WorldWideScience

Sample records for integrated virtual learning

  1. A Regional Integrated Virtual Learning Environment: The AOU's Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Hammad

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose to construct a Regional Integrated Virtual Learning Environment (RIVLE for the Arab Open University (AOU. AOU is a new nonprofit learning institution with branches in six Arab countries and more branches scheduled to open in the near future. The university adopts an open learning methodology. We describe the major elements of the RIVLE and their interaction. We present a generic interface between the RIVLE and the Student Information System (SIS. We focus on the characteristics of the pedagogical model in the Arab Open University context and explain why RIVLE would be a perfect fit for this model. We argue that the potential benefits of a RIVLE are realized in such a setting. We also study the possibility of extending the RIVLE to existing learning institutions in the region.

  2. Integrating Video-Capture Virtual Reality Technology into a Physically Interactive Learning Environment for English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie Chi; Chen, Chih Hung; Jeng, Ming Chang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design and develop a Physically Interactive Learning Environment, the PILE system, by integrating video-capture virtual reality technology into a classroom. The system is designed for elementary school level English classes where students can interact with the system through physical movements. The system is designed to…

  3. Integrating Music into Math in a Virtual Reality Game: Learning Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taehyeong; Lee, Sungwoong; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate future teachers' experiences and perceptions of using a virtual reality game for elementary math education. The virtual reality game was designed and developed to integrate a musical activity (beat-making) into the math learning of fractions. Five math education major students participated in this…

  4. Designing Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this working paper is to present a conceptual model for media integrated communication in virtual learning environments. The model for media integrated communication is very simple and identifies the necessary building blocks for virtual place making in a synthesis of methods...

  5. Integrating Adaptive Games in Student-Centered Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Blanco, Angel; Torrente, Javier; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2010-01-01

    The increasing adoption of e-Learning technology is facing new challenges, such as how to produce student-centered systems that can be adapted to each student's needs. In this context, educational video games are proposed as an ideal medium to facilitate adaptation and tracking of students' performance for assessment purposes, but integrating the…

  6. Immersive Learning Environment Using 3D Virtual Worlds and Integrated Remote Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderval Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This project seeks to demonstrate the use of remote experimentation and 3D virtual environments applied to the teaching-learning in the areas of exact sciences-physics. In proposing the combination of remote experimentation and 3D virtual worlds in teaching-learning process, we intend to achieve greater geographic coverage, contributing to the construction of new methodologies of teaching support, speed of access and foremost motivation for students to continue in scientific study of the technology areas. The proposed architecture is based on a model implemented fully featured open source and open hardware. The virtual world was built in OpenSim software and integrated it a remote physics experiment called "electrical panel". Accessing the virtual world the user has total control of the experiment within the 3D virtual world.

  7. Virtual reality as a comprehensive learning tool; Realidad virtual como una herramienta de aprendizaje integral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Ramirez, Miguel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Ontiveros Hernandez, Norma Josefina [Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Zacatepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    This article presents some of the experiences with developing systems based on non-immersive virtual reality (VR). It discusses the factors that make VR a tool for creating content and learning contexts so that instruction is more efficient. VR systems enable risk-free training even when activities involve high risks, such as procedures for maintenance of medium voltage power lines. In addition, these systems have been designed to record student progress, among other things. [Spanish] Se presentan aqui algunas experiencias en el desarrollo de sistemas basados en realidad virtual (RV) no inmersiva. Se discute acerca de los factores que hacen de la RV una herramienta para crear contenido y con textos de aprendizaje, de tal modo que la instruccion pueda ser mas eficiente. Los sistemas de RV permiten el entrenamiento sin riesgos, aun cuando las actividades involucradas sean de alto riesgo, como es el caso de los procedimientos de mantenimiento a lineas energizadas de media tension. Por otro lado, estos sistemas tambien han sido habilitados para registrar el progreso de los estudiantes, entre otras cosas.

  8. Integration Between SCORM Learning Objects and the CIEMAT Virtual Elearning Platform; Integracion de Objetos de Aprendizaje SCORM con la Plataforma de Ensenanza Virtual del CIEMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailador Ferreras, M A; Troiani, S; Gonzalez Giralda, C; Llorente Herranz, C; Marco Arboli, M L

    2010-08-06

    New information and communications technologies have made a major contribution in the way of understanding the training needs, which have been involved in the change from the traditional teaching to the use of virtual learning platforms. Thus, Ciemat, has installed a virtual platform for education, in particular MOODLE in which have been installed some virtual contents developed with Flash. The next necessary step has been how to integrate the contents with the MOODLE virtual platform, following the aim to know the assessment for learning tracking of the learners. This document provides the technological facts for the integration of the flash virtual contents and the virtual platform in order to achieve the training process is efficiently evaluated. (Author) 5 refs.

  9. A Virtual Commissioning Learning Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Steffen; Madsen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    The introduction of reconfigurable manufacturing systems (RMS), Industry 4.0 and the associated technologies requires the establishment of new competencies. Towards that goal, Aalborg University (AAU) has developed an Industry 4.0 learning factory, the AAU Smart Production Lab. The AAU Smart...... Production Lab integrates a number of Industry 4.0 technologies for learning and research purposes. One of the many techniques is virtual commissioning. Virtual commissioning uses a virtual plant model and real controllers (PLCs) enabling a full emulation of the manufacturing system for verification. Virtual...... commissioning can lower the commissioning time up to 63%, allowing faster time to market. However, virtual commission is still missing industrial impact one of the reasons being lack of competencies and integration experiences. The paper presents the setup of the virtual commissioning learning platform...

  10. The effectiveness of integration of virtual patients in a collaborative learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, Hesham F; Donkers, Jeroen; Van Merrienboer, Jeroen J G

    2018-05-07

    Virtual patients (VPs) have been recently integrated within different learning activities. To compare between the effect of using VPs in a collaborative learning activity and using VPs in an independent learning activity on students' knowledge acquisition, retention and transfer. For two different topics, respectively 82 and 76 dental students participated in teaching, learning and assessment sessions with VPs. Students from a female campus and from a male campus have been randomly assigned to condition (collaborative and independent), yielding four experimental groups. Each group received a lecture followed by a learning session using two VPs per topic. Students were administrated immediate and delayed written tests as well as transfer tests using two VPs to assess their knowledge in diagnosis and treatment. For the treatment items of the immediate and delayed written tests, females outperformed males in the collaborative VP group but not in the independent VP group. On the female campus, the use of VPs in a collaborative learning activity is more effective than its use as an independent learning activity in enhancing students' knowledge acquisition and retention. However, the collaborative use of VPs by itself is not enough to produce consistent results across different groups of students and attention should be given to all the factors that would affect students' interaction.

  11. Use of Signaling to Integrate Desktop Virtual Reality and Online Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Bucky J.; Antonenko, Pavlo D.

    2012-01-01

    Desktop virtual reality is an emerging educational technology that offers many potential benefits for learners in online learning contexts; however, a limited body of research is available that connects current multimedia learning techniques with these new forms of media. Because most formal online learning is delivered using learning management…

  12. An Integration Architecture of Virtual Campuses with External e-Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Antonio; Cigarran, Juan; Huertas, Francisco; Rodriguez-Artacho, Miguel; Cogolludo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Technology enhanced learning relies on a variety of software architectures and platforms to provide different kinds of management service and enhanced instructional interaction. As e-learning support has become more complex, there is a need for virtual campuses that combine learning management systems with the services demanded by educational…

  13. THE INTEGRATION OF CREATIVITY MANAGEMENT MODELS INTO UNIVERSITIES’VIRTUAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru STRUNGĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the access of an increasingly higher number of individuals to virtual learning networks, the issue of creativity management becomes extremely important, especially for schools and universities. In the specialized literature, participating in virtual learning communities has several advantages, including: permanent access to information, high educational performance and increased creativity, and also better-developed professional identity (North and Kumta, 2014; Boulay and van Raalte, 2014. In the Romanian literature, there are few studies that aim directly at the relationship between the participation in virtual learning networks and creativity and innovation management models, especially in higher education institutions. This paper aims to study the ways in which creativity and innovation management models can be used in virtual learning networks in order to achieve better productivity at both individual and organizational levels, taking into account several best practices from this field and their possible implementation in Romanian educational institutions.

  14. Virtual Learning Ecosystems: A Proposed Framework for Integrating Educational Games, E-Learning Methods, and Virtual Community Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Digitally delivered learning shows the promise of enhancing learner motivation and engagement, advancing critical thinking skills, encouraging reflection and knowledge sharing, and improving professional self-efficacy. Digital learning objects take many forms including interactive media, apps and games, video and other e-learning activities and…

  15. Analysis of the Experience of a Virtual Learning Environment Integration Into a Biochemistry Course Offered to Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Espíndola

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available As Information and Communication Technology (ICT becomes available in educational contexts, it is important that educators experiment different ways to deal with ICT tools in the teaching -learning process at the University basic sciences level. The challenge is to integrate ICT throughout the learning subjects in order to improve the quality of the learning process to students. This paper presents the results of an experience using a Virtual Learning Management System (VLMS, named Constructore, applied in the Biochemistry discipline at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ for undergraduate medical students. Using Constructore, we developed a learning environment intended for integrating online activities and traditional course content. The course was focused on the integration of energy-yielding metabolism, exploring  metabolic adaptations in different physiological or pathological states such as starvation, diabetes and exercise. The course environment was structured with three modules, each of them presenting problem-based exercises to be answered after retrieving rele vant information in original scientific articles. Based on the analysis of  a semi-open questionnaire, the results provided evidence that the virtual environment stimulated students to critically read relevant scientific articles and to acquire skills to build and to integrate their knowledge through content association.

  16. Construction and Evaluation of an Integrated Formal/Informal Learning Environment for Foreign Language Learning across Real and Virtual Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waragai, Ikumi; Ohta, Tatsuya; Kurabayashi, Shuichi; Kiyoki, Yasushi; Sato, Yukiko; Brückner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the prototype of a foreign language learning space, based on the construction of an integrated formal/informal learning environment. Before the background of the continued innovation of information technology that places conventional learning styles and educational methods into new contexts based on new value-standards,…

  17. Reality in Virtual Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Frank; Pettersson, Michael

    professors most often decide what and when one could learn by providing the context and substance. In this perspective, the student has a role which is close to the one of a passive receiver, and s/he is mainly preoccupied with the problem of generating substance in memory most efficiently. Today, technology......-time educational logic. There are fewer attempts to use ICT according to a different pedagogical perspective than the old professor authoritarian model. The purpose of this paper is to illuminate some challenges virtual students experience when facing a new ICT-based learning situation. We will try to explore...... and develop understandings of what it might mean to be a student when learning occurs within a virtual problem based learning landscape. When students are used to the traditional classroom, challenges appear in the twilight zone between two pedagogical practices. How do the students cope with challenges...

  18. Virtual integral holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venolia, Dan S.; Williams, Lance

    1990-08-01

    components of a stereo display system with user point-of-view tracking for interactive 3D, and a digital realization of integral composite display which we term virtual integral holography. The primary drawbacks of holographic display - film processing turnaround time, and the difficulties of displaying scenes in full color -are obviated, and motion parallax cues provide easy 3D interpretation even for users who cannot see in stereo.

  19. Virtual overlay metrology for fault detection supported with integrated metrology and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Goo; Schmitt-Weaver, Emil; Kim, Min-Suk; Han, Sang-Jun; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kwon, Won-Taik; Park, Sung-Ki; Ryan, Kevin; Theeuwes, Thomas; Sun, Kyu-Tae; Lim, Young-Wan; Slotboom, Daan; Kubis, Michael; Staecker, Jens

    2015-03-01

    While semiconductor manufacturing moves toward the 7nm node for logic and 15nm node for memory, an increased emphasis has been placed on reducing the influence known contributors have toward the on product overlay budget. With a machine learning technique known as function approximation, we use a neural network to gain insight to how known contributors, such as those collected with scanner metrology, influence the on product overlay budget. The result is a sufficiently trained function that can approximate overlay for all wafers exposed with the lithography system. As a real world application, inline metrology can be used to measure overlay for a few wafers while using the trained function to approximate overlay vector maps for the entire lot of wafers. With the approximated overlay vector maps for all wafers coming off the track, a process engineer can redirect wafers or lots with overlay signatures outside the standard population to offline metrology for excursion validation. With this added flexibility, engineers will be given more opportunities to catch wafers that need to be reworked, resulting in improved yield. The quality of the derived corrections from measured overlay metrology feedback can be improved using the approximated overlay to trigger, which wafers should or shouldn't be, measured inline. As a development or integration engineer the approximated overlay can be used to gain insight into lots and wafers used for design of experiments (DOE) troubleshooting. In this paper we will present the results of a case study that follows the machine learning function approximation approach to data analysis, with production overlay measured on an inline metrology system at SK hynix.

  20. An Integrated Virtual Environment System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, James K; Gritz, Larry; Darken, Rudolph; Geigel, Joseph; Lee, Jong W

    1993-01-01

    .... A joint research at the George Washington University and the Naval Research Laboratory is bringing together issues from these domains to study the factors that contribute to an integrated virtual environment...

  1. Integrating Heuristic and Machine-Learning Methods for Efficient Virtual Machine Allocation in Data Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Pahlevan, Ali; Qu, Xiaoyu; Zapater Sancho, Marina; Atienza Alonso, David

    2017-01-01

    Modern cloud data centers (DCs) need to tackle efficiently the increasing demand for computing resources and address the energy efficiency challenge. Therefore, it is essential to develop resource provisioning policies that are aware of virtual machine (VM) characteristics, such as CPU utilization and data communication, and applicable in dynamic scenarios. Traditional approaches fall short in terms of flexibility and applicability for large-scale DC scenarios. In this paper we propose a heur...

  2. The reality of virtual learning for nurses in the largest integrated health care system in the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Cathy; Kearns, Martha A; Thompson, Nancy A

    2003-01-01

    The health care network and hospital system within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), provides employment to more than 56,000 nursing personnel and serves as clinical education site to countless other nursing and health professional students. Nurse administrators and educators are posed with the challenge of providing an environment in which each nurse is able to gain needed knowledge, learn new skills, and share and communicate this knowledge with other colleagues. The education of nurses improves the health status of veterans while also realizing individual professional enhancement. Regional and cultural diversity of the system present challenges to education, in both delivery and content. VHA's learning organizations, the Employee Education System and the Office of Special Projects, have maximized new technologies and information systems to provide innovative, virtual education opportunities, capitalizing on the benefits of informal and formal learning, thus moving VHA to the forefront in knowledge sharing and dissemination. The Virtual Learning Center, VA Knowledge Network, Learning Catalog, and VA Learning Online provide VHA's nurses with interactive, desktop virtual learning opportunities.

  3. Learning Experience with Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds create a new opportunity to enrich the educational experience through media-rich immersive learning. Virtual worlds have gained notoriety in games such as World of Warcraft (WoW), which has become the most successful online game ever, and in "general purpose" worlds, such as Second Life (SL), whose participation levels (more than 10…

  4. Virtual learning networks for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kraker, Joop; Cörvers, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable development is a participatory, multi-actor process. In this process, learning plays a major role as participants have to exchange and integrate a diversity of perspectives and types of knowledge and expertise in order to arrive at innovative, jointly supported solutions. Virtual

  5. Assessing students' learning outcomes, self-efficacy and attitudes toward the integration of virtual science laboratory in general physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatty, Sundara L.

    Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic rise in online delivery of higher education in the United States. Recent developments in web technology and access to the internet have led to a vast increase in online courses. For people who work during the day and whose complicated lives prevent them from taking courses on campus, online courses are the only alternatives by which they may achieve their goals in education. The laboratory courses are the major requirements for college and university students who want to pursue degree and certification programs in science. It is noted that there is a lack of laboratory courses in online physics courses. The present study addressed the effectiveness of a virtual science laboratory in physics instruction in terms of learning outcomes, attitudes, and self-efficacy of students in a Historically Black University College. The study included fifty-eight students (36 male and 22 female) of different science majors who were enrolled in a general physics laboratory course. They were divided into virtual and traditional groups. Three experiments were selected from the syllabus. The traditional group performed one experiment in a traditional laboratory, while the virtual group performed the same experiment in a virtual laboratory. For the second experiment, the use of laboratories by both groups was exchanged. Learner's Assessment Test (LAT), Attitudes Toward Physics Laboratories (ATPL), and Self-Efficacy Survey (SES) instruments were used. Additionally, quantitative methods such as an independent t-test, a paired t-test, and correlation statistics were used to analyze the data. The results of the first experiment indicated the learning outcomes were higher in the Virtual Laboratory than in the traditional laboratory, whereas there was no significant difference in learning outcomes with either type of lab instruction. However, significant self-efficacy gains were observed. Students expressed positive attitudes in terms of liking

  6. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  7. Designing a Virtual-Reality-Based, Gamelike Math Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhao; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the design issues related to a virtual-reality-based, gamelike learning environment (VRGLE) developed via OpenSimulator, an open-source virtual reality server. The researchers collected qualitative data to examine the VRGLE's usability, playability, and content integration for math learning. They found it important…

  8. CEDS Addresses: Virtual and Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) common data vocabulary supports the collection and use of information about virtual and blended learning. The data element "Virtual Indicator", introduced in version 3 of CEDS, supports a range of virtual learning-related use cases. The Virtual Indicator element may be related to a Course…

  9. VIRTUAL LABORATORY IN DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. Kozlovsky

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Questions of designing and a choice of technologies of creation of virtual laboratory for the distance learning system are considered. Distance learning system «Kherson Virtual University» is used as illustration.

  10. Integrating virtual manipulative with the use of iPad in the teaching and learning of fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajah Nadzirah Fatin Mohammad Malik Finti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have suggested that students have difficulties in understanding the concepts of fraction, particularly on fraction equivalence and addition of fractions that involved unlike denominators. It is envisaged that the implementation of Virtual Manipulative using iPad would enhance students’ conceptual understanding. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of Virtual Manipulative with the use of iPads in teaching equivalence and addition of fractions. The target groups were two Year 7 classes in one of the secondary schools in Brunei, one class comprising high-achieving students, while the other consist of low-achieving students. An action research design that included quantitative and qualitative data analyses was conducted. The findings revealed that the implementation of Virtual Manipulative using iPad has significant effect on students’ performance in-group activities, and it has significant effect for students with low abilities. The study also revealed that students’ motivation to learn fractions increased as they found the use of iPads to be fun and interesting. However, the results also revealed that the use of iPads as a teaching tool appeared to be challenging for teachers.

  11. Machine learning in virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, James L; Burke, Edmund K; Hirst, Jonathan D

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we highlight recent applications of machine learning to virtual screening, focusing on the use of supervised techniques to train statistical learning algorithms to prioritize databases of molecules as active against a particular protein target. Both ligand-based similarity searching and structure-based docking have benefited from machine learning algorithms, including naïve Bayesian classifiers, support vector machines, neural networks, and decision trees, as well as more traditional regression techniques. Effective application of these methodologies requires an appreciation of data preparation, validation, optimization, and search methodologies, and we also survey developments in these areas.

  12. Enhancing Learning within the 3-D Virtual Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Shirin Shafieiyoun; Akbar Moazen Safaei

    2013-01-01

    Today’s using of virtual learning environments becomes more remarkable in education. The potential of virtual learning environments has frequently been related to the expansion of sense of social presence which is obtained from students and educators. This study investigated the effectiveness of social presence within virtual learning environments and analysed the impact of social presence on increasing learning satisfaction within virtual learning environments. Second Life, as an example of ...

  13. Pre-Service Teachers Designing Virtual World Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacka, Lisa; Booth, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Integrating Information Technology Communications in the classroom has been an important part of pre-service teacher education for over a decade. The advent of virtual worlds provides the pre-service teacher with an opportunity to study teaching and learning in a highly immersive 3D computer-based environment. Virtual worlds also provide a place…

  14. Bullying in Virtual Learning Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforos, Stefanos; Tzanavaris, Spyros; Kermanidis, Katia Lida

    2017-01-01

    Bullying through the internet has been investigated and analyzed mainly in the field of social media. In this paper, it is attempted to analyze bullying in the Virtual Learning Communities using Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques, mainly in the context of sociocultural learning theories. Therefore four case studies took place. We aim to apply NLP techniques to speech analysis on communication data of online communities. Emphasis is given on qualitative data, taking into account the subjectivity of the collaborative activity. Finally, this is the first time such type of analysis is attempted on Greek data.

  15. Developing a Virtual Book - Material for Virtual Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Karin Larsen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the process of, and considerations taken when Virtual Learning Materials were developed for an international study in Comparative Social Work arranged by the VIRCLASS project. The steps taken and the elements included in the Virtual Book – A Guide to Social Work in Europe are presented in details to inform others who are planning to make virtual learning materials. Students from 11 countries in Europe participated, and their reception of this material and learning outcomes from using it are analysed and presented. Furthermore; the article discuss how the learning material contributes to students’ learning, how a common understanding of practice enhances knowledge-building and in what way audio-visual learning material can contribute to good learning in e-learning courses. The results are discussed in relation to theories about composite texts and community of inquiry, and outlines some challenges for e-teachers’ competences.

  16. Musical journey: a virtual world gamification experience for music learning

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, José; Figueiredo, Mauro; Amante, Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Games are an integral part of the learning process of humans, in particular for children, who exploit the imagery as an intrinsic part of their lives. Features from games have been successfully implemented as a means to captivate and motivate students to perform learning at various levels of education in traditional schools. This paper presents a virtual world – Musical Journey – representing the Aesthetic Periods of Music History. This virtual environment allows students to freely explore an...

  17. Promoting the Learning Mobility of Future Workers: Experiments with Virtual Placements in University-Business Arrangements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, C.A.; Herrero de Egaña y Espinosa de los Monteros, A.; Lansu, A.; Kocsis Baán, M.; Virkus, S.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual placements are learning arrangements, which generate new possibilities for accumulating professional (work-based) knowledge. Virtual placements are beneficial in many ways; they merit increased training opportunities, exposure to not/never-thought-of occupations, integration of disadvantaged

  18. Project Learning and Virtual Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fibiger, Bo; Nielsen, Janni; Sorensen, Elsebeth

    2005-01-01

    to the modularity and flexibility that characterize the study and allow admission of part-time students, full-time students and students who only sign up for one accredited module. The methodology will be illustrated through empirical snapshots from selected modules in the start-up phase, and the focus...... will be directed towards problems experienced by the students. From an analytical perspective, the paper will identify and discuss fundamental problems related to the organization, flexibility, and implementation of project pedagogy online. MIL is organized around ICT and Learning and the study theme focuses...... on ICT and Learning. In addition, MIL provides a learning space where practice is under constant negotiation and reconstruction as an inherent, integrated part of the learning process. Consequently, we argue that MIL may be seen as an example of best practice in blended learning....

  19. Learning Rationales and Virtual Reality Technology in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Guey-Fa

    1995-01-01

    Defines and describes virtual reality technology and differentiates between virtual learning environment, learning material, and learning tools. Links learning rationales to virtual reality technology to pave conceptual foundations for application of virtual reality technology education. Constructivism, case-based learning, problem-based learning,…

  20. Predicting Virtual Learning Environment Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penjor, Sonam; Zander, Pär-Ola Mikael

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the significance of Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory with regard to the use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB). The focus is on different adoption types and characteristics of users. Rogers’ DOI theory is applied...... to investigate the influence of five predictors (relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, trialability and observability) and their significance in the perception of academic staff at the RUB in relation to the probability of VLE adoption. These predictors are attributes of the VLE that determine the rate...... of adoption by various adopter group memberships (Innovators, Early Adopters, Early Majority, Late Majority, Laggards). Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were deployed to analyse adopter group memberships and predictor significance in VLE adoption and use. The results revealed varying attitudes...

  1. Virtual experiences in business administration learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Alves Amâncio

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In Business Administration, the question about contents’ specialization has arisen, which would difficult the construction of student’s global view and promote detachment between those contents and their application, compromising his professional performance. Considering Theory of Experiential Learning KOLB, 1984 which relates concrete experience and abstract conceptualization, the overcoming of those problems is searched by using a free simulation software that provides a virtual environment for those experiences – in this case, for business plan formulation including all organizational aspects. This paper reports one of those experiences and highlights as important innovations: the appreciation of contents’ integration; the student’s active and critical participation; and the teacher’s essential role as a facilitator of all the process. The incorporation of a new didactical/technological resource to enhance Business Administration Teaching and Learning Process stands out as a contribution of this work.

  2. Information literacy experiencies inside virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández Salazar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Suggest the use of virtual learning environments as an Information Literacy (IL alternative. Method. Analysis of the main elements of web sites. To achieve this purpose the article includes the relationship between IL and the learning virtual environment (by defining both phrases; phases to create virtual IL programs; processes to elaborate didactic media; the applications that may support this plan; and the description of eleven examples of learning virtual environments IL experiences from four countries (Mexico, United States of America, Spain and United Kingdom these examples fulfill the conditions expressed. Results. We obtained four comparative tables examining five elements of each experience: objectives; target community; institution; country; and platform used. Conclusions. Any IL proposal should have a clear definition; IL experiences have to follow a didactic systematic process; described experiences are based on IL definition; the experiences analyzed are similar; virtual learning environments can be used as alternatives of IL.

  3. Integrated Virtual Environment Test Concepts and Objectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tackett, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    ...), a series of integration and verification tests were conducted to provide development milestones for the simulation architecture and tools that would be needed for the full-up live/virtual field experiment...

  4. Virtual Satellite Integration Environment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advatech Pacific proposes to develop a Virtual Satellite Integration Environment (VSIE) for the NASA Ames Mission Design Center. The VSIE introduces into NASA...

  5. Students’ Motivation for Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Beluce, Andrea Carvalho; Oliveira, Katya Luciane de

    2015-01-01

    The specific characteristics of online education require of the student engagement and autonomy, factors which are related to motivation for learning. This study investigated students’ motivation in virtual learning environments (VLEs). For this, it used the Teaching and Learning Strategy and Motivation to Learn Scale in Virtual Learning Environments (TLSM-VLE). The scale presented 32 items and six dimensions, three of which aimed to measure the variables of autonomous motivation, controlled ...

  6. Virtual Reality: A New Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrington, Gary; Loge, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Discusses virtual reality (VR) technology and its possible uses in military training, medical education, industrial design and development, the media industry, and education. Three primary applications of VR in the learning process--visualization, simulation, and construction of virtual worlds--are described, and pedagogical and moral issues are…

  7. Are Learning Styles Relevant to Virtual Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chwen Jen; Toh, Seong Chong; Ismail, Wan Mohd Fauzy Wan

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a virtual reality (VR)-based learning environment on learners with different learning styles. The findings of the aptitude-by-treatment interaction study have shown that learners benefit most from the VR (guided exploration) mode, irrespective of their learning styles. This shows that the VR-based…

  8. Integrated Data Visualization and Virtual Reality Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Data Visualization and Virtual Reality Tool (IDVVRT) Phase II effort was for the design and development of an innovative Data Visualization Environment Tool (DVET) for NASA engineers and scientists, enabling them to visualize complex multidimensional and multivariate data in a virtual environment. The objectives of the project were to: (1) demonstrate the transfer and manipulation of standard engineering data in a virtual world; (2) demonstrate the effects of design and changes using finite element analysis tools; and (3) determine the training and engineering design and analysis effectiveness of the visualization system.

  9. DELIVERing Library Resources to the Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Examines a project to integrate digital libraries and virtual learning environments (VLE) focusing on requirements for online reading list systems. Design/methodology/approach: Conducted a user needs analysis using interviews and focus groups and evaluated three reading or resource list management systems. Findings: Provides a technical…

  10. Virtual Learning: Possibilities and Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimbayev, Nurassyl

    2016-01-01

    In the article it was important to consider two basic moments i.e., impact mode of using virtual environment at training process within one faculty of the University, directly at training quality and what outcomes can be reached therewith. The work significance consists of studying the virtual environment effect instead of traditional educational…

  11. Virtual Globe Games for Geographic Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Ahlqvist

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Virtual, online maps and globes allow for volunteered geographic information to capitalize on users as sensors and generate unprecedented access to information resources and services. These new "Web 2.0" applications will probably dominate development and use of virtual globes and maps in the near future. We present an experimental platform that integrates an existing virtual globe interface with added functionality as follows; an interactive layer on top of the existing map that support real time creation and manipulation of spatial interaction objects. These objects, together with the existing information delivered through the virtual globe, form a game board that can be used for educational purposes.

  12. Virtual Action Learning: Practices and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Mollie; Burgoyne, John; Pedler, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports findings from research that set out to explore virtual action learning (VAL) as an emerging variety of action learning (AL). In bringing together geographically dispersed individuals within and across organizations, and possibly across time, VAL has obvious potential in both educational and commercial contexts. Whilst there is…

  13. Foreign language learning in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Benjamin; Sheldon, Lee; Si, Mei; Hand, Anton

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality has long been used for training simulations in fields from medicine to welding to vehicular operation, but simulations involving more complex cognitive skills present new design challenges. Foreign language learning, for example, is increasingly vital in the global economy, but computer-assisted education is still in its early stages. Immersive virtual reality is a promising avenue for language learning as a way of dynamically creating believable scenes for conversational training and role-play simulation. Visual immersion alone, however, only provides a starting point. We suggest that the addition of social interactions and motivated engagement through narrative gameplay can lead to truly effective language learning in virtual environments. In this paper, we describe the development of a novel application for teaching Mandarin using CAVE-like VR, physical props, human actors and intelligent virtual agents, all within a semester-long multiplayer mystery game. Students travel (virtually) to China on a class field trip, which soon becomes complicated with intrigue and mystery surrounding the lost manuscript of an early Chinese literary classic. Virtual reality environments such as the Forbidden City and a Beijing teahouse provide the setting for learning language, cultural traditions, and social customs, as well as the discovery of clues through conversation in Mandarin with characters in the game.

  14. Immersive Virtual Worlds for (E-) Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Konnerup, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Virtual worlds are becoming ever more popular and important for the information society allowing to meet “face-to-face” and at the same time be distributed across different places. This offers numerous possibilities of revolutionizing the way learning is realized over long distances and at a given...... location. But current uses of environments like Second Life make it very clear that there is a lack of interaction and learning concepts that are tailored to these kinds of collaborative environments resulting more or less in the replication of “always the same” this time in a virtual world. An example...... is a typical lecture that is now available as an in-world podcast. This chapter examines current state-of-the-art approaches of learning in and with virtual worlds in relation to the features of such environments and then proposes a research agenda tailored at making the learning experience truly interactive...

  15. Virtual Learning Simulations in High School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Malene Warming; Makransky, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the value of using a virtual learning simulation compared to traditional lessons on the topic of evolution, and investigated if the virtual learning simulation could serve as a catalyst for STEM academic and career development, based on social cognitive career theory....... The investigation was conducted using a crossover repeated measures design based on a sample of 128 high school biology/biotech students. The results showed that the virtual learning simulation increased knowledge of evolution significantly, compared to the traditional lesson. No significant differences between...... the simulation and lesson were found in their ability to increase the non-cognitive measures. Both interventions increased self-efficacy significantly, and none of them had a significant effect on motivation. In addition, the results showed that the simulation increased interest in biology related tasks...

  16. The Reality of Virtual Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Sheldon

    1999-01-01

    Through a $7.5 million U.S. Department of Education grant, students at the Hudson (Massachusetts) Public Schools "attend" Virtual High School--a network of 30 schools in 10 states. Kids attend classes any time, work collaboratively, and choose among innovative, timely, technologically rich course offerings. Other sites are described.…

  17. Reconfiguring Course Design in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael; Zupancic, Tadeja

    2007-01-01

    for architectural students offers some innovative insights into experientially oriented educational interfaces. A comparative analysis of VIPA courses and project results are presented in the paper. Special attention in the discussion is devoted to the improvements of e-learning solutions in architecture......Although many administrators and educators are familiar with e-learning programs, learning management systems and portals, fewer may have experience with virtual distributed learning environments and their academic relevance. The blended learning experience of the VIPA e-learning project....... The criterion of the relation between the actual applicability of selected e-learning solutions and elements of collaborative educational interfaces with VR are taken into account. A system of e-learning applicability levels in program and course development and implementation of architectural tectonics...

  18. Integrating virtual reality applications in nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, Michael; Crete, Jean-Maurice; Pickett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) tools have already been developed and deployed in the nuclear industry, including in nuclear power plant construction, project management, equipment and system design, and training. Recognized as powerful tools for, inter alia, integration of data, simulation of activities, design of facilities, validation of concepts and mission planning, their application in nuclear safeguards is still very limited. However, VR tools may eventually offer transformative potential for evolving the future safeguards system to be more fully information-driven. The paper focuses especially on applications in the area of training that have been underway in the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It also outlines future applications envisioned for safeguards information and knowledge management, and information-analytic collaboration. The paper identifies some technical and programmatic pre-requisites for realizing the integrative potential of VR technologies. If developed with an orientation to integrating applications through compatible platforms, software, and models, virtual reality tools offer the long-term potential of becoming a real 'game changer,' enabling a qualitative leap in the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safeguards. The IAEA invites Member States, industry, and academia to make proposals as to how such integrating potential in the use of virtual reality technology for nuclear safeguards could be realized. (author)

  19. Intersecting Virtual Patients and Microbiology: Fostering a culture of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, David; O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerard

    2015-10-01

    The use and integration of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) resources in medical education has attracted considerable commentary and support. "Virtual Patients" are one such resource. Whilst evidence exists supporting the benefits of these resources, there has not been specific consideration of their implications for teaching microbiology; nor attention paid to both the internal and external factors that influence learner engagement with virtual patients. The principle aims of this study are to identify factors that explicitly and implicitly influence the student's interaction with a microbiology virtual patient resource and how these interactions reflect upon the use of the resource. A mixed method quantitative (online questionnaire; n=161) and qualitative (student focus groups; N=11) study was undertaken amongst third year medical students enrolled at Queen's University Belfast in the academic year 2012-2013. The results supported prior evidence that virtual patients are a useful learning tool (mean score of 5.09 out of 7) that helped them to integrate microbiology principles with clinical experiences. How students used the virtual patients and the depth of the subsequent benefits was dependent upon their perception of the importance of the resource. This was influenced by a number of factors including how the resources were presented and positioned within the curriculum, whether they were formally examined or timetabled and the importance attributed by peers who had already completed the examinations. Integration of virtual patients into the microbiology curriculum is widely endorsed and may even be considered superior to other methods of teaching. How students use these resources is dependent upon a positive perception of their importance. Educators should be aware of the factors that shape this perception when integrating TEL resources into curricula.

  20. Organizational Learning Goes Virtual?: A Study of Employees' Learning Achievement in Stereoscopic 3D Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to deepen understanding of the use of stereoscopic 3D technology (stereo3D) in facilitating organizational learning. The emergence of advanced virtual technologies, in particular to the stereo3D virtual reality, has fundamentally changed the ways in which organizations train their employees. However, in academic or…

  1. Corporate Learning in a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Anne; Berge, Zane L.

    2009-01-01

    Corporate training professionals led the explosion of e-learning solutions in the 1990s. Yet in 2008, as new generations of technology-savvy, computer games-oriented employees are entering the workforce, corporate training departments are far behind universities in exploring the use of virtual worlds like Second Life or Protosphere as platforms…

  2. Data Virtualization for Business Intelligence Systems Revolutionizing Data Integration for Data Warehouses

    CERN Document Server

    van der Lans, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Data virtualization can help you accomplish your goals with more flexibility and agility. Learn what it is and how and why it should be used with Data Virtualization for Business Intelligence Systems. In this book, expert author Rick van der Lans explains how data virtualization servers work, what techniques to use to optimize access to various data sources and how these products can be applied in different projects. You'll learn the difference is between this new form of data integration and older forms, such as ETL and replication, and gain a clear understanding of how data virtualization r

  3. A Survey of Technologies Supporting Virtual Project Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of technologies and to what extent they support virtual project based learning. The paper argues that a survey of learning technologies should be related to concrete learning tasks and processes. Problem oriented project pedagogy (POPP) is discussed, and a framework...... for evaluation is proposed where negotiation of meaning, coordination and resource management are identified as the key concepts in virtual project based learning. Three e-learning systems are selected for the survey, Virtual-U, Lotus Learningspace and Lotus Quickplace, as each system offers different strategies...... for e-learning. The paper concludes that virtual project based learning may benefit from facilities of all these systems....

  4. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-01-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment "StudentResearcher," which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum…

  5. Game-Based Learning in an OpenSim-Supported Virtual Environment on Perceived Motivational Quality of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesung; Ke, Fengfeng; Paek, Insu

    2017-01-01

    This experimental study was intended to examine whether game-based learning (GBL) that encompasses four particular game characteristics (challenges, a storyline, immediate rewards and the integration of game-play with learning content) in an OpenSimulator-supported virtual reality learning environment can improve perceived motivational quality of…

  6. Students’ Motivation for Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Carvalho Beluce

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The specific characteristics of online education require of the student engagement and autonomy, factors which are related to motivation for learning. This study investigated students’ motivation in virtual learning environments (VLEs. For this, it used the Teaching and Learning Strategy and Motivation to Learn Scale in Virtual Learning Environments (TLSM-VLE. The scale presented 32 items and six dimensions, three of which aimed to measure the variables of autonomous motivation, controlled motivation, and demotivation. The participants were 572 students from the Brazilian state of Paraná, enrolled on higher education courses on a continuous education course. The results revealed significant rates for autonomous motivational behavior. It is considered that the results obtained may provide contributions for the educators and psychologists who work with VLEs, leading to further studies of the area providing information referent to the issue investigated in this study.

  7. Inquiry-Based Learning for a Virtual Learning Community to Enhance Problem-Solving Ability of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprasitchai, Ong-art; Khlaisang, Jintavee

    2016-01-01

    The recent growth in collaborative and interactive virtual learning communities integrating innovative digital technologies and contemporary learning frameworks is contributing enormously to the use of e-learning in higher education in the twenty-first century. The purpose of this study was to describe the development of a virtual learning…

  8. Design of a virtual PBL learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Qvist, Palle; Du, Xiangyun

    2006-01-01

    The technological development has created a need for engineers who are oriented towards a global market, have the ability to be involved in interdisciplinary professional and intercultural teams, and who possess lifelong learning competencies. This entails a demand for new educational programmes...... that are more student-centred. In order to support that development, a new master programme (60 European Credit Transfer System) the Master of Problem Based Learning (MPBL) has been established with the aim to improve engineering education. The master programme addresses staff and is an international distance...... programme capable of recruiting participants from all over the world. In terms of contents, it is organized exemplary according to the problem-based and project-based learning method and the participants have to experiment and develop their own teaching and curriculum. On the virtual learning side...

  9. Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Vandepitte, Sonia; Arnó Macà, Elisabet

    Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments is a critical scholarly resource that examines experiences with virtual networks and their advantages for universities and students in the domains of writing, translation, and usability testing. Featuring coverage o...

  10. Learning Ethics through Virtual Fieldtrips: Teaching Ethical Theories through Virtual Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Rick; Thoma, Steve; Coppock, Amanda; Mazer, Matthew; Midkiff, Lewis; Younanian, Marisa; Young, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Teaching ethical reasoning is considered an important component of the undergraduate learning experience. A recent approach to teaching using experiential learning is through virtual worlds such as Second Life. We discuss how ethics may be taught using experiential learning in the virtual world of Second Life. Participants in the class in this…

  11. Lessons learned from the birth and evolution of the EduFinland virtual community for educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Holmberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Educators around the world are experimenting with the possibilities virtual three dimensional worlds have for education and learning how to use these new environments efficiently. Virtual worlds have the potential to bring some new added value to education and educators can use them to create something that is not possible to do or show in traditional classrooms. Although a lot have been learned about virtual worlds and their potential, a lot more has to be learned before virtual worlds can become an integrated part of education on various levels. The article looks back at the birth and growth of the EduFinland community in the virtual world of Second Life and discusses lessons learned so far during the years of its existence.

  12. Integrating a virtual agent into the real world

    OpenAIRE

    André, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Integrating a virtual agent into the real world : the virtual anatomy assistant ritchie / K. Dorfmüller-Ulhaas ... - In: Intelligent virtual agents : 7th international conference, IVA 2007, Paris, France, September 17-19, 2007 ; proceedings / Catherine Pelachaud ... (eds.). - Berlin [u.a.] : Springer, 2007. - S. 211-224. - (Lecture notes in computer science ; 4722 : Lecture notes in artificial intelligence)

  13. Satisfaction with virtual worlds: An integrated model of experiential value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, T.; Feldberg, J.F.M.; van den Hooff, B.J.; Meents, S.; Merikivi, J.

    2011-01-01

    Although virtual worlds increasingly attract users today, few studies have addressed what satisfies virtual world users. We therefore defined and tested an integrated model of experiential system value and virtual world satisfaction. Drawing upon expectancy-value and cognitive evaluation theories,

  14. Integration Head Mounted Display Device and Hand Motion Gesture Device for Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengganis, Y. A.; Safrodin, M.; Sukaridhoto, S.

    2018-01-01

    Virtual Reality Laboratory (VR Lab) is an innovation for conventional learning media which show us whole learning process in laboratory. There are many tools and materials are needed by user for doing practical in it, so user could feel new learning atmosphere by using this innovation. Nowadays, technologies more sophisticated than before. So it would carry in education and it will be more effective, efficient. The Supported technologies are needed us for making VR Lab such as head mounted display device and hand motion gesture device. The integration among them will be used us for making this research. Head mounted display device for viewing 3D environment of virtual reality laboratory. Hand motion gesture device for catching user real hand and it will be visualized in virtual reality laboratory. Virtual Reality will show us, if using the newest technologies in learning process it could make more interesting and easy to understand.

  15. A Review on Different Virtual Learning Methods in Pharmacy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Noori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual learning is a type of electronic learning system based on the web. It models traditional in- person learning by providing virtual access to classes, tests, homework, feedbacks and etc. Students and teachers can interact through chat rooms or other virtual environments. Web 2.0 services are usually used for this method. Internet audio-visual tools, multimedia systems, a disco CD-ROMs, videotapes, animation, video conferencing, and interactive phones can all be used to deliver data to the students. E-learning can occur in or out of the classroom. It is time saving with lower costs compared to traditional methods. It can be self-paced, it is suitable for distance learning and it is flexible. It is a great learning style for continuing education and students can independently solve their problems but it has its disadvantages too. Thereby, blended learning (combination of conventional and virtual education is being used worldwide and has improved knowledge, skills and confidence of pharmacy students.The aim of this study is to review, discuss and introduce different methods of virtual learning for pharmacy students.Google scholar, Pubmed and Scupus databases were searched for topics related to virtual, electronic and blended learning and different styles like computer simulators, virtual practice environment technology, virtual mentor, virtual patient, 3D simulators, etc. are discussed in this article.Our review on different studies on these areas shows that the students are highly satisfied withvirtual and blended types of learning.

  16. Visualization Analytics for Second Language Vocabulary Learning in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Indy Y. T.; Lan, Yu-Ju; Kao, Chia-Ling; Li, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Language learning occurring in authentic contexts has been shown to be more effective. Virtual worlds provide simulated contexts that have the necessary elements of authentic contexts for language learning, and as a result, many studies have adopted virtual worlds as a useful platform for language learning. However, few studies so far have…

  17. Learning, Teaching and Ambiguity in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Diane; Oliver, Martin; Burn, Andrew

    What might online communities and informal learning practices teach us about virtual world pedagogy? In this chapter we describe a research project in which learning practices in online worlds such as World of Warcraft and Second LifeTM (SL) were investigated. Working within an action research framework, we employed a range of methods to investigate how members of online communities define the worlds they encounter, negotiate the terms of participation, and manage the incremental complexity of game worlds. The implications of such practices for online pedagogy were then explored through teaching in SL. SL eludes simple definitions. Users, or "residents", of SL partake of a range of pleasures and activities - socialising, building, creating and exhibiting art, playing games, exploring, shopping, or running a business, for instance. We argue that the variable nature of SL gives rise to degrees of ambiguity. This ambiguity impacts on inworld social practices, and has significant implications for online teaching and learning.

  18. InSPAL: A Novel Immersive Virtual Learning Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Julia; Ip, Horace H S; Shuk-Ying Lau, Kate; Chen Li, Richard; Tso, Amy; Choi, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce The Interactive Sensory Program for Affective Learning (InSPAL) a pioneering virtual learning programme designed for the severely intellectually disabled (SID) students, who are having cognitive deficiencies and other sensory-motor handicaps, and thus need more help and attention in overcoming their learning difficulties. Through combining and integrating interactive media and virtual reality technology with the principles of art therapy and relevant pedagogical techniques, InSPAL aims to strengthen SID students' pre-learning abilities, promote their self-awareness, decrease behavioral interferences with learning as well as social interaction, enhance their communication and thus promote their quality of life. Results of our study show that students who went through our programme were more focused, and the ability to do things more independently increased by 15%. Moreover, 50% of the students showed a marked improvement in the ability to raise their hands in response, thus increasing their communication skills. The use of therapeutic interventions enabled a better control to the body, mind and emotions, resulting a greater performance and better participation.

  19. Promoting Therapists? Use of Motor Learning Strategies within Virtual Reality-Based Stroke Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Levac, Danielle E.; Glegg, Stephanie M. N.; Sveistrup, Heidi; Colquhoun, Heather; Miller, Patricia; Finestone, Hillel; DePaul, Vincent; Harris, Jocelyn E.; Velikonja, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Therapists use motor learning strategies (MLSs) to structure practice conditions within stroke rehabilitation. Virtual reality (VR)-based rehabilitation is an MLS-oriented stroke intervention, yet little support exists to assist therapists in integrating MLSs with VR system use. Method A pre-post design evaluated a knowledge translation (KT) intervention incorporating interactive e-learning and practice, in which 11 therapists learned how to integrate MLSs within VR-based therapy. Sel...

  20. Neuropsychological performance and integrated evaluation for disabled people using Virtual Reality: integrated VR profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, PierAntonio

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes a Virtual Reality (VR) based innovative model of evaluation of the performance and potentiality of young mentally/psychically disabled subjects with learning difficulties. Using an immersive PC-based VR system, the study investigated the characteristics of 150 disabled subjects in the EU funded project "Horizon O.D.A.--Catania-1998--2000". The result is the definition of an individual neuropsychological "Integrated Profile", based on VR performance, that allows an objective functional benchmark between different subjects. This model can be used to investigate the possibility of job integration for mentally/psychically disabled subjects.

  1. Multisensory Integration in the Virtual Hand Illusion with Active Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the sense of immersion is one of the core issues in virtual reality. Perceptual illusions of ownership can be perceived over a virtual body in a multisensory virtual reality environment. Rubber Hand and Virtual Hand Illusions showed that body ownership can be manipulated by applying suitable visual and tactile stimulation. In this study, we investigate the effects of multisensory integration in the Virtual Hand Illusion with active movement. A virtual xylophone playing system which can interactively provide synchronous visual, tactile, and auditory stimulation was constructed. We conducted two experiments regarding different movement conditions and different sensory stimulations. Our results demonstrate that multisensory integration with free active movement can improve the sense of immersion in virtual reality.

  2. Multisensory Integration in the Virtual Hand Illusion with Active Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woong; Li, Liang; Satoh, Satoru; Hachimura, Kozaburo

    2016-01-01

    Improving the sense of immersion is one of the core issues in virtual reality. Perceptual illusions of ownership can be perceived over a virtual body in a multisensory virtual reality environment. Rubber Hand and Virtual Hand Illusions showed that body ownership can be manipulated by applying suitable visual and tactile stimulation. In this study, we investigate the effects of multisensory integration in the Virtual Hand Illusion with active movement. A virtual xylophone playing system which can interactively provide synchronous visual, tactile, and auditory stimulation was constructed. We conducted two experiments regarding different movement conditions and different sensory stimulations. Our results demonstrate that multisensory integration with free active movement can improve the sense of immersion in virtual reality.

  3. MULTIMEDIA VIRTUAL LABORATORY FOR PHYSICS IN THE DISTANCE LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Kravtsov; E.O. Kozlovskiy

    2014-01-01

    It’s presented the results of the software module "Virtual Lab" for distance learning system «Kherson Virtual University" (DLS KVU) applied to the problems of physics. Relevance of research due to the absence of existing DLS to support the creation and use of virtual labs in the disciplines of science cycle. The subject of this study is a software module to create and use virtual labs in distance learning system. The purpose of the study is a description of software technology of virtual labo...

  4. Virtual and physical toys: open-ended features for non-formal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Eva; Brooks, Anthony

    2006-04-01

    This paper examines the integrated toy--both physical and virtual--as an essential resource for collaborative learning. This learning incorporates rehabilitation, training, and education. The data derived from two different cases. Pedagogical issues related to non-formal learning and open-ended features of design are discussed. Findings suggest that social, material, and expressive affordances constitute a base for an alterative interface to encourage children's play and learning.

  5. Working Group on Virtual Data Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Palanisamy, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); van Dam, K. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-04

    This report is the outcome of a workshop commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) to examine current and future data infrastructure requirements foundational for achieving CESD scientific mission goals in advancing a robust, predictive understanding of Earth’s climate and environmental systems. Over the past several years, data volumes in CESD disciplines have risen sharply to unprecedented levels (tens of petabytes). Moreover, the complexity and diversity of this research data— including simulations, observations, and reanalysis— have grown significantly, posing new challenges for data capture, storage, verification, analysis, and integration. With the trends of increased data volume (in the hundreds of petabytes), more complex analysis processes, and growing cross-disciplinary collaborations, it is timely to investigate whether the CESD community has the computational and data support needed to fully realize the scientific potential of its data collections. In recognition of the challenges, a partnership is forming across CESD and among national and international agencies to examine the viability of creating an integrated, collaborative data infrastructure: a Virtual Laboratory. The overarching goal of this report is to identify the community’s key data technology requirements and high-priority development needs for sustaining and growing its scientific discovery potential. The report also aims to map these requirements to existing solutions and to identify gaps in current services, tools, and infrastructure that will need to be addressed in the short, medium, and long term to advance scientific progress.

  6. INTEGRATION OF VIRTUAL ENTERPRISES USING SERVICE ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladin Stefanovic

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Virtual enterprise integration (VEI is virtually the most critical success factor for making virtual enterprise (VE a real, competitive, and widely implemented organizational an d management concept. One of possible approaches in virtual enterprise integration is employment of web services. In this paper we will present process-oriented approach for developing an SOA for VEI. The general assumption of suggested approach is that service oriented architecture is based on business service and that business services mostly correspond to exchanged documentation in a real business system. CASE tool for web service specification is also presented.

  7. Integration issues in virtual enterprises supported by an architectural framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwegers, Arian; Hannus, Matti; Tølle, Martin

    2001-01-01

    enterprises, especially concerning integration issues. This paper lays down an architectural framework, called VERAM, which aims to support the set-up and operation of virtual enterprises. Five different levels of integration are identified. They should all be addressed during the formation of a virtual......Nowadays, enterprises cooperate more extensively with other enterprises during the entire product life cycle. Temporary alliances between various enterprises emerge such as those in Virtual Enterprises. However, many enterprises experience difficulties in the formation and operation of virtual...

  8. Moving towards Virtual Learning Clouds from Traditional Learning: Higher Educational Systems in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthi Muniasamy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available E-Learning has become an increasingly popular learning approach in higher Education institutions due to the rapid growth of Communication and Information Technology (CIT. In recent years, it has been integrated in many university programs and it is one of the new learning trends. But in many Indian Universities did not implement this novel technology in their Educational Systems. E-Learning is not intended to replace the traditional classroom setting, but to provide new opportunities and new virtual environment for interaction and communication between the students and teacher. E-Learning through Cloud is now becoming an interesting and very useful revolutionary technology in the field of education. E-Learning system usually requires huge amount of hardware and software resources. Due to the cost, many universities in India do not want to implement the E-Learning technology in their Educational system and they cannot afford such investments. Cloud Virtual Learning is the only solution for this problem. This paper presents the benefits of using cloud technology in E-Learning system, working mode, Services, Models. And also we discuss the cloud computing educational environment and how higher education may take advantage of clouds not only in terms of cost but also in terms of Security, flexibility, portability, efficiency and reliability. And also we present some educational clouds introduced by popular cloud providers.

  9. Contextual EFL Learning in a 3D Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the current study are to develop virtually immersive EFL learning contexts for EFL learners in Taiwan to pre- and review English materials beyond the regular English class schedule. A 2-iteration action research lasting for one semester was conducted to evaluate the effects of virtual contexts on learners' EFL learning. 132…

  10. The Influence of Virtual Learning Environments in Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Paulo; Miranda, Luísa; Morais, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the relation between the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) and students' performance. Therefore, virtual learning environments are characterised and a study is presented emphasising the frequency of access to a VLE and its relation with the students' performance from a public higher education institution…

  11. Effectiveness of Collaborative Learning with 3D Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Hoan; Lim, Kenneth Y. T.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual worlds have affordances to enhance collaborative learning in authentic contexts. Despite the potential of collaborative learning with a virtual world, few studies investigated whether it is more effective in student achievements than teacher-directed instruction. This study investigated the effectiveness of collaborative problem solving…

  12. The Virtual Institute for Integrative Biology (VIIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, G.; Gonzalez-Nieto, F.; Perez-Acle, T.; Isea, R.; Holmes, D. S.

    2007-01-01

    The Virtual Institute for Integrative Biology (VII B) is a Latin American initiative for achieving global collaborative e-Science in the areas of bioinformatics, genome biology, systems biology, Metagenomic, medical applications and nanobiotechnolgy. The scientific agenda of VIIB includes: construction of databases for comparative genomic, the AlterORF database for alternate open reading frames discovery in genomes, bioinformatics services and protein simulations for biotechnological and medical applications. Human resource development has been promoted through co-sponsored students and shared teaching and seminars via video conferencing. E-Science challenges include: inter operability and connectivity concerns, high performance computing limitations, and the development of customized computational frameworks and flexible work flows to efficiently exploit shared resources without causing impediments to the user. Outreach programs include training workshops and classes for high school teachers and students and the new Adopt-a-Gene initiative. The VIIB has proved an effective way for small teams to transcend the critical mass problem, to overcome geographic limitations, to harness the power of large scale, collaborative science and improve the visibility of Latin American science It may provide a useful paradigm for developing further e-Science initiatives in Latin America and other emerging regions. (Author)

  13. Dutch virtual integration of healthcare information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, J C; Vlug, A E; van Boven, G J

    2007-01-01

    As information technology creates opportunities for cooperation which crosses the boundaries between healthcare institutions, it will become an integral part of the Dutch healthcare system. Along with many involved organizations in healthcare the National IT Institute for Healthcare in the Netherlands (NICTIZ) is working on the realization of a national IT infrastructure for healthcare and a national electronic patient record (EPR). An underlying national architecture is designed to enable the Dutch EPR virtually, not in a national database, nor on a patient's smartcard. The required secure infrastructure provides generic functions for healthcare applications: patient identification, authentication and authorization of healthcare professionals. The first national applications in the EPR program using a national index of where patient data is stored, are the electronic medication record and the electronic record for after hours GP services. The rollout of the electronic medication record and electronic record for after hours GP services has been started in 2007. To guarantee progress of electronic data exchange in healthcare in the Netherlands we have primarily opted for two healthcare applications: the electronic medication record and the electronic record for after hours GP services. The use of a national switch-point containing the registry of where to find what information, guarantees that the professional receives the most recent information and omits large databases to contain downloaded data. Proper authorization, authentication as well as tracing by the national switchpoint also ensures a secure environment for the communication of delicate information.

  14. Leadership Development through Virtual Action Learning: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Kath; Pedler, Mike; Radcliff, Phil

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a case study based on the evaluation of the two VAL (virtual action learning) sets. We report participants learning both leadership and the VAL process based on the basis of telephone interviews. We conclude that what is learned about leadership is connected with how learning takes place and suggest that the content and process…

  15. Etnografía virtual Virtual ethnography: exploring a methodological option for the research on virtual learning environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez Cadavid Gloria María

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende esbozar algunas de las consideraciones metodológicas que hoy confluyen en el estudio de los ambientes virtuales, desde la opción etnográfica. De manera específica se quiere observar la forma en que, algunos investigadores han abordado el aspecto metodológico para estudiar los ambientes virtuales, líneas de evolución y posible contribución al conocimiento y mejoramiento de los procesos de e-learning. This article aims to outline some methodological considerations that merge together on the study of virtual learning environments, especially from the ethnographic perspective. Specifically, what we want to observe, is the way some researchers have approached the methodological aspect in order to study virtual learning environments, the evolution lines and the possible contribution they’ve made to knowledge and improvement of e-learning processes.

  16. Teaching strategies in web technologies for virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilber Dario Saza-Garzón

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The virtual learning environments (AVAs have been a subject of discussion and questions mainly on finding the best teaching practices, which tools you can use them and how to achieve optimum utilization have better results in virtual education, for Therefore in this paper some elements about the characteristics, history, teaching, studies have virtual environments and web applications as tools to support teaching and learning, are set for a virtual tutor note the when planning, designing, creating and implementing online courses. Thus the reader will find concepts, explanations and different evolutionary processes that wins ICT and how are you have been involved in the educational context, spotting potential applications from mediation of teaching, plus some suggestions of how to carry out exposed use thereof in virtual learning environments to strengthen the different processes of teaching and learning.

  17. Astronomical Data Integration Beyond the Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemson, G.; Laurino, O.

    2015-09-01

    "Data integration" generally refers to the process of combining data from different source data bases into a unified view. Much work has been devoted in this area by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA), allowing users to discover and access databases through standard protocols. However, different archives present their data through their own schemas and users must still select, filter, and combine data for each archive individually. An important reason for this is that the creation of common data models that satisfy all sub-disciplines is fraught with difficulties. Furthermore it requires a substantial amount of work for data providers to present their data according to some standard representation. We will argue that existing standards allow us to build a data integration framework that works around these problems. The particular framework requires the implementation of the IVOA Table Access Protocol (TAP) only. It uses the newly developed VO data modelling language (VO-DML) specification, which allows one to define extensible object-oriented data models using a subset of UML concepts through a simple XML serialization language. A rich mapping language allows one to describe how instances of VO-DML data models are represented by the TAP service, bridging the possible mismatch between a local archive's schema and some agreed-upon representation of the astronomical domain. In this so called local-as-view approach to data integration, “mediators" use the mapping prescriptions to translate queries phrased in terms of the common schema to the underlying TAP service. This mapping language has a graphical representation, which we expose through a web based graphical “drag-and-drop-and-connect" interface. This service allows any user to map the holdings of any TAP service to the data model(s) of choice. The mappings are defined and stored outside of the data sources themselves, which allows the interface to be used in a kind of crowd-sourcing effort

  18. Integration of the virtual model of a Stewart platform with the avatar of a vehicle in a virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbuś, K.; Ociepka, P.

    2016-08-01

    The development of methods of computer aided design and engineering allows conducting virtual tests, among others concerning motion simulation of technical means. The paper presents a method of integrating an object in the form of a virtual model of a Stewart platform with an avatar of a vehicle moving in a virtual environment. The area of the problem includes issues related to the problem of fidelity of mapping the work of the analyzed technical mean. The main object of investigations is a 3D model of a Stewart platform, which is a subsystem of the simulator designated for driving learning for disabled persons. The analyzed model of the platform, prepared for motion simulation, was created in the “Motion Simulation” module of a CAD/CAE class system Siemens PLM NX. Whereas the virtual environment, in which the moves the avatar of the passenger car, was elaborated in a VR class system EON Studio. The element integrating both of the mentioned software environments is a developed application that reads information from the virtual reality (VR) concerning the current position of the car avatar. Then, basing on the accepted algorithm, it sends control signals to respective joints of the model of the Stewart platform (CAD).

  19. Aprender Historia en ambientes virtuales / History learning in virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Moreno Castañeda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este ensayo se basa en la ampliación y profundización de un escrito anterior titulado “Innovar para diversificar y favorecer el aprendizaje histórico mediante entornos virtuales”, que fue presentado en eventos académicos de la Universidad de Guadalajara y la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas en México y en la Universidad de Extremadura en España. Así mismo, esa versión ha sido aprovechada como material de estudio en algunos cursos para la formación de profesores de Historia. La idea de la incorporación de las Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC para el aprendizaje de la Historia me lleva siempre a pensar en la historia de estas tecnologías y las permanentes insistencias de todo lo maravilloso que pudieran ser para la educación, por una parte; y por otra, a las quejas de los educadores por la manera como distraen a los educandos de sus deberes escolares. Así sucedió con la radio, la televisión y ahora con las computadoras e Internet, videojuegos, celulares y la gran diversidad de dispositivos móviles. A propósito de lo histórico, habría que preguntarnos si antes de la aparición de todos estos aparatos no habría otros distractores para los estudiantes, que hicieran más atractiva la vida fuera de la escuela que dentro de ésta.Summary: This essay is based on the expansion and deepening of an earlier article entitled “Innovate to diversify and promote historical learning through virtual environments”, presented in academic events at the University of Guadalajara, the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas and the University of Extremadura in Spain. Also, this version has been used as study material for some courses for training teachers of history.The idea of the incorporation of Information Technology and Communication (ICT for learning history always leads me to think about the history of these technologies and the continuing insistence of everything wonderful that could be for education

  20. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR OF VIRTUAL PHYSICAL LABORATORY IN DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM «KHERSON VIRTUAL UNIVERSITY»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravtsov H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The questions of modeling the structure of the objects of the system, the design of software modules and technologies for creating the editor of a virtual laboratory are considered. The relevance of the study is due to the lack in existing distance learning systems of support for the creation and use of virtual laboratory work on disciplines of the natural-science profile. The subject of the study is a software module for creating and using virtual laboratory work in a distance learning system. The purpose of the study is the development of a system model and a description of the software development technology of a virtual laboratory for physics for a distance learning system. The information technologies of designing the structure of the virtual laboratory and the main modes of the program module of the editor of the virtual laboratory work are described. At the heart of the structure of the software module "Virtual Laboratory" is the multimedia Web-editor of virtual laboratory works, which is created using object-oriented design technology. The program library of multimedia 3D objects created in the development environment of interactive graphic objects Unity3D. It unifies the process of creation and processing of virtual laboratory works. The basic mathematical package for supporting calculations is the mathematical processor Waterloo Maple. The application of the developed software interface will allow teachers to create laboratory works and use them in their distance courses. Students, in turn, will be able to conduct research, performing virtual laboratory work. As an example, the editor of the virtual laboratory for physics in the distance learning system "Kherson Virtual University" is considered.

  1. MULTIMEDIA VIRTUAL LABORATORY FOR PHYSICS IN THE DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Kravtsov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It’s presented the results of the software module "Virtual Lab" for distance learning system «Kherson Virtual University" (DLS KVU applied to the problems of physics. Relevance of research due to the absence of existing DLS to support the creation and use of virtual labs in the disciplines of science cycle. The subject of this study is a software module to create and use virtual labs in distance learning system. The purpose of the study is a description of software technology of virtual laboratory in physics for distance learning system. It’s described the information technology, which used in design and development, as well as the structure of the virtual laboratory and its place in the DLS KVU. It’s described the principal modes of operation of the program module in the system and methods for its use in the educational process. The basic structure of the software module "Virtual Lab" is a multimedia Web editor of virtual labs, which was created using Object-oriented analysis and design technology. Software library of multimedia 3D objects, which was created in the development environment of interactive graphics Unity3D, unifies the process of creating and processing virtual labs. Basic mathematical calculations support the math processor Waterloo Maple. The developed software interface allows teachers to create laboratory and use them in their distance courses. Students, in turn, will be able to conduct research, performing virtual labs.

  2. Integrating Intelligent Structured Training with a Virtual Dismounted Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Randy; Tasoluk, Coskun; Marshall, Henry; Sims, Jason; Green, Gary

    2007-01-01

    .... This paper reviews results from the integration of an Intelligent Structured Trainer with the embedded Virtual Warrior Soldier prototype developed for the Army RDECOM Simulation and Training Technology Center...

  3. Learning Science in a Virtual Reality Application: The Impacts of Animated-Virtual Actors' Visual Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartiko, Iwan; Kavakli, Manolya; Cheng, Ken

    2010-01-01

    As the technology in computer graphics advances, Animated-Virtual Actors (AVAs) in Virtual Reality (VR) applications become increasingly rich and complex. Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) suggests that complex visual materials could hinder novice learners from attending to the lesson properly. On the other hand, previous studies have…

  4. Learning design thinking online : studying students' learning experience in shared virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Kung Wong

    2010-01-01

    Learning Design Thinking Online: Studying Students' Learning Experience in Shared Virtual Reality My study attempts to deepen understanding about the learning experiences of design students in undertaking design-thinking exercises in a shared virtual reality. This study has identified the areas of an appropriate pedagogy for E-Learning and the use of a shared virtual environment for students in tertiary design education. Specific questions arising ji"Om this research are: (1...

  5. Learning Curves of Virtual Mastoidectomy in Distributed and Massed Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2015-10-01

    Repeated and deliberate practice is crucial in surgical skills training, and virtual reality (VR) simulation can provide self-directed training of basic surgical skills to meet the individual needs of the trainee. Assessment of the learning curves of surgical procedures is pivotal in understanding skills acquisition and best-practice implementation and organization of training. To explore the learning curves of VR simulation training of mastoidectomy and the effects of different practice sequences with the aim of proposing the optimal organization of training. A prospective trial with a 2 × 2 design was conducted at an academic teaching hospital. Participants included 43 novice medical students. Of these, 21 students completed time-distributed practice from October 14 to November 29, 2013, and a separate group of 19 students completed massed practice on May 16, 17, or 18, 2014. Data analysis was performed from June 6, 2014, to March 3, 2015. Participants performed 12 repeated virtual mastoidectomies using a temporal bone surgical simulator in either a distributed (practice blocks spaced in time) or massed (all practice in 1 day) training program with randomization for simulator-integrated tutoring during the first 5 sessions. Performance was assessed using a modified Welling Scale for final product analysis by 2 blinded senior otologists. Compared with the 19 students in the massed practice group, the 21 students in the distributed practice group were older (mean age, 25.1 years), more often male (15 [62%]), and had slightly higher mean gaming frequency (2.3 on a 1-5 Likert scale). Learning curves were established and distributed practice was found to be superior to massed practice, reported as mean end score (95% CI) of 15.7 (14.4-17.0) in distributed practice vs. 13.0 (11.9-14.1) with massed practice (P = .002). Simulator-integrated tutoring accelerated the initial performance, with mean score for tutored sessions of 14.6 (13.9-15.2) vs. 13.4 (12.8-14.0) for

  6. Learning Area and Perimeter with Virtual Manipulatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily; Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Manipulatives are considered a best practice for educating students with disabilities, but little research exists which examines virtual manipulatives as tool for supporting students in mathematics. This project investigated the use of a virtual manipulative through the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives--polynominoes (i.e., tiles)--as a…

  7. Virtual Reality in Engineering Education: The Future of Creative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Hadi Ghazi Abulrub

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality has achieved an adequate level of development for it to be considered in innovative applications such as education, training, and research in higher education. Virtual reality offers both opportunities and challenges for the educational sector. One of the challenges of virtual reality technology is the costs associated which have been unaffordable for educational institutes. However, in recent years, computer hardware and software development has made it more feasible to incorporate virtual reality technology into future teaching strategies. Despite the cost challenges, educational benefits of implementing virtual reality remain compelling. This paper explains virtual reality principle and describes the interactive educational environment developed at WMG, the University of Warwick. It also discusses the benefits of using state-of-the-art 3D photorealistic interactive and immersive virtual environment for engineering undergraduates and postgraduate teaching, learning and training.

  8. Improving Virtual Collaborative Learning through Canonical Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Peter; Lehr, Christian; Gersch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Virtual collaboration continues to gain in significance and is attracting attention also as virtual collaborative learning (VCL) in education. This paper addresses aspects of VCL that we identified as critical in a series of courses named "Net Economy": (1) technical infrastructure, (2) motivation and collaboration, and (3) assessment…

  9. Game-Like Language Learning in 3-D Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anke; Gonzalez-Pardo, Antonio; Camacho, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents our recent experiences with the design of game-like applications in 3-D virtual environments as well as its impact on student motivation and learning. Therefore our paper starts with a brief analysis of the motivational aspects of videogames and virtual worlds (VWs). We then go on to explore the possible benefits of both in the…

  10. Learning Desert Geomorphology Virtually versus in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Richard J., II; Douglass, John; Dorn, Ronald I.

    2008-01-01

    Statistical analyses of pre-test and post-test results, as well as qualitative insight obtained by essays, compared introductory physical geography college students who learned desert geomorphology only virtually, in the field and both ways. With the exception of establishing geographic context, the virtual field trip was statistically…

  11. Declarative Knowledge Acquisition in Immersive Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rustin

    2016-01-01

    The author investigated the interaction effect of immersive virtual reality (VR) in the classroom. The objective of the project was to develop and provide a low-cost, scalable, and portable VR system containing purposely designed and developed immersive virtual learning environments for the US Army. The purpose of the mixed design experiment was…

  12. Remote Laboratory Experiments in a Virtual Immersive Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Berruti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Immersive Learning (VIL test bench implements a virtual collaborative immersive environment, capable of integrating natural contexts and typical gestures, which may occur during traditional lectures, enhanced with advanced experimental sessions. The system architecture is described, along with the motivations, and the most significant choices, both hardware and software, adopted for its implementation. The novelty of the approach essentially relies on its capability of embedding functionalities that stem from various research results (mainly carried out within the VICOM national project, and “putting the pieces together” in a well-integrated framework. These features, along with its high portability, good flexibility, and, above all, low cost, make this approach appropriate for educational and training purposes, mainly concerning measurements on telecommunication systems, at universities and research centers, as well as enterprises. Moreover, the methodology can be employed for remote access to and sharing of costly measurement equipment in many different activities. The immersive characteristics of the framework are illustrated, along with performance measurements related to a specific application.

  13. Language Learning in Virtual Reality Environments: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsun-Ju; Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the research trends in language learning in a virtual reality environment by conducting a content analysis of findings published in the literature from 2004 to 2013 in four top ranked computer-assisted language learning journals: "Language Learning & Technology," "CALICO Journal," "Computer…

  14. Transgenic Learning for STEAM Subjects and Virtual Containers for OER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Daniel; Corbí, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Transgenic learning is a disruptive approach in education. It encourages modification of moving parts of the educational chain. This article provides a view of transgenic learning focused on the delivery of enriched learning contents in STEAM areas. It discusses the mutagenic role that the virtual containers may play in current distance education.…

  15. Virtual Communities of Collaborative Learning for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, Gilda E.

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to outline and project three new learning scenarios for Higher Education that, after the emergence of ICT and communication through the Network-lnternet, have appeared under the generic name of virtual communities. To that end, we start from a previous conceptual analysis on collaborative learning, cooperative learning and…

  16. Multi-Agent Framework for Virtual Learning Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Nunez, Gustavo

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of computer-supported collaborative learning, distributed artificial intelligence, and intelligent tutoring systems focuses on the concept of agents, and describes a virtual learning environment that has a multi-agent system. Describes a model of interactions in collaborative learning and discusses agents for Web-based virtual…

  17. Virtual Reality and Learning: Where Is the Pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to build upon Dalgarno and Lee's model or framework of learning in three-dimensional (3-D) virtual learning environments (VLEs) and to extend their road map for further research in this area. The enhanced model shares the common goal with Dalgarno and Lee of identifying the learning benefits from using 3-D VLEs. The…

  18. A framework for different levels of integration of computational models into web-based virtual patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononowicz, Andrzej A; Narracott, Andrew J; Manini, Simone; Bayley, Martin J; Lawford, Patricia V; McCormack, Keith; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-23

    Virtual patients are increasingly common tools used in health care education to foster learning of clinical reasoning skills. One potential way to expand their functionality is to augment virtual patients' interactivity by enriching them with computational models of physiological and pathological processes. The primary goal of this paper was to propose a conceptual framework for the integration of computational models within virtual patients, with particular focus on (1) characteristics to be addressed while preparing the integration, (2) the extent of the integration, (3) strategies to achieve integration, and (4) methods for evaluating the feasibility of integration. An additional goal was to pilot the first investigation of changing framework variables on altering perceptions of integration. The framework was constructed using an iterative process informed by Soft System Methodology. The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) initiative has been used as a source of new computational models. The technical challenges associated with development of virtual patients enhanced by computational models are discussed from the perspectives of a number of different stakeholders. Concrete design and evaluation steps are discussed in the context of an exemplar virtual patient employing the results of the VPH ARCH project, as well as improvements for future iterations. The proposed framework consists of four main elements. The first element is a list of feasibility features characterizing the integration process from three perspectives: the computational modelling researcher, the health care educationalist, and the virtual patient system developer. The second element included three integration levels: basic, where a single set of simulation outcomes is generated for specific nodes in the activity graph; intermediate, involving pre-generation of simulation datasets over a range of input parameters; advanced, including dynamic solution of the model. The third element is the

  19. MULTIMEDIA EDITOR OF VIRTUAL PHYSICAL LABORATORY IN DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEM «KHERSON VIRTUAL UNIVERSITY»

    OpenAIRE

    Kravtsov H.; Baiev A.; Lemeshchuk O.; Orlov V.

    2017-01-01

    The questions of modeling the structure of the objects of the system, the design of software modules and technologies for creating the editor of a virtual laboratory are considered. The relevance of the study is due to the lack in existing distance learning systems of support for the creation and use of virtual laboratory work on disciplines of the natural-science profile. The subject of the study is a software module for creating and using virtual laboratory work in a distance learning syste...

  20. COMPUTER LEARNING SIMULATOR WITH VIRTUAL REALITY FOR OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria V. Gribova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A toolset of a medical computer learning simulator for ophthalmology with virtual reality and its implementation are considered in the paper. The simulator is oriented for professional skills training for students of medical universities. 

  1. Multi-modal Virtual Scenario Enhances Neurofeedback Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avihay Cohen

    2016-08-01

    produced a higher effect size. In addition, neurofeedback via the animated scenario showed better sustainability, as indicated by a no-feedback trial conducted in session 2 and better transferability to a new unfamiliar interface. Lastly, participants reported that the animated scenario was more engaging and more motivating than the thermometer. Together, these results demonstrate the promising potential of integrating realistic virtual environments in neurofeedback to enhance learning and improve user's experience.

  2. Virtual learning environment for interactive engagement with advanced quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Kock Pedersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  3. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  4. Data preparation for municipal virtual assistant using machine learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jovan, Leon Noe

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this master’s thesis was to develop a procedure that will automate the construction of the knowledge base for a virtual assistant that answers questions about municipalities in Slovenia. The aim of the procedure is to replace or facilitate manual preparation of the virtual assistant's knowledge base. Theoretical backgrounds of different machine learning fields, such as multilabel classification, text mining and learning from weakly labeled data were examined to gain a better ...

  5. Virtual Learning Factory on VR-Supported Factory Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Weidig , Christian; Menck , Nicole; Winkes , Pascal ,; Aurich , Jan ,

    2014-01-01

    Part 13: Virtual Reality and Simulation; International audience; Learning Factories are becoming popular as tangible measures to teach engineering methods while making use of them in an industrial-like environment. Their core component is usually a factory demonstrator, users are physically working with. For factory planning such approaches can hardly be adapted, due to long lasting realization phases.To overcome this obstacle a virtual learning factory has been developed whose core component...

  6. Market integration of Virtual Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mette Kirschmeyer; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2013-01-01

    develop a three stage market model, which includes Day-Ahead (Spot), Intra-Day and Regulating Power Markets. This allows us to test the hypothesis that the Virtual Power Plant can generate additional profit by trading across several markets. We find that even though profits do increase as more markets...

  7. Virtual Communities of Collaborative Learning for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda E. Sotomayor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to outline and project three new learning scenarios for Higher Education that, after the emergence of ICT and communication through the Network-lnternet, have come under the generic name of virtual communities. To that end, we start from a previous conceptual analysis on collaborative learning, cooperative learning and related concepts taking place in these communities and serving as a basis for sorting them into three types in particular: communities of educational work of professional practice and scientific knowledge. Virtual communities where the activities undertaken and skills acquired are set as important parts of our personal learning development, wich are necessary to build the Knowledge Society.

  8. VirRAD - The virtual radiopharmacy - a virtual learning community in radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    VirRAD is a new research project funded by the Information Society Technologies programme of the Fifth RTD Framework Programme of the European Union. The aim of VirRAD is to develop an Internet-based virtual learning environment for Radiopharmacy which will facilitate learning and understanding in the speciality at all levels both within and outside the radiopharmaceutical community. The final structure of VirRAD is yet to be decided and will be determined by the needs and desires of its ultimate participants, however it is expected to include multimedia teaching modules for distance learning applications, 3-D simulations of specialised equipment and complex techniques used in radiopharmaceutical preparation and research as well as improved systems of peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor communication and information retrieval. To be as useful and effective as possible VirRAD needs ideas and suggestions from the Nuclear Medicine community. A mechanism for obtaining such input and feedback will be an integral part of the development process

  9. Understanding Social Learning Behaviors via a Virtual Field Trip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Bai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a multidisciplinary study investigating how a virtual rather than face-to-face field trip can be conducted in a real-world setting and how students respond to such a social learning opportunity. Our participants followed a story of a stroke patient at her virtual home and in a virtual hospital via a teaching vignette. They were then given a new case and got on a virtual trip via a multiuser virtual environment. They played the roles of patients, relatives, doctors, or nurses, experiencing the emotional, physical, or social impacts those stakeholders may go through. Our study finds the overall participation of the Virtual Group is 50% more than the Text Group. Although the Virtual Group generates much more nodes in total, they focused much less on knowledge sharing and comparing than the Text Group (46 vs. 67, but more on other higher-level aspects of social interactions, such as knowledge discovery (57 vs. 42, co-construction (66 vs. 39, testing and modification (58 vs. 24 and application of newly constructed meaning (60 vs. 16. Analysis of students’ virtual field activities and in-depth discussions of important issues implied are included to help understand social learning behaviors during a virtual field trip. Sustainability of such systems is discussed.

  10. Effects of Game-Based Learning in an Opensim-Supported Virtual Environment on Mathematical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heesung; Ke, Fengfeng

    2017-01-01

    This experimental study was intended to examine whether the integration of game characteristics in the OpenSimulator-supported virtual reality (VR) learning environment can improve mathematical achievement for elementary school students. In this pre- and posttest experimental comparison study, data were collected from 132 fourth graders through an…

  11. A Virtual Walk through London: Culture Learning through a Cultural Immersion Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Integrating Google Street View into a three-dimensional virtual environment in which users control personal avatars provides these said users with access to an innovative, interactive, and real-world context for communication and culture learning. We have selected London, a city famous for its rich historical, architectural, and artistic heritage,…

  12. Mechanism for Promoting Motivation, Confidence, and Autonomy through Synchronic Communication Sessions in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Jorge Andrick Parra; Dallos, Adriana Rocío Lizcano; Ballesteros, Eliécer Pineda

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a mechanism which explains the effect of synchronous communication on students' perception of the training process in virtual learning methodology used in a postgraduate programme at the University of Santander. We use System Dynamics to design a mechanism that integrates motivation, confidence, trust, and autonomy in students.…

  13. Analysing the Suitability of Virtual Worlds for Direct Instruction and Individual Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarraonandia, Telmo; Francese, Rita; Passero, Ignazio; Diaz, Paloma; Tortora, Genoveffa

    2014-01-01

    Despite several researchers reporting evidence that 3D Virtual Worlds can be used to effectively support educational processes in recent years, the integration of this technology in real learning processes is not as commonplace as in other educational technologies. Instructional designers have to balance the cost associated with the development of…

  14. Teaching Energy Metabolism Using Scientific Articles: Implementation of a Virtual Learning Environment for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Giannella, Tais Rabetti; Struchiner, Miriam; da Silva, Wagner S.; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) applied to the biochemistry class for undergraduate, first-year medical students at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The course focused on the integration of energy metabolism, exploring metabolic adaptations in different physiological or pathological states such as…

  15. Cotton Island: Students' Learning Motivation Using a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Jamie; Lee, Seung-Eun; Domina, Tanya; MacGillivray, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    As technology advances, it is important for teachers to seamlessly integrate technology into their innovative teaching techniques. Using virtual worlds is one alternative to traditional teaching methods that can provide rich learning experiences. The purpose of this article is twofold: (a) to present Cotton Island, an avatar-based 3-D virtual…

  16. Integration of the virtual 3D model of a control system with the virtual controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbuś, K.; Ociepka, P.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design process includes simulation analysis of different components of a constructed object. It involves the need for integration of different virtual object to simulate the whole investigated technical system. The paper presents the issues related to the integration of a virtual 3D model of a chosen control system of with a virtual controller. The goal of integration is to verify the operation of an adopted object of in accordance with the established control program. The object of the simulation work is the drive system of a tunneling machine for trenchless work. In the first stage of work was created an interactive visualization of functioning of the 3D virtual model of a tunneling machine. For this purpose, the software of the VR (Virtual Reality) class was applied. In the elaborated interactive application were created adequate procedures allowing controlling the drive system of a translatory motion, a rotary motion and the drive system of a manipulator. Additionally was created the procedure of turning on and off the output crushing head, mounted on the last element of the manipulator. In the elaborated interactive application have been established procedures for receiving input data from external software, on the basis of the dynamic data exchange (DDE), which allow controlling actuators of particular control systems of the considered machine. In the next stage of work, the program on a virtual driver, in the ladder diagram (LD) language, was created. The control program was developed on the basis of the adopted work cycle of the tunneling machine. The element integrating the virtual model of the tunneling machine for trenchless work with the virtual controller is the application written in a high level language (Visual Basic). In the developed application was created procedures responsible for collecting data from the running, in a simulation mode, virtual controller and transferring them to the interactive application, in which is verified the

  17. The Virtual Learning Commons: Supporting Science Education with Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D. D.; Gandara, A.; Gris, I.

    2012-12-01

    The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC), funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure CI-Team Program, is a combination of Semantic Web, mash up, and social networking tools that supports knowledge sharing and innovation across scientific disciplines in research and education communities and networks. The explosion of scientific resources (data, models, algorithms, tools, and cyberinfrastructure) challenges the ability of educators to be aware of resources that might be relevant to their classes. Even when aware, it can be difficult to understand enough about those resources to develop classroom materials. Often emerging data and technologies have little documentation, especially about their application. The VLC tackles this challenge by providing mechanisms for individuals and groups of educators to organize Web resources into virtual collections, and engage each other around those collections in order to a) learn about potentially relevant resources that are available; b) design classes that leverage those resources; and c) develop course syllabi. The VLC integrates Semantic Web functionality for structuring distributed information, mash up functionality for retrieving and displaying information, and social media for discussing/rating information. We are working to provide three views of information that support educators in different ways: 1. Innovation Marketplace: supports users as they find others teaching similar courses, where they are located, and who they collaborate with; 2. Conceptual Mapper: supports educators as they organize their thinking about the content of their class and related classes taught by others; 3. Curriculum Designer: supports educators as they generate a syllabus and find Web resources that are relevant. This presentation will discuss the innovation and learning theories that have informed design of the VLC, hypotheses about the use of emerging technologies to support innovation in classrooms, and will include a

  18. Relations between the tendency to invest in virtual presence, actual virtual presence and learning outcomes in educational computer games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, Claudia; Bastiaens, Theo

    2018-01-01

    The study examines whether the effect of virtual presence on learning is influenced by learner characteristics. More specifically, the focus is on how the variation in the actual experience of virtual presence and learning is related to learners' individual tendency to invest in virtual presence for

  19. Virtual Collaborative Simulation Environment for Integrated Product and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulli, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Deneb Robotics is a leader in the development of commercially available, leading edge three- dimensional simulation software tools for virtual prototyping,, simulation-based design, manufacturing process simulation, and factory floor simulation and training applications. Deneb has developed and commercially released a preliminary Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) capability for Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD). This capability allows distributed, real-time visualization and evaluation of design concepts, manufacturing processes, and total factory and enterprises in one seamless simulation environment.

  20. Virtual learning object and environment: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira; Bezerril, Manacés Dos Santos; Mariz, Camila Maria Santos; Fernandes, Maria Isabel Domingues; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the concept of virtual learning object and environment according to Rodgers' evolutionary perspective. Descriptive study with a mixed approach, based on the stages proposed by Rodgers in his concept analysis method. Data collection occurred in August 2015 with the search of dissertations and theses in the Bank of Theses of the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel. Quantitative data were analyzed based on simple descriptive statistics and the concepts through lexicographic analysis with support of the IRAMUTEQ software. The sample was made up of 161 studies. The concept of "virtual learning environment" was presented in 99 (61.5%) studies, whereas the concept of "virtual learning object" was presented in only 15 (9.3%) studies. A virtual learning environment includes several and different types of virtual learning objects in a common pedagogical context. Analisar o conceito de objeto e de ambiente virtual de aprendizagem na perspectiva evolucionária de Rodgers. Estudo descritivo, de abordagem mista, realizado a partir das etapas propostas por Rodgers em seu modelo de análise conceitual. A coleta de dados ocorreu em agosto de 2015 com a busca de dissertações e teses no Banco de Teses e Dissertações da Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior. Os dados quantitativos foram analisados a partir de estatística descritiva simples e os conceitos pela análise lexicográfica com suporte do IRAMUTEQ. A amostra é constituída de 161 estudos. O conceito de "ambiente virtual de aprendizagem" foi apresentado em 99 (61,5%) estudos, enquanto o de "objeto virtual de aprendizagem" em apenas 15 (9,3%). Concluiu-se que um ambiente virtual de aprendizagem reúne vários e diferentes tipos de objetos virtuais de aprendizagem em um contexto pedagógico comum.

  1. The virtual corporation : learning from construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelius, L.; Wamelink, J.W.F.

    1998-01-01

    Manufacturing organisations are evolving towards virtual corporations, under the influence of an increasing need for specialisation. In the literature and in management the virtual corporation is advocated as the way of doing business for the twenty-first century. However, in the construction

  2. Using Virtualization to Integrate Weather, Climate, and Coastal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. R.; Paramygin, V. A.; Figueiredo, R.; Sheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand and communicate the important roles of weather and climate on the coastal environment, a unique publically available tool is being developed to support research, education, and outreach activities. This tool uses virtualization technologies to facilitate an interactive, hands-on environment in which students, researchers, and general public can perform their own numerical modeling experiments. While prior efforts have focused solely on the study of the coastal and estuary environments, this effort incorporates the community supported weather and climate model (WRF-ARW) into the Coastal Science Educational Virtual Appliance (CSEVA), an education tool used to assist in the learning of coastal transport processes; storm surge and inundation; and evacuation modeling. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is a next-generation, community developed and supported, mesoscale numerical weather prediction system designed to be used internationally for research, operations, and teaching. It includes two dynamical solvers (ARW - Advanced Research WRF and NMM - Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model) as well as a data assimilation system. WRF-ARW is the ARW dynamics solver combined with other components of the WRF system which was developed primarily at NCAR, community support provided by the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology (MMM) division of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Included with WRF is the WRF Pre-processing System (WPS) which is a set of programs to prepare input for real-data simulations. The CSEVA is based on the Grid Appliance (GA) framework and is built using virtual machine (VM) and virtual networking technologies. Virtualization supports integration of an operating system, libraries (e.g. Fortran, C, Perl, NetCDF, etc. necessary to build WRF), web server, numerical models/grids/inputs, pre-/post-processing tools (e.g. WPS / RIP4 or UPS), graphical user interfaces, "Cloud"-computing infrastructure and other tools into a

  3. Toward Virtual Campuses: Collaborative Virtual Labs & Personalized Learning Services in a Real-Life Context

    OpenAIRE

    Tsekeridou, Sofia; Tiropanis, Thanassis; Christou, Ioannis; Vakilzadeh, Haleh

    2008-01-01

    Virtual campuses are gradually becoming a reality with the advances in e-learning and Web technologies, distributed systems and broadband communication, as well as the emerging needs of remote Universities for collaboration on offering common programs. The advances in grid-based distributed infrastructures have further significantly contributed to this fact providing optimized and real-time system performance and support for virtual communities even under synchronous distributed multi-user us...

  4. Action Learning in Virtual Higher Education: Applying Leadership Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the historical foundation of Northeastern University's course, LDR 6100: Developing Your Leadership Capability, a partial literature review of action learning (AL) and virtual action learning (VAL), a course methodology of LDR 6100 requiring students to apply leadership perspectives using VAL as instructed by the author,…

  5. Building Virtual Teams: Experiential Learning Using Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    Currently, virtual teams are being used exponentially in higher education and business because of the development of technologies and globalization. These teams have become an essential approach for collaborative learning as well as task completion. Team learning, especially in an online format, can be challenging due to lack of effective…

  6. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Software Documentation]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  7. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Computer software]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  8. ANALYSIS OF VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT BENEFIT IN E-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVÁK, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the virtual environment assets towards the e-learning process improvements is mentioned in this article. The virtual environment was created within the solution of the project ‘Virtualization’ at the Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Pardubice. The aim of this project was to eliminate the disproportion of free access to licensed software between groups of part-time and full-time students. The research was realized within selected subjects of the study program System Engineering and Informatics. The subjects were connected to the informatics, applied informatics, control and decision making. Student subject results, student feedback based on electronic questionnaire and data from log file of virtual server usage were compared and analysed. Based on analysis of virtualization possibilities the solution of virtual environment was implemented through Microsoft Terminal Server.

  9. Learning Together and Working Apart: Routines for Organizational Learning in Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Research suggests that teaming routines facilitate learning in teams. This paper identifies and details how specific teaming routines, implemented in a virtual team, support its continual learning. The study's focus was to generate authentic and descriptive accounts of the interviewees' experiences with virtual teaming routines.…

  10. iSee: Teaching Visual Learning in an Organic Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hsiao-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a three-year participatory action research project focusing on the graduate level course entitled Visual Learning in 3D Animated Virtual Worlds. The purpose of this research was to understand "How the virtual world processes of observing and creating can best help students learn visual theories". The first cycle of…

  11. Market Integration of Virtual Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mette Kirschmeyer

    increasingly challenging due to the intrinsic variability of production technologies such as photovoltaics and wind turbines. In a Smart Grid system the balancing task will therefore be handled by mobilizing flexibility on the consumption side. This Thesis assumes that the Smart Grid should be commercially......Global efforts to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide drives the introduction of renewable power production technologies into the existing power system. The real-time balance between production and consumption must, however, still be maintained at all times. Unfortunately, this is becoming....... It does however significantly sharpen the discussion of the flexibility concept and provides a categorization of flexible systems. This Thesis also investigates what value can be created from the different types of flexibility by assuming that the Virtual Power Plant will generate profit by trading...

  12. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Vorstenbosch, Marc; Kooloos, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different visuospatial ability. Sixty-three participants engaged in a one-hour session including a study phase and posttest. One group studied 3D models of the anatomy of the deep neck in full stereoptic virtual ...

  13. Providing Learning Computing Labs using Hosting and Virtualization Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armide González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computing hosting system to provide virtual computing laboratories for learning activities. This system is based on hosting and virtualization technologies. All the components used in its development are free software tools. The computing lab model provided by the system is a more sustainable and scalable alternative than the traditional academic computing lab, and it requires lower costs of installation and operation.

  14. Virtual Satellite Integration Environment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated environment for rapid design studies of small satellite missions will be developed. This environment will be designed to streamline processes at the...

  15. Utilization of virtual learning environments in the allied health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butina, Michelle; Brooks, Donna; Dominguez, Paul J; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple technology based tools have been used to enhance skill development in allied health education, which now includes virtual learning environments. The purpose of this study was to explore whether, and how, this latest instructional technology is being adapted in allied health education. An online survey was circulated to all Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) member institutions and focused on three broad areas of virtual learning environments: the uses of, the perceived pros and cons of, and the outcomes of utilizing them. Results show 40% (17 of 42) of the respondent use some form of the technology. The use of virtual learning technology in other healthcare professions (e.g., medicine) demonstrates the potential benefits to allied health education.

  16. ME science as mobile learning based on virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradika, H. D.; Surjono, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this article described about ME Science (Mobile Education Science) as mobile learning application learning of Fisika Inti. ME Science is a product of research and development (R&D) that was using Alessi and Trollip model. Alessi and Trollip model consists three stages that are: (a) planning include analysis of problems, goals, need, and idea of development product, (b) designing includes collecting of materials, designing of material content, creating of story board, evaluating and review product, (c) developing includes development of product, alpha testing, revision of product, validation of product, beta testing, and evaluation of product. The article describes ME Science only to development of product which include development stages. The result of development product has been generates mobile learning application based on virtual reality that can be run on android-based smartphone. These application consist a brief description of learning material, quizzes, video of material summery, and learning material based on virtual reality.

  17. A Remote and Virtual Lab with Experiments for Secondary Education, Engineering and Lifelong Learning Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cardoso

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Information and Communication Technology tools are nowadays invaluable to support e-learning and b-learning programs. The Remote and Virtual Laboratory in development at the Department of Informatics Engineering of the University of Coimbra (Portugal, RVL@DEI-UC, is a web-based platform that allows users to perform a large set of experiments in different areas and contexts, such as in education or training. This paper aims to describe the inherent potential of this platform in secondary education, engineering and lifelong learning courses. The conceptualization, architecture and implementation of the web platform for real and virtual experiments, which is remotely accessed using the Internet, are presented and the relevance of the lab’s integration in an intelligent tutoring system is also highlighted, mainly in what regards the requirements of adaptation and customization to different users’ profile in different learning contexts.

  18. The Development of the Virtual Learning Media of the Sacred Object Artwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuanmeesri, Sumitra; Jamornmongkolpilai, Saran

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to develop the virtual learning media of the sacred object artwork by applying the concept of the virtual technology in order to publicize knowledge on the cultural wisdom of the sacred object artwork. It was done by designing and developing the virtual learning media of the sacred object artwork for the virtual presentation.…

  19. The creation of virtual teeth with and without tooth pathology for a virtual learning environment in dental education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, I.R.; Wesselink, P.R.; Vervoorn, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the development and opportunities for implementation of virtual teeth with and without pathology for use in a virtual learning environment in dental education. Material and methods The creation of virtual teeth begins by scanning a tooth with a cone beam CT. The resulting scan

  20. Beyond xMOOCs in healthcare education: study of the feasibility in integrating virtual patient systems and MOOC platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathakarou, Natalia; Zary, Nabil; Kononowicz, Andrzej A

    2014-01-01

    Background. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are an emerging trend in online learning. However, their technology is not yet completely adjusted to the needs of healthcare education. Integration of Virtual Patients within MOOCs to increase interactivity and foster clinical reasoning skills training, has been discussed in the past, but not verified by a practical implementation. Objective. To investigate the technical feasibility of integrating MOOCs with Virtual Patients for the purpose of enabling further research into the potential pedagogical benefits of this approach. Methods. We selected OpenEdx and Open Labyrinth as representative constituents of a MOOC platform and Virtual Patient system integration. Based upon our prior experience we selected the most fundamental technical requirement to address. Grounded in the available literature we identified an e-learning standard to guide the integration. We attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of the integration by designing a "proof-of-concept" prototype. The resulting pilot implementation was subject of verification by two test cases. Results. A Single Sign-On mechanism connecting Open Labyrinth with OpenEdx and based on the IMS LTI standard was successfully implemented and verified. Conclusion. We investigated the technical perspective of integrating Virtual Patients with MOOCs. By addressing this crucial technical requirement we set a base for future research on the educational benefits of using virtual patients in MOOCs. This provides new opportunities for integrating specialized software in healthcare education at massive scale.

  1. Beyond xMOOCs in healthcare education: study of the feasibility in integrating virtual patient systems and MOOC platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Stathakarou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs are an emerging trend in online learning. However, their technology is not yet completely adjusted to the needs of healthcare education. Integration of Virtual Patients within MOOCs to increase interactivity and foster clinical reasoning skills training, has been discussed in the past, but not verified by a practical implementation.Objective. To investigate the technical feasibility of integrating MOOCs with Virtual Patients for the purpose of enabling further research into the potential pedagogical benefits of this approach.Methods. We selected OpenEdx and Open Labyrinth as representative constituents of a MOOC platform and Virtual Patient system integration. Based upon our prior experience we selected the most fundamental technical requirement to address. Grounded in the available literature we identified an e-learning standard to guide the integration. We attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of the integration by designing a “proof-of-concept” prototype. The resulting pilot implementation was subject of verification by two test cases.Results. A Single Sign-On mechanism connecting Open Labyrinth with OpenEdx and based on the IMS LTI standard was successfully implemented and verified.Conclusion. We investigated the technical perspective of integrating Virtual Patients with MOOCs. By addressing this crucial technical requirement we set a base for future research on the educational benefits of using virtual patients in MOOCs. This provides new opportunities for integrating specialized software in healthcare education at massive scale.

  2. Virtual integration: A game-theoretic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Schorer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Embedded systems are playing a key role to enable the features of todays cars and other road vehicles. Advances in current hardware platforms of these embedded systems and growing implementation of features in software rather than in new hardware modules lead to new and continuously more complex automotive software systems. The integration process in the course of development of automotive software systems is a crucial and complex phase. An efficient combination of the set of components i...

  3. Promotion of self-directed learning using virtual patient cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Neal; Schonder, Kristine; McGee, James

    2013-09-12

    To assess the effectiveness of virtual patient cases to promote self-directed learning (SDL) in a required advanced therapeutics course. Virtual patient software based on a branched-narrative decision-making model was used to create complex patient case simulations to replace lecture-based instruction. Within each simulation, students used SDL principles to learn course objectives, apply their knowledge through clinical recommendations, and assess their progress through patient outcomes and faculty feedback linked to their individual decisions. Group discussions followed each virtual patient case to provide further interpretation, clarification, and clinical perspective. Students found the simulated patient cases to be organized (90%), enjoyable (82%), intellectually challenging (97%), and valuable to their understanding of course content (91%). Students further indicated that completion of the virtual patient cases prior to class permitted better use of class time (78%) and promoted SDL (84%). When assessment questions regarding material on postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared, no difference in scores were found between the students who attended the lecture on the material in 2011 (control group) and those who completed the virtual patient case on the material in 2012 (intervention group). Completion of virtual patient cases, designed to replace lectures and promote SDL, was overwhelmingly supported by students and proved to be as effective as traditional teaching methods.

  4. Integration of immersive virtual reality in Communication Degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ubaldo Cuesta Cambra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area promotes the integration of new technologies in didactic innovation and it aims to improve skills. It has been requested by students at the Complutense University of Madrid, who have a digital native profile or millennial. This article is a study about implementation of immersive virtual reality in the practical part of the subjects related to business communication. Specifically, it applied in the subject Crisis Communication. The methodology is a survey and three focus groups for professors and students. The conclusions say that the implementation of immersive virtual reality improves the expectations and interest of students. It also improves the skills acquired and the practical part of the subjects of communication improve employment of students of the Degree, which is one of their main causes of dissatisfaction. The full implementation of mobile telephony suggests using virtual reality devices adapted to them rather than “caves” (C.A.V.E. or consoles.

  5. The ALIVE Project: Astronomy Learning in Immersive Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K. C.; Sahami, K.; Denn, G.

    2008-06-01

    The Astronomy Learning in Immersive Virtual Environments (ALIVE) project seeks to discover learning modes and optimal teaching strategies using immersive virtual environments (VEs). VEs are computer-generated, three-dimensional environments that can be navigated to provide multiple perspectives. Immersive VEs provide the additional benefit of surrounding a viewer with the simulated reality. ALIVE evaluates the incorporation of an interactive, real-time ``virtual universe'' into formal college astronomy education. In the experiment, pre-course, post-course, and curriculum tests will be used to determine the efficacy of immersive visualizations presented in a digital planetarium versus the same visual simulations in the non-immersive setting of a normal classroom, as well as a control case using traditional classroom multimedia. To normalize for inter-instructor variability, each ALIVE instructor will teach at least one of each class in each of the three test groups.

  6. Social Contact in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    A common question is whether technology will replace social contact. In this article it is argued that it will not, provided that we learn to use the characteristics of new media constructively in designing for learning. The term “social”, in this context is taken to mean “purposeful communication......” and not “recreational socializing” (even if socializing may indeed facilitate learning)...

  7. Machinima interventions: innovative approaches to immersive virtual world curriculum integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Middleton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The educational value of Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs seems to be in their social immersive qualities and as an accessible simulation technology. In contrast to these synchronous applications this paper discusses the use of educational machinima developed in IVW virtual film sets. It also introduces the concept of media intervention, proposing that digital media works best when simply developed for deployment within a blended curriculum to inform learning activity, and where the media are specifically designed to set challenges, seed ideas, or illustrate problems. Machinima, digital films created in IVWs, or digital games offer a rich mechanism for delivering such interventions. Scenes are storyboarded, constructed, shot and edited using techniques similar to professional film production, drawing upon a cast of virtual world avatars controlled through a human–computer interface, rather than showing real-life actors. The approach enables academics or students to make films using screen capture software and desktop editing tools. In student-generated production models the learning value may be found in the production process itself. This paper discusses six case studies and several themes from research on ideas for educational machinima including: access to production; creativity in teaching and learning; media intervention methodology; production models; reusability; visualisation and simulation.

  8. Multimodal integration in statistical learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Aaron; Christiansen, Morten Hyllekvist; Weiss, Dan

    2014-01-01

    , we investigated the ability of adults to integrate audio and visual input during statistical learning. We presented learners with a speech stream synchronized with a video of a speaker’s face. In the critical condition, the visual (e.g., /gi/) and auditory (e.g., /mi/) signals were occasionally...... facilitated participants’ ability to segment the speech stream. Our results therefore demonstrate that participants can integrate audio and visual input to perceive the McGurk illusion during statistical learning. We interpret our findings as support for modality-interactive accounts of statistical learning.......Recent advances in the field of statistical learning have established that learners are able to track regularities of multimodal stimuli, yet it is unknown whether the statistical computations are performed on integrated representations or on separate, unimodal representations. In the present study...

  9. Visualizing learner activities with a virtual learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Søren; Rodil, Kasper; Rehm, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents how to gain insights into children’s navigation of an interactive virtual learning environment and how that would benefit their educators. A prototype for logging user information as quantifiable data has been developed and deployed in an in-situ evaluation of the system...

  10. The Use of Virtual Learning Environment in Chinese Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢苑苑

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes the current condition of the use of virtual learning environment (VLE) in Zhejiang University of Chinese Medicine. It is indicated that students show a positive attitude toward this technology, but the use of it fails to meet stu-dents’perception. In light of this, recommendations are made with a view to enhance the use of VLE.

  11. Identifying Different Registers of Digital Literacy in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Ola; Blasjo, Mona.; Hallsten, Stina; Karlstrom, Petter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper social semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics in particular, are used in order to identify registers of digital literacy in the use of virtual learning environments. The framework of social semiotics provides means to systemize and discuss digital literacy as a linguistic and semiotic issue. The following research question…

  12. Learning Intercultural Communication Skills with Virtual Humans: Feedback and Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, H. Chad; Hays, Matthew Jensen; Core, Mark G.; Auerbach, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In the context of practicing intercultural communication skills, we investigated the role of fidelity in a game-based, virtual learning environment as well as the role of feedback delivered by an intelligent tutoring system. In 2 experiments, we compared variations on the game interface, use of the tutoring system, and the form of the feedback.…

  13. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.M.; Vorstenbosch, M.A.; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different

  14. A DBR Framework for Designing Mobile Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Cook, Stuart; Aiello, Stephen; Christie, Duncan; Sinfield, David; Steagall, Marcus; Aguayo, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a design based research (DBR) framework for designing mobile virtual reality learning environments. The application of the framework is illustrated by two design-based research projects that aim to develop more authentic educational experiences and learner-centred pedagogies in higher education. The projects highlight the first…

  15. PGDnet: A New Problem-Solving Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Emilio; Rodriguez-Marciel, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide information about the virtual learning environment known as PGDnet (the Spanish acronym for "Plataforma de Gestion Docente" or Educational Management Platform in English), which was developed by the innovative education group at the Technical University of Madrid known as "Nuevas metodologias…

  16. Virtual language learning environments: the standardization of evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Romero Forteza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there are many approaches aimed at helping learners acquire knowledge through the Internet. Virtual Learning Environments (VLE facilitate the acquisition and practice of skills, but some of these learning platforms are not evaluated or do not follow a standard that guarantees the quality of the tasks involved. In this paper, we set out a proposal for the standardization of the evaluation of VLEs available on the World Wide Web. Thus, the main objective of this study is to establish an evaluation template with which to test whether a VLE is appropriate for computer-assisted language learning (CALL. In the methodology section, a learning platform is analysed and tested to establish the characteristics learning platforms must have. Having established the design of the template for language learning environments, we concluded that a VLE must be versatile enough for application with different language learning and teaching approaches.

  17. Virtual Learning Environments and Learning Forms -experiments in ICT-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This paper report the main results of a three year experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) and is one of many projects deeply rooted in the project Virtual Learning Environments...... didactic model has until now been a positive experience........ The main problem is that we do not find the same self regulatoring learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for on-campus students. Based on feedback from evaluation questionnaires and discussions with the students didactic adjustments have been made. The revised...

  18. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Maarten Luursema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different visuospatial ability. Sixty-three participants engaged in a one-hour session including a study phase and posttest. One group studied 3D models of the anatomy of the deep neck in full stereoptic virtual reality; one group studied those structures in virtual reality without stereoptic depth. The control group experienced an unrelated virtual reality environment. A post hoc questionnaire explored cognitive load and problem solving strategies of the participants. We found no effect of condition on learning. Visuospatial ability however did impact correct answers at F(1=5.63 and p=.02. No evidence was found for an impact of cognitive load on performance. Possibly, participants were able to solve the posttest items based on visuospatial information contained in the test items themselves. Additionally, the virtual anatomy may have been complex enough to discourage memory based strategies. It is important to control the amount of visuospatial information present in test items.

  20. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Vorstenbosch, Marc; Kooloos, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different visuospatial ability. Sixty-three participants engaged in a one-hour session including a study phase and posttest. One group studied 3D models of the anatomy of the deep neck in full stereoptic virtual reality; one group studied those structures in virtual reality without stereoptic depth. The control group experienced an unrelated virtual reality environment. A post hoc questionnaire explored cognitive load and problem solving strategies of the participants. We found no effect of condition on learning. Visuospatial ability however did impact correct answers at F (1) = 5.63 and p = .02. No evidence was found for an impact of cognitive load on performance. Possibly, participants were able to solve the posttest items based on visuospatial information contained in the test items themselves. Additionally, the virtual anatomy may have been complex enough to discourage memory based strategies. It is important to control the amount of visuospatial information present in test items.

  1. Combining Face-to-Face Learning with Online Learning in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anke; Gonzalez-Pardo, Antonio; Camacho, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of videogame-like applications in a 3D virtual environment as a complement to the face-to-face teaching and learning. With the changing role of teaching and learning and the increasing use of "blended learning," instructors are increasingly expected to explore new ways to attend to the needs of their…

  2. Simulation of patient encounters using a virtual patient in periodontology instruction of dental students: design, usability, and learning effects in history-taking skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janda, M.S.; Mattheos, N.; Nattestad, A.

    2004-01-01

    computer-assisted learning, effectiveness of learning, health education, patient simulation, virtual patient......computer-assisted learning, effectiveness of learning, health education, patient simulation, virtual patient...

  3. Integrating Simulated Physics and Device Virtualization in Control System Testbeds

    OpenAIRE

    Redwood , Owen; Reynolds , Jason; Burmester , Mike

    2016-01-01

    Part 3: INFRASTRUCTURE MODELING AND SIMULATION; International audience; Malware and forensic analyses of embedded cyber-physical systems are tedious, manual processes that testbeds are commonly not designed to support. Additionally, attesting the physics impact of embedded cyber-physical system malware has no formal methodologies and is currently an art. This chapter describes a novel testbed design methodology that integrates virtualized embedded industrial control systems and physics simula...

  4. Integrating eye tracking in virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Júlio Miguel Gomes Rebelo

    2014-01-01

    This thesis reports on research done for the integration of eye tracking technology into virtual reality environments, with the goal of using it in rehabilitation of patients who suffered from stroke. For the last few years, eye tracking has been a focus on medical research, used as an assistive tool  to help people with disabilities interact with new technologies  and as an assessment tool  to track the eye gaze during computer interactions. However, tracking more complex gaze behavio...

  5. Virtual reality simulator for vitreoretinal surgery using integrated OCT data

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak, Igor; Banerjee,Pat; Luo,Jia; Luciano,Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Igor Kozak,1 Pat Banerjee,2 Jia Luo,2 Cristian Luciano21King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Vitreoretinal Division, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2College of Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Operative practice using surgical simulators has become a part of training in many surgical specialties, including ophthalmology. We introduce a virtual reality retina surgery simulator capable of integrating optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans from real p...

  6. IBF: An Integrated Business Framework for Virtual Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Ferri; Alessia D’Andrea; Patrizia Grifoni

    2012-01-01

    The paper provides an integrated business framework for Business-to-Business, Business-to-Consumer and Consumer-to-Consumer Virtual Communities. The framework involves internal and external factors. Internal factors that include: market analysis; products/services promotion; development of trust; social influence and Knowledge sharing, differ from the different orientations of the framework, while the external factors involve competitors and technological aspects that, while differing from th...

  7. Development of a virtual learning environment for cardiorespiratory arrest training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anazilda Carvalho da; Bernardes, Andrea; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Dalri, Maria Célia Barcellos; Silva, Alexandre Ribeiro da; Sampaio, Camila Santana Justo Cintra

    2016-01-01

    To develop a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) aiming at the training of nursing team workers and emergency vehicle drivers in Basic Life Support (BLS) to attend Cardiorespiratory arrest, and to evaluate the quality of its contents among specialists in the area of Emergency and Urgent care. Applied research of technological development. The methodology used was based on the Instructional Design Model (ADDIE), which structures the teaching-learning planning in different stages (analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation). The VLE was composed of texts elaborated from bibliographic research, links, edited video from a simulation scenario in the laboratory and questions to evaluate the fixation of the content, organized in modules. After its development, it was evaluated as adequate to satisfy the needs of the target public, by eight expert judges, which was made available for electronic access. The VLE has potential as a tool for training and qualification in BLS, as it can be easily integrated with other pedagogical approaches and strategies with active methodologies. Desenvolver um Ambiente Virtual de Aprendizagem (AVA) visando à capacitação de trabalhadores da equipe de enfermagem e condutores de veículo de emergência em Suporte Básico de Vida (SBV) no atendimento à Parada Cardiorrespiratória, e avaliar a qualidade do seu conteúdo junto a especialistas na área de Urgência e Emergência. Pesquisa aplicada, de produção tecnológica. A metodologia utilizada foi baseada no Modelo de Design Instrucional (ADDIE), que estrutura o planejamento de ensino-aprendizagem em estágios distintos (analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation). O AVA foi composto por textos elaborados a partir de pesquisa bibliográfica, links, vídeo construído a partir de um cenário de simulação em laboratório e questões para avaliar a fixação do conteúdo, organizados em módulos. Após a sua construção, foi avaliado como adequado para

  8. Sensorimotor Learning during a Marksmanship Task in Immersive Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Hrishikesh M; Khanna, Rajan; Zielinski, David J; Lu, Yvonne; Clements, Jillian M; Potter, Nicholas D; Sommer, Marc A; Kopper, Regis; Appelbaum, Lawrence G

    2018-01-01

    Sensorimotor learning refers to improvements that occur through practice in the performance of sensory-guided motor behaviors. Leveraging novel technical capabilities of an immersive virtual environment, we probed the component kinematic processes that mediate sensorimotor learning. Twenty naïve subjects performed a simulated marksmanship task modeled after Olympic Trap Shooting standards. We measured movement kinematics and shooting performance as participants practiced 350 trials while receiving trial-by-trial feedback about shooting success. Spatiotemporal analysis of motion tracking elucidated the ballistic and refinement phases of hand movements. We found systematic changes in movement kinematics that accompanied improvements in shot accuracy during training, though reaction and response times did not change over blocks. In particular, we observed longer, slower, and more precise ballistic movements that replaced effort spent on corrections and refinement. Collectively, these results leverage developments in immersive virtual reality technology to quantify and compare the kinematics of movement during early learning of full-body sensorimotor orienting.

  9. Risks and opportunities of virtual learning: the experience of UOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Ros Híjar

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I have tried to give answers to the question of what the risks and opportunities of virtual learning are. In this sense, the UOC's experience has been of great value to analyse several key issues such as the new ways of accessing quality education, the new ways of participation, the new values of educational processes as well as some of the structural factors on which e-learning is based, but which place its very model in jeopardy. Direct observation of some key processes as well as contact with the main actors (e.g. students, teachers and technicians have provided valuable information about some factors to consider when analysing the social implications of virtual learning.

  10. Integration of virtualized worker nodes in standard batch systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buege, Volker; Kunze, Marcel; Oberst, Oliver; Quast, Guenter; Scheurer, Armin; Hessling, Hermann; Kemp, Yves; Synge, Owen

    2010-01-01

    Current experiments in HEP only use a limited number of operating system flavours. Their software might only be validated on one single OS platform. Resource providers might have other operating systems of choice for the installation of the batch infrastructure. This is especially the case if a cluster is shared with other communities, or communities that have stricter security requirements. One solution would be to statically divide the cluster into separated sub-clusters. In such a scenario, no opportunistic distribution of the load can be achieved, resulting in a poor overall utilization efficiency. Another approach is to make the batch system aware of virtualization, and to provide each community with its favoured operating system in a virtual machine. Here, the scheduler has full flexibility, resulting in a better overall efficiency of the resources. In our contribution, we present a lightweight concept for the integration of virtual worker nodes into standard batch systems. The virtual machines are started on the worker nodes just before jobs are executed there. No meta-scheduling is introduced. We demonstrate two prototype implementations, one based on the Sun Grid Engine (SGE), the other using Maui/Torque as a batch system. Both solutions support local job as well as Grid job submission. The hypervisors currently used are Xen and KVM, a port to another system is easily envisageable. To better handle different virtual machines on the physical host, the management solution VmImageManager is developed. We will present first experience from running the two prototype implementations. In a last part, we will show the potential future use of this lightweight concept when integrated into high-level (i.e. Grid) work-flows.

  11. Educational innovation, learning technologies and Virtual culture potential'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Riley

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning technologies are regularly associated with innovative teaching but will they contribute to profound innovations in education itself? This paper addresses the question by building upon Merlin.Donald's co-evolutionary theory of mind, cognition and culture. He claimed that the invention of technologies for storing and sharing external symbol systems, such as writing, gave rise to a 'theoretic culture' with rich symbolic representations and a resultant need for formal education. More recently, Shaffer and Kaput have claimed that the development of external and shared symbol-processing technologies is giving rise to an emerging 'virtual culture'. They argue that mathematics curricula are grounded in theoretic culture and should change to meet the novel demands of 'virtual culture' for symbol-processing and representational fluency. The generic character of their cultural claim is noted in this paper and it is suggested that equivalent pedagogic arguments are applicable across the educational spectrum. Hence, four general characteristics of virtual culture are proposed, against which applications of learning technologies can be evaluated for their innovative potential. Two illustrative uses of learning technologies are evaluated in terms of their 'virtual culture potential' and some anticipated questions about this approach are discussed towards the end of the paper.

  12. Immersive Virtual Reality in a University Setting: Creating an Authentic Learning Environment Through the Virtual Golden Foods Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros A. Yahaya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An authentic learning environment is learning that involves real world problems that are relevant to the learners and relate to their real life experience. Research indicates that Information and Communication Technology (ICT tools can facilitate in creating authentic learning environment, thus improving student learning, interaction and satisfaction. Previous research has focused on using various forms of ICT such as online learning and web-based learning into the classroom. However, little attempt has been made to investigate the effectiveness of incorporating immersive Virtual Reality (VR technology into the university classroom. Virtual Golden Foods Corporation (VGFC is a simulated Virtual Reality (VR organization being developed for use in teaching and learning at a large technology based university in Australia. This study focuses on authentic learning environment where students learn about decision making in complex business contexts throughout the semester which culminates in immersive VR exposure. The findings report that immersive VR environment helps to increase students’ understanding of decision making concepts.

  13. Virtual Learning Environments and Learning Forms -experiments in ICT-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This paper report the main results of a three year experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) and is one of many projects deeply rooted in the project Virtual Learning Environments...... and Learning forms (ViLL). The experiment was to transfer a well functioning on-campus engineering program based on project organized collaborative learning to a technology supported distance education program. After three years the experiments indicate that adjustments are required in this transformation....... The main problem is that we do not find the same self regulatoring learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for on-campus students. Based on feedback from evaluation questionnaires and discussions with the students didactic adjustments have been made. The revised...

  14. Integrating Learning Services in the Cloud: An Approach That Benefits Both Systems and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Carreón, Gustavo; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Jorba, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is an increasing trend to implement functionalities that allow for the development of applications based on Cloud computing. In education there are high expectations for Learning Management Systems since they can be powerful tools to foster more effective collaboration within a virtual classroom. Tools can also be integrated with…

  15. Virtual Worlds and Gamification to Increase Integration of International Students in Higher Education: An Inclusive Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Robb, Nigel; Eyerman, Joe; Goodman, Lizbeth

    2017-01-01

    In response to the growing trend of internationalisation in education, it is important to consider approaches to help international students integrate in their new settings. One possible approach involves the use of e-Learning tools, such as virtual worlds and gamification. To maximise the potential effectiveness of such tools, it may be…

  16. MOOC as a Laboratory of Culture Shock: Helping Non-U.S. Students Integrate into All-American Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhlomin, Valeri; Deshpande, Anant

    2017-01-01

    "iMOOC101: Mastering American e-Learning" is a Coursera-based, free, massive online course aimed at preparing non-U.S. students to succeed in regular, for-credit, online classes in American universities. The course is also intended to help foreign-born professionals integrate into virtual work environments in U.S.-based companies. The…

  17. Usage of a learning virtual environment with interactive virtual reality for helping in reactor engineering teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel, Lucas de Castro

    2017-01-01

    In the last few decades, several studies have been conducted regarding the effectiveness of the use of virtual reality as a teaching tool. New and complex IT tools (Information and Communication Technologies) have also been developed. One such tool, is the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). VLEs are internet media that use cyberspace to convey didactic content and can complement the orthodox teaching method, allowing students a new way of understanding complex content through digital interaction. This work aims to teach the operation of the first and second cycles of a pressurized water nuclear reactor through the development and use of a VLE. The VLE will use interactive virtual reality to demonstrate to the student the 'anatomy' of a generating nuclear power plant. There are several possibilities for future work using this VLE. One is the use as a data repository and 'virtual exhibition room' of each component of the nuclear reactor that researchers are modelling and developing. With these virtual objects allocated in a category, teachers could use this VLE in the classroom as a teaching tool while researchers could use the platform as a quick and practical way of viewing their online work and sharing it with other researchers. Thus, this VLE will be an effective tool for spreading knowledge of nuclear power more easily within, as well as outside of the research community. (author)

  18. Age differences in virtual environment and real world path integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane E Adamo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate path integration requires the integration of visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular self-motion cues and age effects associated with alterations in processing information from these systems may contribute to declines in path integration abilities. The present study investigated age-related differences in path integration in conditions that varied as a function of available sources of sensory information. Twenty-two healthy, young (23.8 ± 3.0 yrs. and 16 older (70.1 ± 6.4 yrs. adults participated in distance reproduction and triangle completion tasks performed in a virtual environment and two real world conditions: guided walking and wheelchair propulsion. For walking and wheelchair propulsion conditions, participants wore a blindfold and wore noise-blocking headphones and were guided through the workspace by the experimenter. For the virtual environment (VE condition, participants viewed self-motion information on a computer monitor and used a joystick to navigate through the environment. For triangle completion tasks, older compared to younger individuals showed greater errors in rotation estimations performed in the wheelchair condition; and for rotation and distance estimations in the VE condition. Distance reproduction tasks, in contrast, did not show any age effects. These findings demonstrate that age differences in path integration vary as a function of the available sources of information and by the complexity of outbound pathway.

  19. Virtual Things for Machine Learning Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bovet , Gérôme; Ridi , Antonio; Hennebert , Jean

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices, especially sensors are pro-ducing large quantities of data that can be used for gather-ing knowledge. In this field, machine learning technologies are increasingly used to build versatile data-driven models. In this paper, we present a novel architecture able to ex-ecute machine learning algorithms within the sensor net-work, presenting advantages in terms of privacy and data transfer efficiency. We first argument that some classes of ...

  20. Integration of virtual and real scenes within an integral 3D imaging environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinsong; Aggoun, Amar; McCormick, Malcolm

    2002-11-01

    The Imaging Technologies group at De Montfort University has developed an integral 3D imaging system, which is seen as the most likely vehicle for 3D television avoiding psychological effects. To create real fascinating three-dimensional television programs, a virtual studio that performs the task of generating, editing and integrating the 3D contents involving virtual and real scenes is required. The paper presents, for the first time, the procedures, factors and methods of integrating computer-generated virtual scenes with real objects captured using the 3D integral imaging camera system. The method of computer generation of 3D integral images, where the lens array is modelled instead of the physical camera is described. In the model each micro-lens that captures different elemental images of the virtual scene is treated as an extended pinhole camera. An integration process named integrated rendering is illustrated. Detailed discussion and deep investigation are focused on depth extraction from captured integral 3D images. The depth calculation method from the disparity and the multiple baseline method that is used to improve the precision of depth estimation are also presented. The concept of colour SSD and its further improvement in the precision is proposed and verified.

  1. Integrated approaches to perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robert A

    2010-04-01

    New technologies and new ways of thinking have recently led to rapid expansions in the study of perceptual learning. We describe three themes shared by many of the nine articles included in this topic on Integrated Approaches to Perceptual Learning. First, perceptual learning cannot be studied on its own because it is closely linked to other aspects of cognition, such as attention, working memory, decision making, and conceptual knowledge. Second, perceptual learning is sensitive to both the stimulus properties of the environment in which an observer exists and to the properties of the tasks that the observer needs to perform. Moreover, the environmental and task properties can be characterized through their statistical regularities. Finally, the study of perceptual learning has important implications for society, including implications for science education and medical rehabilitation. Contributed articles relevant to each theme are summarized. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  2. Situated learning in virtual simulations: Researching the authentic dimension in virtual worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Falconer, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses a case study of postgraduate students undertaking accident investigation and risk assessment exercises in an online virtual world as part of their course curriculum. These exercises were constructed to overcome the ethical and practical barriers inherent in real-world exercises. In particular this paper focusses upon the potential of such exercises to facilitate the authentic dimension of situated learning and identifies some of the factors that affect the s...

  3. Constructivist Learning Environment During Virtual and Real Laboratory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Widodo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

  4. The experiment editor: supporting inquiry-based learning with virtual labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, D.; Heradio, R.; de la Torre, L.; Dormido, S.; Esquembre, F.

    2017-05-01

    Inquiry-based learning is a pedagogical approach where students are motivated to pose their own questions when facing problems or scenarios. In physics learning, students are turned into scientists who carry out experiments, collect and analyze data, formulate and evaluate hypotheses, and so on. Lab experimentation is essential for inquiry-based learning, yet there is a drawback with traditional hands-on labs in the high costs associated with equipment, space, and maintenance staff. Virtual laboratories are helpful to reduce these costs. This paper enriches the virtual lab ecosystem by providing an integrated environment to automate experimentation tasks. In particular, our environment supports: (i) scripting and running experiments on virtual labs, and (ii) collecting and analyzing data from the experiments. The current implementation of our environment supports virtual labs created with the authoring tool Easy Java/Javascript Simulations. Since there are public repositories with hundreds of freely available labs created with this tool, the potential applicability to our environment is considerable.

  5. Using Learning Analytics for Preserving Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigud, Alexander; Arnedo-Moreno, Joan; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Guerrero-Roldan, Ana-Elena

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of integrating learning analytics into the assessment process to enhance academic integrity in the e-learning environment. The goal of this research is to evaluate the computational-based approach to academic integrity. The machine-learning based framework learns students' patterns of language use from data,…

  6. AN INTERACTIVE LOGISTICS CENTRE INFORMATION INTEGRATION SYSTEM USING VIRTUAL REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The logistics industry plays a very important role in the operation of modern cities. Meanwhile, the development of logistics industry has derived various problems that are urgent to be solved, such as the safety of logistics products. This paper combines the study of logistics industry traceability and logistics centre environment safety supervision with virtual reality technology, creates an interactive logistics centre information integration system. The proposed system utilizes the immerse characteristic of virtual reality, to simulate the real logistics centre scene distinctly, which can make operation staff conduct safety supervision training at any time without regional restrictions. On the one hand, a large number of sensor data can be used to simulate a variety of disaster emergency situations. On the other hand, collecting personnel operation data, to analyse the improper operation, which can improve the training efficiency greatly.

  7. An Interactive Logistics Centre Information Integration System Using Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S.; Mao, B.

    2018-04-01

    The logistics industry plays a very important role in the operation of modern cities. Meanwhile, the development of logistics industry has derived various problems that are urgent to be solved, such as the safety of logistics products. This paper combines the study of logistics industry traceability and logistics centre environment safety supervision with virtual reality technology, creates an interactive logistics centre information integration system. The proposed system utilizes the immerse characteristic of virtual reality, to simulate the real logistics centre scene distinctly, which can make operation staff conduct safety supervision training at any time without regional restrictions. On the one hand, a large number of sensor data can be used to simulate a variety of disaster emergency situations. On the other hand, collecting personnel operation data, to analyse the improper operation, which can improve the training efficiency greatly.

  8. Virtual Reality System with Integrated Sound Field Simulation and Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Assenmacher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A real-time audio rendering system is introduced which combines a full room-specific simulation, dynamic crosstalk cancellation, and multitrack binaural synthesis for virtual acoustical imaging. The system is applicable for any room shape (normal, long, flat, coupled, independent of the a priori assumption of a diffuse sound field. This provides the possibility of simulating indoor or outdoor spatially distributed, freely movable sources and a moving listener in virtual environments. In addition to that, near-to-head sources can be simulated by using measured near-field HRTFs. The reproduction component consists of a headphone-free reproduction by dynamic crosstalk cancellation. The focus of the project is mainly on the integration and interaction of all involved subsystems. It is demonstrated that the system is capable of real-time room simulation and reproduction and, thus, can be used as a reliable platform for further research on VR applications.

  9. Extended Immersive Learning Environment: A Hybrid Remote/Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lírio Shaeffer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a collaborative virtual learning environment, which includes technologies such as 3D virtual representations, learning and content management systems, remote experiments, and collaborative learning spaces, among others. It intends to facilitate the construction, management and sharing of knowledge among teachers and students, in a global perspective. The environment proposes the use of 3D social representations for accessing learning materials in a dynamic and interactive form, which is regarded to be closer to the physical reality experienced by teachers and students in a learning context. A first implementation of the proposed extended immersive learning environment, in the area of solid mechanics, is also described, including the access to theoretical contents and a remote experiment to determine the elastic modulus of a given object.These instructions give you basic guidelines for preparing camera-ready papers for conference proceedings. Use this document as a template if you are using Microsoft Word 6.0 or later. Otherwise, use this document as an instruction set. The electronic file of your paper will be formatted further. Define all symbols used in the abstract. Do not cite references in the abstract.

  10. Virtual communities as educational potential of collaborative learning through ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª Ángeles REBOLLO CATALÁN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some results of an educational innovation based on the use of ICT as a learning environment. The main aim of this study is to describe an experience based collaborative learning in virtual communities of learning and reciprocal teaching and assessing students’ knowledge. For that, we design an educational proposal with three didactic units, which includes a kit of tasks and resources for learning. This study adopts a quantitative and qualitative methodology, applying attitudes scales, interviews and analysis of messages from online discussion forums. The study involved 56 students in first year of Pedagogy. We apply a Likert scale and a semantic differential about the learning experience and the methodology used. Also we conducted semi-structured group interviews to understand the perceptions and students’ evaluations about the methodology. The results show a very positive assessment about the learning experience and the methodology used. Peer interaction is focused on resolving technical queries, although there are also other forms of collaboration focused on joint interpretation and understanding of learning activities and assessment of the learning process. The results show that the intervention centers on teacher feedback and monitoring of learning tasks, reinforcing positive actions of the students and guiding the learning process. Finally, as to the benefits received by students, the results show that not only is development of social and communication skills, but also conceptual and emotional changes related to the subject.

  11. Representative Model of the Learning Process in Virtual Spaces Supported by ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacho, José

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the results of research activities for building the representative model of the learning process in virtual spaces (e-Learning). The formal basis of the model are supported in the analysis of models of learning assessment in virtual spaces and specifically in Dembo´s teaching learning model, the systemic approach to evaluating…

  12. Simulation based virtual learning environment in medical genetics counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Bonde, Mads T.; Wulff, Julie S. G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Simulation based learning environments are designed to improve the quality of medical education by allowing students to interact with patients, diagnostic laboratory procedures, and patient data in a virtual environment. However, few studies have evaluated whether simulation based...... the perceived relevance of medical educational activities. The results suggest that simulations can help future generations of doctors transfer new understanding of disease mechanisms gained in virtual laboratory settings into everyday clinical practice....... learning environments increase students' knowledge, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy, and help them generalize from laboratory analyses to clinical practice and health decision-making. METHODS: An entire class of 300 University of Copenhagen first-year undergraduate students, most with a major...

  13. Generation and Application of Virtual Dynamic Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of virtual dynamic learning environments by mental imagery improved physical education of student teachers. Up-to-date studies showed that training computerized simulations improved spatial abilities, especially visualization of the body's movements in space, and enhanced academic achievements. The main program of the research concentrated on creating teaching units focusing on a variety of physical skills through computerized dynamic presentations. The findings showed that as the student teachers practiced the creation of simulations through the PowerPoint Software, it became clear to them how the computer is related to physical activities. Consequently their presentations became highly animated, and applied to the natural environment. The student teachers applied their presentations in their practical classroom and reported about their pupils' progress in physical skills. Moreover the motivation of the student teachers and pupils to both modes of learning, manipulating virtually and physically, was enhanced.

  14. Teachers’ interactions and mathematics learning within a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Terra Salles

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technology brings new ways of enrolment and motivation of individuals. These technologies have been an important vehicle for sharing information and constitute various communities. For this reason, it is necessary analysis of learning in virtual environments. The aim of this article focuses on the analysis of teachers interactions in the environment Virtual Math Team (VMT-Chat in addressing one problem of taxicab geometry. We study learning through different forms of participation of individuals within the environment. The results shows that the identification of different types of interlocution (evaluative, interpretative, informative and negociative allows the teacher the creation of strategies to contribute with the continuity of the debate and to promote the development of mathematical ideas emerged from interlocutions. The analysis also illustrates how teachers interacted online with the use of combinatorial analysis on the metric in taxicab geometry.

  15. Blended learning in paediatric emergency medicine: preliminary analysis of a virtual learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedding, Ruth; Jenner, Rachel; Potier, Katherine; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Carley, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) currently faces many competing educational challenges. Recent changes to the working patterns have made the delivery of effective teaching to trainees extremely difficult. We developed a virtual learning environment, on the basis of socioconstructivist principles, which allows learning to take place regardless of time or location. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended e-learning approach for PEM training. We evaluated the experiences of ST3 trainees in PEM using a multimodal approach. We classified and analysed message board discussions over a 6-month period to look for evidence of practice change and learning. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with trainees approximately 5 months after they completed the course. Trainees embraced the virtual learning environment and had positive experiences of the blended approach to learning. Socioconstructivist learning did take place through the use of message boards on the virtual learning environment. Despite their initial unfamiliarity with the online learning system, the participants found it easy to access and use. The participants found the learning relevant and there was an overlap between shop floor learning and the online content. Clinical discussion was often led by trainees on the forums and these were described as enjoyable and informative. A blended approach to e-learning in basic PEM is effective and enjoyable to trainees.

  16. Empirical Evidence of Priming, Transfer, Reinforcement, and Learning in the Real and Virtual Trillium Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, M. C. R.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been a debate on the effectiveness of virtual reality used for learning with young children, producing many ideas but little empirical proof. This empirical study compared learning activity in situ of a real environment (Real) and a desktop virtual reality (Virtual) environment, built with video game technology,…

  17. Importance of Diversified Leadership Roles in Improving Team Effectiveness in a Virtual Collaboration Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charlie C.; Wu, Jiinpo; Yang, Samuel C.; Tsou, Hsin-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Virtual teams enabled by information and communications technologies (ICT) are increasingly being adopted not only by for-profit organizations but also by education institutions as well. This study investigates what contributes to the success of virtual learning teams. Specifically, we examine the issue of leadership in virtual learning teams. The…

  18. Fostering Learning Through Interprofessional Virtual Reality Simulation Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicely, Stephanie; Farra, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a unique strategy for improving didactic learning and clinical skill while simultaneously fostering interprofessional collaboration and communication. Senior-level nursing students collaborated with students enrolled in the Department of Interactive Media Studies to design a virtual reality simulation based upon disaster management and triage techniques. Collaborative creation of the simulation proved to be a strategy for enhancing students' knowledge of and skill in disaster management and triage while impacting attitudes about interprofessional communication and teamwork.

  19. Evaluation of Virtual Teaching-Learning Environments based on usability standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Cocunubo-Suarez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this review article is to determine the necessary sub-characteristics or aspects for the evaluation of Virtual Teaching-Learning Environments (VTLEs as final or finished products based on ISO 9126, 14598 and 25000-SQuaRE standards. A systematic information search was carried out. A total of 108 documents were retrieved about subjects such as web usability, virtual learning environments, usability, educational software, educational web evaluation, usability evaluation and web usability evaluation. Out of the 108 documents, 70 were selected by inclusion and exclusion analysis. The eight subfeatures of greater statistical frequency were identified among the subset of documents and then integrated as a proposal for standard 25000-SQuaRE.

  20. Motivational interviewing workshop in a virtual world: learning as avatars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shershneva, Marianna; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kear, Cynthia; Heyden, Robin; Heyden, Neil; Lee, Jay; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Limited research has been done to understand outcomes of continuing medical education offered in three-dimensional, immersive virtual worlds. We studied a case of a virtual world workshop on motivational interviewing (MI) applied to smoking cessation counseling and its educational impact. To facilitate content development and evaluation, we specified desired MI competencies. The workshop consisted of three sessions, which included lectures, practice with standardized patients, and chat interactions. Data were collected from 13 primary care physicians and residents through workshop observation, and pre- and 3-month post-workshop telephone/Skype interviews and interactions with standardized patients. Interactions with standardized patients were assessed by an expert using a validated MI tool and by standardized patients using a tool developed for this study. For 11 participants who attended two or three sessions, we conducted paired-samples t tests comparing mean differences between the competency scores before and after the workshop. Expert assessment showed significant improvement on six of seven MI competencies. All participants reported learning new knowledge and skills, and nine described incorporating new learning into their clinical practice. Practicing MI with standardized patients and/or observing others' practice appeared to be the most helpful workshop component. The evaluated workshop had positive impact on participants' competencies and practice as related to MI applied to smoking cessation counseling. Our findings support further exploration of three-dimensional virtual worlds as learning environments for continuing medical education.

  1. Grid Based Integration Technologies of Virtual Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D P; He, L S; Yang, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel integrated architecture of measurement system for the new requirements of measurement collaboration, measurement resource interconnection and transparent access etc in the wide-area and across organization in the context of a grid. The complexity of integration on a grid arises from the scale, dynamism, autonomy, and distribution of the measurement resources. The main argument of this paper is that these complexities should be made transparent to the collaborative measurement, via flexible reconfigurable mechanisms and dynamic virtualization services. The paper is started by discussing the integration-oriented measurement architecture which provides collaborative measurement services to distributed measurement resources and then the measurement mechanisms are discussed which implements the transparent access and collaboration of measurement resources by providing protocols, measurement schedule and global data driven model

  2. VirtualSpace: A vision of a machine-learned virtual space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnik, J.; Sarno-Smith, L. K.; Chu, X.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Angelopoulos, V.; Thorne, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Space borne instrumentation tends to come and go. A typical instrument will go through a phase of design and construction, be deployed on a spacecraft for several years while it collects data, and then be decommissioned and fade into obscurity. The data collected from that instrument will typically receive much attention while it is being collected, perhaps in the form of event studies, conjunctions with other instruments, or a few statistical surveys, but once the instrument or spacecraft is decommissioned, the data will be archived and receive progressively less attention with every passing year. This is the fate of all historical data, and will be the fate of data being collected by instruments even at the present time. But what if those instruments could come alive, and all be simultaneously present at any and every point in time and space? Imagine the scientific insights, and societal gains that could be achieved with a grand (virtual) heliophysical observatory that consists of every current and historical mission ever deployed? We propose that this is not just fantasy but is imminently doable with the data currently available, with the present computational resources, and with currently available algorithms. This project revitalizes existing data resources and lays the groundwork for incorporating data from every future mission to expand the scope and refine the resolution of the virtual observatory. We call this project VirtualSpace: a machine-learned virtual space environment.

  3. Interaction Forms in Successful Collaborative Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuopala, Essi; Hyvönen, Pirkko; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies on social interaction in collaborative learning, little is known about interaction forms in successful computer-supported collaborative learning situations. The purpose of this study was to explore and understand student interaction in successful collaborative learning during a university course which was mediated by…

  4. Technically Speaking: Transforming Language Learning through Virtual Learning Environments (MOOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Emde, Silke; Schneider, Jeffrey; Kotter, Markus

    2001-01-01

    Draws on experiences from a 7-week exchange between students learning German at an American college and advanced students of English at a German university. Maps out the benefits to using a MOO (multiple user domains object-oriented) for language learning: a student-centered learning environment structured by such objectives as peer teaching,…

  5. Virtual reality training versus blended learning of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia Anja; Gondan, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Background: Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Methods: Laparoscopy-naïve medical students...... were randomized in two groups stratified for gender. The BL group (n = 42) used E-learning for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and practiced basic skills with box trainers. The VR group (n = 42) trained basic skills and LC on the LAP Mentor II (Simbionix, Cleveland, USA). Each group trained 3×4 hours...

  6. LEARNING TOOLS INTEROPERABILITY – A NEW STANDARD FOR INTEGRATION OF DISTANCE LEARNING PLATFORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr A. Shcherbyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For information technology in education there is always an issue of re-usage of electronic educational resources, their transferring possibility from one virtual learning environment to another. Previously, standardized sets of files were used to serve this purpose, for example, SCORM-packages. In this article the new standard Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI is reviewed, which allows users from one environment to access resources from another environment. This makes it possible to integrate them into a single distributed learning environment that is created and shared. The article gives examples of the practical use of standard LTI in Moodle learning management system using External tool and LTI provider plugins.

  7. Bringing problem based learning to life using virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Linda; Sadler, Lynne; Surtees, Geoffrey

    2005-03-01

    Recent UK government policy advocates the need for a more flexible approach to nurse education and ;Fitness for Practice' stresses the importance of information technology and computer mediated learning facilities in the future of nursing education [Department of Health, Making a Difference, Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Contribution to Health Care, Department of Health, 1999; The United Kingdom Central Council For Nursing, Fitness for Practice, The UKCC Commission for Nursing and Midwifery Education, 1999]. In response to this recommendation, a virtual reality package has been designed as a learning resource within adult pre-registration nursing education. This learning and teaching strategy is used in conjunction with problem based learning, enabling students to visualise individual/family life in a community setting. Students are encouraged to consider wider issues such as social and environmental factors and their impact upon health. The virtual reality package acts as one of a number of triggers. This paper will discuss the early development and offer an example of its use as a learning and teaching strategy within year two of a three year programme.

  8. Learning in Virtual Forest: A Forest Ecosystem in the Web-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussila, Terttu; Virtanen, Viivi

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Forest is a web-based, open-access learning environment about forests designed for primary-school pupils between the ages of 10 and 13 years. It is pedagogically designed to develop an understanding of ecology, to enhance conceptual development and to give a holistic view of forest ecosystems. Various learning tools, such as concept maps,…

  9. Analysis of Virtual Learning Environments from a Comprehensive Semiotic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria María Álvarez Cadavid

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a wide variety of perspectives and models for the study of online education, most of these focus on the analysis of the verbal aspects of such learning, while very few consider the relationship between speech and elements of a different nature, such as images and hypermediality. In a previous article we presented a proposal for a comprehensive semiotic analysis of virtual learning environments that more recently has been developed and tested for the study of different online training courses without instructional intervention. In this paper we use this same proposal to analyze online learning environments in the framework of courses with instructional intervention. One of the main observations in relation to this type of analyses is that the organizational aspects of the courses are found to be related to the way in which the input elements for the teaching and learning process are constructed.

  10. Virtual reality simulator for vitreoretinal surgery using integrated OCT data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozak I

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Igor Kozak,1 Pat Banerjee,2 Jia Luo,2 Cristian Luciano21King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Vitreoretinal Division, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2College of Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Operative practice using surgical simulators has become a part of training in many surgical specialties, including ophthalmology. We introduce a virtual reality retina surgery simulator capable of integrating optical coherence tomography (OCT scans from real patients for practicing vitreoretinal surgery using different pathologic scenarios.Keywords: optical coherence tomography

  11. Evaluation of knowledge transfer in an immersive virtual learning environment for the transportation community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Immersive Virtual Learning Environments (IVLEs) are extensively used in training, but few rigorous scientific investigations regarding the : transfer of learning have been conducted. Measurement of learning transfer through evaluative methods is key ...

  12. [Learning about social determinants of health through chronicles, using a virtual learning environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Palacio, Sonia; Amaya-Guio, Jairo

    2016-01-01

    To describe the contributions of a pedagogical strategy based on the construction of chronicles, using a Virtual Learning Environment for training medical students from Universidad de La Sabana on social determinants of health. Descriptive study with a qualitative approach. Design and implementation of a Virtual Learning Environment based on the ADDIE instructional model. A Virtual Learning Environment was implemented with an instructional design based on the five phases of the ADDIE model, on the grounds of meaningful learning and social constructivism, and through the narration of chronicles or life stories as a pedagogical strategy. During the course, the structural determinants and intermediaries were addressed, and nine chronicles were produced by working groups made up of four or five students, who demonstrated meaningful learning from real life stories, presented a coherent sequence, and kept a thread; 82% of these students incorporated in their contents most of the social determinants of health, emphasizing on the concepts of equity or inequity, equality or inequality, justice or injustice and social cohesion. A Virtual Learning Environment, based on an appropriate instructional design, allows to facilitate learning of social determinants of health through a constructivist pedagogical approach by analyzing chronicles or life stories created by ninth-semester students of medicine from Universidad de La Sabana.

  13. Internet messenger based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Internet messenger (IM) has become an important educational technology component in college education, IM makes it possible for students to engage in learning and collaborating at smart virtual class learning (SVCL) using ubiquitous computing. However, the model of IM-based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application to improve engagement and behavior are still limited. In addition, the expectation that IM based SVCL using ubiquitous computing could improve engagement and behavior on smart class cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present the model of IM-based SVCL using ubiquitous computing and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous computing and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect and its contribution to learning

  14. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts.

  15. A pythonic integrated solution for virtual prototyping of cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Bin; Yang Jun; Xiong Yongqian; Chen Dezhi; Yu Tiaoqin; Dong Tianlin; Zhang Tianjue; Fan Mingwu

    2007-01-01

    Virtual prototyping (VP) is a novel technique in engineering, which is desired to be applied to cyclotron design and development. Some sub-prototyping components, including beam dynamics, magnet, RF system and control system of cyclotrons, have been developed separately, but an integrated platform which encapsulates these different components is required for global system optimization. Considering that the VP integrated platform is a large-scale software and has numerous loose-coupled components, this paper describes the pythonic approach to implement this platform. By mixing the high-level interpreted Python language and the compiled languages like Fortran/C/C++ in an effective method, this approach can achieve a combination of code efficiency, flexibility and compactness

  16. Student Activity and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Kalle; Nevgi, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between degree of participation and learning outcomes in an e-learning course on medical informatics. Overall activity in using course materials and degree of participation in the discussion forums of an online course were studied among 39 medical students. Students were able to utilise the…

  17. Effects of ICT Assisted Real and Virtual Learning on the Performance of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Monisha; Jena, Ananta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effect of ICT assisted real and virtual learning performance over the traditional approach of secondary school students. Non-Equivalent Pretest-Posttest Quasi Experimental Design used to assess and relate the effects of independent variables virtual learning on dependent variables (i.e. learning performance).…

  18. The Benefits and Barriers of Using Virtual Worlds to Engage Healthcare Professionals on Distance Learning Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Catherine Jane

    2016-01-01

    Using the delivery of a large postgraduate distance learning module in bioethics to health professionals as an illustrative example, the type of learning activity that could be enhanced through delivery in an immersive virtual world (IVW) was explored. Several activities were repurposed from the "traditional" virtual learning environment…

  19. Editorial: Creating, Supporting, Sustaining and Evaluating Virtual Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Ge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is dedicated to creating, building, supporting, sustaining and evaluating virtual learning communities (VLCs using emerging technologies. The contributors from diverse disciplines have come together to share their valuable experiences and findings through their research in the following themes: (a instructional models, strategies, approaches for building, supporting and evaluating VLCs, (b designing effective use of tools to promote discourse and scaffold peer interactions among members, (c iterative processes and models of designing and evaluating VLCs; and (d various variables concerning VLCs, such as virtual community behaviors, cultural factors, adoption patterns of tools. It is hoped that these articles will provide practical guidance and offer valuable experience to both educators and researchers who are interested in designing effective VLCs and examining various aspects of VLCs to advance our understanding of VLCs.

  20. Learning Curves of Virtual Mastoidectomy in Distributed and Massed Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Repeated and deliberate practice is crucial in surgical skills training, and virtual reality (VR) simulation can provide self-directed training of basic surgical skills to meet the individual needs of the trainee. Assessment of the learning curves of surgical procedures is pivotal...... in understanding skills acquisition and best-practice implementation and organization of training. OBJECTIVE: To explore the learning curves of VR simulation training of mastoidectomy and the effects of different practice sequences with the aim of proposing the optimal organization of training. DESIGN, SETTING...... plateaued on a score of 16.0 (15.3-16.7) at approximately the ninth repetition, but the individual learning curves were highly variable. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Novices can acquire basic mastoidectomy competencies with self-directed VR simulation training. Training should be organized with distributed...

  1. The Virtual Health University: An eLearning Model within the Cuban Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardines, José B

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes Cuba's experience with the Virtual Health University (VHU) as a strategic project of INFOMED, promoting creation of an open teaching-learning environment for health sciences education, through intensive and creative use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and a network approach to learning. An analysis of the VHU's main antecedents in its different stages of development provides insight into the strategic reasons that led to the establishment of a virtual university in the national health system during Cuba's so-called Special Period of economic crisis. Using the general objectives of creating, sharing, and collaborating which define the VHU's conceptual-operative framework, the three essential components (subsystems) are described: pedagogical, technological, and managerial, as well as the operative stages of educational design, technological implementation, and teaching-administrative management system. Each component of the model is analyzed in the context of global, modern university trends, towards integration of the face-to-face and distance education approaches and the creation of virtual institutions that assume the technological and pedagogical changes demanded by eLearning.

  2. Sensorimotor Learning during a Marksmanship Task in Immersive Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh M. Rao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor learning refers to improvements that occur through practice in the performance of sensory-guided motor behaviors. Leveraging novel technical capabilities of an immersive virtual environment, we probed the component kinematic processes that mediate sensorimotor learning. Twenty naïve subjects performed a simulated marksmanship task modeled after Olympic Trap Shooting standards. We measured movement kinematics and shooting performance as participants practiced 350 trials while receiving trial-by-trial feedback about shooting success. Spatiotemporal analysis of motion tracking elucidated the ballistic and refinement phases of hand movements. We found systematic changes in movement kinematics that accompanied improvements in shot accuracy during training, though reaction and response times did not change over blocks. In particular, we observed longer, slower, and more precise ballistic movements that replaced effort spent on corrections and refinement. Collectively, these results leverage developments in immersive virtual reality technology to quantify and compare the kinematics of movement during early learning of full-body sensorimotor orienting.

  3. Virtual respiratory system for interactive e-learning of spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tomalak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in computer simulation technology offers new possibilities for modern medicine. On one hand – virtual organs can help to create animal or human models for research, on the other hand – e-learning or distant learning through Internet is now possible. The aim of our work was to create a system for interactive learning of spirometry (SILS, enabling students or physicians to observe spirometric measurements (flow-volume modified by setting level and kind of abnormalities within the respiratory system. SILS is based on a virtual respiratory system presented previously in several papers. Its main features are: separation of the lungs and chest; anatomical division of the lungs; division of airway resistance into transmural pressure dependent (Rp and lung volume dependent (Rv parts. The one mathematical formula that represents Rp describes both flow limitation (forced expiration and dependence of Raw on lungs volume (small airflows. The output of system are spirometric parameters (as FEV1, FVC, FEV1%FVC and a flow–volume loop constructed according to results of simulation of forced expiration for the chosen abnormality kind and level. As a result – this system may be used in teaching process in medical schools and postgraduate education. We offer access to a basic version of SILS for students and physicians at: www.spirometry.ibib.waw.pl and www.zpigichp.edu.pl. As we expect feedback from users, it is possible to modify user interface or model features to comply with users' requests.

  4. Putting the PLE into PLD: Virtual Professional Learning and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Owen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The range of affordances that a virtual environment offers can provide opportunities for more formal Professional Learning and Development (PLD that has flexibility of choice, time and approach for educators. It was this potential that inspired the design of the Virtual Professional Learning and Development (VPLD program that was instigated in October 2009 by the NZ Ministry of Education, who also funded the project. The findings from the pilot of the VPLD program in 2010 indicated that when professional learning was situated within the practitioner's context, and with complementary, easily-accessible opportunities for sharing of practice within an online Community of Practice, participants demonstrated high levels of engagement as well as changes in their own teaching practice. The VPLD Programme was facilitated and researched again during 2011, building on findings from 2010. Findings to date suggest that the educators developed a sense of self-efficacy that motivated them to trial alternative approaches, and to initiate iterative cycles of trial, error, and improvement.

  5. Virtueller Medizinischer Campus Graz: eine e-Learning Umgebung wird 5 Jahre alt / Virtual Medical Campus Graz: an e-learning environment has its 5 year-anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reibnegger, Gilbert

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Parallel with the initiation of an integrated curriculum at the Medical University of Graz a virtual learning environment was implemented, designated as Virtual Medical Campus (VMC. Several financial support projects made the development of the VMC and its enhancements possible. Learning objects are granular and strictly equipped with a set of metadata conforming the SCORM 2004 2nd edition-standard and are therefore reusable and exchangeable with other study courses or e-Learning-systems. Simple usability allows authors the intuitive creation of content, which may be enriched with interactive and tutorial systems using several built in authoring tools like web-based-training or a Virtual Microscope. In 2005 more than 3300 students applied for human medicine at the Medical University of Graz and it was decided to give a virtual term with a selection process at the end of it.More than 1 million accesses to learning objects and 257,000 web-based-trainings were handled without a single breakdown. This unique interim solution of a virtual term demonstrated the capacity of the VMC-system and the organisational possibility to intercept rushes of application using e-Learning. In the meanwhile the VMC Graz provides 13 study courses at four universities in two different European countries and two international postgraduate programs. The technical development aims at Web 3.0 – “Semantic Web” and the further expansion of co-operations is a present and future strategy.

  6. Using Virtual Worlds to Identify Multidimensional Student Engagement in High School Foreign Language Learning Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Laura Beth

    2012-01-01

    Virtual world environments have evolved from object-oriented, text-based online games to complex three-dimensional immersive social spaces where the lines between reality and computer-generated begin to blur. Educators use virtual worlds to create engaging three-dimensional learning spaces for students, but the impact of virtual worlds in…

  7. A Practical Guide, with Theoretical Underpinnings, for Creating Effective Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.; Domingo, Jelia

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of open source virtual environments, the associated cost reductions, and the more flexible options, avatar-based virtual reality environments are within reach of educators. By using and repurposing readily available virtual environments, instructors can bring engaging, community-building, and immersive learning opportunities to…

  8. Virtual NC machine model with integrated knowledge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, Sofija; Dukovski, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The concept of virtual NC machining was established for providing a virtual product that could be compared with an appropriate designed product, in order to make NC program correctness evaluation, without real experiments. This concept is applied in the intelligent CAD/CAM system named VIRTUAL MANUFACTURE. This paper presents the first intelligent module that enables creation of the virtual models of existed NC machines and virtual creation of new ones, applying modular composition. Creation of a virtual NC machine is carried out via automatic knowledge data saving (features of the created NC machine). (Author)

  9. VIRTUAL MODELING OF PHYSICAL EXPERIMENT FOR DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEMS IN THE SECONDARY AND HIGHER PEDAGOGICAL SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V. Holovko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the state of the educational computer simulation and its modern features. It deals with psychological and didactic approaches to modeling in physics education and school physical experiment. It was considered the possible classification of computer models for distance learning system, as well as proposed the ways of implementing virtual experiment in distance education in physics. The main types of virtual modeling, the most widely used computer systems support in teaching physics, their possible application in teaching secondary school students were characterized. The peculiarities of distance education of future physics teachers by means of electronic teaching methods as a combination of integrated electronic educational resources and services were highlighted.

  10. Action learning in virtual higher education: applying leadership theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Joseph

    2016-05-03

    This paper reports the historical foundation of Northeastern University's course, LDR 6100: Developing Your Leadership Capability, a partial literature review of action learning (AL) and virtual action learning (VAL), a course methodology of LDR 6100 requiring students to apply leadership perspectives using VAL as instructed by the author, questionnaire and survey results of students who evaluated the effectiveness of their application of leadership theories using VAL and insights believed to have been gained by the author administering VAL. Findings indicate most students thought applying leadership perspectives using AL was better than considering leadership perspectives not using AL. In addition as implemented in LDR 6100, more students evaluated VAL positively than did those who assessed VAL negatively.

  11. Virtual Learning Spaces at the Royal Danish Defence College

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Gro

    A growing proportion of today’s educational activity, civilian as well as military, takes place in virtual learning environments. A corollary of this growth is the emerging concern that the educational value of information and communication technology (ICT) is under-used by educators....... There are also professional concerns that ICT may even undermine the effectiveness of teaching in some instances. A recent report notes that our educational institutions are ill-prepared pedagogically for making the most of technology. It asserts that simply adding twenty first century technologies to twentieth...... century teaching practices will “dilute the effectiveness of teaching”. Since our military institutions are currently adopting new technologies extensively, this issue is a pressing one. We need a deeper understanding of how e-learning affects learners in a military context. For this reason, the present...

  12. Implementation of 3D virtual learning environment to improve students’ cognitive achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasim; Langi, A. Z. R.; Rosmansyah, Y.; Munir

    2018-05-01

    Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) has been widely used in assisting learning. This study aims to implement VLE-based learning in software engineering course. VLE provides many facilities for learning. In this research, VLE components used were presenter and quiz chair components. Evaluation results showed a significant difference from classical learning.

  13. Learning Competencies Used In the U.S. Navy’s Virtual Schoolhouse Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    system for which they are receiving training. Self -paced practice on newly-learned skills is also typically unavailable in a Navy classroom setting... communication and collaborative skills by using virtual learning applications. We must understand these differences and opportunities in order to design... self - esteem , and ability to control his or her own destiny. Students who are confident in their own abilities are more likely to succeed

  14. ASPECTS OF USING CLOUD TECHNOLOGIES IN VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    ZHVANIA, Taliko; KAPANADZE, David; KIKNADZE, Mzia; TANDILASHVILI, George

    2016-01-01

    Thereare increased using the e-Learning technologies at the modern institutions ofhigher education, which favored to integrate the various instruments in thevirtual learning environment. Recently,the cloud technologies have become the most popular, which offer e-Learninginternet technologies based dynamical and actual new opportunities to theeducational institutions. The cloud technologies provide a high level of theservice and they impact on the design of the training courses, offered servic...

  15. Distance Learning for Students with Special Needs through 3D Virtual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, James M.; Stichter, Janine; Galyen, Krista

    2014-01-01

    iSocial is a 3D Virtual Learning Environment (3D VLE) to develop social competency for students who have been identified with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders. The motivation for developing a 3D VLE is to improve access to special needs curriculum for students who live in rural or small school districts. The paper first describes a…

  16. How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guasch, Teresa; Espasa, Anna; Alvarez, Ibis; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Guasch, T., Espasa, A., Alvarez, I., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, 31 May). How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment? Presentation at a Learning & Cognition meeting, Open Universiteit in the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  17. Integration of virtual control units in the total vehicle simulation; Integration virtueller Steuergeraete in die Gesamtfahrzeugsimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppa, Andreas; Lund, Christoph [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    In this article the simulation of information and energetics of vehicles with model-integration of electronic control units (ECU) in a simulation, based on the coupling of physical and control components of the total vehicle are investigated. For that simplified models of ECU's, simulating the functionally of the real ECU's, were used. The integration of virtual EUC's in models of full vehicles makes it possible to simulate the energetics for different driving cycles in a realistic way. By better simulation results an evaluation of physical components and the amount of functions are possible. In the area of the thermal management of vehicles by this analyses and optimizations of functions become possible. This article shows the advantages of embedding virtual ECU's in simulations of full vehicles. (orig.)

  18. ITER design, integration and assembly studies assisted by virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D., E-mail: delphine.keller@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, F-13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Doceul, L.; Ferlay, F.; Jiolat, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Cordier, J.J.; Kuehn, I.; Manfreo, B.; Reich, J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, F-13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► VR technologies applied to Fusion enable to better and faster understand integration issues. ► Problems are solved and validated on a numerical mock up. ► Integration and accessibility issues can be identified in the earliest design. ► VR technologies are very helpful for assembly and maintenance operation simulations. ► New tools for real time simulations of hands-on operations are currently under development. -- Abstract: In a project like ITER where schedule, resources and cost is continuously optimized, emphasis has to be put on developing long lead items first while keeping other designs very low in definition. Hence, at a particular stage of the project, several components have to coexist in the integrated system while handling different level of maturity. Therefore, all the difficulty consists in managing the interfaces between all these components and to minimize the risk of design changes on the most advanced components. As a future exploitant, ITER is in charge of managing these interfaces and to ensure that maintenance of especially safety important class components (SIC) is feasible. These operation and maintenance constraints have to be taken into account since the earliest design of the components itselves. In this context, CEA IRFM is taking the benefit of using its virtual reality (VR) platform and simulation tools to assist ITER Organization in improving the efficiency of the inconsistencies identification and the machine sub-system design optimization. Currently, two contracts are on-going: the first one concerns the cryostat and in-vessel components; the second one concerns the overall Tokamak (TKM) and diagnostic buildings. This paper describes how VR tools applied to fusion and especially to ITER can help design and Integration with taking into account assembly and maintenance requirements at early stage in the design of complex systems.

  19. ITER design, integration and assembly studies assisted by virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, D.; Doceul, L.; Ferlay, F.; Jiolat, G.; Cordier, J.J.; Kuehn, I.; Manfreo, B.; Reich, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► VR technologies applied to Fusion enable to better and faster understand integration issues. ► Problems are solved and validated on a numerical mock up. ► Integration and accessibility issues can be identified in the earliest design. ► VR technologies are very helpful for assembly and maintenance operation simulations. ► New tools for real time simulations of hands-on operations are currently under development. -- Abstract: In a project like ITER where schedule, resources and cost is continuously optimized, emphasis has to be put on developing long lead items first while keeping other designs very low in definition. Hence, at a particular stage of the project, several components have to coexist in the integrated system while handling different level of maturity. Therefore, all the difficulty consists in managing the interfaces between all these components and to minimize the risk of design changes on the most advanced components. As a future exploitant, ITER is in charge of managing these interfaces and to ensure that maintenance of especially safety important class components (SIC) is feasible. These operation and maintenance constraints have to be taken into account since the earliest design of the components itselves. In this context, CEA IRFM is taking the benefit of using its virtual reality (VR) platform and simulation tools to assist ITER Organization in improving the efficiency of the inconsistencies identification and the machine sub-system design optimization. Currently, two contracts are on-going: the first one concerns the cryostat and in-vessel components; the second one concerns the overall Tokamak (TKM) and diagnostic buildings. This paper describes how VR tools applied to fusion and especially to ITER can help design and Integration with taking into account assembly and maintenance requirements at early stage in the design of complex systems

  20. Impact of Virtual Patients as Optional Learning Material in Veterinary Biochemistry Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsorgen, Christin; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y; Branitzki-Heinemann, Katja; Kankofer, Marta; Mándoki, Míra; Adler, Martin; Tipold, Andrea; Ehlers, Jan P

    2018-01-01

    Biochemistry and physiology teachers from veterinary faculties in Hannover, Budapest, and Lublin prepared innovative, computer-based, integrative clinical case scenarios as optional learning materials for teaching and learning in basic sciences. These learning materials were designed to enhance attention and increase interest and intrinsic motivation for learning, thus strengthening autonomous, active, and self-directed learning. We investigated learning progress and success by administering a pre-test before exposure to the virtual patients (vetVIP) cases, offered vetVIP cases alongside regular biochemistry courses, and then administered a complementary post-test. We analyzed improvement in cohort performance and level of confidence in rating questions. Results of the performance in biochemistry examinations in 2014, 2015, and 2016 were correlated with the use of and performance in vetVIP cases throughout biochemistry courses in Hannover. Surveys of students reflected that interactive cases helped them understand the relevance of basic sciences in veterinary education. Differences between identical pre- and post-tests revealed knowledge improvement (correct answers: +28% in Hannover, +9% in Lublin) and enhanced confidence in decision making ("I don't know" answers: -20% in Hannover, -7.5% in Lublin). High case usage and voluntary participation (use of vetVIP cases in Hannover and Lublin >70%, Budapest learning could be extended and generated cases should be shared across veterinary faculties.

  1. Participatory design in the project of virtual learning environment of histology

    OpenAIRE

    Santa-Rosa, José Guilherme da Silva

    2012-01-01

    This present article describes a research on the development, under the approach of participatory design, a virtual teaching-learning of Histology in which students and teachers participated actively in all stages of development of the educational environment. We postulates that the development of virtual learning environment of Histology, through the Participatory Design approach, contributes to greater acceptance and use by students and that the adoption of virtual environment for teaching ...

  2. A Collaborative Virtual Environment for Situated Language Learning Using VEC3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chun; Yang, Mau-Tsuen

    2008-01-01

    A 3D virtually synchronous communication architecture for situated language learning has been designed to foster communicative competence among undergraduate students who have studied English as a foreign language (EFL). We present an innovative approach that offers better e-learning than the previous virtual reality educational applications. The…

  3. Pedagogical Challenges of Spoken English Learning in the Second Life Virtual World: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haisen

    2013-01-01

    As one of the emerging technologies, the Second Life virtual world provides learners of English as a Foreign Language with a unique opportunity of learning authentic language with native and non-native speakers of English in a virtual environment. It enables them to learn the target language in a real-life-like social communication environment. To…

  4. Improving Teaching and Learning of Computer Programming through the Use of the Second Life Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Micaela; Fonseca, Benjamim; Morgado, Leonel; Martins, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of new technologies such as three-dimensional virtual worlds brings new opportunities for teaching and learning. We conducted an action research approach to the analysis of how teaching and learning of computer programming at the university level could be developed within the Second Life virtual world. Results support the notion that…

  5. Students' Collective Knowledge Construction in the Virtual Learning Environment ""ToLigado"--Your School Interactive Newspaper"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Brasilina

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The ToLigado Project--Your School Interactive Newspaper is an interactive virtual learning environment conceived, developed, implemented and supported by researchers at the School of the Future Research Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Method: This virtual learning environment aims to motivate trans-disciplinary…

  6. Student Preferences for Live versus Virtual Rats in a Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcoro, Mirari; Trundle, Melissa B.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the preference of undergraduate students for a live or a virtual rat when learning about concepts of operant conditioning. Students were provided with the opportunity to directly compare a virtual and a live rat in a supplemental exercise for Learning courses. We argue that the design of teaching exercises should involve a systematic…

  7. Exploring Non-Traditional Learning Methods in Virtual and Real-World Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukman, Rebeka; Krajnc, Majda

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies the commonalities and differences within non-traditional learning methods regarding virtual and real-world environments. The non-traditional learning methods in real-world have been introduced within the following courses: Process Balances, Process Calculation, and Process Synthesis, and within the virtual environment through…

  8. The Effect of Virtual versus Traditional Learning in Achieving Competency-Based Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Shahsavari, Sakine; Sobhanian, Saeed; Dastpak, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Background: By rapid developing of the network technology, the internet-based learning methods are substituting the traditional classrooms making them expand to the virtual network learning environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of virtual systems on competency-based skills of first-year nursing students.…

  9. Service-learning in nursing: Integrating student learning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Service-learning in nursing: Integrating student learning and community-based service experience through reflective practice. ... the students' reflective journals, group project reports and a focus-group discussion as the primary data sources.

  10. The use of agents and objects to integrate virtual enterprises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancerella, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    The manufacturing complex for the Department of Energy (DOE) is distributed: design laboratories, manufacturing facilities, and industrial partners. Designers must have a concurrent engineering environment to support all aspects of the cradle-to-grave product realization process across the distributed sites. Engineers must be able to analyze and simulate processes, retrieve and process heterogeneous information, both archived and current, and access multiple databases. Manufacturers must be able to coordinate activities of various manufacturing centers, which may involve a negotiation process. Furthermore, Sandia must be able to export manufacturing capabilities, such as on-machine acceptance, to outside suppliers. A key element to making this a reality is a flexible information architecture. The DOE information architecture must support a wide-area virtual enterprise, with distributed intelligent software components. The architecture must provide for asynchronous communication; multiple programming languages and operating systems; incorporation of geographically distributed manufacturing services; various hardware platforms; and heterogeneous workstations, PC`s, machine tool controllers, and special-purpose compute engines. Further, it is critical that manufacturing facilities are not isolated from design, planning, and other business activities and that information flows easily and bidirectionally between these activities. To accomplish this seamlessly, heterogeneous knowledge must be exchanged across both domain and organizational boundaries. Distributed object and software agent technologies are two methods for connecting such engineering and manufacturing systems. The two technologies have overlapping goals - interoperability and architectural support for integrating software components - though to date little or no integration of the two technologies has been made.

  11. The Virtual Maternity Clinic: a teaching and learning innovation for midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Diane; Duke, Maxine; Nagle, Cate; Macfarlane, Susie; Karantzas, Gery; Patterson, Denise

    2013-10-01

    There are challenges for midwifery students in developing skill and competency due to limited placements in antenatal clinics. The Virtual Maternity Clinic, an online resource, was developed to support student learning in professional midwifery practice. Identifying students' perceptions of the Virtual Maternity Clinic; learning about the impact of the Virtual Maternity Clinic on the students' experience of its use and access; and learning about the level of student satisfaction of the Virtual Maternity Clinic. Two interventions were used including pre and post evaluations of the online learning resource with data obtained from questionnaires using open ended and dichotomous responses and rating scales. The pre-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention used a qualitative design and the post-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention applied both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Three campuses of Deakin University, located in Victoria, Australia. Midwifery students enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Midwifery and Graduate Diploma of Midwifery were recruited across three campuses of Deakin University (n=140). Thematic analysis of the pre-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention (return rate n=119) related to students' expectations of this resource. The data for the post-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention (return rate n=42) including open-ended responses were thematically analysed; dichotomous data examined in the form of frequencies and percentages of agreement and disagreement; and 5-rating scales were analysed using Pearson's correlations (α=.05, two-tailed). Results showed from the pre-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention that students previously had placements in antenatal clinics were optimistic about the online learning resource. The post-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention results indicated that students were satisfied with the Virtual Maternity Clinic as a learning resource despite some technological issues. The Virtual Maternity Clinic

  12. Physical and cognitive effects of virtual reality integrated training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard T; Watts, Kristopher P; Zhong, Peihan; Wei, Chen-Shuang

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cognitive and physical impact of virtual reality (VR) integrated training versus traditional training methods in the domain of weld training. Weld training is very important in various industries and represents a complex skill set appropriate for advanced training intervention. As such, there has been a long search for the most successful and most cost-effective method for training new welders. Participants in this study were randomly assigned to one of two separate training courses taught by sanctioned American Welding Society certified welding instructors; the duration of each course was 2 weeks. After completing the training for a specific weld type, participants were given the opportunity to test for the corresponding certification. Participants were evaluated in terms of their cognitive and physical parameters, total training time exposure, and welding certification awards earned. Each of the four weld types taught in this study represented distinct levels of difficulty and required the development of specialized knowledge and skills. This study demonstrated that participants in the VR integrated training group (VR50) performed as well as, and in some cases, significantly outperformed, the traditional welding (TW) training group.The VR50 group was found to have a 41.6% increase in overall certifications earned compared with the TW group. VR technology is a valuable tool for the production of skilled welders in a shorter time and often with more highly developed skills than their traditionally trained counterparts. These findings strongly support the use ofVR integrated training in the welding industry.

  13. A novel virtual hub approach for multisource downstream service integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtali, Mattia; Cuca, Branka; Barazzetti, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    A large development of downstream services is expected to be stimulated starting from earth observations (EO) datasets acquired by Copernicus satellites. An important challenge connected with the availability of downstream services is the possibility for their integration in order to create innovative applications with added values for users of different categories level. At the moment, the world of geo-information (GI) is extremely heterogeneous in terms of standards and formats used, thus preventing a facilitated access and integration of downstream services. Indeed, different users and data providers have also different requirements in terms of communication protocols and technology advancement. In recent years, many important programs and initiatives have tried to address this issue even on trans-regional and international level (e.g. INSPIRE Directive, GEOSS, Eye on Earth and SEIS). However, a lack of interoperability between systems and services still exists. In order to facilitate the interaction between different downstream services, a new architectural approach (developed within the European project ENERGIC OD) is proposed in this paper. The brokering-oriented architecture introduces a new mediation layer (the Virtual Hub) which works as an intermediary to bridge the gaps linked to interoperability issues. This intermediation layer de-couples the server and the client allowing a facilitated access to multiple downstream services and also Open Data provided by national and local SDIs. In particular, in this paper an application is presented integrating four services on the topic of agriculture: (i) the service given by Space4Agri (providing services based on MODIS and Landsat data); (ii) Gicarus Lab (providing sample services based on Landsat datasets) and (iii) FRESHMON (providing sample services for water quality) and services from a several regional SDIs.

  14. Special Experiences for Exceptional Students: Integrating Virtual Reality into Special Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erez Cedric

    This paper discusses some of the potential benefits and hazards that virtual reality holds for exceptional children in the special education system. Topics addressed include (1) applications of virtual reality, including developing academic skills via cyberspace, vocational training, and social learning in cyberspace; (2) telepresence and distance…

  15. Students' perspectives on e-learning and the use of a virtual learning environment in dance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, Ä.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838446; Admiraal, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120226340; Wildschut, L.; Simons, P.R.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068032994

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out how dance students experienced learning in an international distance education program delivered in an e-learning format using a virtual learning environment platform. In order to organize the students’ experiences with the various learning assignments, we

  16. Impacting the Science Community through Teacher Development: Utilizing Virtual Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Rachel; van Raalte, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Commitment to the STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) pipeline is slowly declining despite the need for professionals in the medical field. Addressing this, the John A. Burns School of Medicine developed a summer teacher-training program with a supplemental technology-learning component to improve science teachers' knowledge and skills of Molecular Biology. Subsequently, students' skills, techniques, and application of molecular biology are impacted. Science teachers require training that will prepare them for educating future professionals and foster interest in the medical field. After participation in the program and full access to the virtual material, twelve high school science teachers completed a final written reflective statement to evaluate their experiences. Using thematic analysis, knowledge and classroom application were investigated in this study. Results were two-fold: teachers identified difference areas of gained knowledge from the teacher-training program and teachers' reporting various benefits in relation to curricula development after participating in the program. It is concluded that participation in the program and access to the virtual material will impact the science community by updating teacher knowledge and positively influencing students' experience with science.

  17. Virtual Sambor Prei Kuk: An Interactive Learning Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Michon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available MUVEs (Multi-User Virtual Environments are a new media for researching the genesis and evolution of sites of cultural significance. MUVEs are able to model both the tangible and intangible heritage of a site, allowing the user to obtain a more dynamic understanding of the culture. This paper illustrates a cultural heritage project which captures and communicates the interplay of context (geography, content (architecture and artifacts and temporal activity (rituals and everyday life leading to a unique digital archive of the tangible and intangible heritage of the temple complex at Sambor Prei Kuk, Cambodia, circa seventh-eighth century CE. The MU6VE is used to provide a platform which enables the experience of weaved tangible and intangible cultural heritage. This, we argue, turns static space into meaningful place. Further, this kind of digital model has the potential to bring together Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger’s theorizing on the importance of community in education and more recent theorizing on the impact of Virtual Worlds on learning by James Paul Gee.

  18. The influence of virtual presence: Effects on experienced cognitive load and learning outcomes in educational computer games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, Claudia; Bastiaens, Theo

    2018-01-01

    Does the immersive design of an educational gaming environment affect learners’ virtual presence and how much do they learn? Does virtual presence affect learning? This study tries to answer these ques- tions by examining the differences in virtual presence and learning outcomes in two different

  19. Investigating Learners' Attitudes toward Virtual Reality Learning Environments: Based on a Constructivist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Rauch, Ulrich; Liaw, Shu-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The use of animation and multimedia for learning is now further extended by the provision of entire Virtual Reality Learning Environments (VRLE). This highlights a shift in Web-based learning from a conventional multimedia to a more immersive, interactive, intuitive and exciting VR learning environment. VRLEs simulate the real world through the…

  20. Development of a virtual lab for practical eLearning in eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Juliane; Forjan, Mathias; Sauermann, Stefan; Mense, Alexander; Urbauer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    In recent years an ongoing development in educational offers for professionals working in the field of eHealth has been observed. This education is increasingly offered in the form of eLearning courses. Furthermore, it can be seen that simulations are a valuable part to support the knowledge transfer. Based on the knowledge profiles defined for eHealth courses a virtual lab should be developed. For this purpose, a subset of skills and a use case is determined. After searching and evaluating appropriate simulating and testing tools six tools were chosen to implement the use case practically. Within an UML use case diagram the interaction between the tools and the user is represented. Initially tests have shown good results of the tools' feasibility. After an extensive testing phase the tools should be integrated in the eHealth eLearning courses.

  1. Virtual Manufacturing Techniques Designed and Applied to Manufacturing Activities in the Manufacturing Integration and Technology Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearrow, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the identified goals of EM3 is to implement virtual manufacturing by the time the year 2000 has ended. To realize this goal of a true virtual manufacturing enterprise the initial development of a machinability database and the infrastructure must be completed. This will consist of the containment of the existing EM-NET problems and developing machine, tooling, and common materials databases. To integrate the virtual manufacturing enterprise with normal day to day operations the development of a parallel virtual manufacturing machinability database, virtual manufacturing database, virtual manufacturing paradigm, implementation/integration procedure, and testable verification models must be constructed. Common and virtual machinability databases will include the four distinct areas of machine tools, available tooling, common machine tool loads, and a materials database. The machine tools database will include the machine envelope, special machine attachments, tooling capacity, location within NASA-JSC or with a contractor, and availability/scheduling. The tooling database will include available standard tooling, custom in-house tooling, tool properties, and availability. The common materials database will include materials thickness ranges, strengths, types, and their availability. The virtual manufacturing databases will consist of virtual machines and virtual tooling directly related to the common and machinability databases. The items to be completed are the design and construction of the machinability databases, virtual manufacturing paradigm for NASA-JSC, implementation timeline, VNC model of one bridge mill and troubleshoot existing software and hardware problems with EN4NET. The final step of this virtual manufacturing project will be to integrate other production sites into the databases bringing JSC's EM3 into a position of becoming a clearing house for NASA's digital manufacturing needs creating a true virtual manufacturing enterprise.

  2. Integration of laparoscopic virtual-reality simulation into gynaecology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, C; Oestergaard, J; Larsen, C R

    2011-11-01

    Surgery carries the risk of serious harm, as well as benefit, to patients. For healthcare organisations, theatre time is an expensive commodity and litigation costs for surgical specialities are very high. Advanced laparoscopic surgery, now widely used in gynaecology for improved outcomes and reduced length of stay, involves longer operation times and a higher rate of complications for surgeons in training. Virtual-reality (VR) simulation is a relatively new training method that has the potential to promote surgical skill development before advancing to surgery on patients themselves. VR simulators have now been on the market for more than 10 years and, yet, few countries in the world have fully integrated VR simulation training into their gynaecology surgical training programmes. In this review, we aim to summarise the VR simulators currently available together with evidence of their effectiveness in gynaecology, to understand their limitations and to discuss their incorporation into national training curricula. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  3. The Virtual Brain Integrates Computational Modeling and Multimodal Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirner, Michael; McIntosh, Anthony R.; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Brain function is thought to emerge from the interactions among neuronal populations. Apart from traditional efforts to reproduce brain dynamics from the micro- to macroscopic scales, complementary approaches develop phenomenological models of lower complexity. Such macroscopic models typically generate only a few selected—ideally functionally relevant—aspects of the brain dynamics. Importantly, they often allow an understanding of the underlying mechanisms beyond computational reproduction. Adding detail to these models will widen their ability to reproduce a broader range of dynamic features of the brain. For instance, such models allow for the exploration of consequences of focal and distributed pathological changes in the system, enabling us to identify and develop approaches to counteract those unfavorable processes. Toward this end, The Virtual Brain (TVB) (www.thevirtualbrain.org), a neuroinformatics platform with a brain simulator that incorporates a range of neuronal models and dynamics at its core, has been developed. This integrated framework allows the model-based simulation, analysis, and inference of neurophysiological mechanisms over several brain scales that underlie the generation of macroscopic neuroimaging signals. In this article, we describe how TVB works, and we present the first proof of concept. PMID:23442172

  4. Integrating neuroinformatics tools in TheVirtualBrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, M Marmaduke; Pezard, Laurent; Domide, Lia; Knock, Stuart A; Sanz-Leon, Paula; Mersmann, Jochen; McIntosh, Anthony R; Jirsa, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    TheVirtualBrain (TVB) is a neuroinformatics Python package representing the convergence of clinical, systems, and theoretical neuroscience in the analysis, visualization and modeling of neural and neuroimaging dynamics. TVB is composed of a flexible simulator for neural dynamics measured across scales from local populations to large-scale dynamics measured by electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and core analytic and visualization functions, all accessible through a web browser user interface. A datatype system modeling neuroscientific data ties together these pieces with persistent data storage, based on a combination of SQL and HDF5. These datatypes combine with adapters allowing TVB to integrate other algorithms or computational systems. TVB provides infrastructure for multiple projects and multiple users, possibly participating under multiple roles. For example, a clinician might import patient data to identify several potential lesion points in the patient's connectome. A modeler, working on the same project, tests these points for viability through whole brain simulation, based on the patient's connectome, and subsequent analysis of dynamical features. TVB also drives research forward: the simulator itself represents the culmination of several simulation frameworks in the modeling literature. The availability of the numerical methods, set of neural mass models and forward solutions allows for the construction of a wide range of brain-scale simulation scenarios. This paper briefly outlines the history and motivation for TVB, describing the framework and simulator, giving usage examples in the web UI and Python scripting.

  5. Integrating neuroinformatics tools in TheVirtualBrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Marmaduke Woodman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available TheVirtualBrain (TVB is a neuroinformatics Python package representing theconvergence of clinical, systems, and theoretical neuroscience in the analysis,visualization and modeling of neural and neuroimaging dynamics. TVB iscomposed of a flexible simulator for neural dynamics measured across scalesfrom local populations to large-scale dynamics measured byelectroencephalography (EEG, magnetoencephalography (MEG and functionalmagnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, and core analytic and visualizationfunctions, all accessible through a web browser user interface. A datatypesystem modeling neuroscientific data ties together these pieces with persistentdata storage, based on a combination of SQL & HDF5. These datatypes combinewith adapters allowing TVB to integrate other algorithms or computationalsystems. TVB provides infrastructure for multiple projects and multiple users,possibly participating under multiple roles. For example, a clinician mightimport patient data to identify several potential lesion points in thepatient's connectome. A modeler, working on the same project, tests thesepoints for viability through whole brain simulation, based on the patient'sconnectome, and subsequent analysis of dynamical features. TVB also drivesresearch forward: the simulator itself represents the culmination of severalsimulation frameworks in the modeling literature. The availability of thenumerical methods, set of neural mass models and forward solutions allows forthe construction of a wide range of brain-scale simulation scenarios. Thispaper briefly outlines the history and motivation for TVB, describing theframework and simulator, giving usage examples in the web UI and Pythonscripting.

  6. Assessing 3D Virtual World Disaster Training Through Adult Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Taylor-Nelms

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As role-play, virtual reality, and simulated environments gain popularity through virtual worlds such as Second Life, the importance of identifying best practices for education and emergency management training becomes necessary. Using a formal needs assessment approach, we examined the extent to which 3D virtual tornado simulation trainings follow the principles of adult learning theory employed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA National Training and Education Division. Through a three-fold methodology of observation, interviews, and reflection on action, 3D virtual world tornado trainings were analyzed for congruence to adult learning theory.

  7. Navigation and wayfinding in learning spaces in 3D virtual worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Minocha, Shailey; Hardy, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of published research on the design guidelines of learning spaces in virtual worlds. Therefore, when institutions aspire to create learning spaces in Second Life, there are few studies or guidelines to inform them except for individual case studies. The Design of Learning Spaces in 3D Virtual Environments (DELVE) project, funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee in the UK, was one of the first initiatives that identified through empirical investigations the usability ...

  8. Promoting Therapists' Use of Motor Learning Strategies within Virtual Reality-Based Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E Levac

    Full Text Available Therapists use motor learning strategies (MLSs to structure practice conditions within stroke rehabilitation. Virtual reality (VR-based rehabilitation is an MLS-oriented stroke intervention, yet little support exists to assist therapists in integrating MLSs with VR system use.A pre-post design evaluated a knowledge translation (KT intervention incorporating interactive e-learning and practice, in which 11 therapists learned how to integrate MLSs within VR-based therapy. Self-report and observer-rated outcome measures evaluated therapists' confidence, clinical reasoning and behaviour with respect to MLS use. A focus group captured therapists' perspectives on MLS use during VR-based therapy provision.The intervention improved self-reported confidence about MLS use as measured by confidence ratings (p <0.001. Chart-Stimulated Recall indicated a moderate level of competency in therapists' clinical reasoning about MLSs following the intervention, with no changes following additional opportunities to use VR (p = .944. On the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument, no behaviour change with respect to MLS use was noted (p = 0.092. Therapists favoured the strategy of transferring skills from VR to real-life tasks over employing a more comprehensive MLS approach.The KT intervention improved therapists' confidence but did not have an effect on clinical reasoning or behaviour with regard to MLS use during VR-based therapy.

  9. Student perceptions of a virtual learning environment for a problem-based learning undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leng, Bas A; Dolmans, Diana H J M; Muijtjens, Arno M M; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the effects of a virtual learning environment (VLE) on group interaction and consultation of information resources during the preliminary phase, self-study phase and reporting phase of the problem-based learning process in an undergraduate medical curriculum. A questionnaire was administered to 355 medical students in Years 1 and 2 to ask them about the perceived usefulness of a virtual learning environment that was created with Blackboard for group interaction and the use of learning resources. The students indicated that the VLE supported face-to-face interaction in the preliminary discussion and in the reporting phase but did not stimulate computer-mediated distance interaction during the self-study phase. They perceived that the use of multimedia in case presentations led to a better quality of group discussion than if case presentations were exclusively text-based. They also indicated that the information resources that were hyperlinked in the VLE stimulated the consultation of these resources during self-study, but not during the reporting phase. Students indicated that the use of a VLE in the tutorial room and the inclusion of multimedia in case presentations supported processes of active learning in the tutorial groups. However, if we want to exploit the full potential of asynchronous computer-mediated communication to initiate in-depth discussion during the self-study phase, its application will have to be selective and deliberate. Students indicated that the links in the VLE to selected information in library repositories supported their learning.

  10. Science Integrating Learning Objectives: A Cooperative Learning Group Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The integration of agricultural and science curricular content that capitalizes on natural and inherent connections represents a challenge for secondary agricultural educators. The purpose of this case study was to create information about the employment of Cooperative Learning Groups (CLG) to enhance the science integrating learning objectives…

  11. Revisiting Organisational Learning in Integrated Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño-Solinís, Roberto

    2017-08-11

    Progress in health care integration is largely linked to changes in processes and ways of doing. These changes have knowledge management and learning implications. For this reason, the use of the concept of organisational learning is explored in the field of integrated care. There are very limited contributions that have connected the fields of organisational learning and care integration in a systematic way, both at the theoretical and empirical level. For this reason, hybridization of both perspectives still provides opportunities for understanding care integration initiatives from a research perspective as well as potential applications in health care management and planning.

  12. Integrating Virtual Worlds with Tangible User Interfaces for Teaching Mathematics: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Graciela; Ayala, Andrés; Mateu, Juan; Casades, Laura; Alamán, Xavier

    2016-10-25

    This article presents a pilot study of the use of two new tangible interfaces and virtual worlds for teaching geometry in a secondary school. The first tangible device allows the user to control a virtual object in six degrees of freedom. The second tangible device is used to modify virtual objects, changing attributes such as position, size, rotation and color. A pilot study on using these devices was carried out at the "Florida Secundaria" high school. A virtual world was built where students used the tangible interfaces to manipulate geometrical figures in order to learn different geometrical concepts. The pilot experiment results suggest that the use of tangible interfaces and virtual worlds allowed a more meaningful learning (concepts learnt were more durable).

  13. Integrating Virtual Worlds with Tangible User Interfaces for Teaching Mathematics: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Guerrero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a pilot study of the use of two new tangible interfaces and virtual worlds for teaching geometry in a secondary school. The first tangible device allows the user to control a virtual object in six degrees of freedom. The second tangible device is used to modify virtual objects, changing attributes such as position, size, rotation and color. A pilot study on using these devices was carried out at the “Florida Secundaria” high school. A virtual world was built where students used the tangible interfaces to manipulate geometrical figures in order to learn different geometrical concepts. The pilot experiment results suggest that the use of tangible interfaces and virtual worlds allowed a more meaningful learning (concepts learnt were more durable.

  14. The Effects of Integrating Social Learning Environment with Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspopovic, Miroslava; Cvetanovic, Svetlana; Medan, Ivana; Ljubojevic, Danijela

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the learning and teaching styles using the Social Learning Environment (SLE), which was developed based on the computer supported collaborative learning approach. To avoid burdening learners with multiple platforms and tools, SLE was designed and developed in order to integrate existing systems, institutional…

  15. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP (VFT MODULE IN LEARNING BIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbaizura HARIS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Field Trip is a computer aided module of science developed to study the Colonisation and Succession in Mangrove Swamps, as an alternative to the real field trip in Form for Biology. This study is to identify the effectiveness of the Virtual Field Trip (VFT module towards the level of achievement in the formative test for this topic. This study was conducted to 60 students employing a quasi-experimental design involving a treatment group taught using the VFT module and a control group who were taught using conventional methods. Analysis into the effectiveness of the virtual module was done descriptively, followed by inferential analysis involving the two-way ANOVA. The results showed significant differences in the mean scores of pre and post achievement between students taught using VFT and students who were taught using conventional methods for objective, structure and essay type questions. The study concluded that teaching and learning by using the VFT module, integrated with ICT, has a positive impact on student achievement whencompared to conventional methods. This study focuses on the use of the VFT recognizing that teachers are often unable to conduct a real field trip on location.

  16. The Application of SECI Model as a Framework of Knowledge Creation in Virtual Learning: Case Study of IUST Virtual Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyede Mehrnoush

    2011-01-01

    The research aims to define SECI model of knowledge creation (socialization, externalization, combination, and internalization) as a framework of Virtual class management which can lead to better online teaching-learning mechanisms as well as knowledge creation. It has used qualitative research methodology including researcher's close observation…

  17. Remote and Virtual Instrumentation Platform for Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Eppes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This journal presents distance learning using the National Instruments ELVIS II and how Multisim can be combined with ELVIS II for distance learning. National Instrument’s ELVIS II is a new version that can easily be used for e-learning. It features 12 of the commonly used instruments in engineering and science laboratories, including an oscilloscope, a function generator, a variable power supply, and an isolated digital multi-meter in a low-cost and easy-to-use platform and completes integration with Multisim software for SPICE simulation, which simplifies the teaching of circuit design. As NI ELVIS II is based on LabView, designers can easily customize the 12 instruments or can create their own using the provided source code for the instruments.

  18. The creation of virtual teeth with and without tooth pathology for a virtual learning environment in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, I R; Wesselink, P R; Vervoorn, J M

    2013-11-01

    To describe the development and opportunities for implementation of virtual teeth with and without pathology for use in a virtual learning environment in dental education. The creation of virtual teeth begins by scanning a tooth with a cone beam CT. The resulting scan consists of multiple two-dimensional grey-scale images. The specially designed software program ColorMapEditor connects these two-dimensional images to create a three-dimensional tooth. With this software, any aspect of the tooth can be modified, including its colour, volume, shape and density, resulting in the creation of virtual teeth of any type. This article provides examples of realistic virtual teeth with and without pathology that can be used for dental education. ColorMapEditor offers infinite possibilities to adjust and add options for the optimisation of virtual teeth. Virtual teeth have unlimited availability for dental students, allowing them to practise as often as required. Virtual teeth can be made and adjusted to any shape with any type of pathology. Further developments in software and hardware technology are necessary to refine the ability to colour and shape the interior of the pulp chamber and surface of the tooth to enable not only treatment but also diagnostics and thus create a greater degree of realism. The creation and use of virtual teeth in dental education appears to be feasible but is still in development; it offers many opportunities for the creation of teeth with various pathologies, although an evaluation of its use in dental education is still required. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Virtual screening of inorganic materials synthesis parameters with deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Huang, Kevin; Jegelka, Stefanie; Olivetti, Elsa

    2017-12-01

    Virtual materials screening approaches have proliferated in the past decade, driven by rapid advances in first-principles computational techniques, and machine-learning algorithms. By comparison, computationally driven materials synthesis screening is still in its infancy, and is mired by the challenges of data sparsity and data scarcity: Synthesis routes exist in a sparse, high-dimensional parameter space that is difficult to optimize over directly, and, for some materials of interest, only scarce volumes of literature-reported syntheses are available. In this article, we present a framework for suggesting quantitative synthesis parameters and potential driving factors for synthesis outcomes. We use a variational autoencoder to compress sparse synthesis representations into a lower dimensional space, which is found to improve the performance of machine-learning tasks. To realize this screening framework even in cases where there are few literature data, we devise a novel data augmentation methodology that incorporates literature synthesis data from related materials systems. We apply this variational autoencoder framework to generate potential SrTiO3 synthesis parameter sets, propose driving factors for brookite TiO2 formation, and identify correlations between alkali-ion intercalation and MnO2 polymorph selection.

  20. Trust Levels Definition On Virtual Learning Platforms Through Semantic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Montenegro-Marin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trust level concept is a topic that has opened a knowledge area about the profile evaluation and the people participation in Social Networks. These have presented a high knowledge profit, but at the same time it is necessary to analyze a group of variables to determine the trust participants’ degree.In addition, this is a topic that from some years ago has been presenting a big expectation to settle some alternatives to generate confidence in an activer community on internet. To establish these parameters it is important to define a model to abstract some variables that are involved in this process. For this, it is relevant to take into account the semantic languages as one of the alternatives that allow these kinds of activities. The purpose of this article is to analyze the Trust Levels definition in the contents that are shared on Open Source Virtual learning Platforms through the use of a model of representation of semantic languages. The last ones allow determining the trust in the use of learning objects that are shared in this kind of platforms

  1. Combination of a Flipped Classroom Format and a Virtual Patient Case to Enhance Active Learning in a Required Therapeutics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichvar, Alicia Beth; Hedges, Ashley; Benedict, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To design and evaluate the integration of a virtual patient activity in a required therapeutics course already using a flipped-classroom teaching format. Design. A narrative-branched, dynamic virtual-patient case was designed to replace the static written cases that students worked through during the class, which was dedicated to teaching the complications of liver disease. Students completed pre- and posttests before and after completing the virtual patient case. Examination scores were compared to those in the previous year. Assessment. Students’ posttest scores were higher compared to pretest scores (33% vs 50%). Overall median examination scores were higher compared to the historical control group (70% vs 80%), as well as scores on questions assessing higher-level learning (67% vs 83%). A majority of students (68%) felt the virtual patient helped them apply knowledge gained in the pre-class video lecture. Students preferred this strategy to usual in-class activities (33%) or indicated it was of equal value (37%). Conclusion. The combination of a pre-class video lecture with an in-class virtual patient case is an effective active-learning strategy. PMID:28179724

  2. Combination of a Flipped Classroom Format and a Virtual Patient Case to Enhance Active Learning in a Required Therapeutics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichvar, Alicia Beth; Hedges, Ashley; Benedict, Neal J; Donihi, Amy C

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To design and evaluate the integration of a virtual patient activity in a required therapeutics course already using a flipped-classroom teaching format. Design. A narrative-branched, dynamic virtual-patient case was designed to replace the static written cases that students worked through during the class, which was dedicated to teaching the complications of liver disease. Students completed pre- and posttests before and after completing the virtual patient case. Examination scores were compared to those in the previous year. Assessment. Students' posttest scores were higher compared to pretest scores (33% vs 50%). Overall median examination scores were higher compared to the historical control group (70% vs 80%), as well as scores on questions assessing higher-level learning (67% vs 83%). A majority of students (68%) felt the virtual patient helped them apply knowledge gained in the pre-class video lecture. Students preferred this strategy to usual in-class activities (33%) or indicated it was of equal value (37%). Conclusion. The combination of a pre-class video lecture with an in-class virtual patient case is an effective active-learning strategy.

  3. An Algorithm for Creating Virtual Controls Using Integrated and Harmonized Longitudinal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William B; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Saldana, Santiago; Ip, Edward H

    2018-06-01

    We introduce a strategy for creating virtual control groups-cases generated through computer algorithms that, when aggregated, may serve as experimental comparators where live controls are difficult to recruit, such as when programs are widely disseminated and randomization is not feasible. We integrated and harmonized data from eight archived longitudinal adolescent-focused data sets spanning the decades from 1980 to 2010. Collectively, these studies examined numerous psychosocial variables and assessed past 30-day alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. Additional treatment and control group data from two archived randomized control trials were used to test the virtual control algorithm. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessed intentions, normative beliefs, and values as well as past 30-day alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. We developed an algorithm that used percentile scores from the integrated data set to create age- and gender-specific latent psychosocial scores. The algorithm matched treatment case observed psychosocial scores at pretest to create a virtual control case that figuratively "matured" based on age-related changes, holding the virtual case's percentile constant. Virtual controls matched treatment case occurrence, eliminating differential attrition as a threat to validity. Virtual case substance use was estimated from the virtual case's latent psychosocial score using logistic regression coefficients derived from analyzing the treatment group. Averaging across virtual cases created group estimates of prevalence. Two criteria were established to evaluate the adequacy of virtual control cases: (1) virtual control group pretest drug prevalence rates should match those of the treatment group and (2) virtual control group patterns of drug prevalence over time should match live controls. The algorithm successfully matched pretest prevalence for both RCTs. Increases in prevalence were observed, although there were discrepancies between live

  4. Indicators of ADHD symptoms in virtual learning context using machine learning technics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Patricia Mancera Valetts

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg This paper presents a user model for students performing virtual learning processes. This model is used to infer the presence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD indicators in a student. The user model is built considering three user characteristics, which can be also used as variables in different contexts. These variables are: behavioral conduct (BC, executive functions performance (EFP, and emotional state (ES. For inferring the ADHD symptomatic profile of a student and his/her emotional alterations, these features are used as input in a set of classification rules. Based on the testing of the proposed model, training examples are obtained. These examples are used to prepare a classification machine learning algorithm for performing, and improving, the task of profiling a student. The proposed user model can provide the first step to adapt learning resources in e-learning platforms to people with attention problems, specifically, young-adult students with ADHD.

  5. This is Not a Game - Social Virtual Worlds, Fun, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mark W.; Smith-Robbins, Sarah; Withnail, Greg

    This chapter asks a simple question: what is required to make learning fun in social virtual worlds? Several scholars have connected fun with learning but most of these have centered on the function of games in learning. Studies of learning in massive multiplayer online role playing games connect the game mechanics to how learning occurs. However, few have asked whether learning in a virtual world can be fun if there is no game. In a social virtual world, like Second Life (SL) there are no game mechanics (unlike game worlds like World of Warcraft [WoW]). There are no quests, challenges, rewards or other game elements in SL. So can a virtual world that has no game-content provided be a place where fun learning can take place? We define fun and explore how fun has been related to learning. We explore theories of fun from Koster, Crawford, Csíkszentmihályi and others as well as views of the ways fun is explored as related to the learning experience. With these models in mind, we explore how fun is different in a social virtual world. Drawing on definitions of fun from Castronova and others, we see game structures in virtual worlds may not be needed to have fun. These fun activities include game creation, business interactions, and most importantly, identity play and socialization in a social virtual world. Finally, we propose that if learning is to be successful and fun in a social virtual world it should pay close attention to these two activities.

  6. Professional learning of pharmaceutical care in a virtual world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana MARTÍN SUÁREZ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 141 776 Instituto Universitario de Ciencias de la Educación 6 1 916 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The learning of professional skills at University suffers from the drawback of how to reproduce a context similar to reality that with allow students to perform the tasks set them in a “living” way. Here we trained 54 students following the subject entitled Pharmaceutical Care of the Pharmacy degree in Second Life (an immersive virtual world in 3D, simulating common situations in the dispensation of anti-asthmatic agents in the context of a Community Pharmacy. The results of the study indicated that the students had no difficulty in adapting to the virtual platform and they reported a high degree of satisfaction (the mean score obtained was 2.36 on a scale of 0-3. The assessment of professional competencies revealed the high global performance of the group. The activity was hard for the professors, but they considered it an enrichening experience able to open new possibilities in teaching and research.

  7. Students' Personal Networks in Virtual and Personal Learning Environments: A Case Study in Higher Education Using Learning Analytics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquero, Oskar; Ovelar, Ramón; Romo, Jesús; Benito, Manuel; Alberdi, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyse the effect of the affordances of a virtual learning environment and a personal learning environment (PLE) in the configuration of the students' personal networks in a higher education context. The results are discussed in light of the adaptation of the students to the learning network made up by two…

  8. E-Learning System for Learning Virtual Circuit Making with a Microcontroller and Programming to Control a Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel e-Learning system for learning electronic circuit making and programming a microcontroller to control a robot. The proposed e-Learning system comprises a virtual-circuit-making function for the construction of circuits with a versatile, Arduino microcontroller and an educational system that can simulate behaviors of…

  9. Virtual C Machine and Integrated Development Environment for ATMS Controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a prototype virtual machine that fits on current Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) controllers and provides functionality for complex traffic operations.;Prepared in cooperation with Utah S...

  10. Teachers' Conceptions and Their Approaches to Teaching in Virtual Reality and Simulation-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Tuulikki

    2011-01-01

    This research article focuses on virtual reality (VR) and simulation-based training, with a special focus on the pedagogical use of the Virtual Centre of Wellness Campus known as ENVI (Rovaniemi, Finland). In order to clearly understand how teachers perceive teaching and learning in such environments, this research examines the concepts of…

  11. Synchronized Pair Configuration in Virtualization-Based Lab for Learning Computer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongcharoen, Chaknarin; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Ghinea, Gheorghita

    2017-01-01

    More studies are concentrating on using virtualization-based labs to facilitate computer or network learning concepts. Some benefits are lower hardware costs and greater flexibility in reconfiguring computer and network environments. However, few studies have investigated effective mechanisms for using virtualization fully for collaboration.…

  12. Virtual Physics Laboratory Application Based on the Android Smartphone to Improve Learning Independence and Conceptual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista, Fitra Suci; Kuswanto, Heru

    2018-01-01

    The research study concerned here was to: (1) produce a virtual physics laboratory application to be called ViPhyLab by using the Android smartphone as basis; (2) determine the appropriateness and quality of the virtual physics laboratory application that had been developed; and (3) describe the improvement in learning independence and conceptual…

  13. Constructing a Successful Cross-National Virtual Learning Environment in Primary and Secondary Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligorio, Maria Beatrice; van Veen, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    Virtual environments are more and more used in primary schools. One of the most interesting potentialities of these environments is to foster cross-national applications. Yet, this specific feature is not fully exploited. This paper presents a successful virtual learning environment for primary

  14. Learning Icelandic Language and Culture in Virtual Reykjavik: Starting to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédi, Branislav; Arnbjörnsdóttir, Birna; Vilhjálmsson, Hannes Högni; Helgadóttir, Hafdís Erla; Ólafsson, Stefán; Björgvinsson, Elías

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how beginners of Icelandic as a foreign and second language responded to playing the first scene in Virtual Reykjavik, a video game-like environment where learners interact with virtual characters--Embodied Conversational Agents (ECAs). This game enables learners to practice speaking and listening skills, to learn about the…

  15. Attitude and Self-Efficacy Change: English Language Learning in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dongping; Young, Michael F.; Brewer, Robert A.; Wagner, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    This study explored affective factors in learning English as a foreign language in a 3D game-like virtual world, Quest Atlantis (QA). Through the use of communication tools (e.g., chat, bulletin board, telegrams, and email), 3D avatars, and 2D webpage navigation tools in virtual space, nonnative English speakers (NNES) co-solved online…

  16. Virtual Worlds and the Learner Hero: How Today's Video Games Can Inform Tomorrow's Digital Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, C. Scott; Przybylski, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Participation in expansive video games called "virtual worlds" has become a mainstream leisure activity for tens of millions of people around the world. The growth of this industry and the strong motivational appeal of these digital worlds invite a closer examination as to how educators can learn from today's virtual worlds in the development of…

  17. SPECIAL FEATURES OF VIRTUAL PRACTICE INTERACTIVE MEDIA DISCIPLINES FOR DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Mazur

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The features of the development of interactive virtual practical training courses for distance learning are examined in the article. The authors propose their own methods of development tools such disciplines as virtual simulation or video-on labs.

  18. An Interdisciplinary Design Project in Second Life: Creating a Virtual Marine Science Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triggs, Riley; Jarmon, Leslie; Villareal, Tracy A.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual environments can resolve many practical and pedagogical challenges within higher education. Economic considerations, accessibility issues, and safety concerns can all be somewhat alleviated by creating learning activities in a virtual space. Because of the removal of real-world physical limitations like gravity, durability and scope,…

  19. Does Gender Matter? Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Corporate Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcsik, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how gender identity construction in virtuality and actuality affect collaborative learning in a corporate community of practice. As part of a virtual ethnographic design, participants were employees from a major American corporation who were interested specifically in social networking applications. The…

  20. 3D Virtual Learning Environments in Education: A Meta-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisoglu, I.; Topu, B.; Yilmaz, R.; Karakus Yilmaz, T.; Göktas, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate recent empirical research studies about 3D virtual learning environments. A total of 167 empirical studies that involve the use of 3D virtual worlds in education were examined by meta-review. Our findings show that the "Second Life" platform has been frequently used in studies. Among the reviewed…

  1. iVFTs - immersive virtual field trips for interactive learning about Earth's environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, G.; Anbar, A. D.; Semken, S. C.; Summons, R. E.; Oliver, C.; Buxner, S.

    2014-12-01

    Innovations in immersive interactive technologies are changing the way students explore Earth and its environment. State-of-the-art hardware has given developers the tools needed to capture high-resolution spherical content, 360° panoramic video, giga-pixel imagery, and unique viewpoints via unmanned aerial vehicles as they explore remote and physically challenging regions of our planet. Advanced software enables integration of these data into seamless, dynamic, immersive, interactive, content-rich, and learner-driven virtual field explorations, experienced online via HTML5. These surpass conventional online exercises that use 2-D static imagery and enable the student to engage in these virtual environments that are more like games than like lectures. Grounded in the active learning of exploration, inquiry, and application of knowledge as it is acquired, users interact non-linearly in conjunction with an intelligent tutoring system (ITS). The integration of this system allows the educational experience to be adapted to each individual student as they interact within the program. Such explorations, which we term "immersive virtual field trips" (iVFTs), are being integrated into cyber-learning allowing science teachers to take students to scientifically significant but inaccessible environments. Our team and collaborators are producing a diverse suite of freely accessible, iVFTs to teach key concepts in geology, astrobiology, ecology, and anthropology. Topics include Early Life, Biodiversity, Impact craters, Photosynthesis, Geologic Time, Stratigraphy, Tectonics, Volcanism, Surface Processes, The Rise of Oxygen, Origin of Water, Early Civilizations, Early Multicellular Organisms, and Bioarcheology. These diverse topics allow students to experience field sites all over the world, including, Grand Canyon (USA), Flinders Ranges (Australia), Shark Bay (Australia), Rainforests (Panama), Teotihuacan (Mexico), Upheaval Dome (USA), Pilbara (Australia), Mid-Atlantic Ridge

  2. Primary and Secondary Virtual Learning in New Zealand: Examining Barriers to Achieving Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michael; Davis, Niki; Wenmoth, Derek

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the organisational development of virtual learning in networked rural schools in New Zealand, specifically the obstacles that e-learning clusters of rural schools face in their journey to sustainability and maturity through the lens of the Ministry's Learning Communities Online Handbook. Analysis of a nationwide purposeful…

  3. Active Learning Environments with Robotic Tangibles: Children's Physical and Virtual Spatial Programming Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Winslow S.; Harlow, Danielle B.; Nilsen, Katherine J.; Perlin, Ken; Freed, Natalie; Jensen, Camilla Nørgaard; Lahey, Byron; Lu, Patrick; Muldner, Kasia

    2018-01-01

    As computational thinking becomes increasingly important for children to learn, we must develop interfaces that leverage the ways that young children learn to provide opportunities for them to develop these skills. Active Learning Environments with Robotic Tangibles (ALERT) and Robopad, an analogous on-screen virtual spatial programming…

  4. Undergraduate Student Self-Efficacy and Perceptions of Virtual World Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Lorraine May

    2017-01-01

    Virtual worlds are innovative teaching and learning methods that can provide immersive and engaging learning experiences (Lu, 2010). Though they have potential benefits, students sometimes experience a steep learning curve and discomfort with the technology (Warburton, 2009). This study explored how students in two American Studies classes using…

  5. Learning to Communicate in a Virtual World: The Case of a JFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kasumi

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of online simulation games across the globe in many different languages offers Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) researchers an opportunity to examine how language learning occurs in such virtual environments. While there has recently been an increase in the number of exploratory studies involving learning experiences of…

  6. Reduced Mental Load in Learning a Motor Visual Task with Virtual 3D Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, A.; Reiner, M.

    2018-01-01

    Distance learning is expanding rapidly, fueled by the novel technologies for shared recorded teaching sessions on the Web. Here, we ask whether 3D stereoscopic (3DS) virtual learning environment teaching sessions are more compelling than typical two-dimensional (2D) video sessions and whether this type of teaching results in superior learning. The…

  7. Offering a Framework for Value Co-Creation in Virtual Academic Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarfard, Mina; Heidari Sureshjani, Mahboobeh

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to convert the traditional teacher-student models, in which teachers determine the learning resources, into a flexible structure and an active learning environment so that students can participate in the educational processes and value co-creation in virtual academic learning environments (VALEs).…

  8. The Proposed Model of Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment for Introductory Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mahfudzah; Othman, Muhaini

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the proposed model of the collaborative virtual learning system for the introductory computer programming course which uses one of the collaborative learning techniques known as the "Think-Pair-Share". The main objective of this study is to design a model for an online learning system that facilitates the…

  9. Promoting Therapists' Use of Motor Learning Strategies within Virtual Reality-Based Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle E; Glegg, Stephanie M N; Sveistrup, Heidi; Colquhoun, Heather; Miller, Patricia; Finestone, Hillel; DePaul, Vincent; Harris, Jocelyn E; Velikonja, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Therapists use motor learning strategies (MLSs) to structure practice conditions within stroke rehabilitation. Virtual reality (VR)-based rehabilitation is an MLS-oriented stroke intervention, yet little support exists to assist therapists in integrating MLSs with VR system use. A pre-post design evaluated a knowledge translation (KT) intervention incorporating interactive e-learning and practice, in which 11 therapists learned how to integrate MLSs within VR-based therapy. Self-report and observer-rated outcome measures evaluated therapists' confidence, clinical reasoning and behaviour with respect to MLS use. A focus group captured therapists' perspectives on MLS use during VR-based therapy provision. The intervention improved self-reported confidence about MLS use as measured by confidence ratings (p behaviour change with respect to MLS use was noted (p = 0.092). Therapists favoured the strategy of transferring skills from VR to real-life tasks over employing a more comprehensive MLS approach. The KT intervention improved therapists' confidence but did not have an effect on clinical reasoning or behaviour with regard to MLS use during VR-based therapy.

  10. The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC): Enabling Co-Innovation Across Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D. D.; Gandara, A.; Del Rio, N.

    2014-12-01

    A key challenge for scientists addressing grand-challenge problems is identifying, understanding, and integrating potentially relevant methods, models and tools that that are rapidly evolving in the informatics community. Such tools are essential for effectively integrating data and models in complex research projects, yet it is often difficult to know what tools are available and it is not easy to understand or evaluate how they might be used in a given research context. The goal of the National Science Foundation-funded Virtual Learning Commons (VLC) is to improve awareness and understanding of emerging methodologies and technologies, facilitate individual and group evaluation of these, and trace the impact of innovations within and across teams, disciplines, and communities. The VLC is a Web-based social bookmarking site designed specifically to support knowledge exchange in research communities. It is founded on well-developed models of technology adoption, diffusion of innovation, and experiential learning. The VLC makes use of Web 2.0 (Social Web) and Web 3.0 (Semantic Web) approaches. Semantic Web approaches enable discovery of potentially relevant methods, models, and tools, while Social Web approaches enable collaborative learning about their function. The VLC is under development and the first release is expected Fall 2014.

  11. The virtual asthma guideline e-learning program: learning effectiveness and user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Eun; Kim, Tae-Bum; Park, Hye-Kyung; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Jee, Young-Koo; Moon, Hee-Bom; Min, Kyung-Up; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2018-05-01

    Effective educational tools are important for increasing adherence to asthma guidelines and clinical improvement of asthma patients. We developed a computer-based interactive education program for asthma guideline named the Virtual Learning Center for Asthma Management (VLCAM). We evaluated the usefulness of program in terms of its effects on user awareness of asthma guideline and level of satisfaction. Physicians-in-training at tertiary hospitals in Korea were enrolled in a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. The e-learning program on asthma guideline was conducted over a 2-week period. We investigated changes in the awareness of asthma guideline using 35-item self-administered questionnaire aiming at assessing physicians' knowledge, attitude, and practice. Satisfaction with the program was scored on 4-point Likert scales. A total of 158 physicians-in-training at six tertiary hospitals completed the survey. Compared with baseline, the overall awareness obtained from the scores of knowledge, attitude, and practice was improved significantly. Participants were satisfied with the VLCAM program in the following aspects: helpfulness, convenience, motivation, effectiveness, physicians' confidence, improvement of asthma management, and willingness to recommend. All items in user satisfaction questionnaires received high scores over 3 points. Moreover, the problem-based learning with a virtual patient received the highest user satisfaction among all parts of the program. Our computer-based e-learning program is useful for improving awareness of asthma management. It could improve adherence to asthma guidelines and enhance the quality of asthma care.

  12. Dynamics of study strategies and teacher regulation in virtual patient learning activities: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelbring, Samuel; Wahlström, Rolf

    2016-04-23

    Students' self-regulated learning becomes essential with increased use of exploratory web-based activities such as virtual patients (VPs). The purpose was to investigate the interplay between students' self-regulated learning strategies and perceived benefit in VP learning activities. A cross-sectional study (n = 150) comparing students' study strategies and perceived benefit of a virtual patient learning activity in a clinical clerkship preparatory course. Teacher regulation varied among three settings and was classified from shared to strong. These settings were compared regarding their respective relations between regulation strategies and perceived benefit of the virtual patient activity. Self-regulation learning strategy was generally associated with perceived benefit of the VP activities (rho 0.27, p strategies can increase the value of flexible web-based learning resources to students.

  13. Virtual Reality Training Versus Blended Learning of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia A.; Gondan, Matthias; Rangnick, Henriette M.; Chu, Jackson; Kenngott, Hannes G.; Linke, Georg R.; Kadmon, Martina; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost-blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Laparoscopy-naïve medical students were randomized in 2 groups stratified for sex. The BL group (n = 42) used E-learning for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and practiced basic skills with box trainers. The VR group (n = 42) trained basic skills and LC on the LAP Mentor II (Simbionix, Cleveland, OH). Each group trained 3 × 4 hours followed by a knowledge test concerning LC. Blinded raters assessed the operative performance of cadaveric porcine LC using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). The LC was discontinued when it was not completed within 80 min. Students evaluated their training modality with questionnaires. The VR group completed the LC significantly faster and more often within 80 min than BL (45% v 21%, P = .02). The BL group scored higher than the VR group in the knowledge test (13.3 ± 1.3 vs 11.0 ± 1.7, P training and felt well prepared for assisting in laparoscopic surgery. The efficiency of the training was judged higher by the VR group than by the BL group. VR and BL can both be applied for training the basics of LC. Multimodality training programs should be developed that combine the advantages of both approaches. PMID:25997044

  14. Virtual reality cataract surgery training: learning curves and concurrent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvander, Madeleine; Åsman, Peter

    2012-08-01

    To investigate initial learning curves on a virtual reality (VR) eye surgery simulator and whether achieved skills are transferable between tasks. Thirty-five medical students were randomized to complete ten iterations on either the VR Caspulorhexis module (group A) or the Cataract navigation training module (group B) and then two iterations on the other module. Learning curves were compared between groups. The second Capsulorhexis video was saved and evaluated with the performance rating tool Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACSS). The students' stereoacuity was examined. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in performance over the 10 iterations: group A for all parameters analysed including score (p < 0.0001), time (p < 0.0001) and corneal damage (p = 0.0003), group B for time (p < 0.0001), corneal damage (p < 0.0001) but not for score (p = 0.752). Training on one module did not improve performance on the other. Capsulorhexis score correlated significantly with evaluation of the videos using the OSACSS performance rating tool. For stereoacuity < and ≥120 seconds of arc, sum of both modules' second iteration score was 73.5 and 41.0, respectively (p = 0.062). An initial rapid improvement in performance on a simulator with repeated practice was shown. For capsulorhexis, 10 iterations with only simulator feedback are not enough to reach a plateau for overall score. Skills transfer between modules was not found suggesting benefits from training on both modules. Stereoacuity may be of importance in the recruitment and training of new cataract surgeons. Additional studies are needed to investigate this further. Concurrent validity was found for Capsulorhexis module. © 2010 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2010 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  15. Integrating a social network group with a 3D collaborative learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourmirza, S.; Gardner, M.; Callaghan, V; Augusto, J.C.; Zhang, T.

    2014-01-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out on virtual learning environments and the role of groups and communities in social networks, few studies exist which adequately cover the relationship between these two domains. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the effectiveness of integrating

  16. THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION: A REPORT OF BLENDED LEARNING EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Prado Constantino

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experiment in uses of virtual learning environments (VLE in the vocational education, evaluated by the Educational Supervision of Vocational and Secondary Schools of Paula Souza Center. The experience occurred in Etec "Jacinto Ferreira de Sá", São Paulo, Brazil, between 2009 and 2011, where the reported activities were organized and developed in the degree of Music, with students of different ages. Using specifics instruments to qualitative research for data collection were selected class record books, the reports to the virtual environment, the records of the participants' personal reflections, interviews and examination of the minutes of class councils involved. The experience has served as a basis for replication in other contexts and vocational courses presented by the institution.

  17. The influence of an online virtual situated environment on a Chinese learning community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-En Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study used an online virtual environment to create and develop a Chinese learning community. The purposes of research were (1 to enhance the Chinese learners’ oral Chinese communication skills and (2 to change the community members’ Chinese speaking and teaching behavior. This is an action research. The research tried to create a community in a virtual environment. The research results showed that (1 a virtual community can enhance learner’s Chinese competence, and (2 future Chinese teachers’ instructional and leading skills can be developed in a virtual community situation.

  18. Optimizing Virtual Network Functions Placement in Virtual Data Center Infrastructure Using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolodurina, I. P.; Parfenov, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    We have elaborated a neural network model of virtual network flow identification based on the statistical properties of flows circulating in the network of the data center and characteristics that describe the content of packets transmitted through network objects. This enabled us to establish the optimal set of attributes to identify virtual network functions. We have established an algorithm for optimizing the placement of virtual data functions using the data obtained in our research. Our approach uses a hybrid method of visualization using virtual machines and containers, which enables to reduce the infrastructure load and the response time in the network of the virtual data center. The algorithmic solution is based on neural networks, which enables to scale it at any number of the network function copies.

  19. Virtual Reality in Engineering Education: The Future of Creative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Hadi Ghazi Abulrub; Alex Attridge; Mark A Williams

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality has achieved an adequate level of development for it to be considered in innovative applications such as education, training, and research in higher education. Virtual reality offers both opportunities and challenges for the educational sector. One of the challenges of virtual reality technology is the costs associated which have been unaffordable for educational institutes. However, in recent years, computer hardware and software development has made it more feasible to incor...

  20. An Integrated Playful Music Learning Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Frimodt-Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated solution using IT technologies to help a (young) musician learn a piece of music, or learn how to play an instru- ment. The rehearsal process is organized in sequences, consisting of various ac- tivities to be 'passed'. Several games are investigated that help...

  1. Nurses' barriers to learning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marion C

    2012-07-01

    This integrative review of the literature describes nurses' barriers to learning. Five major themes emerged: time constraints, financial constraints, workplace culture, access/relevance, and competency in accessing electronic evidence-based practice literature. The nurse educator must address these barriers for the staff to achieve learning and competency.

  2. Maintaining collaborative, democratic and dialogue-based learning processes in virtual and game-based learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldendahl Jensen, Camilla; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation and use of virtual learning platforms, including computer games, in the education sector, challenge these years the complexity of the learning environment regarding maintaining collaborative, democratic and dialogue-based learning processes that support a high degree of reflection....... When virtual learning platforms are used in an educational context, a fundamental paradox appears as the student needs an active and practice-oriented participation identity to learn while at the same time needing to learn to acquire a participation identity. This identity is raised and trained...... by being a continuous part of a community that recalls the scenarios of reality. It is therefore crucial that the learning environment reflects the reality of which the students' professionalism is unfolded. Learning is, therefore, something more and not just the acquisition of knowledge and past actions...

  3. The Relation between Virtual Presence and Learning Outcomes in Serious Games – The Mediating Effect of Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schrader

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Does the immersive design of a serious game affect learners’ virtual presence? Does virtual presence improve learning? By identifying virtual presence as a variable that may determine learning outcomes, it is argued that computer gaming environments present a new challenge for researchers to investigate. Particularly, the effect of games on virtual presence might help designers to predict which instructional configurations will maximize learning performance. Results indicate that the serious game used as an example in this study leads to a strong form of virtual presence. Virtual presence enhanced retention and comprehension but not transfer. It also significantly increased learners’ motivation. Mediation analyses report that the positive relation between virtual presence, retention and comprehension is mediated through increased motivation. These findings suggest that the relation between all variables should be considered an important factor in the design of virtual worlds for learning.

  4. Validation of virtual learning object to support the teaching of nursing care systematization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira Salvador

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the content validation process of a Virtual Learning Object to support the teaching of nursing care systematization to nursing professionals. Method: methodological study, with quantitative approach, developed according to the methodological reference of Pasquali's psychometry and conducted from March to July 2016, from two-stage Delphi procedure. Results: in the Delphi 1 stage, eight judges evaluated the Virtual Object; in Delphi 2 stage, seven judges evaluated it. The seven screens of the Virtual Object were analyzed as to the suitability of its contents. The Virtual Learning Object to support the teaching of nursing care systematization was considered valid in its content, with a Total Content Validity Coefficient of 0.96. Conclusion: it is expected that the Virtual Object can support the teaching of nursing care systematization in light of appropriate and effective pedagogical approaches.

  5. Integrating Virtual Reality (VR) into traditional instructional design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most technical programs in Nigeria's tertiary institutions lack the desired laboratories to impact technical skills to the students. This has led to the production of pseudo-illustrates as graduates and this accounts for reasons why many employers are saying Nigerian graduates are not employable. Virtual Reality (VR) can ...

  6. Efficient Sustainable Operation Mechanism of Distributed Desktop Integration Storage Based on Virtualization with Ubiquitous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the rapid growth of ubiquitous computing, many jobs that were previously manual have now been automated. This automation has increased the amount of time available for leisure; diverse services are now being developed for this leisure time. In addition, the development of small and portable devices like smartphones, diverse Internet services can be used regardless of time and place. Studies regarding diverse virtualization are currently in progress. These studies aim to determine ways to efficiently store and process the big data generated by the multitude of devices and services in use. One topic of such studies is desktop storage virtualization, which integrates distributed desktop resources and provides these resources to users to integrate into distributed legacy desktops via virtualization. In the case of desktop storage virtualization, high availability of virtualization is necessary and important for providing reliability to users. Studies regarding hierarchical structures and resource integration are currently in progress. These studies aim to create efficient data distribution and storage for distributed desktops based on resource integration environments. However, studies regarding efficient responses to server faults occurring in desktop-based resource integration environments have been insufficient. This paper proposes a mechanism for the sustainable operation of desktop storage (SODS for high operational availability. It allows for the easy addition and removal of desktops in desktop-based integration environments. It also activates alternative servers when a fault occurs within a system.

  7. Technology Integration through Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Lauren; Maxwell, Gerri; Bulu, Sanser

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to build a learning community to support technology integration in three rural school districts and the contributions of various program strategies toward teacher growth. The Stages of Adoption Inventory, classroom observations, the Questionnaire for Technology Integration, interviews, STAR evaluation surveys, a survey of…

  8. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phe...

  9. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING IN VIRTUAL SPACES, USING ORDERS OF COMPLEXITY IN LEVELS OF THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose CAPACHO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at showing a new methodology to assess student learning in virtual spaces supported by Information and Communications Technology-ICT. The methodology is based on the Conceptual Pedagogy Theory, and is supported both on knowledge instruments (KI and intelectual operations (IO. KI are made up of teaching materials embedded in the virtual environment. The student carries out IO in his/her virtual formation process based on KI. Both instruments of knowledge and intellectual operations can be mathematically modelled by using functions of increasing complexity order. These functions represent the student’s learning change. This paper main contribution is to show that these functions let the student go from a concrete thinking to a formal one in his/her virtual learning process. The research showed that 47% of the students moved from a concrete thinking level to the formal thinking level.

  10. 3D Interactions between Virtual Worlds and Real Life in an E-Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lucke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual worlds became an appealing and fascinating component of today's internet. In particular, the number of educational providers that see a potential for E-Learning in such new platforms increases. Unfortunately, most of the environments and processes implemented up to now do not exceed a virtual modelling of real-world scenarios. In particular, this paper shows that Second Life can be more than just another learning platform. A flexible and bidirectional link between the reality and the virtual world enables synchronous and seamless interaction between users and devices across both worlds. The primary advantages of this interconnection are a spatial extension of face-to-face and online learning scenarios and a closer relationship between virtual learners and the real world.

  11. In-World Behaviors and Learning in a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolny, Larysa; Childs, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Educational virtual worlds can give students opportunities that would not otherwise be possible in face-to-face settings. The SciEthics Interactive simulations allow learners to conduct scientific research and practice ethical decision-making within a virtual world. This study examined the in-world behaviors that identify students who perceive…

  12. Teaching Network Security in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Laura; Grahn, Kaj J.; Karlstrom, Krister; Pulkkis, Goran; Astrom, Peik

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a virtual course with the topic network security. The course has been produced by Arcada Polytechnic as a part of the production team Computer Networks, Telecommunication and Telecommunication Systems in the Finnish Virtual Polytechnic. The article begins with an introduction to the evolution of the information security…

  13. Jacob: a web-based learning environment using virtual reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.J.; Heemskerk, S.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the Jacob project. This project involves the construction of a 3D virtual environment where an animated human-like agent called Jacob gives instruction to the user. The project investigates virtual reality techniques and focuses on three issues: the software

  14. Optimal learning in a virtual patient simulation of cranial nerve palsies: the interaction between social learning context and student aptitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R; Lyons, Rebecca; Chuah, Joon Hao; Kopper, Regis; Lok, Benjamin C; Cendan, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in medical education provides students with opportunities to practice interviews, examinations, and diagnosis formulation related to complex conditions without risks to patients. To examine differences between individual and team participation on learning outcomes and student perspectives through use of virtual patients (VPs) for teaching cranial nerve (CN) evaluation. Fifty-seven medical students were randomly assigned to complete simulation exercises either as individuals or as members of three-person teams. Students interviewed, examined, and diagnosed VPs with possible CN damage in the neurological exam rehearsal virtual environment (NERVE). Knowledge of CN abnormalities was assessed pre- and post-simulation. Student perspectives of system usability were evaluated post-simulation. An aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effect was detected; at pre-test scores ≤ 50%, students in teams scored higher (83%) at post-test than did students as individuals (62%, p = 0.02). Post-simulation, students in teams reported greater confidence in their ability to diagnose CN abnormalities than did students as individuals (p = 0.02; mean rating = 4.0/5.0 and 3.4/5.0, respectively). The ATI effect allows us to begin defining best practices for the integration of VP simulators into the medical curriculum. We are persuaded to implement future NERVE exercises with small teams of medical students.

  15. Optimal learning in a virtual patient simulation of cranial nerve palsies: The interaction between social learning context and student aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOHNSON, TERESA R.; LYONS, REBECCA; CHUAH, JOON HAO; KOPPER, REGIS; LOK, BENJAMIN C.; CENDAN, JUAN C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulation in medical education provides students with opportunities to practice interviews, examinations, and diagnosis formulation related to complex conditions without risks to patients. Aim To examine differences between individual and team participation on learning outcomes and student perspectives through use of virtual patients (VPs) for teaching cranial nerve (CN) evaluation. Methods Fifty-seven medical students were randomly assigned to complete simulation exercises either as individuals or as members of three-person teams. Students interviewed, examined, and diagnosed VPs with possible CN damage in the Neurological Exam Rehearsal Virtual Environment (NERVE). Knowledge of CN abnormalities was assessed pre- and post-simulation. Student perspectives of system usability were evaluated post-simulation. Results An aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effect was detected; at pre-test scores ≤50%, students in teams scored higher (83%) at post-test than did students as individuals (62%, p = 0.02). Post-simulation, students in teams reported greater confidence in their ability to diagnose CN abnormalities than did students as individuals (p = 0.02; mean rating = 4.0/5.0 and 3.4/5.0, respectively). Conclusion The ATI effect allows us to begin defining best practices for the integration of VP simulators into the medical curriculum. We are persuaded to implement future NERVE exercises with small teams of medical students. PMID:22938679

  16. Learning to Learn: towards a Relational and Transformational Model of Learning for Improved Integrated Care Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Diamond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Health and social care systems are implementing fundamental changes to organizational structures and work practices in an effort to achieve integrated care. While some integration initiatives have produced positive outcomes, many have not. We reframe the concept of integration as a learning process fueled by knowledge exchange across diverse professional and organizational communities. We thus focus on the cognitive and social dynamics of learning in complex adaptive systems, and on learning behaviours and conditions that foster collective learning and improved collaboration. We suggest that the capacity to learn how to learn shapes the extent to which diverse professional groups effectively exchange knowledge and self-organize for integrated care delivery.

  17. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mag@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nomiya, Diogo V., E-mail: diogonomiya@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  18. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Nomiya, Diogo V.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  19. Immersive and interactive virtual reality to improve learning and retention of neuroanatomy in medical students: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Chelsea; Jamal, Ali; Nguyen, Ron; Kudryk, Annalise; Mann, Jennifer; Mendez, Ivar

    2018-02-23

    Spatial 3-dimensional understanding of the brain is essential to learning neuroanatomy, and 3-dimensional learning techniques have been proposed as tools to enhance neuroanatomy training. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of immersive virtual-reality neuroanatomy training and compare it to traditional paper-based methods. In this randomized controlled study, participants consisted of first- or second-year medical students from the University of Saskatchewan recruited via email and posters displayed throughout the medical school. Participants were randomly assigned to the virtual-reality group or the paper-based group and studied the spatial relations between neural structures for 12 minutes after performing a neuroanatomy baseline test, with both test and control questions. A postintervention test was administered immediately after the study period and 5-9 days later. Satisfaction measures were obtained. Of the 66 participants randomly assigned to the study groups, 64 were included in the final analysis, 31 in the virtual-reality group and 33 in the paper-based group. The 2 groups performed comparably on the baseline questions and showed significant performance improvement on the test questions following study. There were no significant differences between groups for the control questions, the postintervention test questions or the 7-day postintervention test questions. Satisfaction survey results indicated that neurophobia was decreased. Results from this study provide evidence that training in neuroanatomy in an immersive and interactive virtual-reality environment may be an effective neuroanatomy learning tool that warrants further study. They also suggest that integration of virtual-reality into neuroanatomy training may improve knowledge retention, increase study motivation and decrease neurophobia. Copyright 2018, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  20. A mathematical framework for virtual IMRT QA using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, G; Scheuermann, R; Hung, C Y; Olszanski, A; Bellerive, M; Solberg, T D

    2016-07-01

    It is common practice to perform patient-specific pretreatment verifications to the clinical delivery of IMRT. This process can be time-consuming and not altogether instructive due to the myriad sources that may produce a failing result. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm capable of predicting IMRT QA passing rates a priori. From all treatment, 498 IMRT plans sites were planned in eclipse version 11 and delivered using a dynamic sliding window technique on Clinac iX or TrueBeam Linacs. 3%/3 mm local dose/distance-to-agreement (DTA) was recorded using a commercial 2D diode array. Each plan was characterized by 78 metrics that describe different aspects of their complexity that could lead to disagreements between the calculated and measured dose. A Poisson regression with Lasso regularization was trained to learn the relation between the plan characteristics and each passing rate. Passing rates 3%/3 mm local dose/DTA can be predicted with an error smaller than 3% for all plans analyzed. The most important metrics to describe the passing rates were determined to be the MU factor (MU per Gy), small aperture score, irregularity factor, and fraction of the plan delivered at the corners of a 40 × 40 cm field. The higher the value of these metrics, the worse the passing rates. The Virtual QA process predicts IMRT passing rates with a high likelihood, allows the detection of failures due to setup errors, and it is sensitive enough to detect small differences between matched Linacs.

  1. Lessons Learned to Date in Developing the Virtual Space Physics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, C.; Roberts, D. A.; King, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-12-01

    We now have an operational Virtual Space Physics Observatory that provides users the ability to search for and retrieve data from hundreds of space and solar physics data products based on specific terms or a Google-like interface. Lessons learned in building VSPO include: (a) A very close and highly interactive collaboration between scientists and information technologists in the definition and development of services is essential. (b) Constructing a Data Model acceptable to a broad community is very important but very difficult. Variations in usage are inevitable and must be dealt with through translations; this is especially true for the description of variables within data products. (c) Higher-order queries (searches based on events, positions, comparisons of measurements, etc.) are possible, and have been implemented in various systems; currently we see these as being separate from the basic data finding and retrieval services. (d) Building a Virtual Observatory is often more a matter of the tedious details of product descriptions than an exercise in implementing fancy middleware. Paying a knowledgeable third party to build registries can be more efficient than working directly with providers, and automated tools can help but do not solve all the problems. (e) The success of the VO effort in space and solar physics, as elsewhere, will depend on whether the scientific communities involved use and critique the services so that they will come to meet a real need for the integration of resources to solve new scientific problems of perceived importance.

  2. Representability of algebraic topology for biomolecules in machine learning based scoring and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, Zixuan; Mu, Lin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination.

  3. Representability of algebraic topology for biomolecules in machine learning based scoring and virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination. PMID:29309403

  4. Robotically facilitated virtual rehabilitation of arm transport integrated with finger movement in persons with hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Davidow Amy; Lafond Ian; Saleh Soha; Qiu Qinyin; Fluet Gerard G; Merians Alma S; Adamovich Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Recovery of upper extremity function is particularly recalcitrant to successful rehabilitation. Robotic-assisted arm training devices integrated with virtual targets or complex virtual reality gaming simulations are being developed to deal with this problem. Neural control mechanisms indicate that reaching and hand-object manipulation are interdependent, suggesting that training on tasks requiring coordinated effort of both the upper arm and hand may be a more effective me...

  5. Toward a 62.5 MHz analog virtual pipeline integrated data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinfelder, S.A.; Levi, M.; Milgrome, O.

    1991-01-01

    Requirements of analog pipeline memories at the SSC are reviewed and the concept of virtual pipelines is introduced. Design details and test results of several new custom analog and digital integrated circuits implementing sections of the virtual multiple pipeline (VMP) scheme are provied. These include serial, random access and simultaneous read and write random access analog storage and retrieval circuits, a 100 MHz systolic variable depth digital pipeline, and a prototye 32 μs, 12 bit serial analog to digital converter. (orig.)

  6. Best Practices and Provisional Guidelines for Integrating Mobile, Virtual, and Videogame-Based Training and Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    videogame -based platforms, 2) role of assessments and how they can be implemented within these platforms, or 3) benefits or challenges of the...Technical Report 1334 Best Practices and Provisional Guidelines for Integrating Mobile, Virtual, and Videogame -Based Training and...Virtual, and Videogame -Based Training and Assessments 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER W5J9CQ-11-D-0002 5b. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 622785

  7. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phenomenon. The significance of the research includes purposefully facilitating professional learning through informal learning contexts, including social media and online communities beyond technology-centric fields. Discussion and recommendations include using social media and virtual communities as instructional strategies for graduate studies and continued learning beyond formal education.

  8. How to Do Things with Mouse Clicks: Applying Austin's Speech Act Theory to Explain Learning in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Swee-Kin; Golding, Clinton

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses learning in desktop virtual worlds where students role play for professional education. When students role play in such virtual worlds, they can learn some knowledge and skills that are useful in the physical world. However, existing learning theories do not provide a plausible explanation of how performing non-verbal…

  9. A Case Study of the Experiences of Instructors and Students in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) with Different Cultural Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Keol; Kim, Mi Hwa

    2015-01-01

    The use of virtual learning environments (VLEs) has become more common and educators recognized the potential of VLEs as educational environments. The learning community in VLEs can be a mixture of people from all over the world with different cultural backgrounds. However, despite many studies about the use of virtual environments for learning,…

  10. Teachers' and students' perspectives on teaching and learning through virtual learning environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limniou, M.; Smith, M.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to get an insight into how teachers and students responded to the use of virtual learning environments (VLE) in engineering education and what their expectations were from online courses. Teachers designed their online courses with the assistance of a support e-learning team and questionnaires were used for teachers and students to express their views on the online courses. Teachers pointed out that the online courses by themselves would be able to tackle limited lecture time and strengthen the students' background knowledge. Students, on the other hand, stated that their difficulties regarding the courses could be facilitated by using a more interactive teaching approach with the use of collaboration tools and receiving individual feedback. Thus, students suggested that teachers adopt a more student-centred approach by using VLE. Teachers' and students' perspectives were related to their personal characteristics, as students were more familiar with everyday e-communication tools.

  11. Self-regulated learning as a framework for the educational application of virtual communities and personal learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 187 1033 USAL 8 2 1218 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} “Virtual Communities” (VC and “Personal learning Environments” (PLE, as products of the Web 2.0, of the cloud computing and of the “social media”, are impacting the field of education and are carrying the students to perform a more active role in the process of learning, and to integrate in their training not only the formal contexts, but also the informal and non-formal. However, we must be aware that the students control over the technology does not imply, necessarily, their control over their processes of teaching-learning and over the experience of learning. And for such control, self-regulation of learning by the student in CV and PLE can serve them to pass of their perception of technologies as technological tools to their perception of them as pedagogical tools, and to its use in the learning process in a planned and organized action, and directed toward specific goals. In order to do it, self-regulated learning, ie the application of learning strategies, their self-assessment, and the use of corrective actions in CV and in PLE, will led the student to take a more active, participatory and critical position in them, which will result in the creation of meaning mediated learning environments.

  12. The Virtual Learning Commons: An Emerging Technology for Learning About Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D. D.; Del Rio, N.; Fierro, C.; Gandara, A.; Garcia, A.; Garza, J.; Giandoni, M.; Ochoa, O.; Padilla, E.; Salamah, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC), funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure CI-Team Program, is a combination of semantic, visualization, and social media tools that support knowledge sharing and innovation across research disciplines. The explosion of new scientific tools and techniques challenges the ability of researchers to be aware of emerging technologies that might benefit them. Even when aware, it can be difficult to understand enough about emerging technologies to become potential adopters or re-users. Often, emerging technologies have little documentation, especially about the context of their use. The VLC tackles this challenge by providing mechanisms for individuals and groups of researchers to collectively organize Web resources through social bookmarking, and engage each other around those collections in order to a) learn about potentially relevant technologies that are emerging; and b) get feedback from other researchers on innovative ideas and designs. Concurrently, developers of emerging technologies can learn about potential users and the issues they encounter, and they can analyze the impact of their tools on other projects. The VLC aims to support the 'fuzzy front end' of innovation, where novel ideas emerge and there is the greatest potential for impact on research design. It is during the fuzzy front end that conceptual collisions across disciplines and exposure to diverse perspectives provide opportunity for creative thinking that can lead to inventive outcomes. This presentation will discuss the innovation theories that have informed design of the VLC, and hypotheses about the flow of information in virtual settings that can enable the process of innovation. The presentation will include a brief demonstration of key capabilities within the VLC that enable learning about emerging technologies, including the technologies that are presented in this session.

  13. Integrated learning through student goal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Deborah; Tschannen, Dana; Caylor, Shandra

    2013-09-01

    New strategies are emerging to promote structure and increase learning in the clinical setting. Nursing faculty designed a mechanism by which integrative learning and situated coaching could occur more readily in the clinical setting. The Clinical Goals Initiative was implemented for sophomore-, junior-, and senior-level students in their clinical practicums. Students developed weekly goals reflecting three domains of professional nursing practice. Goals were shared with faculty and staff nurse mentors at the beginning of the clinical day to help guide students and mentors with planning for learning experiences. After 6 weeks, faculty and students were surveyed to evaluate project effectiveness. Faculty indicated that goal development facilitated clinical learning by providing more student engagement, direction, and focus. Students reported that goal development allowed them to optimize clinical learning opportunities and track their growth and progress. Faculty and students indicated the goals promoted student self-learning, autonomy, and student communication with nurse mentors and faculty. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Integrated Model for E-Learning Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadiani; Rodziah, A.; Hasan, S. M.; Rusli, A.; Noraini, C.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is not going to work if the system is not used in accordance with user needs. User Interface is very important to encourage using the application. Many theories had discuss about user interface usability evaluation and technology acceptance separately, actually why we do not make it correlation between interface usability evaluation and user acceptance to enhance e-learning process. Therefore, the evaluation model for e-learning interface acceptance is considered important to investigate. The aim of this study is to propose the integrated e-learning user interface acceptance evaluation model. This model was combined some theories of e-learning interface measurement such as, user learning style, usability evaluation, and the user benefit. We formulated in constructive questionnaires which were shared at 125 English Language School (ELS) students. This research statistics used Structural Equation Model using LISREL v8.80 and MANOVA analysis.

  15. Using a Virtual Learning Environment to Manage Group Projects: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Yvonne; Marcus-Quinn, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are increasingly used by Higher Education Institutions to manage and enhance teaching and learning, and research. Discussion, chat, scheduling, and other collaboration tools make VLEs especially useful systems for designing and managing complex group projects. In the spring semester of 2006, students at the…

  16. Network Analysis of a Virtual Community of Learning of Economics Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontainha, Elsa; Martins, Jorge Tiago; Vasconcelos, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper aims at understanding virtual communities of learning in terms of dynamics, types of knowledge shared by participants, and network characteristics such as size, relationships, density, and centrality of participants. It looks at the relationships between these aspects and the evolution of communities of learning. It…

  17. Independient virtual english language learning: a case study in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Nieto Moreno de Diezmas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of independent and self-learning strategies for Foreign Language Learning is of special interest in Higher Education. In particular, these strategies are essential in the Foreign Language Learning area (EFL, since students need to practise and strengthen their exposure to language so as to develop receptive and productive skills. The goal of this paper is to show how independent and virtual learning are developed by means of ICT. To this end, a group of tasks and activities have been designed, distributed and implemented by means of Moodle in the setting of a teaching innovation project in which different campuses and faculties of Education of the University of Castilla-La Mancha where English I is studied have taken part. Additionally, the initial results in terms of students’ perceptions about their independent and virtual learning are shown. Therefore, this paper focuses on a case study at Higher Education in which valid conclusions may be drawn for other similar settings where language learning and virtual learning need to be combined. Initial results suggest the students have responded positively in terms of their perception and participation. This validates the tasks and procedures carried out in the implementation of virtual foreign language learning.

  18. SciEthics Interactive: Science and Ethics Learning in a Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolny, Larysa; Woolfrey, Joan; Pierlott, Matthew; Kahn, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Learning in immersive 3D environments allows students to collaborate, build, and interact with difficult course concepts. This case study examines the design and development of the TransGen Island within the SciEthics Interactive project, a National Science Foundation-funded, 3D virtual world emphasizing learning science content in the context of…

  19. Cooperative Learning in Virtual Environments: The Jigsaw Method in Statistical Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Vargas, Manuel; Mondejar-Jimenez, Jose; Santamaria, Maria-Letica Meseguer; Alfaro-Navarro, Jose-Luis; Fernandez-Aviles, Gema

    2011-01-01

    This document sets out a novel teaching methodology as used in subjects with statistical content, traditionally regarded by students as "difficult". In a virtual learning environment, instructional techniques little used in mathematical courses were employed, such as the Jigsaw cooperative learning method, which had to be adapted to the…

  20. Authentic e-Learning in a Multicultural Context: Virtual Benchmarking Cases from Five Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppisaari, Irja; Herrington, Jan; Vainio, Leena; Im, Yeonwook

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of authentic learning elements at education institutions in five countries, eight online courses in total, is examined in this paper. The International Virtual Benchmarking Project (2009-2010) applied the elements of authentic learning developed by Herrington and Oliver (2000) as criteria to evaluate authenticity. Twelve…

  1. Predicting Students' Attitudes towards Advertising on a University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogba, Ike-Elechi; Saul, Neil; Coates, Nigel F.

    2012-01-01

    Most if not all UK universities and many in other parts of the world support their student learning via a virtual learning environment (VLE). Online resources are going to be increasingly important to students as the internet is very much part of their lives. However, the VLE will require ongoing investment to keep pace with technological…

  2. Visual Perspectives within Educational Computer Games: Effects on Presence and Flow within Virtual Immersive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoresby, Jon; Shelton, Brett E.

    2011-01-01

    The mis-categorizing of cognitive states involved in learning within virtual environments has complicated instructional technology research. Further, most educational computer game research does not account for how learning activity is influenced by factors of game content and differences in viewing perspectives. This study is a qualitative…

  3. Designing Interactive and Collaborative Learning Tasks in a 3-D Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anke; Palomo-Duarte, Manuel; Fernández, David Camacho

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study is to explore several possibilities to use virtual worlds (VWs) and game-applications with learners of the A1 level (CEFR) of German as a foreign language. Our interest focuses especially on designing those learning tools which increase firstly, learner motivation towards online-learning and secondly, enhance autonomous…

  4. Cognitive Presence in Virtual Collaborative Learning: Assessing and Improving Critical Thinking in Online Discussion Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Jennifer; Weber, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The paper introduces a virtual collaborative learning setting called "Net Economy," which we established as part of an international learning network of currently seven universities. Using the Community of Inquiry framework as guidance and Canonical Action Research (CAR) as the chosen research design, the discussion forum of the online…

  5. The acceptance and use of a virtual learning environment in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaij, van E.M.; Schepers, J.J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The success of a virtual learning environment (VLE) depends to a considerable extent on student acceptance and use of such an e-learning system. After critically assessing models of technology adoption, including the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), TAM2, and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and

  6. Bringing the Real World in: Reflection on Building a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundkur, Anuradha; Ellickson, Cara

    2012-01-01

    We reflect on translating participatory and experiential learning methodologies into an online teaching environment through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that simulates the "real-world" contexts of international development in order to develop an applied critical understanding of gender analysis and gender mainstreaming. Rather than being…

  7. Virtual Manipulatives: Tools for Teaching Mathematics to Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mikyung; Bryant, Diane P.; Bryant, Brian R.; McKenna, John W.; Hou, Fangjuan; Ok, Min Wook

    2017-01-01

    Many students with learning disabilities demonstrate difficulty in developing a conceptual understanding of mathematical topics. Researchers recommend using visual models to support student learning of the concepts and skills necessary to complete abstract and symbolic mathematical problems. Virtual manipulatives (i.e., interactive visual models)…

  8. Teaching and Learning Logic Programming in Virtual Worlds Using Interactive Microworld Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosinakis, Spyros; Anastassakis, George; Koutsabasis, Panayiotis

    2018-01-01

    Logic Programming (LP) follows the declarative programming paradigm, which novice students often find hard to grasp. The limited availability of visual teaching aids for LP can lead to low motivation for learning. In this paper, we present a platform for teaching and learning Prolog in Virtual Worlds, which enables the visual interpretation and…

  9. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Student Learning in Industrially Situated Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Kelly, Christine; Gummer, Edith

    2011-01-01

    The instructional design and the corresponding research on student learning of two virtual laboratories that provide an engineering task situated in an industrial context are described. In this problem-based learning environment, data are generated dynamically based on each student team's distinct choices of reactor parameters and measurements.…

  10. Teaching and Learning in the Virtual Campus: The Case of the University of Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Juana M. Sancho; Sanchez, Joan-Anton

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on a research project aimed at analysing the teaching and learning models explicit and implicit in the different uses of e-learning platforms. From qualitative analysis of the interview with the coordinator of the Virtual Campus of the University of Barcelona (VC-UB) and the focus group with the 8 lecturers, emerged both the…

  11. THE PROPOSED MODEL OF COLLABORATIVE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR INTRODUCTORY PROGRAMMING COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfudzah OTHMAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the proposed model of the collaborative virtual learning system for the introductory computer programming course which uses one of the collaborative learning techniques known as the “Think-Pair-Share”. The main objective of this study is to design a model for an online learning system that facilitates the collaborative learning activities in a virtual environment such as online communications and pair or small group discussions. In order to model the virtual learning environment, the RUP methodology has been used where it involves the data collection phase and the analysis and design phase. Fifty respondents have been randomly selected to participate in the data collection phase to investigate the students’ interest and learning styles as well as their learning preferences. The results have shown the needs for the development of online small group discussions that can be used as an alternative learning style for programming courses. The proposed design of the virtual learning system named as the Online Collaborative Learning System or OCLS is being depicted using the object-oriented models which are the use-case model and class diagram in order to show the concise processes of virtual “Think-Pair-Share” collaborative activities. The “Think-Pair-Share” collaborative learning technique that is being used in this model has been chosen because of its simplicity and relatively low-risk. This paper also presents the proposed model of the system’s architecture that will become the guidelines for the physical development of OCLS using the web-based applications.

  12. The Integration of Realistic Episodic Memories Relies on Different Working Memory Processes: Evidence from Virtual Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaën Plancher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory is one of the most important cognitive functions in a person’s life as it is essential for recalling personal memories and performing many everyday tasks. Although a huge number of studies have been conducted in the field, only a few of them investigated memory in realistic situations, due to methodological issues. The various tools that have been developed using virtual environments (VEs have gained popularity in cognitive psychology and neuropsychology because they enable to create naturalistic and controlled situations, and are thus particularly adapted to the study of episodic memory (EM, for which an ecological evaluation is of prime importance. EM is the conscious recollection of personal events combined with their phenomenological and spatiotemporal encoding contexts. Using an original paradigm in a VE, the objective of the present study was to characterize the construction of episodic memories. While the concept of working memory has become central in the understanding of a wide range of cognitive functions, its role in the integration of episodic memories has seldom been assessed in an ecological context. This experiment aimed at filling this gap by studying how EM is affected by concurrent tasks requiring working memory resources in a realistic situation. Participants navigated in a virtual town and had to memorize as many elements in their spatiotemporal context as they could. During learning, participants had either to perform a concurrent task meant to prevent maintenance through the phonological loop, or a task aimed at preventing maintenance through the visuospatial sketchpad, or no concurrent task. EM was assessed in a recall test performed after learning through various scores measuring the what, where and when of the memories. Results showed that, compared to the control condition with no concurrent task, the prevention of maintenance through the phonological loop had a deleterious impact only on the encoding of

  13. The Integration of Realistic Episodic Memories Relies on Different Working Memory Processes: Evidence from Virtual Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, Gaën; Gyselinck, Valérie; Piolino, Pascale

    2018-01-01

    Memory is one of the most important cognitive functions in a person's life as it is essential for recalling personal memories and performing many everyday tasks. Although a huge number of studies have been conducted in the field, only a few of them investigated memory in realistic situations, due to methodological issues. The various tools that have been developed using virtual environments (VEs) have gained popularity in cognitive psychology and neuropsychology because they enable to create naturalistic and controlled situations, and are thus particularly adapted to the study of episodic memory (EM), for which an ecological evaluation is of prime importance. EM is the conscious recollection of personal events combined with their phenomenological and spatiotemporal encoding contexts. Using an original paradigm in a VE, the objective of the present study was to characterize the construction of episodic memories. While the concept of working memory has become central in the understanding of a wide range of cognitive functions, its role in the integration of episodic memories has seldom been assessed in an ecological context. This experiment aimed at filling this gap by studying how EM is affected by concurrent tasks requiring working memory resources in a realistic situation. Participants navigated in a virtual town and had to memorize as many elements in their spatiotemporal context as they could. During learning, participants had either to perform a concurrent task meant to prevent maintenance through the phonological loop, or a task aimed at preventing maintenance through the visuospatial sketchpad, or no concurrent task. EM was assessed in a recall test performed after learning through various scores measuring the what, where and when of the memories. Results showed that, compared to the control condition with no concurrent task, the prevention of maintenance through the phonological loop had a deleterious impact only on the encoding of central elements. By

  14. Gender-Specific Covariations between Competencies, Interest and Effort during Science Learning in Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophel, Eva; Schnotz, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Women are still underrepresented in engineering courses although some German universities offer separate women's engineering courses which include virtual STEM learning environments. To outline information about fundamental aspects relevant for virtual STEM learning, one has to reveal which similarities both genders in virtual learning show. Moreover, the question arises as to whether there are in fact differences in the virtual science learning of female and male learners. Working with virtual STEM learning environments requires strategic and arithmetic-operative competences. Even if we assume that female and male learners have similar competences levels, their correlational pattern of competences, motivational variables, and invested effort during virtual STEM learning might differ. If such gender differences in the correlations between cognitive and motivational variables and learning behavior were revealed, it would be possible to finetune study conditions for female students in a separate engineering course and shape virtual STEM learning in a more gender-appropriate manner. That might support an increase in the number of women in engineering courses. To reveal the differences and similarities between female and male learners, a field study was conducted with 56 students (female = 27, male = 29) as part of the Open MINT Labs project (the German term for Open STEM Labs, OML). The participants had to complete a virtual STEM learning environment during their regular science lessons. The data were collected with questionnaires. The results revealed that the strategic competences of both genders were positively correlated with situational interest in the virtual learning environment. This result shows the big impact strategic competences have for both genders regarding their situational interest. In contrast, the correlations between mental effort and competences differed between female and male participants. Especially female learners' mental effort decreased if

  15. Virtual Spaces: Employing a Synchronous Online Classroom to Facilitate Student Engagement in Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lynn McBrien

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This research study is a collaborative project between faculty in social foundations, special education, and instructional technology in which we analyze student data from six undergraduate and graduate courses related to the use of a virtual classroom space. Transactional distance theory (Moore & Kearsley, 1996 operates as our theoretical framework as we explore the role of a virtual classroom in distance education and analyze the ways in which a synchronous learning environment affects students’ learning experiences. Elluminate Live! was the software employed in the virtual classroom. In this analysis, particular themes emerged related to dialogue, structure, and learner autonomy. In addition, students rated convenience, technical issues, and pedagogical preferences as important elements in their learning experiences. The article discusses these themes as a contribution to reducing the “distance” that students experience in online learning and to developing quality distance education experiences for students in higher education.

  16. Comparative analysis of machine learning methods in ligand-based virtual screening of large compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao H; Jia, Jia; Zhu, Feng; Xue, Ying; Li, Ze R; Chen, Yu Z

    2009-05-01

    Machine learning methods have been explored as ligand-based virtual screening tools for facilitating drug lead discovery. These methods predict compounds of specific pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic or toxicological properties based on their structure-derived structural and physicochemical properties. Increasing attention has been directed at these methods because of their capability in predicting compounds of diverse structures and complex structure-activity relationships without requiring the knowledge of target 3D structure. This article reviews current progresses in using machine learning methods for virtual screening of pharmacodynamically active compounds from large compound libraries, and analyzes and compares the reported performances of machine learning tools with those of structure-based and other ligand-based (such as pharmacophore and clustering) virtual screening methods. The feasibility to improve the performance of machine learning methods in screening large libraries is discussed.

  17. Motor learning from virtual reality to natural environments in individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrado, Virgínia Helena; Silva, Talita Dias da; Favero, Francis Meire; Tonks, James; Massetti, Thais; Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de Mello

    2017-11-10

    To examine whether performance improvements in the virtual environment generalize to the natural environment. we had 64 individuals, 32 of which were individuals with DMD and 32 were typically developing individuals. The groups practiced two coincidence timing tasks. In the more tangible button-press task, the individuals were required to 'intercept' a falling virtual object at the moment it reached the interception point by pressing a key on the computer. In the more abstract task, they were instructed to 'intercept' the virtual object by making a hand movement in a virtual environment using a webcam. For individuals with DMD, conducting a coincidence timing task in a virtual environment facilitated transfer to the real environment. However, we emphasize that a task practiced in a virtual environment should have higher rates of difficulties than a task practiced in a real environment. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Virtual environments can be used to promote improved performance in ?real-world? environments. Virtual environments offer the opportunity to create paradigms similar ?real-life? tasks, however task complexity and difficulty levels can be manipulated, graded and enhanced to increase likelihood of success in transfer of learning and performance. Individuals with DMD, in particular, showed immediate performance benefits after using virtual reality.

  18. Training Dismounted Soldiers in Virtual Environments: Enhancing Configuration Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Witmer, Bob

    2000-01-01

    ...) has conducted research in using virtual environments (VE) to train dismounted soldiers. While showing that some dismounted soldiers skills can be trained in VE, the research has also identified problems in using VE for soldier training...

  19. Outcome Mapping Virtual Learning Community - Phase III | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Indeed, the OMLC affirmed its position as a vibrant community of practice ... a virtual space (www.outcomemapping.ca), and online interaction will be the key driver. ... communication technology (ICT) on social and human development is new ...

  20. HACIA LAS COMUNIDADES VIRTUALES DE APRENDIZAJE, APRENDER PARA APROPIARSE DE LOS NUEVOS MEDIOS DIGITALES TOWARDS VIRTUAL LEARNING COMMUNITY, LEARNING TO APPROPIATE THE NEW DIGITAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Jerónimo Montes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de un análisis de los procesos de formación, considerando las posibilidades de los entornos virtuales para facilitar u obstaculizar la colaboración en Red, y por ende la construcción de comunidades de práctica, con la finalidad de avanzar hacia la construcción de comunidades de aprendizaje, basadas en la colaboración a distancia haciendo uso de un entorno de teleformación. lo anterior para de evaluar de que forma esos sistemas de gestión de los aprendizajes en Red (LMS incorporan elementos de diseño virtual para la metodología que se desea incorporar en los procesos de evaluación cualitativa y cuantitativa, específicamente los espacios virtuales para el trabajo colaborativo y las herramientas de comunicación como son los foros virtuales.The results of an analysis of the processes of formation in the educative modality through Internet a distance, considering the possibilities of the virtual environment to facilitate or to prevent the collaboration in network, and therefore the construction of practice communities; the previous thing with the intention to evaluate of that forms those systems of management of the learning in Net (LMS incorporates elements of virtual design for the methodology that is desired to incorporate in the processes of qualitative and quantitative evaluation, specifically the virtual spaces for the collaborative work and the tools of communication as they are the virtual forums.

  1. The essential skills required by librarians to support medical virtual learning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Akbari, Zahra; Mojiri, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the recent spread of virtual learning programs in universities, especially in the field of medical sciences, libraries play a crucial role to support these programs. This study aimed at investigating the skills required by librarians to support virtual learning programs in Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was an applied survey study. The population of the study includes all librarians working in Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. A sample of 89 librarians was selected by stratified random sampling. Data were collected by a researcher-made questionnaire, the validity of which was confirmed by specialists in the fields of librarianship and information sciences and virtual learning, and its reliability was determined to be 0.92, using Cronbach's Alpha. The questionnaire consisted of 51 items designed to evaluate the librarians' virtual learning skills using Likert scale. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the findings. Results: The findings of this study revealed that librarians had low level of skills with respect to the online reference services, and familiarity with virtual learning environment. They also showed low and average level of skills with respect to their general information technology, communication skills, ability to teach electronic information literacy and ability to create access to electronic resources. The results revealed no significant difference between the librarians of the two universities, or between male and female librarians. However, librarians with educational background in librarianship and information sciences were significantly more skillful and competent than their colleagues. Conclusion: Despite the crucial role of libraries in supporting virtual learning programs, the librarians in Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Medical Sciences had low-level skills to play such an important role. Therefore, it is essential

  2. ARMAGH OBSERVATORY – HISTORIC BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING FOR VIRTUAL LEARNING IN BUILDING CONSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murphy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the recording and design for a Virtual Reality Immersive Model of Armagh Observatory is presented, which will replicate the historic buildings and landscape with distant meridian markers and position of its principal historic instruments within a model of the night sky showing the position of bright stars. The virtual reality model can be used for educational purposes allowing the instruments within the historic building model to be manipulated within 3D space to demonstrate how the position measurements of stars were made in the 18th century. A description is given of current student and researchers activities concerning on-site recording and surveying and the virtual modelling of the buildings and landscape. This is followed by a design for a Virtual Reality Immersive Model of Armagh Observatory use game engine and virtual learning platforms and concepts.

  3. Armagh Observatory - Historic Building Information Modelling for Virtual Learning in Building Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M.; Chenaux, A.; Keenaghan, G.; GIbson, V..; Butler, J.; Pybusr, C.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper the recording and design for a Virtual Reality Immersive Model of Armagh Observatory is presented, which will replicate the historic buildings and landscape with distant meridian markers and position of its principal historic instruments within a model of the night sky showing the position of bright stars. The virtual reality model can be used for educational purposes allowing the instruments within the historic building model to be manipulated within 3D space to demonstrate how the position measurements of stars were made in the 18th century. A description is given of current student and researchers activities concerning on-site recording and surveying and the virtual modelling of the buildings and landscape. This is followed by a design for a Virtual Reality Immersive Model of Armagh Observatory use game engine and virtual learning platforms and concepts.

  4. The art and science of data curation: Lessons learned from constructing a virtual collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, Kaylin; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil; Gatlin, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    A digital, or virtual, collection is a value added service developed by libraries that curates information and resources around a topic, theme or organization. Adoption of the virtual collection concept as an Earth science data service improves the discoverability, accessibility and usability of data both within individual data centers but also across data centers and disciplines. In this paper, we introduce a methodology for systematically and rigorously curating Earth science data and information into a cohesive virtual collection. This methodology builds on the geocuration model of searching, selecting and synthesizing Earth science data, metadata and other information into a single and useful collection. We present our experiences curating a virtual collection for one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC), and describe lessons learned as a result of this curation effort. We also provide recommendations and best practices for data centers and data providers who wish to curate virtual collections for the Earth sciences.

  5. Facilitating 3D Virtual World Learning Environments Creation by Non-Technical End Users through Template-Based Virtual World Instantiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Zhong, Ying; Ozercan, Sertac; Zhu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a template-based solution to overcome technical barriers non-technical computer end users face when developing functional learning environments in three-dimensional virtual worlds (3DVW). "iVirtualWorld," a prototype of a platform-independent 3DVW creation tool that implements the proposed solution, facilitates 3DVW…

  6. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for instrumental analytical chemistry lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurweni, Wibawa, Basuki; Erwin, Tuti Nurian

    2017-08-01

    The framework for teaching and learning in the 21st century was prepared with 4Cs criteria. Learning providing opportunity for the development of students' optimal creative skills is by implementing collaborative learning. Learners are challenged to be able to compete, work independently to bring either individual or group excellence and master the learning material. Virtual laboratory is used for the media of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (Vis, UV-Vis-AAS etc) lectures through simulations computer application and used as a substitution for the laboratory if the equipment and instruments are not available. This research aims to design and develop collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures, to know the effectiveness of this design model adapting the Dick & Carey's model and Hannafin & Peck's model. The development steps of this model are: needs analyze, design collaborative-creative learning, virtual laboratory media using macromedia flash, formative evaluation and test of learning model effectiveness. While, the development stages of collaborative-creative learning model are: apperception, exploration, collaboration, creation, evaluation, feedback. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media can be used to improve the quality learning in the classroom, overcome the limitation of lab instruments for the real instrumental analysis. Formative test results show that the Collaborative-Creative Learning Model developed meets the requirements. The effectiveness test of students' pretest and posttest proves significant at 95% confidence level, t-test higher than t-table. It can be concluded that this learning model is effective to use for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures.

  7. USE OF VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS: A THEORETICAL MODEL USING DECOMPOSED EXPECTANCY DISCONFIRMATION THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Fernando Antonio de Melo; Ramos, Anatália Saraiva Martins; Andrade, Adrianne Paula Vieira de; Oliveira, Bruna Miyuki Kasuya de

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study aims to investigate the determinants of satisfaction and the resulting continuance intention in the e-learning context. The constructs of decomposed expectancy disconfirmation theory (DEDT) are evaluated from the perspective of users of a virtual learning environment (VLE) in relation to expectations and perceived performance. An online survey collected responses from 197 students of a public management distance learning course. Structural equation modeling was oper...

  8. Blended learningintegrating E-learning with traditional learning methods in teaching basic medical science

    OpenAIRE

    J.G. Bagi; N.K. Hashilkar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blended learning includes an integration of face to face classroom learning with technology enhanced online material. It provides the convenience, speed and cost effectiveness of e-learning with the personal touch of traditional learning. Objective: The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of a combination of e-learning module and traditional teaching (Blended learning) as compared to traditional teaching alone to teach acid base homeostasis to Phase I MB...

  9. Visual Learning in Application of Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bt Shafie, Afza; Barnachea Janier, Josefina; Bt Wan Ahmad, Wan Fatimah

    Innovative use of technology can improve the way how Mathematics should be taught. It can enhance student's learning the concepts through visualization. Visualization in Mathematics refers to us of texts, pictures, graphs and animations to hold the attention of the learners in order to learn the concepts. This paper describes the use of a developed multimedia courseware as an effective tool for visual learning mathematics. The focus is on the application of integration which is a topic in Engineering Mathematics 2. The course is offered to the foundation students in the Universiti Teknologi of PETRONAS. Questionnaire has been distributed to get a feedback on the visual representation and students' attitudes towards using visual representation as a learning tool. The questionnaire consists of 3 sections: Courseware Design (Part A), courseware usability (Part B) and attitudes towards using the courseware (Part C). The results showed that students demonstrated the use of visual representation has benefited them in learning the topic.

  10. Learning styles in vertically integrated teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumpton, Kay; Kitchener, Scott; Sweet, Linda

    2013-10-01

    With vertical integration, registrars and medical students attend the same educational workshops. It is not known whether these learners have similar or different learning styles related to their level of education within the medical training schema. This study aims to collect information about learning styles with a view to changing teaching strategies. If a significant difference is demonstrated this will impact on required approaches to teaching. The VARK learning inventory questionnaire was administered to 36 general practice registrars and 20 medical students. The learning styles were compared as individuals and then related to their level of education within the medical training schema. Students had a greater preference for multimodal learning compared with registrars (62.5 per cent versus 33.3 per cent, respectively). More than half of the registrars preferred uni or bimodal learning modalities, compared with one-third of the medical students. The present workshop format based on visual and aural material will not match the learning needs of most learners. This small study has shown that the majority of medical students and registrars could have their learning preferences better met by the addition of written material to the workshop series. Surprisingly, a significantly larger number of medical students than registrars appeared to be broadly multimodal in their learning style, and this warrants further research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evidence of virtual patients as a facilitative learning tool on an anesthesia course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joseph Y C; Critchley, Lester A H; Yung, Alex L K; Kumta, Shekhar M

    2015-10-01

    Virtual patients are computerised representations of realistic clinical cases. They were developed to teach clinical reasoning skills through delivery of multiple standardized patient cases. The anesthesia course at The Chinese University of Hong Kong developed two novel types of virtual patients, formative assessment cases studies and storyline, to teach its final year medical students on a 2 week rotational course. Acute pain management cases were used to test if these two types of virtual patient could enhance student learning. A 2 × 2 cross over study was performed in academic year 2010-2011 on 130 students divided into four groups of 32-34. Performance was evaluated by acute pain management items set within three examinations; an end of module 60-item multiple choice paper, a short answer modified essay paper and the end of year final surgery modified essay paper. The pain management case studies were found to enhanced student performance in all three examinations, whilst the storyline virtual patient had no demonstrable effect. Student-teaching evaluation questionnaires showed that the case studies were favored more than the storyline virtual patient. Login times showed that students on average logged onto the case studies for 6 h, whereas only half the students logged on and used the storyline virtual patient. Formative assessment case studies were well liked by the students and reinforced learning of clinical algorithms through repetition and feedback, whereas the educational role of the more narrative and less interactive storyline virtual patient was less clear .

  12. Using Virtual Microscopy to Scaffold Learning of Pathology: A Naturalistic Experiment on the Role of Visual and Conceptual Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivala, Markus; Saljo, Roger; Rystedt, Hans; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Lehtinen, Erno

    2012-01-01

    New representational technologies, such as virtual microscopy, create new affordances for medical education. In the article, a study on the following two issues is reported: (a) How does collaborative use of virtual microscopy shape students' engagement with and learning from virtual slides of tissue specimen? (b) How do visual and conceptual cues…

  13. Facilitating learning through an international virtual collaborative practice: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihlborg, Monne; Friberg, Elizabeth E; Rose, Karen M; Eastham, Linda

    2018-02-01

    Internationalisation of higher education involving information and communication technology such as e-learning opens opportunities for innovative learning approaches across nations and cultures. Describe a case in practice of collaborative and transformative learning in relation to 'internationalisation on home grounds' with the broader learning objective of 'becoming aware and knowledgeable'. A mutually developed project established a virtual international collaborative exchange for faculty and students using a course management software (MOODLE) and open access technology (Adobe CONNECT). Two research universities in Sweden and the United States. Approximately 90 nursing students from each university per semester over several semesters. A collaborative process to develop a joint learning community to construct a virtual module and learning activity involving academics and nursing students in two countries using principles of meaning construction and negotiated learning. Developed possibilities for dealing with the challenges and finding strategies for a future higher education system that opens dialogues worldwide. Virtual international exchanges open innovative communication and learning contexts across nations and cultures. Internationalisation is so much more than students and teachers' mobility. 'Internationalisation on home grounds' (internationalisation for all) should receive more attention to support faculty and student collaboration, learning, and professional development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analytic integration of real-virtual counterterms in NNLO jet cross sections II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Somogyi, Gabor [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Trocsanyi, Zoltan [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary); Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Research

    2009-05-15

    We present analytic expressions of all integrals required to complete the explicit evaluation of the real-virtual integrated counterterms needed to define a recently proposed subtraction scheme for jet cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. We use the Mellin-Barnes representation of these integrals in 4-2{epsilon} dimensions to obtain the coefficients of their Laurent expansions around {epsilon}=0. These coefficients are given by linear combinations of multidimensional Mellin-Barnes integrals. We compute the coefficients of such expansions in {epsilon} both numerically and analytically by complex integration over the Mellin-Barnes contours. (orig.)

  15. Analytic integration of real-virtual counterterms in NNLO jet cross sections II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Somogyi, Gabor; Trocsanyi, Zoltan

    2009-01-01

    We present analytic expressions of all integrals required to complete the explicit evaluation of the real-virtual integrated counterterms needed to define a recently proposed subtraction scheme for jet cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. We use the Mellin-Barnes representation of these integrals in 4 - 2ε dimensions to obtain the coefficients of their Laurent expansions around ε = 0. These coefficients are given by linear combinations of multidimensional Mellin-Barnes integrals. We compute the coefficients of such expansions in ε both numerically and analytically by complex integration over the Mellin-Barnes contours.

  16. Analytic integration of real-virtual counterterms in NNLO jet cross sections II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Somogyi, Gábor; Trócsányi, Zoltán

    2009-08-01

    We present analytic expressions of all integrals required to complete the explicit evaluation of the real-virtual integrated counterterms needed to define a recently proposed subtraction scheme for jet cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. We use the Mellin-Barnes representation of these integrals in 4 - 2epsilon dimensions to obtain the coefficients of their Laurent expansions around epsilon = 0. These coefficients are given by linear combinations of multidimensional Mellin-Barnes integrals. We compute the coefficients of such expansions in epsilon both numerically and analytically by complex integration over the Mellin-Barnes contours.

  17. Analytic integration of real-virtual counterterms in NNLO jet cross sections II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Somogyi, Gabor; Trocsanyi, Zoltan; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen

    2009-05-01

    We present analytic expressions of all integrals required to complete the explicit evaluation of the real-virtual integrated counterterms needed to define a recently proposed subtraction scheme for jet cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. We use the Mellin-Barnes representation of these integrals in 4-2ε dimensions to obtain the coefficients of their Laurent expansions around ε=0. These coefficients are given by linear combinations of multidimensional Mellin-Barnes integrals. We compute the coefficients of such expansions in ε both numerically and analytically by complex integration over the Mellin-Barnes contours. (orig.)

  18. Virtual Chemical Engineering: Guidelines for E-Learning in Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Schofield

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced three-dimensional virtual environment technology, similar to that used by the film and computer games industry can allow educational developers to rapidly create realistic three-dimensional, virtual environments. This technology has been used to generate a range of interactive learning environments across a broad spectrum of industries.The paper will discuss the implementation of these systems and extrapolate the lessons learnt into general guidelines to be considered for the development of a range of educational learning resources. These guidelines will then be discussed in the context of the development of ViRILE (Virtual Reality Interactive Learning Environment, software which simulates the configuration and operation of a polymerisation plant. This software package has been developed for use by undergraduate chemical engineers at the University of Nottingham.

  19. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  20. Employing Virtualization in Library Computing: Use Cases and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwen Hutt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a broad overview of virtualization technology and describes several examples of its use at the University of California, San Diego Libraries. Libraries can leverage virtualization to address many long-standing library computing challenges, but careful planning is needed to determine if this technology is the right solution for a specific need. This paper outlines both technical and usability considerations, and concludes with a discussion of potential enterprise impacts on the library infrastructure.

  1. Self- directed learning barriers in a virtual environment: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOUSHIN KOHAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a growing trend in online education courses in higher education institutes. Previous studies have shown that high levels of self-direction are essential for successful online learning. The present study aims to investigate challenges of and barriers to self-directed virtual-learning among postgraduate students of medical sciences. Methods: 23 postgraduate virtual students of medical sciences in Iran, collected through maximum variation purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews, served as the sample of this study. The collected data were analyzed using the inductive content analysis method. Results: Three themes and six sub-themes were identified as barriers to self-directed learning in virtual education, including cognitive barriers (information overload and lack of focus on learning or mind wondering, communication barriers (inadequate coping skills and inadequate writing skills and educational environment barriers (heavy workload and role ambiguity. Conclusion: By the importance of self-direction in online education, the present study results can be used by virtual education planners in the review and design of courses, so as to adequately equip students, obviate barriers to self-directed virtual education, and ultimately train highly self-directed learners in online medical education.

  2. Self- directed learning barriers in a virtual environment: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Noushin; Soltani Arabshahi, Kamran; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Rakhshani, Tayebeh; Emami, Amirhousein

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing trend in online education courses in higher education institutes. Previous studies have shown that high levels of self-direction are essential for successful online learning. The present study aims to investigate challenges of and barriers to self-directed virtual-learning among postgraduate students of medical sciences. 23 postgraduate virtual students of medical sciences in Iran, collected through maximum variation purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews, served as the sample of this study. The collected data were analyzed using the inductive content analysis method. Three themes and six sub-themes were identified as barriers to self-directed learning in virtual education, including cognitive barriers (information overload and lack of focus on learning or mind wondering), communication barriers (inadequate coping skills and inadequate writing skills) and educational environment barriers (heavy workload and role ambiguity). By the importance of self-direction in online education, the present study results can be used by virtual education planners in the review and design of courses, so as to adequately equip students, obviate barriers to self-directed virtual education, and ultimately train highly self-directed learners in online medical education.

  3. Self- directed learning barriers in a virtual environment: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOHAN, NOUSHIN; SOLTANI ARABSHAHI, KAMRAN; MOJTAHEDZADEH, RITA; ABBASZADEH, ABBAS; RAKHSHANI, TAYEBEH; EMAMI, AMIRHOUSEIN

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There is a growing trend in online education courses in higher education institutes. Previous studies have shown that high levels of self-direction are essential for successful online learning. The present study aims to investigate challenges of and barriers to self-directed virtual-learning among postgraduate students of medical sciences. Method: 23 postgraduate virtual students of medical sciences in Iran, collected through maximum variation purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews, served as the sample of this study. The collected data were analyzed using the inductive content analysis method. Results: Three themes and six sub-themes were identified as barriers to self-directed learning in virtual education, including cognitive barriers (information overload and lack of focus on learning or mind wondering), communication barriers (inadequate coping skills and inadequate writing skills) and educational environment barriers (heavy workload and role ambiguity). Conclusion: By the importance of self-direction in online education, the present study results can be used by virtual education planners in the review and design of courses, so as to adequately equip students, obviate barriers to self-directed virtual education, and ultimately train highly self-directed learners in online medical education. PMID:28761885

  4. Eliminating educational Inequality through e-learning: the case of Virtual University of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Muhammad Din

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at examining the role of e-learning in combating the issues of inequality in terms of access and quality in the field of higher education in Pakistan. The education system in Pakistan is mainly characterized by educational disparity. The standard of education is directly proportional to the investment students make in the form of registration and fees. Another important issue is the non-availability of reputed educational institutes in small towns and villages. Unfortunately, very few people from rural areas have access to quality higher education. Virtual University of Pakistan through its distance e-learning mode has come forward to break this trend in social inequality by providing equal educational opportunities to all social classes through its affordable fee structure yet ensuring high standards of teaching. For the purpose of testing these assumptions with reference to a Virtual education system, the existing patterns of enrollment, income structure of guardian/students, professors’ profile, and alumni’s profile data were obtained from IT department of Virtual University of Pakistan. Descriptive statistics and independent sample t-test were used for data analysis. It could be ascertained from the conclusion that Virtual University of Pakistan has successfully broken the chain of educational inequality through its e-learning mode. In case of virtual education, discrimination on the basis of gender, social class and location, is no more applicable. The findings of current research have invalidated the existence of inequality in the e-learning system.

  5. Design and Development of ChemInfoCloud: An Integrated Cloud Enabled Platform for Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Pandit, Deepak; Bhavasar, Arvind; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The power of cloud computing and distributed computing has been harnessed to handle vast and heterogeneous data required to be processed in any virtual screening protocol. A cloud computing platorm ChemInfoCloud was built and integrated with several chemoinformatics and bioinformatics tools. The robust engine performs the core chemoinformatics tasks of lead generation, lead optimisation and property prediction in a fast and efficient manner. It has also been provided with some of the bioinformatics functionalities including sequence alignment, active site pose prediction and protein ligand docking. Text mining, NMR chemical shift (1H, 13C) prediction and reaction fingerprint generation modules for efficient lead discovery are also implemented in this platform. We have developed an integrated problem solving cloud environment for virtual screening studies that also provides workflow management, better usability and interaction with end users using container based virtualization, OpenVz.

  6. Using virtual humans and computer animations to learn complex motor skills: a case study in karate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanlang Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning motor skills is a complex task involving a lot of cognitive issues. One of the main issues consists in retrieving the relevant information from the learning environment. In a traditional learning situation, a teacher gives oral explanations and performs actions to provide the learner with visual examples. Using virtual reality (VR as a tool for learning motor tasks is promising. However, it raises questions about the type of information this kind of environments can offer. In this paper, we propose to analyze the impact of virtual humans on the perception of the learners. As a case study, we propose to apply this research problem to karate gestures. The results of this study show no significant difference on the after training performance of learners confronted to three different learning environments (traditional group, video and VR.

  7. GOOD PRACTICES FOR VIRTUAL CLASSROOM IN UNIVERSITARY BLENDED LEARNING BUENAS PRÁCTICAS DE AULAS VIRTUALES EN LA DOCENCIA UNIVERSITARIA SEMIPRESENCIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Area Moreira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the design and results of a study conducted at the University of La Laguna (ULL to identify best practices in virtual classrooms in Higher Education developed in the form of blended learning. The study was conducted in the first quarter of 2008 and analyzed a large sample of virtual classrooms (N = 107 in the Virtual Campus of the University during the period 2005-07. This article presents six examples of virtual classrooms by scientific fields characterized by the incorporation of information resources, communication and experiential learning. En este artículo presentamos el diseño y resultados de un estudio realizado en la Universidad de La Laguna (ULL destinado a identificar buenas prácticas de aulas virtuales en la docencia universitaria desarrolladas bajo la modalidad de blended learning o enseñanza semipresencial. El estudio se desarrolló en el primer trimestre del año 2008 y analizó una importante muestra de las aulas virtuales (N= 107 existentes en el Campus Virtual de dicha universidad en el periodo 2005-07. Se seleccionaron seis ejemplos de aulas virtuales, clasificados por campos científicos, caracterizadas por la incorporación de recursos de información, de comunicación y de aprendizaje experiencial.

  8. Learning Radiology in an Integrated Problem-Based Learning (PBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Faculty of Medicine (FoM) has been training health professions in Uganda since 1924. Five years ago, it decided to change the undergraduate curriculum from traditional to Problem Based Learning (PBL) and adopted the SPICES model. Radiology was integrated into the different courses throughout the 5 ...

  9. "Wide-Awake Learning": Integrative Learning and Humanities Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the development of integrative learning and argues that it has an important role to play in broader conceptions of the undergraduate curriculum recently advanced in the UK. It suggests that such a focus might also provide arts and humanities educators with a hopeful prospect in difficult times: a means by which the distinctive…

  10. Horseless Classrooms and Virtual Learning: Reshaping Our Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    Unlike the rest of the industrialized world, educational institutions were largely untouched by last century's transportation revolution. Teachers have been workhorses pulling students in instructional wagons along well-worn curricula. Since television and the Internet already provide "horseless" classrooms and virtual-learning…

  11. Education Student Perceptions of Virtual Reality as a Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Jelia R.; Bradley, Elizabeth Gates

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain student perceptions of the use and value of three-dimensional virtual environments. A grounded theory approach was used to gather and examine data. Just over half of student participants reported positive experiences. However, most experienced technical difficulties. Despite the technical challenges of…

  12. Online Teacher Development: Collaborating in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Pauline; Guitert Catasús, Montse; Hampel, Regine; Heiser, Sarah; Hopkins, Joseph; Murphy, Linda; Stickler, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, educational institutions have been making increasing use of virtual environments to set up collaborative activities for learners. While it is recognized that teachers play an important role in facilitating learner collaboration online, they may not have the necessary skills to do so successfully. Thus, a small-scale professional…

  13. Multiprog Virtual Laboratory Applied to PLC Programming Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2010-01-01

    This study develops a Multiprog virtual laboratory for a mechatronics education designed to teach how to programme a programmable logic controller (PLC). The study was carried out with 34 students in the Department of Industry Education and Technology at National Changhua University of Education in Taiwan. In total, 17 students were assigned to…

  14. Students learning across differences in a multi-disciplinary virtual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite desegregation, and educational policies calling for increased inclusivity in higher education, students in South Africa generally continue to have homogenous social and learning experiences. This article reports on a collaborative student learning community across three disciplines at two universities.

  15. Virtual Ribosome - a comprehensive DNA translation tool with support for integration of sequence feature annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    of alternative start codons. ( ii) Integration of sequences feature annotation - in particular, native support for working with files containing intron/ exon structure annotation. The software is available for both download and online use at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/VirtualRibosome/....

  16. Crossing the Atlantic: Integrating Cross-Cultural Experiences into Undergraduate Business Courses Using Virtual Communities Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethge, Denise J.; Raska, David; Greer, Bertie M.; O'Connor, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Today's business school academics are tasked with pedagogy that offers students an understanding of the globalization of markets and the cross-cultural communication skills needed in today's business environment. The authors describe how a virtual cross-cultural experience was integrated into an undergraduate business course and used as an…

  17. IMPROVING THE VIRTUAL LEARNING DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES USING XML STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Suss

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Icarning environments and content often lack a common basis for the cxchange of learning materials. This delays, or even hinders, both innovation and delivery of learning tecnology. Standards for platforms and authoring may provide a way to improve interoperability and cooperative development. This article provides an XML-based approach to this problem creaied by the IMS Global Learning Consortium.

  18. Improving the Virtual Learning Development Processes Using XML Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suss, Kurt; Oberhofer, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that distributed learning environments and content often lack a common basis for the exchange of learning materials, which can hinder or even delay innovation and delivery of learning technology. Standards for platforms and authoring may provide a way to improve interoperability and cooperative development. Provides an XML-based approach…

  19. Working Collaboratively in Virtual Learning Environments: Using Second Life with Korean High School Students in History Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the impact of the use of a virtual environment for learning Korean history on high school students' learning outcomes and attitudes toward virtual worlds (collaboration, engagement, general use of SL [Second Life], and immersion). In addition, this experiment examined the relationships…

  20. Cognitive ability predicts motor learning on a virtual reality game in patients with TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Rochelle L; Skeel, Reid L; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality games and simulations have been utilized successfully for motor rehabilitation of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Little is known, however, how TBI-related cognitive decline affects learning of motor tasks in virtual environments. To fill this gap, we examined learning within a virtual reality game involving various reaching motions in 14 patients with TBI and 15 healthy individuals with different cognitive abilities. All participants practiced ten 90-second gaming trials to assess various aspects of motor learning. Cognitive abilities were assessed with a battery of tests including measures of memory, executive functioning, and visuospatial ability. Overall, participants with TBI showed both reduced performance and a slower learning rate in the virtual reality game compared to healthy individuals. Numerous correlations between overall performance and several of the cognitive ability domains were revealed for both the patient and control groups, with the best predictor being overall cognitive ability. The results may provide a starting point for rehabilitation programs regarding which cognitive domains interact with motor learning.

  1. Integrating virtual reality video games into practice: clinicians' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle E; Miller, Patricia A

    2013-10-01

    The Nintendo Wii is a popular virtual reality (VR) video gaming system in rehabilitation practice and research. As evidence emerges related to its effectiveness as a physical therapy training method, clinicians require information about the pragmatics of its use in practice. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore observations and insights from a sample of physical therapists (PTs) working with children with acquired brain injury regarding practical implications of using the Wii as a physical therapy intervention. Six PTs employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Two themes summarize the practical implications of Wii use: 1) technology meets clinical practice; and 2) onus is on the therapist. Therapists described both beneficial and challenging implications arising from the intersection of technology and practice, and reported the personal commitment required to orient oneself to the gaming system and capably implement this intervention. Findings include issues that may be relevant to professional development in a broader rehabilitation context, including suggestions for the content of educational initiatives and the need for institutional support from managers in the form of physical resources for VR implementation.

  2. Scene recognition based on integrating active learning with dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxi; Yin, Xueyan; Yang, Lin; Gong, Chengrong; Zheng, Caixia; Yi, Yugen

    2018-04-01

    Scene recognition is a significant topic in the field of computer vision. Most of the existing scene recognition models require a large amount of labeled training samples to achieve a good performance. However, labeling image manually is a time consuming task and often unrealistic in practice. In order to gain satisfying recognition results when labeled samples are insufficient, this paper proposed a scene recognition algorithm named Integrating Active Learning and Dictionary Leaning (IALDL). IALDL adopts projective dictionary pair learning (DPL) as classifier and introduces active learning mechanism into DPL for improving its performance. When constructing sampling criterion in active learning, IALDL considers both the uncertainty and representativeness as the sampling criteria to effectively select the useful unlabeled samples from a given sample set for expanding the training dataset. Experiment results on three standard databases demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed IALDL.

  3. Using PDM to create a virtually integrated manufacturing enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapetina, N.; Neugebauer, G.

    1997-01-01

    In late 1993, the authors' mission expanded from engineering design to also encompass production of neutron generator devices. They completed a gap analysis of the tools needed to support this emerging production assignment and, as a result, introduced a Product Data Management (PDM) system. This implementation includes basic PDM features, Web access, interfaces to the production floor and suppliers, and other utilities. They carefully strategized, piloted and assessed the integration of the PDM system into their business. Their efforts have prepared them to enter the next tier to further integrate their key operational resources to include their external suppliers

  4. Using PDM to create a virtually integrated manufacturing enterprise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapetina, N.; Neugebauer, G.

    1997-10-01

    In late 1993, the authors` mission expanded from engineering design to also encompass production of neutron generator devices. They completed a gap analysis of the tools needed to support this emerging production assignment and, as a result, introduced a Product Data Management (PDM) system. This implementation includes basic PDM features, Web access, interfaces to the production floor and suppliers, and other utilities. They carefully strategized, piloted and assessed the integration of the PDM system into their business. Their efforts have prepared them to enter the next tier to further integrate their key operational resources to include their external suppliers.

  5. Virtual Reality Learning Activities for Multimedia Students to Enhance Spatial Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina-Carmona

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality is an incipient technology that is proving very useful for training different skills. Our hypothesis is that it is possible to design virtual reality learning activities that can help students to develop their spatial ability. To prove the hypothesis, we have conducted an experiment consisting of training the students using an on-purpose learning activity based on a virtual reality application and assessing the possible improvement of the students’ spatial ability through a widely accepted spatial visualization test. The learning activity consists of a virtual environment where some simple polyhedral shapes are shown and manipulated by moving, rotating and scaling them. The students participating in the experiment are divided into a control and an experimental group, carrying out the same learning activity with the only difference of the device used for the interaction: a traditional computer with screen, keyboard and mouse for the control group, and virtual reality goggles with a smartphone for the experimental group. To assess the experience, all the students have completed a spatial visualization test twice: just before performing the activities and four weeks later, once all the activities were performed. Specifically, we have used the well-known and widely used Purdue Spatial Visualization Test—Rotation (PSVT-R, designed to test rotational visualization ability. The results of the test show that there is an improvement in the test results for both groups, but the improvement is significantly higher in the case of the experimental group. The conclusion is that the virtual reality learning activities have shown to improve the spatial ability of the experimental group.

  6. Taking Science Online: Evaluating Presence and Immersion through a Laboratory Experience in a Virtual Learning Environment for Entomology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, Leonard; Klesath, Marta; Meyer, John

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D virtual field trip was integrated into an online college entomology course and developed as a trial for the possible incorporation of future virtual environments to supplement online higher education laboratories. This article provides an explanation of the rationale behind creating the virtual experience, the Bug Farm; the method and…

  7. Middle school students' learning of mechanics concepts through engagement in different sequences of physical and virtual experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Gnesdilow, Dana; Puntambekar, Sadhana; Kim, Jee-Seon

    2017-08-01

    Physical and virtual experimentation are thought to have different affordances for supporting students' learning. Research investigating the use of physical and virtual experiments to support students' learning has identified a variety of, sometimes conflicting, outcomes. Unanswered questions remain about how physical and virtual experiments may impact students' learning and for which contexts and content areas they may be most effective. Using a quasi-experimental design, we examined eighth grade students' (N = 100) learning of physics concepts related to pulleys depending on the sequence of physical and virtual labs they engaged in. Five classes of students were assigned to either the: physical first condition (PF) (n = 55), where students performed a physical pulley experiment and then performed the same experiment virtually, or virtual first condition (VF) (n = 45), with the opposite sequence. Repeated measures ANOVA's were conducted to examine how physical and virtual labs impacted students' learning of specific physics concepts. While we did not find clear-cut support that one sequence was better, we did find evidence that participating in virtual experiments may be more beneficial for learning certain physics concepts, such as work and mechanical advantage. Our findings support the idea that if time or physical materials are limited, using virtual experiments may help students understand work and mechanical advantage.

  8. Learning STEM Through Integrative Visual Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Satyugjit Singh

    Previous cognitive models of memory have not comprehensively taken into account the internal cognitive load of chunking isolated information and have emphasized the external cognitive load of visual presentation only. Under the Virk Long Term Working Memory Multimedia Model of cognitive load, drawing from the Cowan model, students presented with integrated animations of the key neural signal transmission subcomponents where the interrelationships between subcomponents are visually and verbally explicit, were hypothesized to perform significantly better on free response and diagram labeling questions, than students presented with isolated animations of these subcomponents. This is because the internal attentional cognitive load of chunking these concepts is greatly reduced and hence the overall cognitive load is less for the integrated visuals group than the isolated group, despite the higher external load for the integrated group of having the interrelationships between subcomponents presented explicitly. Experiment 1 demonstrated that integrating the subcomponents of the neuron significantly enhanced comprehension of the interconnections between cellular subcomponents and approached significance for enhancing comprehension of the layered molecular correlates of the cellular structures and their interconnections. Experiment 2 corrected time on task confounds from Experiment 1 and focused on the cellular subcomponents of the neuron only. Results from the free response essay subcomponent subscores did demonstrate significant differences in favor of the integrated group as well as some evidence from the diagram labeling section. Results from free response, short answer and What-If (problem solving), and diagram labeling detailed interrelationship subscores demonstrated the integrated group did indeed learn the extra material they were presented with. This data demonstrating the integrated group learned the extra material they were presented with provides some initial

  9. Semi-automated software service integration in virtual organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Sargolzaei, Mahdi; Shadi, Mahdieh

    2015-08-01

    To enhance their business opportunities, organisations involved in many service industries are increasingly active in pursuit of both online provision of their business services (BSs) and collaborating with others. Collaborative Networks (CNs) in service industry sector, however, face many challenges related to sharing and integration of their collection of provided BSs and their corresponding software services. Therefore, the topic of service interoperability for which this article introduces a framework is gaining momentum in research for supporting CNs. It contributes to generation of formal machine readable specification for business processes, aimed at providing their unambiguous definitions, as needed for developing their equivalent software services. The framework provides a model and implementation architecture for discovery and composition of shared services, to support the semi-automated development of integrated value-added services. In support of service discovery, a main contribution of this research is the formal representation of services' behaviour and applying desired service behaviour specified by users for automated matchmaking with other existing services. Furthermore, to support service integration, mechanisms are developed for automated selection of the most suitable service(s) according to a number of service quality aspects. Two scenario cases are presented, which exemplify several specific features related to service discovery and service integration aspects.

  10. Using Virtual Laboratories as Interactive Textbooks: Studies on Blended Learning in Biotechnology Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Sasidharakurup

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Virtual laboratories, an ICT-based initiative, is a new venture that is becoming more prevalent in universities for improving classroom education. With geographically remote and economically constrained institutes in India as the focus, we developed web-based virtual labs for virtualizing the wet-lab techniques and experiments with the aid of graphics favoured animations, mathematical simulators and remote triggered experimentations. In this paper, we analysed perceived usefulness of Biotechnology virtual labs amongst student groups and its role in improving the student’s performance when introduced as a learning tool in a blended classroom scenario. A pedagogical survey, via workshops and online feedback, was carried out among 600 university-level students and 100 remote users of various Indian universities. Comparing learning groups on usage of blended learning approach against a control group (traditional classroom methods and an experimental group (teacher-mediated virtual labs, our studies indicate augmented academic performance among students in blended environments. Findings also indicated usage of remotely-triggered labs aided enhancing interaction-based lab education enabling anytime-anywhere student participation scenarios.

  11. Transfer of motor learning from virtual to natural environments in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira; Massetti, Thais; da Silva, Talita Dias; van der Kamp, John; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Leone, Claudio; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2014-10-01

    With the growing accessibility of computer-assisted technology, rehabilitation programs for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) increasingly use virtual reality environments to enhance motor practice. Thus, it is important to examine whether performance improvements in the virtual environment generalize to the natural environment. To examine this issue, we had 64 individuals, 32 of which were individuals with CP and 32 typically developing individuals, practice two coincidence-timing tasks. In the more tangible button-press task, the individuals were required to 'intercept' a falling virtual object at the moment it reached the interception point by pressing a key. In the more abstract, less tangible task, they were instructed to 'intercept' the virtual object by making a hand movement in a virtual environment. The results showed that individuals with CP timed less accurate than typically developing individuals, especially for the more abstract task in the virtual environment. The individuals with CP did-as did their typically developing peers-improve coincidence timing with practice on both tasks. Importantly, however, these improvements were specific to the practice environment; there was no transfer of learning. It is concluded that the implementation of virtual environments for motor rehabilitation in individuals with CP should not be taken for granted but needs to be considered carefully. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Second Life: A Virtual Learning Center for the Study of Sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tryfonas Papadamou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the educational capabilities of the virtual world Second Life are researched and tested. A virtual world is constructed to support education for sustainable development. The life and characteristics of the shark is studied as this fish has received a lot of negative publicity and is in the danger of extinction. A virtual museum was developed for this purpose. The research question is focused on whether it can be used effectively in a modern classroom and how difficult is for an educator to develop such an application. To achieve that, a number of learning activities were developed, a number of on line questionnaires were issued and a series of virtual meetings were held. Teachers used the application and answered the questionnaires. The entire effort was attempted through Internet exclusively.

  13. A virtual trainer concept for robot-assisted human motor learning in rowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgartner L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Keeping the attention level and observing multiple physiological and biomechanical variables at the same time at high precision is very challenging for human trainers. Concurrent augmented feedback, which is suggested to enhance motor learning in complex motor tasks, can also hardly be provided by a human trainer. Thus, in this paper, a concept for a virtual trainer is presented that may overcome the limits of a human trainer. The intended virtual trainer will be implemented in a CAVE providing auditory, visual and haptic cues. As a first application, the virtual trainer will be used in a realistic scenario for sweep rowing. To provide individual feedback to each rower, the virtual trainer quantifies errors and provides concurrent auditory, visual, and haptic feedback. The concurrent feedback will be adapted according to the actual performance, individual maximal rowing velocity, and the athlete’s individual perception.

  14. Experiential learning: using virtual simulation in an online RN-to-BSN program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Henny; Jones, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the innovative experiential learning used by an online RN-to-BSN program through the use of simulation that takes place in an online classroom. Three experiential learning activities using a virtual community are described. These learning activities engage the students in thinking about social justice and health policy, as well as teaching concepts that include community, leadership, influence, advocacy, networking, collaboration, and vulnerable populations. These concepts are critical to the learning needs of diploma and associate degree-prepared nurses who wish to continue their education to be better prepared to meet the complex needs of today's health care environment. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. ADAPTATION AND DISABILITY ASPECTS IN A VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA LANCHEROS CUESTA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los principales aspectos que se deben tener en cuenta en el diseño de ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje como por ejemplo, los tutores inteligentes. La mayoría de estos sistemas virtuales de aprendizaje se concentran en la actividad del tutor y se utilizan técnicas de inteligencia artificial. Los sistemas que se relacionan a continuación permitieron la generación de un modelo que, dadas las preferencias y estilos de aprendizaje de un estudiante, realiza un proceso de recuperación de información con el fin de adaptar el despliegue y la manera en la que se muestra el contenido a un estudiante dadas las características particulares del mismo (estilos de aprendizaje, comportamiento y desempeño en el sistema y si tiene una discapacidad.

  16. Virtual universities--the reality of e-learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Graham; Betts, Helen J

    2002-01-01

    With the growth of the internet and world wide web new ways of exchanging information are emerging, barriers are being overcome, new partnerships and ways of working are emerging. Amongst the hype is the notion of a Virtual University; it is hype or reality? What are the issues? A description of a University will not just include the programmes that it delivers but would no doubt include research and the academic environment. This paper raises some of the issues for Health Informatics.

  17. Virtual Reality Game Education to Learn Traffic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andru Deva Lukito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – Traffic accident has become number 3 of children death cause in the world according to WHO[1]. Traffic accident that involve children often caused by their own by breaking the law or regulation. Therefor education about traffic regulation and law including traffic sign and its meaning must be given to children early. Because education means process to change a person or a group attitude and behavior in order to make them mature through teaching and training [2]. One of them that can be used is digital media.  One of interactive digital media is digital game, various form of digital game start from 2D, 2.5D, 3D with many point of view and new technology. VR (Virtual Reality as new digital media where alternate reality exist to test various theory without any real consequences, according to Greenbaum “Virtual Reality is an alternate world filled with computer-generated images that respond to human movements. These simulated environments are usually visited with the aid of an expensive data suit which features stereophonic video goggles and fiber-optic data gloves”[3]. Greenbaum statement before were make VR suitable to test traffic law and regulation and educate kid to obey the traffic sign and regulation without real consequences from real world. This Journal contain the result of using virtual reality as traffic regulation education media. Education material that arranged consisting traffic sign that appear on the road and safety riding gear. Keywords – Virtual Reality, Traffic sign, Road traffic, children, education

  18. Applying machine learning techniques for forecasting flexibility of virtual power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDougall, Pamela; Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2016-01-01

    network as well as the multi-variant linear regression. It is found that it is possible to estimate the longevity of flexibility with machine learning. The linear regression algorithm is, on average, able to estimate the longevity with a 15% error. However, there was a significant improvement with the ANN...... approach to investigating the longevity of aggregated response of a virtual power plant using historic bidding and aggregated behaviour with machine learning techniques. The two supervised machine learning techniques investigated and compared in this paper are, multivariate linear regression and single...... algorithm achieving, on average, a 5.3% error. This is lowered 2.4% when learning for the same virtual power plant. With this information it would be possible to accurately offer residential VPP flexibility for market operations to safely avoid causing further imbalances and financial penalties....

  19. Versatile, immersive, creative and dynamic virtual 3-D healthcare learning environments: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Margaret M

    2008-09-01

    The author provides a critical overview of three-dimensional (3-D) virtual worlds and "serious gaming" that are currently being developed and used in healthcare professional education and medicine. The relevance of this e-learning innovation for teaching students and professionals is debatable and variables influencing adoption, such as increased knowledge, self-directed learning, and peer collaboration, by academics, healthcare professionals, and business executives are examined while looking at various Web 2.0/3.0 applications. There is a need for more empirical research in order to unearth the pedagogical outcomes and advantages associated with this e-learning technology. A brief description of Roger's Diffusion of Innovations Theory and Siemens' Connectivism Theory for today's learners is presented as potential underlying pedagogical tenets to support the use of virtual 3-D learning environments in higher education and healthcare.

  20. COMPUTER ALGEBRA, VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND MEANINGFUL LEARNING: IS IT POSSIBLE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina A. A. P. Abar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge faced by teachers nowadays relates to the usage of proper educational technology to achieve a true and meaningful learning experience involving time for reflection. Teachers constantly seek new ways to improve instruction, but in virtual learning environments they often find themselves in a new role, interacting in a dynamic system with students and simultaneously acquiring new skills related to the tools in use. In this paper we address this question by conducting an online course aimed at primary and secondary school mathematics teachers, designed to investigate the effective use of GeoGebra and Moodle. The tools selected for the course are free and easy to use, an important factor for the new technology to be incorporated into teaching practice. The course results show that a well-constructed proposal is able to meet the expectations of teachers. Furthermore, the usage of new technologies involves, beyond technical issues, changes in the behavior and in the relationships between the actors involved.

  1. Urban water metabolism efficiency assessment: integrated analysis of available and virtual water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chu-Long; Vause, Jonathan; Ma, Hwong-Wen; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Resolving the complex environmental problems of water pollution and shortage which occur during urbanization requires the systematic assessment of urban water metabolism efficiency (WME). While previous research has tended to focus on either available or virtual water metabolism, here we argue that the systematic problems arising during urbanization require an integrated assessment of available and virtual WME, using an indicator system based on material flow analysis (MFA) results. Future research should focus on the following areas: 1) analysis of available and virtual water flow patterns and processes through urban districts in different urbanization phases in years with varying amounts of rainfall, and their environmental effects; 2) based on the optimization of social, economic and environmental benefits, establishment of an indicator system for urban WME assessment using MFA results; 3) integrated assessment of available and virtual WME in districts with different urbanization levels, to facilitate study of the interactions between the natural and social water cycles; 4) analysis of mechanisms driving differences in WME between districts with different urbanization levels, and the selection of dominant social and economic driving indicators, especially those impacting water resource consumption. Combinations of these driving indicators could then be used to design efficient water resource metabolism solutions, and integrated management policies for reduced water consumption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Using CORBA to integrate manufacturing cells to a virtual enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancerella, Carmen M.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    It is critical in today's enterprises that manufacturing facilities are not isolated from design, planning, and other business activities and that information flows easily and bidirectionally between these activities. It is also important and cost-effective that COTS software, databases, and corporate legacy codes are well integrated in the information architecture. Further, much of the information generated during manufacturing must be dynamically accessible to engineering and business operations both in a restricted corporate intranet and on the internet. The software integration strategy in the Sandia Agile Manufacturing Testbed supports these enterprise requirements. We are developing a CORBA-based distributed object software system for manufacturing. Each physical machining device is a CORBA object and exports a common IDL interface to allow for rapid and dynamic insertion, deletion, and upgrading within the manufacturing cell. Cell management CORBA components access manufacturing devices without knowledge of any device-specific implementation. To support information flow from design to planning data is accessible to machinists on the shop floor. CORBA allows manufacturing components to be easily accessible to the enterprise. Dynamic clients can be created using web browsers and portable Java GUI's. A CORBA-OLE adapter allows integration to PC desktop applications. Other commercial software can access CORBA network objects in the information architecture through vendor API's.

  3. Analytic integration of real-virtual counterterms in NNLO jet cross sections I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglietti, Ugo; Del Duca, Vittorio; Duhr, Claude; Somogyi, Gábor; Trócsányi, Zoltán

    2008-09-01

    We present analytic evaluations of some integrals needed to give explicitly the integrated real-virtual counterterms, based on a recently proposed subtraction scheme for next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) jet cross sections. After an algebraic reduction of the integrals, integration-by-parts identities are used for the reduction to master integrals and for the computation of the master integrals themselves by means of differential equations. The results are written in terms of one- and two-dimensional harmonic polylogarithms, once an extension of the standard basis is made. We expect that the techniques described here will be useful in computing other integrals emerging in calculations in perturbative quantum field theories.

  4. Development of Learning Virtual Objects as a Strategy to Foster Student Retention in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Yois S. Pascuas Rengifo; César Omar Jaramillo Morales; Fredy Antonio Verástegui González

    2015-01-01

    Rev.esc.adm.neg One of the problems that the Colombian higher education system is facing is the problem of student desertion, shwoing that a great amount of students leave their university studies during the first semesters. For this reason, the National Education Ministry and Universidad de la Amazonia implement a new strategy to foster student retention and graduation through academic levelling. This paper shows eight learning virtual objects from different learning áreas, applying tech...

  5. Uncanny spaces for higher education: teaching and learning in virtual worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân Bayne

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings together the theory of the uncanny as it emerges in cultural theory, with an understanding of the uncanniness and troublesomeness seen to be inherent in certain understandings of teaching and learning in higher education. Drawing on research into students' experiences of learning in virtual worlds, it explores the sense in which teaching in such spaces materialises and extends the positive aspects of uncertainty, strangeness, disquietude and troublesomeness in online higher education.

  6. THE NATURE OF USING VIRTUAL WORLDS BY A CHILD AS A LEARNING PLATFORM: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BAYTAK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of new technologies is found inevitable and children interests toward online platforms and virtual worlds are rapidly growing. In addition, there is a consensus that use of technology for primary or secondary school education is effective for achievement and motivation. In research and practice there are many educational implementations of technology in classrooms that were found useful.Similar to most qualitative studies, the purpose of this study also cannot be narrowed down to a single sentence but the overarching aim of the study is to explore the nature of using virtual worlds as a learning platform during. The theoretical background of this study is rooted from the constructivism and constructionism learning approaches. Consisted with its theoretical framework, this study has followed a qualitative case study research method to explore the nature of the construct. The case is a bounded system that is narrowed to a single case (Merriam, 1988; Stake, 1995; Yin, 2003. There are various types of data collected within this system. Based on the data collected and the research-suggested case study data analysis approaches, the following themes were emerged; realty, learning by discovering, learning by design, scaffolding and chunking information, and real life desires.After using Whyville virtual platform, the aim of this study was expected to start new discussion on young children using more complex virtual worlds such as Second Life. Thus, the results of this study could be guidance for transmission process of children toward Second Life type of virtual worlds. Even though a further discussion may need about the nature of using the virtual worlds, the primary findings of these case studies suggest some practical implications for children’s education.

  7. Outline and Evaluation of a Joint European and Canadian Virtual Mobility: e-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Alan

    2006-01-01

    The "virtual mobility" project was created as part of a joint Canadian and European Commission funded project to explore cross-cultural clinical curricular developments in the radiation sciences. The aim of the project was to facilitate student learning of the cross-cultural differences in the delivery of healthcare within the…

  8. Use and Mastery of Virtual Learning Environment in Brazilian Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Margarita Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the dynamics of the use and/or mastery of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) by educators and students Open University, important part of the Brazilian Educational System. A questionnaire with 32 items was answered by 174 students/instructors/coordinators of the Media in Education and Physics courses, of two…

  9. Information Problem-Solving Skills in Small Virtual Groups and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Consuelo; Badia, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of use of information problem-solving (IPS) skills and its relationship with learning outcomes. During the course of the study, 40 teachers carried out a collaborative IPS task in small virtual groups in a 4-week online training course. The status of IPS skills was collected through self-reports handed in over…

  10. A Layered Component-Based Architecture of a Virtual Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Retalis, Simos; Skordalakis, Manolis; Psaromiligos, Yiannis

    2001-01-01

    There exists an urgent demand on defining architectures for Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), so that high-level frameworks for understanding these systems can be discovered, portability, interoperability and reusability can be achieved and adaptability over time can be accomplished. In this

  11. Creativity in Technology Education Facilitated through Virtual Reality Learning Environments: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli; Page, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation Education (IE) is a new subject area in Icelandic schools. The aim of the subject is to train students to identify the needs and problems in their environment and to develop solutions: a process of ideation. This activity has been classroom based but now a Virtual Reality Learning Environment technology (VRLE) has been designed to…

  12. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  13. The Effect of Virtual Language Learning Method on Writing Ability of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshsima, Hooshang; Sayadi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of virtual language learning method on Iranian intermediate EFL learners writing ability. The study was conducted with 20 English Translation students at Chabahar Maritime University who were assigned into two groups, control and experimental, after ensuring of their homogeneity by administering a TOEFL…

  14. Users' Continuance Intention of Virtual Learning Community Services: The Moderating Role of Usage Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Yupei; Yan, Weiwei; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Users' continuance intention plays a significant role in the process of information system (IS) service, especially virtual learning community (VLC) services. Following the IS success model and IS post-acceptance model, this study explores the determinants of users' intention to continue using VLCs' service from the perspective of quality,…

  15. A Learning Evaluation for an Immersive Virtual Laboratory for Technical Training Applied into a Welding Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Francisco; Neira Tovar, Leticia A.; del Rio, Marta Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the results of welding virtual training performance, designed using a learning model based on cognitive and usability techniques, applying an immersive concept focused on person attention. Moreover, it also intended to demonstrate that exits a moderating effect of performance improvement when the user experience is taken…

  16. Enhancing University Teachers' Information and Communication Technology Usage by Using a Virtual Learning Environment Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageel, Mohammed; Woollard, John

    2012-01-01

    The research project is a case study focussing on the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) implemented to increase the use of information and communication technology (ICT) by university teachers in Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. The study aims to investigate the effect of the VLE as the vehicle for a training course in ICT designed to…

  17. At-Risk Students and Virtual Enterprise: Tourism and Hospitality Simulations in Applied and Academic Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgese, Anthony

    This paper discusses Virtual Enterprise (VE), a technology-driven business simulation program in which students conceive, create, and operate enterprises that utilize Web-based and other technologies to trade products and services around the world. The study examined the effects of VE on a learning community of at-risk students, defined as those…

  18. Collaborative Learning in Architectural Education: Benefits of Combining Conventional Studio, Virtual Design Studio and Live Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carolina; Hudson, Roland; Niblock, Chantelle

    2018-01-01

    Combinations of Conventional Studio and Virtual Design Studio (VDS) have created valuable learning environments that take advantage of different instruments of communication and interaction. However, past experiences have reported limitations in regards to student engagement and motivation, especially when the studio projects encourage abstraction…

  19. Teaching a Chemistry MOOC with a Virtual Laboratory: Lessons Learned from an Introductory Physical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Patrick J.; Agger, Jonathan R.; Anderson, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the experience and lessons learned of running a MOOC in introductory physical chemistry. The course was unique in allowing students to conduct experimental measurements using a virtual laboratory constructed using video and simulations. A breakdown of the student background and motivation for taking the course is…

  20. A Cross-Case Analysis of Gender Issues in Desktop Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausburn, Lynna J.; Martens, Jon; Washington, Andre; Steele, Debra; Washburn, Earlene

    2009-01-01

    This study examined gender-related issues in using new desktop virtual reality (VR) technology as a learning tool in career and technical education (CTE). Using relevant literature, theory, and cross-case analysis of data and findings, the study compared and analyzed the outcomes of two recent studies conducted by a research team at Oklahoma State…

  1. "Homo Virtualis": Virtual Worlds, Learning, and an Ecology of Embodied Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    This article previews the emergence of "homo virtualis." Drawing on data from seven research studies, peer-reviewed published research articles, and selected excerpts of 30 months of field notes taken in Second Life [SL], the article examines virtual learning environments and embodiment through the lens of interactions of avatars with…

  2. The Learning Outcomes of Mentoring Library Science Students in Virtual World Reference: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpur, Geraldine; Morris, Jon Levi

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the cognitive and affective development of students being mentored in virtual reference interview skills by professional librarians. The authors present a case study which examines the impact on student learning resulting from librarian mentor participation and collaboration with students on a course assignment. This study…

  3. Institutional, Public and Individual Learning Dynamics of the Andy Holt Virtual Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Robert

    The Andy Holt Virtual Library, with a focus on the Humanities and Fine Arts, is free and open to the public, though designed to serve the learning communities within the College of Humanities and Fine Arts at the University of Tennessee-Martin (UT). It also plays a resource role in UT's New College and the Tennessee Governors School for the…

  4. Second Life in Education: The Case of Commercial Online Virtual Reality Applied to Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Abbie Brown; William Sugar

    2009-01-01

    Second Life is a three-dimensional, multi-user virtual environment that has attracted particularattention for its instructional potential in professional development and higher educationsettings. This article describes Second Life in general and explores the benefits and challengesof using it for teaching and learning.

  5. Second Life in Education: The Case of Commercial Online Virtual Reality Applied to Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Abbie; Sugar, William

    2009-01-01

    Second Life is a three-dimensional, multi-user virtual environment that has attracted particular attention for its instructional potential in professional development and higher education settings. This article describes Second Life in general and explores the benefits and challenges of using it for teaching and learning.

  6. Incorporating Kansei Engineering in Instructional Design: Designing Virtual Reality Based Learning Environments from a Novel Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Kee Man; Chen, Chwen Jen; Teh, Chee Siong

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the application of virtual reality (VR) technology in education is rapidly gaining momentum. The educational benefits offered by such technology have prompted many educators as well as instructional designers to investigate ways to create effective and engaging VR learning. Instructional designers have examined widely the…

  7. A Social Network Analysis of Teaching and Research Collaboration in a Teachers' Virtual Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Qintai; Liu, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Analysing the structure of a social network can help us understand the key factors influencing interaction and collaboration in a virtual learning community (VLC). Here, we describe the mechanisms used in social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the social network structure of a VLC for teachers and discuss the relationship between face-to-face…

  8. Using Avatars and Virtual Environments in Learning: What Do They Have to Offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falloon, Garry

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores and discusses arguments for the use of virtual environments and interactive avatars in supporting the achievement of student learning goals within conventional educational contexts. It describes and evaluates arguments promoted by some authors (eg, van den Brekel, 2007; Deuchar & Nodder, 2003; Dickey, 2003; Facer, 2004; de…

  9. Proactive behaviour may lead to failure in virtual project-based collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Hertzum, Morten

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues that proactive behaviour, caused by high engagement and motivation of the learners, may lead to failure of collaborative learning. By examining empirical data from real-world text-only virtual negotiations between dispersed participants engaged in project-based collaborative...

  10. Teachers' Mindset and Responsibilities in Using Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) in Icelandic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2013-01-01

    Running Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) classes using Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) has become a high priority project for many educational institutions, as it offers opportunities for online education and support for conventional education. However, acquiring and deploying a VLE is a difficult task that concerns teachers'…

  11. Dyslexic Students in Higher Education and Virtual Learning Environments: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, L.; Berget, G.; Sandnes, F. E.; Sanderson, N.; Kahn, P.; Fagernes, S.; Olcay, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an interview-based study of the use of virtual learning environments (VLEs) among dyslexic students. Interviews were carried out with 12 informants who had been formally diagnosed as dyslexic. The informants were either enrolled in a university or college programme, or had graduated less than a year before the…

  12. Virtual Learning Environments as Sociomaterial Agents in the Network of Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Monica; Erstad, Ola; Habib, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings related to the sociomaterial agency of educators and their practice in Norwegian education. Using actor-network theory, we ask how Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) negotiate the agency of educators and how they shape their teaching practice. Since the same kinds of VLE tools have been widely implemented…

  13. Feasibility of Using an Augmented Immersive Virtual Reality Learning Environment to Enhance Music Conducting Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Evelyn K.; Price, Harry E.; Russell, Christine R.

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring nonverbal skills necessary to appropriately communicate and educate members of performing ensembles is essential for wind band conductors. Virtual reality learning environments (VRLEs) provide a unique setting for developing these proficiencies. For this feasibility study, we used an augmented immersive VRLE to enhance eye contact, torso…

  14. Communication and Education in a Virtual World: Avatar-Mediated Teaching and Learning in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Lorri

    2010-01-01

    Education within Second Life frequently recapitulates the "sage on the stage" as students sit their avatars down in chairs in the virtual world and listen to or read an instructor's lecture while watching a slideshow. This conceptual article explores alternative active learning techniques supporting independent and collaborative learning…

  15. Learning to Teach in Second Life: A Novice Adventure in Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Maureen; Anderson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Second Life (SL) is a social virtual world, which emphasizes the general use of immersive worlds for supporting a variety of human activities and interactions, presenting a plethora of new opportunities and challenges for enriching how we learn, work and play (Boulos, Hetherington & Wheeler, 2007; Prasolova-Førland, Sourin & Sourina,…

  16. Online virtual-patient cases versus traditional problem-based learning in advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dahir, Sara; Bryant, Kendrea; Kennedy, Kathleen B; Robinson, Donna S

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of faculty-led problem-based learning (PBL) vs online simulated-patient case in fourth-year (P4) pharmacy students. Fourth-year pharmacy students were randomly assigned to participate in either online branched-case learning using a virtual simulation platform or a small-group discussion. Preexperience and postexperience student assessments and a survey instrument were completed. While there were no significant differences in the preexperience test scores between the groups, there was a significant increase in scores in both the virtual-patient group and the PBL group between the preexperience and postexperience tests. The PBL group had higher postexperience test scores (74.8±11.7) than did the virtual-patient group (66.5±13.6) (p=0.001). The PBL method demonstrated significantly greater improvement in postexperience test scores than did the virtual-patient method. Both were successful learning methods, suggesting that a diverse approach to simulated patient cases may reach more student learning styles.

  17. E-Learning Application of Tarsier with Virtual Reality using Android Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroh, H. N.; Munir, R.; Paseru, D.

    2017-01-01

    Spectral Tarsier is a primitive primate that can only be found in the province of North Sulawesi. To study these primates can be used an e-learning application with Augmented Reality technology that uses a marker to confronted the camera computer to interact with three dimensions Tarsier object. But that application only shows tarsier object in three dimensions without habitat and requires a lot of resources because it runs on a Personal Computer. The same technology can be shown three dimensions’ objects is Virtual Reality to excess can make the user like venturing into the virtual world with Android platform that requires fewer resources. So, put on Virtual Reality technology using the Android platform that can make users not only to view and interact with the tarsiers but also the habitat. The results of this research indicate that the user can learn the Tarsier and habitat with good. Thus, the use of Virtual Reality technology in the e-learning application of tarsiers can help people to see, know, and learn about Spectral Tarsier.

  18. Nursing Faculty Experiences of Virtual Learning Environments for Teaching Clinical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharzuk-Marciano, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Nurses need sharp, clinical reasoning skills to respond to critical situations and to be successful at work in a complex and challenging healthcare system. While past research has focused on using virtual learning environments to teach clinical reasoning, there has been limited research on the experiences of nursing faculty and there is a need for…

  19. Exploring Arizona K-12 Virtual Educator Experiences and Perspectives Developing Collaborative Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deborah Iyron

    2015-01-01

    Arizona Online Instruction (AOI) provided an instructional alternative to nearly fifty thousand K-12 students in Arizona during the 2012-2013 school year. Growth in online education underscores the importance of evolving the role of the K-12 virtual teacher as the human agent (Turvey, 2008) demonstrating social learning theory (Bandura, 1977) by…

  20. Virtual Learning Communities as a Vehicle for Workforce Development: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Barbara; Lewis, Dina

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits and challenges of using a virtual learning community (VLC) as a vehicle for workforce development. This paper argues that VLCs provide a flexible vehicle for workforce development. However, workplace realities may lead to unexpected challenges for participants wanting exploit the…