturing Creative Cluster?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waibel, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing 798 Art Zone (北京798艺术区 is certainly the most famous cultural district within China. It is located on a spacious factory site of a former military-industrial project from the 1950s. At that time, it was realized with the support of architects from East Germany, who were responsible for designing many buildings in Bauhaus style. Already during the late 1990s, avant-garde Chinese artists and designers started to move into the mostly derelict area. The site soon became the blossoming epicenter of contemporary art in China. It was finally saved from bulldozing before the Beijing Olympic Games and has turned into a popular urban leisure area not only for the emerging bourgeois bohemians (Bobos, but also for an increasing amount of international tourists. As a pioneering art zone it became a role model for the development and management of many other creative spaces in China.

  9. Participation in a creative arts project can foster hope in a hospice day centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, C E

    2000-09-01

    This study explored the experiences of terminally ill patients taking part in an exhibition of their creative arts work. It took place in St Christopher's Hospice day centre, London, UK, which aims to facilitate an environment in which a range of social and creative opportunities is offered following the theoretical background of Maslow's and Rogers' theories of personal growth and creativity. A phenomenological study explored the views of 10 patients and eleven facilitators using in-depth, semi-structured, audiotaped interviews. A content analysis identified the main themes as enjoyment, enthusiasm, excitement, pride, achievement, satisfaction, sense of purpose, mutual support and permanence. These themes were interpreted as positive expressions of self-esteem, autonomy, social integration and hope. It is suggested that it was possible to identify hope as the essence of the phenomenon, and that this is important in palliative care where traditionally continuation of active medical intervention has been equated with provision of hope.

  10. Integrating Literature with Craft in a Learning Process with Creative Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerila, Juli-Anna; Rönkkö, Marja-Leena

    2015-01-01

    Art-related learning should be the central way of doing and playing in preschool, because the high quality of art-related education has a positive effect on children's well-being, identity development, and creative thinking. In our study we tested an integrated learning process where reading literature and telling stories is combined with the…

  11. Best-practice model for technology enhanced learning in the creative arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jess Power

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a best-practice model for the redesign of virtual learning environments (VLEs within creative arts to augment blended learning. In considering a blended learning best-practice model, three factors should be considered: the conscious and active human intervention, good learning design and pedagogical input, and the sensitive handling of the process by trained professionals. This study is based on a comprehensive VLE content analysis conducted across two academic schools within the creative arts at one Post-92 higher education (HE institution. It was found that four main barriers affect the use of the VLE within creative arts: lack of flexibility in relation to navigation and interface, time in developing resources, competency level of tutors (confidence in developing online resources balanced against other flexible open resources and factors affecting the engagement of ‘digital residents’. The experimental approach adopted in this study involved a partnership between the learning technology advisor and academic staff, which resulted in a VLE best-practice model that focused directly on improving aesthetics and navigation. The approach adopted in this study allowed a purposive sample of academic staff to engage as participants, stepping back cognitively from their routine practices in relation to their use of the VLE and questioning approaches to how they embed the VLE to support teaching and learning. The model presented in this paper identified a potential solution to overcome the challenges of integrating the VLE within creative arts. The findings of this study demonstrate positive impact on staff and student experience and provide a sustainable model of good practice for the redesign of the VLE within creative disciplines.

  12. Arts Integration: A Classroom Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrion, Margaret Dee; Boothby, Paula R.

    1986-01-01

    To integrate the arts and basic curriculum, teachers used advertising as a theme. Viewing it as a form of communication, they developed an integrated reading/language arts and music unit to strengthen both right and left brain modes of knowing. (LHW)

  13. Synaesthesia, the arts and creativity: a neurological connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvenna, Catherine M

    2007-01-01

    For over 100 years the link between synaesthesia and the arts has attracted controversy. This has been spurred by the production of auditory, literary and visual art by famous individuals who report experiences synonymous with the neurological condition. Impressive protagonists in this discussion include Arthur Rimbaud, Charles Baudelaire, Vasily Kandinsky, Vladimir Nabokov, Alexander Scriabin, Olivier Messiaen and David Hockney. Interdisciplinary debates have concerned whether synaesthesia can actively contribute to an artist's ability, whether it is a driving force or a mere idiosyncratic quirk and whether, fundamentally, it is a distinct idiopathic condition or an unusual metaphorical description of normal perception. Recent psychological and neuroscientific evidence offers a new level to the debate. Coherent patterns of a neural basis of synaesthesia have been confirmed with high spatial resolution brain imaging techniques and the link with the arts is transpiring to be more than superficial or coincidental. Moreover, the neural distinction of the synaesthete brain may prove to be a window into a neural basis of creative cognition, and therefore conducive to the expression of creativity in various media.

  14. Integrating Art into Science Education: A Survey of Science Teachers' Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkka, Jaakko; Haatainen, Outi; Aksela, Maija

    2017-01-01

    Numerous case studies suggest that integrating art and science education could engage students with creative projects and encourage students to express science in multitude of ways. However, little is known about art integration practices in everyday science teaching. With a qualitative e-survey, this study explores the art integration of science…

  15. Meeting the Needs of Urban Students: Creative Arts Therapy in Jersey City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cindy Lou

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and development of the Jersey City Public Schools creative arts therapy program. Creative arts therapists contributed examples of their work throughout the district that provide a window into their respective school settings. Examples include technology-based art therapy, an extended school year program,…

  16. Exploration of student's creativity by integrating STEM knowledge into creative products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayasari, Tantri; Kadarohman, Asep; Rusdiana, Dadi; Kaniawati, Ida

    2016-02-01

    Creativity is an important capability that should be held to competitive standards in the 21st century in entering the era of information and knowledge. It requires a creative generation that is able to innovate to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex future. This study examines the student's creativity level by integrating STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) knowledge to make creative products in renewable energy (solar energy). Total respondents in this study were 29 students who take applied science course. This research used qualitative and quantitative method (mixed methods), and used "4P" dimension of creativity to assess student's creativity level. The result showed a creative product is influenced by STEM knowledge that can support student's creativity while collaborating an application of knowledge, skills, and ability to solve daily problems associated with STEM.

  17. Creative Arts Therapies as Temporary Home for Refugees: Insights from Literature and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Dieterich-Hartwell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the frequently overlooked psychosocial problems of refugees is the phenomenon of homesickness. Being forced into exile and unable to return home may cause natural feelings of nostalgia but may also result in emotional, cognitive, behavioral and physical adversities. According to the literature, the creative arts therapies with their attention to preverbal language—music, imagery, dance, role play, and movement—are able to reach individuals through the senses and promote successive integration, which can lead to transformation and therapeutic change. These forms of therapy can be a temporary home for refugees in the acculturation process, by serving as a safe and enactive transitional space. More specifically, working with dance and movement can foster the experience of the body as a home and thus provide a safe starting place, from which to regulate arousal, increase interoception, and symbolize trauma- and resource-related processes. Hearing, playing, and singing music from the home culture may assist individuals in maintaining their cultural and personal individuality. Creating drawings, paintings, or sculpturing around the topics of houses and environments from the past can help refugees to retain their identity through art, creating safe spaces for the future helps to look ahead, retain resources, and regain control. This article provides a literature review related to home and homesickness, and the role the arts therapies can play for refugees in transition. It further reports selected interview data on adverse life events and burdens in the host country from a German study. We propose that the creative arts therapies are not only a container that offers a temporary home, but can also serve as a bridge that gently guides refugees to a stepwise integration in the host country. Several clinical and research examples are presented suggesting that the support and affirmation through the creative arts can strengthen individuals in

  18. Creative performance under pressure: an integrative conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutnik, D.; Walter, F.; Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Creativity is the cornerstone of organizational success in today’s economy. At the same time, employees face considerable work pressure, which might undermine their creativity. This article integrates theoretical perspectives from the stress and creativity literatures to develop a new model that

  19. Tradition and Creativity. Toward a Study of Intericonicity in Ancient Egyptian Art

    OpenAIRE

    Laboury, Dimitri

    2017-01-01

    Although a key-concept in Art historical discourse and reasoning, creativity has almost always been avoided as an issue in the discussion of Ancient Egyptian Art, as if the notion was simply irrelevant in such a context. This surprising phenomenon has clearly deep roots in the history of the western vision of Ancient Egyptian Art (and civilization). Nonetheless, the investigation of some (actually quite rare) cases of true copies in Ancient Egyptian Art reveals that creativity operated within...

  20. Fostering Creativity: A Multiple Intelligences Approach to Designing Learning in Undergraduate Fine Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Angela; Cripps, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum and pedagogy in undergraduate fine art can promote an approach to learning creativity that is more about being an artist than knowing about art. Lecturers can provide a road map for developing particular dispositions, in relation to student ideas and perceptions, to foster personalised creativity. This requires that lecturers have an…

  1. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  2. Connecting Creativity Research and Practice in Art Education: Foundations, Pedagogies, and Contemporary Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Flávia, Ed.; Zimmerman, Enid, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    In three broad sections--Foundations, Pedagogies, and Contemporary Issues--the editors and chapter authors of "Connecting Creativity Research and Practice in Art Education" articulate the significance of reconsidering creativity as a crucial dimension of art education research and practice today. This book represents a groundbreaking…

  3. Artful rainwater design creative ways to manage stormwater

    CERN Document Server

    Echols, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This beautifully illustrated, comprehensive guide explains how to design creative, yet practical, landscapes that treat on-site stormwater management as an opportunity to enhance site design. Stormwater management as art? Absolutely. Rain is a resource that should be valued and celebrated, not merely treated as an urban design problem—and yet, traditional stormwater treatment methods often range from ugly to forgettable. This book shows that it’s possible to effectively manage runoff while also creating inviting, attractive landscapes. It is a must-have resource for landscape architects, urban designers, civil engineers, and architects looking to create landscapes that celebrate rain for the life-giving resource it is-- and contribute to more sustainable, healthy, and even fun, built environments.

  4. Interrelations in the Development of Primary School Learners' Creative Imagination and Creative Activity When Depicting a Portrait in Visual Art Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlahova, Aleksandra; Volonte, Ilze; Cacka, Maris

    2017-01-01

    Creative imagination is a psychic process of creating a new original image, idea or art work based on the acquired knowledge, skills, and abilities as well as on the experience of creative activity. The best of all primary school learners' creative imagination develops at the lessons of visual art, aimed at teaching them to understand what is…

  5. Creative Approaches to School Counseling: Using the Visual Expressive Arts as an Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibbaro, Julia S.; Camacho, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the use of creative arts in school counseling. There is a specific focus on the use of visual arts, particularly such methods as drawing and painting. Existing literature, which supports the use of art in school counseling, provides the paper's rationale. In addition, the paper explores different art techniques that school…

  6. Boxes with Fires: Wisely Integrating Learning Technologies into the Art Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Diane C.

    2009-01-01

    By integrating and infusing computer learning technologies wisely into student-centered or social constructivist art learning environments, art educators can improve student learning and at the same time provide a creative, substantive model for how schools can and should be reformed. By doing this, art educators have an opportunity to demonstrate…

  7. A creative arts intervention for children with diabetes. Part 2: evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Robert V J; Pelech, William James

    2008-12-01

    In Part 1 of this article (published in the October 2008 issue), we discussed the importance of using creative arts skits as an expressive technique for children with Type 1, or juvenile, diabetes. This creative arts intervention offers children the opportunity to decipher emotional difficulties through symbolic play in a secure atmosphere. Analysis of feelings following the skits encourages children to share concerns about their illnesses as well as self-concept issues. In Part 2, we use the case study method to demonstrate the benefits of creative arts skits for children with diabetes.

  8. Making an Art of Creativity: The Cognitive Science of Duchamp and Dada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prager, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Dada is the infant terrible of art history, an anarchic movement that is typically referred to as nihilistic, pathological, and firmly enshrined within the modernist paradigm and the context of WWI. Through the lens of classical, romantic, and psychoanalytic notions, it certainly appears almost...... antithetical to creativity. Yet from a cognitive point-of-view, Dada marks a watershed in the understanding of creativity, and articulates principles of creative cognition with surprising insight and precision many decades ahead of science....

  9. ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Lynn C.; Pinciotti, Patricia; Gorton, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of twenty-first century, global learners can be challenging, yet a growing body of research points to the proved successes of arts-infused and integrated curricula, especially for building capacity for learning and motivation. This article presents the ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion framework, a…

  10. Connecting the dots within: creative performance and identity integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Ying; Sanchez-Burks, Jeffrey; Lee, Fiona

    2008-11-01

    In two studies drawing from social identity theory and the creative-cognition approach, we found that higher levels of identity integration--perceived compatibility between two social identities--predict higher levels of creative performance in tasks that draw on both identity-relevant knowledge domains. Study 1 showed that Asian Americans with higher identity integration were more creative in developing new dishes using a given set of ingredients, but only when both Asian and American ingredients were available. Study 2 showed that female engineers with higher identity integration were more creative in designing a product, but only when the product was targeted to female users. These findings suggest that the psychological management of multiple social identities may be related to accessibility of multiple knowledge domains, which in turn influences creativity.

  11. The Benefits of Fine Art Integration into Mathematics in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezovnik, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the article is to research the effects of the integration of fine art content into mathematics on students at the primary school level. The theoretical part consists of the definition of arts integration into education, a discussion of the developmental process of creative mathematical thinking, an explanation of the position…

  12. Translanguaging Space and Creative Activity: Theorising Collaborative Arts-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jessica; Moore, Emilee; Simpson, James; Atkinson, Louise

    2018-01-01

    This paper focuses on an innovative transdisciplinary educational arts-based learning project, LangScape Curators, which links to and leads from research conducted for the AHRC-funded "Translation and Translanguaging" project. Here, we describe how we work collaboratively with creative practitioners to use a variety of creative arts…

  13. The experiences of professional hospice workers attending creative arts workshops in Gauteng

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blignaut-van Westrhenen, Nadine; Fritz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Object: This article explores the experiences of professional hospice workers using a creative process for debriefing them in order to facilitate the expression and communication of complex thoughts and feelings. The creative arts workshops were developed with the understanding in mind that caring

  14. Dissociative Experiences, Creative Imagination, and Artistic Production in Students of Fine Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Fabello, Maria Jose; Campos, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    The current research was designed to assess the influence of dissociative experiences and creative imagination on the artistic production of Fine Arts students of the University of Vigo (Spain). The sample consisted of 81 students who were administered the Creative Imagination Scale and The Dissociative Experiences Scale. To measure artistic…

  15. Creative Arts Interventions for Stress Management and Prevention—A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Martin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress is one of the world’s largest health problems, leading to exhaustion, burnout, anxiety, a weak immune system, or even organ damage. In Germany, stress-induced work absenteeism costs about 20 billion Euros per year. Therefore, it is not surprising that the Central Federal Association of the public Health Insurance Funds in Germany ascribes particular importance to stress prevention and stress management as well as health enhancing measures. Building on current integrative and embodied stress theories, Creative Arts Therapies (CATs or arts interventions are an innovative way to prevent stress and improve stress management. CATs encompass art, music, dance/movement, and drama therapy as their four major modalities. In order to obtain an overview of CATs and arts interventions’ efficacy in the context of stress reduction and management, we conducted a systematic review with a search in the following data bases: Academic Search Complete, ERIC, Medline, Psyndex, PsycINFO and SocINDEX. Studies were included employing the PICOS principle and rated according to their evidence level. We included 37 studies, 73% of which were randomized controlled trials. 81.1% of the included studies reported a significant reduction of stress in the participants due to interventions of one of the four arts modalities.

  16. Creative Arts Interventions for Stress Management and Prevention—A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lily; Bauer, Katharina; Nottensteiner, Alina; Mergheim, Katja

    2018-01-01

    Stress is one of the world’s largest health problems, leading to exhaustion, burnout, anxiety, a weak immune system, or even organ damage. In Germany, stress-induced work absenteeism costs about 20 billion Euros per year. Therefore, it is not surprising that the Central Federal Association of the public Health Insurance Funds in Germany ascribes particular importance to stress prevention and stress management as well as health enhancing measures. Building on current integrative and embodied stress theories, Creative Arts Therapies (CATs) or arts interventions are an innovative way to prevent stress and improve stress management. CATs encompass art, music, dance/movement, and drama therapy as their four major modalities. In order to obtain an overview of CATs and arts interventions’ efficacy in the context of stress reduction and management, we conducted a systematic review with a search in the following data bases: Academic Search Complete, ERIC, Medline, Psyndex, PsycINFO and SocINDEX. Studies were included employing the PICOS principle and rated according to their evidence level. We included 37 studies, 73% of which were randomized controlled trials. 81.1% of the included studies reported a significant reduction of stress in the participants due to interventions of one of the four arts modalities. PMID:29470435

  17. Academic librarians' perceptions of creative arts students as learners : a discourse of difference and difficulty

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Janice; Saunders, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Academic Librarians, working in specialist arts universities, create resources, design services and provide information literacy sessions to enhance arts student learning. They work collaboratively as hybrid professionals and play a valuable role in supporting students to navigate the complexities of the information landscape and develop as independent learners. This research explores librarians' perceptions of arts students as learners in the creative arts. It further considers connections b...

  18. Education: 1. Creativity and Problem Finding/Solving in Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusu Marinela

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is a complex process that invites to action, both the conscious and the unconscious mind. The work proposed by us puts into question a new aspect of the process of creativity: finding and solving problems, inserting the cognitive and ideational elements into the artistic creative process. Artistic personality represents a complex interaction between diverse psychological factors: intellectual (lateral, creative-thinking and convergent thinking and nonintellectual factors (temperament, character, motivation, affectivity, abyssal factors, special aptitudes. To these are added also, the biological factors (heredity, age, gender, mental health and social factors (economical condition, historical epoch, socio-cultural conditions. In the same time, the artist's success also appears to be linked to his ability to find and solve new problems in artistic themes, to his ability to correctly formulate questions, and then to find original, genuine answers. This paper explains the link between the multitude of solved problems and the artistic success.

  19. Exploring Art and Science Integration in an Afterschool Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotta, Alanna

    Science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) education integrates science with art, presenting a unique and interesting opportunity to increase accessibility in science for learners. This case study examines an afterschool program grounded in art and science integration. Specifically, I studied the goals of the program, it's implementation and the student experience (thinking, feeling and doing) as they participated in the program. My findings suggest that these programs can be powerful methods to nurture scientific literacy, creativity and emotional development in learners. To do so, this program made connections between disciplines and beyond, integrated holistic teaching and learning practices, and continually adapted programming while also responding to challenges. The program is therefore specially suited to engage the heads, hands and hearts of learners, and can make an important contribution to their learning and development. To conclude, I provide some recommendations for STEAM implementation in both formal and informal learning settings.

  20. Translating the Essence of Dance: Rendering Meaning in Artistic Inquiry of the Creative Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manders, Elizabeth; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    The authors used artistic inquiry to study intersubjectivity in a weekly, stimulated creative arts therapy studio experience for one year. They found that the conversion of meaning from the meta-verbal, imaginal, aesthetic language of dance and visual art into verbal and textual discourse required complex translational processes. Personal…

  1. Drawing as Driver of Creativity: Nurturing an Intelligence of Seeing in Art Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Howard

    2017-01-01

    The article reasserts the primacy of drawing as a driver of creativity within art schools. It reviews specific aspects of visual perception theory and visual communication theory relevant to a pedagogical strategy as a means of nurturing an "intelligence of seeing" in art students. The domain of drawing is theorised as a…

  2. Dangerous Learning in Edgy Contexts: Creativity and Innovation in the South African Arts Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovey, Ken; Muller, Lizzie

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we outline a pilot project aimed at exploring the role of contextual factors in the facilitation of creativity and innovation within a range of South African art forms. Interviews with 11 people who have rich experience of the South African art domain delivered an insightful perspective on the contextual factors driving lifelong…

  3. Using Art to Teach Students Science Outdoors: How Creative Science Instruction Influences Observation, Question Formation, and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Christina Schull

    Elementary education has become increasingly divided into subjects and focused on the demand for high math and reading scores. Consequently, teachers spend less time devoted to science and art instruction. However, teaching art and science is crucial to developing creative and rational thinking, especially for observation and questioning skills. In this study, third grade students attending an urban school in Portland, Oregon received instruction of an art strategy using observational and quantifying drawing techniques. This study examines, "Will an art strategy observing the local environment help students make observations and ask questions?" and "In what ways are student learning and perspectives of science affected by the art strategy?" The independent variable is the art strategy developed for this study. There are three dependent variables: quality of student observations, quality of questions, and themes on student learning and perspectives of science. I predicted students would develop strong observation and questioning skills and that students would find the strategy useful or have an increased interest in science. The art scores were high for relevance and detail, but not for text. There were significant correlations between art scores and questions. Interviews revealed three themes: observations create questions, drawing is helpful and challenging, and students connected to science. By examining science through art, students were engaged and created strong observations and questions. Teachers need to balance unstructured drawing time with scaffolding for optimal results. This study provides an integrated science and art strategy that teachers can use outdoors or adapt for the classroom.

  4. An integrative review: Developing and measuring creativity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xue; Zang, Yuli

    2018-03-01

    To analyze and synthesise the existing evidence on creativity in nursing. An integrative review. A systematic search was conducted using seven English databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, Wiley, and Medline) and the top three best Chinese databases (CNKI, Wanfang Data, and VIP). The combined keywords, creativity and nursing/nurse, were used to search for relevant journal articles that were written in English or Chinese from January 1995 to December 2016. The components of articles, i.e. title, abstract, full-text and the cited reference, were screened, filtered, evaluated and recorded according to the PRISMA statements and Joanna Briggs Institute Checklists. Thematic analysis was performed to synthesise evidence from the full-texts of studies. Fifteen quantitative and seven qualitative studies were included in this review. A joyful affective perspective enriched the conceptualization of creativity in nursing. Many intrinsic factors (e.g. learning styles, thinking styles, intrinsic passion, interest in nursing and achievement motivation) or extrinsic factors (mostly workplace problems and nurses' shortage) could influence nurses' and nursing students' creativity. Artistic expressions (e.g. painting, music, and pottery), self-directed learning and group/team work were reported to have a positive effect on creativity enhancement. None of existing instruments can adequately measure nurses' or nursing students' creativity. The concept of creativity requires an explicit definition, which is essential to the development and evaluation of creativity in nursing education and practice. Many factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' creativity can be implemented to achieve positive outcomes through efforts at artistic expressions, self-directed learning and teamwork. An instrument with satisfactory psychometric properties should be available for monitoring creativity development among nurses and nursing students. Copyright © 2017

  5. A Theoretical Framework for Integrating Creativity Development into Curriculum: The Case of a Korean Engineering School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to developing creativity rely on the sporadic teaching of creative thinking techniques or the engagement of learners in a creativity-promoting environment. Such methods cannot develop students' creativity as fully as a multilateral approach that integrates creativity throughout a curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  6. Promoting Creativity in the Middle Grades Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Bintz, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Middle level educators around the country aim to create a classroom environment and a way of teaching that is developmentally responsive, challenging, empowering, and equitable for every student. One way to ensure this is to include instruction that promotes creativity. This article offers guiding principles and shares instructional lessons that…

  7. Creative and Participative Problem Solving - The Art and the Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    This book collects my experiences as a facilitator for many different communities and organizations and as a teacher at the Technical University of Denmark for the courses Creativity and Problem Solving and Systemic Operational Research. Several of the chapters has been used in my lecturing activ...

  8. The Artful Dodger: Creative Resistance to Neoliberalism in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This article explores contemporary forms of creative practices and their survival under siege from what Stuart Hall (2011) describes as the neoliberal revolution, in the context of the tightly policed education system in the United Kingdom. The fragility and importance of the democratic struggle is discussed with reference to Chantal Mouffe's work…

  9. Creativity and innovation among science and art a discussion of the two cultures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This edited book will address creativity and innovation among the two cultures of science and art. Disciplines within science and art include: medicine (neurology), music therapy, art therapy, physics, chemistry, engineering, music, improvisation, education and aesthetics. This book will be the first of its kind to appeal to a broad audience of students, scholars, scientists, professionals, practitioners (physicians, psychologists, counsellors and social workers), musicians, artists, educators and administrators. In order to understand creativity and innovation across fields, the approach is multidisciplinary. While there is overlap across disciplines, unique domain specific traits exist in each field and are also discussed in addition to similarities. This book engages the reader with the comparison of similarities and differences through dialog across disciplines. Authors of each chapter address creativity and innovation from their own distinct perspective. Each chapter is transdisciplinary in approach.  T...

  10. Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, James C.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Creativity is sometimes seen as irrelevant to educational practice. With an increased focus on standardized test scores, creative teachers and those who encourage creativity in the classroom often are accused of being idealists or missing the big picture. But the authors believe instead that creativity brings valuable benefits to the classroom. In…

  11. Art, Science, and the Choreography of Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomask, Jodi

    2010-03-01

    Through my performance company, Capacitor, I have designed a novel conceptual space - ``the Capacitor Lab'' - where artists and scientists exchange ideas and information about a concept that underlies my next performance piece. In 2000, I invited astronomers to advise my company on Earth's relationship to outer space. In 2003, we invited geophysicists into the dance studio to advise us about the layers of the Earth. In 2006, we invited an ecologist to the Monteverde Cloud forest to advise us on the on the quiet interactions among animals and plants in the forest. Currently we are working on a piece about ocean exploration, marine ecology, and the physics of sound underwater. Each of these Capacitor Labs results in a conceptually-rich dance piece which we perform in cities nationally and internationally. In my talk, I take a deeper look at the creative process that scientists and artists share. In the Capacitor labs, the process serves not only our creative team, but also our participating scientists by giving them an opportunity to view their own work in a new light. These collaborations are part of my ongoing research into creative problem solving and my belief that it is essentially the same process regardless of its application.

  12. An Arts-Based Instructional Model for Student Creativity in Engineering Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Laduca

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years, nearly all job growth in the United States has emerged from new companies and organizations with assumedly innovative products, services, and practices. Yet, the nurturing of student creative thinking and problem solving is infrequent in engineering education. Inherent to developing these creativity skills and attributes is the need to be exposed to difference — in people and environment. Engineering education rarely offers such opportunities. Additionally, engineering students are rarely presented opportunities to develop designs responding to real human problems. This paper puts forth a new instructional model to address these needs by utilizing arts processes and practices as catalysts for both creativity development in students and transdisciplinary collaboration on problems addressing deep human needs. This model is premised on the substantiated role of the arts in developing creativity and growing understanding of the human condition. This art-based instructional model was piloted as exploratory pedagogical research during the summers of 2015 and 2016 as a partnership between the Arts Nexus (IAN and the School of Engineering at the University of Dayton. In each year, this program supported twelve student interns from engineering, business, science, the arts, and the humanities to develop innovative technologies and services meeting client needs. Student growth in creative problem-solving and transdisciplinary collaboration, as well as the success of the completed innovation technology prototype were assessed by the project mentors and participating students via survey evaluations and narrative responses. The assessment results revealed substantial student growth in student creativity and transdisciplinary collaboration and a remarkably strong evaluation of the success of the students’ innovations. Also realized for all students was a transformation in their perception of their place in the world as

  13. EEG-neurofeedback for optimising performance. II: creativity, the performing arts and ecological validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzelier, John H

    2014-07-01

    As a continuation of a review of evidence of the validity of cognitive/affective gains following neurofeedback in healthy participants, including correlations in support of the gains being mediated by feedback learning (Gruzelier, 2014a), the focus here is on the impact on creativity, especially in the performing arts including music, dance and acting. The majority of research involves alpha/theta (A/T), sensory-motor rhythm (SMR) and heart rate variability (HRV) protocols. There is evidence of reliable benefits from A/T training with advanced musicians especially for creative performance, and reliable benefits from both A/T and SMR training for novice music performance in adults and in a school study with children with impact on creativity, communication/presentation and technique. Making the SMR ratio training context ecologically relevant for actors enhanced creativity in stage performance, with added benefits from the more immersive training context. A/T and HRV training have benefitted dancers. The neurofeedback evidence adds to the rapidly accumulating validation of neurofeedback, while performing arts studies offer an opportunity for ecological validity in creativity research for both creative process and product. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diasporic art as narrative: The creative construction of self, memory, and place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Azizzadeh, Satkeen

    This paper is concerned with an exploration of how diasporic art creatively constructs a sense of self, memory and place for both artists and viewers, for migrants as well as the communities they come from and arrive into. It conceptualises art, diasporic art in particular, as a form of narrative...... and by this it does not take away anything from the figurative quality of artistic depictions but adds to them a key narrative format. Artworks are stories, stories that include the self and are meant to be told to present and imagined audiences. This is all the more interesting in the case of diasporic art whose...... that considers the verbal and the visual as deeply interconnected. In this presentation we will focus on one particular project in which traditional Iranian sayings are depicted by the artist in series of collages meant to create a bridge between her Eastern legacy and Western audiences, to simulate the creative...

  15. Creativity and Technology in Mathematics: From Story Telling to Algorithmic with Op'Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercat, Christian; Filho, Pedro Lealdino; El-Demerdash, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    This article describes some of the results of the European project mcSquared (http://mc2-project.eu/) regarding the use of Op'Art and optical illusion pieces as a tool to foster modeling and creative mathematical thinking in students. We present briefly the c-book technology and some results we got experimenting it. The Op'Art movement, with…

  16. What Happened to Autonomy? Visual art practices in the creative industries Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Dillen (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis concerns the autonomy of visual artists in an era of a booming creative economy and simultaneously declining governmental support for the arts and culture. The research is particularly directed toward the concept of autonomy. On the one hand, there is social autonomy,

  17. Art-Literary Interface: The Creative Muse of Uche Okeke Through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While I attempt to underscore the importance of Igbo forklore to the creative enterprise, as exemplified by Achebe and Okeke, I also emphasize the role of Okeke's drawings and literary landmarks in the institutionalization of an artliterary tradition at the department of Fine and Applied Arts of the University of Nigeria Nsukka.

  18. Visual Inspirations: The Pedagogical and Cultural Significance of Creative Posters in the Art Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasio, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Creative posters in the classroom can inspire students to become engaged and motivated in learning art. Within the classroom, there are many places to put posters so that students can read them (especially when they get bored in the classroom) - on the cabinets, near the chalkboard, on the teacher's desk and any spare space on the wall. There is…

  19. Choosing Creatively: Choice-Based Art Education in an Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of Choice-Based Art Education on supporting the needs of all learners in an inclusive classroom, while building confidence, creativity, and critical thinking skills. Over a seven-week period, data was collected through photographs, pre- and post- surveys, interviews, pre- and post-creativity…

  20. Piaget and Language Arts: The Role of "Creative Thinking" in the Experimental Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    Isolated examples of creative adaptation show that Jean Piaget's theories of childhood development provide the conscientious teacher with a veritable warehouse of innovative and thought-provoking principles with which to construct a meaningful foundation of language arts experimentation. The elementary Piagetian principles for evoking creativity…

  1. Being, Flow and Knowledge in Maori Arts Education: Assessing Indigenous Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Rawiri; Hynds, Anne S.; Phillips, Hazel; Rameka, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects on issues of Indigenous creativity in Maori arts education, along with what we see as problematic tensions of the assessment of intangible elements. Our writing is motivated by a desire to start a global dialogue on Indigenous/Maori epistemologies, pedagogies and ontologies, and the contradictions and tensions that threaten…

  2. Making an Art of Creativity: The Cognitive Science of Duchamp and Dada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Phillip Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Dada is the infant terrible of art history, an anarchic movement that is typically referred to as nihilistic, pathological, and firmly enshrined within the modernist paradigm and the context of WWI. Through the lens of classical, romantic, and psychoanalytic notions, it certainly appears almost antithetical to creativity. Yet from a cognitive…

  3. Creative Partnerships? Cultural Policy and Inclusive Arts Practice in One Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christine; Thomson, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article traces the "cultural turn" in UK educational policy through an analysis of the Creative Partnerships policy (New Labour's "flagship programme in the cultural education field") and a consideration of an arts project funded under this initiative in one primary school. It argues that current educational policy…

  4. A picture's worth a thousand words: engaging youth in CBPR using the creative arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A; Burke, Jessica G; Rak, Kimberly; Bennett, Antoine; Kelly, Vera; Gielen, Andrea C

    2009-01-01

    Engaging youth and incorporating their unique expertise into the research process is important when addressing issues related to their health. Visual Voices is an arts-based participatory data collection method designed to work together with young people and communities to collaboratively elicit, examine, and celebrate the perspectives of youth. To present a process for using the creative arts with young people as a participatory data collection method and to give examples of their perspectives on safety and violence. Using the creative arts, this study examined and illustrates the perspectives of how community factors influence safety and violence. Visual Voices was conducted with a total of 22 African-American youth in two urban neighborhoods. This method included creative arts-based writing, drawing, and painting activities designed to yield culturally relevant data generated and explored by youth. Qualitative data were captured through the creative content of writings, drawings, and paintings created by the youths as well as transcripts from audio recorded group discussion. Data was analyzed for thematic content and triangulated across traditional and nontraditional mediums. Findings were interpreted with participants and shared publicly for further reflection and utilization. The youth participants identified a range of issues related to community factors, community safety, and violence. Such topics included the role of schools and social networks within the community as safe places and corner stores and abandoned houses as unsafe places. Visual Voices is a creative research method that provides a unique opportunity for youth to generate a range of ideas through access to the multiple creative methods provided. It is an innovative process that generates rich and valuable data about topics of interest and the lived experiences of young community members.

  5. A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words: Engaging Youth in CBPR Using the Creative Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A.; Burke, Jessica G.; Rak, Kimberly; Bennett, Antoine; Kelly, Vera; Gielen, Andrea C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Engaging youth and incorporating their unique expertise into the research process is important when addressing issues related to their health. Visual Voices is an arts-based participatory data collection method designed to work together with young people and communities to collaboratively elicit, examine, and celebrate the perspectives of youth. Objectives To present a process for using the creative arts with young people as a participatory data collection method and to give examples of their perspectives on safety and violence. Methods Using the creative arts, this study examined and illustrates the perspectives of how community factors influence safety and violence. Visual Voices was conducted with a total of 22 African-American youth in two urban neighborhoods. This method included creative arts-based writing, drawing, and painting activities designed to yield culturally relevant data generated and explored by youth. Qualitative data were captured through the creative content of writings, drawings, and paintings created by the youths as well as transcripts from audio recorded group discussion. Data was analyzed for thematic content and triangulated across traditional and nontraditional mediums. Findings were interpreted with participants and shared publicly for further reflection and utilization. Conclusion The youth participants identified a range of issues related to community factors, community safety, and violence. Such topics included the role of schools and social networks within the community as safe places and corner stores and abandoned houses as unsafe places. Visual Voices is a creative research method that provides a unique opportunity for youth to generate a range of ideas through access to the multiple creative methods provided. It is an innovative process that generates rich and valuable data about topics of interest and the lived experiences of young community members. PMID:20097996

  6. 10. Creativity and Innovation in Visual Arts through Form and Space Having Symbolic Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iaţeşen Mihai – Cosmin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The numerous plastic approaches of form in the 20th century are characterized by creativity and innovation. Form, as expression of an artistic language, is the cause and effect for the cultural evolution of a particular spatial-temporal area. The invention of forms depending on the factors which will impose them in a particular socio-cultural context and location environment is not everything. The challenges of the act of creation are far more complex. For the art of the 20th century, the role of the type of expression in visual or gestural language proved much more convincing and meaningful as to the data or phenomena occurring in immediate reality. The personality of the artist, his cultural character, his media coverage and exterior influences of his inner world, his preceding experiences and receiver’s contacts in a specific area are the factors that influence the relation between the work of art and the audience against a particular spatial-temporal background. The psychological and sensory processes in works of plastic art are spatially configured in structures, which leads to self-confession. The artist filters the information and the elements of exterior reality through the vision of his imagination and power of expression specific to his inner self, and turns them into values through the involvement of his state of mind. Constantin Brâncuşi is the sculptor whose role was considered exponential as he revolutionized modern artistic vision by integrating and creating space-form relations through symbol. Throughout his complex work - the Group of Monumental Sculptures of Tg. Jiu, the artist renewed the language of the sculpture-specific means of expression, though archaic forms, by restoring traditional art. Archetypes often make reference to the initial and ideal form and they represent the primitive and native models composing it. Form attracts, polarizes and integrates the energy of the matter outside the human body, and art acquires

  7. Design, innovation, and rural creative places: Are the arts the cherry on top, or the secret sauce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojan, Timothy R; Nichols, Bonnie

    2018-01-01

    Creative class theory explains the positive relationship between the arts and commercial innovation as the mutual attraction of artists and other creative workers by an unobserved creative milieu. This study explores alternative theories for rural settings, by analyzing establishment-level survey data combined with data on the local arts scene. The study identifies the local contextual factors associated with a strong design orientation, and estimates the impact that a strong design orientation has on the local economy. Data on innovation and design come from a nationally representative sample of establishments in tradable industries. Latent class analysis allows identifying unobserved subpopulations comprised of establishments with different design and innovation orientations. Logistic regression allows estimating the association between an establishment's design orientation and local contextual factors. A quantile instrumental variable regression allows assessing the robustness of the logistic regression results with respect to endogeneity. An estimate of design orientation at the local level derived from the survey is used to examine variation in economic performance during the period of recovery from the Great Recession (2010-2014). Three distinct innovation (substantive, nominal, and non-innovators) and design orientations (design-integrated, "design last finish," and no systematic approach to design) are identified. Innovation- and design-intensive establishments were identified in both rural and urban areas. Rural design-integrated establishments tended to locate in counties with more highly educated workforces and containing at least one performing arts organization. A quantile instrumental variable regression confirmed that the logistic regression result is robust to endogeneity concerns. Finally, rural areas characterized by design-integrated establishments experienced faster growth in wages relative to rural areas characterized by establishments using no

  8. Design, innovation, and rural creative places: Are the arts the cherry on top, or the secret sauce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Bonnie

    2018-01-01

    Objective Creative class theory explains the positive relationship between the arts and commercial innovation as the mutual attraction of artists and other creative workers by an unobserved creative milieu. This study explores alternative theories for rural settings, by analyzing establishment-level survey data combined with data on the local arts scene. The study identifies the local contextual factors associated with a strong design orientation, and estimates the impact that a strong design orientation has on the local economy. Method Data on innovation and design come from a nationally representative sample of establishments in tradable industries. Latent class analysis allows identifying unobserved subpopulations comprised of establishments with different design and innovation orientations. Logistic regression allows estimating the association between an establishment’s design orientation and local contextual factors. A quantile instrumental variable regression allows assessing the robustness of the logistic regression results with respect to endogeneity. An estimate of design orientation at the local level derived from the survey is used to examine variation in economic performance during the period of recovery from the Great Recession (2010–2014). Results Three distinct innovation (substantive, nominal, and non-innovators) and design orientations (design-integrated, “design last finish,” and no systematic approach to design) are identified. Innovation- and design-intensive establishments were identified in both rural and urban areas. Rural design-integrated establishments tended to locate in counties with more highly educated workforces and containing at least one performing arts organization. A quantile instrumental variable regression confirmed that the logistic regression result is robust to endogeneity concerns. Finally, rural areas characterized by design-integrated establishments experienced faster growth in wages relative to rural areas

  9. African musical arts creativity and performance: The science of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... arts idioms, ensemble rationalizations and performance norms aim to humanize the individual and bond humanity, and 'the African science of instrument technology' which proves that scientific research informed the design, material and construction of peculiar timbres or sonic vibrancies of indigenous music instruments.

  10. Integrating art into science education: a survey of science teachers' practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkka, Jaakko; Haatainen, Outi; Aksela, Maija

    2017-07-01

    Numerous case studies suggest that integrating art and science education could engage students with creative projects and encourage students to express science in multitude of ways. However, little is known about art integration practices in everyday science teaching. With a qualitative e-survey, this study explores the art integration of science teachers (n = 66). A pedagogical model for science teachers' art integration emerged from a qualitative content analysis conducted on examples of art integration. In the model, art integration is characterised as integration through content and activities. Whilst the links in the content were facilitated either directly between concepts and ideas or indirectly through themes or artefacts, the integration through activity often connected an activity in one domain and a concept, idea or artefact in the other domain with the exception of some activities that could belong to both domains. Moreover, the examples of art integration in everyday classroom did not include expression of emotions often associated with art. In addition, quantitative part of the survey confirmed that integration is infrequent in all mapped areas. The findings of this study have implications for science teacher education that should offer opportunities for more consistent art integration.

  11. Creativity, Spirituality, and Transcendence: Paths to Integrity and Wisdom in the Mature Self. Publications in Creativity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melvin E., Ed.; Cook-Greuter, Susanne R., Ed.

    This book contains 11 papers on creativity, spirituality, and transcendence as paths to integrity and wisdom in the mature self. The book begins with the paper "Introduction--Creativity in Adulthood: Personal Maturity and Openness to Extraordinary Sources of Inspiration" (Susanne R. Cook-Greuter, Melvin E. Miller). The next four papers,…

  12. Design Creativity: Future Directions for Integrated Visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Steven Goulding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC sectors are facing unprecedented challenges, not just with increased complexity of projects per se, but design-related integration. This requires stakeholders to radically re-think their existing business models (and thinking that underpins them, but also the technological challenges and skills required to deliver these projects. Whilst opponents will no doubt cite that this is nothing new as the sector as a whole has always had to respond to change; the counter to this is that design ‘creativity’ is now much more dependent on integration from day one. Given this, collaborative processes embedded in Building Information Modelling (BIM models have been proffered as a panacea solution to embrace this change and deliver streamlined integration. The veracity of design teams’ “project data” is increasingly becoming paramount - not only for the coordination of design, processes, engineering services, fabrication, construction, and maintenance; but more importantly, facilitate ‘true’ project integration and interchange – the actualisation of which will require firm consensus and commitment. This Special Issue envisions some of these issues, challenges and opportunities (from a future landscape perspective, by highlighting a raft of concomitant factors, which include: technological challenges, design visualisation and integration, future digital tools, new and anticipated operating environments, and training requirements needed to deliver these aspirations. A fundamental part of this Special Issue’s ‘call’ was to capture best practice in order to demonstrate how design, visualisation and delivery processes (and technologies affect the finished product viz: design outcome, design procedures, production methodologies and construction implementation. In this respect, the use of virtual environments are now particularly effective at supporting the design and delivery processes. In

  13. Insights of genius imagery and creativity in science and art

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Arthur I

    1996-01-01

    Here, distinguished science historian Arthur I. Miller delves into the connections between modern art and modern physics. He takes us on a wide-ranging study to demonstrate that scientists and artists have a common aim: a visual interpretation of both the visible and invisible aspects of nature. Along the way, we encounter the philosophy of mind and language, cognitive science and neurophysiology in our search for the origins and meaning of visual imagery. At a time when the media are overeager to portray science as a godless, dehumanising exercise undermining the very fabric of society, this sixth book by Professor Miller shows how scientists are struggling to understand nature, convince their peers, inform the public and deal with the reactions to their research. Thus, Insights of Genuis must interest everyone who cares about science and its place in our culture.

  14. Shared or Integrated: Which Type of Integration is More Effective Improves Students’ Creativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyam, M.; Kaniawati, I.; Sriyati, S.

    2017-09-01

    Integrated science learning has various types of integration. This study aims to apply shared and integrated type of integration with project based learning (PjBL) model to improve students’ creativity on waste recycling theme. The research method used is a quasi experiment with the matching-only pre test-post test design. The samples of this study are 108 students consisting of 36 students (experiment class 1st), 35 students (experiment class 2nd) and 37 students (control class 3rd) at one of Junior High School in Tanggamus, Lampung. The results show that there is difference of creativity improvement in the class applied by PjBL model with shared type of integration, integrated type of integration and without any integration in waste recycling theme. Class applied by PjBL model with shared type of integration has the higher creativity improvement than the PjBL model with integrated type of integration and without any integration. Integrated science learning using shared type only combines 2 lessons, hence an intact concept is resulted. So, PjBL model with shared type of integration more effective improves students’ creativity than integrated type.

  15. Embedding arts and humanities in the creative economy: the role of graduates in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Comunian, Roberta; Faggian, Alessandra; Jewell, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The recent change in funding structure in the UK higher education system has fuelled an animated debate about the role that arts and humanities (A & H) subjects play not only within higher education but more broadly in the society and the economy. The debate has engaged with a variety of arguments and perspectives, from the intrinsic value of A & H, to their contribution to the broader society and their economic impact, particularly in relation to the creative economy, through knowledge excha...

  16. Designing Creative Inter-Disciplinary Science and Art Interventions in Schools: The Case of Write a Science Opera (WASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Horin, Oded; Chappell, Kerry A.; Halstead, Jill; Espeland, Magne

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this qualitative study is to provide theoretical knowledge and design principles for a creative educational environment characterized by simultaneous study and exploration of science or math, and the arts: Write a Science Opera (WASO). To do so, we used a theory of creativity in education which links collaborative co-creation in…

  17. Creative art therapy to enhance rehabilitation for stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkasuwan, Ratcharin; Voraakhom, Kotchakorn; Pisolayabutra, Prim; Maneechai, Pichai; Boonin, Jiraporn; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2016-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of creative art therapy plus conventional physical therapy, compared with physical therapy only, in increasing cognitive ability, physical functions, psychological status and quality of life of stroke patients. Randomized controlled trial with blinded assessor. An in-patient setting PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and eighteen stroke patients aged ⩾50 years who could communicate verbally. All participants received conventional physical therapy five days per week. An intervention group received additional creative art therapy, twice a week for four weeks, in a rehabilitation ward. Cognitive function, anxiety and depression, physical performance and quality of life were measured with the Abbreviated Mental Test, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the modified Barthel Index scale and the pictorial Thai Quality of Life questionnaire, respectively. Mean differences for the intervention group were significantly greater than the control group for depression (-4.5, 95% CI -6.5, -2.5, part therapy and most reported improved concentration (68.5%), emotion (79.6%), self-confidence (72.2%) and motivation (74.1%). Creative art therapy combined with conventional physical therapy can significantly decrease depression, improve physical functions and increase quality of life compared with physical therapy alone. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. The Benefits of Fine Art Integration into Mathematics in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Brezovnik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to research the effects of the integration of fine art content into mathematics on students at the primary school level. The theoretical part consists of the definition of arts integration into education, a discussion of the developmental process of creative mathematical thinking, an explanation of the position of art and mathematics in education today, and a summary of the benefits of arts integration and its positive effects on students. The empirical part reports on the findings of a pedagogical experiment involving two different ways of teaching fifth-grade students: the control group was taught mathematics in a traditional way, while the experimental group was taught with the integration of fine art content into the mathematics lessons. At the end of the teaching periods, four mathematics tests were administered in order to determine the difference in knowledge between the control group and the experimental group. The results of our study confirmed the hypotheses, as we found positive effects of fine art integration into mathematics, with the experimental group achieving higher marks in the mathematics tests than the control group. Our results are consistent with the findings of previous research and studies, which have demonstrated and confirmed that long-term participation in fine art activities offers advantages related to mathematical reasoning, such as intrinsic motivation, visual imagination and reflection on how to generate creative ideas.

  19. Promoting Diversity in Creative Art Education: The Case of Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Annette Ruth; Haste, Polly; Jones, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Students studying art at university in the United Kingdom tend to be female, from higher social classes and from majority ethnic groups. This paper considers some of the complex and deeply-rooted social and economic factors that militate against wider participation in the arts and describes how we started to tackle under-representation at…

  20. Materials on Creative Arts (Arts, Crafts, Dance, Drama, Music, Bibliotherapy) for Persons with Handicapping Conditions. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC. Information and Research Utilization Center.

    Intended as a resource guide for persons who include such subjects as arts, crafts, dance, and music in programs for the handicapped, resources are listed for printed materials, audiovisual materials, resource persons and organizations, and material and equipment suppliers. Brief literature reviews sum up the state of the art in the specific art…

  1. On gestation periods of creative work: an interface of Doig's art and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    This article is meant for, but not confined to, younger scientists who may have a series of ideas, hypotheses and projects--be they small or big--and might grapple with the objective to pursue and complete at least some, and preferably most, work in due course. And yet, the very generation, development and completion of numerous projects takes gestation periods which can be long and painful. Importantly, this simple but important truth is valid for any creative process, be it in the sciences or in the arts. With reference to luminaries like Max Perutz and George Wald, more general interfaces between science and the arts are identified. With reference to how some of Peter Doig's paintings evolve over long times and to how John Eccles and Isaac Newton worked, extended gestation periods as a key similarity of creative work by both artists and scientists are exemplified and vindicated. It is concluded that long gestation periods of creative work should be viewed as the expectation rather than the exception. Importantly, the evolutionary and somewhat intuitive commitment to several projects at the same, and often extended, periods of time can be a recipe for revolutionary results fostered by the required variation and diversity of thinking and cross-fertilization of--seemingly--unrelated themes and fields.

  2. Lowering stress while teaching research: a creative arts intervention in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sandra M; Chang, Catharina Y; Schmidt, Lee A; Yoepp, Jan H

    2005-07-01

    Undergraduate students often request "hands-on" research experience but seldom have the time and opportunity during a one-semester introductory course to participate in such a project. The purposes of this educational approach, implemented during a beginning research class for baccalaureate nursing students, were to provide an opportunity for students to participate in an experimental research study, and test the effect of a creative arts intervention on students' stress, anxiety, and emotions. Students designed, participated in, and analyzed the results of the project. The intervention significantly reduced stress and anxiety and increased positive emotions in this student population, while providing a creative research experience. For future use, the intervention may be helpful with a variety of vulnerable groups.

  3. Arte: Un Programa Creativo Para Ninos Pre-Escolares (Art: A Creative Curriculum for Early Childhood).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creative Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Written in Spanish and focusing on art activities for early childhood education, this manual provides guidelines for Spanish-speaking teachers of preschool and primary school children. The content of the manual is oriented to the learning styles and special interests of Spanish-speaking children. Part One defines artistic activity in the preschool…

  4. Connecting Music, Art, and Science for Increased Creativity and Topic Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara L. McNealy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ‘Attention spans have shortened,’ is a common phrase often used in reference to today’s college students. As faculty and instructors, we need to address this issue through the utilization of innovative and creative techniques that aid in making our subjects accessible to our students. Connecting a serious topic such as microbiology with a ‘fun’ activity can increase student engagement and learning. Ideas to maintain student attention on a subject include providing information in 15- to 20-minute blocks, giving one- to two-minute assignments, and providing an active learning activity at least once per hour. But what if we could also increase their engagement with science by connecting it to things they already think of outside of class, and, in addition, make science thinking interdisciplinary? I have recently introduced exercises that connect music and art to various microbiology topics in my class. The creative processes in art and science have much in common. Albert Einstein recognized that both science and art delve into the mysterious by stating, “The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science” (1. Connecting these subjects in the minds of our students will help them realize the importance of technology, industry, and progress in science and simultaneously emphasize the importance of art, music, and the humanities. The tools presented here will encourage students to connect new science information through the music and art they already know and, therefore, provide increased engagement and retention of the new knowledge. These techniques used in a microbiology class increased the amount of time spent thinking about new information, increased engagement with the information being presented, and encouraged critical thinking of microbiology topics. These tools were used in an upper level microbiology course, but the techniques can be easily incorporated into any course

  5. The integration of creative drama into science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Bracha (Bari)

    This study explored the inclusion of creative drama into science teaching as an instructional strategy for enhancing elementary school students' understanding of scientific concepts. A treatment group of sixth grade students was taught a Full Option Science System (FOSS) science unit on Mixtures and Solutions with the addition of creative drama while a control group was taught using only the FOSS teaching protocol. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses demonstrated that students who studied science through creative drama exhibited a greater understanding of scientific content of the lessons and preferred learning science through creative drama. Treatment group students stated that they enjoyed participating in the activities with their friends and that the creative drama helped them to better understand abstract scientific concepts. Teachers involved with the creative drama activities were positively impressed and believed creative drama is a good tool for teaching science. Observations revealed that creative drama created a positive classroom environment, improved social interactions and self-esteem, that all students enjoyed creative drama, and that teachers' teaching style affected students' use of creative drama. The researcher concluded that the inclusion of creative drama with the FOSS unit enhanced students' scientific knowledge and understanding beyond that of the FOSS unit alone, that both teachers and students reacted positively to creative drama in science and that creative drama requires more time.

  6. The beneficial attributes of visual art-making in cancer care: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Kirshbaum, M; Waheed, N

    2018-01-01

    We seek to understand what is known about the use of visual art-making for people who have a cancer diagnosis, and to explore how art-making may help address fatigue in the cancer care context. Art-making involves creating art or craft alone or in a group and does not require an art-therapist as the emphasis is on creativity rather than an overt therapeutic intention. An integrative review was undertaken of qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method studies on art-making for people who have cancer, at any stage of treatment or recovery. An adapted version of Kaplan's Attention Restoration Theory (ART) was used to interpret the themes found in the literature. Fifteen studies were reviewed. Nine concerned art-making programmes and six were focused on individual, non-facilitated art-making. Review results suggested that programme-based art-making may provide participants with opportunities for learning about self, support, enjoyment and distraction. Individual art-making can provides learning about self, diversion and pleasure, self-management of pain, a sense of control, and enhanced social relationships. When viewed through the lens of ART, art-making can be understood as an energy-restoring activity that has the potential to enhance the lives of people with a diagnosis of cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Integrating Creativity Training into Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Curriculum in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    In order to foster creative engineers, a creativity training programme was carried out in medialogy education in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. This paper focuses on the question of how engineering students perceive the strategy of integrating...... creativity training into a PBL curriculum. A total of 20 medialogy students in the training programme were interviewed. The data shows that the training programme was thought useful and students get benefits such as gaining project work skills, creative concepts and confidence of being creative. However...

  8. Stimulating Creativity by Integrating Research and Teaching Across the Academic Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Creativity is a human adventure fueled by the process of exploration. But how do we explore our intellectual interests? In this talk, I'll propose that we seek out our creative opportunities using an inherent natural process. This process might, therefore, exploit search strategies found across diverse natural systems - ranging from the way animals forage for food to the way the human eye locates information embedded within complex patterns. The symbolic significance of this hypothesis lies in its call for educational institutes to provide environments that encourage our natural explorations rather those that stamp restrictive, artificial `order' on the process. To make my case, I'll review some of my own research trajectories followed during my RCSA Cottrell Scholarship at the University of Oregon (UO). My first conclusion will be that it is fundamentally unnatural to declare divides across disciplines. In particular, the infamous `art-science divide' is not a consequence of our natural creative searches but instead arises from our practical inability to accommodate the rapid drive toward academic specialization. Secondly, divides between research and teaching activities are equally unnatural - both endeavors are driven by the same creative strategy and are intertwined within the same natural process. This applies equally to the experiences of professors and students. I will end with specific success stories at the UO. These include a NSF IGERT project (focused on accelerating students' transitions from classroom to research experiences) and a collaboration between architects and professors to design a building (the recently opened Lewis Integrative Science Building) that encourages daily encounters between students and professors across research disciplines.

  9. Examining Gender with General Creativity and Preferences for Creative Persons in College Students within the Sciences and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyton, Christine; Basham, Kimberly M.; Elliott, John O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to investigate gender similarities and differences in general creativity constructs with their preferences for creative persons. Data were collected from 247 participants (87 engineering, 24 psychology students with a psychology major, 51 psychology students with a major other than psychology, 30 English, and 55…

  10. Rocking Your Writing Program: Integration of Visual Art, Language Arts, & Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldberg, Monique M.,; Trainin, Guy; Andrzejczak, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the integration of art, literacy and science in a second grade classroom, showing how an integrative approach has a positive and lasting influence on student achievement in art, literacy, and science. Ways in which art, science, language arts, and cognition intersect are reviewed. Sample artifacts are presented along with their…

  11. Effects of Teacher Lesson Introduction on Second Graders' Creativity in a Science/Literacy Integrated Unit on Health and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Angela Naomi; Rule, Audrey C.

    2014-01-01

    The focus on standardized testing in the areas of reading and mathematics in early elementary education often minimalizes science and the arts in the curriculum. The science topics of health and nutrition were integrated into the reading curriculum through read aloud books. Inclusion of creativity skills through figural transformation drawings…

  12. In a Time of Change: Integrating the Arts and Humanities with Climate Change Science in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, M.; Golux, S.; Franzen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The arts and humanities have a powerful capacity to create lines of communication between the public, policy and scientific spheres. A growing network of visual and performing artists, writers and scientists has been actively working together since 2007 to integrate scientific and artistic perspectives on climate change in interior Alaska. These efforts have involved field workshops and collaborative creative processes culminating in public performances and a visual art exhibit. The most recent multimedia event was entitled In a Time of Change: Envisioning the Future, and challenged artists and scientists to consider future scenarios of climate change. This event included a public performance featuring original theatre, modern dance, Alaska Native Dance, poetry and music that was presented concurrently with an art exhibit featuring original works by 24 Alaskan visual artists. A related effort targeted K12 students, through an early college course entitled Climate Change and Creative Expression, which was offered to high school students at a predominantly Alaska Native charter school and integrated climate change science, creative writing, theatre and dance. Our program at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site is just one of many successful efforts to integrate arts and humanities with science within and beyond the NSF LTER Program. The efforts of various LTER sites to engage the arts and humanities with science, the public and policymakers have successfully generated excitement, facilitated mutual understanding, and promoted meaningful dialogue on issues facing science and society. The future outlook for integration of arts and humanities with science appears promising, with increasing interest from artists, scientists and scientific funding agencies.

  13. Women's experiences of attending a creative arts program during their pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demecs, Ilona Pappne; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny

    2011-09-01

    This small qualitative study aimed to explore pregnant women's experiences of participating in a pregnancy program designed around the use of creative activities. Increasingly childbirth, in resource rich countries, is considered a medical event with limited attention paid to the emotional aspects of pregnancy. However, the use of the creative arts to promote physical and emotional health and well-being has also gained increasing acknowledgement and recognition. Based on this latter literature, a program of activities including singing, dancing, storytelling and weaving was developed for pregnant women. A qualitative descriptive approach was employed. Seven pregnant women participated in six 2-h creative activity sessions. Data were collected using diaries, interviews, field notes and a brief questionnaire. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. Four themes, labelled 'Seeking support', 'Connecting with each other, myself and the baby', 'Finding a place to share, learn and grow,' and 'Finding balance' were identified. The findings suggest that participating in the program afforded women social support, a sense of connection with each other and enhanced perceptions of emotional well-being during pregnancy. The findings provide preliminary evidence that engaging in creative activities during pregnancy may enhance women's sense of emotional well-being. In addition, the findings confirm the growing body of literature that suggests that when childbearing women come together in a supportive sharing environment an opportunity is created whereby women learn or regain their cultural knowledge about birth and feel confident to make the decisions that best meet their own individual needs and preferences. Although the creative activities program was not designed to prepare women for birth it facilitated the sharing of information which appeared to increase the women's confidence and sense of competence to give birth and transition into motherhood. While the

  14. Fostering Sustained Climate Engagement and Collaborative Leadership through Creativity and Science-Informed Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothballer, K.; Sturges, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Join veteran artist/activist Molly Sturges for a presentation on FIREROCK: PASS THE SPARK performances and engagement processes that foster personal and collective creativity for sustained climate engagement and collaborative leadership. FIREROCK: PASS THE ROCK opens in San Francisco in October 2016. This project is an evolving, long-term, social innovation project that has been developed with faith, Indigenous and directly impacted communities as well as schools, towns and universities. Informed by science, social justice, Indigenous knowledge, and grassroots activism FIREROCK includes performances that are accompanied by a series of activities designed to build community and engineer creative spaces for dialogue and response. The FIREROCK team has found that people are excited to engage around climate when there are venues available for expressivity and meaningful exchange. FIREROCK supports us in moving from our current stance in which we are paralyzed— often not knowing what to do or how to act—to seeing ourselves as part of the solution. FIREROCK is a family-friendly catalytic musical journey inviting people into the complexity of climate change and sparking an inspired response to the mythic challenges of our time. Through story, song and unique engagement experiences, FIREROCK builds community towards action and solutions. FIREROCK provides partners with everything they need to make the project their own, including a comprehensive toolkit to assist groups in learning how to develop community partnerships, convene FIREROCK engagement activities and facilitate dialogue and skill sharing. This dynamic storytelling project is scalable and can be employed, adapted and localized by groups and communities nationwide as a powerful catalyst for climate engagement work. Molly Sturges is a national leader in arts, ecology and social change work. She is the Founding Artistic Director of Littleglobe, a diverse arts cooperative made up of artistic and cultural workers

  15. The creative industries: conflict or collaboration? An analysis of the perspectives from which policymakers, art organizations and creative organizations in the creative industries are acting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijzink, Douwe; van den Hoogen, Quirijn; Gielen, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares and contrasts the instruments and values formulated in the creative industries policies of three peripheral municipalities of between 150,000 and 220,000 inhabitants in the Netherlands (Groningen, Arnhem and Eindhoven) with the needs of the creative industries itself. The needs

  16. ‘’: A qualitative study of a creative arts leisure programme for family caregivers of people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorinda Pienaar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the meanings of participating in a 5-week creative arts leisure programme designed for family caregivers of people with dementia, using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Eight carers attended and four who met the eligibility criteria agreed to be interviewed. Participants experienced the arts group as providing a sense of freedom and respite, strengthening identity through promoting achievement, offering social support through a collective focus on art- and craft-making and increasing resilience for coping with caring. Some found the 5-week programme too short. Benefits were linked to the security of knowing that loved ones with dementia were close by, being well cared for. Further research is needed into the long-term benefits of creative arts groups for promoting carer well-being.

  17. Teaching originality? Common habits behind creative production in science and arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marten Scheffer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Originality is a prerequisite for world-changing science and arts alike, but it cannot be taught. Or can it? Here, we show that a set of habits that are - surprisingly - shared among successful artists and scientists may catalyze creative output. We reveal three groups of such habits, each corresponding to a cluster of personality traits, shown to be shared by creative artists and scientists. The first habit group "embrace the unexpected" corresponds to the character trait "openness to new experiences" and encompasses tendencies to go ahead without a plan, collect diverse experiences, and take risks. The second group "create conditions for creation" links to the personality trait "autonomous" and encompasses simple habits such as making empty time and carrying a notebook. The third class of habits "break away from dogma" links to the shared personality trait "norm doubting" and stands for a strong drive to escape from established systems and also occasionally destroy part of one's own work to break tunnel vision and start anew. Although personality traits are hard to change, the habits we found hint at techniques or skills that may be taught.

  18. A Qualitative Study: Integrating Art and Science in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Deborah N.

    2013-01-01

    The study was used to develop an understanding of the nature of a creative learning experience that incorporated the foundational elements of Reggio Emilia, place-based education, and experience design. The study took place in an urban high school with eight students in an advanced placement art class. The qualitative research project revolved…

  19. STEAM Charter Schools: The Role of the Arts in Developing Innovation and Creativity within the Public School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To gather STEAM school experts' responses on (a) instructional delivery methods of arts education fostering achievement, innovation, and creativity in students; and (b) to examine support and facilities needed for these programs. Research Questions: Nine areas were addressed in the research questions regarding STEAM schools: (a)…

  20. Creativity and Democracy in Education: Practices and Politics of Learning through the Arts. Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan

    2015-01-01

    The struggle to establish more democratic education pedagogies has a long history in the politics of mainstream education. This book argues for the significance of the creative arts in the establishment of social justice in education, using examples drawn from a selection of contemporary case studies including Japanese applied drama, Palestinian…

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Animated Drawings and Selected Instructional Strategies on Students' Performance in Creative Arts in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugbenga, Aiyedun Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Creative Arts is a core and compulsory subject in Nigerian upper basic classes, but the students' performance over the years indicated high failure. Instructional strategies play a pivotal role in improving students' performance. Computer-based instructions such as animated drawings could be a possible solution. This research adopted the design…

  2. Developing Second Graders' Creativity through Literacy-Science Integrated Lessons on Lifecycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Angela Naomi; Rule, Audrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Young children need to develop creative problem-solving skills to ensure success in an uncertain future workplace. Although most teachers recognize the importance of creativity, they do not always know how integrate it with content learning. This repeated measures study on animal and plant lifecycles examined student learning of vocabulary and…

  3. The Artful Teacher: A Conceptual Model for Arts Integration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses specific issues within arts-integration experiences in schools. Focusing on the relationship between positive emotions, learning, and the Arts, the article discusses empirical data that has been drawn from a research study, Making the Ordinary Extraordinary: Adopting Artfulness in Danish Schools. When schools integrate the…

  4. Arts Integration: What Is Really Happening in the Elementary Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJevic, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Researching how Arts Integration is practiced in a primary school, this article explores how elementary teachers understand, implement, and experience Arts Integration. Weaving together personal experiences, teacher interviews, focus group sessions, classroom observations, and written texts, I investigate how the arts are often devalued in Arts…

  5. Creative and Arts-Based Research Methods in Academic Research. Lessons from a Participatory Research Project in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenda van der Vaart

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to the discussion on the value of creative and arts-based research methods to researchers interested in community resilience. Based on a participatory research project that used a mix of these methods conducted in a Dutch village, we provide more nuanced, concrete insights into their value. We elaborate on the three project stages: walking interviews, group discussions, and a creative workshop that resulted in an exhibition, and on the challenges encountered during our project. We discuss how each project stage contributed to producing multifaceted knowledge. Researchers can benefit from the discussions about the process and implications of creative and arts-based methods such as ours as, to date, there has been relatively little methodological reflection on these methods. Based on our study, we conclude that despite some challenges, creative and arts-based research methods have much to offer researchers interested in community resilience. We found they can: 1. generate deep insight by going beyond rational-cognitive ways of knowing and providing new ways of understanding people's real lived experiences and views; and 2. offer ways to "give back" and contribute to a community, potentially igniting a spark among community members to engage in further action and contribute to their community's resilience. This aligns with the, currently often articulated, aims of researchers to directly benefit those involved and to share their research findings with a broader non-academic audience.

  6. MODERN TENDENCIES OF USING INTEGRATIVE APPROACH TO ORGANIZING ART TEACHERS’ INSTRUMENTAL AND PERFORMING TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna Kartashova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the modern tendencies of using integrative approach to organizing art teachers’ instrumental and performing training. The concept “integration” is singled out; it is defined as the process of recovery, replenishment, combining previously isolated parts; moving of the system to a great organic integrity. It is disclosed that the integration means considering multidimensionality of element features which are being integrated while accumulating quantitative features and emerging a new quality and individual features of integral elements are saved. It is proved that integrating is interrelation of art varieties in the process of their aesthetic and educational impact on pupils that is the whole perception of a work (its content and its emotional, rational, ethical and aesthetic form in the unity of tasks of developing artistic and aesthetic senses, thoughts, tastes and pupils’ ideals. It is thought that integration in art pedagogy is held at three levels: internal artistic and aesthetic synthesis of various arts organically combined with students creative activity; interdisciplinary humanistic synthesis of the arts, the native language, literature, and folklore; looking for semantic blocks, images, concepts that have universal meaning, which, entering all spheres of human consciousness, such as science and mathematics, seamlessly combining them into a coherent system. It is noted that the most efficient approach is appeal to the learning subjects of Humanities cycle – music, literature and art. It is concluded that designing of training should be started with the analyzing prospective art teacher’s activity. It should be understood what the teacher has to do, not in general formulation, but at the level of actions and operations.

  7. Integrating Digital Images into the Art and Art History Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Sharon P.; Updike, Christina B.; Guthrie, Miriam E.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based image database system connected to a flexible, in-class teaching and learning tool (the Madison Digital Image Database) developed at James Madison University to bring digital images to the arts and humanities classroom. Discusses content, copyright issues, ensuring system effectiveness, instructional impact, sharing the…

  8. Essential Skills for Creative Writing: Integrating Multiple Domain-Specific Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Baptiste; Tan, Mei; Randi, Judi; Santa-Donato, Gabrielle; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gather different perspectives on the "key ingredients" involved in creative writing by children--from experts of diverse disciplines, including teachers, linguists, psychologists, writers and art educators. Ultimately, we sought in the experts' convergence or divergence insights on the relative importance of the…

  9. 創造性轉化:藝術創作碩士生之創作學習經驗探究 Creative Transformation: An Inquiry into the Creative Learning Experience of Master’s Students in Creative Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    鄧宗聖 Tzong Sheng Deng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available 本研究以臺灣教育脈絡為始、個人心智乃社會產物的前提下,將個人創作學習視為教育創新的途徑。研究者以G. Kress的素養論為基礎,運用多模態溝通觀點,進一步理解,創作者學習者如何描繪實務經驗與意義的轉化。本研究招募20位藝術創作碩士生,以分組團體(媒體藝術、表演藝術、視覺藝術)進行創作學習的自我敘說,以相似性原則分別從「前備經驗」、「時間醞釀」、「團體心智」與「創造連結」四個面向做討論。研究發現,自我探索特別重要,故能為作品忍受未知的境遇,並善用積極等待的狀態,在意圖中找到作品中的歧義性、聯想與探索的自由度,意圖則交織在表現中,在自我分析中轉化為創作材料。建議未來教育能將創作視為培養獨創性與社會心智的媒介,深度認識自我與世界關係的行動。 Set within the context of Taiwanese education, and based on the premise of individual mentality being a social consequence, this study poses individual creative learning as an approach to educational creativity. Based on Gunther Kress’s theory of literacy, the perspective of multimodality was employed to gain better understanding of how creative learners portray practical experience and recognize meaning in transformation. The study recruited 20 master’s students studying creative arts. They were divided into discussion groups (media arts, performance arts and visual arts, in which they engaged in self-narratives related to creative learning. Then, the similarity principle was used in the paper to identify four dimensions: “preparatory experience,” “the brewing of ideas through time,” “group mentality,” and “creative association”. The research results revealed that self-exploration was particularly important, as was enduring uncertainty in the creative process and making productive use of the

  10. INTEGRATING ARTS IN EFL CURRICULA: A FOCUS ON LANGUAGE LISTENING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin TİMUÇİN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arts are commonly used in primary and secondary classrooms for learning purposes, but arts integration in higher education curricula could benefit university-level students academically and emotionally as well. Integrating arts into an English as a Foreign Language (EFL curriculum could benefit students who experience foreign language anxiety, which hinders them from being socially and linguistically successful in the classroom according to multiple studies outlined in the literature section. The focus for students in this study was on listening skills because it is a major element in foreign language development that is explored to a lesser degree than reading, writing and speaking skills. The eight introductory-level classes were split between control and experimental classes. During the first part of the arts implementation, the experimental classes began with drama theatre for 30 minutes. This consisted of students taking a theme in English, such as home and directions, then creating a creative performance for their peers involving relevant vocabulary and phrases. The second part consisted of a 15 minute music cloze section, where students were filling in lyrics for a song that they were actively listening to. Two academic assessments were given as department-wide mid-term and final academic assessments, two subjective surveys and the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS were given at the beginning and end of the school semester. The FLCAS determined that students’ anxieties lowered on 15 questions and increased on 18 questions, so the arts integration has not notably altered foreign language anxiety. The arts-integrated classes received average scores of 80.5%, while the control classes received 74%. Students have performed higher academically with an arts integrated curriculum. It is therefore recommended that arts in the form of music cloze and drama theatre should be included in EFL curricula to increase academic achievement

  11. A Theoretical Framework on Using Social Stories with the Creative Arts for Individuals on the Autistic Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    R. Bawazir; P. Jones

    2017-01-01

    Social Stories are widely used to teach social and communication skills or concepts to individuals on the autistic spectrum. This paper presents a theoretical framework for using Social Stories in conjunction with the creative arts. The paper argues that Bandura's social learning theory can be used to explain the mechanisms behind Social Stories and the way they influence changes in response, while Gardner's multiple intelligences theory can be used simultaneously to demonstrate the role of t...

  12. The Effect of Problem-Based Learning on the Creative Thinking and Critical Thinking Disposition of Students in Visual Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger, Kani

    2018-01-01

    The problem-based learning (PBL) approach was implemented as a treatment for higher education visual arts students over one semester to examine its effect on the creative thinking and critical thinking disposition of these students. PBL had a significant effect on creative thinking, but critical thinking disposition was affected to a lesser…

  13. The Predictive Validity of the Torrance Figural Test (Form B) of Creative Thinking in the College of Fine and Applied Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.

    In an effort to improve the predictability of course grades in the College of Fine and Applied Arts the Torrance Figural Test (Form B) of Creative Thinking was administered to entering 1968 freshmen. Four figural creativity variables (Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration) were correlated with course grades, American College Testing…

  14. "Making the Ordinary More Extraordinary": Exploring Creativity as a Health Promotion Practice Among Older Adults in a Community-Based Professionally Taught Arts Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Adelita G; Fleuriet, K Jill

    2018-06-01

    Document psychosocial and mental well-being outcomes across artistic mediums and classes of a community-based, professionally taught arts program for older adults. One hundred and thirty-eight students completed pre and post class surveys about expectations/experiences when creating art in four mediums (painting, drawing, mixed media, creative writing). In addition, 162 students composed one-paragraph biographical narratives describing their relationships to art and creative engagement. Text was coded for a priori and emergent themes to identify and explain well-being outcomes. Results of this new study supported and expanded our earlier model of improved psychosocial and mental well-being due to creative engagement: impact of class-cognitive focus and outcome of class-cognitive focus, happiness as component of mental and social well-being due to creative engagement, and robust sense of calmness during the creative process. Results suggest that professionally taught arts programming can contribute to well-being and may contribute to brain health through promoting an enhanced ability to focus. Holistic nursing treats creativity as healing, and results suggest that creative engagement should be a priority in therapeutic programming, and individual counseling for older adults to begin engaging in some form of art making suited to their abilities should be incorporated into nursing practice.

  15. Arts Integration as Potentiality for Professional Development for Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup; McCandless, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the potentialities for professional development, when teachers work with integration of arts and academic subjects in the classroom. The idea of integrating arts and academic subjects can be seen as a way of experimenting with teaching. Experiments in the classroom as a wa...

  16. Viability of an Online Community of Practice for Motivating Studio Art Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation and creativity are valuable attributes in the 21st century. In response, more instructional time must be focused on motivating high school students to expand their creative abilities. Self-determination theory (SDT) and communities of practice (CoP) are theoretical foundations helpful for understanding how intrinsic motivation promotes…

  17. Writing Creatively in a Museum: Tracing Lines through Persons, Art Objects and Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeti, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Creative writing is often thought of as an individual and solitary pursuit. This is partly owing to Romantic (and still popular) notions of "creativity" as residing in highly gifted individuals, but also to the widely held belief that "writing" is a lonely rather than a social activity. The research presented in this paper…

  18. Mobile Technology and CAD Technology Integration in Teaching Architectural Design Process for Producing Creative Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Hassan, Isham Shah; Ismail, Mohd Arif; Mustafa, Ramlee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of integrating the mobile and CAD technology on teaching architectural design process for Malaysian polytechnic architectural students in producing a creative product. The website is set up based on Caroll's minimal theory, while mobile and CAD technology integration is based on Brown and…

  19. The Role of Identity Integration in Enhancing Creativity among Mixed-Race Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendayi Viki, G.; Williams, May Liang J.

    2014-01-01

    Identity integration among bicultural individuals refers to the perception that their two cultural identities are compatible. Previous research has shown that identity integration is likely to lead to enhanced creativity. However, this research was conducted among first- and second-generation immigrants, but not among mixed-race individuals. The…

  20. Mathematical Practices and Arts Integration in an Activity-Based Projective Geometry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Jessica Brooke

    It is a general assumption that the mathematical activity of students in school should, at least to some degree, parallel the practices of professional mathematicians (Brown, Collins, Duguid, 1989; Moschkovich, 2013). This assumption is reflected in the Common Core State Standards (CCSSI, 2010) and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM, 2000) standards documents. However, the practices included in these standards documents, while developed to reflect the practices of professional mathematicians, may be idealized versions of what mathematicians actually do (Moschkovich, 2013). This might lead us to question then: "What is it that mathematicians do, and what practices are not being represented in the standards documents?" In general, the creative work of mathematicians is absent from the standards and, in turn, from school mathematics curricula, much to the dismay of some mathematicians and researchers (Lockhart, 2009; Rogers, 1999). As a result, creativity is not typically being fostered in mathematics students. As a response to this lack of focus on fostering creativity (in each of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines--the STEM disciplines), a movement to integrate the arts emerged. This movement, called the STEAM movement--introducing the letter A into the acronym STEM to signify incorporating the arts--has been gaining momentum, yet limited research has been carried out on the efficacy of integrating the arts into mathematics courses. My experiences as the co-instructor for an activity-based course focused on projective geometry led me to consider the course as a setting for investigating both mathematical practices and arts integration. In this work, I explored the mathematical practices in which students engaged while working to develop an understanding of projective geometry through group activities. Furthermore, I explored the way in which students' learning experiences were enriched through artistic engagement in the

  1. Directing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte; Ibbotson, Piers

    2008-01-01

    In this article we argue that leaders facing complex challenges can learn from the arts, specifically that leaders can learn by examining how theatre directors direct creativity through creative constraints. We suggest that perceiving creativity as a boundary phenomenon is helpful for directing it....... Like leaders, who are caught in paradoxical situations where they have to manage production and logistics simultaneously with making space for creativity and innovation, theatre directors need to find the delicate balance between on one hand renewal of perceptions, acting and interaction...... and on the other hand getting ready for the opening night. We conclude that the art of directing creativity is linked to developing competencies of conscious presence, attention and vigilance, whereas the craft of directing creativity concerns communication, framing and choice....

  2. Integrating holism and reductionism in the science of art perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    The contextualist claim that universalism is irrelevant to the proper study of art can be evaluated by examining an analogous question in neuroscience. Taking the reductionist-holist debate in visual neuroscience as a model, we see that the analog of orthodox contextualism is untenable, whereas integrated approaches have proven highly effective. Given the connection between art and vision, unified approaches are likewise more germane to the scientific study of art.

  3. The Creativity Handbook: A Visual Arts Guide for Parents and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriss-Krimsky, Carolyn

    Children are born artists, and artistic talent emerges from the interplay of proclivity, cultural enrichment, and nurturance. Intended to demystify art for parents and teachers and to help them understand what the art experience is like for the child or adolescent, this book discusses visual art concepts in simple terms and presents art as a…

  4. Seeking a Higher Level of Arts Integration across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2016-01-01

    To seek a higher level of arts integration across the education curriculum, I investigated designs of teaching through arts activities that would motivate educators to adopt the spirit of "aesthetic teaching." Two different designs were tested, with the second as a continuation of the first. Each ascribes a different educational role to…

  5. Increasing Secondary Teachers' Capacity to Integrate the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Byron; Treichel, Christa J.

    2013-01-01

    Examples from a team of collaborating secondary teachers--one visual arts teacher and one science teacher--highlight key aspects of this professional development project in arts integration. The article traces a regional network designed to build teacher capacity with implications for the design, effectiveness, and sustainability of professional…

  6. The Art of Film Cultural Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, Cecilie

    Research on globalization in European film and film culture generally focuses on the homogenizing effects of globalization. Consequently, the relationship between heterogenization and globalization, reflected in the reinvigoration and reconfiguration of the nation state, sub-and pan......-national regionalization, and the different modes of relating to new forms and content, are underexposed. Since the 1990s, Danish film culture has been influenced by an increasing professionalization. From the bottom up, new generations of filmmakers, born into an international media culture, with Lars von Trier...... as a central figure, have set new standards. From the top down, annual funding budgets and film output have increased dramatically, and the support system has developed into a heterogeneous system covering a wide range of objectives, from industrial to creative. In order to move from the macro...

  7. The effect of a creative art program on self-esteem, hope, perceived social support, and self-efficacy in individuals with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Cira; Keating, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Creative art has been found to be beneficial to some patients with chronic illness. Little is understood about how creative art can benefit individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of the pilot study was to determine if there was a difference in self-esteem, hope, perceived social support, and self-efficacy in individuals with MS after a 4-week creative art program. A one-group, pretest/posttest design was used. The convenience sample of 14 individuals was recruited from MS Centers and the National MS Society. They ranged in age from 29 to 70 years (M = 51.3 years, SD = 12.5 years). Participants included 14 women. The creative art program included week 1-watercolor, week 2-collage making, week 3-beading, and week 4-knitting. Each of the four weekly sessions was facilitated by a registered nurse with expertise in MS and lasted 2 hours. Creative artists instructed participants and provided a hands-on experience for each of the creative projects. Participants were free to share thoughts, experiences, and words of support and encouragement during each session. The variables were measured before starting the creative art program and after the final session. The instruments included the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Herth Hope Index, the Modified Social Support Survey, the MS Self-Efficacy Scale, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 16.0 was used to analyze the data. There was a significant increase in all variables after the creative art program as follows: self-esteem (t = -3.05, p = 009), hope (t = -3.96, p = .002), social support (t = -2.21, p = .046), self-efficacy to function with MS (t = -2.68, p = .019), and self-efficacy to control MS (t = 3.22, p = .007). The power analysis revealed a large effect size for hope (d = 1.06), self-esteem (d = 0.82), and self-efficacy (control; d = 0.86). A medium effect size was found for self-efficacy (function; d = 0.72) and social support (d = 0

  8. Gestalt Therapy with the Dying Patient: Integrative Work Using Clay, Poetry Therapy, and Creative Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Hilarion G.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the use of death therapy with a cancer patient. Gestalt therapy and creative media were used to facilitate an integration of life and a sense of balance with life. Suggests that counseling the dying means walking along a stretch of the path together. (Author)

  9. Defining Spaces of Potential Art: The significance of representation in computer-aided creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle

    2005-01-01

    One way of looking at the creative process is as a search in a space of possible answers. One way of simulating such a process is through evolutionary algorithms, i.e., simulated evolution by random variation and selection. The search space is defined by the chosen genetic representation, a kind...... of formal description, and the ways of navigating the space are defined by the choice of genetic operators (e.g., mutations). In creative systems, such as computer-aided music composition tools, these choices determine the efficiency of the system, in terms of the diversity of the results, the degree...... of novelty and the coherence within the material. Based on various implementations developed during five years of research, and experiences from real-life artistic applications, I will explain and discuss these mechanisms, from a perspective of the creative artist....

  10. Integrating Programmatic Optimization and Learning Through Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judson Wright

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The orthodox view of the computer as a medium or medium of media (ie. “new media” is perfectly justified in colloquial discussions, but is hardly evident as an objective fact. This does not imply that computers are employed in the making of art, rather we are investigating a means of initiating the occurrence of an artistic experience for the audience, with whatever tools are convenient, in this case computers. We leverage the feature that logical syllogisms can be articulated such as to create systems that act as catalysts for Constructivist learning to take place within the individual minds of audience members. These concrete, but unobservable synaptic adjustments are subsequently displayed via unpredicted idiosyncratic behaviours. In short, whether or not a computer can choreograph a dance, we describe how automated machines can coerce humans to dance. In doing so, we uncover mysteries as to the ubiquity and influence of art on our species.

  11. A theory of alpha/theta neurofeedback, creative performance enhancement, long distance functional connectivity and psychological integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzelier, John

    2009-02-01

    Professionally significant enhancement of music and dance performance and mood has followed training with an EEG-neurofeedback protocol which increases the ratio of theta to alpha waves using auditory feedback with eyes closed. While originally the protocol was designed to induce hypnogogia, a state historically associated with creativity, the outcome was psychological integration, while subsequent applications focusing on raising the theta-alpha ratio, reduced depression and anxiety in alcoholism and resolved post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). In optimal performance studies we confirmed associations with creativity in musical performance, but effects also included technique and communication. We extended efficacy to dance and social anxiety. Diversity of outcome has a counterpart in wide ranging associations between theta oscillations and behaviour in cognitive and affective neuroscience: in animals with sensory-motor activity in exploration, effort, working memory, learning, retention and REM sleep; in man with meditative concentration, reduced anxiety and sympathetic autonomic activation, as well as task demands in virtual spatial navigation, focussed and sustained attention, working and recognition memory, and having implications for synaptic plasticity and long term potentiation. Neuroanatomical circuitry involves the ascending mescencephalic-cortical arousal system, and limbic circuits subserving cognitive as well as affective/motivational functions. Working memory and meditative bliss, representing cognitive and affective domains, respectively, involve coupling between frontal and posterior cortices, exemplify a role for theta and alpha waves in mediating the interaction between distal and widely distributed connections. It is posited that this mediation in part underpins the integrational attributes of alpha-theta training in optimal performance and psychotherapy, creative associations in hypnogogia, and enhancement of technical, communication and

  12. Psychological vulnerability and resilience of Holocaust survivors engaged in creative art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Shira; Shrira, Amit

    2018-06-01

    Although evidence demonstrates that engagement in art promotes favorable coping with trauma, this subject is underexplored among Holocaust survivors. Thus, the present study explored whether Holocaust survivors engaged in art differed from survivors not engaged in art in various markers of psychological vulnerability and resilience. The study further included non-Holocaust survivor comparisons, some engaged in art and some not, in order to assess whether engagement in art among Holocaust survivors relates to a unique psychological profile beyond art engagement in general. A sample of 154 community-dwelling older adults (mean age = 81.67, SD = 5.33, range = 73-97) reported exposure to the Holocaust, current engagement in art, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, general psychological distress, resilience and subjective perceptions of age and aging. Holocaust survivors (regardless of whether they engaged in art or not) reported higher PTSD symptoms relative to comparisons. However, Holocaust survivors who engaged in art reported higher resilience than all other groups (survivors not engaged in art and comparisons engaged and not engaged in art). To the best of our knowledge, these findings are the first quantitative evidence pointing toward a link between engagement in art and positive coping with the Holocaust. These findings have important implications for clinicians working with Holocaust survivors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advertising and algorithms – the obvious gains and hidden losses of using software with intelligent agent capabilities in the creative process of art directors and copywriters

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Richie

    2017-01-01

    Situated at the intersection of information technology, advertising and creativity theory, this thesis presents a detailed picture of the influence of autonomous software applications on the creative process of advertising art directors and copywriters. These applications, which are known in the field of information technology as ‘intelligent agents,’ commonly possess the ability to learn from the user and autonomously pursue their own goals. The search engine Google, which employs intelligen...

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Animated Drawings and Selected Instructional Strategies on Students’ Performance in Creative Arts in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyedun Emmanuel Olugbenga

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Creative Arts is a core and compulsory subject in Nigerian upper basic classes, but the students’ performance over the years indicated high failure. Instructional strategies play a pivotal role in improving students’ performance. Computer-based instructions such as animated drawings could be a possible solution. This research adopted the design and development type. The between groups repeated measure design compared pretest and post-test scores of participants to identify differences after treatment. To validate the instruments, test re-test method was used; Pearson product moment correlation co-efficient yielded a reliability value of .94. Also, 674 upper basic school students consisting of 387 public and 287 private schools students, 338 males, and 336 females were involved in the study. Seven research questions and seven corresponding hypotheses were raised and tested respectively. ANOVA and t-test were used for hypotheses testing. Findings of the study showed that computer-based animated drawings instruction enhanced performance. It was recommended among others that the classroom teacher should embrace the strategy for Creative Arts classes; authors and curriculum planners should create more opportunities for computer-based animated drawing in explaining procedures for instruction to enhance learning and improve performance.

  15. The Art of Scientific Ideas: Teaching and Learning Strategies that Promote Creative Problem Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBanca, Frank; Ritchie, Krista C.

    2011-01-01

    Problem solving is a valuable skill in the science classroom. Students often use a variety of inquiry strategies to identify problems and their implications; develop action plans; locate relevant sources, information, and data; and formulate solutions. Problem solving is a logical, analytical, and sometimes creative process. The less tangible,…

  16. Evidence-based creativity: Working between art and science in the field of fine dining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkenhagen, Chad

    2017-10-01

    This article examines how scientific knowledge drives creativity in the small but influential culinary movement of 'modernist cuisine'. Originating in the mid-1990s, modernist cuisine began with a small group of avant-garde chefs using science to produce wildly innovative culinary creations. Since then, many of the movement's innovations, as well as its more general 'science-based' approach to cooking, have gained adoption among a diverse range of culinary professionals. But while science has enabled modernist chefs to produce a wide array of innovations and refinements, the group's embrace of scientific values poses a potential threat to the subjective, intuition-driven logic of culinary creativity. Using data gathered through interviews and participant observation, I describe how modernist chefs navigate the potential challenges of using science in a creative field. I find that advocates of modernist cuisine address these challenges by adopting two separate rhetorical repertoires - one emphasizing science-based cooking's advantages over traditional methods, and another that minimizes the differences between these approaches. Observing the strategic deployment of these repertoires illustrates the challenges to incorporating science into creative fields and reveals a complex and nuanced relationship between objectivity, evidence, and aesthetic judgement.

  17. Creativity, Innovation and Arts Learning: Preparing All Students for Success in a Global Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Sandra S.

    2010-01-01

    The United States is competing in a dynamic global economy in which two assets--a skilled, versatile and highly adaptable workforce and the capacity for creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship--provide a decisive edge. To succeed in today's economic climate, the U.S. needs a well-educated, technically proficient workforce in all sectors and…

  18. Aina Onabolu and Naturalism in Nigerian Visual Arts | Irivwieri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GO Irivwieri. Abstract. This paper focuses on Aina Onabolu's creative exploits in the Nigerian Art Scene. ... that his astute commitment to his work culminated in the integration of Art into the school curriculum as a subject to be recon with.

  19. ANALYSIS OF ARTISTIC AESTHETIC CREATIVITY AND CHILDREN’S ART EDUCATION BASED ON THE SCIENTIFIC SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentyna Levytska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with teaching developing and nurturing after-school arts education on the process of harmoniously developed personality. The problem of the formation of a sense of beauty in the students in Ukrainian society. Emphasis is on basic research in the field of art education, the theoretical approach to the problem. Analysis of literature on the problem of artistic and aesthetic education of youth through art.

  20. Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Allison Antink

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers are often content to leave creativity to the arts and humanities classes. Fostering creativity in science, if attempted at all, is a challenge often relegated to the gifted classroom. But not just the privileged few have the capacity to be creative. Simply restructuring existing lessons can help promote creativity in all science…

  1. Transitions of Creatives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld

    The degree of transferability of skills and knowledge from an creative occupation in the creative industries to the wider economy is a great point of discussion within research in the arts and cultural and creative industries. By applying human capital theory on the labor market for creatives...

  2. Encouraging Creativity in the Face of Administrative Convenience: How Our Schools Discourage Divergent Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eugene; Hohn, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article reports observations of 2 classrooms in which arts based creative activities were integrated with curricular subject areas. One successfully incorporated a positive approach to supporting creativity. The other classroom used a more traditional approach to creative activities in the classroom. Suggestions for and possible outcomes of…

  3. Discovering Science through Art-Based Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Art and science are intrinsically linked; the essence of art and science is discovery. Both artists and scientists work in a systematic but creative way--knowledge and understanding are built up through pieces of art or a series of labs. In the classroom, integrating science and visual art can provide students with the latitude to think, discover,…

  4. Development of a Creative Arts Therapies Center for People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Suzanne; Tanguay, Denise; Snow, Stephen; D'Amico, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for the Arts in Human Development in Montreal has provided art, drama, music, and dance/movement therapies to adults with developmental disabilities for over 10 years with the goals of developing and enhancing self-esteem, social skills, and communication abilities. This report describes the development and purpose of the center,…

  5. Virtual Reality Technologies and the Creative Arts in the Areas of Disability, Therapy, Health, and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cobb, S. V. G.; Brooks, Anthony Lewis; Sharkey, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    A key theme in the ArtAbilitation conferences is the relationship between 6 sound, movement, and art, and how these can be used for rehabilitation and/or 7 expression by individuals who may have limited access to conventional communi- 8 cation. The development of VR environments and interactive...

  6. Laboratory and the art of enterprise integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Kent

    2009-10-01

    Many healthcare organizations are weighing the advantages of investing in a new laboratory information system (LIS) that promises greater accuracy and efficiency against the challenges of replacing the organization's existing LIS system. A recent KLAS survey considers the ROI of replacing an LIS with a next-generation solution, and whether providers are trending toward single-vendor integration or best-of-breed feature sets. Almost 70 percent of the 266 providers interviewed believe there is no "best" LIS.

  7. Creative Interventions with Traumatized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchiodi, Cathy A., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Rich with case material and artwork samples, this volume demonstrates a range of creative approaches for facilitating children's emotional reparation and recovery from trauma. Contributors include experienced practitioners of play, art, music, movement and drama therapies, bibliotherapy, and integrative therapies, who describe step-by-step…

  8. Counterpoint as a principle of creativity: Extracting divergent modifiers from 'The Art of Fugue' by Johann Sebastian Bach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Emanuele Corazza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main message carried by this article is that counterpoint can be taken as a model approach for the introduction of contrasting elements, not only in musical composition but also in the generation of ideas in any domain of knowledge. We start by an interdisciplinary review about the power of opposite concepts as constituting elements in nature. This is followed by the description of the DIMAI model for creative thinking, which is founded upon the dual forces of convergent and divergent thinking modalities. The main body of our work is an extraction of divergent modifiers from the Contrapunctus composed by Bach and collected in the Art of Fugue, with simple examples of application to the diversified fields of education and computer science.

  9. Connecting Music, Art, and Science for Increased Creativity and Topic Engagement ?

    OpenAIRE

    McNealy, Tamara L.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Attention spans have shortened,’ is a common phrase often used in reference to today’s college students. As faculty and instructors, we need to address this issue through the utilization of innovative and creative techniques that aid in making our subjects accessible to our students. Connecting a serious topic such as microbiology with a ‘fun’ activity can increase student engagement and learning. Ideas to maintain student attention on a subject include providing information in 15- to 20-min...

  10. Shader programming for computational arts and design: A comparison between creative coding frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Andres Felipe; Colubri, Andres; Charalambos, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We describe an Application Program Interface (API) that facilitates the use of GLSL shaders in computational design, interactive arts, and data visualization. This API was first introduced in the version 2.0 of Processing, a programming language and environment widely used for teaching and production in the context of media arts and design, and has been recently completed in the 3.0 release. It aims to incorporate low-level shading programming into code-based design, by int...

  11. The Medialogy education - AAU Copenhagen:Where art and creativity meet technology. Special focus on interactive systems design, programming and evaluation in problem based learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Nordahl, Rolf; Serafin, Stefania

    2007-01-01

    In the Medialogy education we attempt to subject some of the common conventions of art to quantitative, scientific experiments to see if they work as intended. Several educational methods are used within the education of Medialogy in order to enable students to make their own connections, filling gaps and create awareness of the pros and cons of working with dogmas within the minefield where art and creativity meet technology. In this talk we will demonstrate our approach through concrete exa...

  12. Teacher competencies for working with young talent : part 2: integration of arts disciplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kors, Ninja; Rickels, Horst; Smilde, Rineke; Verkuil, Marinus

    2007-01-01

    Twenty sixteen year old fourth-graders of the School for Young Talent (School voor Jong Talent) in The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Design, Music and Dance (Hogeschool van Beeldende Kunsten, Muziek en Dans) participated in a pilot project that combined music, dance and visual arts in a creative

  13. Applied Creativity: The Creative Marketing Breakthrough Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of personal creativity in today's business environment, few conceptual creativity frameworks have been presented in the marketing education literature. The purpose of this article is to advance the integration of creativity instruction into marketing classrooms by presenting an applied creative marketing…

  14. Carnegie Mellon's STUDIO for Creative Inquiry [and] The Interdisciplinary Teaching Network (ITeN) [and] Interactive Fiction [and] The Networked Virtual Art Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Lynn; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, an interdisciplinary center at Carnegie Mellon University that supports experimental activities in the arts, and its Interdisciplinary Teaching Network. Three STUDIO projects are described: the Ancient Egypt Prototype application of the network; an interactive fiction system based on artificial…

  15. Re-Discovering the Arts: The Impact of Engagement in a Natural Environment upon Pre-Service Teacher Perceptions of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Australian national statements describing a quality 21st century education prioritize creativity and sustainability as essentials for global and economic survival and for individual wellbeing. However, data gathered from 114 pre-service teachers commencing undergraduate study indicates their limited experience and skills in the arts, and lack of…

  16. Designing an Earthquake-Proof Art Museum: An Arts- and Engineering-Integrated Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Anastasia; Hussain, Mahjabeen

    2016-01-01

    In this practical arts-integrated science and engineering lesson, an inquiry-based approach was adopted to teach a class of fourth graders in a Midwest elementary school about the scientific concepts of plate tectonics and earthquakes. Lessons were prepared following the 5 E instructional model. Next Generation Science Standards (4-ESS3-2) and the…

  17. Betting for Integral Formation through the Models of Arts Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Margarita Barco Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time integral formation has been a main purpose of educational curricula. But even though it proves necessary on the ground of the benefits education may bring to human development, its outcomes are not always visible and many times it actually does not exist beyond the speech. In the field of arts teaching, the wholeness of human expressions seems to be one of the main goals in the formative purposes for young people and children. Such a commitment demands serious reflection on how and what artistic practices may bring to the formation of integral citizens, be it from the perspective of free expression or from a cognitivist or cultural one. Tracking the curricula in art education will allow us to understand the movement and whereabouts of such a high view, bringing together the conceptual and methodological arguments for it to match contemporaneity, so underlining the pertinence of art practices in education.

  18. Creativity in Lif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Rubí-Barquero

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author explains the following ideas: that creativity is not restricted to the sphere of art, as it is usually considered, since art is just an expression of creativity; that people do many things that require creativity; and that not even creativity is an attribute of humans, since, from certain critical levels, we may observe behaviors in living beings that involve different degrees of aesthetic cognition.

  19. Integrating Technology, Art, and Writing to Create Comic Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Edwin S.; Schnakenberg, Heidi L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors talk about the Summer Safari program that is designed for 9-to 14-year-old students. It targets individuals with an interest in comic books and a penchant for writing stories and/or drawing. The highlight of this multidisciplinary workshop is the seamless integration of writing, fine arts, and computer technology to…

  20. Dancing with STEAM: Creative Movement Generates Electricity for Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson Steele, Jamie; Fulton, Lori; Fanning, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The integration of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) serves to develop creative thinking and twenty-first-century skills in the classroom (Maeda 2012). Learning through STEAM promotes novelty, innovation, ingenuity, and task-specific purposefulness to solve real-world problems--all aspects that define creativity. Lisa…

  1. Art-science integration: Portrait of a residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Rhoda Lynn

    This dissertation is based on a year-long study of an arts integration residency at Hampton, a public elementary school in the Midwest. The study examined residency curriculum and pedagogies, factors facilitating and constraining the integration, and the perception of the artist, teachers, and students of the program and arts integration within it. The Hampton residency, "Art and Science: A Shared Evolution," represented a historical approach to the linking of the two disciplines within the framework of a survey extending from the origins of the universe to relativity theory, from cave paintings to Picasso. Findings indicate that integration encompassed more than issues of curriculum and pedagogy---that it was closely linked to the nature and extent of artist-teacher collaboration (importance of the interpersonal element); that multiple factors seemed to militate against integration and collaboration, including differing expectations of teachers and artist for the residency and integration, the lack of sustained professional development to support the integration of disciplines and collaboration of participants, and the pressure upon teachers of high stakes testing; that a common prep period was a necessary but not sufficient condition for collaboration to occur; and that the pedagogy of the artist while at Hampton was different than while at another school with similar demographics. The experience at Hampton seems to support conceiving of integration as a partnership capitalizing on the strengths of each partner, including teachers in the planning and development of curriculum, establishing structures to support teachers and artists in integrating curriculum and building/sustaining collaborative relationships, and insuring alignment of residency units with subject-area teaching. The study revealed that while integration in theory can offer an antidote for fragmentation of the school curriculum, in practice it is difficult to execute in a way that is meaningful to

  2. Augmented reality art from an emerging technology to a novel creative medium

    CERN Document Server

    Geroimenko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This is the first ever book on augmented reality art. It is written by a team of world-leading artists, researchers and practitioners, pioneering in the use of augmented reality technology as a novel artistic medium. The book explores a wide range of major aspects of augmented reality art and its enabling technology. It is intended to be a starting point and essential reading not only for artists, researchers and technology developers, but also for students (both graduates and undergraduates) and everyone who is interested in emerging augmented reality technology and its current and future app

  3. Integrating Creativity and Leadership:Creative Leadership%创造与领导力的结合:创造型领导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏秋江

    2012-01-01

    ,research paradigms referencing the neuroscience and multi - dimensional integration of the creative leadership,were discussed.%管理理论的研究已迈进创新/创造管理阶段,其典型代表为创造型领导力的理论研究。文章在探讨了创造与领导力关系的基础上,分析了创造型领导的影响效能,阐述了领导者创造思维的前因、领导者与员工创造思维过程研究。最后从创造型领导的技能与策略的发展、认知神经科学范式的采纳、多维整合等角度,评述未来研究趋势。

  4. Hearing Ancestral Voices through Creative Art--A Tool for Environmental Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silo, Nthalivi; Khudu-Petersen, Kelone

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this paper draws on a study in the Kgalagari region of Botswana where participant observation workshops were conducted to illustrate the impact of using the Arts in Education approach (AiE). This approach was used through traditional storytelling in lessons on environmental issues in a rural primary school in the…

  5. InnerSpark: A Creative Summer School and Artistic Community for Teenagers with Visual Arts Talent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Christina S.; Harrington, David M.

    2009-01-01

    InnerSpark is a residential summer arts training program for high school students established by the California State Legislature (California Education Code sections 8950-8957) in order to make it possible for "artistically gifted and talented students, broadly representative of the socioeconomic and ethnic diversity of the state, to receive…

  6. Creative Minds: The Search for the Reconciling Principles of Science, the Humanities, Arts and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Since before the time of writers such as Plato in his "Republic" and "Timaeus"; Martianus Capella in "The Marriage of Mercury and Philology"; Boethius in "De institutione musica"; Kepler in "The Harmony of the Universe"; and many others, there have been attempts to reconcile the various disciplines in the sciences, arts, humanities, and religion…

  7. Circle Justice: A Creative Arts Approach to Conflict Resolution in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This brief report describes a cooperative classroom art therapy intervention in a public elementary school that provided conflict resolution education, social learning, and group cohesion among sixth-grade students. The organizing framework of a "circle justice" group explored the roles of fictional characters in conflict, including…

  8. Inspiring Creativity in Urban School Leaders: Lessons from the Performing Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Girija; Drescher, Jon; Fairbank, Holly; Gonzaga, Adele; White, George P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how guided engagement with the arts can provide leadership lessons for school leaders and administrators. The study was conducted as part of two projects funded by the School Leadership Program (SLP) grants from the U.S. Department of Education. The principal interns and practicing school leaders participated in…

  9. Evaluating Interdisciplinary Collaborative Learning and Assessment in the Creative Arts and Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Melissa; Rainbird, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article responds to the rising emphasis placed on interdisciplinary collaborative learning and its implications for assessment in higher education. It presents findings from a research project that examined the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary collaborative student symposium as an assessment task in an art school/humanities environment.…

  10. Collaborating or Fighting for the Marks? Students' Experiences of Group Work Assessment in the Creative Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The study explores students' and lecturers' experiences of group work assessment in a performing arts department that includes undergraduate studies in theatre, dance and film. Working from the perspective that assessment is a socially situated practice informed by, and mediated through, the socio-political context within which it occurs, this…

  11. Creativity, the Muse of Innovation: How Art and Design Pedagogy Can Further Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levick-Parkin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how art and design pedagogy can further entrepreneurship in societal, economic and educational contexts, so that students may thrive in a world full of complexity and flux, empowered to create sustainable futures of their own making for themselves and their communities. The author touches on some of the methodologies inherent…

  12. A arte de contar histórias, integrada a outras linguagens de arte: uma prática pedagógica na educação básica The art of storytelling integrated to other languages of art: an educational practice in primary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tarnowski Fasanello

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo discutir a relevância da arte de contar histórias, integrada a outras linguagens de arte e expressão enquanto prática pedagógica desencadeadora de processos criativos e de autoconhecimento no âmbito da educação básica. O artigo está organizado em duas partes: a primeira aborda as bases conceituais da arte-educação e da arte de contar histórias; e a segunda relata experiências profissionais de um dos autores, desenvolvidas entre 1998 e 2006, no âmbito da chamada "Oficina Escola de Arte Granada", envolvendo atividades complementares à escola com alunos e professores de escolas públicas no município de Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro. Tais experiências reforçam a importância de buscar alternativas pedagógicas para o desenvolvimento de escolas criativas e transformadoras da realidade, que estimulem alunos mais autônomos e futuros cidadãos.This article discusses the relevance of the art of storytelling integrated to other art languages and expressions As a teaching practice which can promote creative and self-knowledge processes in the context of basic education. The article is organized in two parts: firstly we approach the conceptual bases of art-education and the art of storytelling; secondly we explain some professional experiences developed by one of the authors between 1998 and 2006 related to the "Granada School of Art", an educational organization dedicated to art education and storytelling, involving complementary activities to formal education with students and teachers from public schools in the municipality of Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro State. Such experiences reinforce the importance of looking for pedagogic alternatives to the development of creative and engaged schools that generate autonomy and citizenship among students.

  13. Creative Art and Cinematographic Production Vis-a-Vis the State in Europe. International Colloquy Organised by the European Art and Experimental Cinema Association in Collaboration with the Council of Europe. Cultural Policy Studies Series 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, Jean; Degand, Claude

    Various aspects of the role of the state in fostering creative art and cinematography are discussed in the two reports presented in this volume. In "The Role of the Market in the Relation Between the State and Cinematographic Creation" Jean Lescure emphasizes that this relationship should be viewed as one of complicity rather than…

  14. The Integration Method of Ceramic Arts in the Product Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuxin, Wang

    2018-03-01

    As one of the four ancient civilization countries, the firing technology of ceramic invented by China has made a great contribution to the progress and development of human society. In modern life, even the development of technology still needs the ceramics, there are large number of artists who take the ceramics as carrier active in the field of contemporary art. The ceramics can be seen everywhere in our daily life, this paper mainly discusses the integration means of ceramic art in the product design.

  15. The Art of Thinking: Using Collage to Stimulate Scholarly Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Nicola; Daley, Shauna

    2013-01-01

    Integrating the arts into higher education pedagogy provides an opportunity for cultivating rich ideas and high-level thinking, capitalizing on the creativity that every person already possesses and uses (Livingston, 2010). As Newton and Plummer (2009) note "the use of the creative arts as pedagogical strategy enables individuals to better…

  16. Computational creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Mántaras Badia, Ramon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New technologies, and in particular artificial intelligence, are drastically changing the nature of creative processes. Computers are playing very significant roles in creative activities such as music, architecture, fine arts, and science. Indeed, the computer is already a canvas, a brush, a musical instrument, and so on. However, we believe that we must aim at more ambitious relations between computers and creativity. Rather than just seeing the computer as a tool to help human creators, we could see it as a creative entity in its own right. This view has triggered a new subfield of Artificial Intelligence called Computational Creativity. This article addresses the question of the possibility of achieving computational creativity through some examples of computer programs capable of replicating some aspects of creative behavior in the fields of music and science.Las nuevas tecnologías y en particular la Inteligencia Artificial están cambiando de forma importante la naturaleza del proceso creativo. Los ordenadores están jugando un papel muy significativo en actividades artísticas tales como la música, la arquitectura, las bellas artes y la ciencia. Efectivamente, el ordenador ya es el lienzo, el pincel, el instrumento musical, etc. Sin embargo creemos que debemos aspirar a relaciones más ambiciosas entre los ordenadores y la creatividad. En lugar de verlos solamente como herramientas de ayuda a la creación, los ordenadores podrían ser considerados agentes creativos. Este punto de vista ha dado lugar a un nuevo subcampo de la Inteligencia Artificial denominado Creatividad Computacional. En este artículo abordamos la cuestión de la posibilidad de alcanzar dicha creatividad computacional mediante algunos ejemplos de programas de ordenador capaces de replicar algunos aspectos relacionados con el comportamiento creativo en los ámbitos de la música y la ciencia.

  17. Teaching Art a Greener Path: Integrating Sustainability Concepts of Interior Design Curriculum into the Art Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasio, Cindy; Crane, Tommy J.

    2014-01-01

    Interior design is seldom integrated within the general art education curriculum because the subject matter is generally segregated as a commercial art. However, the importance of interior design concepts of sustainability in art education can really help a student understand the scale and proportion of space and mass, and how sustainability is…

  18. Arts Integration as Potentiality for Professional Development for School Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    This paper investigates the potentialities for professional development, when teachers work with integration of arts and academic subjects in the classroom. The idea of integrating arts and academic subjects can be seen as a way of experimenting with teaching. Experiments in the classroom as a way...... of creating new knowledge about teaching is very closely linked to ideas from action research approaches to development of both new practices and new knowledge. Therefore, we will draw on concepts from action research theory to explore how teachers learn and at the same time develop new knowledge when......: Experience, Exploration, and Experimentation. In this way, the action research approach has the possibility of creating not only new practices, but also to develop new theoretic understanding of the learning processes involved in creating change in a living practice as classroom teaching. As an empirical...

  19. When are Rewards Bad for Creativity? Examining the Role of Leadership and Integrated Extrinsic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between common creativity antecedents and creative performance is seldom clarified and the assertion that employee attitudinal and work environment factors spur creative performance has rarely been tested. The present study adopts an individual level of analysis and investigates the association between leader behaviors, employee extrinsic motivation, creative performance behaviors and creative performance in the Indian R&D context. Data were collected using a survey questionn...

  20. Managing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slavich, Barbara; Velikova, Silviya Svejenova

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at providing definitional clarity on creativity and a systematic understanding of its management in organizations. By drawing on the results of a content analysis of creativity definitions in 440 scholarly publications in the field of management between 1990 and 2014, this study...... clarifies how scholars in the management domain have defined the concept and identifies core categories shared by these definitions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for managing creativity in organizations. The framework outlines...... a view of managing creativity, which involves managing interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as processes-outcomes, individuals-collectives, and permanent-temporary creativity units. Finally, it paves the way to new research frontiers for the domain....

  1. Turkish Preschool Teachers' Beliefs on Integrated Curriculum: Integration of Visual Arts with Other Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Erden, Feyza Tantekin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates preschool teachers' beliefs about integrated curriculum and, more specifically, their beliefs about integration of visual arts with other activities. The participants of this study consisted of 255 female preschool teachers who are employed in preschools in Ankara, Turkey. For the study, teachers were asked to complete…

  2. Bridging views in cinema: a review of the art and science of view integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Daniel T; Baker, Lewis J

    2017-09-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the relationship between film and cognitive science. This is reflected in a new science of cinema that can help us both to understand this art form, and to produce new insights about cognition and perception. In this review, we begin by describing how the initial development of cinema involved close observation of audience response. This allowed filmmakers to develop an informal theory of visual cognition that helped them to isolate and creatively recombine fundamental elements of visual experience. We review research exploring naturalistic forms of visual perception and cognition that have opened the door to a productive convergence between the dynamic visual art of cinema and science of visual cognition that can enrich both. In particular, we discuss how parallel understandings of view integration in cinema and in cognitive science have been converging to support a new understanding of meaningful visual experience. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1436. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1436 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  4. How Can Creative Workplaces Meet Creative Employees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kolnhofer Derecskei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the individual and contextual factors that facilitate or hinder employees’ creativity. However, in this paper the literature is also referring to critical factors that impact employees’ creativity. According to the creativity’s state of the art, we focused on factors based on creativity’s 4P, choosing Person (characteristics of creative persons and Place (environmental factors that influence creativity. Considerable research efforts have been invested to explore the possible connections between these two domains by investigating the Hungarian labour market. We found that the probability that a creative person works in a creative workplace is twice greater than that of the case of a non-creative person. This study presents the requisites of a creative workplace so that employees’ creativity can be developed and a kind of work environment which facilitates organizational creativity can be created. First, we have collected and presented the best practices of recruitment-tools which help managers to hire the most creative applicants. With these two components, i.e. finding creative workers and securing them a creative friendly environment, the business success is guaranteed.

  5. Creative ICT

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Promoting pupils' creativity when they use ICT, this book also encourages learning across core as well as foundation subjects. It includes: flexible activities for pupils to refer to as they work through the activities; helpful examples of work so pupils know what to aim for; additional support sheets that can be used by the pupil of the teacher; departure points for integrated studies; extension activities that will encourage further creativity.

  6. Shifting Gear. The daily deliberation between arts and economics in cultural and creative organisations in Utrecht, 2010–2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, J

    2014-01-01

    This research analyses strategic practice and discourse in ten cultural and for-profit creative organisations in the Dutch city of Utrecht, between 2010 and 2012. The main question of this research is how deliberations on culture, creativity and business structure strategic discourse and practice in

  7. Opening up Openness to Experience: A Four-Factor Model and Relations to Creative Achievement in the Arts and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Scott Barry

    2013-01-01

    Openness to experience is the broadest personality domain of the Big Five, including a mix of traits relating to intellectual curiosity, intellectual interests, perceived intelligence, imagination, creativity, artistic and aesthetic interests, emotional and fantasy richness, and unconventionality. Likewise, creative achievement is a broad…

  8. Creativity as an integral element of social capital and its role for economic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Westlund , Hans; Andersson, Martin; Karlsson, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the connections between creativity, social capital and economic performance and growth. Our working hypothesis is that both creativity and social capital influences the economy, both each per se, but also through their influence on each other. We regard creativity as one of the sources of entrepreneurship and innovation (although creativity also can have ‘bad’ consequences if bad actors such as criminals perform it). Depending on the types of networks and the norms ...

  9. Creative Science Teaching Labs: New Dimensions in CPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Kerry; Craft, Anna

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers analysis and evaluation of "Creative Science Teaching (CST) Labs III", a unique and immersive approach to science teachers' continuing professional development (CPD) designed and run by a London-based organisation, Performing Arts Labs (PAL), involving specialists from the arts, science and technology as integral. Articulating…

  10. Culture diversity/a mobile workforce command creative leadership, new partnerships, and innovative approaches to integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Regina; Wurmser, Theresa A

    2004-01-01

    Today's healthcare environment requires that nursing leaders meet the needs of a growing multicultural workforce and patient population. Cultural factors may be overlooked as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly dominated by technological, economic, and social changes. Through creative leadership, the chief nurse executive (CNE) can encourage staff to pay closer attention to cultural factors that will impact on patient, staff, and hospital outcomes. The CNE can begin by enhancing his/her own multicultural competency, building these competencies in his/her staff, and then empowering staff to respect and accommodate cultural differences. An understanding to transcultural nursing theory can enhance the development and maintenance of a multicultural perspective. The use of Madeline Leininger's Culture Care modalities can assist staff in making culturally competent decisions and in implementing actions. This article will provide an overview of one community hospital's experiences in integrating a multicultural perspective to better meet the needs of specific patient populations.

  11. Theory and (In) Practice: The Problem of Integration in Art and Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintoul, Jenny Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between art "theory" and art "practice" in British art education at post-compulsory level, with a focus on the ways in which theory is framed and delivered and what this means for its integration. Drawing upon constructions of knowledge and approaches to integration as a technique and…

  12. Art Integration as School Culture Change: A Cultural Ecosystem Approach to Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, William

    2011-01-01

    While much has been written about arts integration theory, and the various benefits of visual art in the curriculum, the literature is sparse regarding arts integration implementation, and the personal, professional, and school culture barriers to the persistence and dissemination of such interventions. Successful educational interventions are…

  13. Collaborative College Playwriting and Performance: A Core Course "Trespassing" onto the Dramatic Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedetti, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is relevant in the context of the increased demand for creative thinkers in a global economy. However, reaching across disciplinary boundaries is less common in higher education. Arts integration is one way that a literature class can "trespass" onto the dramatic arts. This paper reports on a study of integrating the…

  14. Integrating dependency on the leader and empowerment into the transformational leadership-creative performance relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kollmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous literature highlights employees’ creativity as an important means of fostering innovation and competitiveadvantage in companies. Transformational leadership is an approach aimed at stimulating and encouraging thecreative performance of employees. However, contradictory empirical fi ndings indicate that the relationship betweentransformational leadership and creativity may be more complex than a simple direct link. Drawing from the existingliterature, we propose that dependency on the leader is a partial mediator of this relationship, impeding employees’ creativity.Synthesizing theories of leadership and creativity, we propose that empowerment, as a moderator, is able to reducethe dependency on the leader caused by transformational leadership as well as contribute to turning possible negativeoutcomes of transformational leadership on creative performance into positive outcomes. The fi ndings of a PLS analysisof 271 employees support the predicted mediating and moderating effects. Our results indicate that the transformationalleadership style should be combined with empowering behavior to enhance employees’ creative performance.

  15. Laughter Filled the Classroom: Outcomes of Professional Development in Arts Integration for Elementary Teachers in Inclusion Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Katherine A.; Thompson, Janna Chevon

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examined teachers' experiences with an arts integration curriculum. This study considered the teachers' perceptions of arts integrations before and after being introduced to the concepts of arts integration. The teachers were provided with knowledge and tools to integrate the arts into general education curriculum and…

  16. Teaching the Arts as a Second Language: A School-Wide Policy Approach to Arts Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brittany Harker

    2017-01-01

    The arts can be used to teach, not just as activities that enhance learning, but also as the primary medium through which students process, acquire, and represent knowledge. This means the arts can function as a language. If we accept this metaphor, and we truly want students to be fluent in the artistic languages, then the arts can be taught in…

  17. The quest for balanced curriculum: The perceptions of secondary students and teachers who experienced an integrated art and science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Susan Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to describe how an integrated high school curriculum unit connecting the different subject areas of art and science could be used to give students a voice in the decisions about learning. Through the data generated I examined the obstacles of integrating curriculum in a traditionally subject-centered high school. Forty-one students, nineteen biology students in the ninth grade, and twenty-two art students ranging from the tenth grade through the twelfth grade, along with their two teachers and a student teacher, were the subjects of the research. An integrated curricular unit, "Genetic Robotics," was designed specifically for this research to enable students to integrate scientific and artistic processes such as communication skills, problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity and responsiveness to the aesthetic; thus empowering them for future learning. Semi-structured interviews, surveys, questionnaires, informal conversations, reaction journals, field observations, video tapes, and official documents from the school, provided the data for this research. Data were collected using a strategy of participant-observation. The constant comparative analysis method was employed to explore emerging themes. Oak Park students' adaptability to an integrated art and science unit was found to be limited because of their inability to conceptualize curricular structures that are different from the traditional ones to which they are accustomed. Students typically scored high on standardized proficiency tests and college entrance exams. Therefore, for them to experience an innovation that is not based on the memorize-and-recall mode of learning is to risk failure and many are unwilling to do so, especially the high achieving students.

  18. Arts-Integrated Literacy Instruction: Promising Practices for Preservice Teaching Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Coneway, Betty; Hindman, Janet Tipton; Garcia, Beth; Bingham, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers are facing increasing responsibility to integrate the arts during literacy instruction. In order to address the arts effectively, teachers require understandings, confidence, and competence with visual arts, music, dance, and theater. Therefore, educator preparation programs must develop the knowledge and skills of preservice…

  19. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Intrinsic Motivation on the Affect and Evaluation of the Creative Process among Fine Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko-Kaczmarek, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the effect of intrinsic motivation on affect, subjective evaluation, and the creative process of young artists. Relations between motivation, affect, and evaluation were treated as a dynamic process and measured several times. The unique contribution of this study is that it…

  1. A Conceptualisation of Emotion within Art and Design Education: A Creative, Learning and Product-Orientated Triadic Schema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spendlove, David

    2007-01-01

    There is a resurgence of interest in the powerful concept of emotion in current educational policy and practice. This article calls for the recognition and conceptualisation of a triadic schema for theorising the location of emotion within a creative educational experience. The schema represents emotion within three domains within current…

  2. Multidimensional Assessment of Giftedness: criterion Validity of Battery of Intelligence and Creativity Measures in Predicting Arts and Academic Talents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana de Cassia Nakano

    Full Text Available We test the utility of the Battery for Giftedness Assessment (BaAH/S in identifying differences in two groups of already known gifted students in the areas of academic and artistic talents. Four latent factors were assessed (a fluid intelligence, (b metaphor production (verbal creativity, (c figural fluency (figural creativity, and (d divergent thinking figural task quality (figural creativity. A sample of 987 children and adolescents, 464 boys and 523 girls, of ages ranging from 8 to 17 of two groups: regular students (N=866 and gifted students (N= 67 academic abilities, N=34 artistic abilities and N=20 no domain identified. Academic giftedness group of have higher reasoning, can produce more remote/original metaphors, high figural fluency and drawings rated as more original. Children in the group of artistic giftedness have higher reasoning, high figural fluency and drawings rated as more original. Reasoning abilities are relatively higher in academic giftedness group than artistic (r = .39 vs r =.14. Within artistic group figural fluency and ratings of originality are relatively more important than reasoning (r = .25 and r = .21 vs .14. We emphasizes the importance of assessing creativity in different domains in addition to intelligence to improve the understanding of giftedness and talent.

  3. Digital Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson Brooks, Eva; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from children’s play with technology in early childhood learning practices. The paper addresses questions related to how digital technology can foster creativity in early childhood learning environments. It consists of an analysis of children......’s interaction with the KidSmart furniture focusing on digital creativity potentials and play values suggested by the technology. The study applied a qualitative approach and included125 children (aged three to five), 10 pedagogues, and two librarians. The results suggests that educators should sensitively...... consider intervening when children are interacting with technology, and rather put emphasize into the integration of the technology into the environment and to the curriculum in order to shape playful structures for children’s digital creativity....

  4. Artfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  5. THE INTEGRATION OF CREATIVITY MANAGEMENT MODELS INTO UNIVERSITIES’VIRTUAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru STRUNGĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the access of an increasingly higher number of individuals to virtual learning networks, the issue of creativity management becomes extremely important, especially for schools and universities. In the specialized literature, participating in virtual learning communities has several advantages, including: permanent access to information, high educational performance and increased creativity, and also better-developed professional identity (North and Kumta, 2014; Boulay and van Raalte, 2014. In the Romanian literature, there are few studies that aim directly at the relationship between the participation in virtual learning networks and creativity and innovation management models, especially in higher education institutions. This paper aims to study the ways in which creativity and innovation management models can be used in virtual learning networks in order to achieve better productivity at both individual and organizational levels, taking into account several best practices from this field and their possible implementation in Romanian educational institutions.

  6. Reflection of phases of interviews with preschool and younger school children, during the creative art activities with ceramic clay.

    OpenAIRE

    HOŘKÁ, Vlasta

    2014-01-01

    The author will first introduce the reason she had chosen her topic, which is focused on using clay as the mean of promoting creativity while interviewing children, this is to help personality growth and preparation to enter school in preschool children. In the theoretical part the author will touch on some developmental theories of preschool and younger school-age children, followed by pointing out the specifics of pre-school education and the importance of an educator's personality with reg...

  7. Neuropsychiatry of creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco; Hermann, Bruce; Trimble, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review in brief the development of ideas that over time have tried to explain why some individuals are more creative than others and what may be the neurobiological links underlying artistic creativity. We note associations with another unique human idea, that of genius. In particular, we discuss frontotemporal dementia and bipolar, cyclothymic mood disorder as clinical conditions that are helping to unravel the underlying neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of human creativity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Short Stories About The Ocean, an Art Integrated Project Into the Elementary Curriculum, Using Shadow Theatre and Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guieu, M.; Scheurle, C.

    2016-02-01

    The holistic aspect of integrated learning reflects the way our world works: everything is interconnected. Integrated Learning connects students, teachers, academic content and the world. It creates bridges between disciplines, encourages invention, experimentation, and problem solving. In an art integrated lesson or project, the students learn in a creative way, exploring a given subject by working on an art project, individually or collectively, using an array of traditional techniques and technology tools. Short Stories about the Ocean is anchored in the 4th and 5th grade curriculum, the art technique is the shadow theatre. The students videotape the performances for documentation and sharing. After giving the students information about different types of human activities that have an impact on the ocean, and discussing them, the students form groups and choose a specific subject - for example over fishing or pipe spilling. They gather more information and create a story with a beginning, a development and an end. Prior to start the project, the teacher prepares a small shadow theatre made of simple material, with a template I provide. The teacher explains the basics in shadow theatre technique. The students work with paper and skewers to create the elements they need for their story. They find solutions to render proportions, movements, actions and timing. Each group rehearses and then presents to the class a two/three minutes performance. The students who watch give a positive critique. Each group takes the time to make changes if the story, the message or the elements need to be clearer. Each group performs in front of the class again. This collaborative work encourages decision making. The students have to define their idea and concept clearly, with enough details but not too many, so that their message is understood by the viewers. It is a challenge for the students to design the shapes they need for their story with minimal material and they must be

  9. Creativity and Creative Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  10. Creative Marketing in Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Brakus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Art is a human activity which aims to stimulate the senses, mind and spirit. It is an activity that was created with the intention to transmit emotions and ideas. The need for art comes from human creativity. Many scientific disciplines such as psychology, sociology, art, are exploring the concept of creativity. The presence of creativity in marketing is not sufficiently explored. We live in a time that is characterized by rapid technological advances and changes. We are meeting with a large number of advertisements and our consciousness has already built a “defense” against advertising. We do not notice many advertisements and become blind to most of them. Companies must be extremely creative if they want to send a specific message and to gain public attention. Creative marketing is a combination of marketing and creativity. It is useful in theoretical and practical terms, and can use all types of media to achieve their goal. Creativity has benefits of marketing because it can express through it, and the marketing gets benefits of creativity because on that way it gets a new look and a becomes a marketing of new age.

  11. Creativity-Relevant Personal Characteristics among Indonesia Creative Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho J. Setiadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify Creativity-relevant Personal Characteristics among creative workers in Indonesia’s creative industry. Identification of the constituent elements of the nature of the changes needs to be measured. Researchers have advocated replacing creativity-relevant personal characteristics based on the five-factor model to investigate how individual differences stimulate creativity. This study presents data supporting reliability (internal consistency and validity (criterion and construct of the instrument. Validity of the instrument is based on the content validity involving art and design experts. The 220 creative workers from several creative industry firms in Indonesia participated as samples in this research. Results of a factor analysis indicated a five factor solution of creative characteristics and behavior. Discussion of findings and the most important ways in which individuals differ in their enduring emotional, interpersonal, experiential, attitudinal, and motivational styles for stimulating creativity are presented.

  12. art@CMS SciArt Workshops

    CERN Document Server

    Hoch, Michael; Preece, Stephen; Storr, Mick; Petrilli, Achille

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments in science education policy and practice suggest that successful learning in the 21st century requires the horizontal connectedness across areas of knowledge by linking the arts and humanities with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects. The rapidly increasing STEAM movement calls for arts integration into science teaching and learning to help school students develop skills that are necessary to thrive in an innovation economy. Education and outreach in high - energy physics are not an exception to these developments. This paper outlines a series of learning activities for students at secondary and tertiary level that use a cross - disciplinary approach to fostering creativity and imagination in physics education and outreach.

  13. art@CMS SciArt Workshops

    CERN Document Server

    Hoch, Michael; Preece, Stephen; Storr, Mick; Petrilli, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in science education policy and practice suggest that successful learning in the 21st century requires the horizontal connectedness across areas of knowledge by linking the arts and humanities with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects. The rapidly increasing STEAM movement calls for arts integration into science teaching and learning to help school students develop skills that are necessary to thrive in an innovation economy. Education and outreach in high - energy physics are not an exception to these developments. This paper outlines a series of learning activities for students at secondary and tertiary level that use a cross - disciplinary approach to fostering creativity and imagination in physics education and outreach.

  14. Promoting Mental Health and Community Participation: A study on participatory arts practice, creativity and play in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Bang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze a participative health experience involving art, creativity and play, in articulation with the strategy of Comprehensive Primary Health Care focused on mental health. This experience is conducted by a network of institutions in Buenos Aires City.This is an exploratory and descriptive case study based on qualitative research methodologies. From an ethnographic perspective, the fieldwork revolved around interviews and participant observation records. The systematization process followed qualitative analysis content techniques. The outcomes describe a practice cored in intersectoral work, community participation, occupation of public space, creation of community gathering spaces and conformation of solidarity ties for addressing complex psychosocial issues. The main participatory processes focused on community organization and collective artistic creations are described. It is concluded that this experience shows great transforming potential, creating community conditions suitable for joint decision making on the health- illness care process itself.

  15. The creativity of Crumb: research on the effects of psychedelic drugs on the comic art of Robert Crumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew T

    2007-09-01

    This article investigates the influence of perception that is altered by psychedelic drugs on processes of creativity through a case study of the work of well-known comic artist Robert Crumb. Samples of Crumb's work before, during, and after the period of his use of psychedelic drugs are content analyzed and compared according to the categorization offered by Janiger and Dobkin de Rios (1989). The results of the comparison indicate that Robert Crumb's drug use significantly altered the stylistic approach of his artwork not only during the period of his drug use, but long after he had stopped using drugs.

  16. CSP - 2017 International Conference of Mobile Brain Body Imaging (MoBI) and the Neuroscience of Art, Innovation and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-10

    including suggestions for reducing the burden, to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and...covered in the conference: 1) Wearable Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) technologies (both hardware and software developments); 2) Cognitive and Brain...the state of the art and challenges in cognitive and affective brain-computer interfaces, and their deployment in the service of the arts and the

  17. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  18. Noncognitive Factors in an Elementary School-Wide Arts Integrated Model

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson Steele, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Pomaika‘i Elementary School has answered a call to improve education by providing content instruction through the arts. How does school wide arts integration in an elementary setting support students as they transition to middle school? This bounded case study examines the experiences of eight families through a series of interviews with students, parents, and teachers. It describes and explains learning through the arts within three overarching noncognitive factors: a) academic mindsets, or ...

  19. Multiplicity and Self-Identity: Trauma and Integration in Shirley Mason's Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    This viewpoint appeared in its original form as the catalogue essay that accompanied the exhibition "Multiplicity and Self-Identity: Trauma and Integration in Shirley Mason's Art," curated by the author for Gallery 2110, Sacramento, CA, and the 2010 Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association. The exhibition featured 17 artworks by…

  20. Bridging the Arts and Computer Science: Engaging At-Risk Students through the Integration of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Lisa; Klopfer, Michelle; Ernst, Jeremy V.

    2018-01-01

    Linux Laptop Orchestra (L2Ork), founded in 2009 in the Virginia Tech Music Department's Digital and Interactive Sound & Intermedia Studio, "explores the power of gesture, communal interaction, and the multidimensionality of arts, as well as technology's potential to seamlessly integrate arts and sciences with particular focus on K-12…

  1. Supporting the Language Development of Limited English Proficient Students through Arts Integration in the Primary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Liane

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at how arts integration can boost the language development of limited English proficient students in kindergarten through second grade. I first review existing research on how young children learn and describe the special challenges faced by children who must learn in an unfamiliar language. I then identify arts-based mechanisms…

  2. Action Research in Preservice Teachers' Arts-Integration Pedagogies for Social Justice Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felleman-Fattal, Laura Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Age-appropriate children's books can be an effective way to introduce and discuss issues of social justice with young students. These books can be the anchor for interdisciplinary lessons that integrate core content areas, such as language arts, science, and/or social studies with the visual and performing arts to enrich students' learning…

  3. Possibilities and Limitations of Integrating Peer Instruction into Technical Creativity Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijuan; Murota, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The effects of active peer-peer interaction on the generation of new hypotheses or models and the increase of new solutions have attracted widespread attention. Therefore, the peer discussion portion of peer instruction is supposedly effective in developing students' creativity. However, few empirical research involves how to adapt peer…

  4. Interdisciplinary Working Practices: Can Creative Dance Improve Math?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, Cristina Rebelo; Monteiro, Elisabete; Melo, Filipe

    2018-01-01

    This study is integrated in the field of Dance in Education, focusing on the instrumentalist aspect of art. We focused on creative dance as a catalyst to learn Mathematics' contents. This interdisciplinary work can enhance the learning, as far as the understanding of Mathematics' concepts is achieved through the body and revealed by expressive and…

  5. Nature versus nurture segues to choice versus circumstance in the new millennium: one consideration for an integrative biopsychosocial philosophy, art, and science of chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Monica

    2009-12-01

    This commentary discusses the evolving sociocultural roles and sociocultural authority of chiropractic. The complex interconnectivity of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of our individual and collective well-being has occupied centuries of "nature versus nurture" philosophical debate, creative art, and scientific work. What has emerged is a better understanding of how our human development is affected by the circumstances of what we are born with (ie, nature) and how we are shaped by the circumstances that we are born into (ie, nurture). In the new millennium, a cumulative challenge to the emerging integrative biopsychosocial health care disciplines is one of reconciling "circumstance versus choice"; that is, advancing individually and collectively the fullest actualization of human potential through the philosophy, art, and science of autonomy and empowerment.

  6. Integrating Mathematics, Science, and Language Arts Instruction Using the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kenneth; Hosticka, Alice; Kent, Judi; Browne, Ron

    1998-01-01

    Addresses issues of access to World Wide Web sites, mathematics and science content-resources available on the Web, and methods for integrating mathematics, science, and language arts instruction. (Author/ASK)

  7. Integrating Fine Arts Instruction with At Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, Charles; Kendall-Dudley, Lori; Sarmiento, Patty

    This report details a program design for improving fine arts instruction among at-risk students. The participants were in a second and third grade bilingual class and a first-through third-grade learning disabled and behavior disordered class in an at-risk elementary school along with a heterogeneous fourth-grade class in a neighboring Midwest…

  8. An Art Information System: From Integration to Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Patricia J.

    1988-01-01

    Explores the qualities of bibliographic and object entities that contribute to the similarities and differences in the data describing them and the possibility of cooperation between indexers of art objects and indexers of bibliographic information. The discussion covers the role of authority control as the linking component between bibliographic…

  9. Arts Integration as a Catalyst for High School Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Dorinne

    2008-01-01

    The director of a small career academy of the arts in a public high school reflects on the conflicting demands to establish a college-preparatory program adhering to state standards and to facilitate the personal growth, artistic discovery, and democratic empowerment of teens. By narrating experiences that go to the heart of philosophical discord,…

  10. Unforgettable art

    OpenAIRE

    Iván Moratilla Pérez; Esther Gallego García; Francisco Javier Moreno Martínez

    2018-01-01

    Humanity and Art make an indissoluble marriage, it is impossible to comprehend one without the other. Even before producing the first musical instrument, humanity already sang; before using a canvas, humans painted on the walls of a cave. Creative manifestations invariably take place in “poverty and wealth”, but also in “sickness and health”. In this article we introduce the reader to the subject of art and dementia, highlighting the creative potential of patients, and including examples of e...

  11. Creativity and development of creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Nebřenská, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of my Bachelor's degree thesis is to analyse creativity and possibilities of development of creativity. The thesis is composed of nine chapters, each of them dealing with different aspect of creativity. Introductory chapter defines term creativity from different points of view as well problems connected with its defining. Then is provided an outline of historical concepts of creativity. Next part of text examines creative personality, deals with concept of creative personality, Gu...

  12. The artist emerges: visual art learning alters neural structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alexander; Alexander, Prescott; Fogelson, Sergey V; Li, Xueting; Lu, Zhengang; Kohler, Peter J; Riley, Enrico; Tse, Peter U; Meng, Ming

    2015-01-15

    How does the brain mediate visual artistic creativity? Here we studied behavioral and neural changes in drawing and painting students compared to students who did not study art. We investigated three aspects of cognition vital to many visual artists: creative cognition, perception, and perception-to-action. We found that the art students became more creative via the reorganization of prefrontal white matter but did not find any significant changes in perceptual ability or related neural activity in the art students relative to the control group. Moreover, the art students improved in their ability to sketch human figures from observation, and multivariate patterns of cortical and cerebellar activity evoked by this drawing task became increasingly separable between art and non-art students. Our findings suggest that the emergence of visual artistic skills is supported by plasticity in neural pathways that enable creative cognition and mediate perceptuomotor integration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. O pensamento criativo de Paul Klee: arte e música na constituição da Teoria da Forma The creative thinking of Paul Klee: art and music in the formation of the Theory of Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Costa Ramalho de Castro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudo sobre a Teoria da Forma concebida no início do século XX pelo artista plástico Paul Klee e publicado no livro O Pensamento Criativo (KLEE, 1920. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é uma demonstração do pensamento artístico que adota pressupostos formais, previamente estabelecidos para resultar na prática da representação artística. Klee identificou as relações formais entre a música e as artes visuais, apresentando conexões entre a linha melódica e a linha no desenho; o ritmo e as seqüências de módulos e sub-módulos; os tempos dos compassos e as divisões da pintura; a métrica da música e a modulação da forma e da cor nas artes visuais. Klee também apresentou suas experiências com superposição de cores e texturas para representar visualmente a polifonia. A Teoria da Forma de Paul Klee é um exemplo de estudo que pressupõe modelos formais para a elaboração artística e projetual.Study on the Theory of Form conceived in the early twentieth century by artist Paul Klee and published in the book The Creative Thinking (KLEE, 1920. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is a demonstration of an artistic thought that adopts the previously established formal prerequisites that result in the practice of artistic representation. Klee identified the formal relationship between music and the visual arts, providing connections between the melodic line and the line in the drawing, rhythm and sequence of modules and sub-modules, the pulses of the measures and the divisions of the painting, metrics in music and the modulation of shape and color in the visual arts. Klee also presented his experiences with overlapping colors and textures to visually represent polyphony. The Theory of Form of Paul Klee is an example of a study that requires formal models for the artistic and design elaboration.

  14. Linking Science and Language Arts: A Review of the Literature Which Compares Integrated versus Non-Integrated Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Leslie U.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature published during the last 20 years that investigates the impact of approaches that describe themselves as integrating science and language arts on student learning and/or attitude at the elementary level. The majority of papers report that integrated approaches led to greater student…

  15. The Effects of Integrating Mobile and CAD Technology in Teaching Design Process for Malaysian Polytechnic Architecture Student in Producing Creative Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Isham Shah; Ismail, Mohd Arif; Mustapha, Ramlee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of integrating the digital media such as mobile and CAD technology on designing process of Malaysian polytechnic architecture students in producing a creative product. A website is developed based on Caroll's minimal theory, while mobile and CAD technology integration is based on Brown and…

  16. Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact - State of the Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J. C.; Milligan, M. R.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.

    2007-08-01

    At the end of 2005, the Power Engineering Society (PES) published a special issue of its Power & Energy Magazine that focused on integrating wind into the power system. This paper provides a summary and update on many of the salient points from that special issue about the current state of knowledge regarding utility wind integration issues.

  17. Creative Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Consciousness is creative. That creativity expresses in myriad ways – as moments in time in which decades of progress can be achieved overnight, as organizational innovations of immense power for social accomplishment; as creative social values that further influence the evolution of organizations and society; as the creativity of individuality in the leader, genius, artist and inventor; as social creativity that converts raw human experience into civilization; as cultural creativity that tra...

  18. Supporting Creativity: A Look at Children's Experiences at Two Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsana, Madhavi

    2010-01-01

    People have always valued and appreciated creativity, and art is a medium for expressing one's individuality and creativity. Creativity can be reflected in the products a person makes. For young children though, creativity is a road of trial and errors; it's a process. Adults nurture or inhibit children's creativity in their design of the physical…

  19. Creativity in the Age of Technology: Measuring the Digital Creativity of Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology and its many uses form an emerging domain of creative expression for adolescents and young adults. To date, measures of self-reported creative behavior cover more traditional forms of creativity, including visual art, music, or writing, but do not include creativity in the digital domain. This article introduces a new measure,…

  20. ARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...

  1. Creative activity and inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemanov A.Yu.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to analyze the inclusion potential of art creative activity, namely of theatre performance, in people with disabilities. The article provides examples of disagreements in understanding the significance of these art activities for exercising the rights of people with disabilities to contribute to culture and art and some problems arising here. The conclusion is made that theatre art performed by people with disabilities is gradually changing its function: from being a means of self-affirmation to the determination of its specific place in overall theatre process. These changes confirm the inclusion potential of theatre art activity.

  2. Decentring the Creative Self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lubart, Todd

    2014-01-01

    to themes depicting the interaction between these different others and the creator. Findings reveal both similarities and differences across the five domains in terms of the specific contribution of others to the creative process. Social interactions play a key formative, regulatory, motivational...... and informational role in relation to creative work. From ‘internalized’ to ‘distant’, other people are an integral part of the equation of creativity calling for a de-centring of the creative self and its re-centring in a social space of actions and interactions....

  3. Integrated Simulation for HVAC Performance Prediction: State-of-the-Art Illustration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, J.L.M.; Clarke, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper aims to outline the current state-of-the-art in integrated building simulation for performance prediction of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The ESP-r system is used as an example where integrated simulation is a core philosophy behind the development. The

  4. Creativity as Action: Findings from Five Creative Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad eGlaveanu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter-subjective phenomenon. This framework, drawing extensively from the work of Dewey (1934 on art as experience, is used to derive a coding frame for the analysis of interview material. The article reports findings from the analysis of 60 interviews with recognised French creators in five creative domains: art, design, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not ‘inside’ individual creators but ‘in between’ actors and their environment. Implications for the field of educational psychology are discussed.

  5. Integrating Art into Places in Transition - Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembeza, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Among the many projects realized in public spaces, some are truly unique - and these are the ones that build the identity of a place. The aim of this paper is to examine how integrating art and cultural strategies into public space can enhance and reinforce the sense of a place. Particular attention is devoted to urban spaces that we call “places in transition”, where public art improves the city’s imaginative capacity, enlivens neighbourhoods, and sparks civic exchange. Research methods include multidisciplinary literature studies and a detailed case study of the Rose Kennedy Greenway (RKG) - a contemporary urban park in Boston, USA, intended to stitch together the various neighbourhoods surrounding downtown. The Greenway is also a place in transition, to which the Conservancy introduces innovative and contemporary art through temporary exhibitions, engaging people in experiences, interactions and dialogue with art. The five-year Public Art Strategy was supported by Fund for the Arts, a public art program of the New England Foundation for the Arts. The main vision of the project is to amplify the Greenway’s unique characteristic through art that is connective, innovative, and celebratory. There are the two main types of projects within the Public Art Strategy for the RKG: short-term projects called “Platforms” and long-term projects called “Magnets”. The particular conceptual framework is being developed to guide proposals: connection, interactivity, civic dialogue, ecology, and the environment. The article examines the case and analyses the important issues related to implementing art into a public space such as re-imagining places, short-term and long-term artistic interventions, arts and cultural programming.

  6. Editorial Board Thoughts: Arts into Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – STEAM, Creative Abrasion, and the Opportunity in Libraries Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Tod Colegrove

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available By actively seeking out opportunities to bring art into traditionally STEM-focused activity, and vice-versa, we are deliberately increasing the diversity of the environment. Makerspace services and activities, to the extent they are open and visibly accessible to all, are a natural for the spontaneous development of trans-disciplinary collaboration. Within the spaces of the library, opportunities to connect individuals around shared avocational interest might range from music and spontaneous performance areas to spaces salted with LEGO bricks and jigsaw puzzles; the potential connections between our resources and the members of our communities are as diverse as their interests. Indeed, when a practitioner from one discipline can interact and engage with others from across the STEAM spectrum, the world becomes a richer place – and maybe, just maybe, we can fan the flames of curiosity along the way.

  7. Accessing Both Halves of the Brain to Make Climate Decisions: How Community-Sourced Media, Earth Remote Sensing Data, and Creative Placemaking Art Can Cultivate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, J. K.; Wagner, L.

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making, science tells us, accesses multiple parts of the brain: both logic and data as well as memory and emotion. It is this mix of signals that propels individuals and communities to act. Founded in 2012, ISeeChange is the nation's first community crowdsourced climate and weather journal that empowers users to document environmental changes with others and discuss the impacts over time. Our neighborhood investigation methodology includes residents documenting their personal experiences alongside collected data, Earth remote sensing data, and local artists interpreting community questions and experiences into place-based public art in the neighborhood to inspire a culture of resilience and climate literacy. ISeeChange connects the public with national media, scientists, and data tools that support community dialogue and enable collaborative science and journalism investigations about our changing environment. Our groundbreaking environmental reporting platform—available online and through a mobile app—personalizes and tracks climate change from the perspective of every day experiences, bringing Eearth science home and into the placesspaces people know best and trust most- their own communities Our session will focus on our newest neighborhood pilot program in New Orleans, furthering the climate resilience, green infrastructure, and creative placemaking efforts of the Trust for Public Land, the City of New Orleans, and other resilience community partners.

  8. Into the Curriculum. Creative Dramatics: Valentine Lip Sync Book Charades; Language Arts/Social Studies: Found Poetry from Primary Sources; Reading/Language Arts: A Thematic Activity To Herald in the New Year; Science: Asian Elephant Life Cycles; Social Studies: Conservation of Animal Species-Asian Elephants; Social Studies: What Makes a Leader?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugar, Candace; Robinson, Alice A.

    2003-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in creative dramatics, language arts, social studies, reading, and science. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activities and procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for…

  9. Creativity in phenomenological methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Pia; Martinsen, Bente; Norlyk, Annelise

    2014-01-01

    on the methodologies of van Manen, Dahlberg, Lindseth & Norberg, the aim of this paper is to argue that the increased focus on creativity and arts in research methodology is valuable to gain a deeper insight into lived experiences. We illustrate this point through examples from empirical nursing studies, and discuss......Nursing research is often concerned with lived experiences in human life using phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches. These empirical studies may use different creative expressions and art-forms to describe and enhance an embodied and personalised understanding of lived experiences. Drawing...... may support a respectful renewal of phenomenological research traditions in nursing research....

  10. Evaluation of the Kòts'iìhtła (“We Light the Fire” Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Fanian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The creative arts – music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others – are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop’s areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Design: Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Results: Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Conclusions: Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North.

  11. Evaluation of the Kòts'iìhtła ("We Light the Fire") Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The creative arts - music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others - are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop's areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North.

  12. Evaluation of the K[Formula: see text]ts'iìhtła ("We Light the Fire") Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The creative arts - music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others - are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop's areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Design Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Results Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Conclusions Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North.

  13. Integration of art and culture to develop the hotel business in North-eastern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Sereerat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative investigation had three research aims: 1 To study the history and background of the hotel industry in Isan; 2 To study the current situation and problems with using art in order to develop the tourism industry in Thailand; 3 To study the integration of art and culture to develop the hotel business in North-eastern Thailand. Nine hotels were selected from four provinces in North-eastern Thailand as the research population and the research sample was composed of 86 individuals. Tools used for data collection were survey, observation, interview, focus group discussion and workshop. Results show that hoteliers in North-eastern Thailand developed their businesses as a reaction to the economic crisis and failing trade. To attract more tourists to the region, hotel managers integrated traditional Thai art to their businesses, especially local Isan art. This investigation of nine hotels in Isan identified nine areas in which art has been integrated into hotel businesses. These are paintings, sculptures, architecture, literature, music and dance , the four Buddhist necessities of life (food, accommodation, clothing and medicine, beliefs, customs and ceremonies. By integrating elements of each of these categories into their hotels, business owners and managers have been able to generate extra trade.

  14. Integration of art and culture to develop the hotel business in North-eastern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Sereerat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative investigation had three research aims: 1 To study the history and background of the hotel industry in Isan; 2 To study the current situation and problems with using art in order to develop the tourism industry in Thailand; 3 To study the integration of art and culture to develop the hotel business in North-eastern Thailand. Nine hotels were selected from four provinces in North-eastern Thailand as the research population and the research sample was composed of 86 individuals. Tools used for data collection were survey, observation, interview, focus group discussion and workshop. Results show that hoteliers in North-eastern Thailand developed their businesses as a reaction to the economic crisis and failing trade. To attract more tourists to the region, hotel managers integrated traditional Thai art to their businesses, especially local Isan art. This investigation of nine hotels in Isan identified nine areas in which art has been integrated into hotel businesses. These are paintings, sculptures, architecture, literature, music and dance , the four Buddhist necessities of life (food, accommodation, clothing and medicine, beliefs, customs and ceremonies. By integrating elements of each of these categories into their hotels, business owners and managers have been able to generate extra trade

  15. Creativity and group innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2002-01-01

    Comments on M. West's article regarding the validity of an integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups. Variables affecting the level of team innovation; Relationship between predictors and team innovation; Promotion of constructive conflict.

  16. EFFECT OF SHORT-TERM ART INTERRUPTION ON LEVELS OF INTEGRATED HIV DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strongin, Zachary; Sharaf, Radwa; VanBelzen, D Jake; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Connick, Elizabeth; Volberding, Paul; Skiest, Daniel J; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; O'Doherty, Una; Li, Jonathan Z

    2018-03-28

    Analytic treatment interruption (ATI) studies are required to evaluate strategies aimed at achieving ART-free HIV remission, but the impact of ATI on the viral reservoir remains unclear. We validated a DNA size selection-based assay for measuring levels of integrated HIV DNA and applied it to assess the effects of short-term ATI on the HIV reservoir. Samples from participants from four AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) ATI studies were assayed for integrated HIV DNA levels. Cryopreserved PBMCs were obtained for 12 participants with available samples pre-ATI and approximately 6 months after ART resumption. Four participants also had samples available during the ATI. The median duration of ATI was 12 weeks. Validation of the HIV Integrated DNA size-Exclusion (HIDE) assay was performed using samples spiked with unintegrated HIV DNA, HIV-infected cell lines, and participant PBMCs. The HIDE assay eliminated 99% of unintegrated HIV DNA species and strongly correlated with the established Alu- gag assay. For the majority of individuals, integrated DNA levels increased during ATI and subsequently declined upon ART resumption. There was no significant difference in levels of integrated HIV DNA between the pre- and post-ATI time points, with the median ratio of post:pre-ATI HIV DNA levels of 0.95. Using a new integrated HIV DNA assay, we found minimal change in the levels of integrated HIV DNA in participants who underwent an ATI followed by 6 months of ART. This suggests that short-term ATI can be conducted without a significant impact on levels of integrated proviral DNA in the peripheral blood. IMPORTANCE Interventions aimed at achieving sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART)-free HIV remission require treatment interruption trials to assess their efficacy. However, these trials are accompanied by safety concerns related to the expansion of the viral reservoir. We validated an assay that uses an automated DNA size-selection platform for quantifying levels of integrated

  17. Comparison of Syllabi and Inclusion of Recommendations for Interdisciplinary Integration of Visual Arts Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Birsa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We applied qualitative analysis to the syllabi of all subjects from the 1st up to the 5th grade of basic school in Slovenia in order to find out in what ways they contain recommendations for interdisciplinary integration. We classified them into three categories: references to subjects, implicit references, and explicit references. The classification into these categories has shown that certain concepts foreseen for integration with visual arts education in individual subjects for a certain grade or for a particular educational cycle cannot be found in the visual arts syllabus.

  18. Creative Trade for Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kabanda, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, international trade in creative goods and services has been expanding. But this upward march is not lifting all boats. Although many developing countries are endowed with vast cultural wealth, they still lag behind. In addition, women are not faring well. Much needs to be done to expand creative trade for human development. Suggestions here include implementing a Women Art...

  19. Brain and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliverio, A.

    Creativity can be considered from different points of view. Afirst possibility is to trace its natural history in mammals, mostly in non human primates. A second one is to consider mental processes, such as analogies, that may result in creative associations as evident in many fields, from arts to sciences. These two approaches lead to a better understanding of cognitive systems at the roots of creative behaviour. A third strategy relies on an analysis of primary and secondary states of mind characterizing flow and creativity. Flow, the mental state of operation in which a person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing, typical of intense problem solving activities, has been explained in terms of reduced prefrontal activity. While it is not difficult to carry out tests of problem solving activity, creativity is much more elusive and it is not easy to measure it. Thus, flow has often been simplistically assimilated to creativity and it has been assumed that also creati ve performance depends on low prefrontal activity. It is instead proposed that creativity involves two consecutive steps: 1. Generation of novelty, mostly in the ventral striatum. 2. Analysis of novelty by the prefrontal cortex that transforms it into creative behaviour. The emergence of creativity has been explained through a Darwinian process based upon the classic variation-selection procedure. Thus, basal ganglia, with their implicit strategies and memories, may be regarded as a mechanism that continuously generates novelty (variation) while the prefrontal cortex, possibly its dorsolateral areas, may be considered as the computational mechanism that transforms novelty (selection) into explicit creative behaviours.

  20. The Mirror and the Canyon: Reflected Images, Echoed Voices How Evidence of GW's Performing Arts Integration Model Is Used to Build Support for Arts Education Integration and to Promote Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrodt, John Charles; Fico, Maria; Harnett, Susanne; Ramsey, Lori Gerstein; Lopez, Angelina

    2014-01-01

    The Global Writes (GW) model is a well-designed performing arts integrated literacy program that builds local and global support among students, teachers, and arts partners through the use of innovative technologies. Through local partnerships between schools and arts organizations forged by GW, classroom teachers and local teaching artists build…

  1. Decorative Integration or Relevant Learning? A Literature Review of Studio Arts-Based Management Education with Recommendations for Teaching and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Buonincontro, Jen

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a synthesis of the state of arts-based management education scholarship, with teaching and research recommendations. To begin, the lack of creativity and empathy development in management students is presented. Next, literature-based descriptions of arts-based management exercises focus on how to use improvisational theatre,…

  2. Converging Paths: Creativity Research and Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Michael Hanchett

    2014-01-01

    Education has long been a central issue for creativity research, and the integration of creativity and education has remained a goal and controversy. In spite of over sixty years of trying to bring creativity into education, education is often criticized for not teaching creative thinking, while also criticized from other quarters for not meeting…

  3. Incorporating the Creative Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endrissat, Nada; Kärreman, Dan; Noppeney, Claus

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of branding, identity and control. It develops the notion of identity-incentive branding and links research on the collective-associative construction of occupational identities with work on identity incentives as an engaging form of control. Empirically, we...... draw on a case study of a North American grocery chain that is known for employing art-school graduates and other creative talents in creative (store artist) and non-creative shop-floor positions. The study shows that the brand is partly built outside–in through association with employees who embody...... brand-relevant characteristics in their identities and lifestyles. In return, those employees receive identity opportunities to validate their desired sense of self as ‘creative subject’. We discuss the dual nature of identity-incentive branding as neo-normative control and outline its implications...

  4. Entrepreneurship in Creative Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Černevičiūtė

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Creative industries topic is closely related to the art markets in a variety of mediation forms. Traditional business entrepreneurship is risk-related activities implementing innovations in markets, and generating economic growth. The creative industry area has plenty of innovation, but its acceptance is more complex because of the cultural world’s participants’ agreements. Cultural world has its own social organization, associated with the mediation (including entrepreneurship types. The article examines the concept of entrepreneurship in the traditional business and creative industries and types of innovation and mediation (including entrepreneurship. The conclusion is that types of intermediary in creative industries depend on the cultural world’s social organization, and forms of mediation are more heterogeneous than in the traditional business. 

  5. Cultivating Common Ground: Integrating Standards-Based Visual Arts, Math and Literacy in High-Poverty Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, Marisol; Kantrowitz, Andrea; Harnett, Susanne; Hill-Ries, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The "Framing Student Success: Connecting Rigorous Visual Arts, Math and Literacy Learning" experimental demonstration project was designed to develop and test an instructional program integrating high-quality, standards-based instruction in the visual arts, math, and literacy. Developed and implemented by arts-in-education organization…

  6. Arts Integration: A Strategy to Improve Teaching and Learning, Promote Personal Competencies, and Turn Around Low-Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscoe, Belinda; Wilson, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    This paper connects the dots between arts integration, students' personal competencies, and school turnaround. Its thesis is that by intertwining art forms and methods with content in all subject areas, students learn more about art and the other subjects and build their personal competencies for learning. The paper includes the story of an…

  7. Literacy and Arts-Integrated Science Lessons Engage Urban Elementary Students in Exploring Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P.; Elser, C. F.; Klein, J. L.; Rule, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive case study examined student attitudes, writing skills and content knowledge of urban fourth and fifth graders (6 males, 9 female) during a six-week literacy, thinking skill, and art-integrated environmental science unit. Pre- and post-test questions were used to address knowledge of environmental problems and student environmental…

  8. Middle Level Preservice Teachers Experience a Natural History Arts-Integrated Interdisciplinary Thematic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn A.; Rule, Audrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Curricular demands and best practices for middle school require interdisciplinary units. Arts integration can provide motivation and a new pathway to learning. This unit focused on inquiry into the natural history of artifacts and rocks recovered from the exposed subsoil of an area near Cedar Falls, Iowa that had been bulldozed as part of…

  9. Integrated Arts-Based Teaching (IAT) Model for Brain-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inocian, Reynaldo B.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes teaching strategies among the eight books in Principles and Methods of Teaching recommended for use in the College of Teacher Education in the Philippines. It seeks to answer the following objectives: (1) identify the most commonly used teaching strategies congruent with the integrated arts-based teaching (IAT) and (2) design…

  10. Egyptian Art: An Integrated Curriculum Guide for the Intermediate and Middle School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Ann Heidt, Ed.

    This curriculum guide offers instructional materials to integrate the study of ancient Egyptian art across the curriculum. It is designed to be used in coordination with a student field trip to a related exhibit at the San Diego (California) Museum of Man. Materials can be adapted for use independent of the exhibition. Designed for students and…

  11. Developing Integrated Arts Curriculum in Hong Kong: Chaos Theory at Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marina

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the development of integrated arts curriculum in two Hong Kong secondary schools over a 9-year period. Initial findings display a range of individual responses to educational change that are both non-predictable and non-linear. Chaos theory is used to explain these varied responses in terms of bifurcations. The findings of…

  12. A New Proposal on Analysis of Artistic Creativity through Introspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre d’Argyll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The genesis of the creative process in Art is currently conceived as the intellectual selection by the artist of fragments of memory from her/his personal, cultural and emotional experience. Interpretation of the artistic object has been systematically developed from an external perspective of art history, literature, and fine arts or of medicine and psychology. Recent neurological findings on the molecular nature of memory have revolutioned the knowledge of the mental process of memorization, remembrance and creative synthesis. A movement of scientists defends the necessity of new tools to access mental processes, inherently subjective, such as artistic creativity. In the light of those evidences, we propose a new approach to the artwork starting from a first-person analysis, namely introspection, which offers an interpretation of the genesis of the artwork from his/her own memory. The scientific, philosophical and social background on the neuropsychological processes guiding the creative activity is reviewed. Our purpose is to integrate the previous approaches from a wide multidisciplinary perspective, and to pose a new reflection on how the autobiographical and intertextual data from the artist are modeled in a dynamic way in the complex net of mental interactions up to reach the creation of an artwork, which highlights an original new vision on the reading of art. This insight from first-person analysis might complement and enrich other analyses external to the artist.

  13. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Despite more than half a century of psychological research on creativity we are still far from a clear understanding of the creative process, its antecedents and consequences and, most of all, the ways in which we can effectively support creativity. This is primarily due to a narrow focus...... on creative individuals isolated from culture and society. Rethinking Creativity proposes a fundamental review of this position and argues that creativity is not only a psychological but a sociocultural phenomenon. This edited volume aims to relocate creativity from inside individual minds to the material......, symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...

  14. Creative Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is creative. That creativity expresses in myriad ways – as moments in time in which decades of progress can be achieved overnight, as organizational innovations of immense power for social accomplishment; as creative social values that further influence the evolution of organizations and society; as the creativity of individuality in the leader, genius, artist and inventor; as social creativity that converts raw human experience into civilization; as cultural creativity that transforms human relationships into sources of rich emotional capacity; and as value-based educational creativity that can awaken and nurture young minds to develop and discover their own inherent capacity for knowledge in freedom. Through such moments do society and humanity evolve. Education is society’s most advanced institution for conscious social evolution. Values are the essence of society’s knowledge for highest accomplishment. Education that imparts values is an evolutionary social organization that can hasten the emergence of that creative consciousness.

  15. Using Creative Group Techniques in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Laura J.; Gladding, Samuel T.

    2007-01-01

    Groups in high schools that use creative techniques help adolescents express their emotions appropriately, behave differently, and gain insight into themselves and others. This article looks at seven different creative arts media--music, movement, visual art, literature, drama, play, and humor--and offers examples of how they can be used in groups…

  16. The nature of creativity in craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2012-01-01

    The present article explores the nature of creativity in craft and does so with the help of a case study of traditional Easter egg decoration. It starts by positioning the domain of folk art in relation to fine art and within a larger category of everyday life forms of creative expression...

  17. Self-Imposed Creativity Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This dissertation epitomizes three years of research guided by the research question: how can we conceptualize creative self-binding as a resource in art and design processes? Concretely, the dissertation seeks to offer insight into the puzzling observation that highly skilled creative...... practitioners sometimes freely and intentionally impose rigid rules, peculiar principles, and other kinds of creative obstructions on themselves as a means to spur momentum in the process and reach a distinctly original outcome. To investigate this the dissertation is composed of four papers (Part II) framed...... of analysis. Informed by the insight that constraints both enable and restrain creative agency, the dissertation’s main contention is that creative self- binding may profitably be conceptualized as the exercise of self-imposed creativity constraints. Thus, the dissertation marks an analytical move from vague...

  18. Unforgettable art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Moratilla Pérez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Humanity and Art make an indissoluble marriage, it is impossible to comprehend one without the other. Even before producing the first musical instrument, humanity already sang; before using a canvas, humans painted on the walls of a cave. Creative manifestations invariably take place in “poverty and wealth”, but also in “sickness and health”. In this article we introduce the reader to the subject of art and dementia, highlighting the creative potential of patients, and including examples of educational programmes that some museums develop for people with this condition.

  19. Drawing Breath: Creative Elements and Their Exile from Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison

    2010-01-01

    We are all creative now. Where once creativity was thought to be the preserve of the arts and humanities, we now find creativity has become a ubiquitous aim of higher education in the twenty-first century. Our ills will be resolved as long as we can release our latent creativity and perform. The discourse of higher education strategic management…

  20. Distributed creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    This book challenges the standard view that creativity comes only from within an individual by arguing that creativity also exists ‘outside’ of the mind or more precisely, that the human mind extends through the means of action into the world. The notion of ‘distributed creativity’ is not commonly...... used within the literature and yet it has the potential to revolutionise the way we think about creativity, from how we define and measure it to what we can practically do to foster and develop creativity. Drawing on cultural psychology, ecological psychology and advances in cognitive science......, this book offers a basic framework for the study of distributed creativity that considers three main dimensions of creative work: sociality, materiality and temporality. Starting from the premise that creativity is distributed between people, between people and objects and across time, the book reviews...

  1. Investigating the Synergy of Critical Thinking and Creative Thinking in the Course of Integrated Activity in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yulin; Li, Bei-Di; Chen, Hsueh-Chih; Chiu, Fa-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The relationship lying between critical thinking and creative thinking is opposite or complementary, results of previous relevant researches have not yet concluded. However, most of researches put the effort to compare the respective effect of the thinking methods, either the teaching of creative thinking or that of critical thinking. Less of them…

  2. 2. The Openness of the Visual Art Curriculum towards a New Visual Art Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprotosoaie-Iftimi Ana-Maria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Visual art curriculum should allow a wide range of activities to develop children's imagination and creativity, to provide a balanced framework for the harmonious development of people who can cope with the massive ammount of images that invade our daily lives. Contemporary art develops a new language - a hybrid language - which for now remains unknown to the majority of the public and it is not integrated into the Arts curriculum. General frame analysis reveals that Fine Arts are studied only up to the 10th grade, except for the humanity profile and for the vocational arts profile. School curricula stipulate fine arts study up to mid twentieth century. Openness towards contemporary art and the language of art starting with the second half of the twentieth century is quite limited even if the curriculum allows a certain flexibility in the approach.

  3. Integrated Conservation of the Cantonese Opera Art Museum and Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cantonese Opera, as the sole cultural heritage of Guangdong Province of China so far, which was included in the World Intangible Cultural Heritage List by the UNESCO, bears the cultural memory of the Lingnan region and as well as the overseas Chinese worldwide. Located in the core historic urban area – Enning Road of Guangzhou, the Cantonese Opera Art Museum is designed in Lingnan traditional garden manner, through going deep into the Cantonese opera culture, Lingnan traditional garden culture and Lingnan cultural spirit. The design highlights the integrated conservation of tangible and intangible cultural heritage, to protect living history and build the historical environment and place spirit for the intangible cultural heritage. The Cantonese Opera Art Museum is not only a tangible space for exhibition, study, education and display of the Cantonese Opera art, but also a cultural space with the Lingnan cultural memory, gathering the Lingnan intangible heritage and closely linked with current life of successors and ordinary people.

  4. Homo creator: facet of creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Grekova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to highlight the essence of the concepts of «creativity» and «creative person». We give a definition of «Homo creator», which is treated as a creative person. For definition of creativity as a term analyzes existing in modern and ancient philosophical literature interpretation. «Homo creator» is analyzed as a person free from fears and experiences, some of the faces and boundaries that limit a person; active, open, proactive and creative person can create something new and unknown; constantly provides further restructuring of nature, creates a new objective environment in which developing human civilization and nature. Outlined the phenomenon of creativity as a complex complex phenomenon. It is proved that creativity is a social and cultural phenomenon that is focused basically on something new and expressing the present culture. Creativity - a special quality of that belongs to man as a social being and promotes change and development in all spheres of public life and undoubtedly overcomes various crisis conditions and situations that pose basic questions of human existence and the meaning of its relationships with the outside world . The phenomenon of creativity as an option to overcome the existential crisis of identity. The problem of studying the influence of modern art to overcome the «boundary» conditions of human life and further reflection on existential experiences of her creative life position is relevant to the subject of scientific research.

  5. Intersecting Interests: Qualitative Research Synthesis on Art in the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbi, Samantha; Cowell, Amanda; Perreault-Laird, Jordyn; El-Lahib, Yahya; Straka, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative research synthesis that explored the intersections between art and social work. The scholarship notes a rise in interest in integrating creative arts practices in social work classrooms from assignment design to classroom activities. Also highlighted are the potential contributions of these artsinformed…

  6. Constituents of Music and Visual-Art Related Pleasure - A Critical Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiihonen, Marianne; Brattico, Elvira; Maksimainen, Johanna; Wikgren, Jan; Saarikallio, Suvi

    2017-01-01

    The present literature review investigated how pleasure induced by music and visual-art has been conceptually understood in empirical research over the past 20 years. After an initial selection of abstracts from seven databases (keywords: pleasure, reward, enjoyment, and hedonic), twenty music and eleven visual-art papers were systematically compared. The following questions were addressed: (1) What is the role of the keyword in the research question? (2) Is pleasure considered a result of variation in the perceiver's internal or external attributes? (3) What are the most commonly employed methods and main variables in empirical settings? Based on these questions, our critical integrative analysis aimed to identify which themes and processes emerged as key features for conceptualizing art-induced pleasure. The results demonstrated great variance in how pleasure has been approached: In the music studies pleasure was often a clear object of investigation, whereas in the visual-art studies the term was often embedded into the context of an aesthetic experience, or used otherwise in a descriptive, indirect sense. Music studies often targeted different emotions, their intensity or anhedonia. Biographical and background variables and personality traits of the perceiver were often measured. Next to behavioral methods, a common method was brain imaging which often targeted the reward circuitry of the brain in response to music. Visual-art pleasure was also frequently addressed using brain imaging methods, but the research focused on sensory cortices rather than the reward circuit alone. Compared with music research, visual-art research investigated more frequently pleasure in relation to conscious, cognitive processing, where the variations of stimulus features and the changing of viewing modes were regarded as explanatory factors of the derived experience. Despite valence being frequently applied in both domains, we conclude, that in empirical music research pleasure

  7. Constituents of Music and Visual-Art Related Pleasure – A Critical Integrative Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Tiihonen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present literature review investigated how pleasure induced by music and visual-art has been conceptually understood in empirical research over the past 20 years. After an initial selection of abstracts from seven databases (keywords: pleasure, reward, enjoyment, and hedonic, twenty music and eleven visual-art papers were systematically compared. The following questions were addressed: (1 What is the role of the keyword in the research question? (2 Is pleasure considered a result of variation in the perceiver’s internal or external attributes? (3 What are the most commonly employed methods and main variables in empirical settings? Based on these questions, our critical integrative analysis aimed to identify which themes and processes emerged as key features for conceptualizing art-induced pleasure. The results demonstrated great variance in how pleasure has been approached: In the music studies pleasure was often a clear object of investigation, whereas in the visual-art studies the term was often embedded into the context of an aesthetic experience, or used otherwise in a descriptive, indirect sense. Music studies often targeted different emotions, their intensity or anhedonia. Biographical and background variables and personality traits of the perceiver were often measured. Next to behavioral methods, a common method was brain imaging which often targeted the reward circuitry of the brain in response to music. Visual-art pleasure was also frequently addressed using brain imaging methods, but the research focused on sensory cortices rather than the reward circuit alone. Compared with music research, visual-art research investigated more frequently pleasure in relation to conscious, cognitive processing, where the variations of stimulus features and the changing of viewing modes were regarded as explanatory factors of the derived experience. Despite valence being frequently applied in both domains, we conclude, that in empirical music

  8. Constituents of Music and Visual-Art Related Pleasure – A Critical Integrative Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiihonen, Marianne; Brattico, Elvira; Maksimainen, Johanna; Wikgren, Jan; Saarikallio, Suvi

    2017-01-01

    The present literature review investigated how pleasure induced by music and visual-art has been conceptually understood in empirical research over the past 20 years. After an initial selection of abstracts from seven databases (keywords: pleasure, reward, enjoyment, and hedonic), twenty music and eleven visual-art papers were systematically compared. The following questions were addressed: (1) What is the role of the keyword in the research question? (2) Is pleasure considered a result of variation in the perceiver’s internal or external attributes? (3) What are the most commonly employed methods and main variables in empirical settings? Based on these questions, our critical integrative analysis aimed to identify which themes and processes emerged as key features for conceptualizing art-induced pleasure. The results demonstrated great variance in how pleasure has been approached: In the music studies pleasure was often a clear object of investigation, whereas in the visual-art studies the term was often embedded into the context of an aesthetic experience, or used otherwise in a descriptive, indirect sense. Music studies often targeted different emotions, their intensity or anhedonia. Biographical and background variables and personality traits of the perceiver were often measured. Next to behavioral methods, a common method was brain imaging which often targeted the reward circuitry of the brain in response to music. Visual-art pleasure was also frequently addressed using brain imaging methods, but the research focused on sensory cortices rather than the reward circuit alone. Compared with music research, visual-art research investigated more frequently pleasure in relation to conscious, cognitive processing, where the variations of stimulus features and the changing of viewing modes were regarded as explanatory factors of the derived experience. Despite valence being frequently applied in both domains, we conclude, that in empirical music research pleasure

  9. Building a Peaceful Society: Creative Integration of Peace Education. Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Laura

    2011-01-01

    To truly move toward a more peaceful society, it is imperative that peace education better address structural and institutional violence. This requires that it be integrated into institutions outside of schools and universities. Doing so will be challenging, as many of these institutions are structured on domination and control, not on partnership…

  10. Assessing the state of the art in biomedical relation extraction: overview of the BioCreative V chemical-disease relation (CDR) task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Peng, Yifan; Leaman, Robert; Davis, Allan Peter; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Li, Jiao; Wiegers, Thomas C; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Manually curating chemicals, diseases and their relationships is significantly important to biomedical research, but it is plagued by its high cost and the rapid growth of the biomedical literature. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing computational approaches for automatic chemical-disease relation (CDR) extraction. Despite these attempts, the lack of a comprehensive benchmarking dataset has limited the comparison of different techniques in order to assess and advance the current state-of-the-art. To this end, we organized a challenge task through BioCreative V to automatically extract CDRs from the literature. We designed two challenge tasks: disease named entity recognition (DNER) and chemical-induced disease (CID) relation extraction. To assist system development and assessment, we created a large annotated text corpus that consisted of human annotations of chemicals, diseases and their interactions from 1500 PubMed articles. 34 teams worldwide participated in the CDR task: 16 (DNER) and 18 (CID). The best systems achieved an F-score of 86.46% for the DNER task--a result that approaches the human inter-annotator agreement (0.8875)--and an F-score of 57.03% for the CID task, the highest results ever reported for such tasks. When combining team results via machine learning, the ensemble system was able to further improve over the best team results by achieving 88.89% and 62.80% in F-score for the DNER and CID task, respectively. Additionally, another novel aspect of our evaluation is to test each participating system's ability to return real-time results: the average response time for each team's DNER and CID web service systems were 5.6 and 9.3 s, respectively. Most teams used hybrid systems for their submissions based on machining learning. Given the level of participation and results, we found our task to be successful in engaging the text-mining research community, producing a large annotated corpus and improving the results of

  11. CREATIVE ASPECTS OF USAGE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN DESIGNER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A Polishchuk

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic approaches to the use of information technologies in educational process of visual art and design are analysed in the article. Methodological aspects of ICT integration and the artistic and educational activity as well as difficulties regarding the development of teaching materials for professional thinking formation and development of the creative person are considered.

  12. Measuring Creative Imagery Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M. Jankowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA, developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail, originality (the ability to produce unique imagery, and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery. TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of eight studies on a total sample of more than 1,700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument’s validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science.

  13. Brain structure links everyday creativity to creative achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenfeng; Chen, Qunlin; Tang, Chaoying; Cao, Guikang; Hou, Yuling; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Although creativity is commonly considered to be a cornerstone of human progress and vital to all realms of our lives, its neural basis remains elusive, partly due to the different tasks and measurement methods applied in research. In particular, the neural correlates of everyday creativity that can be experienced by everyone, to some extent, are still unexplored. The present study was designed to investigate the brain structure underlying individual differences in everyday creativity, as measured by the Creative Behavioral Inventory (CBI) (N=163). The results revealed that more creative activities were significantly and positively associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the regional premotor cortex (PMC), which is a motor planning area involved in the creation and selection of novel actions and inhibition. In addition, the gray volume of the PMC had a significant positive relationship with creative achievement and Art scores, which supports the notion that training and practice may induce changes in brain structures. These results indicate that everyday creativity is linked to the PMC and that PMC volume can predict creative achievement, supporting the view that motor planning may play a crucial role in creative behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Art School

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Art School is a body of research that focuses on the pedagogical environment and the conditions of creative thinking & material making. The outputs are films that embed reflexivity in their concept, process and form, further contextualised through International talks, events and curated screenings about Art School and the nature of artist’s process and pedagogy. The underlying research questions also address the significance of artist’s processes within the contemporary political and cultur...

  15. Rethinking Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , symbolic and social world of culture. It brings together eminent social and cultural psychologists who study dynamic, transformative and emergent phenomena, and invites them to conceptualise creativity in ways that depart from mainstream definitions and theoretical models existing in past and present...... and the lives of those around them. It will be of key interest to both social and cultural psychologists, as well as to creativity researchers and those who, as part of their personal or professional life, try to understand creativity and develop creative forms of expression....

  16. Mind, Thinking and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Global civilization is the product of diverse cultures, each contributing a unique perspective arising from the development of different mental faculties and powers of mind. The momentous achievements of modern science are the result of the cumulative development of mind’s capacity for analytic thinking, mathematical rendering and experimental validation. The near-exclusive preoccupation with analysis, universal laws, mechanism, materialism, and objective experience over the past two centuries has shaped the world we live in today, accounting both for its accomplishments and its insoluble problems. Today humanity confronts complex challenges that defy solution by piecemeal analysis, unidimensional theories, and fragmented strategies. Poverty, unemployment, economic crisis, fundamentalism, violence, climate change, war, refugees, reflect the limitations and blindspots that have resulted from a partial, one-sided application of the diverse capacities of the human mind. Human monocultures suffer from all the limitations as their biological counterparts. There is urgent need to revive the legitimacy of synthetic, organic and integrated modes of thinking, to restore the credibility of subjective self-experience in science, to reaffirm the place of symbol, analogy and metaphor as valid ways of knowing and communication in education, to recognize the unique role of the individual in social processes, to recognize the central role of insight and intuition in science as in art. This article examines themes presented at the WAAS-WUC course on Mind, Thinking and Creativity, conducted at Dubrovnik in April 2016.

  17. Using New-Antiquarian Photographic Processes to Integrate Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, J.

    2017-12-01

    In this session we describe an interdisciplinary course, The Art and Science of Photography (ASP), and its accompanying textbook and associated project-based activities, offered at the University of Wisconsin - Fox Valley in Menasha, Wisconsin. ASP uses photography as a point of departure to inspire students to ask fundamental questions about the nature of art, and to consider physics and astronomy as part of the study of nature. In turn, aspects of art and physics/astronomy are chosen in part for their direct relevance to the fundamentals of photography. For example, the subtle nature of shadows on a sunny day is related to the geometry of eclipses.ASP is offered as a 4-credit lecture/lab/studio course, and the students have a choice of registration for either art or natural-science credit. A large majority of students register for natural-science credit, and we suggest that ASP may be particularly useful as an entry point for students who view themselves as lacking ability in the sciences.Combining art with science in an introductory course is a particularly fruitful way to increase student engagement, as there is a perception that to be "artistic" precludes success in science. But it is of equal importance that students sometimes perceive that being "science-minded" precludes success in art.Part of the aim of ASP is to integrate art and science to such a degree that a student is always doing both, while still maintaining the integrity and rigor of each discipline. Towards this end, we have developed several unique hands-on practices that often use antiquarian photographic processes in a new way.Some of these hybrid techniques are little known or not previously described. Yet they allow for unique artistic expression, while also highlighting - in a way that ordinary digital photography does not - prinicpals of the interaction between light, atmosphere, weather, and the physical photographic substrate. These newly-described processes are accessible and inexpensive

  18. Adoption of the Creative Process According to the Immersive Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Vuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The immersive method is a new concept of visual education that is better suited to the needs of students in contemporary post-industrial society. The features of the immersive method are: 1 it emerges from interaction with visual culture; 2 it encourages understanding of contemporary art (as an integral part of visual culture; and 3 it implements the strategies and processes of the dominant tendencies in contemporary art (new media art and relational art with the goal of adopting the creative process, expressing one’s thoughts and emotions, and communicating with the environment. The immersive method transfers the creative process from art to the process of creation by the students themselves. This occurs with the mediation of an algorithmic scheme that enables students to adopt ways to solve problems, to express thoughts and emotions, to develop ideas and to transfer these ideas to form, medium and material. The immersive method uses transfer in classes, the therapeutic aspect of art and “flow state” (the optimal experience of being immersed in an activity/aesthetic experience (a total experience that has a beginning, a process and a conclusion/immersive experience (comprehensive immersion in the present moment. This is a state leading to the sublimative effect of creation (identification with what has been expressed, as well as to self-actualisation. The immersive method teaches one to connect the context, social relations and the artwork as a whole in which one lives as an individual. The adopted creative process is implemented in a critical manner on one’s surrounding through analysis, aesthetic interventions, and ecologically and socially aware inclusion in the life of a community. The students gain the crucial meta-competence of a creative thinking process.

  19. ART integration in oral health care systems in Latin American countries as perceived by directors of oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to carry out a situation analysis of: a prevalence of ART training courses; b integration of ART into the oral healthcare systems and; c strengths and weaknesses of ART integration, in Latin American countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A structured questionnaire, consisting of 18 questions, was emailed to directors of national or regional oral health departments of all Latin American countries and the USA. For two countries that had not responded after 4 weeks, the questionnaire was sent to the Dean of each local Dental School. The questions were related to ART training courses, integration of ART in the dental curriculum and the oral healthcare system, barriers to ART implementation in the public health system and recommendations for ART implementation in the services. Factor analysis was used to construct one factor in the barrier-related question. Means and percentages were calculated. RESULTS: The response rate, covering 55% of all Latin American countries, was 76%. An ART training course had been given in all Latin American countries that responded, with more than 2 having been conducted in 64.7% of the respondent countries. ART was implemented in public oral health services in 94.7 % of the countries, according to the respondents. In 15.8% of the countries, ART was applied throughout the country and in 68.4%, in some areas or regions of a country. ART had been used for more, or less, than three years in 42.1% and 47.4% of the countries, respectively. Evaluation and monitoring activities to determine the effectiveness of ART restorations and ART sealants had been carried out in 42.1% of the countries, while evaluation training courses had taken place in only 3 countries (15.8%. Respondents perceived the "increase in the number of treated patients" as the major benefit of ART implementation in public oral health services. The major perceived barrier factors to ART implementation were "operator opinion" and "high

  20. Folklore, creativity, and cultural memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    the role of tradition and creativity in the life of a rural community. Egg decoration is an old custom, with pre-Christian roots, practiced extensively in the historical region of Bucovina, and relying on a complex system of material artefacts and symbolic elements acquired and enacted by artisans usually...... means the opposite of creativity but the actual vehicle of creative activity and its understanding as a stable cultural system ‘engraved’ in collective memory needs to be challenged. The tradition of egg decoration in Romania is a living and evolving social practice that engages the self and community......This paper addresses the question of how folk art can be, simultaneously, a vehicle for cultural memory and cultural creativity. It takes the case of Romanian Easter egg decoration as a practice situated at the intersection between art, folklore, religion and a growing market, it order to unpack...

  1. Integrating the Visual Arts Back into the Classroom with Mobile Applications: Teaching beyond the "Click and View" Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Buonincontro, Jen; Foster, Aroutis

    2013-01-01

    Teachers can use mobile applications to integrate the visual arts back into the classroom, but how? This article generates recommendations for selecting and using well-designed mobile applications in the visual arts beyond a "click and view " approach. Using quantitative content analysis, the results show the extent to which a sample of…

  2. Whence Creativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I explicate where my theoretical work on creativity has been and where it is going. I describe earlier three-facet and investment theories, as well as a propulsion model. I then describe my new triangular theory of creativity.

  3. Leveraging creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesike, Sascha; Gassmann, Oliver; Gassman, Oliver; Schweitzer, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Creativity describes the ability to rethink existing solutions, to combine existing ones with solutions used in other fields, or to imagine a new way of doing things, and as such, creativity represents the basis of innovation. But in many companies the thinking prevails that not every employee is

  4. The wisdom of nature in integrating science, ethics and the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, A

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with an approach to the integration of science (with technology and economics), ethics (with religion and mysticism), the arts (aesthetics) and Nature, in order to establish a world-view based on holistic, evolutionary ethics that could help with problem solving. The author suggests that this integration is possible with the aid of "Nature's wisdom" which is mirrored in the macroscopic pattern of the ecosphere. The corresponding eco-principles represent the basis for unifying soft and hard sciences resulting in "deep sciences". Deduction and induction will remain the methodology for deep sciences and will include conventional experiments and aesthetic and sentient experiences. Perception becomes the decisive factor with the senses as operators for the building of consciousness through the subconscious. In this paper, an attempt at integrating the concepts of the "true", the "right" and the "beautiful" with the aid of Nature's wisdom is explained in more detail along with consequences.

  5. Support for Arts Education. State Arts Agency Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Supporting lifelong learning in the arts is a top priority for state arts agencies. By supporting arts education in the schools, state arts agencies foster young imaginations, address core academic standards, and promote the critical thinking and creativity skills essential to a 21st century work force. State arts agencies also support…

  6. Creativity Development for Engineering Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Kolmos, Anette

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we outline two approaches to enhance creative skills in a PBL environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. The two strategies are respectively characterized by 1) integrating creativity training into curriculum and 2) introducing real life engineering projects for students. Two cases...

  7. Creativity in Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Bathje MS, OTR/L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Professor Sandra Edwards, MA, OTR/L, FOATA, and professor emerita at Western Michigan University (WMU, provided the cover art for the winter 2014 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. The oil painting, “Silent Witness, Cross Creek” was created over a period of two years. Professor Edwards has participated in many creative and artistic activities throughout her life, which have shaped her practice as an occupational therapist and her experience in life.

  8. Creativity: resource or risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aranguren

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to review some of the present perspectives and outstanding contributions that examine the relationship between creativity, psychopathology and psychological well-being. We know that creativity is a psychological process, which involves and integrates cognitive, volitional and emotional aspects of human behavior. In addition, creativity is associated with a greater flow of ideas, cognitive flexibility, ability to solve problems and originality (Guilford, 1956, 1968; Torrance, 1966, all qualities that lead to think of a better quality of life. Many of the humanist psychologists and others from the psychoanalytic stream stress that creativity is an element linked to sublimation, play, symbolic thought, transcendence and self-realization (Maslow, Rogers, Winnicott, Frankl, Freud, among others. However, many empirical studies show that highly creative individuals are more vulnerable to mental disorders, especially in the spectrum of mood disorders. Some current studies attempt to clarify the issue of creativity and psychopathology, taking into account different perspectives, which may explain the possible links between these two conceptual entities. The perspectives or contributions, which are considered in the present article to address this problem, are: (a the historical-social perspective, (b the contributions of psychometric studies and cognitive psychology, in relation to personality traits and cognitive styles, (c the “systemic” perspective or contributions from fractal geometry, and (d the contributions from positive psychology. 

  9. Transformative Performing Arts and Mentorship Pedagogy: Nurturing Developmental Relationships in a Multidisciplinary Dance Theatre Program for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary dance and theatre arts program geared for high school-aged youth can result in both short-term and the long-term outcomes for its students if it seeks to offer a life-changing peak experience as part of the arts training and performance process. By integrating a combination of dance, movement, theater, music, creative and…

  10. The Changing Face of Creativity in Australian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anne; Ammermann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditional ties between "arts" education (that is, discipline-based arts subjects and activities in schools) and an emergent notion of "creativity" in educational discourses and policy documents are loosening, with implications for both. While creativity seems to be on the ascent, the arts may not be as fortunate; creative…

  11. Dumbing down Art in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, David

    1993-01-01

    Argues that art education does not meet its objective of creativity and instead is replicative rather than original. Contends educational journals such as "Instructor" and "Good Apple" reduce fine art to its antithesis, popular art. Concludes that art educators must work diligently to protect fine art from becoming "dumb…

  12. Decentering the creative self: How others make creativity possible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lubart, Todd

    interact with a series of ‘gatekeepers’ specific for their domains while more distant others – the general public – are decisive in the case of music as a performance art. Conclusions: Others play a key formative, motivational, informational and regulatory role in the creative process. From internalised...... on a creator’s activity, and (b) what is the contribution others make to creative outcomes. Design: The study included 60 professional creators in France from the following domains: art, design, science, screenplay writing, and music composition. Methods: Participants were selected using convenience sampling...

  13. Behind the Scenes of Artistic Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana; Jensen, Julie Borup; Hersted, Lone

    , asking the question: how do artists create, learn, and organise their work? This book explores these questions by means of original empirical data (interviews with 22 artists) and theoretical research in the field of the arts and creativity from a learning perspective. Findings shed an original light...... on how artists learn and create, and how their creative learning and change processes come about, for instance when facilitating and leading creative processes....

  14. UWE: Engaging with industry, creatively [case study

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Professional practice and enterprise modules along with a graduate placement scheme prepare design and media students for employability in the creative sector.\\ud \\ud Responding to professional challenges facing graduates and UWE’s Employability Agenda, the Faculty of Creative Arts created an innovative senior academic post specialising in Employability and Creative Industry Liaison in 2007. Senior lecturer Adrienne Noonan works with Communication Design and Media courses on employability, te...

  15. Instrumentness for Creativity - Mediation, Materiality & Metonymy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    in use beyond what is initially designed for. The paper performs a conceptual investigation into qualities in software interfaces that support creativity, supported by analysis of, and interviews with, musical composers. Instrumentness is explained through discussions of materiality and metonymy...... as central strategies for computer mediated creativity. The paper is contributing to an investigation of the aesthetics of use in relation to software, pointing to alternative values, differing from traditional usability, which are also relevant in creative work outside art and music composition....

  16. Imagination in Creative Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiltschnig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This paper unpacks the notion of imagination presented in the I5-system of knowledge creation along several theoretical contributions and process models from “knowledge science”, creativity research and design studies. It aims at conceptual clarification and integration around the key notion...... of “insight moments” across various levels of abstraction from system perspectives through foci on groups and individuals to mental activity. This work is meant to serve as a conceptual foundation for micro-analyses of in-vivo data of creative design processes based on protocols of participatory ethnographic...

  17. Imagination in Creative Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiltschnig, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper unpacks the notion of imagination presented in the I5-system of knowledge creation along several theoretical contributions and process models from “knowledge science”, creativity research and design studies. It aims at conceptual clarification and integration around the key notion...... of “insight moments” across various levels of abstraction from system perspectives through foci on groups and individuals to mental activity. This work is meant to serve as a conceptual foundation for micro-analyses of in-vivo data of creative design processes based on protocols of participatory ethnographic...

  18. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  19. Scientific creativity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxenbaum, H

    1991-01-01

    Aside from possession of the relevant knowledge, skills, and intelligence, what seems to characterize the creative scientist is his imagination, originality, and ingenuity in combining existing knowledge into a new and unified scheme. This creativity frequently emerges from an aesthetic, poetic sense of freedom derived from work, an uninhibited playful activity of exploring a medium for its own sake. We speculate thus: With a preference for irregularities and disorder, the creative scientist temporarily takes leave of his senses, permitting expression of unconfigurated forces of his irrational unconscious. This amounts to a kind of internal "wagering," in which the scientist pits himself against uncertain circumstances, a situation in which his individual effort can be the deciding factor. When working on a difficult problem, there frequently occurs a "creative worrying" in which the problem is consciously and unconsciously carried around while doing other tasks. This period is attended by frustrations, tensions, and false inspirations. Dream and reality are wedded in a largely unconscious process of undefined emotional turmoil. When a uniquely gratifying association is realized, the unconscious deposits its collection of insights into the fringe consciousness, whereupon the full consciousness seizes on it and releases it as a flash of insight. Because the creative scientist possesses a strong and exacting self-concept, he can organize, integrate, and even exploit the conflict within himself. By compensating in fantasy for what is missing in reality, creativeness can be an expressive outlet ameliorating the universal, annoying split between a man's inner unconscious world and his outer conscious world. Although there is a divergence of opinion as to whether creativity can be taught, there is agreement that it can be fostered. However, parents, teachers, and institutions must display considerably more flexibility and tolerance towards individually minded persons who

  20. Effects of Evaluation Expectation on Artistic Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    Conditions are examined under which the imposition of an extrinsic constraint upon performance of an activity can lead to decrements in creativity. Female college students worked on an art activity either with or without the expectation of external evaluation. In addition, subjects were asked to focus upon either the creative or the technical…

  1. The Wasteland of Creative Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfstjerne, Michael Alexander

    2011-01-01

    in the art communities that thrive on the recent international recognition of Chinese artworks. It addresses some of the effects that occur when art production becomes mediated by cultural entrepreneurs and propelled by resourceful investors. Challenging notions of autonomy and independence in the sphere...... of aesthetics and contemporary art, the article addresses some of the ways in which art becomes co-opted, not only by commercial agents, but also by official ambitions. The commercialization of the cultural sphere reveals a paradigmatic shift, giving a stronger emphasis to the intangible notion of creativity...

  2. Music plus Music Integration: A Model for Music Education Policy Reform That Reflects the Evolution and Success of Arts Integration Practices in 21st Century American Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripp, Lawrence; Gilbert, Josh

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the special case of integrative teaching and learning in music as a model for 21st century music education policy reform based on the principles that have evolved out of arts integration research and practices over the past century and informed by the recent rising tide of evidence of music's impact on brain capacity and…

  3. Creativity@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Aren’t we innovative and creative people? Building complex accelerators and doing sophisticated physics analysis is not easy and requires a lot of excellent brains. Some items of hardware are pure works of art, worthy of a place in an art museum. Some software takes advantage of all the finesse of computer science to optimize every last bit of computing power. So, yes. We are. Innovation and creativity are our middle names.   But I wonder why these splendid characteristics are lost when dealing with passwords? Recent computer security scans have found a series of unprotected passwords and, I hope you agree, “Operator1”, “SamFox” or “Admin123” do not reflect our innovative nature (and might even be taken as an insult). I believe we can do much better than that and encourage you to be Creative@CERN! So take up this small challenge. I am sure you can do better than your colleagues! Your good password, however, must be private...

  4. Embracing Creativity in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen, MOT, OTR/L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jen Gash, an occupational therapist and creativity coach living in the UK, provided the cover art for the winter 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. The picture is titled “Over the Exe.” Jen uses her inspiration of the Kawa River model in this painting. The painting is of her husband and daughter standing where the river meets the sea. This is a metaphoric representation of rejoining the greater collective. In addition, Jen has a passion for occupational therapists to encompass creativity. A core aspect of occupational therapy is the multi-dimensional concept of occupations; it allows for occupational therapists to incorporate creativity into daily practice. Jen’s goal is for occupational therapy to embrace its creative theoretical roots.

  5. The Importance of Creativity in Family Therapy: A Preliminary Consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, David K.

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the importance of creativity in the context of family therapy. Examines creative techniques such as family sculpturing, family art therapy, puppetry, family drawings, and psychodrama. Focuses on the concept of creativity in prominent theories of counseling (i.e., humanistic, Gestalt, cognitive psychology) and the relation of divergent…

  6. [About creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2006-01-01

    The term 'creativity', meaning to produce something out of nothing, is not accurate. A definition that included the establishment, the founding or the introduction of something anew for the first time would be rather appropiate. The most accurate interpretation of the creativity process is the one proposed by Alfred Rothenberg which establishes the hypothesis that creativity is due to what he calls a 'janusian thinking' characterized by conceiving simultaneously two or more opposed ideas, images or concepts. Two examples illustrate such way of thinking: one is Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and the other is Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection. The overcome of a dualistic thinking while keeping full consciousnees, that is, the utilization of both the primary and the secondary processes postulated by Freud, would be the key to creative thinking. From a neurophysiological point of view, it is very likely that the right hemisphere is rather connected to creativity, given that it is a mental state that requires non-focalized attention, greater right hemisphere activation, and low levels of prefrontal cortical activation allowing cognitive inhibition.

  7. Visual art appreciation in Nigeria: The Zaria art society experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no doubt that one of the greatest creative impetuses injected into Nigerian art was made possible by, among other things, the activities of the first art institution in Nigeria to award a Diploma certificate in art, Nigerian College of Arts, Science and Technology (NCAST). NCAST started in 1953/54 at their Ibadan branch ...

  8. Art in Early Childhood Education Classrooms: An Invitation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Art is more or less a conceptual representation of inner thoughts and feelings. It is in recognition of this that art educators have emphasized creativity as the primary aim of art. Through art activities the child makes real, his ideas. Essentially, the child's concept of creativity can be best described as 'the art of combining things ...

  9. On art and science: an epistemic framework for integrating social science and clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Jason Adam

    2014-06-01

    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate "social facts" in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the more fundamental processes of thinking by which art and science proceed have not been addressed to this end. As such, the art of medical practice is conceptualized as an innate gift, and thus little is done to cultivate it. Yet doing so is more important than ever because uncertainty in diagnosing and treating chronic illnesses, the most significant contemporary mortality risks, suggests a re-expanding role for clinical judgment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Geometrical tuning art for entirely subwavelength grating waveguide based integrated photonics circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, Donglei; Wang, Yaguo; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T

    2016-05-05

    Subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguide is an intriguing alternative to conventional optical waveguides due to the extra degree of freedom it offers in tuning a few important waveguide properties, such as dispersion and refractive index. Devices based on SWG waveguides have demonstrated impressive performances compared to conventional waveguides. However, the high loss of SWG waveguide bends jeopardizes their applications in integrated photonic circuits. In this work, we propose a geometrical tuning art, which realizes a pre-distorted refractive index profile in SWG waveguide bends. The pre-distorted refractive index profile can effectively reduce the mode mismatch and radiation loss simultaneously, thus significantly reduce the bend loss. This geometry tuning art has been numerically optimized and experimentally demonstrated in present study. Through such tuning, the average insertion loss of a 5 μm SWG waveguide bend is reduced drastically from 5.43 dB to 1.10 dB per 90° bend for quasi-TE polarization. In the future, the proposed scheme will be utilized to enhance performance of a wide range of SWG waveguide based photonics devices.

  11. An innovative art therapy program for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, K; Fitch, M; Carman, M

    2000-01-01

    Art therapy is a healing art intended to integrate physical, emotional, and spiritual care by facilitating creative ways for patients to respond to their cancer experience. A new art therapy program was designed to provide cancer patients with opportunities to learn about the McMichael Canadian Art Collection and to explore personal feelings about their cancer experience through combined gallery and studio components. The role of the facilitator was to assist in the interpretation of a participant's drawing in order to reveal meaning in the art. This paper presents patients' perspectives about the new art therapy program. Content analysis of participant feedback provided information about the structure, process, and outcomes of the program. Evaluation of the art therapy/museum education program demonstrated many benefits for cancer patients including support, psychological strength, and new insights about their cancer experience.

  12. Teaching Creatively and Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief review of generally accepted ideas about creativity, followed by examples of music teachers teaching creatively and teaching their students to be more creative. Implications for teacher education and policy recommendations for music education are discussed.

  13. Translational Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    A long-established approach to legal translation focuses on terminological equivalence making translators strictly follow the words of source texts. Recent research suggests that there is room for some creativity allowing translators to deviate from the source texts. However, little attention...... is given to genre conventions in source texts and the ways in which they can best be translated. I propose that translators of statutes with an informative function in expert-to-expert communication may be allowed limited translational creativity when translating specific types of genre convention....... This creativity is a result of translators adopting either a source-language or a target-language oriented strategy and is limited by the pragmatic principle of co-operation. Examples of translation options are provided illustrating the different results in target texts. The use of a target-language oriented...

  14. The Arts and Talent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the role of creative arts in developing talent among gifted students. Talent development strategies using the arts are identified. Also describes ways that teachers can support collaboration among the arts and that parents can advocate and foster arts programs. (CR)

  15. The Value of the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The value of the arts is often measured in terms of human creativity against instrumental rationality, while art for art's sake defends against a utility of art. Such critiques of the technical and formulaic are themselves formulaic, repeating the dualism of the head and the heart. How should we account for this formula? We should do so by…

  16. Affectivating environments in creative work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    . Illustrations of these processes are offered from a study of craft creativity, more specifically the decoration of Easter eggs by Romanian folk artists in the historical region of Bucovina. Decorators learn their art through social interaction and observing their environment which is symbolically rich...

  17. Creativity, Pragmatism and the Social Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2006-01-01

    In this discussion, Richard Sennett and Hans Joas elaborate on the role of both creativity and pragmatism in the social sciences. They pursue these topics from different perspectives: the role creativity played in the history of ideas and in classical pragmatism, what creativity means...... in the practice of the arts and how a creative pragmatist sociology might be possible. Pragmatism, they conclude, may not be a new idea, but the practice of pragmatism offers a new political vision beyond the traditional frontiers of left and right....

  18. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  19. Possible Brain Mechanisms of Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-06-01

    Creativity is the new discovery, understanding, development and expression of orderly and meaningful relationships. Creativity has three major stages: preparation, the development (nature and nurture) of critical knowledge and skills; innovation, the development of a creative solution; and creative production. Successful preparation requires a basic level of general intelligence and domain specific knowledge and skills and highly creative people may have anatomic alterations of specific neocortical regions. Innovation requires disengagement and divergent thinking primarily mediated by frontal networks. Creative people are often risk-takers and novelty seekers, behaviors that activate their ventral striatal reward system. Innovation also requires associative and convergent thinking, activities that are dependent on the integration of highly distributed networks. People are often most creative when they are in mental states associated with reduced levels of brain norepinephrine, which may enhance the communication between distributed networks. We, however, need to learn more about the brain mechanisms of creativity. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  1. IBSE and Creativity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Creativity plays a very important role in education. Most of educational systems support creativity as relevant competence for the 21st century. According to the findings of experts, teachers' creativity is important for the development of students' creativity. We introduce a theoretical base of creativity and styles of creativity. Based on our…

  2. Framing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines a way of understanding and modelling how it is possible to design for creative processes. The processes in question involve user-driven didactic design in a Danish project for developing e-learning designs to be used at small and medium sized enterprises (the ELYK-project). ......This article outlines a way of understanding and modelling how it is possible to design for creative processes. The processes in question involve user-driven didactic design in a Danish project for developing e-learning designs to be used at small and medium sized enterprises (the ELYK......-project). After briefly discussing the concepts of creativity and innovation, the article outlines three levels of analysis. On a meta-level, a new model of quadruple helix innovation is introduced, providing a framework for interrelations between enterprise, government, knowledge institutions, and users...... (learners). On a meso-level, a four-field model is introduced. It is an operational model for user involvement in creativity and innovation processes, depicting and demarcating the changing roles of users and developers at different stages of the design process. On a micro-level, the design practise...

  3. Creative Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, John

    1988-01-01

    Punishment given in a caring, supportive environment can assist children to learn some tasks more quickly, when used in conjunction with programmed positive reinforcement. The manner in which a punishment is implemented impacts its effectiveness. Two experiments are presented in which teachers used creative punishment to produce classroom behavior…

  4. Rethinking Interaction in Creative Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter

    The use of digital tools has become central in many creative practices. However, research into the design and use of such tools has thus far fallen in between the disciplinary cracks between HCI and Creativity Research. In this position paper, I offer a brief overview of our work on exploring...... and developing digital tools for collaborative creative work that integrates approaches and insights from these two disciplines. On this basis, I offer two theoretical perspectives for discussion at the the Rethinking Interactions workshop: shearing layers, building on studies of architecure in use [Brand 1994...

  5. Adobe Creative Suite 4 Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Padova, Ted

    2009-01-01

    As one of the few books to cover integration and workflow issues between Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, GoLive, Acrobat, and Version Cue, this comprehensive reference is the one book that Creative Suite users need; Two well-known and respected authors cover topics such as developing consistent color-managed workflows, moving files among the Creative Suite applications, preparing files for print or the Web, repurposing documents, and using the Creative Suite with Microsoft Office documents; More than 1,200 pages are packed with valuable advice and techniques for tackling common everyday issu

  6. Creativity in Artistic Education: Introducing Artists into Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Free; Lombaerts, Koen; De Mette, Tom; Buffel, Tine; Elias, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Despite a more prominent role of arts education in the school curriculum, artistic creativity does not occur to a great extent in primary school practice. More opportunities for teachers to strengthen their know-how in the field of artistic creativity can therefore be considered important. Arts education projects focus on pupils' development of…

  7. When Is Creativity? Intrinsic Motivation and Autonomy in Children's Artmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquith, Diane B.

    2011-01-01

    The title of this article borrows loosely from the philosopher Nelson Goodman, whose classic essay "When is Art" addresses context and symbolic function. The discussion in this article concerns an entirely different matter: identifying moments when a learner's creativity is sparked in school art programs. The word "creativity" usually enters…

  8. The Role of Creativity in Romanian Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Marin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is a concept that we encounter every day. We do hear about creative people, admire original art objects or read original books.However, in spite of our capacity to admit, there is a high level of confusion pertaining to the meaning of creativity. The rapid growth of competitionin business and industry is often used as a motivation of the desire to better understand the creative process. Thus, many organizations are forced to improve their old system and products. Managers in Romania must also find new methods and better problem solving ways. An even greater number of problems have little or no precedent, hence the conclusion that there are less tested methods of approach, in this way some positive results being anticipated. Therefore, having a creative ability is an essential skill of each leader. In other words, the creative leaders look for new problems and are successful especially in approaching new challenges.

  9. Interior design as a motivation for creating creative spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Weiner, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The thesis underlines the importance of a thoughtful, systematic and modern way of designing classrooms due to its effects on productivity and creativity of pupils. The theoretical part focuses on the relationship between creativity and art classroom; a particular attention is given to the elements of interior design of art classrooms, enabling such organisation of space that fosters creativity in pupils. The emphasis is given on colour and lights as essential elements of interior design. In ...

  10. Relationship Between Leadership Styles and Organizational Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bratnicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Empirical research on entrepreneurship in organizations has brought disparate and often contradictory evidence related to the impact of leadership on creativity in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss the impact of different leadership styles on creativity, with the view to formulating an integrated conceptual model that links creative novelty and creative practicality with leadership. Methodology: The author applied the methodology of meta-theoretical review. In accordance with the principles of theoretical bricolage, a new conceptual model was built on the basis of the multidimensional creativity theory and the leadership theory. In her analysis, the author took into account leadership styles that have already been subject to research; each of them was mapped in the two-dimensional space of organizational creativity. Findings: In order to fully understand the reasons for differences in organizational creativity, the drivers of divergences in the space of creative novelty and creative practicality need to be clarified. Greater knowledge about the impact of leadership styles on the structure and configuration of organizational creativity is necessary. In this paper, the author provides a theoretical framework that illustrates manners in which leadership influences organizational creativity. The model clarifies the role that leadership plays in shaping a unique configuration of organizational creativity, and consequently in ensuring the necessary internal adaptation of an organization. Originality: The value of this research lies in the situational interpretation of various leadership styles in the context of their impact on organizational creativity. The analysis goes beyond the conventional discussion about leadership and creativity, focused on establishing whether a given leadership style proves beneficial or not for organizational creativity. The paper identifies particular effects that several key

  11. ACTIVE AND PARTICIPATORY METHODS IN BIOLOGY: CULTIVATION OF CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina SÎRBU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Creative achievement is obvious in the arts but it is essential in all other fields including the sciences and business. Creativity allows for the making of connections across different domains of knowledge. It is possible in all areas of human activity and all young people and adults have creative abilities. It is cultivated through rigorous training and by practicing of dynamic capabilities over an extended period of time. Creativity needs time, flow, interaction, suspension of judgement. It is influenced by much more than the shape and content of the formal school curriculum. The roles of teachers are to recognise young people's creative capacities; and to provide the creative climate in which they can be realised. Educational actors have the power to unlock the creative and innovative potential of the young. Creative learning requires innovative and flexible teaching. Creative education involves a balance between teaching knowledge and skills, and encouraging innovation.

  12. Activities and Accomplishments in Various Domains: Relationships with Creative Personality and Creative Motivation in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relationships between five personal traits and adolescents' creative activities and accomplishments in five domains--music, visual arts, creative writing, science, and technology. Participants were 439 tenth graders (220 males and 219 females) in China. The relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis.…

  13. Schizotypal traits in painters: Relations with intelligence, creativity and creative productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present research we explored the presence of schizotypal traits in painters. Furthermore, the relations of schizotypy and creativity-related variables (intelligence, creativity and creative productivity were analyzed. Study participants were divided into the criterion (132 students of art academy and art high school and control group (119 psychology students and members of grammar school. Two hypotheses were set: 1 schizotypal traits are more pronounced in painters than in control group; 2 schizotypy is more closely associated with the creativitylinked variables in the criterion than in control group. Schizotypy was operationalized by Disintegration construct and measured via DELTA 10 inventory. Intelligence was assessed by Advanced Progressive Matrices-18; creativity was measured by the same labeled scale from HEXACO-PI-R inventory and creative productivity was explored by a set of questions regarding the frequency of creative behavior. Results showed that Magical thinking, Enhanced awareness, Somatoform Dysregulation, Perceptual distortions and Social anhedonia were the schizotypal traits which were more pronounced in painters as compared to the control group. Factor analyses performed in each group separately revealed a latent component loaded both with schizotypal traits, creativity and creative productivity, but only in the group of painters: schizotypy and creativity were not so closely related in the control group. Thus, the study hypotheses were largely confirmed. Results provide a more detailed understanding of the relations between schizotypy and creativity.

  14. The Effects of Arts-Integrated Instruction on Students' Memory for Science Content: Results from a Randomized Control Trial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Mariale; JohnBull, Ranjini Mahinda; Carran, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Strong correlational evidence suggests that involvement in the arts improves students' academic outcomes and memory of learning events (e.g., Peppler et al., 2014; Robinson, 2013; Scripps & Paradis, 2014). It is unclear, however, whether the improved outcomes are the result of general exposure to the arts, arts integrated into content…

  15. Impact of Integrated Science and English Language Arts Literacy Supplemental Instructional Intervention on Science Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jamar Terry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design study was to determine if any differences existed in upper elementary school students' science academic achievement when instructed using an 8-week integrated science and English language arts literacy supplemental instructional intervention in conjunction…

  16. Aesthetic Education of Primary School Pupils as an Integral Part of the National System of Continuous Art Education in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchai, Tetiana

    2014-01-01

    The article examines aesthetic education of primary school pupils as an integral part of the national system of continuous art education in Japan. One of the most important traditional means of aesthetic education in Japan, according to L. Tsaryova is considered nature. Analysis of the scientific literature by domestic and foreign scientists…

  17. Art as Peace Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Art educators can "critique" senseless violence--mistreatment, exclusion, intimidation, bullying, violation, abuse, corruption, murder, and war--by unleashing the power of students' creativity. In this article, the author, sharing her philosophical context, discusses how art is preventative medicine with the power to transform the cycle…

  18. Using Task Like PISA's Problem to Support Students' Creativity in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novita, Rita; Putra, Mulia

    2016-01-01

    Creativity is one of keys to success in the evolving global economy and also be a fundamental skill that is absolutely necessary in the 21st century. Also in mathematics, creativity or thinking creatively is important to be developed because creativity is an integral part of mathematics. However, limiting the use of creativity in the classroom…

  19. Quantifying creativity: can measures span the spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-03-01

    Because the cognitive neuroscientists have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon of creativity, the issue arises of how creativity is to be optimally measured. Unlike intelligence, which can be assessed across the full range of intellectual ability creativity measures tend to concentrate on different sections of the overall spectrum. After first defining creativity in terms of the three criteria of novelty, usefulness, and surprise, this article provides an overview of the available measures. Not only do these instruments vary according to whether they focus on the creative process, person, or product, but they differ regarding whether they tap into "little-c" versus "Big-C" creativity; only productivity and eminence measures reach into genius-level manifestations of the phenomenon. The article closes by discussing whether various alternative assessment techniques can be integrated into a single measure that quantifies creativity across the full spectrum.

  20. Creativity and Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving...... approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools....

  1. Creativity and problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Victor Valqui Vidal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools.

  2. Creative Learning with Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristides Protopsaltis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper, summarises the Creative Learning with Serious Games workshop that took place in the Fun and Games 2010 conference. The workshop discussed innovative methodological approaches to Serious Games for creative learning. A special emphasis was given to state-ofthe- art research work and cross-discipline approaches (e.g. the mix of Storytelling and Serious Games. In addition, different case studies coming from very different European (research projects were presented and discussed with the participants. Five papers were selected via a peer reviewed process to be presented at the workshop. The authors presented their work and demonstrated their applications during the second part of the workshop.

  3. Creative nonfiction: narrative and revelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2009-06-01

    Creative nonfiction and the illness narrative are recently identified approaches to literary expression. They are particularly well suited to the genre of memoir where psychological issues such as mourning and attachment and loss may be explored. The recent memoirs of Sue Erikson Bloland and Honor Moore fulfill the description of creative nonfiction. They offer their readers an opportunity to explore with them the theological and existential issues of revelation, reconciliation, and forgiveness. This paper was first presented for the Working Group on Psychoanalysis and the Arts of the Richardson Research Seminar in the History of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College.

  4. Creative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette; Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Opsamling af diskussioner på konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems i september/oktober 2007. Konferencen og Udstillingen Creative Systems sætter fokus på systemer som en positiv drivkraft i den kreative skabelsesproces. CINARK inviterede fire internationale kapaciteter, som indenfor hver...... deres felt har beskæftiget sig med udviklingen af systemer. Kieran Timberlake, markant amerikansk tegnestue; Mark West, Professor på University of Manitoba, Canada, og pioner indenfor anvendelse af tekstilforskalling til betonstøbninger; Matilda McQuaid, Arkitekturhistoriker og kurator på udstillingen...... om Extreme Textiles på amerikanske Cooper Hewit Design Museum, samt Professor Ludger Hovestadt, ved ETH, Zürich der fokuserer på udvikling og anvendelse af logaritmiske systemtilgange. Udstillingen diskuterede ud fra deres meget forskellige arbejder, det kreative potentiale i anvendelsen af systemer...

  5. FATES OF RUSSIAN ART IN THE YEARS OF REVOLUTION AND CIVIL WAR (PECULIARITIES OF A.A. RYBNIKOV’S CREATIVE WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Галина Владимировна Аксенова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the fate of the intellectuals who came over to the Soviet power and participated in the revolutionary process. The analysis is carried out on the example of the life and work of artist Alexei Rybnikov (1887-1949, who came from a merchant family, initially received economic education, graduated from Kharkov school of painting and drawin-gand participated in the exhibitions of “Jack of diamonds”.There are considered the peculiarities of his pre-revolutionary art. The author notes the role of the artist in the rescue of the unique art collections in the years of his work in the People’s Commissariat for Education. There is shownhow the Revolution and the Civil war, the nationalization and requisition of artistic values changed the processes of museum construction in Russia and then the Soviet Union. The author points out that the process of nationalization of the historical and artistic values revealed one of the important issues related to the conservation of works of art - the problem of restoration. The solution to this problem was associated with the need to study the technological characteristics of the paintings by old masters, to record the physical condition of all existing works of art, to describe its technical condition. There is shown that the practical work of rescue and restoration of the old masters’ heritage, which was carried out at the State Tretyakov gallery and the Hermitage by artists, technologists, photographers and scientists (chemists and physicists, led to the discovery of new methods of paintings salvation. Russian artist Alexei Rybnikov began his career before the revolution of 1917 as a painter, book designer and muralist.Like many other representatives of this profession, at first he became an officer of the People’s Commissariat for Education, then an employee of a museum. This path of a free artist’s transformation into a serious museum employee gave the world a new way of

  6. Implications of the Vienna Integrated Model of Art Perception for art-based interventions in clinical populations: Comment on "Move me, astonish me... delight my eyes and brain: The Vienna Integrated Model of top-down and bottom-up processes in Art Perception (VIMAP) and corresponding affective, evaluative, and neurophysiological correlates" by Matthew Pelowski et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Pelowski et al. present a holistic framework within which the multiple processes underlying art viewing can be systematically organized [1]. The proposed model integrates a broad range of dynamic mechanisms, which can effectively account for empirical as well as humanistic perspectives on art perception. Particularly challenging is the final section of the article, where the authors draw a correspondence between behavioral and cognitive components and brain structures (as well as networks). Here, we comment on the implications of the Vienna Integrated Model of Art Perception for art therapy in clinical populations, particularly focusing on (1) expanding Pelowski et al.'s considerations of the Default Mode Network (DMN) into discussion of its relevance to mental diseases, and (2) elaborating on empathic resonance in aesthetic contexts and the capacity of art to build up empathic skills.

  7. An Investigation into the Process of Transference, through the Integration of Art with Science and Math Curricula, in a California Community College: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachford, Maryann Kvietkauskas

    2011-01-01

    The transference of learning from one discipline to another creates new knowledge between subjects. Students can connect and apply what they learn in one subject to previously existing knowledge. Art expression is an integral part of human nature and has been a means of communication throughout history. Through the integration of art with science…

  8. Playing in the "Gutter": Cultivating Creativity in Medical Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kevin T; Jamorabo, Daniel S; Dollase, Richard H; Dumenco, Luba; Schiffman, Fred J; Baruch, Jay M

    2016-03-01

    In comics, "gutters" are the empty spaces between panels that readers must navigate to weave disjointed visual sequences into coherent narratives. A gutter, however, is more than a blank space--it represents a creative zone for making connections and for constructing meaning from disparate ideas, values, and experiences. Over the course of medical training, learners encounter various "gutters" created by the disconnected subject blocks and learning experiences within the curriculum, the ambiguity and uncertainty of medical practice, and the conflicts and tensions within clinical encounters. Navigating these gutters requires not only medical knowledge and skills but also creativity, defined as the ability to make connections between disparate fragments to create meaningful, new configurations. To cultivate medical students' creative capacity, the authors developed the Integrated Clinical Arts (ICA) program, a required component of the first-year curriculum at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. ICA workshops are designed to place students in a metaphorical gutter, wherein they can practice making connections between medicine and arts-based disciplines. By playing in the gutter, students have opportunities to broaden their perspectives, gain new insights into both medical practice and themselves, and explore different ways of making meaning. Student feedback on the ICA program highlights an important role for creativity and the arts in medicine: to transform gutters from potential learning barriers into opportunities for discovery, self-reflection, and personal growth.

  9. A psycho-historical research program for the integrative science of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullot, Nicolas J; Reber, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Critics of the target article objected to our account of art appreciators' sensitivity to art-historical contexts and functions, the relations among the modes of artistic appreciation, and the weaknesses of aesthetic science. To rebut these objections and justify our program, we argue that the current neglect of sensitivity to art-historical contexts persists as a result of a pervasive aesthetic–artistic confound; we further specify our claim that basic exposure and the design stance are necessary conditions of artistic understanding; and we explain why many experimental studies do not belong to a psycho-historical science of art.

  10. Practical Examples of an Integrated Field Study Program at Mt. Fuji: Geosciences and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T.; Kamikuri, S. I.; Otsuji, H.; Kataguchi, N.; Maruyama, H.; Hashiura, H.

    2017-12-01

    Mt. Fuji is a symbol of existence for the Japanese and it also has been a religiously revered subject. In addition, as represented by the ukiyo-e of Hokusai and Hiroshige, it is a subject of paintings, as well as of various types of literary expression such as waka, haiku and novels. Historically, there was a time when Mt. Fuji was used as a symbol of the integration of the country; and it has long reflected the culture, life and thoughts of the Japanese. On another level, from the Earth scientific point of view, Mt. Fuji is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. Teacher training colleges in Japan have created educational programs for all subjects taught at school. However, as there is no effective linkage among these subjects, students may have different opinions on them according to their curriculum. In this study, we adopted a multifaceted learning approach toward that most symbolic icon of our country. In FY2014 and FY2016, a course created by the College of Education at Ibaraki University, called "Fieldwork on Geology," was conducted at and around Mt. Fuji. In addition to conducting fieldwork from the viewpoint of earth science, it also had abundant artistic content. Academics in the fields of earth science, art and pedagogy worked closely together from the planning stage and participated in a field study with 25 university students. Specifically, we focused on how the experience of sketching a landscape affects field observations by broadening the viewpoint and deepening the understanding of students. To ascertain the bidirectional educational effects between earth sciences and art, students were asked: 1) to express an image of Mt. Fuji, and 2) to appreciate paintings of Mt. Fuji and express the information they garnered from the paintings, before and after the fieldwork. These two exercises are considered as providing insights into how the students' understanding had changed. In addition, reports and impressions submitted by the students were used as

  11. ARTEFACTOS DIALÓGICOS: UNA PROPUESTA PARA INTEGRAR LA EDUCACIÓN DE ARTES MUSICALES Y VISUALES (DIALOGIC ARTIFACTS: A PROPOSAL TO INTEGRATE THE EDUCATION OF MUSICAL AND VISUAL ARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arenas Navarrete Mario

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:El propósito de este ensayo es realizar una propuesta para crear unidades de integración de artes musicales y visuales a través de la participación de estudiantes desde 12 a 17 años de edad, aproximadamente, en la creación de “Artefactos Dialógicos”, es decir, esculturas sonoras cinéticas e interactivas. La particularidad de estas instalaciones-esculturas es que establecen y explicitan diversos tipos de diálogos con la naturaleza. Corresponden a la cristalización de un proceso iniciado el año 1986 en el Departamento de Música de la Universidad de La Serena, Chile, caracterizado por la defensa de la transversalidad disciplinar, en oposición al especialismo. Han participado estudiantes universitarios y niños de su Escuela Experimental de Música; profesores, artistas visuales, compositores e investigadores. La pretensión de que estudiantes construyan estos artefactos, conlleva cumplir como requisito, su empoderamiento, el desarrollo de su capacidad de agencia y creatividad, para que, en colaboración con profesores de diferentes asignaturas artísticas, científicas y humanísticas, incluyan en la mirada estética, la configuración material y estructural de estos aparatos, integrando, así, racionalismo y expresividad. Todo ello, visualizado a través del filtro epistémico que otorga la educación intercultural, de tal modo de atrapar y proyectar ancestros, gestos, modos, iconografías,2 idiolectos,3 identidades y patrimonio.Abstract: In this essay, we propose to create units of integration of the musical and visual arts through the participation of students ranging approximately from 12 to 17 years of age, for the creation of the "Dialogical Artifacts", i.e., kinetic and interactive sound sculptures. The particularity of these artifacts lies on the fact that they establish and explicit different types of dialogues with nature from a transversal perspective of the curriculum. This initiative was taken for the first

  12. Integrate Science and Arts Process Skills in the Early Childhood Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Linking science and art explorations makes sense in early childhood education for a number of reasons. Young children have a natural curiosity about their world and how it works. Young children are also natural artists. Most are delighted to participate in open-ended art activities, dramatic play, singing, and dancing. For young children, the…

  13. A case study of full integration of the arts into core subject area instruction in one East Texas secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leysath, Maggie

    This exploratory phenomenological case study investigated the influence the full integration of the arts into core subject instruction has on classroom environment, student academic achievement, and student engagement as perceived by administrators, teachers, and students in one East Texas secondary school. Participant interviews were analyzed using Creswell's (2012) six-step method for analyzing phenomenological studies. The researcher implemented three learning activities in which ceramics learning objectives were fully integrated with chemistry learning objectives. The first activity combined clay properties and pottery wheel throwing with significant numbers. The second activity combined glaze formulation with moles. The third combined stoichiometry with the increased glaze formula for students to glaze the bowls they made. Findings suggest the full integration of art in core subject area instruction has numerous positive effects. Participants reported improved academic achievement for all students including reluctant learners. Students, teachers, and the administrator reported greater participation in the art integrated activities. Participants perceived a need for further training for teachers and administrators for greater success.

  14. The Dynamics of Creativity & the Courage to BE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Frederick David

    The following sections are included: * Preliminary Note * Definitions Of Creativity * American Heritage (Morris, 1969-78)55 * Howard Gardner (1993)33 * Stephen Nachmanovich (1990)58 * Dynamical Metaphor * Literary, Philosophic, and Religious Roots of Ideas of Creativity * Myth * Mysticism * Existentialism * Psychological Analysis of Creativity * Barman (& Freud), The Two Faces of Creativity (1989)18 * Stephen Nachmanovich, Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art (1990)58 * Rollo May Man's Search for Himself, Chap 6, The Creative Conscience (1953)53. * Joy P. Guilford, The Psychometric Approach. (1950,1953)37,38 * Wolfgang Köhler, The Mentality of Apes (1925)46,47 * Csitszentmihalyi, Humanistic Attributional Approaches; Flow(1990)25; The Evolving Mind (1993)26 * Howard Gardner, Creating Minds (1993)33 * Summary of Dynamical Concepts Involved In Creativity * Self-Organizational Bifurcations are Creativity * Chaos and Instability Facilitate Creativity * Chaos at the Controls * Summary * Acknowledgement * References

  15. Creativity In Conscience Society

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Gh. Rosca; Dumitru Todoroi

    2011-01-01

    Creativity is a result of brain activity which differentiates individuals and could ensure an important competitive advantage for persons, for companies, and for Society in general. Very innovative branches – like software industry, computer industry, car industry – consider creativity as the key of business success. Natural Intelligence Creativity can develop basic creative activities, but Artificial Intelligence Creativity, and, especially, Conscience Intelligence Creativity should be devel...

  16. Effectiveness of Integrating Simulation with Art-Based Teaching Strategies on Oncology Fellows' Performance Regarding Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhforoshha, Afsaneh; Emami, Seyed Amir Hossein; Shahi, Farhad; Shahsavari, Saeed; Cheraghi, Mohammadali; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Shirazi, Mandana

    2018-02-21

    The task of breaking bad news (BBN) may be improved by incorporating simulation with art-based teaching methods. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of an integrating simulation with art-based teaching strategies, on fellows' performance regarding BBN, in Iran. The study was carried out using quasi-experimental methods, interrupted time series. The participants were selected from medical oncology fellows at two teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. Participants were trained through workshop, followed by engaging participants with different types of art-based teaching methods. In order to assess the effectiveness of the integrating model, fellows' performance was rated by two independent raters (standardized patients (SPs) and faculty members) using the BBN assessment checklist. This assessment tool measured seven different domains of BBN skill. Segmented regression was used to analyze the results of study. Performance of all oncology fellows (n = 19) was assessed for 228 time points during the study, by rating three time points before and three time points after the intervention by two raters. Based on SP ratings, fellows' performance scores in post-training showed significant level changes in three domains of BBN checklist (B = 1.126, F = 3.221, G = 2.241; p art-based teaching strategies may help oncology fellows to improve their communication skills in different facets of BBN performance. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials ID: IRCT2016011626039N1.

  17. How To Teach Nutrition to Kids: An Integrated, Creative Approach to Nutrition Education for Children Ages 6-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Connie Liakos

    This book presents nutrition education activities and strategies that are child-tested and teacher-endorsed. It targets educators, nutrition professionals, parents, and other caregivers, offering the tools to teach children ages 6-10 years about nutrition in a meaningful, integrated way. Divided by subject, this resource integrates nutrition into…

  18. Mind, Machine, and Creativity: An Artist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Louise

    2014-06-01

    Harold Cohen is a renowned painter who has developed a computer program, AARON, to create art. While AARON has been hailed as one of the most creative AI programs, Cohen consistently rejects the claims of machine creativity. Questioning the possibility for AI to model human creativity, Cohen suggests in so many words that the human mind takes a different route to creativity, a route that privileges the relational, rather than the computational, dimension of cognition. This unique perspective on the tangled web of mind, machine, and creativity is explored by an application of three relational models of the mind to an analysis of Cohen's talks and writings, which are available on his website: www.aaronshome.com.

  19. Creative ways of knowing in engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Eodice, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a platform for engineering educators who are interested in implementing a “creative ways of knowing” approach to presenting engineering concepts. The case studies in this book reveal how students learn through creative engagement that includes not only design and build activities, but also creative presentations of learning, such as composing songs, writing poems and short stories, painting and drawing, as well as designing animations and comics. Any engineering educator will find common ground with the authors, who are all experienced engineering and liberal arts professors, who have taken the step to include creative activities and outlets for students learning engineering. • Demonstrates various methods for returning to the basics of engineering education, which include design and creativity, teamwork and interdisciplinary thinking; • Discusses a timely topic, as higher education puts more attention on the student experience of learning in all disciplines; • Includes actual stude...

  20. Enhancing Science Education through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Augmenting science with the arts is a natural combination when one considers that both scientists and artists rely on similar attitudes and values. For example, creativity is often associated with artists, but scientists also use creativity when seeking a solution to a problem or creating a new product. Curiosity is another common trait shared…

  1. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 3: Space power and thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft integrated technology plan on thermal power and thermal management are presented. Topics covered include: space energy conversion research and technology; space photovoltaic energy conversion; chemical energy conversion and storage; thermal energy conversion; power management; thermal management; space nuclear power; high capacity power; surface power and thermal management; space platforms power and thermal management; and project SELENE

  2. Creativity: Creativity in Complex Military Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Novelty Goals,” Motivation and Emotion 35, no. 2 (June 2011): 141-142. 24 Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi, Creativity: The Psychology of Discovery and Invention...34 Motivation and Emotion (Springer Science and Business Media, LLC), no. 2 (February 2011): 135-143. Logan, Brian, and Tim Smither. "Creativity and Design...Army values creativity and extolls individuals to employ creative thinking in problem solving and planning. This reflects an understanding of the

  3. Encouraging Creativity in Online University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Educational and business literature affirms the importance and value of creativity. Unfortunately, this knowledge is not always presented in a manner that is useful to online instructors who want to integrate more reflective lessons into their courses. The discussion will provide vital background information on creativity and offer relevant…

  4. Pleasantness of Creative Tasks and Creative Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenasni, Franck; Lubart, Todd

    2011-01-01

    To examine the impact of emotion on creative potential, experimental studies have typically focused on the impact of induced or spontaneous mood states on creative performance. In this report the relationship between the perceived pleasantness of tasks (using divergent thinking and story writing tasks) and creative performance was examined.…

  5. The elementary school musical as an authentic, integrated performing arts experience

    OpenAIRE

    Bespflug, Kevin Sean

    2009-01-01

    While musicals are often common arts activities in high schools in North America, little has been written about their place in elementary schools. This is surprising when many elementary schools, particularly independent schools, are starting to include them in their fine arts programming. This thesis looks carefully at the elementary school musical by first undertaking a review of literature connected to the staging of musicals. The research and writings of various theorists and educators ar...

  6. Information Extraction, Data Integration, and Uncertain Data Management: The State of The Art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, Mena Badieh; van Keulen, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Information Extraction, data Integration, and uncertain data management are different areas of research that got vast focus in the last two decades. Many researches tackled those areas of research individually. However, information extraction systems should have integrated with data integration

  7. Teaching Synaesthesia as a Gateway to Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D. Murgia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article encapsulates my experience of teaching creativity within a higher education curriculum. Creativity often eludes common understanding because it involves using different conceptual streams of thought, often times developing unconsciously and manifesting in the prized “eureka” moment. In 2009, I began explaining the neurological condition of synaesthesia and later introduced this phenomenology in a course designed to cultivate creativity to first year fashion design students. There are many challenges in teaching creativity. Through teaching this course, I discovered that the first challenge is making the students conscious of their own qualitative beliefs on creativity and art. The second is creating exercises to challenge and alter these beliefs, thus forming a new way of thinking and experiencing the world. The most resistance from my students arose when experimenting with non-representational art. They did not have a conscious framework for making and evaluating abstract art. Introducing synaesthesia, a neurologically-based condition that “merges” two or more sensory pathways in the brain, gave my students a framework for discovery. Understanding sensory modalities and ways in which these modalities can blended together in synaesthesia proved to be a gateway to creativity in many of my students. The scope of this article chronicles how I developed my teaching methodology, the results it created in my classroom, as well as its effects on my own artistic practice.

  8. Spanning organizational boundaries to manage creative processes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Kragh, Hanne; Lettl, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In order to continue to be innovative in the current fast-paced and competitive environment, organizations are increasingly dependent on creative inputs developed outside their boundaries. The paper addresses the boundary spanning activities that managers undertake to a) select and mobilize...... creative talent, b) create shared identity, and c) combine and integrate knowledge in innovation projects involving external actors. We study boundary spanning activities in two creative projects in the LEGO group. One involves identifying and integrating deep, specialized knowledge, the other focuses...... actors, and how knowledge is integrated across organizational boundaries. We discuss implications of our findings for managers and researchers in a business-to-business context...

  9. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a process…

  10. Creative Research: The Theory and Practice of Research for the Creative Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kathryn Best

    2011-01-01

    When conducting research in and for the creative industries, there are a wealth of different possible research approaches that can be taken - reflecting the diverse nature of the disciplines (design, arts and crafts, advertising, architecture, fashion, film, music, TV, radio performing arts,

  11. Re-Framing Literacy: Teaching and Learning in English and the Language Arts. Language, Culture, and Teaching Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Imaginative and attractive, cutting edge in its conception, this text explicates a model for the integration of language arts and literacy education based on the notion of framing. The act of framing--not frames in themselves--provides a creative and critical approach to English as a subject. "Re-framing Literacy" breaks new ground in the language…

  12. The role of creativity in the management of innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The effective management of innovation is integral to the development of any business. This book provides a collection of articles dealing with creativity in the context of innovation management from an interdisciplinary perspective of business, psychology and engineering. It takes papers from......, creativity reduction in avoidance- and approach-oriented persons, creativity techniques and innovation, and the interplay between cognitive and organisational processes....

  13. The Creative Drawing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg, Ingelise

      The creative drawing process Associated Professor Ingelise Flensborg, PhD The Danish University school of Education, Aarhus University Tuborgvej 164 København NV   Why are children's drawings important for the development of cognitive structures and for their development in a visual society......'s. It is a pattern of actions as well as a pattern for action    In my doctoral thesis I discussed the connection between spatial orientation and visual representation (as a form of knowledge). I wanted to show the developmental possibilities within spatial cognition in art-education. I used the dynamic theory......, which is supposed to be our most basic cognitive structure. The body's interaction with the environment is decisive for children's spatial representations. In my theoretical and empirical investigations I found that this interaction creates the basic form of cognitive structures. The child...

  14. Creativity for designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to modern and interdisciplinary concepts related to creativity and creative processes. The selected topics are of special relevance to professionals of any kind in connection with their work as designers. Some useful creative tools and approaches are also...... outlined. Finally, practical recommendations to enhance and apply creative work in design are elaborated....

  15. Creativity and other Fundamentalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The magic word these days is 'creativity'. And not just for artists: managers and policymakers alike demand creativity. Even family therapists and mediators urge us to find more creative solutions. Nowadays, creativity is all about positive morality. We expect nothing but good from it. But what

  16. Lay Theories of Creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, Simone; Rietzschel, Eric; Zedelius, Claire; Müller, Barbara; Schooler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is of great appeal and importance to people, and they strive to understand creativity by developing lay theories. Such lay theories about creativity concern, for example, the characteristics of creative persons, such as the ‘mad genius’ idea, or environmental factors that contribute to

  17. Designing Creative Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cochrane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing creative learning environments involves not only facilitating student creativity, but also modeling creative pedagogical practice. In this paper we explore the implementation of a framework for designing creative learning environments using mobile social media as a catalyst for redefining both lecturer pedagogical practice, as well as redesigning the curriculum around student generated m-portfolios.

  18. Creativity for a Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hellen

    2011-01-01

    Creativity in primary science is even more important now than when it was first raised with the publication of the report "All our futures: creativity, culture and education." Creativity needs to involve both the teacher and the children. Exciting, creative and practical opportunities provided by the teacher will increase children's motivation and…

  19. Concepts of art education curriculum, tendencies and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojislav L. Ilić

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the different concepts of teaching Art, one should start from the competences we want to transfer to students. Through different ideas about competences, we can see the wishes of individual countries about what is expected of visual arts education. In this review, we have focused on the thinking of the European countries. All European countries have some variants of learning art in curricula and outcomes that determine what is meant to be achieved by these subjects. Depending on whether these curricula are structured as an integrated whole or as a set of specific subjects, objectives/outcomes are defined more concretely for visual arts, music, theater, dance, media arts or crafts. Learning objectives differ from country to country: in some cases, they are more globally expressed, and in others, it is more specific. The goals to be achieved or the skills to be mastered are defined for each year of learning or schooling periods.There are increasing pressures on the art education to fulfill a number of goals, in addition to learning about art. Educational systems increasingly recognize the importance of developing children’s creativity and contributing to cultural education. Almost all European countries have similar goals for the curriculum of teaching Art, among them: the development of artistic skills, knowledge, and understanding, engagement with various art forms; increasing cultural understanding; exchange of experiences. But in addition to these artistic results, the curriculum includes personal and social/cultural outcomes (such as self-confidence and self-esteem, the individuality of expression, teamwork, intercultural understanding and cultural participation. The focus on creativity (often in relation to its importance in innovation and cultural education (in relation to individual identity and the promotion of intercultural understanding is present in these goals.Various studies have recognized the pressure to include in the

  20. Deathcore, creativity, and scientific thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Sundstrom, Shana M.; Allen, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundMajor scientific breakthroughs are generally the result of materializing creative ideas, the result of an inductive process that sometimes spontaneously and unexpectedly generates a link between thoughts and/or objects that did not exist before. Creativity is the cornerstone of scientific thinking, but scientists in academia are judged by metrics of quantification that often leave little room for creative thinking. In many scientific fields, reductionist approaches are rewarded and new ideas viewed skeptically. As a result, scientific inquiry is often confined to narrow but safe disciplinary ivory towers, effectively preventing profoundly creative explorations that could yield unexpected benefits.New informationThis paper argues how apparently unrelated fields specifically music and belief systems can be combined in a provocative allegory to provide novel perspectives regarding patterns in nature, thereby potentially inspiring innovation in the natural, social and other sciences. The merger between basic human tensions such as those embodied by religion and music, for example the heavy metal genre of deathcore, may be perceived as controversial, challenging, and uncomfortable. However, it is an example of moving the thinking process out of unconsciously established comfort zones, through the connection of apparently unrelated entities. We argue that music, as an auditory art form, has the potential to enlighten and boost creative thinking in science. Metal, as a fast evolving and diversifying extreme form of musical art, may be particularly suitable to trigger surprising associations in scientific inquiry. This may pave the way for dealing with questions about what we don´t know that we don´t know in a fast-changing planet.

  1. From Minotaurs to Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Paul

    1992-01-01

    An integrated topic approach (on Theseus and the Minotaur) was used to develop creative writing skills of children (ages 12 and 13) with health- and stress-related disorders at a special school in England. Three elements of the topic (presentation, action, and interaction) were developed through which individual assessment, collaboration, and…

  2. Psychostimulants and Artistic, Musical, and Literary Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Iain

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores links between psychostimulants and creativity in the arts. These links are set in the context of an overview of the association between mind-altering drugs in general and specific branches of the arts, particularly literature. The economic impact of the psychostimulants both historically and in today's world has been substantial and this is mirrored in the culture of the countries involved with the trade in these special commodities. As with other families of addictive drugs, the psychostimulants are sought out more frequently than is the norm by creative individuals who then may represent the drugs in their art or associate the drugs with their creativity. The creative process is outlined and it is noted that if a drug helps at all with creativity then the specific properties of the drug may link it to a particular stage of the creative process. Stimulants are particularly associated with the evaluation and elaboration stage of the creative process and in particular nicotine and caffeine have been used in this way by writers when putting words on paper. The ability of psychostimulants to boost convergent thinking is the main mechanism at work but this is at a cost as divergent thinking is diminished. The other findings of note in this review are that particular venues based around the consumption of a psychostimulants can act as a creative hub-café culture in Paris and Vienna and early modern Europe-and that particular drugs can come to define an artistic grouping as with the Beats and the group around Warhol who had a preference for amphetamine. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Creativity for Problem Solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications related to the theme are briefly reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support problem solving are also presented. Finally......, the paper outlines the author’s experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems, and creative design of software optimisation for complex non...

  4. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity- OR are brie y reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  5. Creativity for Operational Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes specially related to problem solving. Central publications of Creativity-OR are briefly reviewed. Creative tools and approaches suitable to support OR work are also presented. Finally, the paper...... outlines the author's experiences using creative tools and approaches to: Facilitation of problem solving processes, strategy development in organisations, and design of optimisation systems for large scale and complex logistic systems....

  6. The integrated reporting: A presentation of the current state of art and aspects of integrated reporting that need further development

    OpenAIRE

    Morrós Ribera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to synthesise what is the emerging field of integrated reporting, with particular emphasis in the International Integrated Reporting Council, and outline a list of items for future research in this area. Design/methodology/approach: The approach is to outline a presentation of integrated reporting (IR), and make a review of the implications for the research agenda of the most important items. Findings: The need for quality researchers to address a number ...

  7. Integrating Apps with the Core Arts Standards in the 21st-Century Elementary Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath-Reynolds, Julia; VanWeelden, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the National Core Arts Standards has amplified the need for multiple approaches and opportunities for student responses and may compel music educators to use new tools. There are currently over one million available apps, and with the popularity of smart devices, student access to technology is increasing exponentially. Music…

  8. Integrating the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards into Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Alisa R.; Bullock, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    Physical education teachers are expected to implement the English language arts (ELA) Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in their instruction. This has proved to be challenging for many physical educators. The purpose of this article is to provide developmentally appropriate examples of how to incorporate the ELA CCSS into physical education,…

  9. Emotional and Social Potential of Art in the City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małuj, Joanna; Załuski, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    In the city residents are more often consumers than creators. Due to evolving specialization and the division of public tasks, citizens do not have an active influence on their surroundings and public spaces. They remain passive users who are detached from the process of creation. As a result, they often have no emotional connection to public space. On the basis of literature research, case studies, questionnaires as well as in-depth interviews with the inhabitants of Tri-City Metropolis (Poland), it has been noted that art capable of evoking emotions has a particular impact on both their attitudes and engagement in the process of city revitalization. Shared participation of artists and residents in shaping space through creative acts and artistic expression may contribute to greater satisfaction with the place of residence as well as a perceived increase in the quality of life. Creative acts and processes influence the sense of dignity and personal freedom and integrity, they may serve as a catalyst to unleash the residents’ authenticity, creativity and agency. The quality of art being created and its social impact depend on the model of cooperation, adopted and professed values as well as the principles being followed by the process of revitalization. This presentation discusses the what art, including street art, becomes after revitalization: a memory, an inspiration, a work of considerable material or social value or a feeling of insufficient fulfilment arrived upon due to compromise.

  10. The Complexity of Integrity Culture Change: A Case Study of a Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram Gallant, Tricia

    2007-01-01

    The concept of academic integrity has been resurrected in both literature and practice in response to a perceived problem of student academic dishonesty. Most specifically, academic integrity advocates suggest changing the student academic culture to normalize academic integrity and reduce occurrences of academic dishonesty. Theories of…

  11. Creative Research: The Theory and Practice of Research for the Creative Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Best, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    When conducting research in and for the creative industries, there are a wealth of different possible research approaches that can be taken - reflecting the diverse nature of the disciplines (design, arts and crafts, advertising, architecture, fashion, film, music, TV, radio performing arts, publishing and interactive software) and academic contexts (art schools, business schools and universities) involved. The result is that there are variations in the emphasis and approach taken to how stud...

  12. Playing with Nature: Supporting Preschoolers' Creativity in Natural Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewra, Christine; Veselack, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Conducted at two separate natural outdoor classrooms with preschool-aged children from three to five years old, this qualitative research study investigated how outdoor environments supported children's creativity and imagination. Although many studies have explored the development of creative arts in the young children, few have focused on…

  13. The Asele Period in Uche Okeke's Creativity 1958-1966 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Asele Period is a research study of a major aspect of the creative works of Professor Uche Okeke. The artist, who is generally regarded as father of modern Nigerian art tradition, has made various giant strides in the creative development of the country. He is naturally endowed with skill and good knowledge of the ...

  14. Creative Ageing? Selfhood, Temporality and the Older Adult Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeti, Shari

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on a long-term ethnography of an adult creative writing class situated in a major urban art gallery in the United Kingdom. It takes the claims of one group of older adults--that creative writing made them "feel younger"--as the starting point for exploring this connection further. It places these claims broadly within…

  15. ICT in the Arts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Increased use of ICT in art projects opens novel opportunities for contemporary artists seeking innovative means to create and express beyond the traditional in new ways and places. This can also be beyond what is conventionally considered art. Thus, wider and transdisciplinary philosophical...... perspectives become apparent. Specific examples are presented from the author’s portfolio with a focus on biofeedback and unencumbered gesture control of digital media. Parallel is increased attention to creativity seen from within academia and industry with specific education programmes reflecting how...... creative industries are important to economic well being in society. This contribution1 presents across these borders through introducing an international conference series titled ArtsIT within a special issue of the International Journal on Arts and Technology, which are vehicles for contemporary artists...

  16. Slack in the Faculty Workday: An Imperative for Creative Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John H.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that faculty, particularly in the liberal arts, use slack in their schedules to creatively develop new applications for college resources, design adaptations of existing programs and courses for new markets, and initiate change benefiting the college. (MSE)

  17. Creativity and the Dyslexic Child: A Classroom View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Dian; Wolf, Beverly

    1983-01-01

    Multisensory techniques can be used to provide opportunities for creative expression for children with specific language disabilities. Dramatics, art, movement activities, music, poetry, and dancing can help meet the children's emotional needs while also enhancing their self-concepts. (CL)

  18. Cross-Cultural Research on the Creativity of Elementary School Students in Korea and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyunghwa, Lee; Hyejin, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand cultural differences and similarities in children's creative characteristics in Korea and Australia. In this cross-cultural research, the Integrative Creativity Test (K-ICT, [13]) with identified validity and reliability for measuring elementary school students' creative ability and creative personality,…

  19. Creativity in Organizational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szobiová Eva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is focused on the conditions which allow the application of creativity in the context of an organization. The aim of the article is to reveal the work environment factors influencing the creativity of the employees. Another aim is to demonstrate how management style of an organization can affect the creativity of employees in order to successfully exploit their creative potential. The contribution also presents the manner how a manager can influence creativity of one’s own employees. Moreover, the article deals with the process of innovation and transmission of creative ideas and solutions into practice.

  20. Adventures in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewig-Goodman, Jeanne

    Classroom teachers are provided with ideas and procedures for teaching art in grades one through six. The activities encourage individuality, creativity, and aesthetic awareness in the child. For grades one through three, activity suggestions include two-dimensional painting, painting stuffed animals, and painting with sponges; paper tearing and…

  1. This is my life : The stories of independent workers in the creative industries in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, J.; Koch, K.; Bakhuisen, N.; Borghuis, P.

    2017-01-01

    The new precariat or free agents? Two powerful stories dominate discussion of labour in what are now called the creative industries. A policy invention, the creative industries in the Netherlands combine media, the arts, cultural heritage and creative business services as a new top sector, expected

  2. Understanding Creative Design Processes by Integrating Sketching and CAD Modelling Design Environments: A Preliminary Protocol Result from Architectural Designers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Teng Shih

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a preliminary protocol study of the cognitive behaviour of architectural designers during the design process. The aim is to better understand the similarities and differences in cognitive behaviour using Sequential Mixed Media (SMM and Alternative Mixed Media (AMM approaches, and how switching between media may impact on design processes. Two participants with at least one-year’s professional design experience and a Bachelor of Design degree, and competence in both sketching and computer-aid design (CAD modelling participated in the study. Video recordings of participants working on different projects were coded using the Function-Behaviour-Structure (FBS coding scheme. Participants were also interviewed and their explanations about their switching behaviours were categorised into three types: S→C, S/C↹R and C→S. Preliminary results indicate that switching between media may influence how designers identify problems and develop solutions. In particular, two design issues were identified.  These relate to the FBS coding scheme, where structure (S and behaviour derived from structure (Bs, change to documentation (D after switching from sketching to CAD modelling (S→C. These switches make it possible for designers to integrate both approaches into one design medium and facilitate their design processes in AMM design environments.

  3. Neural Foundations of Creativity: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen Raymond, Stephanie

    When considering the importance of the human cognitive function of creativity, we often overlook the fact that it is due to human creativity and to the constant search for new sensory stimuli that our world has, throughout the years, been one of innovation in every aspect of our existence -in the sciences, the humanities, and the arts. Almost everything that surrounds us is the result of human creativity, therefore it is not difficult to understand that although neuroscientific research has led to valuable perceptions into the probable underpinnings of this multifaceted ability, the precise neurological substrates that underlie creativity are yet to be determined. Despite the establishment of a strong link between creativity and divergent thinking, other brain networks have been implicated in this mental process. The following review underlines recent studies on the neural foundations of creativity. A comprehensive analysis of the upmost important facts will be presented, with emphasis on concepts, tests, and methods that have been used to study creativity, and how they have outlined a pathway to the key understanding of this unique human ability. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. The integrated reporting: A presentation of the current state of art and aspects of integrated reporting that need further development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Morros

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to synthesise what is the emerging field of integrated reporting, with particular emphasis in the International Integrated Reporting Council, and outline a list of items for future research in this area. Design/methodology/approach: The approach is to outline a presentation of integrated reporting (IR, and make a review of the implications for the research agenda of the most important items. Findings: The need for quality researchers to address a number of pressing challenges posed by the rapid development of IR policies and practices. Research limitations/implications: The paper provide insights into issues and aspects of integrated reporting that need further development and need robust evidence to help inform improvements in policy and practice. Practical implications: Highlight how companies may benefit from integrated reporting in response to stakeholders’ calls for enhanced disclosure of environmental, social, governance and other non financial information. Social implications: The main social implication is to promote the wider public interest of improving the relevance of information for decision-making, for all stakeholders, and allow greater efficiency in the allocation of financial and other resources and in adding public value Originality/value: This paper offers a general view on a subject that is a challenge for entities oriented to the implementation of sustainability in their values and also in their reporting.

  5. InP integrated photonics : state of the art and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    InP integrated circuits enable transceiver technologies with more than 200Gb/s per wavelength and 2Tb/s per fiber. Advances in monolithic integration are poised to reduce energy. remove assembly complexity, and sustain future year-on-year performance increases.

  6. Integration of TB and ART services fails to improve TB treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The median CD4+ count of HIV-positive patients was 152 cells/μl (interquartile range (IQR) 71 - 277) for integrated facilities and 148 cells/μl (IQR 67 - 260) for single-service facilities. There was no statistical difference in the TB treatment outcome profile between integrated and single-service facilities for all TB patients (p=0.

  7. State-of-the-Art Report on Ethics of Research Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyuk; Hahn, K. W.; Nam, Y. M.; You, B. H.; Min, B. J.

    2006-04-01

    The report briefly considers the generous ethical issues such as the background of philosophy, the issues of research ethics, the research integrity, the role of citation, the program and the code of research ethics. The report introduces the background of philosophy of science and elements of research ethics. It also considers the precedents of misconduct in research ethics and the ingredients to preserve the research integrity. Especially, the citation with obscure boundary between proper citation and plagiarism is carefully explored through several examples. Finally, the domestic ethics conditions are investigated on the research integrity and educational program on the responsible conduct of research. To compare the domestic situation, the educational program and the system of research integrity in EU and USA are deeply searched in Ch. 6 and Appendix III and V. To develop an educational program of research ethics and integrity, Nuclear Training Centre(NTC) collects and arranges the material and resource for research ethics

  8. State-of-the-Art Report on Ethics of Research Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk; Hahn, K. W.; Nam, Y. M.; You, B. H.; Min, B. J

    2006-04-15

    The report briefly considers the generous ethical issues such as the background of philosophy, the issues of research ethics, the research integrity, the role of citation, the program and the code of research ethics. The report introduces the background of philosophy of science and elements of research ethics. It also considers the precedents of misconduct in research ethics and the ingredients to preserve the research integrity. Especially, the citation with obscure boundary between proper citation and plagiarism is carefully explored through several examples. Finally, the domestic ethics conditions are investigated on the research integrity and educational program on the responsible conduct of research. To compare the domestic situation, the educational program and the system of research integrity in EU and USA are deeply searched in Ch. 6 and Appendix III and V. To develop an educational program of research ethics and integrity, Nuclear Training Centre(NTC) collects and arranges the material and resource for research ethics.

  9. Building innovative and creative character through mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyitno, Hardi; Suyitno, Amin

    2018-03-01

    21st century is predicted as the century with rapid development in all aspects of life. People require creative and innovative character to exist. Specifically, mathematics has been given to students from the kindergarten until the middle school. Thus, building character through mathematics should begin since the early age. The problem is how to build creative and innovative character through mathematics education? The goal expected from this question is to build innovative and creative characters to face the challenges of the 21st century. This article discusses the values of mathematics, the values in mathematics education, innovative and creative character, and the integration of these values in teaching mathematics that support the innovative and creative character building, and applying the values in structurely programmed, measurable, and applicable learning activities.

  10. [Creativity and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maçkalı, Zeynep; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Oral, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder has been an intriguing topic since ancient times. Early studies focused on describing characteristics of creative people. From the last quarter of the twentieth century, researchers began to focus on the relationship between mood disorders and creativity. Initially, the studies were based on biographical texts and the obtained results indicated a relationship between these two concepts. The limitations of the retrospective studies led the researchers to develop systematic investigations into this area. The systematic studies that have focused on artistic creativity have examined both the prevalence of mood disorders and the creative process. In addition, a group of researchers addressed the relationship in terms of affective temperaments. Through the end of the 90's, the scope of creativity was widened and the notion of everyday creativity was proposed. The emergence of this notion led researchers to investigate the associations of the creative process in ordinary (non-artist) individuals. In this review, the descriptions of creativity and creative process are mentioned. Also, the creative process is addressed with regards to bipolar disorder. Then, the relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder are evaluated in terms of aforementioned studies (biographical, systematic, psychobiographical, affective temperaments). In addition, a new model, the "Shared Vulnerability Model" which was developed to explain the relationship between creativity and psychopathology is introduced. Finally, the methodological limitations and the suggestions for resolving these limitations are included.

  11. The Hidden Dimensions of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Bruce

    1982-01-01

    Describes an art program for preschool children that includes four social dimensions of art in order to heighten aesthetic perception, improve artistic creativity, and nurture self-esteem. The social dimensions are children having power, children acting on norms legitimate in their own eyes, children functioning "nonestrangedly," and children…

  12. The Ontology of Creativity in Industrial Cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik; Wicmandy, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is (e.g. Gadner, 1993) often associated with the arts, science, technology, high-end products developed (cf. Plucker, Beghetto & Dow, 2004) by a genius working through long, complicated, isolated, arduous and mythical procedures. But, what about ordinary people doing ordinary work...

  13. DEVELOP CREATIVE EMPLOYEES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    THAT SOME MANAGERS MUST BE ABLE TO HELP EMPLOYEES DEVELOP OR APPLY CREATIVITY. IN THIS CONFERENCE PAPER WE WILL ANALYSE A CASE STUDY IN ORDER TO PRODUCE A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR IDENTIFYING WHEN AND HOW EMPLOYEES BECOME CREATIVE AT WORK. AN ESSENTIAL ASPECT OF THIS CONFERENCE PAPER WILL BE ANALYZING......PREVIOUS STUDIES (e.g. Hertel, 2015) HAS SHOWN THAT SOME CLEANING INDUSTRIES ARE ACTUALLY REQUIRING CREATIVE EMPLOYEES. HUMAN BEINGS ARE (c.f. Richards, 2010) BY DEFINITION CREATIVE BUT NOT ALL EMPLOYEES ARE USED TO OR ACTUALLY ALLOWED TO APPLY CREATIVITY IN EVERYDAY ORGANIZATIONAL LIFE. THIS MEANS...... THE CREATIVITY PRODUCED BY EMPLOEES. ANALYZING THE CREATIVITY PRODUCED WILL HELP US DEVELOP A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING HOW CREATIVE THE EMPLOYEES ACTUALLY BECOMES....

  14. Beyond Muddling: Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Camille

    1979-01-01

    Argues that incrementalism's weakness is that it is another rational approach to problem solving when what is needed is a nonrational approach--creativity. Offers guidelines for improving creativity in oneself and in the work environment. (IRT)

  15. State-of-the-art Review : Vol. 2B. Integrated Building Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Aa, Ad; Andresen, Inger; Asada, Hideo

    an overview of 23 case study buildings from 9 countries with integrated building concepts. The overview provides descriptions of the buildings and their contexts, a description of the integrated energy systems, and the overall performance of the building with respect to energy, indoor environment and costs......The purpose of this report is to give examples of integrated building concepts and related available performance data and information. The report does not aspire to give a complete overview of all possible integrated building concepts and processes. The buildings included in the report have been...... selected according to the knowledge of the participants in the project, as characteristic examples of the concepts and the challenges they represent. The report will be a common basis for the research and development work that is going to be carried out within the IEA Annex 44 project. The report contains...

  16. Participation is possible: A case report of integration into a community performing arts program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Emily; Dusing, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Typically developing children frequently participate in community recreation activities that enhance their social/emotional and physical development. The inclusion of children with developmental disabilities in these activities continues to be a challenge. This case report investigated the feasibility of including a child with Down syndrome in a community performing arts program. The participant is an 11-year-old female with Down syndrome and mild cognitive impairment. The participant was enrolled in a 14-week performing arts session that included a combination of acting, voice, and dance instruction. She participated in the program with the support of a one-on-one assistant who was a physical therapy student. The assistant facilitated learning the choreography, appropriate socialization, and positioning on the stage. Peer helpers were used to allow for greater independence toward the end of the session and for the final performance. The participant completed the final performance without the one-on-one assistant. The participant's mother completed the PedsQL before and after the performance, and the participant's scaled scores increased in all subsets except for emotional function and the total scales score increased from 51 to 57. With appropriate modifications and the right child/program fit, children with developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome can successfully be included in community programs. Physical therapists can assist families and community programs to make developmentally appropriate modifications to enhance participation.

  17. [Exploration of nursing art and aesthetic experiences: cross-disciplinary links and dialogues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Shuh-Jen

    2013-08-01

    Interdisciplinary understanding is crucial for readers today. This article integrates the ideas of four care-aesthetics-column writers in order to illustrate and discuss nursing art and aesthetic care experiences in a cross-disciplinary conversation. This article reflects critically on the art, culture, and nature of nursing in the five themes of: 1) the shape of nursing knowledge, "science" or "art"?; 2) the caring arts: passively regulative or consciously creative labor?; 3) busy hospital workers: a landscape of persons and objects or the creators of the scenery?; 4) nursing skills, arts, and the Tao; and 5) art liberation: is the nursing profession in need of a revolution or fundamental reform? This article utilizes diverse and occasionally contradictory points of view together with practical examples in order to encourage readers to interlink their disparate professional nursing skills and draw aesthetic knowledge from multiple sources and experiences.

  18. Imaging the Creative Unconscious

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Olivarius, Morten; Hulme, Oliver J.; Skov, Martin

    2017-01-01

    , as well as a battery of psychometric creativity tests, we could assess whether stimulus-bound neural activity was predictive of state or trait variability in creativity. We found that stimulus-bound responses in superior occipital regions were linearly predictive of trial-by-trial variability in creative......, creative individuals are endowed with occipital and medial temporal reflexes that generate a greater fluency in associative representations, making them more accessible for ideation even when no ideation is explicitly called for....

  19. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CREATIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS MATERIAL ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF CREATIVITY. APPROXIMATELY 50 UNANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED TO DOCUMENTS DATING FROM 1961 TO 1966. JOURNALS, BOOKS, AND REPORT MATERIALS ARE LISTED. SUBJECT AREAS INCLUDED ARE (1) IDENTIFICATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND MEASUREMENT OF CREATIVITY, (2) PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES OF CREATIVITY, (3)…

  20. How to Kill Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    1998-01-01

    Creativity is undermined unintentionally every day in work environments that were established to maximize business imperatives such as coordination, productivity, and control. Organizations must make a concerted effort to get rid of creativity killers and be truly innovative so that creativity not only survives but thrives. (Author/JOW)

  1. Computers and Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Dyke, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    A traditional question is whether or not computers shall ever think like humans. This question is redirected to a discussion of whether computers shall ever be truly creative. Creativity is defined and a program is described that is designed to complete creatively a series problem in mathematics. (MP)

  2. Creativity in Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert A., Ed.

    A collection of 20 essays on creative problem solving in advertising and sales promotion considers the relationship between client and agency and the degree of creativity that is necessary or desirable for each side to bring to their collaboration. The different essays are fully illustrated and specifically focus on such areas as creativity in…

  3. Freedom, structure, and creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietzschel, Eric; Reiter-Palmon, Roni; Kaufman, James

    2018-01-01

    Creativity is commonly thought to depend on freedom and a lack of constraints. While this is true to a large extent, it neglects the creative potential of structure and constraints. In this chapter, I will address the relation between freedom, structure, and creativity. I will explain that freedom,

  4. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All…

  5. The Creativity Crusade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2015-01-01

    Creativity has and always will be at the heart of American culture. It is evidenced in our daily lives thanks to the contributions of society's most revered icons. For decades, creativity has languished in the educational system. Creativity is not the norm in schools, and seems to only survive in classrooms or enrichment programs when highly…

  6. Creativity, Giftedness and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Maud

    2013-01-01

    In this article, conceptions of creativity in giftedness and their implications for education are reviewed. First, the definition of giftedness is examined taking into consideration the difference between intellectual giftedness and creative giftedness and the difference between potential and talent. Second, the nature of creativity based on the…

  7. Nurturing Creativity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Paul; Looney, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Across continents, creativity is a priority for education and is central to the discourse on 21st century learning. In this article, we explore how a greater focus on "everyday creativity" in schools changes the dynamics of teaching and learning. We look briefly at the main concepts in the literature on creativity in education. We then…

  8. Imaging the Creative Unconscious

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Olivarius, Morten; Hulme, Oliver J.; Skov, Martin

    2017-01-01

    What does it take to have a creative mind? Theories of creative cognition assert that the quantity of automatic associations places fundamental constraints on the probability of reaching creative solutions. Due to the difficulties inherent in isolating automated associative responses from cogniti...

  9. The functionality of creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is about the functionality of creativity. Why do people invest time and effort in being creative? Being creative is inherently risky, as you need to come up with something new that departs from what is already known, and there is a risk of ridicule, being singled out, or simply

  10. Creativity in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2013-01-01

    One quality among the many that characterize effective teachers is the ability to bring a creative disposition to teaching. In second language teaching, creativity has also been linked to levels of attainment in language learning. Many of the language tasks favored by contemporary language teaching methods are believed to release creativity in…

  11. State of the Art Authentication, Access Control, and Secure Integration in Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetesh Saxena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The smart grid (SG is a promising platform for providing more reliable, efficient, and cost effective electricity to the consumers in a secure manner. Numerous initiatives across the globe are taken by both industry and academia in order to compile various security issues in the smart grid network. Unfortunately, there is no impactful survey paper available in the literature on authentications in the smart grid network. Therefore, this paper addresses the required objectives of an authentication protocol in the smart grid network along with the focus on mutual authentication, access control, and secure integration among different SG components. We review the existing authentication protocols, and analyze mutual authentication, privacy, trust, integrity, and confidentiality of communicating information in the smart grid network. We review authentications between the communicated entities in the smart grid, such as smart appliance, smart meter, energy provider, control center (CC, and home/building/neighborhood area network gateways (GW. We also review the existing authentication schemes for the vehicle-to-grid (V2G communication network along with various available secure integration and access control schemes. We also discuss the importance of the mutual authentication among SG entities while providing confidentiality and privacy preservation, seamless integration, and required access control with lower overhead, cost, and delay. This paper will help to provide a better understanding of current authentication, authorization, and secure integration issues in the smart grid network and directions to create interest among researchers to further explore these promising areas.

  12. Educating for integrated design at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, KADK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimand, Nini; Jerl Jensen, Mette; Vindum, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    In August 2014, the structure and curriculum of KADK was re-organized. The bachelor study at the school of architecture is structured around six different subject fields, one for each semester: Settlement, Organisation, Materials, Aesthetics, Practices and Project. Every semester starts...... how to educate for applied construction at an academy of fine arts is a central issue for this paper. The course for 3th semester under the heading MATERIAL-assemblages, makes explorations and synthesis in models and material visualizations of building elements scale 1:1 and 1:10. The intention...... of the course is to examine the materials in their interaction as it unfolds in the building element. Materials interact not only with each other but also with the conditions they work under, thus the building element can be perceived as an assemblage. In order to be able to maneuver in such complex situations...

  13. A History of Design Theory in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nanyoung

    2006-01-01

    Since Discipline-Based Art Education (DBAE) began to advocate the teaching of art based on art subjects and knowledge rather than creative self-expression, the elements and principles of design have taken a firm place in various art curricula, textbooks, and national and state Visual Arts Standards. This article intends to trace the history of…

  14. The Business of Art Education: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Franchised art instruction businesses are not necessarily the enemy of the art educator, and can even provide a mutually beneficial way to enrich school art education programs. This article explores the status of art education businesses as creative enterprises that offer art curricula for children as clients, beyond the traditional school and…

  15. Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesko, S.C.; Marchant, M.

    1997-02-24

    Objective was to follow the cognitive and creative processes demonstrated by student research participants as they integrated a developing knowledge of ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, into a personal and idiosyncratic visual, graphical, or multimedia product. The participants, all non-scientists, involved in this process, attended a series of design classes, sponsored by LLNL at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA. As a result of this study, we have become interested in the possibility of similar characteristics between scientists and artists. We have also become interested in the different processes that can be used to teach science to non-scientists, so that they are able to understand and portray scientific information.

  16. Creativity and Impact of Advertising Electronic Led Billboards in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprayitno Suprayitno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The creativity and the impact of advertising electronic LED billboards in Jakarta was an approach to see, to know and to understand in a deeper way. Creativity decisions affect all advertising, art, and knowledge combined with the phrase creative strategy. Creative advertising ideas must be original, unique, different, new, unexpected and right on target. The approach used was qualitative research methods, including data collection in the form of literature review, interviews with the actors and the surrounding communities, as well as documenting the billboard directly outside the media was located. The results of this research are the analysis report the creativity and impact of LED electronic billboard advertising effectiveness, is expected to produce a more detailed picture. So that students and practitioners can use the visual communication design, process, and maximize the advertising rules in designing a design to reach the stage of design creativity and better application. 

  17. Creativity as action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Lubart, Todd; Bonnardel, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The present paper outlines an action theory of creativity and substantiates this approach by investigating creative expression in five different domains. We propose an action framework for the analysis of creative acts built on the assumption that creativity is a relational, inter......, science, scriptwriting, and music. Results point to complex models of action and inter-action specific for each domain and also to interesting patterns of similarity and differences between domains. These findings highlight the fact that creative action takes place not “inside” individual creators but “in...

  18. Recent Trends in Minicomputer-Based Integrated Learning Systems for Reading and Language Arts Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    This paper discusses minicomputer-based ILSs (integrated learning systems), i.e., computer-based systems of hardware and software. An example of a minicomputer-based system in a school district (a composite of several actual districts) considers hardware, staffing, scheduling, reactions, problems, and training for a subskill-oriented reading…

  19. Integrating Botany with Chemistry & Art to Improve Elementary School Children's Awareness of Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çil, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Students need to be aware of plants in order to learn about, appreciate, care for, and protect them. However, research has found that many children are not aware of the plants in their environment. A way to address this issue might be integration of plants with various disciplines. I investigated the effectiveness of an instructional approach…

  20. Improving English Language Arts and Mathematics Teachers' Capabilities for Teaching Integrated Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Teachers in a large Illinois suburban school district will soon have to integrate the teaching of the Common Core State Standards into their content classes and may not feel prepared to do this effectively. Stephenson's definition of capability was used as the conceptual framework for this study, which holds that capable teachers are those who…