WorldWideScience

Sample records for integrated curriculum model

  1. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  2. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  3. Model construction by students within an integrated medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, Peter M; Ramasamy, Perumal

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents our experience of running a special study module (SSM) in the second semester of the first year of our 5-year medical programme, worth 10 per cent of that semester's assessment, in which each student constructs an individually selected model illustrating a specific aspect of the teaching course. Each student conceptualises and develops his or her model, to clarify a specific aspect of medical teaching. The use of non-traditional materials in construction is strongly encouraged. Six weeks later, each student presents their model for assessment by four first-year academic teaching staff. The student is quizzed about the concepts that he or she presents, the mode of construction and the materials used. The students' projects broadly cover the disciplines of physiology, biochemistry and anatomy, but are somewhat biased towards anatomy. Students spend on average about 14 hours planning and building their models, at a time when they are busy with other teaching activities. The marks awarded for the projects closely follow a normal distribution. A survey suggests that most students enjoy the exercise and feel that it has enhanced their learning and understanding. It is clear from the wide variety of different topics, models and materials that students are highly resourceful in their modelling. Creative activity does not generally play a substantial part in medical education, but is of considerable importance. The development of their models stimulates, informs and educates the constructors, and provides a teaching resource for later use in didactic teaching. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  4. "Paideia Kyriou": Biblical and Patristic Models for an Integrated Christian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Stephen Richard

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies corroborate the importance of an integrated or interdisciplinary curriculum for an effective education. However, contemporary proposals for the function of theology as the integrative center have been limited mainly to sectarian communities and remain a work in progress. Noting the fruitfulness of historical…

  5. The Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Suzanne

    This textbook provides an outline of an integrated curriculum for early childhood education. Part 1 discusses the human element in school: the child and the teacher and child development. Part 2 contains the curriculum itself and covers the subjects of language, mathematics, science, social studies, art, music, and movement. Guidelines provide…

  6. Competency Maps: an Effective Model to Integrate Professional Competencies Across a STEM Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Carracedo, Fermín; Soler, Antonia; Martín, Carme; López, David; Ageno, Alicia; Cabré, Jose; Garcia, Jordi; Aranda, Joan; Gibert, Karina

    2018-05-01

    Curricula designed in the context of the European Higher Education Area need to be based on both domain-specific and professional competencies. Whereas universities have had extensive experience in developing students' domain-specific competencies, fostering professional competencies poses a new challenge we need to face. This paper presents a model to globally develop professional competencies in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) degree program, and assesses the results of its implementation after 4 years. The model is based on the use of competency maps, in which each competency is defined in terms of competency units. Each competency unit is described by a set of expected learning outcomes at three domain levels. This model allows careful analysis, revision, and iteration for an effective integration of professional competencies in domain-specific subjects. A global competency map is also designed, including all the professional competency learning outcomes to be achieved throughout the degree. This map becomes a useful tool for curriculum designers and coordinators. The results were obtained from four sources: (1) students' grades (classes graduated from 2013 to 2016, the first 4 years of the new Bachelor's Degree in Informatics Engineering at the Barcelona School of Informatics); (2) students' surveys (answered by students when they finished the degree); (3) the government employment survey, where former students evaluate their satisfaction of the received training in the light of their work experience; and (4) the Everis Foundation University-Enterprise Ranking, answered by over 2000 employers evaluating their satisfaction regarding their employees' university training, where the Barcelona School of Informatics scores first in the national ranking. The results show that competency maps are a good tool for developing professional competencies in a STEM degree.

  7. Integrating Spanish language training across a Doctor of Physical Therapy curriculum: a case report of one program's evolving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Diaz, Deborah; Dillon, Loretta

    2014-12-01

    As the Hispanic population continues to expand in the United States, health professionals increasingly may encounter people who speak Spanish and have limited English proficiency. Responding to these changes, various health profession educators have incorporated Spanish language training into their curricula. Of 12 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) programs identified as including elective or required Spanish courses, the program at The University of Texas at El Paso is the only one integrating required Spanish language training across the curriculum. The purpose of this case report is to describe the development, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of the evolving educational model at The University of Texas at El Paso. The University of Texas at El Paso is situated immediately across the border from Mexico. Responding to the large population with limited English proficiency in the community, faculty began to integrate required Spanish language training during a transition from a master-level to a DPT curriculum. The Spanish language curriculum pillar includes a Spanish medical terminology course, language learning opportunities threaded throughout the clinical courses, clinical education courses, and service-learning. Forty-five DPT students have completed the curriculum. Assessment methods were limited for early cohorts. Clinically relevant Spanish verbal proficiency was assessed with a practical examination in the Spanish course, a clinical instructor-rated instrument, and student feedback. Preliminary data suggested that the model is improving Spanish language proficiency. The model still is evolving. Spanish language learning opportunities in the curriculum are being expanded. Also, problems with the clinical outcome measure have been recognized. Better definition of intended outcomes and validation of a revised tool are needed. This report should promote opportunities for collaboration with others who are interested in linguistic competence. © 2014

  8. Ethnomusicology, Ethnomathematics, and Integrating Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Ryan; Marshall, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Integrating curriculum provides rich opportunities for students to focus on relevant applications to the real world and make meaningful connections across different disciplines. This article attempts to go beyond common discourse and platitudes by offering specific examples, showing we--an ethnomusicologist and a mathematics educator--attempted to…

  9. Integrating critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry across a four-year dental curriculum: a model for independent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Handoo, Nidhi; Solow, Catherine M; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Introducing critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) content into an established dental curriculum can be a difficult and challenging process. Over the past three years, the University of Iowa College of Dentistry has developed and implemented a progressive four-year integrated critical thinking and EBD curriculum. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation process to make it available as a model for other dental schools contemplating introduction of critical thinking and EBD into their curricula. The newly designed curriculum built upon an existing problem-based learning foundation, which introduces critical thinking and the scientific literature in the D1 year, in order to expose students to the rationale and resources for practicing EBD in the D2 and D3 years and provide opportunities to practice critical thinking and apply the EBD five-step process in the D2, D3, and D4 years. All curricular content is online, and D3 and D4 EBD activities are integrated within existing clinical responsibilities. The curricular content, student resources, and student activities are described.

  10. Residents’ perceptions of an integrated longitudinal curriculum: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Lubitz

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This study suggests that an integrated longitudinalized family medicine block training model has the potential to support the principles of a longitudinal integrated competency-based curriculum to effectively prepare residents for family medicine practice.

  11. [Creating an integrated nursing curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, R A; Papa, L M; Lopes, G T

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, Brazilian society has gone through great changes into political, ideological and economical fields. These changes left their strings into society, specially in population health. The nurse formation based on the Law n(o) 5540/68 and on the Statement n(o) 163/72, no more meets population demands. Since 1992, the Nursing Faculty of UERJ-FEUerj intensifies the reflection movement upon teaching-learning process searching for transforming its own reality. The making of this project presents two complementary and important reasons: FEUerj docents and discents' desire in elaborating a curriculum which searches for nurses' formation that articulates teaching-work-community, theory and practice, based on a Critical Theory of Education, on the line of PROBLEMATIZATION, and the accomplishment of Statement n(o) 314/94 from the CFE and from the Letter of Order MEC n(o) 1171/15/dez/94. From debating, the professional profile has been defined from the social environment where the profession is performed and the alumnate's characteristics; area determination or group of attributions, according to professional praxis adequation, concept hierachization, processes, etc., which in the process of 'classification and syntheses' of knowledge results into a netlike chained and related tree. In the first phase of the curriculum study, it has diagnosed as principal condition, the actual curriculum 'DECONTEXTUALIZATION' and the 'US' to be faced to lead it to an end the Curriculum Reformulation Proposal. The Process of Pedagogical Abilitation for professors, workshops, researches on the desirable and present profile, seminars, performance, abilities and principles systematization, identification of areas which compose the integrated curriculum, subjects localization into areas and articulation between professional subjects and other activities, has been implemented. Based on this work on the problematized pedagogy first step, an instrument 'Research on the

  12. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  13. Pre-Eminent Curriculum in Islamic Basic School Integrated Comparative Studies in Islamic Basic School Integrated Al-Izzah Serang and Al-Hanif Cilegon, Banten, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauz, Anis; Hasbullah

    2016-01-01

    Compare to General SD (Primary school), the superiority of SD Islam Terpadu (Integrated Islamic Primary School) lies on the development of the curriculum and learning that is more emphasize on integrated curriculum and integrated learning. Curriculum model applied in Sekolah Dasar Islam Terpadu (SDIT) is integrated curriculum. This curriculum is…

  14. Mutual Workshops enhancing Curriculum Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard Jensen, Lotte; Markvorsen, Steen; Almegaard, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    . A course in material science was moved from the fourth to the first semester so that the project could be informed by material science. A new course in geometry was prepared and software that could facilitate an integrated design project was introduced (STAAD Pro). The ‘full package’ of the new third....... Every semester has a teaching team consisting of all the teachers for courses in that semester. Each semester also has its own theme and a multidisciplinary, joint project. So the most active members of the teaching team, of course, are those responsible for courses that address the theme and contribute...... to the joint project. The theme of the third semester is ‘structural design’. Structural design is defined as an integration of material science, statics and geometry in relation to an architectural project. Anticipating the implementation of CDIO and this theme, major changes were made to the curriculum...

  15. A Faculty Workshop Model to Integrate Climate Change across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranes, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Much of the growing scientific certainty of human impacts on the climate system, and the implications of these impacts on current and future generations, have been discovered and documented in research labs in colleges and universities across the country. Often these institutions also take decisive action towards combatting climate change, by making significant reductions in greenhouse emissions and pledging to greater future reductions. Yet, there are still far too many students that graduate from these campuses without an adequate understanding of how climate change will impact them within their lifetimes and without adequate workforce preparation to implement solutions. It may be that where college and universities still have the largest influence on climate change adaption and mitigation is in the way that we educate students. Here I present a curriculum workshop model at UC San Diego that leverages faculty expertise to infuse climate change education across disciplines to enhance UC San Diego students' climate literacy, particularly for those students whose major focus is not in the geosciences. In this model, twenty faculty from a breadth of disciplines, including social sciences, humanities, arts, education, and natural sciences participated in workshops and developed curricula to infuse aspects of climate change into their existing undergraduate courses. We particularly encouraged development of climate change modules in courses in the humanities, social sciences and arts that are best positioned to address the important human and social dimensions of climate change. In this way, climate change content becomes embedded in current course offerings, including non-science courses, to increase climate literacy among a greater number and a broader cross-section of students.

  16. A collaborative institutional model for integrating computer applications in the medical curriculum.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, C. P.; Oxford, G. S.; Juliano, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and promotion of information technology in an established medical curriculum with existing academic and technical support structures poses a number of challenges. The UNC School of Medicine has developed the Taskforce on Educational Applications in Medicine (TEAM), to coordinate this effort. TEAM works as a confederation of existing research and support units with interests in computers and education, along with a core of interested faculty with curricular responsibilities. C...

  17. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  18. Horizontal integration of the basic sciences in the chiropractic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Basic science curricula at most chiropractic colleges consist of courses (eg, general anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc) that are taught as stand-alone content domains. The lack of integration between basic science disciplines causes difficulties for students who need to understand how the parts function together as an integrated whole and apply this understanding to solving clinical problems. More horizontally integrated basic science curricula could be achieved by several means: integrated Part I National Board of Chiropractic Examiners questions, a broader education for future professors, an increased emphasis on integration within the current model, linked courses, and an integrated, thematic basic science curriculum. Horizontally integrating basic science curricula would require significant efforts from administrators, curriculum committees, and instructional faculty. Once in place this curriculum would promote more clinically relevant learning, improved learning outcomes, and superior vertical integration.

  19. Horizontal Integration of the Basic Sciences in the Chiropractic Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Basic science curricula at most chiropractic colleges consist of courses (eg, general anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc) that are taught as stand-alone content domains. The lack of integration between basic science disciplines causes difficulties for students who need to understand how the parts function together as an integrated whole and apply this understanding to solving clinical problems. More horizontally integrated basic science curricula could be achieved by several means: integrated Part I National Board of Chiropractic Examiners questions, a broader education for future professors, an increased emphasis on integration within the current model, linked courses, and an integrated, thematic basic science curriculum. Horizontally integrating basic science curricula would require significant efforts from administrators, curriculum committees, and instructional faculty. Once in place this curriculum would promote more clinically relevant learning, improved learning outcomes, and superior vertical integration. PMID:21048882

  20. Elements of Contemporary Integrated Science Curriculum: Impacts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper acknowledged the vital roles played by integration of ideas and established the progress brought about when science is taught as a unified whole through knowledge integration which birthed integrated science as a subject in Nigerian school curriculum. The efforts of interest groups at regional, national and ...

  1. Integrating components of culture in curriculum planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Chibiko Offorma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Culture is seen from different perspectives but the focus of this paper is on the totality of people’s way of life; those things that bind the society together. In this paper, the key concepts of curriculum, culture, and curriculum planning are explained. The components of culture, namely, universals of culture, specialties of culture and alternatives of culture are discussed. Integration is briefly presented and how to integrate culture in the curriculum planning is discussed. This can be done through situational analysis to identify the necessary cultural contents to be included or integrated in the curriculum. Different modes of delivery to be used are role play, dramatization, collaboration, field trips, games and simulation, and other interactive modes that make learning meaningful and worthwhile.

  2. Models for Instruction and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Elizabeth L.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes three models of course-specific curricula and a content-curriculum model for undergraduate public-relations education, and proposes core and elective areas for a master's of public-relations curriculum. Agrees that public-relations curricula should have a broad liberal arts and science basis, and recommended more attention to ethics,…

  3. Integrated Assessment for an Integrated Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockrish, Rob

    1989-01-01

    In a sixth grade science classroom for able students, major grades are broken down into four categories: lab reports, projects, creative writing, and written tests. These four components of assessment structure how the curriculum content is presented. (JDD)

  4. Integrating Ethics into the Marketing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James H.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how John Carroll University successfully integrated ethics into existing marketing courses. Provides a summary of the current literature on marketing ethics, discusses the educational goals that are met by integrating ethics into the curriculum, examines available curricular options, and details the design and implementation of a segment…

  5. The educated citizen and global public health issues: One model for integration into the undergraduate curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary M. Caron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Educated Citizen Initiative proposes that an understanding of public health issues is a core component of an educated citizenry and is essential to developing one’s societal responsibility. This initiative supports the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation that all undergraduates should have access to education in public health. Furthermore, the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP framework developed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities supports the integration of public health education into general and liberal education with an aim to produce an educated citizenry. The LEAP framework is implemented by teaching about the role of social determinants in a population’s health status; the significance of personal and social responsibility; and providing skills for inquiry, critical thinking, problem solving, and evaluation. This article describes one university’s experience in generating an educated citizenry cognizant of comprehensive public health conflicts, thus contributing to both a local and global perspective on learning.

  6. An integrated model for developing research skills in an undergraduate medical curriculum: appraisal of an approach using student selected components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Simon C; Morton, Jeremy; Ray, David C; Swann, David G; Davidson, Donald J

    2013-09-01

    Student selected components (SSCs), at that time termed special study modules, were arguably the most innovative element in Tomorrow's Doctors (1993), the document from the General Medical Council that initiated the modernization of medical curricula in the UK. SSCs were proposed to make up one-third of the medical curriculum and provide students with choice, whilst allowing individual schools autonomy in how SSCs were utilized. In response, at the University of Edinburgh the undergraduate medical curriculum provides an integrated and sequential development and assessment of research skill learning outcomes, for all students in the SSC programme. The curriculum contains SSCs which provide choice to students in all 5 years. There are four substantial timetabled SSCs where students develop research skills in a topic and speciality of their choice. These SSCs are fully integrated and mapped with core learning outcomes and assessment, particularly with the 'Evidence-Based Medicine and Research' programme theme. These research skills are developed incrementally and applied fully in a research project in the fourth year. One-third of students also perform an optional intercalated one-year honours programme between years 2 and 3, usually across a wide range of honours schools at the biomedical science interface. Student feedback is insightful and demonstrates perceived attainment of research competencies. The establishment of these competencies is discussed in the context of enabling junior graduate doctors to be effective and confident at utilizing their research skills to effectively practice evidence-based medicine. This includes examining their own practice through clinical audit, developing an insight into the complexity of the evidence base and uncertainty, and also gaining a view into a career as a clinical academic.

  7. Technology and Environmental Education: An Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jana M.; Weiser, Brenda

    2005-01-01

    Preparing teacher candidates to integrate technology into their future classrooms effectively requires experience in instructional planning that utilizes technology to enhance student learning. Teacher candidates need to work with curriculum that supports a variety of technologies. Using Project Learning Tree and environmental education (EE),…

  8. Evolution of the New Pathway curriculum at Harvard Medical School: the new integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienstag, Jules L

    2011-01-01

    In 1985, Harvard Medical School adopted a "New Pathway" curriculum, based on active, adult learning through problem-based, faculty-facilitated small-group tutorials designed to promote lifelong skills of self-directed learning. Despite the successful integration of clinically relevant material in basic science courses, the New Pathway goals were confined primarily to the preclinical years. In addition, the shifting balance in the delivery of health care from inpatient to ambulatory settings limited the richness of clinical education in clinical clerkships, creating obstacles for faculty in their traditional roles as teachers. In 2006, Harvard Medical School adopted a more integrated curriculum based on four principles that emerged after half a decade of self-reflection and planning: (1) integrate the teaching of basic/population science and clinical medicine throughout the entire student experience; (2) reestablish meaningful and intensive faculty-student interactions and reengage the faculty; (3) develop a new model of clinical education that offers longitudinal continuity of patient experience, cross-disciplinary curriculum, faculty mentoring, and student evaluation; and (4) provide opportunities for all students to pursue an in-depth, faculty-mentored scholarly project. These principles of our New Integrated Curriculum reflect our vision for a curriculum that fosters a partnership between students and faculty in the pursuit of scholarship and leadership.

  9. Curriculum Integration Using Enterprise Resource Planning: An Integrative Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, David M.; Klein, Helen A; Koste, Lori L.; Magal, Simha R.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to achieve greater curriculum integration in schools of business have included team teaching, student group projects, multidisciplinary cases, and, more recently, the use of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Although these approaches are beneficial, they tend to be implemented on an ad hoc basis rather than through curriculum…

  10. The critical thinking curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William Haviland

    The Critical Thinking Curriculum Model (CTCM) utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that integrates effective learning and teaching practices with computer technology. The model is designed to be flexible within a curriculum, an example for teachers to follow, where they can plug in their own critical issue. This process engages students in collaborative research that can be shared in the classroom, across the country or around the globe. The CTCM features open-ended and collaborative activities that deal with current, real world issues which leaders are attempting to solve. As implemented in the Critical Issues Forum (CIF), an educational program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the CTCM encompasses the political, social/cultural, economic, and scientific realms in the context of a current global issue. In this way, students realize the importance of their schooling by applying their efforts to an endeavor that ultimately will affect their future. This study measures student attitudes toward science and technology and the changes that result from immersion in the CTCM. It also assesses the differences in student learning in science content and problem solving for students involved in the CTCM. A sample of 24 students participated in classrooms at two separate high schools in New Mexico. The evaluation results were analyzed using SPSS in a MANOVA format in order to determine the significance of the between and within-subjects effects. A comparison ANOVA was done for each two-way MANOVA to see if the comparison groups were equal. Significant findings were validated using the Scheffe test in a Post Hoc analysis. Demographic information for the sample population was recorded and tracked, including self-assessments of computer use and availability. Overall, the results indicated that the CTCM did help to increase science content understanding and problem-solving skills for students, thereby positively effecting critical thinking. No matter if the

  11. Integrating technology, curriculum, and online resources: A multilevel model study of impacts on science teachers and students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei

    This scale-up study investigated the impact of a teacher technology tool (Curriculum Customization Service, CCS), curriculum, and online resources on earth science teachers' attitudes, beliefs, and practices and on students' achievement and engagement with science learning. Participants included 73 teachers and over 2,000 ninth-grade students within five public school districts in the western U.S. To assess the impact on teachers, changes between pre- and postsurveys were examined. Results suggest that the CCS tool appeared to significantly increase both teachers' awareness of other earth science teachers' practices and teachers' frequency of using interactive resources in their lesson planning and classroom teaching. A standard multiple regression model was developed. In addition to "District," "Training condition" (whether or not teachers received CCS training) appeared to predict teachers' attitudes, beliefs, and practices. Teachers who received CCS training tended to have lower postsurvey scores than their peers who had no CCS training. Overall, usage of the CCS tool tended to be low, and there were differences among school districts. To assess the impact on students, changes were examined between pre- and postsurveys of (1) knowledge assessment and (2) students' engagement with science learning. Students showed pre- to postsurvey improvements in knowledge assessment, with small to medium effect sizes. A nesting effect (students clustered within teachers) in the Earth's Dynamic Geosphere (EDG) knowledge assessment was identified and addressed by fitting a two-level hierarchical linear model (HLM). In addition, significant school district differences existed for student post-knowledge assessment scores. On the student engagement questionnaire, students tended to be neutral or to slightly disagree that science learning was important in terms of using science in daily life, stimulating their thinking, discovering science concepts, and satisfying their own

  12. Curriculum integrated information literacy: a challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Mette; Kobow, Else; Kristensen, Anne-Kirstine Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    Information literacy is a competence needed for students and for practitioners in the nursing profession. A curriculum integrated intervention was qualitatively evaluated by focus group interviews of students, lecturers and the university librarian. Information literacy makes sense for students...... when it is linked to assignments, timed right, prepared, systematic and continuous. Support is needed to help students understand the meaning of seeking information, to focus their problem and to make them reflect on their search and its results. Feedback on materials used is also asked for...

  13. Five Levels of Curriculum Integration Defined, Refined, and Described.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Donna H.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a description of five levels of curriculum integration at the middle level, specifically: departmentalization, reinforcement, complementary or shared units, webbed, and integrated themes. Discusses curriculum integration in relation to preservice and inservice programs, common planning time, team composition, time issues, and…

  14. The Integration of Trade Books into the Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhler, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Safe, noncontroversial social studies textbooks are neither meaningful nor necessary according to many students. As an alternative, teachers can integrate well-written trade books into the social studies curriculum. Well-researched diaries, journals, biographies, and autobiographies should become an integral part of the curriculum. (28 references)…

  15. Integrating Curriculum: A Case Study of Teaching Global Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Patrick, Kate; Reynolds, Ruth; Macqueen, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Despite widespread support for integrated approaches to teaching, classroom practice reveals a lack of implementation. This paper explores challenges and opportunities in teaching an integrated curriculum, and connects this with the contemporary notion of a twenty-first century curriculum and pedagogy. A case study of Global Education (GE) is used…

  16. Residents' perceptions of an integrated longitudinal curriculum: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Rebecca; Lee, Joseph; Hillier, Loretta M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore family medicine residents' perceptions of a newly restructured integrated longitudinal curriculum. A purposeful sample of 16 family medicine residents participated in focus group interviews conducted from a grounded theory perspective to identify the characteristics of this training model that contribute to and that challenge learning. Eight key themes were identified: continuity of care, relevance to family medicine, autonomy, program-focused preparation, professional development as facilitated by role modeling, patient volume, clarity of expectations for learners, and logistics. Positive learning experiences were marked by high levels of autonomy, continuity, and relevance to family medicine. Less favorable learning experiences were characterized by limited opportunities for continuity of care, limited relevance to family medicine practice and unclear expectations for the resident's role. Family physician-led learning experiences contributed to residents' understanding of the full scope of family medicine practice, more so than specialist-led experiences. The logistics of implementing the integrated block were challenging and negatively impacted continuity and learning. This study suggests that an integrated longitudinalized family medicine block training model has the potential to support the principles of a longitudinal integrated competency-based curriculum to effectively prepare residents for family medicine practice.

  17. Evaluation of an Integrated Curriculum in Physics, Mathematics, Engineering, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    1997-04-01

    An experimental, student centered, introductory curriculum called IMPEC (for Integrated Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry curriculum) is in its third year of pilot-testing at NCSU. The curriculum is taught by a multidisciplinary team of professors using a combination of traditional lecturing and alternative instructional methods including cooperative learning, activity-based class sessions, and extensive use of computer modeling, simulations, and the world wide web. This talk will discuss the research basis for our design and implementation of the curriculum, the qualitative and quantitative methods we have been using to assess its effectiveness, and the educational outcomes we have noted so far.

  18. Mi-STAR Unit Challenges serve as a model for integrating earth science and systems thinking in a Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aligned curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochis, E. E.; Tubman, S.; Matthys, T.; Bluth, G.; Oppliger, D.; Danhoff, B.; Huntoon, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Michigan Science Teaching and Assessment Reform (Mi-STAR) is developing an NGSS-aligned middle school curriculum and associated teacher professional learning program in which science is taught and learned as an integrated body of knowledge that can be applied to address societal issues. With the generous support of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, Mi-STAR has released several pilot-tested units through the Mi-STAR curriculum portal at mi-star.mtu.edu. Each of these units focuses on an ongoing `Unit Challenge' investigation that integrates STEM content across disciplinary boundaries, stimulates interest, and engages students in using scientific practices to address 21st century challenges. Each Mi-STAR unit is connected to a Unifying NGSS Crosscutting Concept (CCC) that allows students to recognize the concepts that are related to the phenomena or problems under investigation. In the 6th grade, students begin with an exploration of the CCC Systems and System Models. Through repeated applications across units, students refine their understanding of what a system is and how to model a complex Earth system. An example 6th grade unit entitled "Water on the Move: The Water Cycle," provides an example of how Mi-STAR approaches the use of Unifying CCCs and Unit Challenges to enhance middle school students' understanding of the interconnections of Earth system processes and human activities. Throughout the unit, students use a series of hands-on explorations and simulations to explore the hydrologic cycle and how human activity can alter Earth systems. Students develop new knowledge through repeated interactions with the Unit Challenge, which requires development of system models and construction of evidence-based arguments related to flooding problems in a local community. Students have the opportunity to make predictions about how proposed land-use management practices (e.g. development of a skate-park, rain garden, soccer field, etc.) can alter the earth

  19. Expanding the Use of Solid Modeling throughout the Engineering Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas H.

    2001-01-01

    Presents the initial work that Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has done to integrate solid modeling throughout the engineering curriculum. Aims to provide students the opportunity to use their solid modeling skills in several courses and show students how solid modeling tools can be used to help solve a variety of engineering problems.…

  20. Transforming the Economics Curriculum by Integrating Threshold Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Prashan Shayanka Mendis; Breyer, Yvonne A.; Wood, Leigh N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Economics is catering to a diverse student cohort. This cohort needs to be equipped with transformative concepts that students can integrate beyond university. When a curriculum is content-driven, threshold concepts are a useful tool in guiding curriculum re-design. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/Methodology/Approach: The…

  1. Information-Processing Models and Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, Robert C.

    1970-01-01

    "This paper consists of three sections--(a) the relation of theoretical analyses of learning to curriculum design, (b) the role of information-processing models in analyses of learning processes, and (c) selected examples of the application of information-processing models to curriculum design problems." (Author)

  2. Integrating gender into a basic medical curriculum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, P.; Mans, L.J.L.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 1998, gaps were found to exist in the basic medical curriculum of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre regarding health-related gender differences in terms of biological, psychological and social factors. After screening the curriculum for language, content and context,

  3. The evolving integrated vascular surgery residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Greenberg, Jacob A; Mitchell, Erica L

    2014-10-01

    Since their introduction several years ago, integrated (0 + 5) vascular surgery residency programs are being increasingly developed across the country. To date, however, there is no defined "universal" curriculum for these programs and each program is responsible for creating its own curriculum. The aim of this study was to review the experiences of current 0 + 5 program directors (PDs) to determine what factors contributed to the curricular development within their institution. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 0 + 5 PDs to explore their experiences with program development, factors influencing the latter, and rationale for current curricula. The interview script was loosely structured to explore several factors including time of incoming residents' first exposure to the vascular surgical service, timing and rationale behind the timing of core surgical rotations throughout the 5 year program, educational value of nonsurgical rotations, opportunities for leadership and scholarly activity, and influence the general surgery program and institutional climate had on curricular structure. All interviews were conducted by a single interviewer. All interviews were qualitatively analyzed using emergent theme analysis. Twenty-six 0 + 5 PDs participated in the study. A total of 69% believed establishing professional identity early reduces resident attrition and recommend starting incoming trainees on vascular surgical services. Sixty-two percent spread core surgical rotations over the first 3 years to optimize general surgical exposure and most of the programs have eliminated specific rotations, as they were not considered valuable to the goals of training. Factors considered most important by PDs in curricular development include building on existing institutional opportunities (96%), avoiding rotations considered unsuccessful by "experienced" programs (92%), and maintaining a good working relationship with general surgery (77%). Fifty-eight percent of

  4. Novel horizontal and vertical integrated bioethics curriculum for medical courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Russell F; Mathew, Mary; D'Souza, Derek S J; Palatty, Princy

    2018-02-28

    Studies conducted by the University of Haifa, Israel in 2001, evaluating the effectiveness of bioethics being taught in medical colleges, suggested that there was a significant lack of translation in clinical care. Analysis also revealed, ineffectiveness with the teaching methodology used, lack of longitudinal integration of bioethics into the undergraduate medical curriculum, and the limited exposure to the technology in decision making when confronting ethical dilemmas. A modern novel bioethics curriculum and innovative methodology for teaching bioethics for the medical course was developed by the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics, Haifa. The horizontal (subject-wise) curriculum was vertically integrated seamlessly through the entire course. An innovative bioethics teaching methodology was employed to implement the curriculum. This new curriculum was piloted in a few medical colleges in India from 2011 to 2015 and the outcomes were evaluated. The evaluation confirmed gains over the earlier identified translation gap with added high student acceptability and satisfaction. This integrated curriculum is now formally implemented in the Indian program's Health Science Universities which is affiliated with over 200 medical schools in India. This article offers insights from the evaluated novel integrated bioethics curriculum and the innovative bioethics teaching methodology that was used in the pilot program.

  5. The Educated Citizen and Global Public-Health Issues: One Model for Integration into the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Rosemary M

    2016-01-01

    The Educated Citizen Initiative proposes that an understanding of public-health issues is a core component of an educated citizenry and is essential to develop one's societal responsibility. This initiative supports the Institute of Medicine's recommendation that "all undergraduates should have access to education in public health." Furthermore, the Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) framework developed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities supports the "integration of public-health education into general and liberal education with an aim to produce an educated citizenry." The LEAP framework is implemented by teaching about the role of social determinants in a population's health status; the significance of personal and social responsibility; and providing skills for inquiry, critical thinking, problem solving, and evaluation. This article describes one university's experience in generating an educated citizenry cognizant of comprehensive public-health conflicts, thus contributing to both a local and global perspective on learning.

  6. The Educated Citizen and Global Public-Health Issues: One Model for Integration into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Rosemary M.

    2016-01-01

    The Educated Citizen Initiative proposes that an understanding of public-health issues is a core component of an educated citizenry and is essential to develop one’s societal responsibility. This initiative supports the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation that “all undergraduates should have access to education in public health.” Furthermore, the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) framework developed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities supports the “integration of public-health education into general and liberal education with an aim to produce an educated citizenry.” The LEAP framework is implemented by teaching about the role of social determinants in a population’s health status; the significance of personal and social responsibility; and providing skills for inquiry, critical thinking, problem solving, and evaluation. This article describes one university’s experience in generating an educated citizenry cognizant of comprehensive public-health conflicts, thus contributing to both a local and global perspective on learning. PMID:26973829

  7. A Proposed Curriculum Model for Geriatric Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Albert A.

    1985-01-01

    A model for a geriatric optometry curriculum that defines key content areas and addresses the values essential for effective practice and basic therapeutic modalities used in treatment regimens with older adults is outlined. (MSE)

  8. Integrating Ethics into the Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Urges incorporation of ethics into social studies curriculum. Provides an overview of ethical theory including principle-based theories of utilitarianism and deontology and virtue-based theories. Discusses philosophies of social science including positivism, interpretivism, and critical social science. Suggests teaching methods and curriculum…

  9. Curriculum Integration = Course Disintegration: What Does This Mean for Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolender, David L.; Ettarh, Rajunor; Jerrett, David P.; Laherty, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Many basic scientists including anatomists are currently involved in decisions related to revisions of the undergraduate medical curriculum. Integration is a common theme in many of these decisions. As described by Harden, integration can occur along a multistep continuum from independent, discipline-based courses to a completely interdisciplinary…

  10. An integrative approach to cultural competence in the psychiatric curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kenneth; Andermann, Lisa; Zaretsky, Ari; Lo, Hung-Tat

    2008-01-01

    As it is increasingly recognized that cultural competence is an essential quality for any practicing psychiatrist, postgraduate psychiatry training programs need to incorporate cultural competence training into their curricula. This article documents the unique approach to resident cultural competence training being developed in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, which has the largest residency training program in North America and is situated in an ethnically diverse city and country. The authors conducted a systematic review of cultural competence by searching databases including PubMed, PsycINFO, PsycArticles, CINAHL, Social Science Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts; by searching government and professional association publications; and through on-site visits to local cross-cultural training programs. Based on the results of the review, a resident survey, and a staff retreat, the authors developed a deliberate "integrative" approach with a mindful, balanced emphasis on both generic and specific cultural competencies. Learning objectives were derived from integrating the seven core competencies of a physician as defined by the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists (CanMEDS) roles framework with the tripartite model of attitudes, knowledge, and skills. The learning objectives and teaching program were further integrated across different psychiatric subspecialties and across the successive years of residency. Another unique strategy used to foster curricular and institutional change was the program's emphasis on evaluation, making use of insights from modern educational theories such as formative feedback and blueprinting. Course evaluations of the core curriculum from the first group of residents were positive. The authors propose that these changes to the curriculum may lead to enhanced cultural competence and clinical effectiveness in health care.

  11. Models and automation technologies for the curriculum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Volkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the sequence of the curriculum development stages on the basis of the system analysis, as well as to create models and information technologies for the implementation of thesestages.The methods and the models of the systems’ theory and the system analysis, including methods and automated procedures for structuring organizational aims, models and automated procedures for organizing complex expertise.On the basis of the analysis of existing studies in the field of curriculum modeling, using formal mathematical language, including optimization models, that help to make distribution of disciplines by years and semesters in accordance with the relevant restrictions, it is shown, that the complexity and dimension of these tasks require the development of special software; the problem of defining the input data and restrictions requires a large time investment, that seems to be difficult to provide in real conditions of plans’ developing, thus it is almost impossible to verify the objectivity of the input data and the restrictions in such models. For a complete analysis of the process of curriculum development it is proposed to use the system definition, based on the system-targeted approach. On the basis of this definition the reasonable sequence of the integrated stages for the development of the curriculum was justified: 1 definition (specification of the requirements for the educational content; 2 determining the number of subjects, included in the curriculum; 3 definition of the sequence of the subjects; 4 distribution of subjects by semesters. The models and technologies for the implementation of these stages of curriculum development were given in the article: 1 models, based on the information approach of A.Denisov and the modified degree of compliance with objectives based on Denisov’s evaluation index (in the article the idea of evaluating the degree of the impact of disciplines for realization

  12. Embedding of Authentic Assessment in Work-Integrated Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Anna Maria; Ferns, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary perspectives of higher education endorse a work integrated learning (WIL) approach to curriculum content, delivery and assessment. It is agreed that authenticity in learning relates to real-world experience, however, differentiating and strategically linking WIL provision and facilitation to assessment tasks and collation of authentic…

  13. Integrating Business Analytics in the Marketing Curriculum: Eight Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClair, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Advances in technology and marketing practice have left little doubt that analytics must be integrated into the marketing curriculum, the question for many educators now is how to best to do so. While the response for each school will depend on its mission and context, as well as its strategies and resources, there already is much that can be…

  14. Business Analytics in the Marketing Curriculum: A Call for Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintu-Wimsatt, Alma; Lozada, Héctor R.

    2018-01-01

    Marketing education has responded, to some extent, to the academic challenges emanating from the Big Data revolution. To provide a forum to specifically discuss how business analytics has been integrated into the marketing curriculum, we developed a Special Issue for "Marketing Education Review." We start with a call to action that…

  15. Seeking a Higher Level of Arts Integration across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2016-01-01

    To seek a higher level of arts integration across the education curriculum, I investigated designs of teaching through arts activities that would motivate educators to adopt the spirit of "aesthetic teaching." Two different designs were tested, with the second as a continuation of the first. Each ascribes a different educational role to…

  16. Computer integration in the curriculum: promises and problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.; van den Akker, Jan

    1988-01-01

    This discussion of the integration of computers into the curriculum begins by reviewing the results of several surveys conducted in the Netherlands and the United States which provide insight into the problems encountered by schools and teachers when introducing computers in education. Case studies

  17. Integrating Occupational Health and Safety into TAFE Courses: Curriculum Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bob; Mageean, Pauline

    This guide is designed to help technical and further education (TAFE) curriculum writers in Australia integrate safety education into vocational education courses. It provides a general overview of occupational health and safety from the perspective of TAFE trade training and a brief summary of the major health and safety issues that might be…

  18. Integrative Report on a culture-sensitive quality & curriculum framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylva, Kathy; Ereky-Stevens, Katharina; Pastori, Giulia; Slot, P.L.; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina

    This report draws together research findings that support a comprehensive culture-sensitive European curriculum and quality assessment framework that can inform practice, teacher education and policy. The aim of this integrative report is to inform the development of a comprehensive,

  19. Integrating the ChE Curriculum via a Recurring Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilius, Matthew B.; Tu, Raymond S.; Anderson, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    A recurring framework has been integrated throughout the curriculum via a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) platform. This laboratory is introduced during the material and energy balance course, and subsequent courses can use these results when explaining more advanced concepts. Further, this laboratory gives students practical experience…

  20. Integrating Professional Development across the Curriculum: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarocco, Natalie J.; Dinella, Lisa M.; Hatchard, Christine J.; Valosin, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The current study empirically tested the effectiveness of a modular approach to integrating professional development across an undergraduate psychology curriculum. Researchers conducted a two-group, between-subjects experiment on 269 undergraduate psychology students assessing perceptions of professional preparedness and learning. Analysis…

  1. Integrating Mobile Technologies into Very Young Second Language Learners' Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykova, Gulnara; Gimaletdinova, Gulnara; Khalitova, Liliia; Kayumova, Albina

    2016-01-01

    This report is based on an exploratory case study of a private multilingual preschool language program that integrated a Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL) project into the curriculum of five/six year-old children whose native language(s) is/are Russian and/or Tatar. The purpose of the study was to reveal teachers' and parents' perceptions…

  2. Integrating Gender into the Political Science Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassese, Erin C.; Bos, Angela L.; Duncan, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    The New Research on Gender in Political Psychology Conference brought together new and experienced teachers with interests in gender politics. The conference session "Teaching Gender throughout the Curriculum" generated a great deal of discussion concerning the pedagogical practice of gender mainstreaming. Gender mainstreaming--the integration of…

  3. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presents Enhancing Standards Based Science Curriculum through NASA Content Relevancy: A Model for Sustainable Teaching-Research Integration Dr. Robert Gabrys, Raquel Marshall, Dr. Evelina Felicite-Maurice, Erin McKinley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. H.; Gabrys, R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a systemic educator professional development model for the integration of NASA climate change resources into the K-12 classroom. The desired outcome of this model is to prepare teachers in STEM disciplines to be globally engaged and knowledgeable of current climate change research and its potential for content relevancy alignment to standard-based curriculum. The application and mapping of the model is based on the state education needs assessment, alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and implementation framework developed by the consortium of district superintendents and their science supervisors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate best practices for extending the concept of inquiry-based and project-based learning through the integration of current NASA climate change research into curriculum unit lessons. This model includes a significant teacher development component focused on capacity development for teacher instruction and pedagogy aimed at aligning NASA climate change research to related NGSS student performance expectations and subsequent Crosscutting Concepts, Science and Engineering Practices, and Disciplinary Core Ideas, a need that was presented by the district steering committee as critical for ensuring sustainability and high-impact in the classroom. This model offers a collaborative and inclusive learning community that connects classroom teachers to NASA climate change researchers via an ongoing consultant/mentoring approach. As a result of the first year of implementation of this model, Maryland teachers are implementing NGSS unit lessons that guide students in open-ended research based on current NASA climate change research.

  4. Mathematical Modeling in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical modeling occupies an unusual space in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum: typically an "advanced" course, it nonetheless has little to do with formal proof, the usual hallmark of advanced mathematics. Mathematics departments are thus forced to decide what role they want the modeling course to play, both as a component of the…

  5. A Substantiation of Macdonald's Models in Science Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A history and analysis of science curriculum development is presented. Factors which influence the selection and organization of content in a science curriculum are discussed, including Macdonald's curriculum development models, propositions for curriculum development, and changes made in science curricula during the last century. (CJ)

  6. Integrating Clinical Neuropsychology into the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Antonio E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Claims little information exists in undergraduate education about clinical neuropsychology. Outlines an undergraduate neuropsychology course and proposes ways to integrate the subject into existing undergraduate psychology courses. Suggests developing specialized audio-visual materials for telecourses or existing courses. (NL)

  7. From gene to structure: Lactobacillus bulgaricus D-lactate dehydrogenase from yogurt as an integrated curriculum model for undergraduate molecular biology and biochemistry laboratory courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Jeffrey A; Prescott, Noelle A; Lawton, Ping X

    2018-05-01

    We have developed an integrated, project-oriented curriculum for undergraduate molecular biology and biochemistry laboratory courses spanning two semesters that is organized around the ldhA gene from the yogurt-fermenting bacterium Lactobacillus bulgaricus, which encodes the enzyme d-lactate dehydrogenase. The molecular biology module, which consists of nine experiments carried out over eleven sessions, begins with the isolation of genomic DNA from L. bulgaricus in yogurt and guides students through the process of cloning the ldhA gene into a prokaryotic expression vector, followed by mRNA isolation and characterization of recombinant gene expression levels using RT-PCR. The biochemistry module, which consists of nine experiments carried out over eight sessions, begins with overexpression of the cloned ldhA gene and guides students through the process of affinity purification, biochemical characterization of the purified LdhA protein, and analysis of enzyme kinetics using various substrates and an inhibitor, concluding with a guided inquiry investigation of structure-function relationships in the three-dimensional structure of LdhA using molecular visualization software. Students conclude by writing a paper describing their work on the project, formatted as a manuscript to be submitted for publication in a scientific journal. Overall, this curriculum, with its emphasis on experiential learning, provides hands-on training with a variety of common laboratory techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry and builds experience with the process of scientific reasoning, along with reinforcement of essential transferrable skills such as critical thinking, information literacy, and written communication, all within the framework of an extended project having the look and feel of a research experience. © 2018 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(3):270-278, 2018. © 2018 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Integrating biodefense topics into secondary education curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalfrey, Karen E.

    into current curriculum.

  9. Integrating Career Development into the Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Susan B.; Sumner, Dana F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a series of integrated career development activities offered in several required courses which are designed to help accounting majors gain a competitive edge in the job market. Supported by a partnership between the School of Business and the Academic and Career Planning Office, the Career Tool Kit program consists of…

  10. elements of contemporary integrated science curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    both science and technology (Hurd, 1975). Discoveries in nature are made easier through integration of ideas, thoughts and concepts. To this end, science teaching in the modern world ought to be interdisciplinary, unified, society based and aspire above all to achieve scientific literacy (Arokoyu and Dike, 2009). These are.

  11. Curriculum Integration in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is a topic that has been researched and discussed by music educators and general educators alike. Some feel this is a worthwhile endeavor in both the arts classroom and the general classroom, while others feel that we should be spending what little time we have in the music classroom focusing on music goals. This article will…

  12. Integrating Sustainability across the University Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Jane Ellen; Garofalo, Dan; Fisher, Sarah; Greene, Ann; Gambogi, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Colleges and universities increasingly have the mandate and motivation to integrate sustainability into their curricula. The purpose of this paper is to share the strategy used at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and provide an evaluation of its success and guidance to others creating similar programs. Design/methodology/approach:…

  13. Integrating professional behavior development across a professional allied health curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumas, Linda J; Pelletier, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Professional behaviors are an integral part of clinical practice in all allied health and medical fields. A systematic process for instruction, the education, and development of professional behaviors, cannot be taught in the same way that memorization of human anatomy or medical terminology is taught. One cannot expect professional behaviors to just appear in an individual upon graduation and entry into a health care field. Professional behavior development is an essential component of physical therapy professional education and is clearly defined through the guiding documents of the American Physical Therapy Association, which include 'A Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education,' 'Evaluative Criteria for Accreditation of Education Programs for the Preparation of Physical Therapists,' and the 'Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.' Building a comprehensive and progressive curricular thread for professional behaviors can pose a challenge for a professional program and the core faculty. This paper will present a curricular model of weaving professional behaviors into a core entry-level professional curriculum using a specific curricular thread, activities for different levels of students, and assessment at each point in the path. This paper will demonstrate the potential for universal application of a professional behaviors.

  14. From Communication Skills to Skillful Communication: A Longitudinal Integrated Curriculum for Critical Care Medicine Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda L; Doig, Christopher J; Couillard, Philippe; Lord, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Communication with patients and families in critical care medicine (CCM) can be complex and challenging. A longitudinal curricular model integrating multiple techniques within classroom and clinical milieus may facilitate skillful communication across diverse settings. In 2014-2015, the authors developed and implemented a curriculum for CCM fellows at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, to promote the longitudinal development of skillful communication. A departmental needs assessment informed curriculum development. Five 4-hour classroom sessions were developed: basic communication principles, family meetings about goals and transitions of care, discussing patient safety incidents, addressing conflict, and offering organ donation. Teaching methods-including instructor-led presentations incorporating a consistent framework for approaching challenging conversations, simulation and clinical practice, and feedback from peers, trained facilitators, family members, and clinicians-supported integration of skills into the clinical setting and longitudinal development of skillful communication. Seven fellows participated during the first year of the curriculum. CCM fellows engaged enthusiastically in the program, commented that the framework provided was helpful, and highly valued the opportunity to practice challenging communication scenarios, learn from observing their peers, and receive immediate feedback. More detailed accounts of fellows', patients', and family members' experiences will be obtained to guide curricular development. The curriculum will be expanded to involve other members of the multidisciplinary intensive care unit team, and faculty education initiatives will be offered to enhance the quality of the feedback provided. The impact of the curriculum on initial skill development, retention, and progression will be assessed.

  15. Development of Integrative STEM Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Teams in Two Pennsylvania High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider-Bertrand, Joey H.

    At the start of the 21st century, STEM education was a new priority in many schools as the focus shifted from separate disciplines to integrative STEM education. Unfortunately, there was limited research to offer guidance to practitioners (Brown, 2012; Honey, Pearson & Schweingruber, 2014). This qualitative, multiple case study explored the experiences of two multi-disciplinary teams of secondary teachers from Pennsylvania who developed and implemented integrative STEM curriculum. Four teachers from a rural high school and four teachers from a suburban high school participated in the study. A document review of integrative STEM curriculum and semi-structured interviews were conducted to learn about the curriculum development process and teachers' perceptions regarding conditions that support or hinder success. Individual and cross-case analyses were performed to establish findings and themes. Although the individual case themes varied slightly, the cross-case themes and assertions that emerged provided highly sought after guidance to practitioners and added to the limited body of research on integrative STEM education. This study found that current curriculum models do not fit integrative STEM curriculum, the development process is fluid, and substantial administrative support and resources are necessary to develop, implement, and sustain integrative STEM education programs. The results offered implications for all educators, as well as two examples of how teachers navigated the terrain of integrative STEM curriculum.

  16. Nursing curriculum and bullying: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Sharan; Park, Tanya

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this integrative review was to identify and synthesize key concepts that inform curriculum which increase nursing students' competence, skills and strategies when addressing bullying. Specifically, the authors sought to examine the concepts informing educational interventions, skills, and strategies, which addressed the bullying of nursing students. Integrative literature review. A search of the electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycINFO, Proquest, and PubMed was conducted in January 2016 using search terms such as 'bully' 'nursing student' 'education' and 'curriculum'. Articles were screened for relevance and eligibility and extracted onto a table. Critical appraisal was conducted using multiple tools. Papers were analysed using constant comparison and concept mapping. 61 articles were included in the synthesis. Concepts identified included: empowerment, socialization, support, self-awareness, awareness about bullying, collaboration, communication, and self-efficacy. All concepts linked to empowerment. Social Cognitive Theory was used by many studies. Active teaching methods which gave students opportunities to practice skills were the most effective. Empowered nursing students have the potential to address bullying more effectively and competently. Empowerment of nursing students is a powerful concept that educators must consider when developing curriculum and educational interventions to address bullying. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Turkish Preschool Teachers' Beliefs on Integrated Curriculum: Integration of Visual Arts with Other Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Erden, Feyza Tantekin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates preschool teachers' beliefs about integrated curriculum and, more specifically, their beliefs about integration of visual arts with other activities. The participants of this study consisted of 255 female preschool teachers who are employed in preschools in Ankara, Turkey. For the study, teachers were asked to complete…

  18. Student Integration and Evaluation in Mechatronic Curriculum With PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben O.; Conrad, Finn

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the PBL model used at Aalborg University in the mechanical engineering is shortly presented with emphasis on the mechatronic curriculum. A specific semester with a both theoretical and practical mechatronic content is presented in detail as a reference project for a subsequent discu...... discussion on three potential concerns with respect to the continued succes of problem and project based learning in mechatronics namely: individual assessment, Bologna model and research based teaching...

  19. Integrating Resources into Curriculum with the Systems Connect Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshry, A.; Bean, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    A broadly applicable and guided approach for planning curriculum and instruction around new academic standards or initiatives is critical for implementation success. Curriculum and assessment differs across schools and districts, so built-in adaptability is important for maximal adoption and ease of use by educators. The Systems Connect Planning Guide directs the flow of instruction for building conceptual links between topics in a unit/curriculum through critical vetting and integration of relevant resources. This curricular template is flexible for use in any setting or subject area, and ensures applicability, high impact and responsiveness to academic standards while providing inquiry-based, real-world investigations and action that incorporate authentic research and data. These needs are what informed the creation of the three components of the planning guide:• Curriculum Anchor: alignment with academic standards & learning outcomes and setting the context of the topic• Issues Investigations: informing how students explore topics, and incorporate authentic research and data into learning progressions• Civic Action: development of how students could apply their knowledgeThe Planning Guide also incorporates criteria from transdisciplinary practices, cross-cutting concepts, and organizational charts for outlining guiding questions and conceptual links embedded in the guide. Integration of experiential learning and real-world connections into curricula is important for proficiency and deeper understanding of content, replacing discrete, stand-alone experiences which are not explicitly connected. Rather than information being dispelled through individual activities, relying on students to make the connections, intentionally documenting explicit connections provides opportunities to foster deeper understanding by building conceptual links between topics, which is how fundamental knowledge about earth and living systems is gained. Through the critical vetting

  20. Veterinary student attitudes toward curriculum integration at James Cook University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, John

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of veterinary science students to activities designed to promote curriculum integration. Students (N = 33) in their second year of a five-year veterinary degree were surveyed in regard to their attitudes to activities that aimed to promote integration. Imaging, veterinary practice practicals, and a field trip to a cattle property were classified as the three most valuable learning activities that were designed to promote integration. Veterinary practice practicals, case studies, and palpable anatomy were regarded by students as helping them to learn information presented in other teaching sessions. They also appeared to enhance student motivation, and students indicated that the activities assisted them with their preparation for and performance at examinations. Attitudes to whether the learning exercises helped improve a range of skills and specific knowledge varied, with 39-88% of students agreeing that specific skills and knowledge were enhanced to a large or very large extent by the learning activities. The results indicate that learning activities designed to promote curriculum integration helped improve motivation, reinforced learning, created links between foundational knowledge and its application, and assisted with the development of skills that are related to what students will do in their future careers.

  1. The integration of blended learning into an occupational therapy curriculum: a qualitative reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Ashton, Paula; Rothberg, Alan; McInerney, Patricia

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a critical reflection of the integration of Blended Learning (BL) into an undergraduate occupational therapy curriculum which was delivered through Problem Based Learning (PBL). This is a qualitative reflection of a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study using Brookfield's model for critical reflection of an educator's practice. The model uses four 'lenses' through which to focus enquiry: Lens 1) our autobiography as a learner of practice; Lens 2) our learners' eyes; Lens 3) our colleagues' experiences; and Lens 4) the theoretical literature. Grounded theory analysis was applied to the data. The factors that contributed to successful integration of technology and e-Learning into an existing curriculum, the hurdles that were navigated along the way, and how these influenced decisions and innovation are explored. The core categories identified in the data were "drivers of change" and "outcomes of BL integration". Key situations and pivotal events are highlighted for their role in the process that led to the project maturing. Each lens reflects the successes and hurdles experienced during the study. Brookfield's model provides an objective method of reflection which showed that despite the hurdles, e-Learning was successfully integrated into the curriculum.

  2. Flood Rescue: A Gender-Inclusive Integrated STEM Curriculum Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Dare

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As national reform documents and movements in the United States, such as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States, 2013, push K-12 educators to begin to include engineering and integration of the STEM disciplines, there is a need to create curricula that meet a multitude of different standards. Additionally, there is a need to engage a more diverse population of students to pursue STEM careers. The 6th grade curriculum presented here focuses on an example of a teacher-created integrated STEM curriculum that combines girl-friendly instructional strategies (Häussler et al., 1998; Newbill & Cennamo, 2008 with an integrated STEM framework (Moore et al., 2014. An engineering design challenge that asks students to create a prototype of a watercraft used by the National Guard to rescue people during floods engages students in learning various physics concepts (forces, buoyancy, volume, and maximum capacity. In this article, we describe the lessons of the unit with respect to the frameworks, as well as key areas that particularly impacted 6th grade girls and boys.

  3. "INTEGRATED QUALITY MANAGEMENT" AS A SUBJECT IN HIGHER EDUCATION CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Živojinović

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of introduction of "Integrated quality management" into higher education curricula arises from the need for students to grasp synergetic application of new and advanced approaches to theoretical and practical management quality and process based management in particular as well as understanding a unified concept which improves conformity and linking of all levels in management hierarchy (normative, strategic and operational toward accomplishment of successful business performance. A curriculum is proposed (as a contribution to a map of necessary knowledge to be expected from prospective quality personnel with appropriate topics in accordance with studies objective and chosen up-to-date options of management concepts and methods.

  4. Integrating Sustainability into the Curriculum: Crossing Disciplinary Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushnik, J.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation will confront an increased number of global issues that interface the complexities of socioeconomic perspectives, environmental stability, poverty and development. Recently California State University Chico undertook a general education reform, providing a unique opportunity to craft a general education pathway to prepare students for these challenges by focusing a curriculum on sustainability. The Sustainability Pathway emphasizes a system thinking approach to help students understand and be able to address a set of problems involving the biosphere processes, human institutions and the economic vitality. The curriculum intentionally integrates courses from across the disciplines of natural sciences, social sciences, agriculture, engineering, economics, arts and humanities into a central focused theme of sustainability. The diverse backgrounds and academic focus of the participating faculty has necessitate the development of a common language and a cohesion within the curriculum. To address these needs a faculty learning community (FLC) was established to build on a common set of case studies. Three regional environmental water related issues were selected that had demonstrable socioeconomic, equity/ethical dimensions and environmental consequences. These case studies are Klamath River basin in northern California, the Bay-Delta project in the central part of the state and the Sultan Sea in southern California. Members of the FLC has contributed a perspective from their academic discipline which includes proposed reading lists, web based resources and PowerPoint presentations which are housed in common web- based resource repository. The pedagogical rational is to create linkages and cohesion among the courses in the curriculum by iteratively examining these case studies as basis for development of a multidisciplinary perspective as students progress through their general education.

  5. Preparing Future Leaders: An Integrated Quality Improvement Residency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Stacy; Shields, Sara; Upshur, Carole

    2016-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recognized the importance of quality improvement (QI) training and requires that accredited residencies in all specialties demonstrate that residents are "integrated and actively participate in interdisciplinary clinical quality improvement and patient safety activities." However, competing demands in residency training may make this difficult to accomplish. The study's objective is to develop and evaluate a longitudinal curriculum that meets the ACGME requirement for QI and patient safety training and links to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices. Residents in the Worcester Family Medicine Residency (WFMR) participated in a faculty-developed quality improvement curriculum that included web-based tutorials, quality improvement projects, and small-group sessions across all 3 years of residency. They completed self-evaluations of knowledge and use of curricular activities annually and at graduation, and comparisons were made between two graduating classes, as well as comparison of end of PGY2 to end of PGY3 for one class. Graduating residents who completed the full 3 years of the curriculum rated themselves as significantly more skilled in nine of 15 areas assessed at end of residency compared to after PGY2 and reported confidence in providing future leadership in a focus group. Five areas were also rated significantly higher than prior-year residents. Involving family medicine residents in a longitudinal curriculum with hands-on practice in implementing QI, patient safety, and chronic illness management activities that are inclusive of PCMH goals increased their self-perceived skills and leadership ability to implement these new and emerging evidence-based practices in primary care.

  6. JOURNAL CLUB: Redefining the Radiology Curriculum in Medical School: Vertical Integration and Global Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retrouvey, Michele; Trace, Anthony Paul; Goodmurphy, Craig W; Shaves, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Radiology interconnects medical disciplines given that a working understanding of imaging is essential to clinicians of every specialty. Using online education, we created a globally accessible, web-based undergraduate medical radiology curriculum modeled after the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology program of the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. Seventy-four radiology faculty-mentored video modules were produced, 50 of which were integrated into the 1st-year anatomy course. We administered tests to medical students before and after students saw the videos to assess the effectiveness of the modules. We surveyed students on their interests in pursuing radiology as a career before and after participating in this curriculum. On the preexamination questions, the mean score was 58.0%, which increased to 83.6% on the pair-matched imaging-related questions on the actual examination. Before participating in the new curriculum, 88% of students did not express an interest in radiology, and 9% were undecided about radiology as a future career. There was an increase in students who reported that they would definitely or most likely pursue a career in radiology (7%) after they had viewed the lectures. Radiology education is now available to a greater number of multidisciplinary learners worldwide. This project produced a comprehensive, globally accessible radiology curriculum in a self-paced, flexible learning format for new generations of physicians.

  7. A Commentary on "Integrated Reporting: A Review of Developments and Their Implications for the Accounting Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Correa Ruiz notes that from his analysis, Owen (2013) identified the essential elements to be included in a modern professional accounting curriculum, described how Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) has embedded "Integrated Reporting" in its curriculum, and discussed future curriculum development,…

  8. A model for integrating strategic planning and competence-based curriculum design in establishing a public health programme: the UNC Charlotte experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael E; Harver, Andrew; Eure, Marquis

    2009-08-11

    The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a doctoral/research-intensive university, is the largest institution of higher education in the Charlotte region. The university currently offers 18 doctoral, 62 master's and 90 baccalaureate programmes. Fall 2008 enrolment exceeded 23,300 students, including more than 4900 graduate students. The university's Department of Health Behavior and Administration was established on 1 July 2002 as part of a transformed College of Health & Human Services. In 2003, the Department initiated a series of stakeholder activities as part of its strategic planning and programmatic realignment efforts. The Department followed an empirically derived top-down/bottom-up strategic planning process that fostered community engagement and coordination of efforts across institutional levels. This process culminated in a vision to transform the unit into a Council on Education for Public Health accredited programme in public health and, eventually, an accredited school of public health. To date, the Department has revised its Master of Science in health promotion into an Master of Science in Public Health programme, renamed itself the Department of Public Health Sciences, launched a Bachelor of Science in Public Health major, laid plans for a doctoral programme, and received accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health as a public health programme. Furthermore, the campus has endorsed the programme's growth into a school of public health as one of its priorities. It is only through this rigorous and cyclical process of determining what society needs, designing a curriculum specifically to prepare graduates to meet those needs, ensuring that those graduates meet those needs, and reassessing society's needs that we can continue to advance the profession and ensure the public's health. Community stakeholders should be active contributors to programme innovation. Lessons learnt from this process include: being connected to your

  9. A model for integrating strategic planning and competence-based curriculum design in establishing a public health programme: the UNC Charlotte experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harver Andrew

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a doctoral/research-intensive university, is the largest institution of higher education in the Charlotte region. The university currently offers 18 doctoral, 62 master's and 90 baccalaureate programmes. Fall 2008 enrolment exceeded 23 300 students, including more than 4900 graduate students. The university's Department of Health Behavior and Administration was established on 1 July 2002 as part of a transformed College of Health & Human Services. Case description In 2003, the Department initiated a series of stakeholder activities as part of its strategic planning and programmatic realignment efforts. The Department followed an empirically derived top-down/bottom-up strategic planning process that fostered community engagement and coordination of efforts across institutional levels. This process culminated in a vision to transform the unit into a Council on Education for Public Health accredited programme in public health and, eventually, an accredited school of public health. To date, the Department has revised its Master of Science in health promotion into an Master of Science in Public Health programme, renamed itself the Department of Public Health Sciences, launched a Bachelor of Science in Public Health major, laid plans for a doctoral programme, and received accreditation from the Council on Education for Public Health as a public health programme. Furthermore, the campus has endorsed the programme's growth into a school of public health as one of its priorities. Discussion and Evaluation It is only through this rigorous and cyclical process of determining what society needs, designing a curriculum specifically to prepare graduates to meet those needs, ensuring that those graduates meet those needs, and reassessing society's needs that we can continue to advance the profession and ensure the public's health. Community stakeholders should be active contributors to

  10. A New Methodology for the Integration of Performance Materials into the Clothing Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Jess

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model for integrating the study of performance materials into the clothing curriculum. In recent years there has been an increase in demand for stylish, functional and versatile sports apparel. Analysts predict this will reach US$126.30 billion by 2015. This growth is accredited to dramatic lifestyle changes and increasing participation in sports/leisurely pursuits particularly by women. The desire to own performance clothing for specific outdoor pursuits is increasing a...

  11. Extending the theoretical framework for curriculum integration in pre-clinical medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergel, John; Stentoft, Diana; Montoya, Juny

    2017-01-01

    students' knowledge integration. Therefore, we aimed to uncover how curriculum integration is manifested through context. METHODS: We collected data from the official curriculum and interviewed ten participants (including curriculum designers, facilitators, and students) in the bachelor's medical program......INTRODUCTION: Curriculum integration is widely discussed in medical education but remains ill defined. Although there is plenty of information on logistical aspects of curriculum integration, little attention has been paid to the contextual issues that emerge from its practice and may complicate...... at Aalborg University. We observed various learning activities focused on pre-clinical education. Inspired by grounded theory, we analyzed the information we gathered. RESULTS: The following theoretical constructs emerged after the inductive analysis: 1) curriculum integration complexity is embedded...

  12. Stress predictors in two Asian dental schools with an integrated curriculum and traditional curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T T; Seki, N; Morio, I

    2018-05-01

    This study explored stress predictors and the role of instructional methods and institutional differences in perceived stress levels amongst students at two Asian dental schools. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Japan and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP), Hochiminh City, Vietnam in 2016. Data concerning the students' demographic information and grades, and responses to the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) were collected. The questionnaires were prepared in English and translated into Japanese and Vietnamese following a forward-backward translation process. Altogether 684 students answered the questionnaire with a response rate of 97% for TMDU and 89% for UMP. The mean DES score of UMP students was significantly higher than TMDU (P stress scores in several areas than UMP preclinical students. Having dentistry as their first choice of educational programme was a significant stress predictor for Japanese students whilst the clinical practicum was a significant stress predictor for Vietnamese students. Previous academic performance was not a significant stress predictor for students at either dental school. Dental students of an integrated, active-learning curriculum reported lower stress levels than students of a traditional, discipline-based curriculum. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Future of Chemical Engineering: Integrating Biology into the Undergraduate ChE Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosto, Patricia; Savelski, Mariano; Farrell, Stephanie H.; Hecht, Gregory B.

    2007-01-01

    Integrating biology in the chemical engineering curriculum seems to be the future for chemical engineering programs nation and worldwide. Rowan University's efforts to address this need include a unique chemical engineering curriculum with an intensive biology component integrated throughout from freshman to senior years. Freshman and Sophomore…

  14. Integration of Ethics across the Curriculum: From First Year through Senior Seminar†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparich, Gail E.; Wimmers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Fisher College of Science and Mathematics (FCSM) at Towson University (TU) has integrated authentic research experiences throughout the curriculum from first year STEM courses through advanced upper-level classes and independent research. Our observation is that training in both responsible conduct of research (RCR) and bioethics throughout the curriculum was an effective strategy to advance the cognitive and psychosocial development of the students. As students enter TU they generally lack the experience and tools to assess their own competence, to apply ethical debates, to investigate scientific topics from an ethical perspective, or to integrate ethics into final conclusions. Student behavior and development follow cognitive models such as described in the theories put forth by Piaget, Kohlberg, and Erikson, both for initial learning and for how concepts are understood and adopted. Three examples of this ethics training integration are described, including a cohort-based course for first year students in the STEM Residential Learning Community, a cohort-based course for community college students that are involved in an NIH-funded Bridges to the Baccalaureate program, and a senior seminar in Bioethics in the Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Bioinformatics Program. All three focus on different aspects of RCR and bioethics training, providing opportunities for students to learn about the principles of effective decision-making, critical and analytical thinking, problem solving, and communication with increasing degrees of complexity as they move through the curriculum. PMID:25574282

  15. Integration of Ethics across the Curriculum: From First Year through Senior Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparich, Gail E; Wimmers, Larry

    2014-12-01

    The Fisher College of Science and Mathematics (FCSM) at Towson University (TU) has integrated authentic research experiences throughout the curriculum from first year STEM courses through advanced upper-level classes and independent research. Our observation is that training in both responsible conduct of research (RCR) and bioethics throughout the curriculum was an effective strategy to advance the cognitive and psychosocial development of the students. As students enter TU they generally lack the experience and tools to assess their own competence, to apply ethical debates, to investigate scientific topics from an ethical perspective, or to integrate ethics into final conclusions. Student behavior and development follow cognitive models such as described in the theories put forth by Piaget, Kohlberg, and Erikson, both for initial learning and for how concepts are understood and adopted. Three examples of this ethics training integration are described, including a cohort-based course for first year students in the STEM Residential Learning Community, a cohort-based course for community college students that are involved in an NIH-funded Bridges to the Baccalaureate program, and a senior seminar in Bioethics in the Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Bioinformatics Program. All three focus on different aspects of RCR and bioethics training, providing opportunities for students to learn about the principles of effective decision-making, critical and analytical thinking, problem solving, and communication with increasing degrees of complexity as they move through the curriculum.

  16. Integration of Ethics across the Curriculum: From First Year through Senior Seminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail E. Gasparich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fisher College of Science and Mathematics (FCSM at Towson University (TU has integrated authentic research experiences throughout the curriculum from first year STEM courses through advanced upper-level classes and independent research. Our observation is that training in both responsible conduct in research (RCR and bioethics throughout the curriculum was an effective strategy to advance the cognitive and psychosocial development of the students. As students enter TU they generally lack the experience and tools to assess their own competence, to apply ethical debates, to investigate scientific topics from an ethical perspective, or to integrate ethics into final conclusions. Student behavior and development follow cognitive models such as described in the theories put forth by Piaget, Kohlberg, and Erikson, both for initial learning and for how concepts are understood and adopted. Three examples of this ethics training integration are described, including a cohort-based course for first year students in the STEM Residential Learning Community, a cohort-based course for community college students that are involved in an NIH-funded Bridges to the Baccalaureate program, and a senior seminar in Bioethics in the Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Bioinformatics Program. All three focus on different aspects of RCR and bioethics training, providing opportunities for students to learn about the principles of effective decision-making, critical and analytical thinking, problem solving, and communication with increasing degrees of complexity as they move through the curriculum.

  17. The Robust Learning Model with a Spiral Curriculum: Implications for the Educational Effectiveness of Online Master Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith; Lewis, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    This study integrated the Spiral Curriculum approach into the Robust Learning Model as part of a continuous improvement process that was designed to improve educational effectiveness and then assessed the differences between the initial and integrated models as well as the predictability of the first course in the integrated learning model on a…

  18. Curriculum, human development and integral formation within the colombian caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Rodríguez Akle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the reality of the colombian Caribbean from the perspective of human development integral to start to understand that problematic situations are opportunities to enhance the transformations that allow to retrieve the subject social and collective. So the reconstruction of regional identity from the contributions of educational communities that build-oriented curriculum to become full, proactive, people with leadership and management capacity for sustainable development in a changing world. The article proposes some strategies to address alternatives to a society in which the quality of life and human dignity are the sense of the daily work in the context of the caribbean colombianidad and globalism in practice.  

  19. Nursing curriculums may hinder a career in gerontological nursing: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbrah, William; Välimäki, Tarja; Palovaara, Marjo; Kankkunen, Päivi

    2017-09-01

    To investigate what prevents undergraduate nursing students from choosing gerontological nursing as a career option. This study utilised an integrative literature review, which allows the inclusion of previous studies with diverse research designs to gain a broader view of the reasons why nursing students do not choose a gerontological nursing career. An electronic database search of CINAHL (Ebsco), Scopus and Eric elicited 251 scientific peer-reviewed empirical studies, published from 2006 to March 2016 in English. After meeting the inclusion criteria, 97 qualified for closer examination. Following exclusion, the final analysis and synthesis included 21 articles. Four main themes described nursing students' contributing reasons for not selecting gerontological nursing as a career option: socio-demographic factors; experiences, perceptions and knowledge about ageing; perceptions concerning the nature or status of gerontological nursing; and theoretical studies and practical education of nursing curriculum. Lack of positive experiences with older people before and during nursing students' studies led to their disinterest in gerontological nursing as a career option. The nursing curriculum also reinforces the perception of modern nursing as technical, with more emphasis on acute and critical care. The findings emphasise the need to implement an age-friendly curriculum and have nurses that specialise in gerontology to serve as mentors and role models. It is important to assist nursing students in identifying the potentials for career advancement in terms of gerontological nursing. There is also a need for nursing faculties to liaise with other stakeholders to develop or improve upon the clinical atmosphere for nursing students during gerontological nursing placement. Nursing faculties must review their curriculum to ensure that there is sufficient focus on the needs of older people within the curriculum for every student. Furthermore, respected role models who are

  20. Integrative curriculum reform, domain dependent knowing, and teachers` epistemological theories: Implications for middle-level teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.R. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). College of Education

    1998-12-01

    Integrative curriculum as both a theoretical construct and a practical reality, and as a theme-based, problem-centered, democratic way of schooling, is becoming more widely considered as a feasible alternative to traditional middle-level curricula. Importantly for teaching and learning, domain dependence requires teachers to view one area of knowledge as fully interdependent with other areas of knowledge during the learning process. This requires teachers to adopt personal epistemological theories that reflect integrative, domain dependent knowing. This study explored what happened when teachers from highly traditional domain independent school settings encountered an ambitious college-level curriculum project that was designed to help the teachers understand the potential that integrative, domain dependent teaching holds for precollege settings. This study asked: What influence does an integrative, domain dependent curriculum project have on teachers` domain independent, epistemological theories for teaching and learning? Finding an answer to this question is essential if we, as an educational community, are to understand how integrative curriculum theory is transformed by teachers into systemic curriculum reform. The results suggest that the integrative curriculum project that teachers participated in did not explicitly alter their classroom practices in a wholesale manner. Personal epistemological theories of teachers collectively precluded teachers from making any wholesale changes in their individual classroom teaching. However, teachers became aware of integrative curriculum as an alternative, and they expressed interest in infusing integrative practices into their classrooms as opportunities arise.

  1. Washington State Nursing Home Administrator Model Curriculum. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Florence Kelly

    The course outlines presented in this final report comprise a proposed Fort Steilacoom Community College curriculum to be used as a statewide model two-year associate degree curriculum for nursing home administrators. The eight courses described are introduction to nursing, home administration, financial management of nursing homes, nursing home…

  2. Integrating Medical Simulation Into the Physician Assistant Physiology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixin; Lopes, John; Zhou, Joseph Yi; Xu, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Medical simulation has recently been used in medical education, and evidence indicates that it is a valuable tool for teaching and evaluation. Very few studies have evaluated the integration of medical simulation in medical physiology education, particularly in PA programs. This study was designed to assess the value of integrating medical simulation into the PA physiology curriculum. Seventy-five students from the PA program at Central Michigan University participated in this study. Mannequin-based simulation was used to simulate a patient with hemorrhagic shock and congestive heart failure to demonstrate the Frank-Starling force and cardiac function curve. Before and after the medical simulation, students completed a questionnaire as a self-assessment. A knowledge test was also delivered after the simulation. Our study demonstrated a significant improvement in student confidence in understanding congestive heart failure, hemorrhagic shock, and the Frank-Starling curve after the simulation. Medical simulation may be an effective way to enhance basic science learning experiences for students and an ideal supplement to traditional, lecture-based teaching in PA education.

  3. Teaching Art a Greener Path: Integrating Sustainability Concepts of Interior Design Curriculum into the Art Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasio, Cindy; Crane, Tommy J.

    2014-01-01

    Interior design is seldom integrated within the general art education curriculum because the subject matter is generally segregated as a commercial art. However, the importance of interior design concepts of sustainability in art education can really help a student understand the scale and proportion of space and mass, and how sustainability is…

  4. The Integrated Approach versus the Traditional Approach: Analyzing the Benefits of a Dance and Transportation Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, Megan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a dance and transportation integrated curriculum on student learning and engagement. The curriculum, entitled Consequences of Our Actions: Dance and Transportation, synthesized transportation content with the art form of dance. The experimental and control groups were comprised of fifth-grade…

  5. Integration of School Features into Taiwanese Elementary School New English Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Elementary school English activation curriculum, an additional two culture classes, has been implemented only in New Taipei City in Taiwan starting from 2010, so only a few studies focus on it. This is a case study of an English teacher's integration of a school's features into the activation curriculum in a rural elementary school. This study…

  6. Integration of Computers into the Medical School Curriculum: An Example from a Microbiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Mark W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    While the use of computers has become widespread in recent years, a unified, integrated approach to their use in the medical school curriculum has not yet emerged. Describes a program at the University of New Mexico that will phase-in computerization of its curriculum beginning in the fall of 1993. (LZ)

  7. Egyptian Art: An Integrated Curriculum Guide for the Intermediate and Middle School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Ann Heidt, Ed.

    This curriculum guide offers instructional materials to integrate the study of ancient Egyptian art across the curriculum. It is designed to be used in coordination with a student field trip to a related exhibit at the San Diego (California) Museum of Man. Materials can be adapted for use independent of the exhibition. Designed for students and…

  8. Integration of Medical Imaging Including Ultrasound into a New Clinical Anatomy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscova, Michelle; Bryce, Deborah A.; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Young, Noel

    2015-01-01

    In 2008 a new clinical anatomy curriculum with integrated medical imaging component was introduced into the University of Sydney Medical Program. Medical imaging used for teaching the new curriculum included normal radiography, MRI, CT scans, and ultrasound imaging. These techniques were incorporated into teaching over the first two years of the…

  9. Mentoring BUGS: An Integrated Science and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Walker, Michelle; Hildreth, Bertina; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2004-01-01

    The current study describes an authentic learning experience designed to develop technology and science process skills through a carefully scaffolded curriculum using mealworms as a content focus. An individual mentor assigned to each 4th and 5th grade girl participating in the program delivered the curriculum. Results indicate mastery of science…

  10. Validation of the integration of HIV and AIDS related nursing competencies into the undergraduate nursing curriculum in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis R. Marie Modeste

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being in its fourth decade, HIV remains an epidemic that requires combined efforts for the global fight. The strategies planned and implemented in the fight against HIV include reversing and halting the spread of HIV, increasing health care access, and strengthening the health care system. South Africa has made the fight one of its top priorities, and has developed plans to increase the role of nurses in the management of HIV, demonstrating its willingness, commitment and progress in the fight against HIV. Objective: This article presents the validation process conducted to confirm the integration and mapping of the HIV and AIDS related nursing competencies into the four-year Bachelor of Nursing programme at a university in South Africa. Methods: This study adopted a constructivist paradigm, using a qualitative approach, applyingthe design step of the process model of curriculum development, to validate the inte gration of the mapped HIV and AIDS related nursing competencies into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Results: For each competency, outcomes were developed for each year. Participants confirmed completeness of outcomes and appropriateness of the mapping of the HIV and AIDS related outcomes into the nursing curriculum, as well as the feasibility and practicability of the integration. Conclusion: Required resources for integration of HIV and AIDS related nursing competencies, such as human resources and nurse educators’ continued personal development were identified, as well as barriers to integration, and measures to eliminate them were discussed. The importance of integration of HIV and AIDS nursing competencies into the curriculum was reiterated.

  11. Anatomy as the Backbone of an Integrated First Year Medical Curriculum: Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Brenda J.; Paulsen, Douglas F.; Wineski, Lawrence E

    2011-01-01

    Morehouse School of Medicine chose to restructure its first year medical curriculum in 2005. The anatomy faculty had prior experience in integrating courses, stemming from the successful integration of individual anatomical sciences courses into a single course called Human Morphology. The integration process was expanded to include the other first year basic science courses (Biochemistry, Physiology, and Neurobiology) as we progressed toward an integrated curriculum. A team, consisting of the course directors, a curriculum coordinator and the Associate Dean for Educational and Faculty Affairs, was assembled to build the new curriculum. For the initial phase, the original course titles were retained but the lecture order was reorganized around the Human Morphology topic sequence. The material from all four courses was organized into four sequential units. Other curricular changes included placing laboratories and lectures more consistently in the daily routine, reducing lecture time from 120 to 90 minute blocks, eliminating unnecessary duplication of content, and increasing the amount of independent study time. Examinations were constructed to include questions from all courses on a single test, reducing the number of examination days in each block from three to one. The entire restructuring process took two years to complete, and the revised curriculum was implemented for the students entering in 2007. The outcomes of the restructured curriculum include a reduction in the number of contact hours by 28%, higher or equivalent subject examination average scores, enhanced student satisfaction, and a first year curriculum team better prepared to move forward with future integration. PMID:21538939

  12. Successfully Integrating Climate Change Education into School System Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallion, M.

    2017-12-01

    Maryland's Eastern Shore is threatened by climate change driven sea level rise. By working with school systems, rather than just with individual teachers, educators can gain access to an entire grade level of students, assuring that all students, regardless of socioeconomic background or prior coursework have an opportunity to explore the climate issue and be part of crafting community level solutions for their communities. We will address the benefits of working with school system partners to achieve a successful integration of in-school and outdoor learning by making teachers and administrators part of the process. We will explore how, through the Maryland and Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment, and Research Project, teachers, content supervisors and informal educators worked together to create a climate curriculum with local context that effectively meets Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. Over the course of several weeks during the year, students engage in a series of in-class and field activities directly correlated with their science curriculum. Wetlands and birds are used as examples of the local wildlife and habitat being impacted by climate change. Through these lessons led by Pickering Creek Audubon Center educators and strengthened by material covered by classroom teachers, students get a thorough introduction to the mechanism of climate change, local impacts of climate change on habitats and wildlife, and actions they can take as a community to mitigate the effects of climate change. The project concludes with a habitat and carbon stewardship project that gives students and teachers a sense of hope as they tackle this big issue on a local scale. We'll explore how the MADE-CLEAR Informal Climate Change Education (ICCE) Community of Practice supports Delaware and Maryland environmental educators in collaboratively learning and expanding their programming on the complex issue of climate change. Participants will learn how to

  13. Exploring the Associations Among Nutrition, Science, and Mathematics Knowledge for an Integrative, Food-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Virginia C; Kolasa, Kathryn M; Díaz, Sebastián R; Duffrin, Melani W

    2018-01-01

    Explore associations between nutrition, science, and mathematics knowledge to provide evidence that integrating food/nutrition education in the fourth-grade curriculum may support gains in academic knowledge. Secondary analysis of a quasi-experimental study. Sample included 438 students in 34 fourth-grade classrooms across North Carolina and Ohio; mean age 10 years old; gender (I = 53.2% female; C = 51.6% female). Dependent variable = post-test-nutrition knowledge; independent variables = baseline-nutrition knowledge, and post-test science and mathematics knowledge. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression. The hypothesized model predicted post-nutrition knowledge (F(437) = 149.4, p mathematics knowledge were predictive of nutrition knowledge indicating use of an integrative science and mathematics curriculum to improve academic knowledge may also simultaneously improve nutrition knowledge among fourth-grade students. Teachers can benefit from integration by meeting multiple academic standards, efficiently using limited classroom time, and increasing nutrition education provided in the classroom. © 2018, American School Health Association.

  14. Machinima interventions: innovative approaches to immersive virtual world curriculum integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Middleton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The educational value of Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs seems to be in their social immersive qualities and as an accessible simulation technology. In contrast to these synchronous applications this paper discusses the use of educational machinima developed in IVW virtual film sets. It also introduces the concept of media intervention, proposing that digital media works best when simply developed for deployment within a blended curriculum to inform learning activity, and where the media are specifically designed to set challenges, seed ideas, or illustrate problems. Machinima, digital films created in IVWs, or digital games offer a rich mechanism for delivering such interventions. Scenes are storyboarded, constructed, shot and edited using techniques similar to professional film production, drawing upon a cast of virtual world avatars controlled through a human–computer interface, rather than showing real-life actors. The approach enables academics or students to make films using screen capture software and desktop editing tools. In student-generated production models the learning value may be found in the production process itself. This paper discusses six case studies and several themes from research on ideas for educational machinima including: access to production; creativity in teaching and learning; media intervention methodology; production models; reusability; visualisation and simulation.

  15. Integrating radiology vertically into an undergraduate medical education curriculum: a triphasic integration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Qahtani F

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fahd Al Qahtani,1 Adel Abdelaziz2,31Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 3Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, EgyptAbstract: Fulfilling the goal of integrating radiology into undergraduate medical curricula is a real challenge due to the enduring faith assuming that traditional medical disciplines are worthy of consuming the available study time. In this manner, radiology is addressed occasionally and with relevance to these traditional disciplines. In Al-Baha University Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia, efforts have been made to integrate radiology vertically and in a structured manner into the undergraduate curriculum from the first year to the sixth year. For achieving convenient integration of radiology, a triphasic approach to integration is adopted. This approach consists of the integration of radiology foundations into the basic sciences phase, development of a distinct 4-week module in year 4, and finally, integration of clinical applications of radiology in the clinical phase modules. Feedback of students and inferences obtained through assessment and program evaluation are in favor of this approach to integration. Minor reform and some improvement related to time allocated and content balancing are still indicated.Keywords: radiology foundations, radiology module, students assessment

  16. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilakazi, S S; Chabeli, M M; Roos, S D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994: 155). Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described.

  17. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Vilakazi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994:155. Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/ goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described.

  18. Integrating numerical computation into the undergraduate education physics curriculum using spreadsheet excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Numerical computation has many pedagogical advantages: it develops analytical skills and problem-solving skills, helps to learn through visualization, and enhances physics education. Unfortunately, numerical computation is not taught to undergraduate education physics students in Indonesia. Incorporate numerical computation into the undergraduate education physics curriculum presents many challenges. The main challenges are the dense curriculum that makes difficult to put new numerical computation course and most students have no programming experience. In this research, we used case study to review how to integrate numerical computation into undergraduate education physics curriculum. The participants of this research were 54 students of the fourth semester of physics education department. As a result, we concluded that numerical computation could be integrated into undergraduate education physics curriculum using spreadsheet excel combined with another course. The results of this research become complements of the study on how to integrate numerical computation in learning physics using spreadsheet excel.

  19. Curriculum Outline for Tennessee Transition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, B. J.

    This curriculum outline for the Sevier County, Tennessee, transition program for special needs students provides goals and objectives for the following domains: domestic, vocational, community functioning, and recreation/leisure. The domestic domain covers personal hygiene/grooming, first aid, home nursing, birth control/pregnancy, parenting, drug…

  20. Communication Arts Curriculum: A Model Program. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaqua Area School District, PA.

    This publication describes, in three sections, a high school Communication Arts Curriculum (CAC) program designed to further students' communication skills as they participate in student-centered learning activities in the fine arts, the practical arts, and the performing arts. "Program Operation" includes a course outline and inventories for…

  1. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  2. Integrating student feedback during "Dental Curriculum Hack-A-thon".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Shawheen S; Frederick Lambert, R; Dang, Lucy; Pagni, Sarah; Dragan, Irina F

    2018-05-02

    The future of dental education is at crossroads. This study used the parameter of the 2016 Dental Curriculum Hack-a-Thon to assess intra- and inter-institutional agreement between student and faculty views regarding dental curriculums to determine if there is an impact in student perceptions towards dental education from before and after the event. This exploratory, cross-sectional study involved two surveys, with Survey 1 being distributed among four faculty-student pairs of the four participating dental schools answering 14 questions. Survey 2 assessed the views of 20 participating dental students through 26 questions in a pre- and post- event survey design. Descriptive statistics were used to explore differences in perceptions towards dental education across both instrument surveys. The results revealed valuable student insights regarding intra- and inter-institutional agreement relevant for the change in dental curriculum that needs to occur. Survey 2 revealed that mandatory attendance in didactic courses, electronic based examination preferences, and the preference of preclinical courses being held in the first and second years of a four-year dental curriculum were of particular importance to student participants. The results of this study indicate that exposure and participation in subjects pertaining to dental education can be influential on student preferences and opinions on how dental education should be delivered in a four-year curriculum.

  3. Curriculum: Integrating Health and Safety Into Engineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talty, John T.

    1985-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health instituted a project in 1980 to encourage engineering educators to focus on occupational safety and health issues in engineering curricula. Progress to date is outlined, considering specific results in curriculum development, engineering society interaction, and formation of a teaching…

  4. Mathematical and Scientific Foundations for an Integrative Engineering Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robin; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Mathematical and Scientific Foundations of Engineering curriculum which emphasizes the mathematical and scientific concepts common to all engineering fields. Scientists and engineers together devised topics and experiments that emphasize the relevance of theory to real-world applications. Presents material efficiently while building…

  5. Distributed Leadership of School Curriculum Change: An Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasso, Wendy; Knight, Bruce Allen; Purnell, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception in 1999, the distributed leadership framework of Spillane, Halverson, and Diamond [2004. "Towards a Theory of Leadership Practice: A Distributed Perspective." "Journal of Curriculum Studies" 36 (1): 3-34. doi:10.1080/0022027032000106726] has supported research into leadership and change in schools. Whilst…

  6. Quantitative Evaluation of Performance in Interventional Neuroradiology: An Integrated Curriculum Featuring Theoretical and Practical Challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle Ernst

    Full Text Available We sought to develop a standardized curriculum capable of assessing key competencies in Interventional Neuroradiology by the use of models and simulators in an objective, quantitative, and efficient way. In this evaluation we analyzed the associations between the practical experience, theoretical knowledge, and the skills lab performance of interventionalists.We evaluated the endovascular skills of 26 participants of the Advanced Course in Endovascular Interventional Neuroradiology of the European Society of Neuroradiology with a set of three tasks (aneurysm coiling and thrombectomy in a virtual simulator and placement of an intra-aneurysmal flow disruptor in a flow model. Practical experience was assessed by a survey. Participants completed a written and oral examination to evaluate theoretical knowledge. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed.In multivariate analysis knowledge of materials and techniques in Interventional Neuroradiology was moderately associated with skills in aneurysm coiling and thrombectomy. Experience in mechanical thrombectomy was moderately associated with thrombectomy skills, while age was negatively associated with thrombectomy skills. We found no significant association between age, sex, or work experience and skills in aneurysm coiling.Our study gives an example of how an integrated curriculum for reasonable and cost-effective assessment of key competences of an interventional neuroradiologist could look. In addition to traditional assessment of theoretical knowledge practical skills are measured by the use of endovascular simulators yielding objective, quantitative, and constructive data for the evaluation of the current performance status of participants as well as the evolution of their technical competency over time.

  7. Residency Training: The need for an integrated diversity curriculum for neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendale, Nicole; Josephson, S Andrew

    2017-12-12

    Providing culturally responsive care to an increasingly multicultural population is essential and requires formal cultural humility training for residents. We sought to understand the current prevalence and need for this type of training within neurology programs and to pilot an integrated curriculum locally. We surveyed via email all program directors of academic neurology programs nationally regarding the prevalence of and need for formal cultural responsiveness training. Forty-seven program directors (36%) responded to the survey. The majority of respondents did not have a formalized diversity curriculum in their program (65%), but most (85%) believed that training in cultural responsiveness was important. We developed locally an integrated diversity curriculum as a proof of concept. The curriculum covered topics of diversity in language, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, and socioeconomic status designed to focus on the needs of the local community. Program evaluation included a pre and post survey of the learner attitudes toward cultural diversity. There is an unmet need for cultural responsiveness training within neurology residencies, and integrating this curriculum is both feasible and efficacious. When adapted to address cultural issues of the local community, this curriculum can be generalizable to both academic and community organizations. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Building an Evaluation Strategy for an Integrated Curriculum in Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Joseph J.; Parker, Robert S.; Abatan, Adetola; Besterfield-Sacre, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Increasing knowledge integration has gained wide-spread support as an important goal in engineering education. The Chemical Engineering Pillars curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh, unique for its use of block scheduling, is one of the first four-year, integrated curricula in engineering, and is specifically designed to facilitate knowledge…

  9. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  10. Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in Sénégal - Phase II ... for integrating ICTs at various stages of the teaching and learning process. ... première cohorte de chercheuses en science des changements climatiques.

  11. The Integration of Psychomotor Skills in a Hybrid-PBL Dental Curriculum: The Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joanne N.; MacNeil, M. A. J.; Harrison, Rosamund L.; Clark, D. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Describes the restructuring of clinical clerkships at the University of British Columbia (Canada) dental school as part of a new, hybrid, problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum, focusing on strategies for integrating development of psychomotor skills. Methods of achieving both horizontal and vertical integration of competencies through grouping…

  12. Integrating geriatrics into medical school: student journaling as an innovative strategy for evaluating curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée R; Farrell, Timothy W; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-02-01

    The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer preclerkship and clerkship students between 2007 and 2010. The journals were used to assess the quality of curricular integration of geriatrics didactic and clinical content, to gather information for shaping the evolving curriculum, and to elicit students' responses about their professional development and caring for older adults. Student "journalers" wrote narrative reactions to and evaluations of aging-related content and exposure to older patients in response to written semistructured questions. An interdisciplinary team (including a health services researcher, gerontologist, medical anthropologist, and 2 geriatricians) used qualitative analysis to code the 405 journal entries. The team identified 10 themes within the following domains: (a) evaluation of efforts to integrate geriatrics within the medical school curriculum, (b) recognition and application of geriatrics principles, (c) student attitudes and cultural experiences regarding aging and the care of older patients, and (d) personal and professional development over time. Themes emerging within these domains reflect the effectiveness of geriatrics integration within the new curriculum as well as students' professional development. Journaling provides a novel and effective method for capturing medical students' responses to curricular content in real time, allowing for midcourse corrections and identifying key components of their professional development.

  13. PLACE-BASED EDUCATION APPROACH AS AN INNOVATION OF AN INTEGRATED CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fidyati sulaiman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum design is aimed to promote equality of empowerment. In most practice, however, the curriculum purposes confront conflicts especially between national and local needs. Consequently, there are many insightful and innovative educational work which has relatively small advantages for students and schools in its flexibility and opportunity. This leads to a situation in which some groups have lack of opportunities in getting benefit from the educational curriculum application. This essay presents an appproch as an innovation of an integrated curriculum called as place-based education. The significance of this strategy is believed to be able to promote the content of learning to the level of local’s relevance and engagement. Finally, the more relevant of the learning content to the students’ socio-cultural life the broader participation they can play in the community and future career.

  14. Clinical leadership as an integral curriculum thread in pre-registration nursing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in leadership development frameworks in health for the existing workforce. There has also been a related abundance of leadership programmes developed specifically for qualified nurses. There is a groundswell of opinion that clinical leadership preparation needs to extend to preparatory programmes leading to registration as a nurse. To this end a doctoral research study has been completed that focused specifically on the identification and verification of the antecedents of clinical leadership (leadership and management) so they can shape the curriculum content and the best way to deliver the curriculum content as a curriculum thread. To conceptualise how the curriculum content, identified and verified empirically, can be structured within a curriculum thread and to contribute to the discussion on effective pedagogical approaches and educational strategies for learning and teaching of clinical leadership. A multi-method design was utilised in the research in Australia. Drawing on core principles in critical social theory, an integral curriculum thread is proposed for pre-registration nursing programmes that identifies the antecedents of clinical leadership; the core concepts, together with the continuum of enlightenment, empowerment, and emancipation. The curriculum content, the effective pedagogical approaches and the educational strategies are supported theoretically and we believe this offers a design template for action and a way of thinking about this important aspect of preparatory nursing education. Moreover, we hope to have created a process contributing to a heighten sense of awareness in the nursing student (and other key stakeholders) of the what, how and when of clinical leadership for a novice registered nurse. The next stage is to further test through research the proposed integral curriculum thread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Model integration and a theory of models

    OpenAIRE

    Dolk, Daniel R.; Kottemann, Jeffrey E.

    1993-01-01

    Model integration extends the scope of model management to include the dimension of manipulation as well. This invariably leads to comparisons with database theory. Model integration is viewed from four perspectives: Organizational, definitional, procedural, and implementational. Strategic modeling is discussed as the organizational motivation for model integration. Schema and process integration are examined as the logical and manipulation counterparts of model integr...

  16. The quest for balanced curriculum: The perceptions of secondary students and teachers who experienced an integrated art and science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Susan Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to describe how an integrated high school curriculum unit connecting the different subject areas of art and science could be used to give students a voice in the decisions about learning. Through the data generated I examined the obstacles of integrating curriculum in a traditionally subject-centered high school. Forty-one students, nineteen biology students in the ninth grade, and twenty-two art students ranging from the tenth grade through the twelfth grade, along with their two teachers and a student teacher, were the subjects of the research. An integrated curricular unit, "Genetic Robotics," was designed specifically for this research to enable students to integrate scientific and artistic processes such as communication skills, problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity and responsiveness to the aesthetic; thus empowering them for future learning. Semi-structured interviews, surveys, questionnaires, informal conversations, reaction journals, field observations, video tapes, and official documents from the school, provided the data for this research. Data were collected using a strategy of participant-observation. The constant comparative analysis method was employed to explore emerging themes. Oak Park students' adaptability to an integrated art and science unit was found to be limited because of their inability to conceptualize curricular structures that are different from the traditional ones to which they are accustomed. Students typically scored high on standardized proficiency tests and college entrance exams. Therefore, for them to experience an innovation that is not based on the memorize-and-recall mode of learning is to risk failure and many are unwilling to do so, especially the high achieving students.

  17. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    cohesiveness. Without integrity, a curriculum is unlikely to be able to deliver all its required outcomes. Utilising the concepts of system dynamics and systems thinking I propose that not only is the curriculum a complex adaptive system, it is a multi-dimensional object. Adopting this notion facilitates possible interventions that may be used to monitor the curriculum and to moderate the effects of curriculum drift. I argue that using the articulated purpose of the curriculum to determine the desired outcomes of that curriculum will enhance curricular alignment, leading to improved student learning and outcomes. Furthermore, perceiving the curriculum as a multi-dimensional object reinforces the proposition that aligning the purpose and desired outcomes of each course with those of the program will achieve improved desired outcomes from the program as a whole. The original contributions to knowledge arising from this research are curriculum drift, an enhanced approach to the curricular alignment, and a multi-dimensional view of curriculum. Perhaps the most important implication of this research, is insight into how we might incorporate curriculum drift into curriculum review models. Successful incorporation has the potential to deliver increased quality of educational outcomes by enabling innovation whilst maintaining the integrity of the curriculum.

  18. Dental Hygiene Curriculum Model for Transition to Future Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paarmann, Carlene S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of the baccalaureate degree as the minimum entry level for dental hygiene practice centers around three main concerns: changes in health care delivery, awarding of a degree commensurate with students' educational background, and the credibility of dental hygiene as a profession. A curriculum model is discussed. (MLW)

  19. Cesar Chavez--Grade Seven Model Curriculum and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    In this California state curriculum model for grade 7, "World History and Geography: Medieval Society," students study the life, work, and philosophy of Cesar Chavez. They learn about the ideas and philosophies that have withstood the test of time and emerged in Chavez's work and actions. Students examine Chavez's ancestral heritage link…

  20. Achieving Competency in Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Model Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Tamara J.; Philbrick, Kemuel L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article illustrates a model electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) curriculum with specific parameters of both practice-based learning and medical knowledge. Method: The authors review the recommendations of the APA Task Force on ECT as they relate to training in ECT in psychiatry residency programs, and discuss diverse educational…

  1. INTEGRATED CORPORATE STRATEGY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALINA SORIANA SITNIKOV

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Corporations are at present operating in demanding and highly unsure periods, facing a mixture of increased macroeconomic need, competitive and capital market dangers, and in many cases, the prospect for significant technical and regulative gap. Throughout these demanding and highly unsure times, the corporations must pay particular attention to corporate strategy. In present times, corporate strategy must be perceived and used as a function of various fields, covers, and characters as well as a highly interactive system. For the corporation's strategy to become a competitive advantage is necessary to understand and also to integrate it in a holistic model to ensure sustainable progress of corporation activities under the optimum conditions of profitability. The model proposed in this paper is aimed at integrating the two strategic models, Hoshin Kanri and Integrated Strategy Model, as well as their consolidation with the principles of sound corporate governance set out by the OECD.

  2. Teacher Preparedness in the Implementation of the Integrated Business Studies Curriculum in Public Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerotich, Florah; Kurgat, Susan J.; Kimutai, Chris K.

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess teacher preparedness in the implementation of the integrated Business Studies curriculum in public secondary schools in Kenya. Specifically, the study sought to: find out the level of preservice training of the Business Studies teachers implementing the integrated Business Studies curriculum and to find…

  3. Integrating Informatics into the Undergraduate Curriculum: A Report on a Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, D; Murphy, J

    1996-01-01

    Previous case reports in this series on Education and Training have looked at specialist courses for postgraduate students seeking an in-depth knowledge of informatics and a career in the field. By contrast, this review describes a project designed to pilot a series of learning opportunities for undergraduate medical students. Although some UK medical colleges have opted to introduce informatics into the curriculum as a discipline in its own right, the Informatics Department at St Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College chose a different approach. When a new curriculum was introduced at St Bartholomew's and at The London Hospital Medical College, the Head of the Informatics Department saw this as an ideal opportunity to explore ways of integrating informatics into the curriculum. The initiatives described in this paper were made possible as a result of an award from the UK government Department of Employment. Money from an Enterprise in Higher Education grant funded a range of programmes, one of which was designed to introduce students to selected aspects of informatics and to demonstrate what is feasible in the undergraduate curriculum. The work carried out over a period of three and a half years was intended to provide the basis for the next phase of curriculum development. However, in the wake of the restructuring which has taken place in London medical colleges, the Informatics Department at what was St Bartholomew's has relocated to University College London Medical School, and is now called The Centre for Health Informatics and Multiprofessional Education (CHIME). University College is designing a new medical curriculum and CHIME is drawing on the experience gained through the Enterprise Project to find the best way to integrate informatics into this curriculum.

  4. Exploring the Associations among Nutrition, Science, and Mathematics Knowledge for an Integrative, Food-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Virginia C.; Kolasa, Kathryn M.; Díaz, Sebastián R.; Duffrin, Melani W.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Explore associations between nutrition, science, and mathematics knowledge to provide evidence that integrating food/nutrition education in the fourth-grade curriculum may support gains in academic knowledge. Methods: Secondary analysis of a quasi-experimental study. Sample included 438 students in 34 fourth-grade classrooms across…

  5. The Effects of Curriculum Integration on the Academic Achievement of Secondary Career and Technical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia Anders

    2012-01-01

    Using a causal-comparative design, this quantitative study investigated whether or not the curriculum integration of academic subjects with career and technical education classes affected secondary students' academic performance as assessed by scores on standardized tests. The purposive sample was drawn from students in Trade and Industry classes…

  6. Sustainability Design in Higher Education: Curriculum, Teaching Methods, and Program Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydow, Brooke C.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the growing problems of an unsustainable world, this qualitative, phenomenological study was designed to investigate the process of developing and integrating sustainability curriculum into general education requirements in higher education. The researcher interviewed six participants from different parts of the world who had first-hand…

  7. Integrating Enterprise Resource Planning (SAP) in the Accounting Curriculum: A Systematic Literature Review and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Yvette; Abedin, Babak; Vatanasakdakul, Savanid; Erfani, Seyedezahra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software package SAP was integrated into the curriculum of an accounting information systems (AIS) course in an Australian university. Furthermore, the paper provides a systematic literature review of articles published between 1990 and 2013 to understand how ERP systems were…

  8. Technology in Education: Technology Integration into the School's Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Bobby L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating technology into the school's curriculum is a very contentious issue. However, it is an important issue that schools need to consider and assess. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between K-5th grade teachers' perceptions of proficiency of technology equipment, experience with technology in education, and…

  9. Integrating SFA Technology into the Sales Curriculum: Helping Students Understand What, Why, and When

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    While sales force automation (SFA) and customer relationship management are important concepts in business-to-business selling, many instructors struggle to effectively integrate these topics into their curriculum. The research described in this article offers a role play and two coordinating sets of slides that aim to help students better…

  10. Integrating Content on Feminism and Racism into the Social Work Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Sophie F.

    1976-01-01

    It is suggested that power relationships among people have become a unifying concept of human behavior in modern society, replacing the Freudian libido, and that this concept can function as a unifying principle for integrating racism, sexism and other key relationship concerns into the human behavior curriculum sequence. (Editor/JT)

  11. Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in Sénégal - Phase ... Special journal issue highlights IDRC-supported findings on women's paid work ... A new website and resource library will help improve developing country ...

  12. Making a Literacy Plan: Developing an Integrated Curriculum That Meets Your School's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Literacy does not happen in a single lesson or course. There are no shortcuts to gaining mastery over a skill set, whether it is reading literacy, information literacy and research skills, online literacy and digital citizenship, or visual literacy. School librarians dream about a perfect integrated curriculum: there is ample time for…

  13. Developing Integrated Arts Curriculum in Hong Kong: Chaos Theory at Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marina

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the development of integrated arts curriculum in two Hong Kong secondary schools over a 9-year period. Initial findings display a range of individual responses to educational change that are both non-predictable and non-linear. Chaos theory is used to explain these varied responses in terms of bifurcations. The findings of…

  14. A Theoretical Framework for Integrating Creativity Development into Curriculum: The Case of a Korean Engineering School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to developing creativity rely on the sporadic teaching of creative thinking techniques or the engagement of learners in a creativity-promoting environment. Such methods cannot develop students' creativity as fully as a multilateral approach that integrates creativity throughout a curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  15. Developing a Participatory Pedagogical and Multidisciplinary Approach for Integrating HIV/AIDS into University Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulwo, Abraham Kiprop; Chemai, Lemmy

    2015-01-01

    The current framework for integrating HIV/AIDS into university curriculum is mainly informed by the need to make HIV/AIDS education relevant to specific disciplines, and to equip graduates with necessary skills to respond to HIV/AIDS in their professional capacities. This strategy mainly emphasizes content and knowledge and largely ignores the…

  16. Organization and Integration of Learning Experiences in a Curriculum: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everwijn, S. E. M.

    1983-01-01

    The literature on "organizers" by Ausubel, Earl, and Tyler provides clues to help teachers and students relate what has been learned in one subject to what is being learned in another. Problems of integration in a curriculum for student nurses are examined, and a solution to these problems is described. (RM)

  17. Agricultural Awareness Activities and Their Integration into the Curriculum as Perceived by Elementary Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Neil A.; Martin, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Responses from 281 of 689 elementary teachers indicated they had positive perceptions of the agriculture industry and integration of agriculture into the curriculum. Over 80% used agriculture activities, especially the study of animals, plants, food, nutrition, environment, wildlife, and insects. (Contains 38 references.) (SK)

  18. A Vertically Integrated Online Radiology Curriculum Developed as a Cognitive Apprenticeship: Impact on Student Performance and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim-Dunham, Jennifer E; Ensminger, David C; McNulty, John A; Hoyt, Amy E; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J

    2016-02-01

    confidence in interpreting radiological images, and (5) transfer of conceptual knowledge to actual practice. The vertically integrated online radiology curriculum can positively impact student performance and learning process in the context of the cognitive apprenticeship model. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on Spatial Cultural Heritage Integrated into the Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W. H.; Lai, Y. P.

    2015-08-01

    These Many countries have put a lot of efforts, promoting education of cultural heritage, to raise the conservation awareness and increase people's participation. However, the development of Taiwan's higher education about cultural heritage has not shown a significant growth, so it didn't train talents with enough cultural heritage awareness. In the workplace, these professionals will inevitably lack of comprehensions and the appropriate professional assessments for cultural heritage. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to study and combine these concepts into the core curriculum of Department of Construction and Spatial Design at Tungnan University. It takes the local "Shenkeng historic cultural district" as a case study, and will gradually develop an proper interdisciplinary course in order to help local residents implement projects of conserving cultural heritage. This plan not only can increase schools' engagements toward communities, with an ability of social civilization, but also it can encourage the conservation and maintenance of cultural heritages.

  20. Integrating social class and privilege in the community medicine curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymaker, Christopher; Cadick, Amber; Seavey, Allison

    2017-05-01

    Social class and privilege are hidden variables that impact the physician-patient relationship and health outcomes. This article presents a sample of activities from three programs utilized in the community health curriculum to teach resident physicians about patients within context, including how social class and privilege impact physician-patient relationships and patient health. These activities address resident physicians' resistance to discussion of privilege, social class, and race by emphasizing direct experience and active learning rather than traditional didactic sessions. The group format of these activities fosters flexible discussion and personal engagement that provide opportunities for reflection. Each activity affords opportunities to develop a vocabulary for discussing social class and privilege with compassion and to adopt therapeutic approaches that are more likely to meet patients where they are.

  1. Integrating SAP to Information Systems Curriculum: Design and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Information Systems (IS) education is being transformed from the segmented applications toward the integrated enterprise-wide system software Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). ERP is a platform that integrates all business functions with its centralized data repository shared by all the business operations in the enterprise. This tremendous…

  2. Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravi Shankar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2% participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

  3. Educational system factors that engage resident physicians in an integrated quality improvement curriculum at a VA hospital: a realist evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Ercolano, Ellyn; Cohen, Emily S; Harwood, Beth; Baum, Karyn; van Aalst, Robertus; Jones, Anne C; Davies, Louise

    2014-10-01

    Learning about quality improvement (QI) in resident physician training is often relegated to elective or noncore clinical activities. The authors integrated teaching, learning, and doing QI into the routine clinical work of inpatient internal medicine teams at a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital. This study describes the design factors that facilitated and inhibited the integration of a QI curriculum-including real QI work-into the routine work of inpatient internal medicine teams. A realist evaluation framework used three data sources: field notes from QI faculty; semistructured interviews with resident physicians; and a group interview with QI faculty and staff. From April 2011 to July 2012, resident physician teams at the White River Junction VA Medical Center used the Model for Improvement for their QI work and analyzed data using statistical process control charts. Three domains affected the delivery of the QI curriculum and engagement of residents in QI work: setting, learner, and teacher. The constant presence of the QI material on a public space in the team workroom was a facilitating mechanism in the setting. Explicit sign-out of QI work to the next resident team formalized the handoff in the learner domain. QI teachers who were respected clinical leaders with QI expertise provided role modeling and local system knowledge. Integrating QI teaching into the routine clinical and educational systems of an inpatient service is challenging. Identifiable, concrete strategies in the setting, learner, and teacher domains helped integrate QI into the clinical and educational systems.

  4. Integrating Technical Communication in the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth; Ashcraft, Timothy; van Poppel, Bret

    2017-11-01

    Technical communication is essential to engineering practice, but these skills can be challenging to teach and assess in the classroom. Instructors in the Mechanical Engineering (ME) program at the United States Military Academy are developing new learning exercises to prepare students for success in their capstone design course and beyond. In this paper we highlight the recent successes and lessons learned from two courses: junior-level Thermal-Fluid Systems and the senior-level ME Seminar. Both courses support the newly implemented West Point Writing Program (WPWP), an institutional, writing-across-the-curriculum program. The junior course incorporates four hands-on experiments, which provide an abundance of data for students to analyze, assess, and present. In the senior course the majority of the content that students present is from their ongoing capstone design projects. Between the two courses, students craft essays, lab reports, short summaries, posters, quad charts, and technical presentations. Both courses include peer evaluation, revision exercises, and timed (on demand) writing assignments. The junior course includes assignments co-authored by a group as well as an individual report. An overview of both courses' assignments with course-end feedback from the students and the faculty is provided. Strengths and weaknesses are identified and recommendations for instructors seeking to implement similar technical communications assignments in their own courses are presented.

  5. Shared Curriculum Model: A Promising Practice for Education Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Liz; Gorski, Mary Sue; Sroczynski, Maureen; Farmer, Pat; Wortock, Jean

    2015-12-01

    The shared curriculum model is one of four successful models of academic progression identified through a consensus-building process facilitated by The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP, and the AARP Foundation. Seamless academic progression from the associate degree in nursing (ADN) to the baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN) is achieved either by simultaneously revising both ADN and BSN curricula or by making targeted adjustments in ADN or BSN curricula to create a unified academic progression. Systematic vetting and definitive agreement on nursing prerequisites and corequisites, general education courses, nursing major content, and general degree requirements are necessary to ensure coordinated degree progression. A standardized set of expectations for beginning professional practice and for unique baccalaureate nursing knowledge ensures vital nursing content across the ADN-to-BSN continuum. Examples of state and regional ADN-to-BSN progression programs using the shared curriculum model are highlighted. The shared curriculum model is a promising practical and sustainable approach to seamless ADN-to-BSN academic progression. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. New Zealand Curriculum Innovation in Historical and Political Context: The Freyberg Integrated Studies Project and Parallel Projects of the 1940s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, David H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes curricular and pedagogical experimentation in humanities and social studies instruction conducted in New Zealand immediately after World War II. Compares such developments with the Freyberg Integrated Studies Project, a later three-year curriculum development and research program. Concludes that the Freyberg model provides support for…

  7. Integrating health literacy and ESL: an interdisciplinary curriculum for Hispanic immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Mas, Francisco; Mein, Erika; Fuentes, Brenda; Thatcher, Barry; Balcázar, Héctor

    2013-03-01

    Adult Hispanic immigrants are at a greater risk of experiencing the negative outcomes related to low health literacy, as they confront cultural and language barriers to the complex and predominately monolingual English-based U.S. health system. One approach that has the potential for simultaneously addressing the health, literacy, and language needs of Hispanics is the combination of health literacy and English as a second language (ESL) instruction. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of using ESL instruction as a medium for improving health literacy among Hispanic immigrants. Objectives included the development, implementation, and evaluation of an interdisciplinary health literacy/ESL curriculum that integrates theories of health literacy and health behavior research and practice, sociocultural theories of literacy and communication, and adult learning principles. This article describes the curriculum development process and provides preliminary qualitative data on learners' experiences with the curriculum. Results indicate that the curriculum was attractive to participants and that they were highly satisfied with both the format and content. The curriculum described here represents one example of an audience-centered approach designed to meet the specific health and literacy needs of the Hispanic population on the U.S.-Mexico border. The combination of ESL and health literacy contributed to a perceived positive learning experience among participants. Interdisciplinary approaches to health literacy are recommended.

  8. Integrating Condensed Matter Physics into a Liberal Arts Physics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The emergence of nanoscale science into the popular consciousness presents an opportunity to attract and retain future condensed matter scientists. We inject nanoscale physics into recruiting activities and into the introductory and the core portions of the curriculum. Laboratory involvement and research opportunity play important roles in maintaining student engagement. We use inexpensive scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopes to introduce students to nanoscale structure early in their college careers. Although the physics of tip-surface interactions is sophisticated, the resulting images can be interpreted intuitively. We use the STM in introductory modern physics to explore quantum tunneling and the properties of electrons at surfaces. An interdisciplinary course in nanoscience and nanotechnology course team-taught with chemists looks at nanoscale phenomena in physics, chemistry, and biology. Core quantum and statistical physics courses look at effects of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics in degenerate systems. An upper level solid-state physics course takes up traditional condensed matter topics from a structural perspective by beginning with a study of both elastic and inelastic scattering of x-rays from crystalline solids and liquid crystals. Students encounter reciprocal space concepts through the analysis of laboratory scattering data and by the development of the scattering theory. The course then examines the importance of scattering processes in band structure and in electrical and thermal conduction. A segment of the course is devoted to surface physics and nanostructures where we explore the effects of restricting particles to two-dimensional surfaces, one-dimensional wires, and zero-dimensional quantum dots.

  9. Integrating Leadership Development throughout the Undergraduate Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kelynne E.; Aiello, David P.; Barton, Lance F.; Gould, Stephanie L.; McCain, Karla S.; Richardson, John M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Teaching and Research (STAR) Leadership Program, developed at Austin College, which engages students in activities integrated into undergraduate STEM courses that promote the development of leadership behaviors. Students focus on interpersonal communication,…

  10. An Integrated Business and Technology Curriculum: Oil and Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Hillary Jean

    2011-01-01

    Technology in every form has become an important part of everyday life. In business, it is a necessity for success and survival. Many authors (Kotrlik & Redmann, 2009; Ma & Runyon (2004), among others) in the arena of higher education have pointed out the need for truly integrated business and technology programs at the graduate level, but…

  11. Integrating mental health into the basic nursing curriculum: Benefits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integration of mental health into the basic nursing curricula provides an environment for and affords students an opportunity to learn how a client should be treated holistically. Nurses constitute the largest proportion of health workers in most countries of the world. They work in the remotest areas where there are hardly any ...

  12. A Responsive, Integrative Spanish Curriculum at UNC Charlotte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The Spanish program at UNC Charlotte is timely and responsive because it is designed to meet documented societal (job market) needs in today's and tomorrow's global village and economy by providing graduates with strong specialties in English-Spanish translating and in business Spanish. It is integrative in that it does so while maintaining its…

  13. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. A TENTATIVE CURRICULUM GUIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRANT, VINCENT; GERARDI, WILLIAM

    A GUIDE FOR A 1-YEAR COURSE IN DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS PREREQUISITED KNOWLEDGE IN ALGEBRA, ANALYTIC TRIGONOMETRY, AND ELEMENTARY ANALYSIS. EACH ASSIGNMENT CONTAINED BOTH NEW AND REVIEW WORK TO REINFORCE THE NEW WORK. THERE WERE ELEVEN UNITS OF STUDY USING THE FOLLOWING FOUR BOOKS--"CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY, THIRD…

  14. The Value of ERP Curriculum Integration: Perspectives from the Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepner, Michelle; Dickson, Warren

    2013-01-01

    In the current economic conditions, many institutions face dwindling budgets and an increased focus on proving the value of the education provided. The effort and costs required to integrate Enterprise Resource Planning systems into course curricula are a significant investment of resources for any university. This paper examines the expense of…

  15. Using Student Managed Businesses to Integrate the Business Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, Victor J.; Tucker, Joanne M.

    2009-01-01

    To teach business today requires that we go beyond classroom learning and encourage real world, cross-functional experiences and applied management decision-making. This paper describes an innovative approach that requires students to apply their function-specific knowledge of business, integrated with other functional areas, to an authentic…

  16. Mathematical Modeling in the High School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Maria L.; Levy, Rachel; Felton-Koestler, Mathew D.; Zbiek, Rose Mary

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, mathematics leaders and instructors from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and the Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP), with input from NCTM, came together to write the "Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Mathematical Modeling Education" (GAIMME) report as a resource for…

  17. Quark Model in the Quantum Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussar, P. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses in detail the totally symmetric three-quark karyonic wave functions. The two-body mesonic states are also discussed. A brief review of the experimental efforts to identify the quark model multiplets is given. (Author/SK)

  18. Preparing residents for family practice: role of an integrated “Triple C” curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited understanding of the impact of Triple C competency-based curriculums on the preparation of residents for family practice. This paper describes a competency-based curriculum within an integrated longitudinal block design and presents preliminary evaluation data on the impact of this curriculum on preparedness for family practice. Methods: First and second year family medicine residents were surveyed as a component of a year-end program evaluation to assess the extent to which the residency program is preparing them to engage in a variety of practice domains, the likelihood that they would engage in these domains, and the extent to which this residency program is comprehensive, relevant to their development as a family physician, and promotes interprofessional practice. Results: Residents perceived themselves as prepared to engage in most practice areas and their intentions to engage in various practice domains were positively correlated to their ratings of preparedness. Ratings reflected that residents perceived this program as comprehensive and relevant to their development as a family physician and they perceived a high degree of encouragement for interprofessional practice. Conclusions: This study provides some preliminary evidence that an integrated competency-based curriculum, with an emphasis on interprofessional practice has the potential to effectively prepare residents for practice in family medicine.

  19. The Role of Work-Integrated Learning in Student Preferences of Instructional Methods in an Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Indra

    2015-01-01

    The role of work-integrated learning in student preferences of instructional methods is largely unexplored across the accounting curriculum. This study conducted six experiments to explore student preferences of instructional methods for learning, in six courses of the accounting curriculum that differed in algorithmic rigor, in the context of a…

  20. Integration of Geospatial Technologies into K-12 Curriculum: An Investigation of Teacher and Student Perceptions and Student Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore outcomes of a GIS/GPS integration process: to (a) examine student responses to GIS and GPS inclusion in their curriculum, (b) determine whether a relationship exists between inclusion of GIS into existing K-12 curriculum and student achievement, (c) examine the effectiveness of GIS professional development…

  1. Knowledge and Perceptions of Visual Communications Curriculum in Arkansas Secondary Agricultural Classrooms: A Closer Look at Experiential Learning Integrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kristin; Calico, Carley; Edgar, Leslie D.; Edgar, Don W.; Johnson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arkansas developed and integrated visual communications curriculum related to agricultural communications into secondary agricultural programs throughout the state. The curriculum was developed, pilot tested, revised, and implemented by selected secondary agriculture teachers. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate…

  2. Final Year Undergraduates' Perceptions of the Integration of Soft Skills in the Formal Curriculum: A Survey of Malaysian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadason, Evelyn Shyamala; Subramaniam, Thirunaukarasu; Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini

    2010-01-01

    A recent initiative or skill bridging measure taken by the Malaysian public universities is to build into the formal curriculum soft skills to produce graduates with a right balance of diverse abilities. However, to date, there is no comprehensive attempt to review the integration of soft skills in the formal curriculum (both coursework and…

  3. Using the earth system for integrating the science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Victor J.

    Content and process instruction from the earth sciences has gone unrepresented in the world's science curricula, especially at the secondary level. As a result there is a serious deficiency in public understanding of the planet on which we all live. This lack includes national and international leaders in politics, business, and science. The earth system science effort now engaging the research talent of the earth sciences provides a firm foundation from the sciences for inclusion of earth systems content into the evolving integrated science curricula of this country and others. Implementing integrated science curricula, especially at the secondary level where potential leaders often have their only exposure to science, can help to address these problems. The earth system provides a conceptual theme as opposed to a disciplinary theme for organizing such integrated curricula, absent from prior efforts. The end of the cold war era is resulting in a reexamination of science and the influence it has had on our planet and society. In the future, science and the curricula that teach about science must seriously address the environmental and social problems left in the wake of over 100 years of preparation for military and economic war. The earth systems education effort provides one such approach to the modernization of science curricula. Earth science educators should assume leadership in helping to establish such curricula in this country and around the world.

  4. Vertical Integration of Geographic Information Sciences: A Recruitment Model for GIS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jaehyung; Huynh, Niem Tu; McGehee, Thomas Lee

    2011-01-01

    An innovative vertical integration model for recruiting to GIS education was introduced and tested following four driving forces: curriculum development, GIS presentations, institutional collaboration, and faculty training. Curriculum development was a useful approach to recruitment, student credit hour generation, and retention-rate improvement.…

  5. A two-year experience of an integrated simulation residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittels, Kathleen A; Takayesu, James K; Nadel, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) is increasingly used in medical education, but its role in Emergency Medicine (EM) residency education is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of HPS when fully integrated into an EM residency didactic curriculum. The study design was a cross-sectional survey performed in 2006, 2 years after the implementation of an integrated simulation curriculum. Fifty-four residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-4) of a 4-year EM residency were surveyed with demographic and curricular questions on the perceived value of simulation relative to other teaching formats. Survey items were rated on a bipolar linear numeric scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 9 (strongly agree), with 5 being neutral. Data were analyzed using Student t-tests. Forty residents responded to the survey (74% response rate). The perceived effectiveness of HPS was higher for junior residents than senior residents (8.0 vs. 6.2, respectively, peffectiveness of lectures (7.8 vs. 7.9, respectively, p=0.1), morbidity and mortality conference (8.5 vs. 8.7, respectively, p=0.3), and trauma conference (8.4 vs. 8.8, respectively, p=0.2) between junior and senior residents. Scores for perceptions of improvement in residency training (knowledge acquisition and clinical decision-making) after the integration of HPS into the curriculum were positive for all residents. Residents' perceptions of HPS integration into an EM residency curriculum are positive for both improving knowledge acquisition and learning clinical decision-making. HPS was rated as more effective during junior years than senior years, while the perceived efficacy of more traditional educational modalities remained constant throughout residency training. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Integrated Curriculum Design Reform of Civil Engineering Management Discipline Based on Inter-disciplinary Professional Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yidong, Xu; Ping, Wu; Jian, Chen; Jiansheng, Shen

    2018-05-01

    In view of the shortcomings of the current civil engineering management discipline, this paper investigates the necessity of the course design reform. Based on the analysis of basic occupation requirements of civil engineering management discipline, the basic ideas and implementation strategies of the integrated reform of curriculum design system are proposed, which can not only improve the students’ overall understanding of knowledge and skills, but also enhance the system of student learning.

  7. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  8. Integrating YouTube into the nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharoff, Leighsa

    2011-08-17

    Nurse educators need to be innovative, stimulating, and engaging as they teach future nursing professionals. The use of YouTube in nursing education classes provides an easy, innovative, and user-friendly way to engage today's nursing students. YouTube presentations can be easily adapted into nursing courses at any level, be it a fundamentals course for undergraduate students or a theoretical foundations course for graduate students. In this article I will provide information to help educators effectively integrate YouTube into their course offerings. I will start by reviewing the phenomenon of social networking. Next I will discuss challenges and strategies related to YouTube learning experiences, after which I will share some of the legal considerations in using YouTube. I will conclude by describing how to engage students via YouTube and current research related to YouTube.

  9. Diverse methods for integrable models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehér, G.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is centered around three topics, sharing integrability as a common theme. This thesis explores different methods in the field of integrable models. The first two chapters are about integrable lattice models in statistical physics. The last chapter describes an integrable quantum chain.

  10. Developing an integrated organ/system curriculum with community-orientation for a new medical college in Jazan, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa M El-Naggar

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: The new curriculum adopted by the Jazan Faculty of Medicine is an integrated, organ/ system based, community-oriented, with early clinical skills, elective modules, and innovative methods of instructions.

  11. In Search of an Integrative Theme for the Undergraduate Business Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, W. Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Business Core is typically a set of courses in the curriculum of many business schools which provides the student with a breadth of knowledge across all business disciplines. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a curricular model based upon the balanced scorecard (BSC) developed by Kaplan & Norton (1996). With its multi-dimensional…

  12. An Ecological System Curriculum: An Integrated MST Approach to Environmental Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Nina A.

    This paper describes an inquiry-based, student-centered mathematics, science, and technology curriculum guide. It features activities addressing such environmental science topics as groundwater modeling, water filtration, soil permeability and porosity, water temperature and salinity, and quadrant studies. Activities are organized so that the…

  13. Integrated Environmental Assessment Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardanz, R; Gimeno, B S; Bermejo, V; Elvira, S; Martin, F; Palacios, M; Rodriguez, E; Donaire, I [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the results of the Spanish participation in the project Coupling CORINAIR data to cost-effect emission reduction strategies based on critical threshold. (EU/LIFE97/ENV/FIN/336). The subproject has focused on three tasks. Develop tools to improve knowledge on the spatial and temporal details of emissions of air pollutants in Spain. Exploit existing experimental information on plant response to air pollutants in temperate ecosystem and Integrate these findings in a modelling framework that can asses with more accuracy the impact of air pollutants to temperate ecosystems. The results obtained during the execution of this project have significantly improved the models of the impact of alternative emission control strategies on ecosystems and crops in the Iberian Peninsula. (Author) 375 refs.

  14. Integrating computation into the undergraduate curriculum: A vision and guidelines for future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonacky, Norman; Winch, David

    2008-04-01

    There is substantial evidence of a need to make computation an integral part of the undergraduate physics curriculum. This need is consistent with data from surveys in both the academy and the workplace, and has been reinforced by two years of exploratory efforts by a group of physics faculty for whom computation is a special interest. We have examined past and current efforts at reform and a variety of strategic, organizational, and institutional issues involved in any attempt to broadly transform existing practice. We propose a set of guidelines for development based on this past work and discuss our vision of computationally integrated physics.

  15. Human trafficking education for nurse practitioners: Integration into standard curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Rebecca M

    2018-02-01

    of human trafficking among students enrolled in a nurse practitioner program. Informed nurse practitioners have the ability to identify, treat, and refer victims of trafficking. As an integral part of the health care team, nurse practitioners should receive trafficking education as part of the standard course curricula. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrating clinical communication with clinical reasoning and the broader medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Julie; Kurtz, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of this paper are to discuss the results of a workshop conducted at EACH 2012. Specifically, we will (1) examine the link between communication, clinical reasoning, and medical problem solving, (2) explore strategies for (a) integrating clinical reasoning, medical problem solving, and content from the broader curriculum into clinical communication teaching and (b) integrating communication into the broader curriculum, and (3) discuss benefits gained from such integration. Salient features from the workshop were recorded and will be presented here, as well as a case example to illustrate important connections between clinical communication and clinical reasoning. Potential links between clinical communication, clinical reasoning, and medical problem solving as well as strategies to integrate clinical communication teaching and the broader curricula in human and veterinary medicine are enumerated. Participants expressed enthusiasm and keen interest in integration of clinical communication teaching and clinical reasoning during this workshop, came to the idea of the interdependence of these skills easily, and embraced the rationale immediately. Valuing the importance of communication as clinical skill and embracing the interdependence between communication and thought processes related to clinical reasoning and medical problem solving will be beneficial in teaching programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Addressing Professionalism, Social, and Communication Competencies in Surgical Residency Via Integrated Humanities Workshops: A Pilot Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Jennifer; French, Judith; Siperstein, Allan; Capizzani, Tony R; Krishnamurthy, Vikram D

    We aimed to conduct professionalism and social competencies (PSC) training by integrating humanities into structured workshops, and to assess reception of this curriculum by first-year surgical residents. An IRB-approved, pilot curriculum consisting of 4 interactive workshops for surgical interns was developed. The workshops were scheduled quarterly, often in small group format, and supplemental readings were assigned. Humanities media utilized to illustrate PSC included survival scenarios, reflective writing, television portrayals, and social media. Emphasis was placed on recognizing personal values and experiences that influence judgment and decision-making, using social media responsibly, identifying and overcoming communication barriers related to generational changes in training (especially technology and work-life balance), and tackling stereotypes of surgeons. Anonymous and voluntary pre- and postcurriculum surveys were administered. Univariate analysis of responses was performed with JMP Pro v12 using Fisher's exact, χ 2 , and Students' t-tests for categorical and continuous variables. The study took place at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, OH, within the general surgery program. Surgical interns at the Cleveland Clinic were included in the study. A total of 16 surgical interns completed the curriculum. Sixteen surgical interns participated in the curriculum: 69% were domestic medical school graduates (DG) and 31% were international medical school graduates (IMG). Overall, the majority (81%) of residents had received PSC courses during medical school: 100% of DG compared to 40% of IMG (p = 0.02). Before beginning the curriculum, 86% responded that additional PSC training would be useful during residency, which increased to 94% upon completion (p = 0.58). Mean number of responses supporting the usefulness of PSC training increased from 1.5 ± 0.2 before the curriculum to 1.75 ± 0.2 upon completion (p = 0.4). When describing public and medical student

  18. Integrated Medical Model Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Boley, L.; Foy, M.; Goodenow, D.; Griffin, D.; Keenan, A.; Kerstman, E.; Melton, S.; McGuire, K.; Saile, L.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Project represents one aspect of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) to quantitatively assess medical risks to astronauts for existing operational missions as well as missions associated with future exploration and commercial space flight ventures. The IMM takes a probabilistic approach to assessing the likelihood and specific outcomes of one hundred medical conditions within the envelope of accepted space flight standards of care over a selectable range of mission capabilities. A specially developed Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) maintains evidence-based, organizational knowledge across a variety of data sources. Since becoming operational in 2011, version 3.0 of the IMM, the supporting iMED, and the expertise of the IMM project team have contributed to a wide range of decision and informational processes for the space medical and human research community. This presentation provides an overview of the IMM conceptual architecture and range of application through examples of actual space flight community questions posed to the IMM project.

  19. Integration of computer technology into the medical curriculum: the King's experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickie Aitken

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there have been major changes in the requirements of medical education which have set the scene for the revision of medical curricula (Towle, 1991; GMC, 1993. As part of the new curriculum at King's, the opportunity has been taken to integrate computer technology into the course through Computer-Assisted Learning (CAL, and to train graduates in core IT skills. Although the use of computers in the medical curriculum has up to now been limited, recent studies have shown encouraging steps forward (see Boelen, 1995. One area where there has been particular interest is the use of notebook computers to allow students increased access to IT facilities (Maulitz et al, 1996.

  20. Simulation-based ureteroscopy skills training curriculum with integration of technical and non-technical skills: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunckhorst, Oliver; Shahid, Shahab; Aydin, Abdullatif; McIlhenny, Craig; Khan, Shahid; Raza, Syed Johar; Sahai, Arun; Brewin, James; Bello, Fernando; Kneebone, Roger; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    Current training modalities within ureteroscopy have been extensively validated and must now be integrated within a comprehensive curriculum. Additionally, non-technical skills often cause surgical error and little research has been conducted to combine this with technical skills teaching. This study therefore aimed to develop and validate a curriculum for semi-rigid ureteroscopy, integrating both technical and non-technical skills teaching within the programme. Delphi methodology was utilised for curriculum development and content validation, with a randomised trial then conducted (n = 32) for curriculum evaluation. The developed curriculum consisted of four modules; initially developing basic technical skills and subsequently integrating non-technical skills teaching. Sixteen participants underwent the simulation-based curriculum and were subsequently assessed, together with the control cohort (n = 16) within a full immersion environment. Both technical (Time to completion, OSATS and a task specific checklist) and non-technical (NOTSS) outcome measures were recorded with parametric and non-parametric analyses used depending on the distribution of our data as evaluated by a Shapiro-Wilk test. Improvements within the intervention cohort demonstrated educational value across all technical and non-technical parameters recorded, including time to completion (p technical and non-technical skills teaching is both educationally valuable and feasible. Additionally, the curriculum offers a validated simulation-based training modality within ureteroscopy and a framework for the development of other simulation-based programmes.

  1. Integrating security issues in nuclear engineering curriculum in Indonesia. Classical vs policy approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putero, Susetyo Hario; Rosita, Widya; Sihana, Fnu; Ferdiansjah; Santosa, Haryono Budi; Muharini, Anung

    2015-01-01

    Recently, risk management for nuclear facilities becomes more complex due to security issue addressed by IAEA. The harmonization between safety, safeguards and security is still questionable. It also challenges to nuclear engineering curriculum in the world how to appropriately lecture the new issue. This paper would like to describe how to integrate this issue in developing nuclear engineering curriculum in Indonesia. Indonesia has still no nuclear power plant, but there are 3 research reactors laid in Indonesia. As addition, there are several hospitals and industries utilizing radioisotopes in their activities. The knowledge about nuclear security of their staffs is also not enough for handling radioactive material furthermore the security officers. Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) is the only university in Indonesia offering nuclear engineering program, as consequently the university should actively play the role in overcoming this issue not only in Indonesia, but also in Southeast Asia. In the other hand, students has to have proper knowledge in order to complete in the global nuclear industry. After visited several universities in USA and participated in INSEN meeting, we found that most of universities in the world anticipate this issue by giving the student courses related to policy (non-technical) study based on IAEA NSS 12. In the other hand, the rest just make nuclear security as a case study on their class. Furthermore, almost all of programs are graduate level. UGM decided to enhance several present related undergraduate courses with security topics as first step to develop the awareness of student to nuclear security. The next (curriculum 2016) is to integrate security topics into the entire of curriculum including designing a nuclear security elective course for undergraduate level. The first trial has successfully improved the student knowledge and awareness on nuclear security. (author)

  2. Controlling Curriculum Redesign with a Process Improvement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinka, Dennis; Yen, Minnie Yi-Miin

    2008-01-01

    A portion of the curriculum for a Management Information Systems degree was redesigned to enhance the experiential learning of students by focusing it on a three-semester community-based system development project. The entire curriculum was then redesigned to have a project-centric focus with each course in the curriculum contributing to the…

  3. Curriculum as Environments for Learning: A Practicel Meaning and Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert L.; Ghory, Ward J.

    Effective curriculum development and implementation may be achieved by considering the multidimensional nature of the term "curriculum." A definition of curriculum should be considered in terms of its expressed, implied, and emergent dimensions. The expressed dimension is the written statement of learning objectives, sequence of contents, learning…

  4. CAD and 3d-printing integration experience in the curriculum of engineers education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zelentsov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the results of using the 3d-printing educational methodology for training the students in the spacecraft-configuration developing area.The first purpose of the considered methodology practice is to implement the rapid-prototyping skills into the educational process, to provide perfection of the student knowledge in configuring the internal on-board equipment of the spacecraft. The second purpose – is to habituate the students to the main principles of the available CAM technologies, to fill the available educational gap in the area of information support of the spacecraft life-cycle.The proposed curriculum includes six training exercises based on a special “Engineering drawing” course unit. The training exercises require using the SolidWorks geometric-simulation software. The preliminary obtained virtual prototypes of the spacecraft configuration elements are subjected to 3d-printing and assembled into a physical configuration model. The physical configuration models are obtained using one of the most accessible rapid-prototyping technologies – 3d-printing of extrusion type. Practicing in 3d-printing provides developing the student skills in managing all other digital-program control devices.The specified first experience of integrating the computer geometricsimulation methodology and the 3d-printing practices in a single course unit has proved: developing the physical-configuration models heightens the student interest to the configuration training.A ready-made physical model does not excuse the available configuration mistakes unlike a virtual model where the component interferences may remain undetected. So, developing a physical model requires additional endeavor and responsibility. Developing a project in a team has proved to be an effective means for solving a common creative problem.The first test of the proposed methodology has shown the importance of perfect adjustment of the available 3d-printing process and

  5. EPTS Curriculum Model in the Education of Gifted Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Sak

    Full Text Available In this article, the author reviews the EPTS Model (Education Programs for Talented Students and discuss how it was developed through multiple stages, the ways it is used to develop programs for gifted students, and then presents research carried out on the effectiveness of this model in the education of gifted students. The EPTS Model has two dimensions: ability and content. The ability dimension has a hierarchical structure composed of three levels of cognitive skills. The content dimension is the extension of the regular curriculum but organized at four levels: data, concept, generalization and theory. Included in the article also is a brief critics of the current state of curricular programs in gifted education.

  6. Integrating Information Literacy and Evidence-Based Medicine Content within a New School of Medicine Curriculum: Process and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellenbach, Joanne M; Houk, Kathryn M; E Thimons, Dana; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2018-01-01

    This column describes a process for integrating information literacy (IL) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) content within a new school of medicine curriculum. The project was a collaborative effort among health sciences librarians, curriculum deans, directors, and faculty. The health sciences librarians became members of the curriculum committees, developed a successful proposal for IL and EBM content within the curriculum, and were invited to become course instructors for Analytics in Medicine. As course instructors, the librarians worked with the other faculty instructors to design and deliver active learning class sessions based on a flipped classroom approach using a proprietary Information Mastery curriculum. Results of this collaboration may add to the knowledge base of attitudes and skills needed to practice as full faculty partners in curricular design and instruction.

  7. Integrative structure modeling with the Integrative Modeling Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Benjamin; Viswanath, Shruthi; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Pellarin, Riccardo; Greenberg, Charles H; Saltzberg, Daniel; Sali, Andrej

    2018-01-01

    Building models of a biological system that are consistent with the myriad data available is one of the key challenges in biology. Modeling the structure and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies, for example, can give insights into how biological systems work, evolved, might be controlled, and even designed. Integrative structure modeling casts the building of structural models as a computational optimization problem, for which information about the assembly is encoded into a scoring function that evaluates candidate models. Here, we describe our open source software suite for integrative structure modeling, Integrative Modeling Platform (https://integrativemodeling.org), and demonstrate its use. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  8. A Model for the Development of a CDIO Based Curriculum in Electrical Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Kjærgaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a model providing a structured method for engineering curriculum design. The model is developed to show the major influencers on the curriculum design and the relations between the influencers. These influencers are identified as the engineering science, the business...... environment, the university environment, and the teachers and students. Each of them and their influence on the curriculum is described and the sources of information about the influencers are discussed. The CDIO syllabus has been defined as part of the basis for the Bachelor of Engineering programs...... at the Technical University of Denmark and this gives a strong direct impact of the university environment on the resulting curriculum in electrical engineering. The resulting Bachelor of Engineering curriculum is presented and it is discussed how it complies with the model for curriculum development. The main...

  9. A model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a two year project to design a model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education. The core of the curriculum are sixteen modules which cover the broad range of medical informatics and which are closely related to the profiles of the professions involved (nursing, physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietetics). The curriculum emphasizes the need of using structured data and information to perform tasks in health care delivery and management, for which modern information technology is indispensable. The model curriculum will enable faculty to redesign existing undergraduate programs and to select the contents they see appropriate. In this way we hope that the model curriculum will contribute to an innovative attitude of future graduating health care professionals. A new three year project just has started to develop learning materials using professional health care software based on the sixteen modules of the curriculum. PMID:8563329

  10. Teaching pharmacology to medical students in an integrated problem-based learning curriculum:an Australian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Owen L WOODMAN; Agnes E DODDS; Albert G FRAUMAN; Mosepele MOSEPELE

    2004-01-01

    The world-wide move away from the didactic teaching of single disciples to integrated Problem-based Learning (PBL) curricula in medical education has posed challenges for the basic sciences. In this paper we identify two major challenges. The first challenge is the need to describe a core disciplinary curriculum that can be articulated and mapped onto the new structure. We illustrate how the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) Guidelines are used to evaluate the curriculum coverage in the medical course at The University of Melbourne. The second challenge is to ensure that foundational concepts are given adequate emphasis within the new structure, and in particular, that students have the opportunity to pursue these concepts in their self-directed learning. We illustrate one approach to teaching important pharmacological concepts in an integrated curriculum with a case study from the first year curriculum at The University of Melbourne. Finally, we propose the features of an integrated curriculum that facilitates the learning of basic pharmacology in a situation where PBL and integration sets the curriculum framework.

  11. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: A path to isolation or integration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Deven, T.; Hibbert, K.; Faden, L.; Chhem, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. Methods: A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. Results: The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. Conclusions: The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada

  12. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: A path to isolation or integration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Deven, T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Hibbert, K., E-mail: khibbert@uwo.ca [Faculty of Education, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Faden, L. [Faculty of Education, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Chhem, R.K. [Institute of History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. Methods: A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. Results: The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. Conclusions: The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada.

  13. Clinical and Educational Outcomes of an Integrated Inpatient Quality Improvement Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Cohen, Emily S; van Aalst, Robertus; Harwood, Beth; Ercolano, Ellyn; Baum, Karyn D; Pattison, Adam J; Jones, Anne C; Davies, Louise; West, Al

    2016-10-01

    Integrating teaching and hands-on experience in quality improvement (QI) may increase the learning and the impact of resident QI work. We sought to determine the clinical and educational impact of an integrated QI curriculum. This clustered, randomized trial with early and late intervention groups used mixed methods evaluation. For almost 2 years, internal medicine residents from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center on the inpatient teams at the White River Junction VA participated in the QI curriculum. QI project effectiveness was assessed using statistical process control. Learning outcomes were assessed with the Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool-Revised (QIKAT-R) and through self-efficacy, interprofessional care attitudes, and satisfaction of learners. Free text responses by residents and a focus group of nurses who worked with the residents provided information about the acceptability of the intervention. The QI projects improved many clinical processes and outcomes, but not all led to improvements. Educational outcome response rates were 65% (68 of 105) at baseline, 50% (18 of 36) for the early intervention group at midpoint, 67% (24 of 36) for the control group at midpoint, and 53% (42 of 80) for the late intervention group. Composite QIKAT-R scores (range, 0-27) increased from 13.3 at baseline to 15.3 at end point ( P  < .01), as did the self-efficacy composite score ( P  < .05). Satisfaction with the curriculum was rated highly by all participants. Learning and participating in hands-on QI can be integrated into the usual inpatient work of resident physicians.

  14. Integration of scholastic curriculum in computergames – impossible or a design challenge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    The present paper argues that integration of scholastic knowledge in computer games is a design challenge and one that will only work if you preserve the computer game as a game. This is important cause if you don’t adhere to or understand the dynamics of computer games you run the risk of destro......The present paper argues that integration of scholastic knowledge in computer games is a design challenge and one that will only work if you preserve the computer game as a game. This is important cause if you don’t adhere to or understand the dynamics of computer games you run the risk...... of destroying your own goal. In order to integrate the scholastic curriculum in computer games for a learning purpose it is and can not be stressed enough important to preserve the action-outcome circle inside the game world. Stated in simpler terms this means that users of learning games must see...

  15. Business and technology integrated model

    OpenAIRE

    Noce, Irapuan; Carvalho, João Álvaro

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in business modeling and architecture in the areas of management and information systems. One of the issues in the area is the lack of integration between the modeling techniques that are employed to support business development and those used for technology modeling. This paper proposes a modeling approach that is capable of integrating the modeling of the business and of the technology. By depicting the business model, the organization structure and the technolog...

  16. Integrating Creativity Training into Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Curriculum in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    In order to foster creative engineers, a creativity training programme was carried out in medialogy education in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. This paper focuses on the question of how engineering students perceive the strategy of integrating...... creativity training into a PBL curriculum. A total of 20 medialogy students in the training programme were interviewed. The data shows that the training programme was thought useful and students get benefits such as gaining project work skills, creative concepts and confidence of being creative. However...

  17. Curriculum Integration in Distance Learning at Primary and Secondary Educational Levels on the Example of eTwinning Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Gajek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum integration is one of the concepts which has been discussed for years. Telecollaborative projects, which employ elements of distance learning, provide opportunities for putting the idea into practice. Analysis of eTwinning projects undertaken in Polish schools aims at demonstrating the integrative role of distance learning approaches and their contribution to integration of various themes in educational context. As the eTwinning framework is very flexible, allowing for teacher and students autonomy the projects may vary in the topics, age and number of participants, duration scope within curriculum etc. The study shows various levels and perspectives of curriculum integration which take place in eTwinning projects. It also discusses the role of distance learning at primary and secondary educational levels. The challenge is to transform international collaboration of selected schools an everyday practice for all learners and teachers.

  18. Participatory action inquiry using baccalaureate nursing students: The inclusion of integrative health care modalities in nursing core curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxane Raffin; Schaffrath, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Nurses, nursing educators and students support the inclusion of integrative health care (IHC) into nursing core curriculum as a way to create nurses who deliver nursing care to the full extent of their scope of practice and advance evidenced based IHC. Because of the holistic nature of IHC modalities, research to investigate appropriate teaching strategies and potential efficacy of learning IHC in the baccalaureate core curriculum requires a holistic approach. Therefore a phenomenological exploration using participatory action inquiry was conducted at a large Midwestern university. Eighteen first year nursing students were selected as co-researchers. Their experiences in learning and delivering three 15 min IHC interventions (foot reflexology, lavender aromatherapy and mindful breathing) in an acute care setting were captured using reflexive journaling and participation in structured and organic communicative spaces. Of the patients approached, 67% accepted to receive one or more IHC modalities (147/219). Using van Manen's model for holistic data reduction three themes emerged: The experience of presence, competency and unexpected results. Learning IHC modalities is best supported by a self-reflective process that is constructed and modeled by a nurse faculty member with experience in delivering IHC modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent; James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D.; Glenn, Chance M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  20. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science Center, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States); James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D. [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, Chance M. [College of Engineering, Technology and Physical Sciences, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  1. Curriculum Integration in Distance Learning at Primary and Secondary Educational Levels on the Example of eTwinning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Elzbieta

    2018-01-01

    Curriculum integration is one of the concepts which has been discussed for years. Telecollaborative projects, which employ elements of distance learning, provide opportunities for putting the idea into practice. Analysis of eTwinning projects undertaken in Polish schools aims at demonstrating the integrative role of distance learning approaches…

  2. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  3. Horizontal and vertical integration of academic disciplines in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, Branislav; Weitlauf, Harry M

    2002-05-01

    A rapid expansion of new scientific information and the introduction of new technology in operative and diagnostic medicine has marked the last several decades. Medical educators, because of and parallel to these developments, initiated a search for a more effective system of presenting core material to medical students. The new educational trends, although varying somewhat from one institution to another, concentrated on the following pedagogical shifts: 1) expansion of conceptual presentation of material at the expense of detail-oriented education; 2) amplification of an integrated approach, as opposed to subject-oriented instruction; 3) scheduling of elective courses to compliment required courses in the curriculum; and 4) institution of small group instruction (i.e., problem-based learning) to actively involve students in the educational process and to develop deductive reasoning based on clinical cases. The future pedagogical system in medical schools will most likely be a combination of "classical" presentation of material combined with concept-oriented, subject-integrated and small group instruction based on either hypothetical or real clinical cases. It is imperative for the success of the new curriculum, however, that certain criteria are satisfied: 1) reorganize basic science departments to determine course ownership; 2) establish a reward system for teaching faculty; and 3) establish new course objectives. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Curriculum Model for Medical Technology: Lessons from International Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring-Valdez, Anacleta

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum is a crucial component of any educational process. Curriculum development and instructional management serve as effective tools for meeting the present and future needs of the local and national communities. In trying to strengthen the quality assurance system in Philippine higher education, institutions of higher learning were mandated…

  5. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum-Part Two: Translation of MPH Core Competencies into an Integrated Theory-Based Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvin, Jaime A; DeBate, Rita; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, the dynamics of health and health care are changing, necessitating a commitment to revising traditional public health curricula to better meet present day challenges. This article describes how the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida utilized the Intervention Mapping framework to translate revised core competencies into an integrated, theory-driven core curriculum to meet the training needs of the twenty-first century public health scholar and practitioner. This process resulted in the development of four sequenced courses: History and Systems of Public Health and Population Assessment I delivered in the first semester and Population Assessment II and Translation to Practice delivered in the second semester. While the transformation process, moving from traditional public health core content to an integrated and innovative curriculum, is a challenging and daunting task, Intervention Mapping provides the ideal framework for guiding this process. Intervention mapping walks the curriculum developers from the broad goals and objectives to the finite details of a lesson plan. Throughout this process, critical lessons were learned, including the importance of being open to new ideologies and frameworks and the critical need to involve key-stakeholders in every step of the decision-making process to ensure the sustainability of the resulting integrated and theory-based curriculum. Ultimately, as a stronger curriculum emerged, the developers and instructors themselves were changed, fostering a stronger public health workforce from within.

  6. Curriculum Guidelines for a Distance Education Course in Urban Agriculture Based on an Eclectic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaum, Wilma G.; van Rooyen, Hugo G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes research to develop curriculum guidelines for a distance education course in urban agriculture. The course, designed to train the teacher, is based on an eclectic curriculum design model. The course is aimed at the socioeconomic empowerment of urban farmers and is based on sustainable ecological-agricultural principles, an…

  7. Towards a Multi-Stakeholder-Driven Model for Excellence in Higher Education Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. H.; Bushney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stakeholder-driven model for excellence in higher education curriculum development has been developed. It is based on the assumption that current efforts to curriculum development take place within a framework of limited stakeholder consultation. A total of 18 multiple stakeholders are identified, including learners, alumni, government,…

  8. MCD Process Model: A Systematic Approach to Curriculum Development in Black Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Howard J.

    1986-01-01

    Holds that Black Studies programs have had problems surviving because of (1) resistance to curriculum change in colleges and universities, (2) their lack of supporters in positions of administrative power, and (3) lack of an organized, conceptual approach to developing and implementing a Black Studies curriculum. Presents a model designed to…

  9. Integrability of the Rabi Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braak, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Rabi model is a paradigm for interacting quantum systems. It couples a bosonic mode to the smallest possible quantum model, a two-level system. I present the analytical solution which allows us to consider the question of integrability for quantum systems that do not possess a classical limit. A criterion for quantum integrability is proposed which shows that the Rabi model is integrable due to the presence of a discrete symmetry. Moreover, I introduce a generalization with no symmetries; the generalized Rabi model is the first example of a nonintegrable but exactly solvable system.

  10. Attitudes among students and teachers on vertical integration between clinical medicine and basic science within a problem-based undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynhildsen, J; Dahle, L O; Behrbohm Fallsberg, M; Rundquist, I; Hammar, M

    2002-05-01

    Important elements in the curriculum at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping are vertical integration, i.e. integration between the clinical and basic science sections of the curriculum, and horizontal integration between different subject areas. Integration throughout the whole curriculum is time-consuming for both teachers and students and hard work is required for planning, organization and execution. The aim was to assess the importance of vertical and horizontal integration in an undergraduate medical curriculum, according to opinions among students and teachers. In a questionnaire 102 faculty teachers and 106 students were asked about the importance of 14 different components of the undergraduate medical curriculum including vertical and horizontal integration. They were asked to assign between one and six points to each component (6 points = extremely important for the quality of the curriculum; 1 point = unimportant). Students as well as teachers appreciated highly both forms of integration. Students scored horizontal integration slightly but significantly higher than the teachers (median 6 vs 5 points; p=0.009, Mann-Whitney U-test), whereas teachers scored vertical integration higher than students (6 vs 5; p=0.019, Mann-Whitney U-test). Both students and teachers considered horizontal and vertical integration to be highly important components of the undergraduate medical programme. We believe both kinds of integration support problem-based learning and stimulate deep and lifelong learning and suggest that integration should always be considered deeply when a new curriculum is planned for undergraduate medical education.

  11. IMMIGRANTS’ INTEGRATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN UZLĂU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the European population aging trend, and while the birth rate is still at a low level, the immigrants may contribute to the support of the EU economy and to finance the national social protection systems. But this would be possible only if they have been fully integrated in the host countries, the integration policies being a task of the national governments. The European Union may still offer support and stimulation through financing, policies coordination and good practices exchange facilitation. The new measures should encourage local level actions, including cooperation between local authorities, employers, migrants’ organizations, service providers and local population. Within the EU, there live 20.1 million immigrants (approximately 4% of the entire population coming from outside European area. An important element of the common EU policy on immigration is the one regarding the development of a policy on immigrants’ integration, which should provide a fair treatment within the member states, and guarantee rights and obligations comparable with the ones of the Union citizens.

  12. On track for success: an innovative behavioral science curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedy, John R; Carek, Peter J; Dickerson, Lori M; Mallin, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the behavioral science curriculum currently in place at the Trident/MUSC Family Medicine Residency Program. The Trident/MUSC Program is a 10-10-10 community-based, university-affiliated program in Charleston, South Carolina. Over the years, the Trident/MUSC residency program has graduated over 400 Family Medicine physicians. The current behavioral science curriculum consists of both required core elements (didactic lectures, clinical observation, Balint groups, and Resident Grand Rounds) as well as optional elements (longitudinal patient care experiences, elective rotations, behavioral science editorial experience, and scholars project with a behavioral science focus). All Trident/MUSC residents complete core behavioral science curriculum elements and are free to participate in none, some, or all of the optional behavioral science curriculum elements. This flexibility allows resident physicians to tailor the educational program in a manner to meet individual educational needs. The behavioral science curriculum is based upon faculty interpretation of existing "best practice" guidelines (Residency Review Committee-Family Medicine and AAFP). This article provides sufficient curriculum detail to allow the interested reader the opportunity to adapt elements of the behavioral science curriculum to other residency training programs. While this behavioral science track system is currently in an early stage of implementation, the article discusses track advantages as well as future plans to evaluate various aspects of this innovative educational approach.

  13. Integrating a relaxation response-based curriculum into a public high school in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foret, Megan M; Scult, Matthew; Wilcher, Marilyn; Chudnofsky, Rana; Malloy, Laura; Hasheminejad, Nicole; Park, Elyse R

    2012-04-01

    Academic and societal pressures result in U.S. high school students feeling stressed. Stress management and relaxation interventions may help students increase resiliency to stress and overall well-being. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility (enrollment, participation and acceptability) and potential effectiveness (changes in perceived stress, anxiety, self-esteem, health-promoting behaviors, and locus of control) of a relaxation response (RR)-based curriculum integrated into the school day for high school students. The curriculum included didactic instruction, relaxation exercises, positive psychology, and cognitive restructuring. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvements in levels of perceived stress, state anxiety, and health-promoting behaviors when compared to the wait list control group. The intervention appeared most useful for girls in the intervention group. The results suggest that several modifications may increase the feasibility of using this potentially effective intervention in high schools. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Designing a Curriculum Model for the Teaching of the Bible in UK Jewish Secondary Schools: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Eli

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process of designing a curriculum model for Bible teaching in UK Jewish secondary schools. This model was designed over the period 2008-2010 by a team of curriculum specialists from the Jewish Curriculum Partnership UK in collaboration with a group of teachers from Jewish secondary schools. The paper first outlines the…

  15. Systematic Curriculum Integration of Sustainable Development Using Life Cycle Approaches: The Case of the Civil Engineering Department at the Université de Sherbrooke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roure, Bastien; Anand, Chirjiv; Bisaillon, Véronique; Amor, Ben

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a consistent and systematic integration framework of sustainable development (SD) in a civil engineering (CE) curriculum, given the connection between the two. Curriculum integration is a challenging project and requires the development of certain protocols to ensure success.…

  16. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis of integrating the World Health Organization patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Misbah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis of integrating the World Health Organization (WHO patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan. Methods A qualitative interpretive case study was conducted at Riphah International University, Islamabad, from October 2016 to June 2017. The study included 9 faculty members and 1 expert on patient safety. The interviews were audiotaped, and a thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed using NVivo software. Results Four themes were derived based on the need analysis model. The sub-themes derived from the collected data were arranged under the themes of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, in accordance with the principles of SWOT analysis. The strengths identified were the need for a formal patient safety curriculum and its early integration into the undergraduate program. The weaknesses were faculty awareness and participation in development programs. The opportunities were an ongoing effort to develop an appropriate curriculum, to improve the current culture of healthcare, and to use the WHO curricular resource guide. The threats were attitudes towards patient safety in Pakistani culture, resistance to implementation from different levels, and the role of regulatory authorities. Conclusion The theme of patient safety needs to be incorporated early into the formal medical education curriculum, with the main goals of striving to do no harm and seeing mistakes as opportunities to learn. Faculty development activities need to be organized, and faculty members should to be encouraged to participate in them. The lack of a patient safety culture was identified as the primary reason for resistance to this initiative at many levels. The WHO curriculum, amended according to local institutional culture, can be implemented appropriately with support from the corresponding regulatory bodies.

  17. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis of integrating the World Health Organization patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misbah, Samreen; Mahboob, Usman

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of integrating the World Health Organization (WHO) patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan. A qualitative interpretive case study was conducted at Riphah International University, Islamabad, from October 2016 to June 2017. The study included 9 faculty members and 1 expert on patient safety. The interviews were audiotaped, and a thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed using NVivo software. Four themes were derived based on the need analysis model. The sub-themes derived from the collected data were arranged under the themes of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, in accordance with the principles of SWOT analysis. The strengths identified were the need for a formal patient safety curriculum and its early integration into the undergraduate program. The weaknesses were faculty awareness and participation in development programs. The opportunities were an ongoing effort to develop an appropriate curriculum, to improve the current culture of healthcare, and to use the WHO curricular resource guide. The threats were attitudes towards patient safety in Pakistani culture, resistance to implementation from different levels, and the role of regulatory authorities. The theme of patient safety needs to be incorporated early into the formal medical education curriculum, with the main goals of striving to do no harm and seeing mistakes as opportunities to learn. Faculty development activities need to be organized, and faculty members should to be encouraged to participate in them. The lack of a patient safety culture was identified as the primary reason for resistance to this initiative at many levels. The WHO curriculum, amended according to local institutional culture, can be implemented appropriately with support from the corresponding regulatory bodies.

  18. Integrable quantum impurity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckle, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    By modifying some of the local L operators of the algebraic form of the Bethe Ansatz inhomogeneous one dimensional quantum lattice models can be constructed. This fact has recently attracted new attention, the inhomogeneities being interpreted as local impurities. The Hamiltonians of the so constructed one-dimensional quantum models have a nearest neighbour structure except in the vicinity of the local impurities which involve three-site interactions. The pertinent feature of these models is the absence of backscattering at the impurities: the impurities are transparent. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  19. Integrating neuroscience in the training of psychiatrists: a patient-centered didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David A; Rohrbaugh, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The authors describe the development and implementation of a new adult psychiatry residency didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles and an integrative, patient-centered approach that includes a progressive 4-year neuroscience curriculum. The authors describe the process of conducting a needs assessment, engaging stakeholders and developing guiding principles for the new curriculum. The curriculum was evaluated using qualitative measures, a resident survey, course evaluations, and a pilot version of a specialized assessment tool. Feedback from the resident survey and from course evaluations was positive, and residents indicated interest in receiving additional training in neuroscience. Residents self-reported not incorporating neuroscience into formulation and treatment planning as often as other perspectives. They also reported that neuroscience was reinforced less by clinical faculty than other perspectives. Performance on the curriculum assessment corroborated that clinical application of neuroscience may benefit from additional reinforcement. Residents responded well to the design and content of the new didactic curriculum. The neuroscience component appears to have achieved its primary objective of enhancing attitudes to the field. Continued work including enhancing the culture of neuroscience at the clinical sites may be required to achieve broader behavioral goals.

  20. Gravitational interactions of integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, E.; Abdalla, M.C.B.

    1995-10-01

    We couple non-linear σ-models to Liouville gravity, showing that integrability properties of symmetric space models still hold for the matter sector. Using similar arguments for the fermionic counterpart, namely Gross-Neveu-type models, we verify that such conclusions must also hold for them, as recently suggested. (author). 18 refs

  1. Training Psychiatry Residents in Quality Improvement: An Integrated, Year-Long Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Weinberg, Michael; Cabaniss, Deborah L.; Kistler; Susan C.; Isaacs, Abby J.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Essock, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a curriculum for psychiatry residents in Quality Improvement (QI) methodology. Methods: All PGY3 residents (N=12) participated in a QI curriculum that included a year-long group project. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the curriculum, using a modified Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment…

  2. Pre-Service and Mentor Teachers' Perceptions Regarding the Level of Technology Integration in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Gatsy A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative study was to explore perceptions of pre-service and mentor teachers regarding the level of integrating technology in the curriculum of 21 selected classrooms in eight rural school districts in Southeast Texas. The following research questions guided this phenomenological study: 1. What are…

  3. A History of Women in the Trades for Integration with the Gender Equity in Education and the Workplace Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Morgan, Comp.

    This document, which was originally intended to complement a curriculum titled "Gender Equity in Education and the Workplace," is a compilation of the historical contributions made by women in trade and technical careers that may be used as a source of materials suitable for integration into existing trade and industrial education programs.…

  4. Integrating Mindfulness Practices into the Elementary Curriculum to Improve Attention-to-Task Behaviors and Social Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagy-Borofka, Lori

    2013-01-01

    This study examined effects of integrating mindfulness practices into the 5th grade curriculum to improve attention-to-task, including inattention and executive functioning, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and social relations. As academic requirements become more rigorous, students have been expected to demonstrate increased skills in…

  5. Developing a Curriculum for On-Line International Business Degree: An Integrated Approach Using Systems and ERP Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mayur S.; Pitre, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The world today can be characterized by constant change. One such change is globalization: the integration of world economies into a single economy. Because of globalization, it is necessary for colleges and universities to respond with appropriate curriculum changes that addresses this new world phenomenon. Several institutions of higher…

  6. Integration of Work and Learning. Proceedings of the Workshop on Curriculum Innovation (2nd, Bled, Slovenia, September 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    This proceedings consists of 13 papers and 3 working group presentations from a 3-day workshop on issues of work-linked learning relevant for curriculum development. "Welcome" (Slavko Gaber, Peter de Rooij) is followed by two introductory papers: "Integration of Work and Learning: A Challenge for Both Schools and Companies"…

  7. Integration of Technology, Curriculum, and Professional Development for Advancing Middle School Mathematics: Three Large-Scale Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Shechtman, Nicole; Tatar, Deborah; Hegedus, Stephen; Hopkins, Bill; Empson, Susan; Knudsen, Jennifer; Gallagher, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present three studies (two randomized controlled experiments and one embedded quasi-experiment) designed to evaluate the impact of replacement units targeting student learning of advanced middle school mathematics. The studies evaluated the SimCalc approach, which integrates an interactive representational technology, paper curriculum,…

  8. Empowering Language Learners through the Use of a Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy Programme: An Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    This paper implements and evaluates a curriculum-integrated information literacy programme in an Arabic primary school in the United Kingdom to empower learners and develop life-long learning skills. It reports on an action research project with a reflective practice approach used at the beginning of the semester to identify potential problems…

  9. Novel Dissection of the Central Nervous System to Bridge Gross Anatomy and Neuroscience for an Integrated Medical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavac, Rebecca J.; Klaus, Rachel; Betts, Kourtney; Smith, Shilo M.; Stabio, Maureen E.

    2018-01-01

    Medical schools in the United States continue to undergo curricular change, reorganization, and reformation as more schools transition to an integrated curriculum. Anatomy educators must find novel approaches to teach in a way that will bridge multiple disciplines. The cadaveric extraction of the central nervous system (CNS) provides an…

  10. Integrated Debugging of Modelica Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pop

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high abstraction level of equation-based object-oriented (EOO languages such as Modelica has the drawback that programming and modeling errors are often hard to find. In this paper we present integrated static and dynamic debugging methods for Modelica models and a debugger prototype that addresses several of those problems. The goal is an integrated debugging framework that combines classical debugging techniques with special techniques for equation-based languages partly based on graph visualization and interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first Modelica debugger that supports both equation-based transformational and algorithmic code debugging in an integrated fashion.

  11. Integrated Inflammatory Stress (ITIS) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Elisabeth O.; Hjorth, Poul G.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2017-01-01

    maintains a long-term level of the stress hormone cortisol which is also anti-inflammatory. A new integrated model of the interaction between these two subsystems of the inflammatory system is proposed and coined the integrated inflammatory stress (ITIS) model. The coupling mechanisms describing....... A constant activation results in elevated levels of the variables in the model while a prolonged change of the oscillations in ACTH and cortisol concentrations is the most pronounced result of different LPS doses predicted by the model....

  12. Two-Language, Two-Paradigm Introductory Computing Curriculum Model and its Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Zanev, Vladimir; Radenski, Atanas

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes difficulties with the introduction of object-oriented concepts in introductory computing education and then proposes a two-language, two-paradigm curriculum model that alleviates such difficulties. Our two-language, two-paradigm curriculum model begins with teaching imperative programming using Python programming language, continues with teaching object-oriented computing using Java, and concludes with teaching object-oriented data structures with Java.

  13. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated Medical Model – Chest Injury Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) developed the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) to forecast the resources...

  15. Models and Materials: Bridging Art and Science in the Secondary Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, D.; Cavazos, L.

    2006-12-01

    Creating and sustaining student engagement in science is one challenge facing secondary teachers. The visual arts provide an alternative means of communicating scientific concepts to students who may not respond to traditional formats or identify themselves as interested in science. We have initiated a three-year teacher professional development program at U C Santa Barbara focused on bridging art and science in secondary curricula, to engage students underrepresented in science majors, including girls, English language learners and non-traditional learners. The three-year format provides the teams of teachers with the time and resources necessary to create innovative learning experiences for students that will enhance their understanding of both art and science content. Models and Materials brings together ten secondary art and science teachers from six Santa Barbara County schools. Of the five participating science teachers, three teach Earth Science and two teach Life Science. Art and science teachers from each school are teamed and challenged with the task of creating integrated curriculum projects that bring visual art concepts to the science classroom and science concepts to the art classroom. Models and Materials were selected as unifying themes; understanding the concept of models, their development and limitations, is a prominent goal in the California State Science and Art Standards. Similarly, the relationship between composition, structure and properties of materials is important to both art and science learning. The program began with a 2-week institute designed to highlight the natural links between art and science through presentations and activities by both artists and scientists, to inspire teachers to develop new ways to present models in their classrooms, and for the teacher teams to brainstorm ideas for curriculum projects. During the current school year, teachers will begin to integrate science and art and the themes of modeling and materials

  16. The integrated economic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, J.; Cirelli, J.F.; Brimont, S.; Lyle, C.; Nossent, G.; Moraleda, P.

    2005-01-01

    The setting up of the European energy market has triggered a radical change of the context within with the energy players operated. The natural markets of the incumbent operators, which were formerly demarcated by national and even regional borders, have extended to at least the scale of the European Union. In addition to their geographical development strategy, gas undertakings are diversifying their portfolios towards both upstream as well as downstream activities of the gas chain, and/or extending their offers to other energies and services. Energy players' strategies are rather complex and sometimes give the impression that of being based on contradictory decisions. Some operators widen their field of operations, whereas others specialize in a limited number of activities. This Round Table provides an opportunity to compare business models as adopted by the major gas undertakings in response to structural changes observed in various countries over recent years

  17. Modelling Spark Integration in Science Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Paz E. Morales

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study critically explored how a PASCO-designed technology (SPARK ScienceLearning System is meaningfully integrated into the teaching of selected topics in Earth and Environmental Science. It highlights on modelling the effectiveness of using the SPARK Learning System as a primary tool in learning science that leads to learning and achievement of the students. Data and observation gathered and correlation of the ability of the technology to develop high intrinsic motivation to student achievement were used to design framework on how to meaningfully integrate SPARK ScienceLearning System in teaching Earth and Environmental Science. Research instruments used in this study were adopted from standardized questionnaires available from literature. Achievement test and evaluation form were developed and validated for the purpose of deducing data needed for the study. Interviews were done to delve into the deeper thoughts and emotions of the respondents. Data from the interviews served to validate all numerical data culled from this study. Cross-case analysis of the data was done to reveal some recurring themes, problems and benefits derived by the students in using the SPARK Science Learning System to further establish its effectiveness in the curriculum as a forerunner to the shift towards the 21st Century Learning.

  18. Separations and safeguards model integration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Research and development of advanced reprocessing plant designs can greatly benefit from the development of a reprocessing plant model capable of transient solvent extraction chemistry. This type of model can be used to optimize the operations of a plant as well as the designs for safeguards, security, and safety. Previous work has integrated a transient solvent extraction simulation module, based on the Solvent Extraction Process Having Interaction Solutes (SEPHIS) code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The goal of this work was to strengthen the integration by linking more variables between the two codes. The results from this integrated model show expected operational performance through plant transients. Additionally, ORIGEN source term files were integrated into the SSPM to provide concentrations, radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and thermal power data for various spent fuels. This data was used to generate measurement blocks that can determine the radioactivity, neutron emission rate, or thermal power of any stream or vessel in the plant model. This work examined how the code could be expanded to integrate other separation steps and benchmark the results to other data. Recommendations for future work will be presented.

  19. Integration of sexual and reproductive health in the medical curriculum in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afsar, H.A.; Sohani, S.; Younas, M.; Mohammad, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the knowledge of medical practitioners regarding management of selected reproductive tract infections, diagnosis of sexual dysfunction and identification of sexual abuse and to assess the attitudes and practices of health care providers regarding sexual and reproductive rights in order to recommend areas that need to be incorporated in a sexual and reproductive health curriculum. Design: A cross-sectional survey. Place and Duration of Study: From March to August 2003 in the District Turbat of Balochistan, Pakistan. Subject and Methods: Selected indicators of knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding sexual and reproductive health of primary care physicians were assessed using a pre-tested questionnaire and formal informal interviews. Variables were identified from the literature and previous in-depth interviews, and then formulated into respective questions. A Lichert scale marked from 1 to 5 was used for categorizing responses into agreed, neutral and disagreed. Descriptive statistics were computed using SPSS version 10 for windows. Qualitative interviews were translated and transcribed and analyzed according to pre-judged and emerging themes. Results: Out of 45 physicians interviewed, nearly half scored less than 50% in the knowledge section. Attitudes and practices assessed suggested a tendency to be judgmental, gender/rights discriminatory and with little provision for enabling clients to make their own decisions, so essential for quality sexual health service provision. Conclusion: Keeping in view the importance of the sexual health issues and a lack of ability of health care providers to handle it effectively, deficient areas of sexual health must be integrated into the medical curriculum. Medical educators have the responsibility to train physicians and other health professionals in the core competencies to improve the sexual and reproductive health of their communities. (author)

  20. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  1. Superficial and deep learning approaches among medical students in an interdisciplinary integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghani, Hisham M; Ezimokhai, Mutairu; Shaban, Sami; van Berkel, Henk J M

    2014-01-01

    Students' learning approaches have a significant impact on the success of the educational experience, and a mismatch between instructional methods and the learning approach is very likely to create an obstacle to learning. Educational institutes' understanding of students' learning approaches allows those institutes to introduce changes in their curriculum content, instructional format, and assessment methods that will allow students to adopt deep learning techniques and critical thinking. The objective of this study was to determine and compare learning approaches among medical students following an interdisciplinary integrated curriculum. This was a cross-sectional study in which an electronic questionnaire using the Biggs two-factor Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) with 20 questions was administered. Of a total of 402 students at the medical school, 214 (53.2%) completed the questionnaire. There was a significant difference in the mean score of superficial approach, motive and strategy between students in the six medical school years. However, no significant difference was observed in the mean score of deep approach, motive and strategy. The mean score for years 1 and 2 showed a significantly higher surface approach, surface motive and surface strategy when compared with students in years 4-6 in medical school. The superficial approach to learning was mostly preferred among first and second year medical students, and the least preferred among students in the final clinical years. These results may be useful in creating future teaching, learning and assessment strategies aiming to enhance a deep learning approach among medical students. Future studies are needed to investigate the reason for the preferred superficial approach among medical students in their early years of study.

  2. The Impact of Science Integrated Curriculum Supplements on Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs towards Science while In-Service: A Multiple Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kellian L.

    Science at the early childhood level has been rarely taught as a single subject or integrated into the curriculum. One reason why early childhood educators avoid teaching science are their attitudes, beliefs, and lack of understanding scientific concepts as presented in traditional science curriculums. The intervention used by researchers for improving beliefs and attitudes in K-6 pre-service teachers towards teaching science in early childhood has been science method courses. For in service teachers, the intervention has been professional development workshops, seminars, and symposiums. Though these interventions have had a positive impact on teachers' attitudes and beliefs toward teaching science, the interventions have not necessarily guaranteed more science being taught in the preschool classroom. The specific problem investigated for this study was how to improve the interventions designed to improve preschool teachers' attitudes and beliefs so that they would feel more confident in teaching science to young children. The purpose of this study was to examine how implementing a one-week science integrated curriculum supplement could be an effective tool for improving preschool teachers' attitudes and beliefs toward teaching science. This study utilized the qualitative multiple case study research method. A logical model was created based on negative teacher attitudes and beliefs attributes that were the core components of the Preschool Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs toward Science teaching (P-TABS) questionnaire. The negative attributes were paired with positive interventions and encapsulated in a one-week science integrated curriculum supplement based on the factors of teacher comfort, child benefit and challenges. The primary source of evidence for this study was the semi-structured interview. The researcher contacted 24 early childhood facilities, 44 emails were sent to preschool teachers, four teachers agreed to participate in the study. The results of the

  3. Developing an integrated evidence-based medicine curriculum for family medicine residency at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Tan, Amy; Hindle, Hugh; Kung, Lina; Manca, Donna

    2008-06-01

    There is general consensus in the academic community that evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching is essential. Unfortunately, many postgraduate programs have significant weakness in their EBM programs. The Family Medicine Residency committee at the University of Alberta felt their EBM curriculum would benefit from critical review and revision. An EBM Curriculum Committee was created to evaluate previous components and develop new strategies as needed. Input from stakeholders including faculty and residents was sought, and evidence regarding the teaching and practical application of EBM was gathered. The committee drafted goals and objectives, the primary of which were to assist residents to (1) become competent self-directed, lifelong learners with skills to effectively and efficiently keep up to date, and 2) develop EBM skills to solve problems encountered in daily practice. New curriculum components, each evidence based, were introduced in 2005 and include a family medicine EBM workshop to establish basic EBM knowledge; a Web-based Family Medicine Desktop promoting easier access to evidence-based Internet resources; a brief evidence-based assessment of the research project enhancing integration of EBM into daily practice; and a journal club to support peer learning and growth of rapid appraisal skills. Issues including time use, costs, and change management are discussed. Ongoing evaluation of the curriculum and its components is a principal factor of the design, allowing critical review and adaptation of the curriculum. The first two years of the curriculum have yielded positive feedback from faculty and statistically significant improvement in multiple areas of residents' opinions of the curriculum and comfort with evidence-based practice.

  4. Integrating nutrition education into the cardiovascular curriculum changes eating habits of second-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Eric J; Zelis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Survey of medical curricula continues to show that nutrition education is not universally adequate. One measure of nutritional educational competence is a positive change in student eating habits. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether integrating nutrition education within the second-year cardiovascular course for medical students, using the "Rate Your Plate" (RYP) questionnaire, coupled with knowledge of student personal 30-year risk of a cardiovascular event was useful in changing students' eating behaviors. Thirty-two students completed an unpublished 24-item questionnaire (modified-RYP) about their eating habits in the spring of their first year. The same students then completed the questionnaire in the spring of their second year. Paired t test was used to analyze the difference in RYP scores. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for the Framingham 30-year cardiovascular event risk and change in RYP score to examine whether risk knowledge may have changed eating habits. Mean scores at baseline and 1 year later were 57.19 and 58.97, respectively (paired t test, P eating healthy at baseline, integration of nutrition education within the second-year cardiovascular medical curriculum was associated with improved heart healthy eating habits. Because student attitudes about prevention counseling are influenced by personal eating habits, this suggests that students with a more healthy diet will be more likely to recommend the same for their patients. Copyright © 2014 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enabling model customization and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minho; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2003-09-01

    Until fairly recently, the idea of dynamic model content and presentation were treated synonymously. For example, if one was to take a data flow network, which captures the dynamics of a target system in terms of the flow of data through nodal operators, then one would often standardize on rectangles and arrows for the model display. The increasing web emphasis on XML, however, suggests that the network model can have its content specified in an XML language, and then the model can be represented in a number of ways depending on the chosen style. We have developed a formal method, based on styles, that permits a model to be specified in XML and presented in 1D (text), 2D, and 3D. This method allows for customization and personalization to exert their benefits beyond e-commerce, to the area of model structures used in computer simulation. This customization leads naturally to solving the bigger problem of model integration - the act of taking models of a scene and integrating them with that scene so that there is only one unified modeling interface. This work focuses mostly on customization, but we address the integration issue in the future work section.

  6. Developing Integrated Care: Towards a development model for integrated care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.N. Minkman (Mirella)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated

  7. PLA-Based Curriculum: Humanistic Model of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova-Gonci, Viktoria; Tobol, Amy Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The authors believe that there is no inherent academic validity or lack of thereof in the notion of prior learning assessment (PLA)-based curriculum. If mishandled, it can become the tool for carrying out diploma mill practices. Conversely, if implemented and facilitated appropriately, PLA-based curricula can offer humanistic educational values…

  8. NANOSCIENCES IN LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES: CURRICULUM EMBEDDING AND PROGRAM’S INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quesada

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This communication discusses an approach for teaching about nanosciences from the perspective of the School of Sciences at St. Thomas University with a “Liberal Art” type of education, where also there is not a major in Physics neither room within the curriculum for a course on nanosciences. Besides that, this approach intends motivate students about technological entrepreneurship and discuss how applied sciences might be conducive to mathematical models that might be extended to other basic science fields. In this end, the phenomenon of superconductivity is discussed from different angles, and it is shown how it is linked to technological advances from medicine to computer science, and from them to astrophysics and cosmology.

  9. Constructing the integral concept on the basis of the idea of accumulation: suggestion for a high school curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouropatov, Anatoli; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2013-07-01

    Students have a tendency to see integral calculus as a series of procedures with associated algorithms and many do not develop a conceptual grasp giving them the desirable versatility of thought. Thus, instead of a proceptual view of the symbols in integration, they have, at best, a process-oriented view. On the other hand, it is not surprising that many students find concepts such as the integral difficult when they are unable to experience these processes directly in the classroom. With a view towards improving this situation, constructing the integral concept on the basis of the idea of accumulation has been proposed (Educ Stud Math. 1994;26:229-274; Integral as accumulation: a didactical perspective for school mathematics; Thessaloniki: PME; 2009. p. 417-424). In this paper, we discuss a curriculum that is based on this idea and a design for curriculum materials that are intended to develop an improved cognitive base for a flexible proceptual understanding of the integral and integration in high school. The main focus is on how we (mathematics teachers and mathematics educators) might teach the integral concept in order to help high school students to construct meaningful knowledge alongside acquiring technical abilities.

  10. A Pre- and Post-Evaluation of Integrating Sustainability Curriculum by Inserting Okala Modules into an Interior Design Materials and Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Deborah; Freihoefer, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the integration of Okala curriculum into Interior Design coursework. Okala, as a teaching package, is utilized extensively in industrial design education. However, this study examines the expansion and insertion of Okala modules in an existing interior design curriculum. The Okala modules included…

  11. Challenges in horizontal model integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolczyk, Katrin; Conradi, Carsten

    2016-03-11

    Systems Biology has motivated dynamic models of important intracellular processes at the pathway level, for example, in signal transduction and cell cycle control. To answer important biomedical questions, however, one has to go beyond the study of isolated pathways towards the joint study of interacting signaling pathways or the joint study of signal transduction and cell cycle control. Thereby the reuse of established models is preferable, as it will generally reduce the modeling effort and increase the acceptance of the combined model in the field. Obtaining a combined model can be challenging, especially if the submodels are large and/or come from different working groups (as is generally the case, when models stored in established repositories are used). To support this task, we describe a semi-automatic workflow based on established software tools. In particular, two frequent challenges are described: identification of the overlap and subsequent (re)parameterization of the integrated model. The reparameterization step is crucial, if the goal is to obtain a model that can reproduce the data explained by the individual models. For demonstration purposes we apply our workflow to integrate two signaling pathways (EGF and NGF) from the BioModels Database.

  12. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  13. Primary exploration of the application of case based learning method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-zhen XU; Ye-fei WANG; Yan WANG; Shu CHENG; Yi-qun HU; Lei DING

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application and the effect of the case based learning(CBL)method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.Methods The CBL method was applied to the experimental group,and the traditional approach for the control group.After the lecture,a questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate the teaching effect in the two groups.Results The CBL method efficiently increased the students’interest in learning and autonomous learning ability,enhanced their ability to solve clinical problems with basic theoretic knowledge and cultivated their clinical thinking ability.Conclusion The CBL method can improve the quality of clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.

  14. Prospects and challenges in teachers’ adoption of a new modeling orientated science curriculum in lower secondary school in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Schnell

    A new science curriculum with a significant emphasis on modeling has recently been enacted in the Danish compulsory school. This design based study aims to investigate science teachers’ beliefs, practice and reflections in response to the new curriculum. The data sources include teacher...... towards the modeling emphasis in the new curriculum, but nevertheless use a restricted range of modeling practices and pay limited attention to the purpose and utility of models. Teachers raised concerns in enacting the new curriculum due to: (i) Lack of time for preparations and teamwork, (ii) Shortage...... of clarifications and examples in the curriculum materials and teacher education on how to enact modeling in practice, (iii) Overcrowded curriculum, and (iv) Lack of alignment with a national test. In addition, the results indicate an inconsistence between teachers’ intentions and their classroom practice...

  15. Outcomes of a Self-Regulated Learning Curriculum Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Burton, Erin E.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe connections among students' views of nature of science in relation to the goals of a curriculum delivered in a unique setting, one where a researcher and two teachers collaborated to develop a course devoted to teaching students about how knowledge is built in science. Students proceeded through a cycle of self-regulated phases, forethought, performance, and self-reflection, during each segment of the curriculum: (a) independent research, (b) knowledge building in the discipline of science, and (c) a citizen science project. Student views were measured at the beginning and end of the course using epistemic network analysis. The pretest map reported student understanding of science as experimentation and indicated three clusters representing the durability of knowledge, empirical evidence, and habits of mind, which were loosely connected and represented knowledge generation as external to personal thinking. The posttest map displayed a broader understanding of scientific endeavors beyond experimentation, a shift toward personal knowledge generation, and indicated a larger number of connections among three more tightly oriented clusters: empirical evidence, habits of mind, and tentativeness. Implications include the potential to build curriculum that purposefully considers reinforcing cycles of learning of the nature of science in different contexts.

  16. Potential Teaching Model for Applying Novel Approaches of Renewed Estonian National Curriculum into Visual Art Classes in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahter, Edna

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the renewed national curriculum was legislated in Estonia. Major changes include a new list of cross-curricular topics, increased importance of integration and specification of the components of the art learning process. In this situation, the question arises--how to fully implement the challenges of the renewed curriculum in primary…

  17. SYMBIOSIS: Development, Implementation, and Assessment of a Model Curriculum across Biology and Mathematics at the Introductory Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depelteau, Audrey M.; Joplin, Karl H.; Govett, Aimee; Miller, Hugh A., III; Seier, Edith

    2010-01-01

    With the support of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) administration and a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the departments of Biological Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology-math integrated curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team, charged with teaching the 18…

  18. Integrated modeling: a look back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Clark

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses applications and implementation approaches used for integrated modeling of structural systems with optics over the past 30 years. While much of the development work focused on control system design, significant contributions were made in system modeling and computer-aided design (CAD) environments. Early work appended handmade line-of-sight models to traditional finite element models, such as the optical spacecraft concept from the ACOSS program. The IDEAS2 computational environment built in support of Space Station collected a wider variety of existing tools around a parametric database. Later, IMOS supported interferometer and large telescope mission studies at JPL with MATLAB modeling of structural dynamics, thermal analysis, and geometric optics. IMOS's predecessor was a simple FORTRAN command line interpreter for LQG controller design with additional functions that built state-space finite element models. Specialized language systems such as CAESY were formulated and prototyped to provide more complex object-oriented functions suited to control-structure interaction. A more recent example of optical modeling directly in mechanical CAD is used to illustrate possible future directions. While the value of directly posing the optical metric in system dynamics terms is well understood today, the potential payoff is illustrated briefly via project-based examples. It is quite likely that integrated structure thermal optical performance (STOP) modeling could be accomplished in a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tool set. The work flow could be adopted, for example, by a team developing a small high-performance optical or radio frequency (RF) instrument.

  19. Integrated model of destination competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armenski Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the weakest point of Serbian destination competitiveness as a tourist destination in comparation with its main competitors. The paper is organized as follows. The short introduction of the previous research on the destination competitiveness is followed by description of the Integrated model of destination competitiveness (Dwyer et al, 2003 that was used as the main reference framework. Section three is devoted to the description of the previous studies on competitiveness of Serbian tourism, while section four outlines the statistical methodology employed in this study and presents and interprets the empirical results. The results showed that Serbia is more competitive in its natural, cultural and created resources than in destination management while, according to the Integrated model, Serbia is less competitive in demand conditions that refer to the image and awareness of the destination itself.

  20. Exclusion statistics and integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashkevich, S.

    1998-01-01

    The definition of exclusion statistics, as given by Haldane, allows for a statistical interaction between distinguishable particles (multi-species statistics). The thermodynamic quantities for such statistics ca be evaluated exactly. The explicit expressions for the cluster coefficients are presented. Furthermore, single-species exclusion statistics is realized in one-dimensional integrable models. The interesting questions of generalizing this correspondence onto the higher-dimensional and the multi-species cases remain essentially open

  1. Exclusion statistics and integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashkevich, S.

    1998-01-01

    The definition of exclusion statistics that was given by Haldane admits a 'statistical interaction' between distinguishable particles (multispecies statistics). For such statistics, thermodynamic quantities can be evaluated exactly; explicit expressions are presented here for cluster coefficients. Furthermore, single-species exclusion statistics is realized in one-dimensional integrable models of the Calogero-Sutherland type. The interesting questions of generalizing this correspondence to the higher-dimensional and the multispecies cases remain essentially open; however, our results provide some hints as to searches for the models in question

  2. Integrated materials–structural models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    , repair works and strengthening methods for structures. A very significant part of the infrastructure consists of reinforced concrete structures. Even though reinforced concrete structures typically are very competitive, certain concrete structures suffer from various types of degradation. A framework...... should define a framework in which materials research results eventually should fit in and on the other side the materials research should define needs and capabilities in structural modelling. Integrated materials-structural models of a general nature are almost non-existent in the field of cement based...

  3. The integrated environmental control model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.S.; Berkenpas, M.B.; Kalagnanam, J.R. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The capability to estimate the performance and cost of emission control systems is critical to a variety of planning and analysis requirements faced by utilities, regulators, researchers and analysts in the public and private sectors. The computer model described in this paper has been developed for DOe to provide an up-to-date capability for analyzing a variety of pre-combustion, combustion, and post-combustion options in an integrated framework. A unique capability allows performance and costs to be modeled probabilistically, which allows explicit characterization of uncertainties and risks.

  4. Developing a Model for an Innovative Culinary Competency Curriculum and Examining Its Effects on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng-Lei I-Chen Monica; Horng, Jeou-Shyan; Teng, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The present study designs and develops an innovative culinary competency curriculum (ICCC) model comprising seven sections: innovative culture, aesthetics, techniques, service, product, management, and creativity. The model is formulated based on culinary concept, creativity, innovation, and competency theory. The four elements of curriculum…

  5. Integrated Site Model Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Integrated Site Model (ISM) provides a framework for discussing the geologic features and properties of Yucca Mountain, which is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for the disposal of nuclear waste. The ISM is important to the evaluation of the site because it provides 3-D portrayals of site geologic, rock property, and mineralogic characteristics and their spatial variabilities. The ISM is not a single discrete model; rather, it is a set of static representations that provide three-dimensional (3-D), computer representations of site geology, selected hydrologic and rock properties, and mineralogic-characteristics data. These representations are manifested in three separate model components of the ISM: the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), the Rock Properties Model (RPM), and the Mineralogic Model (MM). The GFM provides a representation of the 3-D stratigraphy and geologic structure. Based on the framework provided by the GFM, the RPM and MM provide spatial simulations of the rock and hydrologic properties, and mineralogy, respectively. Functional summaries of the component models and their respective output are provided in Section 1.4. Each of the component models of the ISM considers different specific aspects of the site geologic setting. Each model was developed using unique methodologies and inputs, and the determination of the modeled units for each of the components is dependent on the requirements of that component. Therefore, while the ISM represents the integration of the rock properties and mineralogy into a geologic framework, the discussion of ISM construction and results is most appropriately presented in terms of the three separate components. This Process Model Report (PMR) summarizes the individual component models of the ISM (the GFM, RPM, and MM) and describes how the three components are constructed and combined to form the ISM

  6. The integration of an anatomy massive open online course (MOOC) into a medical anatomy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnerton, Bronwen J; Morris, Neil P; Hotchkiss, Stephanie; Pickering, James D

    2017-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are designed as stand-alone courses which can be accessed by any learner around the globe with only an internet-enabled electronic device required. Although much research has focused on the enrolment and demographics of MOOCs, their impact on undergraduate campus-based students is still unclear. This article explores the impact of integrating an anatomy MOOC in to the anatomy curriculum of a year 1 medical degree program at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom. The course did not replace any teaching that was already being delivered, and was used to supplement this teaching to support the students' consolidation and revision. Analysis of student feedback indicates a high level of usage, with evidence to suggest that female learners may have approached the course in a more personalized manner. Although the video based resources and quizzes were greatly appreciated as learning tools, significant evidence suggests the students did not engage, or were inclined to engage, with the discussion fora. Furthermore, a significant majority of students did not want the MOOC to replace the existing teaching they received. Given the feedback provided, this research suggests that although the student population believe there to be value in having access to MOOC material, their role as replacements to campus-based teaching is not supported. Details regarding the enrolment and engagement of the general public with the MOOC during the two runs are also documented, with the suggestion that graduates employed in the healthcare sector were the primary users of the course. Anat Sci Educ 10: 53-67. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. DISEÑO CURRICULAR: DE LA INTEGRACIÓN A LA COMPLEJIDAD (CURRICULUM DESIGN: FROM INTEGRATION TO COMPLEXITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badilla Saxe Eleonora

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:En este ensayo se muestra un tránsito que podría seguir el diseño curricular desde la integración hacia la complejidad. Se parte de las ideas de James Beane y John Deswey sobre la Integración Curricular y las Actividades Ocupacionales respectivamente para pasar por los llamados Ejes Transversales y el Enfoque por Proyectos, con miras a evolucionar hacia la Pedagogía de la Complejidad, tomando como base las ideas para promover el pensamiento complejo que propone Edgar Morin. Como conclusión se propone un cambio en la metáfora con la cual se diseñan currículos y planes de estudio.Abstract:This essay shows a path that can be taken when designing curriculum, that goes from Integration onto Complexity. It starts with Jeames Beane´s Curriculum Integration and John Dewey´s Occupational Activities, going through Transversal Axis and Project Approach, with the goal to evolve into the Pedagogy of Complexity, based on Edgar Morin´s ideas to stimulate complex thinking. A change of metaphor for curriculum design is proposed, as a conclusion.

  8. Cotangent Models for Integrable Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesenhofer, Anna; Miranda, Eva

    2017-03-01

    We associate cotangent models to a neighbourhood of a Liouville torus in symplectic and Poisson manifolds focusing on b-Poisson/ b-symplectic manifolds. The semilocal equivalence with such models uses the corresponding action-angle theorems in these settings: the theorem of Liouville-Mineur-Arnold for symplectic manifolds and an action-angle theorem for regular Liouville tori in Poisson manifolds (Laurent- Gengoux et al., IntMath Res Notices IMRN 8: 1839-1869, 2011). Our models comprise regular Liouville tori of Poisson manifolds but also consider the Liouville tori on the singular locus of a b-Poisson manifold. For this latter class of Poisson structures we define a twisted cotangent model. The equivalence with this twisted cotangent model is given by an action-angle theorem recently proved by the authors and Scott (Math. Pures Appl. (9) 105(1):66-85, 2016). This viewpoint of cotangent models provides a new machinery to construct examples of integrable systems, which are especially valuable in the b-symplectic case where not many sources of examples are known. At the end of the paper we introduce non-degenerate singularities as lifted cotangent models on b-symplectic manifolds and discuss some generalizations of these models to general Poisson manifolds.

  9. The systems integration modeling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.; Williams, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the systems integration modeling system (SIMS), an analysis tool for the detailed evaluation of the structure and related performance of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) and its interface with waste generators. It's use for evaluations in support of system-level decisions as to FWMS configurations, the allocation, sizing, balancing and integration of functions among elements, and the establishment of system-preferred waste selection and sequencing methods and other operating strategies is presented. SIMS includes major analysis submodels which quantify the detailed characteristics of individual waste items, loaded casks and waste packages, simulate the detailed logistics of handling and processing discrete waste items and packages, and perform detailed cost evaluations

  10. An architecture for integration of multidisciplinary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey; Holst, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Integrating multidisciplinary models requires linking models: that may operate at different temporal and spatial scales; developed using different methodologies, tools and techniques; different levels of complexity; calibrated for different ranges of inputs and outputs, etc. On the other hand......, Enterprise Application Integration, and Integration Design Patterns. We developed an architecture of a multidisciplinary model integration framework that brings these three aspects of integration together. Service-oriented-based platform independent architecture that enables to establish loosely coupled...

  11. SYMBIOSIS: development, implementation, and assessment of a model curriculum across biology and mathematics at the introductory level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depelteau, Audrey M; Joplin, Karl H; Govett, Aimee; Miller, Hugh A; Seier, Edith

    2010-01-01

    "It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power." Alan Cohen (Used by permission. All rights reserved. For more information on Alan Cohen's books and programs, see (www.alancohen.com.) With the support of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) administration and a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the departments of Biological Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology-math integrated curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team, charged with teaching the 18 curriculum modules, designed this three-semester curriculum, known as SYMBIOSIS. This curriculum was piloted to two student cohorts during the developmental stage. The positive feedback and assessment results of this project have given us the foundation to implement the SYMBIOSIS curriculum as a replacement for the standard biology majors curriculum at the introductory level. This article addresses the history and development of the curriculum, previous assessment results and current assessment protocol, and the future of ETSU's approach to implementing the SYMBIOSIS curriculum.

  12. Cognitive learning during surgical residency. A model for curriculum evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R S; Wile, M Z; Persons, M L; Shuck, J M

    1987-02-01

    The program summary of the American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Exam (ABSITE) can be used to quantitate cognitive learning during a surgical residency and to identify areas of curricular weakness in a residency program. Knowledge on each question is categorized as high (known) or low (unknown) depending on the percentage of residents who answered correctly. Knowledge of Level 1 (entry) residents is then compared with Level 5 (exit) residents. Each ABSITE question can thus be categorized on entry versus exit as known-known, unknown-unknown, unknown-known, and known-unknown. Only about half of unknown knowledge on entry appears to become known on exit. Very little knowledge known on entry becomes unknown on exit. Weaknesses in specific subject areas can be readily identified by ranking questions according to the number of exiting residents who answer incorrectly. Use of this technique to quantitate cognitive learning in a residency program may allow objective assessment of changes in curriculum.

  13. Integrated modelling in materials and process technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    Integrated modelling of entire process sequences and the subsequent in-service conditions, and multiphysics modelling of the single process steps are areas that increasingly support optimisation of manufactured parts. In the present paper, three different examples of modelling manufacturing...... processes from the viewpoint of combined materials and process modelling are presented: solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron, integrated modelling of spray forming and multiphysics modelling of friction stir welding. The fourth example describes integrated modelling applied to a failure analysis...

  14. Integration of design applications with building models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman, C. M.; Jeng, T. S.; Chowdbury, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews various issues in the integration of applications with a building model... (Truncated.)......This paper reviews various issues in the integration of applications with a building model... (Truncated.)...

  15. The effects of an integrated Algebra 1/physical science curriculum on student achievement in Algebra 1, proportional reasoning and graphing abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Lettie Carol

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if an integrated curriculum in algebra 1/physical science facilitates acquisition of proportional reasoning and graphing abilities better than a non-integrated, traditional, algebra 1 curriculum. Also, this study was to ascertain if the integrated algebra 1/physical science curriculum resulted in greater student achievement in algebra 1. The curriculum used in the experimental class was SAM 9 (Science and Mathematics 9), an investigation-based curriculum that was written to integrate physical science and basic algebra content. The experiment was conducted over one school year. The subjects in the study were 61 ninth grade students. The experimental group consisted of one class taught concurrently by a mathematics teacher and a physical science teacher. The control group consisted of three classes of algebra 1 students taught by one mathematics teacher and taking physical science with other teachers in the school who were not participating in the SAM 9 program. This study utilized a quasi-experimental non-randomized control group pretest-posttest design. The investigator obtained end-of-algebra 1 scores from student records. The written open-ended graphing instruments and the proportional reasoning instrument were administered to both groups as pretests and posttests. The graphing instruments were also administered as a midtest. A two sample t-test for independent means was used to determine significant differences in achievement on the end-of-course algebra 1 test. Quantitative data from the proportional reasoning and graphing instruments were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance to determine differences in scores over time for the experimental and control groups. The findings indicate no significant difference between the experimental and control groups on the end-of-course algebra 1 test. Results also indicate no significant differences in proportional reasoning and graphing abilities between

  16. Twelve tips for applying change models to curriculum design, development and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm, Judy; Jones, Paul Kneath

    2017-10-25

    Drawing primarily from business and management literature and the authors' experience, these 12 tips provide guidance to organizations, teams, and individuals involved in curriculum or program development at undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education levels. The tips are based around change models and approaches and can help underpin successful curriculum review, development, and delivery, as well as fostering appropriate educational innovation. A range of tools exist to support systematic program development and review, but even relatively simple changes need to take account of many factors, including the complexity of the environment, stakeholder engagement, cultural and psychological aspects, and the importance of followers.

  17. Qualitative Analysis of Integration Adapter Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Daniel; Holzleitner, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Integration Adapters are a fundamental part of an integration system, since they provide (business) applications access to its messaging channel. However, their modeling and configuration remain under-represented. In previous work, the integration control and data flow syntax and semantics have been expressed in the Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) as a semantic model for message-based integration, while adapter and the related quality of service modeling were left for further studi...

  18. A Tiered Mentoring Model of Exposing and Engaging Students with Research Throughout the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, J.; Hayes, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Incorporating research into undergraduate curricula has been linked to improved critical thinking, intellectual independence, and student retention, resulting in a graduating population more ready for the workforce or graduate school. We have designed a three-tier model of undergraduate chemistry courses that enable first-year students with no previous research experience to gain the skills needed to develop, fund and execute independent research projects by the close of their undergraduate studies. First-year students are provided with context through a broadly focused introductory class that exposes them to current faculty research activities, and also gives them direct experience with the research process through peer mentored research teams as they participate in faculty-directed projects. Mid-career undergraduate students receive exposure and support in two formats: illustrative examples from current faculty research are incorporated into lessons in core classes, and courses specially designed to foster research independence. This is done by providing content and process mentoring as students develop independent projects, write proposals, and build relationships with faculty and graduate students in research groups. Advanced undergraduates further develop their research independence performing student-designed projects with faculty collaboration that frequently result in tangible research products. Further, graduate students gain experience in mentoring though formal training, as well as through actively mentoring mid-career undergraduates. This novel, integrated approach enables faculty to directly incorporate their research into all levels of the undergraduate curriculum while fostering undergraduates in developing and executing independent projects and empowering mentoring relationships.

  19. Assessing the Reliability of Curriculum-Based Measurement: An Application of Latent Growth Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seungsoo; Kim, Dong-Il; Branum-Martin, Lee; Wayman, Miya Miura; Espin, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of Latent Growth Modeling (LGM) as a method for estimating reliability of Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) progress-monitoring data. The LGM approach permits the error associated with each measure to differ at each time point, thus providing an alternative method for examining of the…

  20. Innovative curriculum: Integrating the bio-behavioral and social science principles across the LifeStages in basic science years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele Mookerjee, Anuradha; Fischer, Bradford D; Cavanaugh, Susan; Rajput, Vijay

    2018-05-20

    Behavioral and social science integration in clinical practice improves health outcomes across the life stages. The medical school curriculum requires an integration of the behavioral and social science principles in early medical education. We developed and delivered a four-week course entitled "LifeStages" to the first year medical students. The learning objectives of the bio-behavioral and social science principles along with the cultural, economic, political, and ethical parameters were integrated across the lifespan in the curriculum matrix. We focused on the following major domains: Growth and Brain Development; Sexuality, Hormones and Gender; Sleep; Cognitive and Emotional Development; Mobility, Exercise, Injury and Safety; Nutrition, Diet and Lifestyle; Stress and coping skills, Domestic Violence; Substance Use Disorders; Pain, Illness and Suffering; End of Life, Ethics and Death along with Intergenerational issues and Family Dynamics. Collaboration from the clinical and biomedical science departments led to the dynamic delivery of the course learning objectives and content. The faculty developed and led a scholarly discussion, using the case of a multi-racial, multi-generational family during Active Learning Group (ALG) sessions. The assessment in the LifeStages course involved multiple assessment tools: including the holistic assessment by the faculty facilitator inside ALGs, a Team-Based Learning (TBL) exercise, multiple choice questions and Team Work Assessment during which the students had to create a clinical case on a LifeStages domain along with the facilitators guide and learning objectives.

  1. Incorporating and evaluating an integrated gender-specific medicine curriculum: a survey study in Dutch GP training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielissen, Patrick W; Bottema, Ben JAM; Verdonk, Petra; Lagro-Janssen, Toine LM

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently set standards for gender-specific medicine training as an integrated part of the GP training curriculum. This paper describes the programme and evaluation of this training. Methods The programme is designed for GP registrars throughout the 3-year GP training. The modules emphasize interaction, application, and clinically integrated learning and teaching methods in peer groups. In 2005 - 2008, after completion of each tutorial, GP registrars were asked to fill in a questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale to assess the programme's methods and content. GP registrars were also asked to identify two learning points related to the programme. Results The teaching programme consists of five 3-hour modules that include gender themes related to and frequently seen by GPs such as in doctor-patient communication and cardiovascular disease. GP registrars evaluated the training course positively. The written learning points suggest that GP registrars have increased their awareness of why attention to gender-specific information is relevant. Conclusion In summary, gender-specific medicine training has been successfully integrated into an existing GP training curriculum. The modules and teaching methods are transferable to other training institutes for postgraduate training. The evaluation of the teaching programme shows a positive impact on GP registrars' gender awareness. PMID:19737396

  2. Incorporating and evaluating an integrated gender-specific medicine curriculum: a survey study in Dutch GP training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagro-Janssen Toine LM

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently set standards for gender-specific medicine training as an integrated part of the GP training curriculum. This paper describes the programme and evaluation of this training. Methods The programme is designed for GP registrars throughout the 3-year GP training. The modules emphasize interaction, application, and clinically integrated learning and teaching methods in peer groups. In 2005 - 2008, after completion of each tutorial, GP registrars were asked to fill in a questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale to assess the programme's methods and content. GP registrars were also asked to identify two learning points related to the programme. Results The teaching programme consists of five 3-hour modules that include gender themes related to and frequently seen by GPs such as in doctor-patient communication and cardiovascular disease. GP registrars evaluated the training course positively. The written learning points suggest that GP registrars have increased their awareness of why attention to gender-specific information is relevant. Conclusion In summary, gender-specific medicine training has been successfully integrated into an existing GP training curriculum. The modules and teaching methods are transferable to other training institutes for postgraduate training. The evaluation of the teaching programme shows a positive impact on GP registrars' gender awareness.

  3. Integrating GIS in the Middle School Curriculum: Impacts on Diverse Students' Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna; Alibrandi, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    This case study conducted with 1,425 middle school students in Palm Beach County, Florida, included a treatment group receiving GIS instruction (256) and a control group without GIS instruction (1,169). Quantitative analyses on standardized test scores indicated that inclusion of GIS in middle school curriculum had a significant effect on student…

  4. Pitfalls and opportunities of teaching veterinary parasitology within an integrated curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, D.C.K.

    2018-01-01

    The Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University has seen three major curriculum changes, in 1995, 2001 and 2007. The last change was made because of the European change to a Bachelor-Master system. Almost each time teaching hours tagged for veterinary parasitology have been reduced to

  5. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Kristie; Wright, Caroline; Osborne, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  6. Sustaining Environmental Pedagogy in Times of Educational Conservatism: A Case Study of Integrated Curriculum Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Erin; Breunig, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Although the global call for environmental education is persistent, on a local or regional level, this call can be confronted by educational policies that drive environmental education out of the curriculum. This paper reports on a qualitative case study of the factors contributing to the sustainability of three teacher-driven integrated…

  7. The Integrated Curriculum, University Teacher Identity and Teaching Culture: The Effects of an Interdisciplinary Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Israel Alonso; Sancho, Naiara Berasategi

    2017-01-01

    The results of an investigative process are reported that centre on the impact that modular curricular organization and its interdisciplinary activity are having on the teaching culture in the Degree in Social Education at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/ EHU). This understanding of the curriculum is a seminal change for teaching staff…

  8. Knowledge that Counts in a Global Community: Exploring the Contribution of Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Leonie J.; Venville, Grady; Wallace, John

    2011-01-01

    As the third millennium progresses, we are faced with increasing pressures relating to climate change and the sustainability of life on Earth. Concerned citizens are realizing that the responsibility to respond is both local and global. There is an increasing sense of urgency about the need to reform the processes of schooling and curriculum to…

  9. Integrating Ethics across the Curriculum: A Pilot Study to Assess Students' Ethical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Susan L.; Mansfield, Nancy Reeves; Sherman, Margaret B.

    2012-01-01

    At Georgia State University (GSU), undergraduate and graduate business students are introduced to ethical theory and decision making in the required legal environment of business course, but ethics instruction in the functional areas is sporadic and uncoordinated. After a broad overview of the history of ethics in the business curriculum in Part…

  10. A Technical Infrastructure to Integrate Dynamics AX ERP and CRM into University Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Hayden; Hall, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Enterprise Resource Planning and Customer Relationship Management are becoming important topics at the university level, and are increasingly receiving course-level attention in the curriculum. In fact, the Information Systems Body of Knowledge specifically identifies Enterprise Architecture as an Information Systems-specific knowledge area. The…

  11. Integrating Mission-Based Values into Accounting Curriculum: Catholic Social Teaching and Introductory Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hise, Joan Vane; Koeplin, John P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents several reasons why mission-based values, in this case Catholic Social Teaching (CST), should be incorporated into a university business curriculum. The CST tenets include the sanctity of human life; call to family, community, and participation; rights and responsibilities; option for the poor and vulnerable; the dignity of…

  12. Integrating Geographic Information Systems in Business School Curriculum: An Initial Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A.; Arnette, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information systems have experienced rapid growth and user adoption over the last four decades, due to an increasing value to the business community. However, business schools are not teaching geospatial concepts and the related location intelligence to their students. This curriculum decision seems completely at odds with business'…

  13. Scaling up Sexuality Education in Senegal: Integrating Family Life Education into the National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Katie; Traoré Seck, Aminata; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Svanemyr, Joar

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, school-based sexuality education has evolved over 20 years from family life education (FLE) pilot projects into cross-curricular subjects located within the national curriculum of primary and secondary schools. We conducted a literature review and semi-structured interviews to gather information regarding the scale and nature of FLE…

  14. Meeting the Challenge of IS Curriculum Modernization: A Guide to Overhaul, Integration, and Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Sean T.; Frost, Raymond D.; Matta, Vic; Huang, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Information Systems (IS) departments are facing challenging times as enrollments decline and the field evolves, thus necessitating large-scale curriculum changes. Our experience shows that many IS departments are in such a predicament as they have not evolved content quickly enough to keep it relevant, they do a poor job coordinating curriculum…

  15. Integration of Computational Chemistry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Hill, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in software and hardware have promoted the use of computational chemistry in all branches of chemical research to probe important chemical concepts and to support experimentation. Consequently, it has become imperative that students in the modern undergraduate curriculum become adept at performing simple calculations using computational…

  16. The Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies: A New Case for Curriculum Integration in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Richard; Poledink, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The Ford Motor Company launched a new pre-engineering curriculum for high schools in the Fall of 2004. Building on an earlier manufacturing program, the development process for the Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies took approximately three years. Ford and the course designers wanted the new program to incorporate the best principles and…

  17. A Study of EFL Curriculum of China's Science and Technology Institutes under Graded Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunyan; Han, Fei

    2018-01-01

    Recent years, most universities and colleges have been reforming the English as a foreign language (EFL) curriculum system in China. Some reformed EFL curriculum into English for Specific Purposes (ESP) courses, for instance, while some conducted a graded teaching model in EFL teaching. However, the effect of this reform was not so good,…

  18. Integrable models of quantum optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudson Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We give an overview of exactly solvable many-body models of quantum optics. Among them is a system of two-level atoms which interact with photons propagating in a one-dimensional (1D chiral waveguide; exact eigenstates of this system can be explicitly constructed. This approach is used also for a system of closely located atoms in the usual (non-chiral waveguide or in 3D space. Moreover, it is shown that for an arbitrary atomic system with a cascade spontaneous radiative decay, the fluorescence spectrum can be described by an exact analytic expression which accounts for interference of emitted photons. Open questions related with broken integrability are discussed.

  19. Key steps for integrating a basic science throughout a medical school curriculum using an e-learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Eline Agnès; Franson, Kari Lanette

    2009-09-01

    Basic sciences can be integrated into the medical school curriculum via e-learning. The process of integrating a basic science in this manner resembles a curricular change. The change usually begins with an idea for using e-learning to teach a basic science and establishing the need for the innovation. In the planning phase, learning outcomes are formulated and a prototype of the program is developed based on the desired requirements. A realistic concept is formed after considering the limitations of the current institute. Next, a project team is assembled to develop the program and plan its integration. Incorporation of the e-learning program is facilitated by a well-developed and communicated integration plan. Various course coordinators are contacted to determine content of the e-learning program as well as establish assessment. Linking the e-learning program to existing course activities and thereby applying the basic science into the clinical context enhances the degree of integration. The success of the integration is demonstrated by a positive assessment of the program including favourable cost-benefit analysis and improved student performance. Lastly, when the program becomes institutionalised, continuously updating content and technology (when appropriate), and evaluating the integration contribute to the prolonged survival of the e-learning program.

  20. Integration of Information Literacy into the Curriculum: Constructive Alignment from Theory into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Dahlqvist

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Librarian-teacher cooperation is essential for the integration of information literacy into course syllabi. Therefore, a common theoretical and methodological platform is needed. As librarians at Kristianstad University we have had the opportunity to develop such a platform when teaching information literacy in a basic course for teachers in higher education pedagogy. Information literacy is taught in context with academic writing, distance learning and teaching, and development of course syllabi. Constructive Alignment in Theory: We used constructive alignment in designing our part of the course. John Biggs’ ideas tell us that assessment tasks (ATs should be aligned to what is intended to be learned. Intended learning outcomes (ILOs specify teaching/learning activities (TLAs based on the content of learning. TLAs should be designed in ways that enable students to construct knowledge from their own experience. The ILOs for the course are to have arguments for the role of information literacy in higher education and ideas of implementing them in TLAs. The content of learning is for example the concept of information literacy, theoretical perspectives and constructive alignment for integration in course syllabi. TLAs are written pre-lecture reflections on the concept of information literacy, used as a starting point for the three-hour seminar. Learning reflections are written afterwards. The AT is to revise a syllabus (preferably using constructive alignment for a course the teacher is responsible for, where information literacy must be integrated with the other parts and topics of the course. Constructive Alignment in Practice: Using constructive alignment has taught us that this model serves well as the foundation of the theoretical and methodological platform for librarian-teacher cooperation when integrating information literacy in course syllabi. It contains all important aspects of the integration of information literacy in course

  1. Topological quantum theories and integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Niemi, A.J.; Semenoff, G.; Tirkkonen, O.

    1991-01-01

    The path-integral generalization of the Duistermaat-Heckman integration formula is investigated for integrable models. It is shown that for models with periodic classical trajectories the path integral reduces to a form similar to the finite-dimensional Duistermaat-Heckman integration formula. This provides a relation between exactness of the stationary-phase approximation and Morse theory. It is also argued that certain integrable models can be related to topological quantum theories. Finally, it is found that in general the stationary-phase approximation presumes that the initial and final configurations are in different polarizations. This is exemplified by the quantization of the SU(2) coadjoint orbit

  2. A Quasi-Experimental Control Group Design Study to Determine the Effect of Integrating Character Education into a High School Social Studies Curriculum through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to offer evidence for the development of student character through the integration of historical storytelling into a social studies classroom. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of character education through historical storytelling integrated into a United States history curriculum on…

  3. Clinical leadership and pre-registration nursing programmes: A model for clinical leadership and a prospective curriculum implementation and evaluation research strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    To present for wider debate a conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a proposed implementation plan. Globally, leadership in nursing has become a significant issue. Whilst there is continued support for leadership preparation in pre-registration nursing programmes, there have been very few published accounts of curriculum content and/or pedagogical approaches that foster clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing. A doctoral research study has resulted in the creation of an overarching model for clinical leadership. A multi-method research study using theoretical and empirical literature 1974-2015, a focus group, expert opinion and a national on-line survey. A conceptual model of clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programme is presented, including the infinity loop of clinical leadership, an integral curriculum thread and a conceptual model: a curriculum-pedagogy nexus for clinical leadership. In order to test out usability and evaluate effectiveness, a multi method programme of research in one school of nursing in Australia is outlined. Implementation of the proposed conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a programme of (post-doctoral) research will contribute to what is known about curriculum content and pedagogy for nurse academics. Importantly, for nursing students and the profession as a whole, there is a clearer expectation of what clinical leadership might look like in the novice registered nurse. For nurse academics a model is offered for consideration in curriculum design and implementation with an evaluation strategy that could be replicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrating climate-smart rice agriculture into secondary-level curriculum: lessons from three high schools in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Jaime A; Balmeo, Katherine P; Berto, Jayson C; Saludez, Fredierick M; Villaflor, Jennifer D; Pagdanganan, Argie M

    2016-01-01

    Climate change (CC) is an urgent and highly relevant topic that must be integrated into the school curriculum. Literature on CC integration, however, is scarce, let alone literature on integrating climate-smart rice agriculture (CSRA). Bringing CSRA lessons into the classroom means the chance is higher that climate-smart technologies on rice will reach even the most far-flung areas of the Philippines, which stand to be among the most vulnerable as regards the negative impacts of CC. This paper shares experiences drawn from three high schools in the Philippines on integrating CSRA into their curriculum. The research centers on appropriate teaching tools/strategies, push and exogenous factors in CSRA integration, and the types of information that are likely to be shared by the students with their farmer-parents or other farmers in their communities. Surveys among participating students (n = 155) and three focus group discussions among key school officials were conducted. Different teaching methods and/or tools were found to be generally useful in various contexts. Photos and videos, however, emerged as the most effective tools across sites. The livelihood source of the students does have a bearing on the complexity of messages that they can convey. Students from rice-farming households can competently discuss even highly complex adaptation and mitigation information with their farmer-parents or other farmers. Thorough message-framing is necessary to maximize student involvement as well as to increase production of education-entertainment (edutainment) materials to be utilized in teaching. This study, in general, contributes to CC education by bringing in best-fit practices in teaching tools and strategies to mobilize students to act on urgent matters relating to the impacts of CC. It also advises on considering exogenous factors that might affect CC education by taking into account those that are equally capable of shaping students' perception and knowledge.

  5. Testing periodically integrated autoregressive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPeriodically integrated time series require a periodic differencing filter to remove the stochastic trend. A non-periodic integrated time series needs the first-difference filter for similar reasons. When the changing seasonal fluctuations for the non-periodic integrated series can be

  6. Integration and Validation of Hysteroscopy Simulation in the Surgical Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elessawy, Mohamed; Skrzipczyk, Moritz; Eckmann-Scholz, Christel; Maass, Nicolai; Mettler, Liselotte; Guenther, Veronika; van Mackelenbergh, Marion; Bauerschlag, Dirk O; Alkatout, Ibrahim

    The primary objective of our study was to test the construct validity of the HystSim hysteroscopic simulator to determine whether simulation training can improve the acquisition of hysteroscopic skills regardless of the previous levels of experience of the participants. The secondary objective was to analyze the performance of a selected task, using specially designed scoring charts to help reduce the learning curve for both novices and experienced surgeons. The teaching of hysteroscopic intervention has received only scant attention, focusing mainly on the development of physical models and box simulators. This encouraged our working group to search for a suitable hysteroscopic simulator module and to test its validation. We decided to use the HystSim hysteroscopic simulator, which is one of the few such simulators that has already completed a validation process, with high ratings for both realism and training capacity. As a testing tool for our study, we selected the myoma resection task. We analyzed the results using the multimetric score system suggested by HystSim, allowing a more precise interpretation of the results. Between June 2014 and May 2015, our group collected data on 57 participants of minimally invasive surgical training courses at the Kiel School of Gynecological Endoscopy, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel. The novice group consisted of 42 medical students and residents with no prior experience in hysteroscopy, whereas the expert group consisted of 15 participants with more than 2 years of experience of advanced hysteroscopy operations. The overall results demonstrated that all participants attained significant improvements between their pretest and posttests, independent of their previous levels of experience (p hysteroscopic skills, proving an adequate construct validation of the HystSim. Using the multimetric scoring system enabled a more accurate analysis of the performance of the

  7. Developing a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum for professionalism and scientific integrity training for biomedical graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L; Peiffer, Ann M; Lambros, Ann; Guthold, Martin; Johnson, A Daniel; Tytell, Michael; Ronca, April E; Eldridge, J Charles

    2010-10-01

    A multidisciplinary faculty committee designed a curriculum to shape biomedical graduate students into researchers with a high commitment to professionalism and social responsibility and to provide students with tools to navigate complex, rapidly evolving academic and societal environments with a strong ethical commitment. The curriculum used problem-based learning (PBL), because it is active and learner-centred and focuses on skill and process development. Two courses were developed: Scientific Professionalism: Scientific Integrity addressed discipline-specific and broad professional norms and obligations for the ethical practice of science and responsible conduct of research (RCR). Scientific Professionalism: Bioethics and Social Responsibility focused on current ethical and bioethical issues within the scientific profession, and implications of research for society. Each small-group session examined case scenarios that included: (1) learning objectives for professional norms and obligations; (2) key ethical issues and philosophies within each topic area; (3) one or more of the RCR instructional areas; and (4) at least one type of moral reflection. Cases emphasised professional standards, obligations and underlying philosophies for the ethical practice of science, competing interests of stakeholders and oversight of science (internal and external). To our knowledge, this is the first use of a longitudinal, multi-semester PBL course to teach scientific integrity and professionalism. Both faculty and students endorsed the active learning approach for these topics, in contrast to a compliance-based approach that emphasises learning rules and regulations.

  8. Advocacy and Awareness: Integrating LGBTQ Health Education Into the Prelicensure Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiel, Paula L; Elertson, Kathleen M

    2018-05-01

    An identified gap in the curriculum related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) health needs prompted nursing faculty to implement a collaborative educational offering. LGBTQ individuals experience significant health disparities, compared with heterosexual counterparts. Enhancing established LGBTQ population-specific training to highlight health disparities and awareness of special health care needs was piloted with two clinical groups of senior baccalaureate nursing students (N = 16). Didactic, simulated, and panel discussion related to LGBTQ terminology, current health standards of care, and the importance of advocacy was provided by campus advocates, experienced health care providers, and a student panel identifying as LGBTQ. Health specific learning outcomes were established and evaluated. Posteducation, anonymous surveys, and journaling were completed. Survey respondents (n = 13) reported increased awareness and understanding of health disparities specific to the LGBTQ population. LGBTQ-specific health education has been implemented as a permanent curriculum change. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(5):312-314.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Interprofessional faculty development: integration of oral health into the geriatric diabetes curriculum, from theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dounis G

    2013-12-01

    -training interprofessional team building knowledge improved significantly. The health care faculty post-training attitude scores improved significantly, with heightened awareness of the unique oral–systemic care needs of older adults with type 2 diabetes, supporting an interprofessional team approach to care management. In addition, the health care faculty viewed communication across disciplines as being essential and interprofessional training as being vital to the core curriculum of each discipline. Significant improvement occurred in the perception survey items for team accountability and use of uniform terminology to bridge communication gaps.Conclusion: Attitude, knowledge, and perceptions of health care faculty regarding interprofessional team building and the team approach to management of the oral–systemic manifestations of chronic disease in older adults was improved. Uniform language to promote communication across health professionals, care settings, and caregivers/patients, was noted. Interprofessional team building/care planning should be integrated in core curricula.Keywords: team building, patient-centered care, oral–systemic, older adults

  10. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  11. Correlations between Academic Achievement and Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students Experiencing Integrated Curriculum Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Chun Yeh; Cheng-Fang Yen; Chung-Sheng Lai; Chun-Hsiung Huang; Keh-Min Liu; In-Ting Huang

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the correlations between academic achievement and levels of anxiety and depression in medical students who were experiencing curriculum reform. The differences in academic achievement and the directions of correlations between academic achievement and anxiety and depression among the medical students with different levels of anxiety and depression were also examined. Grade 1 students from graduate-entry program and grade 3 students from undergraduate-entry program ...

  12. Flow Formulation-based Model for the Curriculum-based Course Timetabling Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Niels-Christian Fink; Kristiansen, Simon; Sørensen, Matias

    2015-01-01

    problem. This decreases the number of integer variables signicantly and improves the performance compared to the basic formulation. It also shows competitiveness with other approaches based on mixed integer programming from the literature and improves the currently best known lower bound on one data...... instance in the benchmark data set from the second international timetabling competition.......In this work we will present a new mixed integer programming formulation for the curriculum-based course timetabling problem. We show that the model contains an underlying network model by dividing the problem into two models and then connecting the two models back into one model using a maximum ow...

  13. The Influence of Curriculum, Instruction, Technology, and Social Interactions on Two Fifth-Grade Students' Epistemologies in Modeling Throughout a Model-Based Curriculum Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hamin; Schwarz, Christina V.

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, reform efforts in science education have increasingly attended to engaging students in scientific practices such as scientific modeling. Engaging students in scientific modeling can help them develop their epistemologies by allowing them to attend to the roles of mechanism and empirical evidence when constructing and revising models. In this article, we present our in-depth case study of how two fifth graders—Brian and Joon—who were students in a public school classroom located in a Midwestern state shifted their epistemologies in modeling as they participated in the enactment of a technologically enhanced, model-based curriculum unit on evaporation and condensation. First, analyses of Brian's and Joon's models indicate that their epistemologies in modeling related to explanation and empirical evidence shifted productively throughout the unit. Additionally, while their initial and final epistemologies in modeling were similar, the pathways in which their epistemologies in modeling shifted differed. Next, analyses of the classroom activities illustrate how various components of the learning ecology including technological tools, the teacher's scaffolding remarks, and students' collective activities and conversations, were marshaled in the service of the two students' shifting epistemologies in modeling. These findings suggest a nuanced view of individual learners' engagement in scientific modeling, their epistemological shifts in the practice, and the roles of technology and other components of a modeling-oriented learning environment for such shifts.

  14. Integration of Hands-On Team Training into Existing Curriculum Improves Both Technical and Nontechnical Skills in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Robert C; Owei, Lily; Rao, Raghavendra; Riddle, Elijah W; Brooks, Ari D; Dempsey, Daniel T; Morris, Jon B; Neylan, Christopher J; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    Nontechnical skills are an essential component of surgical education and a major competency assessed by the ACGME milestones project. However, the optimal way to integrate nontechnical skills training into existing curricula and then objectively evaluate the outcome is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect laparoscopic team-based task training would have on the nontechnical skills needed for laparoscopic surgery. 9 PGY-1 residents underwent an established training curriculum for teaching the knowledge and technical skills involved in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Initial training involved a didactic session, expert-led practice on a porcine model in a simulated operating room and laparoscopic skills practice on a virtual reality trainer. Residents then performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the same porcine model as a preintervention test. Three to four months following this, residents were subjected to specific nontechnical skills training involving 2 simple team-based laparoscopic tasks. They then practiced a further 4 to 6 hours on the virtual reality trainer. A repeat postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomy was then performed 3 to 4 months after nontechnical skills training. Both the preintervention and postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomies were audiovisually recorded and then evaluated by 2 independent surgeons in a blinded fashion. Technical skills were assessed using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) and a technique specific rating scale (TRS) that we developed for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Nontechnical skills were assessed using nontechnical skills for surgeons (NOTSS). Residents also completed a survey at the beginning and end of the training. Tertiary care, university based teaching institution. A total of 9 general surgery residents at the intern level. The mean OSATS score improved from 13.7 ± 1.24 to 26.7 ± 0.31 (p training. There was a strong correlation between OSATS and

  15. "Thinking ethics": a novel, pilot, proof-of-concept program of integrating ethics into the Physiology curriculum in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Savitha; Vaz, Manjulika; Vaz, Mario

    2017-06-01

    Integrating medical ethics into the physiology teaching-learning program has been largely unexplored in India. The objective of this exercise was to introduce an interactive and integrated ethics program into the Physiology course of first-year medical students and to evaluate their perceptions. Sixty medical students (30 men, 30 women) underwent 11 sessions over a 7-mo period. Two of the Physiology faculty conducted these sessions (20-30 min each) during the routine physiology (theory/practicals) classes that were of shorter duration and could, therefore, accommodate the discussion of related ethical issues. This exercise was in addition to the separate ethics classes conducted by the Medical Ethics department. The sessions were open ended, student centered, and designed to stimulate critical thinking. The students' perceptions were obtained through a semistructured questionnaire and focused group discussions. The students found the program unique, thought provoking, fully integrated, and relevant. It seldom interfered with the physiology teaching. They felt that the program sensitized them about ethical issues and prepared them for their clinical years, to be "ethical doctors." Neutral observers who evaluated each session felt that the integrated program was relevant to the preclinical year and that the program was appropriate in its content, delivery, and student involvement. An ethics course taught in integration with Physiology curriculum was found to be beneficial, feasible, and compatible with Physiology by students as well as neutral observers. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Integrable models in classical and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurco, B.

    1991-01-01

    Integrable systems are investigated, especially the rational and trigonometric Gaudin models. The Gaudin models are diagonalized for the case of classical Lie algebras. Their relation to the other integrable models and to the quantum inverse scattering method is investigated. Applications in quantum optics and plasma physics are discussed. (author). 94 refs

  17. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Composites Integrated Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Composites Integrated Modeling (CIM) Element developed low cost, lightweight, and efficient composite structures, materials and manufacturing technologies with...

  18. Modeling integrated biomass gasification business concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Ince; Ted Bilek; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2011-01-01

    Biomass gasification is an approach to producing energy and/or biofuels that could be integrated into existing forest product production facilities, particularly at pulp mills. Existing process heat and power loads tend to favor integration at existing pulp mills. This paper describes a generic modeling system for evaluating integrated biomass gasification business...

  19. Millennials in action: a student-guided effort in curriculum-integration of library skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Stewart

    2004-01-01

    By working in tandem with the Coordinator of Information Management Education (IME) at the University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library, students serving on the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Curriculum Committee helped map out a three-year plan for training in library and information literacy skills. Through meetings and e-mail exchanges with the student representatives, the IME Coordinator developed a series of specific course-related instruction and assessment opportunities which would cover tertiary resources, bibliographic searching, evidence-based pharmacy, and advanced information skills.

  20. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: Part I. Impact on Students' Career Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Canizares, Genevieve; Navarro, Justine; Connell, Michelle; Jancar, Sonya; Stinson, Jennifer; Victor, Charles

    2015-11-24

    Student nurses often embark on their professional careers with a lack of the knowledge and confidence necessary to navigate them successfully. An ongoing process of career planning and development (CPD) is integral to developing career resilience, one key attribute that may enable nurses to respond to and influence their ever-changing work environments with the potential outcome of increased job satisfaction and commitment to the profession. A longitudinal mixed methods study of a curriculum-based CPD program was conducted to determine the program's effects on participating students, new graduate nurses, and faculty. This first in a series of three papers about the overall study's components reports on undergraduate student outcomes. Findings demonstrate that the intervention group reported higher perceived career resilience than the control group, who received the standard nursing curriculum without CPD. The program offered students the tools and resources to become confident, self-directed, and active in shaping their engagement in their academic program to help achieve their career goals, whereas control group students continued to look uncertainly to others for answers and direction. The intervention group recognized the value of this particular CPD program and both groups, albeit differently, highlighted the key role that faculty played in students' career planning.

  1. Integration of Structural Knowledge in Design Studio Project: Assessment Study of Curriculum In Architecture Course in University Of Malaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural education should advance in parallel with the industrial growth of building technology. Universities as producers of future architects have yet to develop curriculums for building technology to suit the growth of the building industry. This gap between education and industrial growth has been a topic of debate for many researchers who are concerned about architectural pedagogy. Architectural instruction further aggravated the problem whereby in most architectural schools worldwide, teaching is divided between the design studio, where the design projects are taught and lecture classes where the technical parts are taught. The latter should be integrated with design studio to enhance design levels. Students face difficulty integrating and applying the structural knowledge gained from structure classes into their design. One explanation for this deficiency is because the current architectural structure subject's content is borrowed from an engineering syllabus. This study will examine the course content, instruction styles and method of teaching structure subjects and will investigate the learning outcomes of design studio through students' performance and perception in integrating structural knowledge in their design projects. Respondents were students from Year 1 to Year 5 doing their Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Architecture degrees in University of Malaya. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the design studio coordinators and structure lecturers. This study aims to find the ideal course content/method of teaching to facilitate more integration between structure and design studio.

  2. Phenomenological Investigation of Elementary School Teachers Who Successfully Integrated Instructional Technology into the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lori Raquel; Shepard, MaryFriend

    2011-01-01

    Technology integration in school curricula promotes student achievement, yet many teachers are not successfully integrating technology for learning. This phenomenological study explored the strategies of 10 elementary teachers in Georgia who overcame barriers to technology integration to successfully incorporate lessons within the public school…

  3. Students' perception of an integrated approach of teaching entire sequence of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacotherapeutics courses in PharmD curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Schweiger, Teresa A

    2015-04-01

    To develop an integrated approach of teaching medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacotherapeutics and to evaluate students' perceptions of integration as they progress through the PharmD curriculum. Instructors from each discipline jointly mapped the course contents and sequenced the course delivery based on organ systems/disease states. Medicinal chemistry and pharmacology contents were integrated and aligned with respective pharmacotherapeutics contents to deliver throughout second and third year of the curriculum. In addition to classroom lectures, active learning strategies such as recitation, case studies, online-discussion boards, open book quizzes, and writing patient progress notes were incorporated to enhance student learning. Student learning was assessed by examination scores, patient progress notes, and writing assignments. The impact of course integration was evaluated by a Web-based survey. One hundred and sixty-nine students completed the survey. Students exhibited positive attitude toward the integrated approach of teaching medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. The P3 and P4 students better appreciated the benefits of integration compared to P2 students (P < .05). Students perceived the course integration as an effective way of learning. This study supports course improvement and the viability of expanding the concept of integration to other courses in the curriculum. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Development of a death education curriculum model for the general public using DACUM method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Ahn, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Chong-Hyung; Lee, Moo-Sik; Kim, Moon-Joon; Arma, Park; Hwang, Hye-Jeong; Song, Hyeon-Dong; Shim, Moon-Sook; Kim, Kwang-Hwan

    2016-05-18

    In order to analyze tasks of the death education curriculum for the public, DACUM method was used. A committee for DACUM was gathered and a survey was conducted on professors of health care, humanities and social sciences for an interdisciplinary study. In the survey used to verify the model for death education for the public, a compilation based on difficulty and importance factor shows that the 27 tasks including the psychological changes in terminally ill or suicidal patients, healing of stress, acceptance and understanding of death and suicide prevention were identified as needing to be included in the curriculum. The data thus concluded will have to be reviewed when they are applied to actual education to revise the education program to make it more appropriate.

  5. The Johns Hopkins model of psychological first aid (RAPID-PFA): curriculum development and content validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, George S; Barnett, Daniel J; Links, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    There appears to be virtual universal endorsement of the need for and value of acute "psychological first aid" (PFA) in the wake of trauma and disasters. In this paper, we describe the development of the curriculum for The Johns Hopkins RAPID-PFA model of psychological first aid. We employed an adaptation of the basic framework for the development of a clinical science as recommended by Millon which entailed: historical review, theoretical development, and content validation. The process of content validation of the RAPID-PFA curriculum entailed the assessment of attitudes (confidence in the application of PFA interventions, preparedness in the application of PFA); knowledge related to the application of immediate mental health interventions; and behavior (the ability to recognize clinical markers in the field as assessed via a videotape recognition exercise). Results of the content validation phase suggest the six-hour RAPID-PFA curriculum, initially based upon structural modeling analysis, can improve confidence in the application of PFA interventions, preparedness in the application of PFA, knowledge related to the application of immediate mental health interventions, and the ability to recognize clinical markers in the field as assessed via a videotape recognition exercise.

  6. A Fractionally Integrated Wishart Stochastic Volatility Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThere has recently been growing interest in modeling and estimating alternative continuous time multivariate stochastic volatility models. We propose a continuous time fractionally integrated Wishart stochastic volatility (FIWSV) process. We derive the conditional Laplace transform of

  7. Integrating Prevention of Mother to Child HIV Transmission competencies into the nursing curriculum: Methodological lessons from a university-based undergraduate programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbombo, Nomafrench; Bimerew, Million

    2012-11-14

    South Africa (SA) has the highest number of women infected with HIV and AIDS during pregnancy, which results in more than 70 000 infected babies being born each year AIDS is the major contributor to maternal and child morbidities and mortalities in the country. To combat this, the SA government has developed a national policy to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT). However, for effective implementation of this policy, there is a dire need for a competent, skilled health worker to render the service. In response to this, the School of Nursing at the University of the Western Cape has integrated PMTCT competencies into the undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing Science curriculum. In this paper, we described teaching and learning approaches used to integrate PMTCT competencies, including the skills laboratory methodology and case-based learning, as well as a portfolio of evidence assessment tool. A quantitative descriptive design was used to analyse data collected from students in regard to assessment of PMTCT competencies achieved. The study used the conceptual framework of Lenburg's competency outcomes and performance assessment model, which focuses on competency development and assessment in a clinical environment. HIV competencies, including PMTCT, should be integrated both theoretically and at service delivery into other nursing and midwifery competencies, including assessment strategies. Provincial policies in provision of antiretrovirals by nurses and midwives become barriers to successful implementation of PMTCT, resulting in limited learning opportunities for students to practice PMTCT competencies. Further research is required to assess an attribute, affect, which is another prong for competencies.

  8. NEW PATTERNS IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION--EMERGING CURRICULUM MODELS FOR THE AMERICAN COLLEGE. NEW DIMENSIONS IN HIGHER EDUCATION, NUMBER 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AXELROD, JOSEPH

    THIS REVIEW OF A LITERATURE SEARCH PRESENTS A DESCRIPTION OF NEW MODELS OF UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUMS THAT ARE COMING INTO EXISTENCE AND COMPARES THE PURPOSES OF THESE NEW MODELS WITH THE WEAKNESSES OF THE OLD MODELS THAT THE NEW MODELS SEEK TO CORRECT. THE NEW MODELS OF UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION ARE SEEKING TO CREATE, EVEN ON THE LARGEST CAMPUSES,…

  9. Data requirements for integrated near field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilems, R.E.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Faust, C.R.; Brecher, A.

    1981-01-01

    The coupled nature of the various processes in the near field require that integrated models be employed to assess long term performance of the waste package and repository. The nature of the integrated near field models being compiled under the SCEPTER program are discussed. The interfaces between these near field models and far field models are described. Finally, near field data requirements are outlined in sufficient detail to indicate overall programmatic guidance for data gathering activities

  10. The integration of computerised accounting in the accounting curriculum as an educational learning curve for students entering the business world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmarie Papageorgiou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available At universities, educating students on real-life practices is one of the key drivers in a changing academic environment. Academic institutions encourage the study of the learning environment and ensure that appropriate strategies are in place for educating students. A first-year Accounting I student stated the importance of computerised accounting: ‘Computerised accounting is used in the workplace and therefore using it in varsity, grants students a view on how things will be after completion of their respective degrees.’ Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to empirically investigate the perceived acquisition of information technology (IT knowledge and determine the skills required for students to convert the knowledge gained into actions as a learning curve for accounting students entering the business world. The results indicated that students’ knowledge of Accounting I increased with the integration of computerised Accounting in the Accounting I Curriculum.

  11. The research of 4th grade mathematical curriculum electronic picture book construction and development in integrating indigenous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen Ting; Hsin Wang, Juei

    2017-02-01

    This research aimed at integrating Seediq culture and mathematical course design for fourth-grade elementary school, and then transforming this mathematical course into an electronic picture book. During the process of electronic book development, the researchers collected videos of six participants engaged in discussion, reflection minutes after the meeting written by the attendants, the researchers' observation and review journals, and conversations with the participants. Then, researchers utilized Content Analysis to explore, try, review and retry steps of electronic book making process. The main findings: There are four periods of electronic book making process, research occurrence period, curriculum design period, electronic book transformation period, and result evaluation period. The picture book included the White Stone Legend born from Seediq seniors, historical battle for hunting field between tribes, and concepts of approximation, angle, triangle, and quadrangle features. At last, with the research result, this article presents the corroboration of related works, and then proposes suggestions of electronic book teaching and follow-up studies.

  12. Correlations between academic achievement and anxiety and depression in medical students experiencing integrated curriculum reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Liu, Keh-Min; Huang, In-Ting

    2007-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the correlations between academic achievement and levels of anxiety and depression in medical students who were experiencing curriculum reform. The differences in academic achievement and the directions of correlations between academic achievement and anxiety and depression among the medical students with different levels of anxiety and depression were also examined. Grade 1 students from graduate-entry program and grade 3 students from undergraduate-entry program in their first semester of the new curriculum were recruited to complete the Zung's Anxiety and Depression Scale twice to examine their levels of anxiety and depression. Their academic achievement ratings in the four blocks of the first semester of the new curriculum were collected. The results indicated that no significant correlation was found between academic achievement and global anxiety and depression. However, by dividing the medical students into low, moderate and high level anxiety or depression groups, those who had poorer academic achievement in the first learning block were more likely to have higher levels of depression in the first psychologic assessment. Among the medical students who were in the high anxiety level group in the first psychologic assessment, those who had more severe anxiety had poorer academic achievement in the fourth learning block. Among the medical students who were in the low anxiety level group in the second psychologic assessment, those who had more severe anxiety had better academic achievement in the fourth learning block. Among the medical students who were in the moderate anxiety level group in the second psychologic assessment, those who had more severe anxiety had poorer academic achievement in the second learning block. Among the medical students who were in the high depression level group in the second psychologic assessment, those who had more severe depression had poorer academic achievement in the fourth learning block. The

  13. Correlations between Academic Achievement and Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students Experiencing Integrated Curriculum Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Yeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the correlations between academic achievement and levels of anxiety and depression in medical students who were experiencing curriculum reform. The differences in academic achievement and the directions of correlations between academic achievement and anxiety and depression among the medical students with different levels of anxiety and depression were also examined. Grade 1 students from graduate-entry program and grade 3 students from undergraduate-entry program in their first semester of the new curriculum were recruited to complete the Zung's Anxiety and Depression Scale twice to examine their levels of anxiety and depression. Their academic achievement ratings in the four blocks of the first semester of the new curriculum were collected. The results indicated that no significant correlation was found between academic achievement and global anxiety and depression. However, by dividing the medical students into low, moderate and high level anxiety or depression groups, those who had poorer academic achievement in the first learning block were more likely to have higher levels of depression in the first psychologic assessment. Among the medical students who were in the high anxiety level group in the first psychologic assessment, those who had more severe anxiety had poorer academic achievement in the fourth learning block. Among the medical students who were in the low anxiety level group in the second psychologic assessment, those who had more severe anxiety had better academic achievement in the fourth learning block. Among the medical students who were in the moderate anxiety level group in the second psychologic assessment, those who had more severe anxiety had poorer academic achievement in the second learning block. Among the medical students who were in the high depression level group in the second psychologic assessment, those who had more severe depression had poorer academic achievement in the fourth

  14. Does integrating research into the prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate curriculum enhance students' clinical practice? An interview study on students' perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qaroot, Bashar S; Sobuh, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Problem-based learning (where rather than feeding students the knowledge, they look for it themselves) has long been thought of as an ideal approach in teaching because it would encourage students to acquire knowledge from an undetermined medium of wrong and right answers. However, the effect of such approach in the learning experience of prosthetics and orthotics students has never been investigated. This study explores the implications of integrating problem-based learning into teaching on the students' learning experience via implementing a research-informed clinical practice module into the curriculum of last year prosthetics and orthotics undergraduate students at the University of Jordan (Amman, Jordan). Qualitative research pilot study. Grounded theory approach was used based on the data collected from interviewing a focus group of four students. Students have identified a number of arguments from their experience in the research-informed clinical practice where, generally speaking, students described research-informed clinical practice as a very good method of education. Integrating problem-based learning into teaching has many positive implications. In particular, students pointed out that their learning experience and clinical practice have much improved after the research-informed clinical practice. Findings from this investigation demonstrate that embedding problem-based learning into prosthetics and orthotics students' curriculum has the potential to enhance students' learning experience, particularly students' evidence-based practice. This may lead to graduates who are more knowledgeable and thus who can offer the optimal patient care (i.e. clinical practice). © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  15. MEASURING INFORMATION INTEGR-ATION MODEL FOR CAD/CMM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A CAD/CMM workpiece modeling system based on IGES file is proposed. The modeling system is implemented by using a new method for labelling the tolerance items of 3D workpiece. The concept-"feature face" is used in the method. First the CAD data of workpiece are extracted and recognized automatically. Then a workpiece model is generated, which is the integration of pure 3D geometry form with its corresponding inspection items. The principle of workpiece modeling is also presented. At last, the experiment results are shown and correctness of the model is certified.

  16. El proceso hacia la integracion de la equidad por genero al curriculo.(The Process of the Integration of Gender Equity in the Curriculum.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Bermudez, Carmen D.

    "El Proyecto Colaborativo de Equidad por Genero en la Educacion," or the Collaborative Project for Gender Equity in Education, was undertaken in Puerto Rico between 1990 and 1992 to study how to facilitate the integration of gender equity themes in the curriculum through the direct action of participating teachers. A study examined the…

  17. When Students Struggle with Gross Anatomy and Histology: A Strategy for Monitoring, Reviewing, and Promoting Student Academic Success in an Integrated Preclinical Medical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortsch, Michael; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Gross anatomy and histology are now often taught as parts of an integrated medical or dental curriculum. Although this puts these foundational basic sciences into a wider educational context, students may not fully appreciate their importance as essential components of their medical education and may not develop a sufficient level of competency,…

  18. A distance learning model in a physical therapy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, T; Harrison, A L; Hart, A L

    1998-01-01

    In response to the rural health initiative established in 1991, the University of Kentucky has developed an innovative distance learning program of physical therapy instruction that combines classroom lecture and discussion via compressed video technology with laboratory experiences. The authors describe the process of planning, implementing, and evaluating a specific distance learning course in pathomechanics for the professional-level master's-degree physical therapy students at the University of Kentucky. This presentation may serve as a model for teaching distance learning. Descriptions of optimal approaches to preclass preparation, scheduling, course delivery, use of audiovisual aids, use of handout material, and video production are given. Special activities that may enhance or deter the achievement of the learning objectives are outlined, and a problem-solving approach to common problems encountered is presented. An approach to evaluating and comparing course outcomes for the distance learnere is presented. For this particular course, there was no statistically significant difference in the outcome measures utilized to compare the distance learners with the on-site learners.

  19. Teacher Models of Technology Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Leinda

    2003-01-01

    Provides examples of best practices in technology integration from five Technology Innovation Challenge Grant (TICG) programs, funded through the Department of Education to meet the No Child Left Behind technology goals. Highlights include professional development activities in Louisiana and New Mexico; collaborative learning applications; and…

  20. Data assimilation in integrated hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørn

    Integrated hydrological models are useful tools for water resource management and research, and advances in computational power and the advent of new observation types has resulted in the models generally becoming more complex and distributed. However, the models are often characterized by a high...... degree of parameterization which results in significant model uncertainty which cannot be reduced much due to observations often being scarce and often taking the form of point measurements. Data assimilation shows great promise for use in integrated hydrological models , as it allows for observations...... to be efficiently combined with models to improve model predictions, reduce uncertainty and estimate model parameters. In this thesis, a framework for assimilating multiple observation types and updating multiple components and parameters of a catchment scale integrated hydrological model is developed and tested...

  1. Open source integrated modeling environment Delta Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, B.; van Putten, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decade, integrated modelling has become a very popular topic in environmental modelling since it helps solving problems, which is difficult to model using a single model. However, managing complexity of integrated models and minimizing time required for their setup remains a challenging task. The integrated modelling environment Delta Shell simplifies this task. The software components of Delta Shell are easy to reuse separately from each other as well as a part of integrated environment that can run in a command-line or a graphical user interface mode. The most components of the Delta Shell are developed using C# programming language and include libraries used to define, save and visualize various scientific data structures as well as coupled model configurations. Here we present two examples showing how Delta Shell simplifies process of setting up integrated models from the end user and developer perspectives. The first example shows coupling of a rainfall-runoff, a river flow and a run-time control models. The second example shows how coastal morphological database integrates with the coastal morphological model (XBeach) and a custom nourishment designer. Delta Shell is also available as open-source software released under LGPL license and accessible via http://oss.deltares.nl.

  2. In the Soup: Integrating and Correlating Social Studies with Other Curriculum Areas: Part Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Virginia A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Demonstrates a thematic approach, using soup as the theme, to integrate and correlate elementary social studies with other subject areas. Outlines four soup activities, presenting goals, materials, strategies, and extensions of each. Stresses how integrated curricula effectively develops skills such as observing, inferring, serial ordering, and…

  3. The Execution and Evaluation of an Integrated Business Common Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharr, Steven W.; Morris, John S.; Stover, Dana; Byers, C. Randall; Reyes, Mario G.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the rationale, process, and organization of an integrated, cross-disciplinary undergraduate program known as the Integrated Business Common Core (IBC) at the University of Idaho. Indicates that IBC's goal is to provide students with an understanding of key business issues, with emphasis on processes. (2 tables and 11 references) (JDI)

  4. The influence of a vertically integrated curriculum on the transition to postgraduate training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen-Meijer, M.; Cate, O.T.J. ten; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Schaaf, M. van der; Borleffs, J.C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, many medical curricula have been changed into vertically integrated programmes. One of the aims of vertical integration is to facilitate the transition from theoretical to clinical education and from medical school to postgraduate training. Aims: The aim of this study was to

  5. A Commentary on "Integrated Reporting: A Review of Developments and Their Implications for the Accounting Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp-Roelands, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Kamp-Roelands states that it was very encouraging to observe that the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) recognises that responding to "Integrated Reporting" initiatives requires an "integrated approach" to accounting education. That change in financial reporting standards put pressure on…

  6. Effectiveness of Adaptive Contextual Learning Model of Integrated Science by Integrating Digital Age Literacy on Grade VIII Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrizal, A.; Amran, A.; Ananda, A.; Festiyed, F.

    2018-04-01

    Educational graduates should have good competencies to compete in the 21st century. Integrated learning is a good way to develop competence of students in this century. Besides that, literacy skills are very important for students to get success in their learning and daily life. For this reason, integrated science learning and literacy skills are important in 2013 curriculum. However, integrated science learning and integration of literacy in learning can’t be implemented well. Solution of this problem is to develop adaptive contextual learning model by integrating digital age literacy. The purpose of the research is to determine the effectiveness of adaptive contextual learning model to improve competence of grade VIII students in junior high school. This research is a part of the research and development or R&D. Research design which used in limited field testing was before and after treatment. The research instruments consist of three parts namely test sheet of learning outcome for assessing knowledge competence, observation sheet for assessing attitudes, and performance sheet for assessing skills of students. Data of student’s competence were analyzed by three kinds of analysis, namely descriptive statistics, normality test and homogeneity test, and paired comparison test. From the data analysis result, it can be stated that the implementation of adaptive contextual learning model of integrated science by integrating digital age literacy is effective to improve the knowledge, attitude, and literacy skills competences of grade VIII students in junior high school at 95% confidence level.

  7. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adel Abdelaziz,1,2 Emad Koshak3 1Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al Baha University, Al Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt; 3Dean and Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al Baha University, Al Baha, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment. Keywords: curriculum development, teaching, learning, assessment, apprenticeship, community-based settings, health service-based settings

  8. Auditing sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) content in medical school curriculum: a student scholar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Michael M; Jones, Betsy G; Casanova, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) aims to (1) delineate and investigate sex- and gender-based differences in health, disease, and response to treatment and (2) apply that knowledge to clinical care to improve the health of both women and men. However, the integration of SGBM into medical school curricula is often haphazard and poorly defined; schools often do not know the current status of SGBM content in their curricula, even if they are committed to addressing gaps and improving SGBM delivery. Therefore, complete auditing and accounting of SGBM content in the existing medical school curriculum is necessary to determine the baseline status and prepare for successful integration of SGBM content into that curriculum. A review of course syllabi and lecture objectives as well as a targeted data analysis of the Curriculum Management and Information Tool (CurrMIT) were completed prior to a real-time curriculum audit. Subsequently, six "student scholars," three first-year and three second-year medical students, were recruited and trained to audit the first 2 years of the medical school curriculum for SGBM content, thus completing an audit for both of the pre-clinical years simultaneously. A qualitative analysis and a post-audit comparative analysis were completed to assess the level of SGBM instruction at our institution. The review of syllabi and the CurrMIT data analysis did not generate a meaningful catalogue of SGBM content in the curriculum; most of the content identified specifically targeted women's or men's health topics and not sex- or gender-based differences. The real-time student audit of the existing curriculum at Texas Tech revealed that most of the SGBM material was focused on the physiological/anatomical sex differences or gender differences in disease prevalence, with minimal coverage of sex- or gender-based differences in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The real-time student scholar audit was effective in identifying SGBM content in

  9. Model Identification of Integrated ARMA Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnytska, Tetiana; Braun, Simone; Werner, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    This article evaluates the Smallest Canonical Correlation Method (SCAN) and the Extended Sample Autocorrelation Function (ESACF), automated methods for the Autoregressive Integrated Moving-Average (ARIMA) model selection commonly available in current versions of SAS for Windows, as identification tools for integrated processes. SCAN and ESACF can…

  10. Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagami, Jason

    2013-01-01

    ICT integration of teacher preparation programmes was undertaken by the Australian Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project in all 39 Australian teacher education institutions and highlighted the need for guidelines to inform systemic ICT integration approaches. A Social Ecological Model (SEM) was used to positively inform integration…

  11. A Framework for Integrating Biosimilars Into the Didactic Core Requirements of a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Edward; Liu, Jennifer; Ramchandani, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Biologic drugs approved via the abbreviated United States biosimilar approval pathway are anticipated to improve access to medications by addressing increasing health care expenditures. Surveys of health care practitioners indicate that there is inadequate knowledge and understanding about biosimilars; this must be addressed to ensure safe and effective use of this new category of products. Concepts of biosimilar development, manufacturing, regulation, naming, formulary, and inventory considerations, as well as patient and provider education should be included within the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum as preparation for clinical practice. Based on these considerations, we propose that PharmD graduates be required to have knowledge in the following domains regarding biologics and biosimilars: legal definition, development and regulation, state pharmacy practice laws, and pharmacy practice management. We link these general biosimilar concepts to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 and Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) Outcomes 2013, and provide example classroom learning objectives, in-class activities, and assessments to guide implementation.

  12. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  13. Bridging the Chasm: Challenges, Opportunities, and Resources for Integrating a Dissemination and Implementation Science Curriculum into Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Heckman, Carolyn J; Cragun, Deborah; Quintiliani, Lisa M; Proctor, Enola K; Chambers, David A; Skolarus, Ted; Brownson, Ross C

    2018-01-01

    Physicians are charged with implementing evidence-based medicine, yet few are trained in the science of Dissemination and Implementation (D&I). In view of the potential of evidence-based training in D&I to help close the gap between research and practice, the goal of this review is to examine the importance of D&I training in medical education, describe challenges to implementing such training, and provide strategies and resources for building D&I capacity. We conducted (1) a systematic review to identify US-based D&I training efforts and (2) a critical review of additional literature to inform our evaluation of the challenges and opportunities of integrating D&I training in medical education. Out of 269 unique articles reviewed, 11 described US-based D&I training. Although vibrant and diverse training opportunities exist, their capacity is limited, and they are not designed to meet physicians' needs. Synthesis of relevant literature using a critical review approach identified challenges inherent to changing medical education, as well as challenges related to D&I science. Finally, selected strategies and resources are available for facilitating incorporation of D&I training into medical education and overcoming existing challenges. Integrating D&I training in the medical education curriculum, and particularly in residency and fellowship training, holds promise for bridging the chasm between scientific discoveries and improved patient care and outcomes. However, unique challenges should be addressed, including the need for greater evidence.

  14. Integrating the issues of world animal health and world public health into the veterinary curriculum: a Southeast Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamri-Saad, M; Romziah, S; Kunavongkrit, A; Valdez, C A; Thien, M

    2009-08-01

    The authors analysed the curricula of five veterinary schools in Southeast Asia to determine how successfully they integrate the issues of global animal health and global public health into their programmes. Two schools offer a five-year programme while the remaining three offer a six-year programme. The core courses within the curricula range from 145 to 224 credit hours, in total. In general, world animal health and world public health are well integrated into the veterinary curriculum. Most curricula allocate approximately 3% of their total credit hours to subjects associated with animal and public health, but other subjects that may contain discussions on these issues range between 6% and 10%. Most veterinary schools in Southeast Asia offer a Master's programme in Veterinary Public Health, with detailed emphasis on animal and public health but focusing principally on topics of local importance. At the same time, undergraduate and post-graduate veterinary students are exposed to current issues in animal and public health through regional and international scientific meetings.

  15. An Infusion Model for Including Content on Elders with Chronic Illness in the Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry M. Cummings

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Older people with chronic mental illness (CMI are experiencing longer life expectancies that parallel those of the general population. Due to their experience of having CMI, these older adults present unique issues that affect service delivery and care provision. Content on this population is often omitted in the curriculum, which leaves students unprepared to practice with these clients. This article proposes an infusion model that can be used in baccalaureate or graduate foundation courses to increase exposure to elders with CMI.

  16. Critical social theory as a model for the informatics curriculum for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, P; Jones, P G

    2000-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the education and training of nurses in information management and technology is problematic. Drawing from recent research this paper presents a theoretical framework within which the nature of the problems faced by nurses in the use of information may be analyzed. This framework, based on the critical social theory of Habermas, also provides a model for the informatics curriculum. The advantages of problem based learning and multi-media web-based technologies for the delivery of learning materials within this area are also discussed.

  17. Integrable lattice models and quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.; Zuber, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    These lectures aim at introducing some basic algebraic concepts on lattice integrable models, in particular quantum groups, and to discuss some connections with knot theory and conformal field theories. The list of contents is: Vertex models and Yang-Baxter equation; Quantum sl(2) algebra and the Yang-Baxter equation; U q sl(2) as a symmetry of statistical mechanical models; Face models; Face models attached to graphs; Yang-Baxter equation, braid group and link polynomials

  18. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Adel; Koshak, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment.

  19. Integrated climate and hydrology modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl

    To ensure optimal management and sustainable strategies for water resources, infrastructures, food production and ecosystems there is a need for an improved understanding of feedback and interaction mechanisms between the atmosphere and the land surface. This is especially true in light of expected...... global warming and increased frequency of extreme events. The skill in developing projections of both the present and future climate depends essentially on the ability to numerically simulate the processes of atmospheric circulation, hydrology, energy and ecology. Previous modelling efforts of climate...... and hydrology models to more directly include the interaction between the atmosphere and the land surface. The present PhD study is motivated by an ambition of developing and applying a modelling tool capable of including the interaction and feedback mechanisms between the atmosphere and the land surface...

  20. Vertical and horizontal integration of knowledge and skills - a working model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, W D; Kroon, J

    2005-02-01

    The new integrated outcomes-based curriculum for dentistry was introduced at the University of Pretoria in 1997. The first participants graduated at the end of 2001. Educational principles that underpin the new innovative dental curriculum include vertical and horizontal integration, problem-oriented learning, student-centred learning, a holistic attitude to patient care and the promotion of oral health. The aim of this research project was to develop and assay a model to facilitate vertical integration of knowledge and skills thereby justifying the above mentioned action. The learning methodology proposed for the specific outcome of the Odontology module, namely the diagnosis of dental caries and the design of a primary preventive programme, included problem-solving as the driving force for the facilitation of vertical and horizontal integration, and an instructional design for the integration of the basic knowledge and clinical skills into a single learning programme. The paper describes the methodology of problem-oriented learning as applied in this study together with the detail of the programme. The consensus of those teachers who represent the basic and clinical sciences and who participate in this learning programme is that this model is practical and can assist vertical as well as horizontal integration of knowledge.

  1. Ontology modeling in physical asset integrity management

    CERN Document Server

    Yacout, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge applications of, and up-to-date research on, ontology engineering techniques in the physical asset integrity domain. Though a survey of state-of-the-art theory and methods on ontology engineering, the authors emphasize essential topics including data integration modeling, knowledge representation, and semantic interpretation. The book also reflects novel topics dealing with the advanced problems of physical asset integrity applications such as heterogeneity, data inconsistency, and interoperability existing in design and utilization. With a distinctive focus on applications relevant in heavy industry, Ontology Modeling in Physical Asset Integrity Management is ideal for practicing industrial and mechanical engineers working in the field, as well as researchers and graduate concerned with ontology engineering in physical systems life cycles. This book also: Introduces practicing engineers, research scientists, and graduate students to ontology engineering as a modeling techniqu...

  2. Integrated Reporting: A Review of Developments and Their Implications for the Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    Integrated reporting (IR) is a major development in a number of sustainability-related accounting initiatives and, if widely adopted, will require significant developments in professional and university accounting curricula. These will include: a strategic rather than operational or transactional focus; longer- rather than short-term outlook;…

  3. Integrative Curriculum Planning in Technological and Vocational Education in Taiwan, Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert T. Y.

    Taiwan is facing these three challenges: cultivating a world-class work force, preventing shortages of industry-related workers, and increasing industrial competitiveness. To meet them, technological and vocational education (TVE) needs to integrate the curricula among the technical arts programs in junior high schools, senior vocational high…

  4. Educating Masters of Public Health Students on Tobacco Control and Prevention: An Integrated Curriculum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Aquilino, Mary; Abramsohn, Erin

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Comprehensive training in the area of tobacco control and prevention has not been available to public health students receiving professional degrees. This study describes findings of a project designed to develop and evaluate an integrated approach to the education of Masters of Public Health (MPH) students at the University of Iowa…

  5. Promoting Student Learning through the Integration of Lab and Lecture: The Seamless Biology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Patricia; Nazario, Gladys

    2008-01-01

    The authors engaged in an education experiment to determine if the integration of lab and lecture activities in zoology and botany proved beneficial to student learning and motivation toward biology. Their results revealed that this strategy positively influenced students' academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and ability to apply…

  6. How an Integrative STEM Curriculum Can Benefit Students in Engineering Design Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Szu-Chun; Yu, Kuang-Chao

    2017-01-01

    STEM-oriented engineering design practice has become recognized increasingly by technology education professionals in Taiwan. This study sought to examine the effectiveness of the application of an integrative STEM approach within engineering design practices in high school technology education in Taiwan. A quasi-experimental study was conducted…

  7. Integrating Military and Veteran Culture in Social Work Education: Implications for Curriculum Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Julie; Weiss, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the conceptual question of how to best integrate military culture and issues into social work education. Military service members, veterans, and their families are returning to civilian communities with the ending of conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and seeking community-based providers for health and mental health…

  8. Integrating Multimedia ICT Software in Language Curriculum: Students' Perception, Use, and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Nikolai; Grodek, Elzbieta

    2014-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) constitute an integral part of the teaching and learning environment in present-day educational institutions and play an increasingly important role in the modern second language classroom. In this study, an online language learning tool "Tell Me More" (TMM) has been introduced as a…

  9. Integration of Professional Certification Examinations with the Financial Planning Curriculum: Increasing Efficiency, Motivation, and Professional Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph W.; Zhu, Dandan; Hampton, Vickie L.; Chatterjee, Swarn; Salter, John

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical-based rationale and plan of action for educational programs to encourage and create opportunities for the integration of course study with professional exam preparation, while highlighting the complementary benefits for students, academic programs, and the financial services profession. Serving primarily as a…

  10. Addressing the 21st Century Paradox: Integrating Entrepreneurship in the Computer Information Systems Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Guido; Babb, Jeffry

    2015-01-01

    The Computer Information Systems (CIS) discipline faces an identity crisis: although demand for CIS graduates is growing, student enrollment is either in decline, or is at least soft or flat in many cases. This has been referred to as the 21st century paradox. As one solution to this problem, we propose to integrate entrepreneurship in the CIS…

  11. Developing a Program-Level Faith Integration Curriculum: A Case Study from Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating faith with academics possesses significant benefits for students, because it connects major disciplines to students' personal values and goals, prepares students to be effective and faithful professionals in their discipline and vocation, and develops students' understanding of the nature of their discipline. However, to…

  12. Integrating systems biology models and biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Gennari, John H; Wimalaratne, Sarala; de Bono, Bernard; Cook, Daniel L; Gkoutos, Georgios V

    2011-08-11

    Systems biology is an approach to biology that emphasizes the structure and dynamic behavior of biological systems and the interactions that occur within them. To succeed, systems biology crucially depends on the accessibility and integration of data across domains and levels of granularity. Biomedical ontologies were developed to facilitate such an integration of data and are often used to annotate biosimulation models in systems biology. We provide a framework to integrate representations of in silico systems biology with those of in vivo biology as described by biomedical ontologies and demonstrate this framework using the Systems Biology Markup Language. We developed the SBML Harvester software that automatically converts annotated SBML models into OWL and we apply our software to those biosimulation models that are contained in the BioModels Database. We utilize the resulting knowledge base for complex biological queries that can bridge levels of granularity, verify models based on the biological phenomenon they represent and provide a means to establish a basic qualitative layer on which to express the semantics of biosimulation models. We establish an information flow between biomedical ontologies and biosimulation models and we demonstrate that the integration of annotated biosimulation models and biomedical ontologies enables the verification of models as well as expressive queries. Establishing a bi-directional information flow between systems biology and biomedical ontologies has the potential to enable large-scale analyses of biological systems that span levels of granularity from molecules to organisms.

  13. Modeling energy-economy interactions using integrated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyterlinde, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    Integrated models are defined as economic energy models that consist of several submodels, either coupled by an interface module, or embedded in one large model. These models can be used for energy policy analysis. Using integrated models yields the following benefits. They provide a framework in which energy-economy interactions can be better analyzed than in stand-alone models. Integrated models can represent both energy sector technological details, as well as the behaviour of the market and the role of prices. Furthermore, the combination of modeling methodologies in one model can compensate weaknesses of one approach with strengths of another. These advantages motivated this survey of the class of integrated models. The purpose of this literature survey therefore was to collect and to present information on integrated models. To carry out this task, several goals were identified. The first goal was to give an overview of what is reported on these models in general. The second one was to find and describe examples of such models. Other goals were to find out what kinds of models were used as component models, and to examine the linkage methodology. Solution methods and their convergence properties were also a subject of interest. The report has the following structure. In chapter 2, a 'conceptual framework' is given. In chapter 3 a number of integrated models is described. In a table, a complete overview is presented of all described models. Finally, in chapter 4, the report is summarized, and conclusions are drawn regarding the advantages and drawbacks of integrated models. 8 figs., 29 refs

  14. Integrated Heat Air & Moisture Modeling and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, van A.W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a recently developed Heat Air & Moisture Laboratory in SimuLink. The simulation laboratory facilitates the integration of the following models: (1) a whole building model; (2) Heating Venting and Air-Conditioning and primary systems; (3) 2D indoor airflow, 3D Heat Air & Moisture

  15. Development of a generalized integral jet model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan; Kessler, A.; Markert, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Integral type models to describe stationary plumes and jets in cross-flows (wind) have been developed since about 1970. These models are widely used for risk analysis, to describe the consequences of many different scenarios. Alternatively, CFD codes are being applied, but computational requireme......Integral type models to describe stationary plumes and jets in cross-flows (wind) have been developed since about 1970. These models are widely used for risk analysis, to describe the consequences of many different scenarios. Alternatively, CFD codes are being applied, but computational...... requirements still limit the number of scenarios that can be dealt with using CFD only. The integral models, however, are not suited to handle transient releases, such as releases from pressurized equipment, where the initially high release rate decreases rapidly with time. Further, on gas ignition, a second...... model is needed to describe the rapid combustion of the flammable part of the plume (flash fire) and a third model has to be applied for the remaining jet fire. The objective of this paper is to describe the first steps of the development of an integral-type model describing the transient development...

  16. Examining Teacher Mental Models for the Implementation of a STEM-Focused Curriculum Paradigm in Engineering and Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Janel M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of mental models in Idaho's Engineering and Technology Education teachers' in decision making when faced with major curriculum changes. Senge (1990) defined mental models as, "deeply ingrained assumptions, generalizations, or even pictures or images that influence how we understand the world…

  17. A person-task-context model for designing curriculum and in-training assessment in postgraduate education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Anne Marie; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke; Henriksen, Ann-Helen

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to trial a person-task-context model in designing a curriculum and in-training assessment programme that embraces trainee level of professional development and the work-based context of postgraduate medical education. The model was applied to the design of a programme...... for Senior House Officers in internal medicine....

  18. An introduction to Space Weather Integrated Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, D.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    The need for a software toolkit that integrates space weather models and data is one of many challenges we are facing with when applying the models to space weather forecasting. To meet this challenge, we have developed Space Weather Integrated Modeling (SWIM) that is capable of analysis and visualizations of the results from a diverse set of space weather models. SWIM has a modular design and is written in Python, by using NumPy, matplotlib, and the Visualization ToolKit (VTK). SWIM provides data management module to read a variety of spacecraft data products and a specific data format of Solar-Interplanetary Conservation Element/Solution Element MHD model (SIP-CESE MHD model) for the study of solar-terrestrial phenomena. Data analysis, visualization and graphic user interface modules are also presented in a user-friendly way to run the integrated models and visualize the 2-D and 3-D data sets interactively. With these tools we can locally or remotely analysis the model result rapidly, such as extraction of data on specific location in time-sequence data sets, plotting interplanetary magnetic field lines, multi-slicing of solar wind speed, volume rendering of solar wind density, animation of time-sequence data sets, comparing between model result and observational data. To speed-up the analysis, an in-situ visualization interface is used to support visualizing the data 'on-the-fly'. We also modified some critical time-consuming analysis and visualization methods with the aid of GPU and multi-core CPU. We have used this tool to visualize the data of SIP-CESE MHD model in real time, and integrated the Database Model of shock arrival, Shock Propagation Model, Dst forecasting model and SIP-CESE MHD model developed by SIGMA Weather Group at State Key Laboratory of Space Weather/CAS.

  19. Boundary Interaction: Towards Developing a Mobile Technology-Enabled Science Curriculum to Integrate Learning in the Informal Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores the crossover between formal learning and learning in informal spaces supported by mobile technology, and proposes design principles for educators to carry out a science curriculum, namely Boundary Activity-based Science Curriculum (BAbSC). The conceptualization of the boundary object, and the principles of boundary activity as…

  20. Assessing the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geoscience curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, A.; Marshall, J.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Technology and computer models enhance the learning experience when appropriately utilized. Moreover, learning is significantly improved when effective visualization is combined with models of processes allowing for inquiry-based problem solving. Still, hands-on experiences in real scenarios result in better contextualization of related problems compared to virtual laboratories. Therefore, the role of scientific visualization, technology, and computer modeling is to enhance, not displace, the learning experience by supplementing real-world problem solving and experiences, although in some circumstances, they can adequately serve to take the place of reality. The key to improving scientific education is to embrace an inquiry-based approach that favorably uses technology. This study will attempt to evaluate the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geological sciences curriculum. An assessment tool, designed to assess student understanding of physical hydrology, was used to evaluate a curriculum intervention based on student learning with a data- and modeling-driven approach using COMSOL Multiphysics software. This intervention was implemented in an upper division and graduate physical hydrology course in fall 2012. Students enrolled in the course in fall 2011 served as the control group. Interactive modeling was added to the curriculum in fall 2012 to replace the analogous mathematical modeling done by hand in fall 2011. Pre- and post-test results were used to assess and report its effectiveness. Student interviews were also used to probe student reactions to both the experimental and control curricula. The pre- and post-tests asked students to describe the significant processes in the hydrological cycle and describe the laws governing these processes. Their ability to apply their knowledge in a real-world problem was also assessed. Since the pre- and post-test data failed to meet the assumption of normality, a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was run to

  1. Conceptual model of integrated apiarian consultancy

    OpenAIRE

    Bodescu, Dan; Stefan, Gavril; Paveliuc Olariu, Codrin; Magdici, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The socio-economic field researches have indicated the necessity of realizing an integrated consultancy service for beekeepers that will supply technical-economic solutions with a practical character for ensuring the lucrativeness and viability of the apiaries. Consequently, an integrated apiarian consultancy model has been built holding the following features: it realizes the diagnosis of the meliferous resources and supplies solutions for its optimal administration; it realizes the technica...

  2. MMM: A toolbox for integrative structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2018-01-01

    Structural characterization of proteins and their complexes may require integration of restraints from various experimental techniques. MMM (Multiscale Modeling of Macromolecules) is a Matlab-based open-source modeling toolbox for this purpose with a particular emphasis on distance distribution restraints obtained from electron paramagnetic resonance experiments on spin-labelled proteins and nucleic acids and their combination with atomistic structures of domains or whole protomers, small-angle scattering data, secondary structure information, homology information, and elastic network models. MMM does not only integrate various types of restraints, but also various existing modeling tools by providing a common graphical user interface to them. The types of restraints that can support such modeling and the available model types are illustrated by recent application examples. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Integrating Curriculum through the Learning Cycle: Content-Based Reading and Vocabulary Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda H.; Guillaume, Andrea M.

    2006-01-01

    The content areas provide rich contexts for developing vocabulary. This article presents some principles and a lesson model--the learning cycle--that can be used to develop vocabulary while building understanding in science. Because science instruction and the learning cycle model promote learning in real-world contexts, they provide students with…

  4. High School Mathematics Curriculum Development Integrated with Character Education Within Project Assessment as Spiral System Leveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Badriatul Munawaroh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research are: (1 description of characteristics and (2 validate thesenior hight school of mathematics syllabus integrated character education with the project assessment, (3 test the effectiveness of the learning material of function in class X. Testing procedure of syllabus and learning used research development of Borg & Gall (1987. The data were processed with descriptive analysis, statistical test t test and regression. The results obtained by the integration of the 10 characters on the senior hight school of mathematics syllabus show a valid syllabus by experts with an average score of 4 (both categories, the maximum score of 5. Test implementation on learning reach effective: (1 the percentage of learners achieve mastery learning by 89, 5%; (2 an increase of characters curiosity of learners of meeting 1 to 2, up to 3, up to 4 each score gain of 0.17; 0.30; 0.31; (3 the influence of the curiosity of students to the learning outcomes of 48.9%, (4 the average learning outcomes of students experimental class (77.2 is better than the control class (76.2. Thus, each character can bring a change in behavior according to the character programmed and observed in the learning process in focus. Coordination learning at every level stated in the syllabus.

  5. Integration of Cognitive Skills as a Cross-Cutting Theme Into the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum at Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Soltani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, improvement of thinking skills of students is one of the universally supported aims in the majority of medical schools. This study aims to design longitudinal theme of reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making into the undergraduate medical curriculum at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. A participatory approach was applied to design the curriculum during 2009-2011. The project was conducted by the contribution of representatives of both basic and clinical faculty members, students and graduates at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The first step toward integrating cognitive skills into the curriculum was to assemble a taskforce of different faculty and students, including a wide variety of fields with multidisciplinary expertise using nonprobability sampling and the snowball method. Several meetings with the contribution of experts and some medical students were held to generate the draft of expected outcomes. Subsequently, the taskforce also determined what content would fit best into each phase of the program and what teaching and assessment methods would be more appropriate for each outcome. After a pilot curriculum with a small group of second-year medical students, we implemented this program for all first-year students since 2011 at TUMS. Based on findings, the teaching of four areas, including scientific and critical thinking skills (Basic sciences, problem-solving and reasoning (Pathophysiology, evidence-based medicine (Clerkship, and clinical decision-making (Internship were considered in the form of a longitudinal theme. The results of this study could be utilized as a useful pattern for integration of psycho-social subjects into the medical curriculum.

  6. Integrated Modelling - the next steps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated modelling (IM) has made considerable advances over the past decade but it has not yet been taken up as an operational tool in the way that its proponents had hoped. The reasons why will be discussed in Session U17. This talk will propose topics for a research and development programme and suggest an institutional structure which, together, could overcome the present obstacles. Their combined aim would be first to make IM into an operational tool useable by competent public authorities and commercial companies and, in time, to see it evolve into the modelling equivalent of Google Maps, something accessible and useable by anyone with a PC or an iphone and an internet connection. In a recent study, a number of government agencies, water authorities and utilities applied integrated modelling to operational problems. While the project demonstrated that IM could be used in an operational setting and had benefit, it also highlighted the advances that would be required for its widespread uptake. These were: greatly improving the ease with which models could be a) made linkable, b) linked and c) run; developing a methodology for applying integrated modelling; developing practical options for calibrating and validating linked models; addressing the science issues that arise when models are linked; extending the range of modelling concepts that can be linked; enabling interface standards to pass uncertainty information; making the interface standards platform independent; extending the range of platforms to include those for high performance computing; developing the concept of modelling components as web services; separating simulation code from the model’s GUI, so that all the results from the linked models can be viewed through a single GUI; developing scenario management systems so that that there is an audit trail of the version of each model and dataset used in each linked model run. In addition to the above, there is a need to build a set of integrated

  7. Teaching `community engagement' in engineering education for international development: Integration of an interdisciplinary social work curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorie J.; Lehman Held, Mary; Ellzey, Janet L.; Bailey, William T.; Young, Laurie B.

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the literature on challenges faced by engineering faculty in educating their students on community-engaged, sustainable technical solutions in developing countries. We review a number of approaches to increasing teaching modules on social and community components of international development education, from adding capstone courses and educational track seminars to integrating content from other disciplines, particularly the social sciences. After summarising recent pedagogical strategies to increase content on community-focused development, we present a case study of how one engineering programme incorporates social work students and faculty to infuse strategies for community engagement in designing and implementing student-led global engineering development projects. We outline how this interdisciplinary pedagogical approach teaches students from the two disciplines to work together in addressing power balances, economic and social issues and overall sustainability of international development projects.

  8. Graduate Curriculum for Biological Information Specialists: A Key to Integration of Scale in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole L. Palmer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific data problems do not stand in isolation. They are part of a larger set of challenges associated with the escalation of scientific information and changes in scholarly communication in the digital environment. Biologists in particular are generating enormous sets of data at a high rate, and new discoveries in the biological sciences will increasingly depend on the integration of data across multiple scales. This work will require new kinds of information expertise in key areas. To build this professional capacity we have developed two complementary educational programs: a Biological Information Specialist (BIS masters degree and a concentration in Data Curation (DC. We believe that BISs will be central in the development of cyberinfrastructure and information services needed to facilitate interdisciplinary and multi-scale science. Here we present three sample cases from our current research projects to illustrate areas in which we expect information specialists to make important contributions to biological research practice.

  9. Integrated facilities modeling using QUEST and IGRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, K.R.; Haan, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    A QUEST model and associated detailed IGRIP models were developed and used to simulate several workcells in a proposed Plutonium Storage Facility (PSF). The models are being used by team members assigned to the program to improve communication and to assist in evaluating concepts and in performing trade-off studies which will result in recommendations and a final design. The model was designed so that it could be changed easily. The added flexibility techniques used to make changes easily are described in this paper in addition to techniques for integrating the QUEST and IGRIP products. Many of these techniques are generic in nature and can be applied to any modeling endeavor

  10. Integrated modelling of two xenobiotic organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Gernaey, K.V.; Henze, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic mathematical model that describes the fate and transport of two selected xenobiotic organic compounds (XOCs) in a simplified representation. of an integrated urban wastewater system. A simulation study, where the xenobiotics bisphenol A and pyrene are used as reference...... compounds, is carried out. Sorption and specific biological degradation processes are integrated with standardised water process models to model the fate of both compounds. Simulated mass flows of the two compounds during one dry weather day and one wet weather day are compared for realistic influent flow...... rate and concentration profiles. The wet weather day induces resuspension of stored sediments, which increases the pollutant load on the downstream system. The potential of the model to elucidate important phenomena related to origin and fate of the model compounds is demonstrated....

  11. An integrative model of organizational safety behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Fan, Di; Fu, Gui; Zhu, Cherrie Jiuhua

    2013-06-01

    This study develops an integrative model of safety management based on social cognitive theory and the total safety culture triadic framework. The purpose of the model is to reveal the causal linkages between a hazardous environment, safety climate, and individual safety behaviors. Based on primary survey data from 209 front-line workers in one of the largest state-owned coal mining corporations in China, the model is tested using structural equation modeling techniques. An employee's perception of a hazardous environment is found to have a statistically significant impact on employee safety behaviors through a psychological process mediated by the perception of management commitment to safety and individual beliefs about safety. The integrative model developed here leads to a comprehensive solution that takes into consideration the environmental, organizational and employees' psychological and behavioral aspects of safety management. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modern model of integrated corporate communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Slijepčević

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to present the modern model of integrated corporate communication. Beside this, the authors will describe the changes occurring in the corporate environment and importance of changing the model of corporate communication. This paper also discusses the importance of implementation of the suggested model, the use of new media and effects of these changes on corporations. The approach used in this paper is the literature review. The authors explore the importance of implementation of the suggested model and the new media in corporate communication, both internal and external, addressing all the stakeholders and communication contents. The paper recommends implementation of a modern model of integrated corporate communication as a response to constant development of the new media and generation changes taking place. Practical implications: the modern model of integrated corporate communication can be used as an upgrade of the conventional communication models. This modern model empowers companies to sustain and build up the existing relationships with stakeholders, and to find out and create new relationships with stakeholders who were previously inaccessible and invisible.

  13. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  14. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDENBURN, MICHAEL W.; BUNTING, MARCUS; PAYNE, ARTHUR C. JR.; TROST, LAWRENCE C.

    2000-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0

  15. Renewed mer model of integral management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko Belak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The research work on entrepreneurship, enterprise's policy and management, which started in 1992, successfully continued in the following years. Between 1992 and 2011, more than 400 academics and other researchers have participated in research work (MER research program whose main orientation has been the creation of their own model of integral management. Results: In past years, academics (researchers and authors of published papers from Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Byelorussia, Canada, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Switzerland, Ukraine, and the US have cooperated in MER programs, coming from more than fifty institutions. Thus, scientific doctrines of different universities influenced the development of the MER model which is based on both horizontal and vertical integration of the enterprises' governance and management processes, instruments and institutions into a consistently operating unit. Conclusions: The presented MER model is based on the multi-layer integration of governance and management with an enterprise and its environment, considering the fundamental desires for the enterprises' existence and, thus, their quantitative as well as qualitative changes. The process, instrumental, and institutional integrity of the governance and management is also the initial condition for the implementation of all other integration factors.

  16. Provision and assessment of pharmacology and pharmacotherapy education across an integrated medical school curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franson, Kari Lanette

    2008-01-01

    The papers presented here detail the approach to provide pharmacology and pharmacotherapy education at the Leiden University Medical Center. First it was decided to use the ability-based education model as the educational method and to have consistent outcomes and assessments throughout the

  17. Integrating Multimedia ICT Software in Language Curriculum: Students’ Perception, Use, and Effectivenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Penner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICT constitute an integral part of the teaching and learning environment in present-day educational institutions and play an increasingly important role in the modern second language classroom. In this study, an online language learning tool Tell Me More (TMM has been introduced as  a supplementary tool in French and German first and second-year language university classes. At the end of the academic year, the students completed a questionnaire exploring their TMM usage behaviour and perception of the software. The survey also addressed aspects of the respondents' readiness for self-directed language learning. The data were then imported into SPSS and underwent statistical analysis. The results of the study show that 1 relatively few of today's university students are open to the idea of voluntarily using ICT for independent language practice; 2 grade, price, and availability of alternative means of language practice are the most important factors affecting the students' decision to purchase and use ICT software; 3 there is a relationship between the students' decision to buy and use ICT software and their readiness for self-directed learning.

  18. Short Stories About The Ocean, an Art Integrated Project Into the Elementary Curriculum, Using Shadow Theatre and Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guieu, M.; Scheurle, C.

    2016-02-01

    The holistic aspect of integrated learning reflects the way our world works: everything is interconnected. Integrated Learning connects students, teachers, academic content and the world. It creates bridges between disciplines, encourages invention, experimentation, and problem solving. In an art integrated lesson or project, the students learn in a creative way, exploring a given subject by working on an art project, individually or collectively, using an array of traditional techniques and technology tools. Short Stories about the Ocean is anchored in the 4th and 5th grade curriculum, the art technique is the shadow theatre. The students videotape the performances for documentation and sharing. After giving the students information about different types of human activities that have an impact on the ocean, and discussing them, the students form groups and choose a specific subject - for example over fishing or pipe spilling. They gather more information and create a story with a beginning, a development and an end. Prior to start the project, the teacher prepares a small shadow theatre made of simple material, with a template I provide. The teacher explains the basics in shadow theatre technique. The students work with paper and skewers to create the elements they need for their story. They find solutions to render proportions, movements, actions and timing. Each group rehearses and then presents to the class a two/three minutes performance. The students who watch give a positive critique. Each group takes the time to make changes if the story, the message or the elements need to be clearer. Each group performs in front of the class again. This collaborative work encourages decision making. The students have to define their idea and concept clearly, with enough details but not too many, so that their message is understood by the viewers. It is a challenge for the students to design the shapes they need for their story with minimal material and they must be

  19. Model training curriculum for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyner, C.J.; Birk, S.M.

    1995-09-01

    This document is to assist in the development of the training programs required to be in place for the operating license for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It consists of an introductory document and four additional appendixes of individual training program curricula. This information will provide the starting point for the more detailed facility-specific training programs that will be developed as the facility hires and trains new personnel and begins operation. This document is comprehensive and is intended as a guide for the development of a company- or facility-specific program. The individual licensee does not need to use this model training curriculum as written. Instead, this document can be used as a menu for the development, modification, or verification of customized training programs.

  20. Model training curriculum for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyner, C.J.; Birk, S.M.

    1995-09-01

    This document is to assist in the development of the training programs required to be in place for the operating license for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It consists of an introductory document and four additional appendixes of individual training program curricula. This information will provide the starting point for the more detailed facility-specific training programs that will be developed as the facility hires and trains new personnel and begins operation. This document is comprehensive and is intended as a guide for the development of a company- or facility-specific program. The individual licensee does not need to use this model training curriculum as written. Instead, this document can be used as a menu for the development, modification, or verification of customized training programs

  1. Integrated Model of Bioenergy and Agriculture System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurjonsson, Hafthor Ægir; Elmegaard, Brian; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased burden on the environment caused by human activities, focus on industrial ecology designs are gaining more attention. In that perspective an environ- mentally effective integration of bionergy and agriculture systems has significant potential. This work introduces a modeling...... of the overall model. C- TOOL and Yasso07 are used in the carbon balance of agri- culture, Dynamic Network Analysis is used for the energy simulation and Brightway2 is used to build a Life Cycle Inventory compatible database and processes it for vari- ous impacts assessment methods. The model is success- fully...... approach that builds on Life Cycle Inventory and carries out Life Cycle Impact Assessment for a con- sequential Life Cycle Assessment on integrated bioenergy and agriculture systems. The model framework is built in Python which connects various freely available soft- ware that handle different aspects...

  2. Towards an integrated model of international migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. MASSEY

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Demographers have yet to develop a suitable integrated model of international migration and consequently have been very poor at forecasting immigration. This paper outlines the basic elements of an integrated model and surveys recent history to suggest the key challenges to model construction. A comprehensive theory must explain the structural forces that create a supply of people prone to migrate internationally, the structural origins of labour demand in receiving countries, the motivations of those who respond to these forces by choosing to migrate internationally, the growth and structure of transnational networks that arise to support international movement, the behaviour states in response to immigrant flows, and the influence of state actions on the behaviour of migrants. Recent history suggests that a good model needs to respect the salience of markets, recognize the circularity of migrant flows, appreciate the power of feedback effects, and be alert unanticipated consequences of policy actions.

  3. Quiver gauge theories and integrable lattice models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Junya

    2015-01-01

    We discuss connections between certain classes of supersymmetric quiver gauge theories and integrable lattice models from the point of view of topological quantum field theories (TQFTs). The relevant classes include 4d N=1 theories known as brane box and brane tilling models, 3d N=2 and 2d N=(2,2) theories obtained from them by compactification, and 2d N=(0,2) theories closely related to these theories. We argue that their supersymmetric indices carry structures of TQFTs equipped with line operators, and as a consequence, are equal to the partition functions of lattice models. The integrability of these models follows from the existence of extra dimension in the TQFTs, which emerges after the theories are embedded in M-theory. The Yang-Baxter equation expresses the invariance of supersymmetric indices under Seiberg duality and its lower-dimensional analogs.

  4. Catalogue of Interactive Learning Objectives to improve an Integrated Medical and Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Sagheb, K; Sagheb, Ka; Schulz, P; Willershausen, B; Al-Nawas, B; Walter, C

    2016-12-01

    Online learning media are increasingly being incorporated into medical and dental education. However, the coordination between obligatory and facultative teaching domains still remains unsatisfying. The Catalogue of Interactive Learning Objectives of the University Clinic of Mainz (ILKUM), aims to offer knowledge transfer for students while being mindful of their individual qualifications. Its hierarchical structure is designed according to the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) levels of competence. The ILKUM was designed to establish a stronger interconnection between already existing and prospective learning strategies. All contents are linked to the current lectures as well as to e-learning modules, e.g., clinical case studies and OR videos. Students can conduct self-examinations regarding specific learning objectives. Since 2007, ILKUM has been developed and analyzed regarding its acceptance among dental students. These improved e-learning techniques foster time and location-independent access to study materials and allow an estimation of the knowledge achieved by students. Surveys of our students clearly show a large demand for upgrading ILKUM content (89%; n = 172) with integrated self-testing (89%; n = 174). In parallel to the advancement of our e-learning offering, a portion of internet-based learning is constantly rising among students. The broad acceptance and demand for the development of ILKUM show its potential. Moreover, ILKUM grants fast, topic-oriented querying of learning content without time and locale limitations as well as direct determination of the individually needed knowledge conditions. The long-term goal of the ILKUM project is to be a sustainable, important additional modality of teaching and training for dental and medical students.

  5. THE INTEGRATION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT INTO PRIMARY SCHOOLS CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi Alaba Sofowora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is a critical overview of the efforts of the Nigerian government at integrating Information and Communication Technology (ICT into education. It also assessed the availability of these facilities and infrastructure as stated in the strategic ICT objectives. The study in addition investigated whether the sample used have the skills needed for ICT utilization and factors/challenges that affects the diffusion of ICT in education. This is with the ultimate view of providing empirical information on the extent of achieving the vision and objectives of the National policy for ICT in Nigeria. The study employed exploratory research design. Three hundred participants constituted the sample for this study. The sample was selected from ten schools using simple random sampling technique. While the schools were selected using stratified sampling technique, based on the Local Education Authority Area, school type and location. The research instrument is made up of a self-designed questionnaire on five point Likert Scale. They were derived from relevant literature and the research objectives and were validated by exerts from the Departments of Educational Technology, Educational Foundations and Counseling and ICT teachers in public schools in Ife for content validity. The reliability of the instrument was also determined using Pearson Moment Correlation. A correlation of 0.87 was found. The data was analyzed using One way analysis of Variance (ANOVA .The findings showed that ICT facilities are not universally available. It was also found that 10 years after the enactment of the Nigerian National ICT Policy, internet services are yet to be fully made available in all the government Institutions in Nigeria

  6. Which coordinate system for modelling path integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickerstaff, Robert J; Cheung, Allen

    2010-03-21

    Path integration is a navigation strategy widely observed in nature where an animal maintains a running estimate, called the home vector, of its location during an excursion. Evidence suggests it is both ancient and ubiquitous in nature, and has been studied for over a century. In that time, canonical and neural network models have flourished, based on a wide range of assumptions, justifications and supporting data. Despite the importance of the phenomenon, consensus and unifying principles appear lacking. A fundamental issue is the neural representation of space needed for biological path integration. This paper presents a scheme to classify path integration systems on the basis of the way the home vector records and updates the spatial relationship between the animal and its home location. Four extended classes of coordinate systems are used to unify and review both canonical and neural network models of path integration, from the arthropod and mammalian literature. This scheme demonstrates analytical equivalence between models which may otherwise appear unrelated, and distinguishes between models which may superficially appear similar. A thorough analysis is carried out of the equational forms of important facets of path integration including updating, steering, searching and systematic errors, using each of the four coordinate systems. The type of available directional cue, namely allothetic or idiothetic, is also considered. It is shown that on balance, the class of home vectors which includes the geocentric Cartesian coordinate system, appears to be the most robust for biological systems. A key conclusion is that deducing computational structure from behavioural data alone will be difficult or impossible, at least in the absence of an analysis of random errors. Consequently it is likely that further theoretical insights into path integration will require an in-depth study of the effect of noise on the four classes of home vectors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Topological matter, integrable models and fusion rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeschansky, D.; Warner, N.P.

    1992-01-01

    We show how topological G k /G k models can be embedded into the topological matter models that are obtained by perturbing the twisted N = 2 supersymmetric, hermitian symmetric, coset models. In particular, this leads to an embedding of the fusion ring of G as a sub-ring of the perturbed, chiral primary ring. The perturbation of the twisted N = 2 model that leads to the fusion ring is also shown to lead to an integrable N = 2 supersymmetric field theory when the untwisted N = 2 superconformal field theory is perturbed by the same operator and its hermitian conjugate. (orig.)

  8. Towards an Integrative Model of Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Heslop, Ben

    This paper aims to contribute towards the advancement of an efficient architecture of a single market for knowledge through the development of an integrative model of knowledge transfer. Within this aim, several points of departure can be singled out. One, the article builds on the call of the Eu......This paper aims to contribute towards the advancement of an efficient architecture of a single market for knowledge through the development of an integrative model of knowledge transfer. Within this aim, several points of departure can be singled out. One, the article builds on the call...... business and academia, and implementing the respective legislature are enduring. The research objectives were to explore (i) the process of knowledge transfer in universities, including the nature of tensions, obstacles and incentives, (ii) the relationships between key stakeholders in the KT market...... of the emergent integrative model of knowledge transfer. In an attempt to bring it to a higher level of generalizability, the integrative model of KT is further conceptualized from a ‘sociology of markets’ perspective resulting in an emergent architecture of a single market for knowledge. Future research...

  9. International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM), held in Washington, DC 7th-9th December 2010. The meeting brought together 57 scientists and managers from leading US and European government and non-governmental organizations, universitie...

  10. Accurate Electromagnetic Modeling Methods for Integrated Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheng, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The present development of modern integrated circuits (IC’s) is characterized by a number of critical factors that make their design and verification considerably more difficult than before. This dissertation addresses the important questions of modeling all electromagnetic behavior of features on

  11. Rethinking School Bullying: Towards an Integrated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Roz; Smith, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    What would make anti-bullying initiatives more successful? This book offers a new approach to the problem of school bullying. The question of what constitutes a useful theory of bullying is considered and suggestions are made as to how priorities for future research might be identified. The integrated, systemic model of school bullying introduced…

  12. Effectiveness of the Multidimensional Curriculum Model in Developing Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Elementary and Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidergor, Hava E.

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the multidimensional curriculum model (MdCM) in the development of higher-order thinking skills in a sample of 394 elementary and secondary school students in Israel. The study employed a quantitative quasi-experimental pre-post design, using a study module based on MdCM, comparing intervention group…

  13. Curriculum vitae of the LOTOS–EUROS (v2.0 chemistry transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. M. Manders

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and application of chemistry transport models has a long tradition. Within the Netherlands the LOTOS–EUROS model has been developed by a consortium of institutes, after combining its independently developed predecessors in 2005. Recently, version 2.0 of the model was released as an open-source version. This paper presents the curriculum vitae of the model system, describing the model's history, model philosophy, basic features and a validation with EMEP stations for the new benchmark year 2012, and presents cases with the model's most recent and key developments. By setting the model developments in context and providing an outlook for directions for further development, the paper goes beyond the common model description.With an origin in ozone and sulfur modelling for the models LOTOS and EUROS, the application areas were gradually extended with persistent organic pollutants, reactive nitrogen, and primary and secondary particulate matter. After the combination of the models to LOTOS–EUROS in 2005, the model was further developed to include new source parametrizations (e.g. road resuspension, desert dust, wildfires, applied for operational smog forecasts in the Netherlands and Europe, and has been used for emission scenarios, source apportionment, and long-term hindcast and climate change scenarios. LOTOS–EUROS has been a front-runner in data assimilation of ground-based and satellite observations and has participated in many model intercomparison studies. The model is no longer confined to applications over Europe but is also applied to other regions of the world, e.g. China. The increasing interaction with emission experts has also contributed to the improvement of the model's performance. The philosophy for model development has always been to use knowledge that is state of the art and proven, to keep a good balance in the level of detail of process description and accuracy of input and output, and to keep a good record

  14. Nonlinear integral equations for the sausage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Changrim; Balog, Janos; Ravanini, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    The sausage model, first proposed by Fateev, Onofri, and Zamolodchikov, is a deformation of the O(3) sigma model preserving integrability. The target space is deformed from the sphere to ‘sausage’ shape by a deformation parameter ν. This model is defined by a factorizable S-matrix which is obtained by deforming that of the O(3) sigma model by a parameter λ. Clues for the deformed sigma model are provided by various UV and IR information through the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA) analysis based on the S-matrix. Application of TBA to the sausage model is, however, limited to the case of 1/λ integer where the coupled integral equations can be truncated to a finite number. In this paper, we propose a finite set of nonlinear integral equations (NLIEs), which are applicable to generic value of λ. Our derivation is based on T-Q relations extracted from the truncated TBA equations. For a consistency check, we compute next-leading order corrections of the vacuum energy and extract the S-matrix information in the IR limit. We also solved the NLIE both analytically and numerically in the UV limit to get the effective central charge and compared with that of the zero-mode dynamics to obtain exact relation between ν and λ. Dedicated to the memory of Petr Petrovich Kulish.

  15. Integrating Public Health and Health Promotion Practice in the Medical Curriculum: A Self-Directed Team-Based Project Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Kershaw

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparing health professionals in health promotion (HP and disease prevention is essential for improvement of population health, community HP, and better health care for individuals. The aim of this article is to describe an HP project in the form of a major self-directed project-based learning task integrated within the curriculum in the second year of the medical degree program at United Arab Emirates University. The project introduces students to public health and HP practice and develops students’ literature searching, writing, presentation skills, and team work. Students learn the principles underlying behavioral change, and the design of HP programs and materials, through a lecture format. Small groups of students each choose a specific health topic for their project. Over 11 weeks, students obtain information about their topic from appropriate sources (library, PubMed, Google Scholar, credible health sources such as World Health Organization. Using the principles learned in the lectures, they develop appropriate materials for their target audience: for example, posters, a pamphlet, social media content, or a video or radio message. Students seek advice from specialist faculty as needed. In week 12, each team presents their project background, rationale, and materials to their colleagues in a seminar format open to all faculty. They then submit the materials they developed for assessment. Group marks are assigned for presentations and materials. Key concepts are assessed by multiple choice questions in comprehensive course examinations. By participation in the HP project, many students develop a solid background in prevention. The information retrieval, writing, and presentation skills, as well as experience of team work, are valuable both for the remaining years of their training and their future careers.

  16. Integrating global animal health, public health and tropical animal health issues into the veterinary curriculum: a South African/African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, G E; Coetzer, J A W; Terblanche, H M

    2009-08-01

    The globalisation of trade and food, the increased volume and speed of international travel, climate change, and the related escalation of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases mean that countries are now more interconnected and interdependent than ever before. Africa is beleaguered by a range of endemic infectious and parasitic tropical diseases which, due to its diverse wildlife populations and indigenous livestock, can serve as a reservoir of high-impact or transboundary diseases and play a role in the emergence of disease, particularly at the wildlife, domestic animal and human interfaces. It is therefore essential to integrate animal and public health issues into the veterinary curriculum. Veterinary training in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa has focused on producing veterinarians to serve the livestock sector although socio-economic changes and privatisation of Veterinary Services have caused curriculum adjustments, as have globalisation and the increased risk of the spread of transboundary diseases. In South Africa, undergraduate veterinary training is more clinically oriented than in other regions. Animal and public health issues are covered in the curriculum, although their global relevance is not emphasised. The authors describe the undergraduate veterinary curriculum and summarise post-graduate programmes in South Africa. They also discuss a more comprehensive core-elective approach to the current curriculum and the need to adapt to new challenges facing the profession. Finally, they examine the potential use of innovative technology in undergraduate and post-graduate training and professional development, the importance of regional and international collaboration and the accreditation and recognition of veterinary training.

  17. CurriM : Curriculum mining (Poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pechenizkiy, M.; Trcka, N.; De Bra, P.M.E.; Toledo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum mining includes three main kinds of tasks: (i) actual curriculum model discovery, i.e. constructing complete and compact academic curriculum models that are able to reproduce the observed behavior of students, (ii) curriculum model conformance checking, i.e. checking whether the observed

  18. Teaching spiritual care to nursing students:an integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Testerman, Nancy; Hart, Dynnette

    2014-01-01

    Graduating nurses are required to know how to support patient spiritual well-being, yet there is scant literature about how spiritual care is taught in undergraduate programs. Typically spiritual content only is sporadically included; the authors recommend intergrating spiritual can thoughout the nursing curriculum. This article describes how one Christian nursing school integrates spiritual care content, supports student spiritual well-being throughout the program, and evaluates spiritual care instruction at graduation.

  19. Mass generation in perturbed massless integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controzzi, D.; Mussardo, G.

    2005-01-01

    We extend form-factor perturbation theory to non-integrable deformations of massless integrable models, in order to address the problem of mass generation in such systems. With respect to the standard renormalisation group analysis this approach is more suitable for studying the particle content of the perturbed theory. Analogously to the massive case, interesting information can be obtained already at first order, such as the identification of the operators which create a mass gap and those which induce the confinement of the massless particles in the perturbed theory

  20. Paradox of integration-A computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    The paradoxical aspect of integration of a social group has been highlighted by Blau (1964). During the integration process, the group members simultaneously compete for social status and play the role of the audience. Here we show that when the competition prevails over the desire of approval, a sharp transition breaks all friendly relations. However, as was described by Blau, people with high status are inclined to bother more with acceptance of others; this is achieved by praising others and revealing her/his own weak points. In our model, this action smooths the transition and improves interpersonal relations.

  1. Integrated assessment models of global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parson, E.A.; Fisher-Vanden, K.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review recent work in the integrated assessment modeling of global climate change. This field has grown rapidly since 1990. Integrated assessment models seek to combine knowledge from multiple disciplines in formal integrated representations; inform policy-making, structure knowledge, and prioritize key uncertainties; and advance knowledge of broad system linkages and feedbacks, particularly between socio-economic and bio-physical processes. They may combine simplified representations of the socio-economic determinants of greenhouse gas emissions, the atmosphere and oceans, impacts on human activities and ecosystems, and potential policies and responses. The authors summarize current projects, grouping them according to whether they emphasize the dynamics of emissions control and optimal policy-making, uncertainty, or spatial detail. They review the few significant insights that have been claimed from work to date and identify important challenges for integrated assessment modeling in its relationships to disciplinary knowledge and to broader assessment seeking to inform policy- and decision-making. 192 refs., 2 figs

  2. The Curriculum Innovation Canvas: A Design Thinking Framework for the Engaged Educational Entrepreneur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willness, Chelsea; Bruni-Bossio, Vince

    2017-01-01

    Integrating literature on entrepreneurial business models and community-based experiential learning, we propose a new framework to advance the practice of curriculum innovation. Grounded in principles of design thinking, the curriculum innovation canvas provides a human-centered, collaborative, and holistic platform for instructors, curriculum…

  3. COGMIR: A computer model for knowledge integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.X.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation explores some aspects of knowledge integration, namely, accumulation of scientific knowledge and performing analogical reasoning on the acquired knowledge. Knowledge to be integrated is conveyed by paragraph-like pieces referred to as documents. By incorporating some results from cognitive science, the Deutsch-Kraft model of information retrieval is extended to a model for knowledge engineering, which integrates acquired knowledge and performs intelligent retrieval. The resulting computer model is termed COGMIR, which stands for a COGnitive Model for Intelligent Retrieval. A scheme, named query invoked memory reorganization, is used in COGMIR for knowledge integration. Unlike some other schemes which realize knowledge integration through subjective understanding by representing new knowledge in terms of existing knowledge, the proposed scheme suggests at storage time only recording the possible connection of knowledge acquired from different documents. The actual binding of the knowledge acquired from different documents is deferred to query time. There is only one way to store knowledge and numerous ways to utilize the knowledge. Each document can be represented as a whole as well as its meaning. In addition, since facts are constructed from the documents, document retrieval and fact retrieval are treated in a unified way. When the requested knowledge is not available, query invoked memory reorganization can generate suggestion based on available knowledge through analogical reasoning. This is done by revising the algorithms developed for document retrieval and fact retrieval, and by incorporating Gentner's structure mapping theory. Analogical reasoning is treated as a natural extension of intelligent retrieval, so that two previously separate research areas are combined. A case study is provided. All the components are implemented as list structures similar to relational data-bases.

  4. A Future-Oriented, Globally Based Curriculum Model for Industrial Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Presents a future-oriented curriculum approach for industrial technology programs. Major global issues provide the basic structure for curriculum development. These issues include energy management, resource management, technological advancement, and international relations. Rationales for industrial technology are discussed and a curriculum…

  5. Towards a Model of School-Based Curriculum Development and Assessment Using the SOLO Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John

    1989-01-01

    One factor preventing the wider acceptance of school-based curriculum development and assessment is the problem of comparing performances of different students, in different schools. The SOLO taxonomy is used to describe the complexity of learning outcomes in a language that is generally applicable across the curriculum. (Author/MLW)

  6. Model of Supervision Based on Primary School Teacher Professional Competency in Tematic Learning in Curriculum 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilani Hartono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find the Supervision Model Based on Primary Teacher Professional Competence which effective on integrated learning. This study use research and development with qualitative approach which will be carried out in the Palmerah, West Jakarta. The techniques used to collect data are interviews, questionnaires, observation and documentation. Data v alidity is tested with credibility, transferability, dependability, and comfortability. The model developed will be validated using the Delphi technique. The result of this research is the discovery of the model and device-based supervision model of professional competence of primary teachers in integrated learning. The long-term goal of this research is to improve the teachers’ competence and the supervision quality for primary teachers in integrated learning

  7. Toward an Integrative Model of Global Business Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin

    fragmentation-integration-fragmentation-integration upward spiral. In response to the call for integrative approach to strategic management research, we propose an integrative model of global business strategy that aims at integrating not only strategy and IB but also the different paradigms within the strategy...... field. We also discuss the merit and limitation of our model....

  8. The Development and Evaluation of a Time Based Network Model of the Industrial Engineering Technology Curriculum at the Southern Technical Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, James W.

    A practicum was conducted to develop a scientific management tool that would assist students in obtaining a systems view of their college curriculum and to coordinate planning with curriculum requirements. A modification of the critical path method was employed and the result was a time-based network model of the Industrial Engineering Technology…

  9. CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenburn, M.W.; Bunting, M.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia`s Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, top-level, modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM`s unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection) and location accuracy of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system`s performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. This report describes version 1.2 of IVSEM.

  10. GLOBE Atmosphere and AMS Diversity Program Content to Foster Weather and Climate Science Awareness at HBCUs: A Curriculum Enhancement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, D.

    2017-12-01

    perhaps pursue further study at the graduate level. The "vertical integration" model being developed herein is designed to be replicated at other HBCUs and MSIs as an effective vehicle for drawing students from underrepresented groups into the STEM education pipeline, particularly those planning careers in teaching.

  11. Pedagogic process modeling: Humanistic-integrative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boritko Nikolaj M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some current problems of modeling the dynamics of the subject-features development of the individual. The term "process" is considered in the context of the humanistic-integrative approach, in which the principles of self education are regarded as criteria for efficient pedagogic activity. Four basic characteristics of the pedagogic process are pointed out: intentionality reflects logicality and regularity of the development of the process; discreteness (stageability in dicates qualitative stages through which the pedagogic phenomenon passes; nonlinearity explains the crisis character of pedagogic processes and reveals inner factors of self-development; situationality requires a selection of pedagogic conditions in accordance with the inner factors, which would enable steering the pedagogic process. Offered are two steps for singling out a particular stage and the algorithm for developing an integrative model for it. The suggested conclusions might be of use for further theoretic research, analyses of educational practices and for realistic predicting of pedagogical phenomena. .

  12. Site descriptive modelling - strategy for integrated evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan

    2003-02-01

    The current document establishes the strategy to be used for achieving sufficient integration between disciplines in producing Site Descriptive Models during the Site Investigation stage. The Site Descriptive Model should be a multidisciplinary interpretation of geology, rock mechanics, thermal properties, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, transport properties and ecosystems using site investigation data from deep bore holes and from the surface as input. The modelling comprise the following iterative steps, evaluation of primary data, descriptive and quantitative modelling (in 3D), overall confidence evaluation. Data are first evaluated within each discipline and then the evaluations are checked between the disciplines. Three-dimensional modelling (i.e. estimating the distribution of parameter values in space and its uncertainty) is made in a sequence, where the geometrical framework is taken from the geological model and in turn used by the rock mechanics, thermal and hydrogeological modelling etc. The three-dimensional description should present the parameters with their spatial variability over a relevant and specified scale, with the uncertainty included in this description. Different alternative descriptions may be required. After the individual discipline modelling and uncertainty assessment a phase of overall confidence evaluation follows. Relevant parts of the different modelling teams assess the suggested uncertainties and evaluate the feedback. These discussions should assess overall confidence by, checking that all relevant data are used, checking that information in past model versions is considered, checking that the different kinds of uncertainty are addressed, checking if suggested alternatives make sense and if there is potential for additional alternatives, and by discussing, if appropriate, how additional measurements (i.e. more data) would affect confidence. The findings as well as the modelling results are to be documented in a Site Description

  13. Electromechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electromechanical engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electromechanical engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard…

  14. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  15. Preparation Model of Student Teacher Candidate in Developing Integrative Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyanto; Widiyatmoko, Arif

    2016-01-01

    According to 2013 Curriculum in Indonesia, science learning process in Junior High School is integrally held between physics, chemistry, biology, and earth science. To successfully implementing the 2013 Curriculum in school, the education institution which generates science teacher should prepare the student, so that they can develop integrative…

  16. Integrated Modelling in CRUCIAL Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Mukhamedzhanova, Elena; Nerobelov, Georgiy; Sedeeva, Margarita; Suhodskiy, Alexander; Mostamandy, Suleiman; Smyshlyaev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    The NordForsk CRUCIAL project (2016-2017) "Critical steps in understanding land surface - atmosphere interactions: from improved knowledge to socioeconomic solutions" as a part of the Pan-Eurasian EXperiment (PEEX; https://www.atm.helsinki.fi/peex) programme activities, is looking for a deeper collaboration between Nordic-Russian science communities. In particular, following collaboration between Danish and Russian partners, several topics were selected for joint research and are focused on evaluation of: (1) urbanization processes impact on changes in urban weather and climate on urban-subregional-regional scales and at contribution to assessment studies for population and environment; (2) effects of various feedback mechanisms on aerosol and cloud formation and radiative forcing on urban-regional scales for better predicting extreme weather events and at contribution to early warning systems, (3) environmental contamination from continues emissions and industrial accidents for better assessment and decision making for sustainable social and economic development, and (4) climatology of atmospheric boundary layer in northern latitudes to improve understanding of processes, revising parameterizations, and better weather forecasting. These research topics are realized employing the online integrated Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - High Resolution Limited Area Model) model within students' research projects: (1) "Online integrated high-resolution modelling of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area influence on weather and air pollution forecasting"; (2) "Modeling of aerosol impact on regional-urban scales: case study of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area"; (3) "Regional modeling and GIS evaluation of environmental pollution from Kola Peninsula sources"; and (4) "Climatology of the High-Latitude Planetary Boundary Layer". The students' projects achieved results and planned young scientists research training on online integrated modelling (Jun 2017) will be presented and

  17. Research enrichment: evaluation of structured research in the curriculum for dental medicine students as part of the vertical and horizontal integration of biomedical training and discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Tanis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research programs within medical and dental schools are important vehicles for biomedical and clinical discovery, serving as effective teaching and learning tools by providing situations in which predoctoral students develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Although research programs at many medical and dental schools are well-established, they may not be well integrated into the predoctoral curriculum to effectively support the learning objectives for their students. Methods A series of structured seminars, incorporating faculty research, was designed for first-year dental students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine to reinforce and support the concepts and skills taught in concurrent courses. A structured research enrichment period was also created to facilitate student engagement in active research using faculty and student curricular release time. Course evaluations and surveys were administered to gauge student perceptions of the curricular integration of research, the impact of these seminars on recruitment to the research program, and overall levels of student satisfaction with research enrichment. Results The analysis of course surveys revealed that students perceived the research-containing seminars effectively illustrated concepts, were logically sequenced, and were well-integrated into their curriculum. In addition, analysis of surveys revealed that the Integration Seminar courses motivated students to engage in research enrichment. Finally, this analysis provided evidence that students were very satisfied with their overall learning experience during research enrichment. Conclusion Curricular integration is one method of improving the teaching and learning of complicated and inter-related concepts, providing an opportunity to incorporate research training and objectives into traditionally separate didactic courses. Despite the benefits of curricular integration, finding

  18. Research enrichment: evaluation of structured research in the curriculum for dental medicine students as part of the vertical and horizontal integration of biomedical training and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Karl; O'Malley, Susan; Stewart, Tanis; Howard, Katherine M

    2008-02-19

    Research programs within medical and dental schools are important vehicles for biomedical and clinical discovery, serving as effective teaching and learning tools by providing situations in which predoctoral students develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Although research programs at many medical and dental schools are well-established, they may not be well integrated into the predoctoral curriculum to effectively support the learning objectives for their students. A series of structured seminars, incorporating faculty research, was designed for first-year dental students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine to reinforce and support the concepts and skills taught in concurrent courses. A structured research enrichment period was also created to facilitate student engagement in active research using faculty and student curricular release time. Course evaluations and surveys were administered to gauge student perceptions of the curricular integration of research, the impact of these seminars on recruitment to the research program, and overall levels of student satisfaction with research enrichment. The analysis of course surveys revealed that students perceived the research-containing seminars effectively illustrated concepts, were logically sequenced, and were well-integrated into their curriculum. In addition, analysis of surveys revealed that the Integration Seminar courses motivated students to engage in research enrichment. Finally, this analysis provided evidence that students were very satisfied with their overall learning experience during research enrichment. Curricular integration is one method of improving the teaching and learning of complicated and inter-related concepts, providing an opportunity to incorporate research training and objectives into traditionally separate didactic courses. Despite the benefits of curricular integration, finding the most appropriate points of integration, obtaining release time

  19. Student and faculty perspective toward the role and value of integration of natural product information into the pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka-Rokosz, Maria D; Dvorkin-Camiel, Lana; Asabigi, Amina-Louise

    2011-03-01

    Consumer use of natural products is a mainstay in our society and continues to grow in prevalence. As pharmacists are viewed as drug experts and are easily accessible to patients, it is important for them to have basic knowledge of natural products. Students and faculty members participating in a natural product elective were surveyed upon completion of the course about their perspectives regarding incorporation of covered information into the required curriculum. The majority of students and faculty members agree with the necessity of natural product content in the pharmacy curriculum. Their ideas for ways of incorporating this information, however, differ. Healthcare students and faculty are beginning to recognize the need for incorporation of Natural Product information into the curriculum and healthcare programs in the country should begin to rise to the occasion.

  20. SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysanova, V; Wechsung, F; Arnold, J; Srinivasan, R; Williams, J

    2000-12-01

    The model SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model) was developed in order to provide a comprehensive GIS-based tool for hydrological and water quality modelling in mesoscale and large river basins (from 100 to 10,000 km{sup 2}), which can be parameterised using regionally available information. The model was developed for the use mainly in Europe and temperate zone, though its application in other regions is possible as well. SWIM is based on two previously developed tools - SWAT and MATSALU (see more explanations in section 1.1). The model integrates hydrology, vegetation, erosion, and nutrient dynamics at the watershed scale. SWIM has a three-level disaggregation scheme 'basin - sub-basins - hydrotopes' and is coupled to the Geographic Information System GRASS (GRASS, 1993). A robust approach is suggested for the nitrogen and phosphorus modelling in mesoscale watersheds. SWIM runs under the UNIX environment. Model test and validation were performed sequentially for hydrology, crop growth, nitrogen and erosion in a number of mesoscale watersheds in the German part of the Elbe drainage basin. A comprehensive scheme of spatial disaggregation into sub-basins and hydrotopes combined with reasonable restriction on a sub-basin area allows performing the assessment of water resources and water quality with SWIM in mesoscale river basins. The modest data requirements represent an important advantage of the model. Direct connection to land use and climate data provides a possibility to use the model for analysis of climate change and land use change impacts on hydrology, agricultural production, and water quality. (orig.)

  1. Adaptation Entrepreneurship Education Model Curriculum 2013 for SMK (Description Preparation and Implementation Barriers in School/Model Pendidikan Kewirausahaan Adaptasi Kurikulum 2013 bagi SMK (Diskripsi Persiapan dan Hambatan Penerapan di Sekolah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Winarno

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the discovery of an effective entrepreneurial education model for SMK to implement the values of character and attention to the nuances of curriculum 2013. This model was developed as a whole better schools, teachers and learning tools and practices of learning activities. Specifically, this study aims to (1 describe the preparation of schools in planning appropriate entrepreneurship education curriculum in 2013 (2 identifies the difficulties that arise in the context of the transition adjustments from the previous curriculum leading to the curriculum in 2013 (3 collate and find draft model of entrepreneurship education character-based. The results showed that there was no significant change related to the implementation of the curriculum in 2013, changes occur in the process of adaptation of teachers to understand the curriculum, especially on the subjects of craft and Entrepreneurship are not yet fully have terstandart syllabus. In general, teachers are also still doubts over the implementation of the guidance curriculum which is based on 2013, this is caused understanding core competencies both spiritual and social attitudes as learning indirect to direct instructional coloring on behavioral aspects of competency knowledge there has been no agreement, in addition to almost all teachers yet have adequate syllabus including the media and materials. The model is offered in the study related to the development of curriculum and learning tools that are integrated with a comprehensive system of entrepreneurship education both regarding the function of institutions (schools and teacher qualifications.   Abstrak : Tujuan penelitian ini adalah ditemukannya   model pendidikan kewirausahaan yang efektif bagi  SMK dengan mengimplementasikan nilai-nilai karakter dan memperhatikan nuansa kurikulum 2013. Model ini dikembangkan secara menyeluruh baik sekolah, guru maupun perangkat pembelajarannya serta praktik

  2. Integrated Model for E-Learning Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadiani; Rodziah, A.; Hasan, S. M.; Rusli, A.; Noraini, C.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is not going to work if the system is not used in accordance with user needs. User Interface is very important to encourage using the application. Many theories had discuss about user interface usability evaluation and technology acceptance separately, actually why we do not make it correlation between interface usability evaluation and user acceptance to enhance e-learning process. Therefore, the evaluation model for e-learning interface acceptance is considered important to investigate. The aim of this study is to propose the integrated e-learning user interface acceptance evaluation model. This model was combined some theories of e-learning interface measurement such as, user learning style, usability evaluation, and the user benefit. We formulated in constructive questionnaires which were shared at 125 English Language School (ELS) students. This research statistics used Structural Equation Model using LISREL v8.80 and MANOVA analysis.

  3. MODELS OF TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION: AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei OGREZEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary study of information technology adoption has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. Various theoretical models have been developed and applied such as: the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT, Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB, etc. The result of these many years of research is thousands of contributions to the field, which, however, remain highly fragmented. This paper develops a theoretical model of technology adoption by integrating major theories in the field: primarily IDT, TAM, and TPB. To do so while avoiding mess, an approach that goes back to basics in independent variable type’s development is proposed; emphasizing: 1 the logic of classification, and 2 psychological mechanisms behind variable types. Once developed these types are then populated with variables originating in empirical research. Conclusions are developed on which types are underpopulated and present potential for future research. I end with a set of methodological recommendations for future application of the model.

  4. An Integrative Model of Internationalization Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin; Gammelgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    – The OLI and the UIP models fail to include corporate entrepreneurship and managerial psychology in their analyses. We suggest that regulatory focus theory unifies the managerial strategic choice between position logic and opportunity logic. In addition, host country institutions affect this managerial......Purpose – This paper aims to critically review the ownership, location and internalization (OLI) model and the Uppsala internationalization process (UIP) framework. We suggest that the inclusion of concepts such as corporate entrepreneurship, host country institutions and regulatory focus...... in an integrated framework helps to explain firm internationalization. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a review of the literature on the OLI and UIP models. In addition, it presents a conceptual model that encompasses corporate entrepreneurship, regulatory focus and institutions. Findings...

  5. The Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education: An Examination of Infused and Dedicated Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Faye Bean

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disability content has been slowly integrated into social work curricula despite the large proportion of social workers supporting people with disabilities and its requirement in social work education by the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Schools of social work offer disability content to their students in three ways: infused, dedicated (specialization, or a combination of both. A content analysis of 1620 course titles and descriptions from the top schools of social work was conducted to assess the integration of disability content into social work curricula. Eighty percent of the schools included disability content in their curriculum. Disability content was more likely to be integrated using the infused rather than the dedicated model.

  6. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  7. Neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum challenges based on context, input, process, and product evaluation model: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Ashghali-Farahani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Weakness of curriculum development in nursing education results in lack of professional skills in graduates. This study was done on master's students in nursing to evaluate challenges of neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum based on context, input, process, and product (CIPP evaluation model. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with qualitative approach, which was completed according to the CIPP evaluation model. The study was conducted from May 2014 to April 2015. The research community included neonatal intensive care nursing master's students, the graduates, faculty members, neonatologists, nurses working in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and mothers of infants who were hospitalized in such wards. Purposeful sampling was applied. Results: The data analysis showed that there were two main categories: “inappropriate infrastructure” and “unknown duties,” which influenced the context formation of NICU master's curriculum. The input was formed by five categories, including “biomedical approach,” “incomprehensive curriculum,” “lack of professional NICU nursing mentors,” “inappropriate admission process of NICU students,” and “lack of NICU skill labs.” Three categories were extracted in the process, including “more emphasize on theoretical education,” “the overlap of credits with each other and the inconsistency among the mentors,” and “ineffective assessment.” Finally, five categories were extracted in the product, including “preferring routine work instead of professional job,” “tendency to leave the job,” “clinical incompetency of graduates,” “the conflict between graduates and nursing staff expectations,” and “dissatisfaction of graduates.” Conclusions: Some changes are needed in NICU master's curriculum by considering the nursing experts' comments and evaluating the consequences of such program by them.

  8. The Gold Coast Integrated Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Connor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the development of the Australian Gold Coast Integrated Care Model based on the elements identified in contemporary research literature as essential for successful integration of care between primary care, and acute hospital services. The objectives of the model are to proactively manage high risk patients with complex and chronic conditions in collaboration with General Practitioners to ultimately reduce presentations to the health service emergency department, improve the capacity of specialist outpatients, and decrease planned and unplanned admission rates. Central to the model is a shared care record which is maintained and accessed by staff in the Coordination Centre. We provide a process map outlining the care protocols from initial assessment to care of the patient presenting for emergency care. The model is being evaluated over a pilot three year proof of concept phase to determine economic and process perspectives. If found to be cost-effective, acceptable to patients and professionals and as good as or better than usual care in terms of outcomes, the strategic intent is to scale the programme beyond the local health service.

  9. Typological and Integrative Models of Sexual Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidova L.Y.,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the basic typological and integrative theoretical models that explain the occurrence of child sexual abuse and the differences detected among the perpetrators of crimes against sexual integrity of minors. A comprehensive review of the theoretical concepts of sexual abuse in our country, in fact has not been carried out, and in this paper for the first time we made such an attempt. It is shown that the existing notions of sexual abuse largely overlap each other, but each of the models somehow takes into account the factors not explicitly addressed in other concepts. Systematic consideration of the theoretical models of sexual abuse can generalize and systematize the available data on the mechanisms of pedophile behavior. This review provides an opportunity to develop a new benchmark in the study of sexual abuse, get closer to building the most accurate and comprehensive model. In turn, this may contribute to solving the questions about the factors, dynamics, and the prevention of criminal sexual conduct against children

  10. Global Environmental Change: An integrated modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Elzen, M.

    1993-01-01

    Two major global environmental problems are dealt with: climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion (and their mutual interactions), briefly surveyed in part 1. In Part 2 a brief description of the integrated modelling framework IMAGE 1.6 is given. Some specific parts of the model are described in more detail in other Chapters, e.g. the carbon cycle model, the atmospheric chemistry model, the halocarbon model, and the UV-B impact model. In Part 3 an uncertainty analysis of climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion is presented (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 briefly reviews the social and economic uncertainties implied by future greenhouse gas emissions. Chapters 6 and 7 describe a model and sensitivity analysis pertaining to the scientific uncertainties and/or lacunae in the sources and sinks of methane and carbon dioxide, and their biogeochemical feedback processes. Chapter 8 presents an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the carbon cycle model, the halocarbon model, and the IMAGE model 1.6 as a whole. Part 4 presents the risk assessment methodology as applied to the problems of climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion more specifically. In Chapter 10, this methodology is used as a means with which to asses current ozone policy and a wide range of halocarbon policies. Chapter 11 presents and evaluates the simulated globally-averaged temperature and sea level rise (indicators) for the IPCC-1990 and 1992 scenarios, concluding with a Low Risk scenario, which would meet the climate targets. Chapter 12 discusses the impact of sea level rise on the frequency of the Dutch coastal defence system (indicator) for the IPCC-1990 scenarios. Chapter 13 presents projections of mortality rates due to stratospheric ozone depletion based on model simulations employing the UV-B chain model for a number of halocarbon policies. Chapter 14 presents an approach for allocating future emissions of CO 2 among regions. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Integrated identification, modeling and control with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guojun

    This thesis deals with the integration of system design, identification, modeling and control. In particular, six interdisciplinary engineering problems are addressed and investigated. Theoretical results are established and applied to structural vibration reduction and engine control problems. First, the data-based LQG control problem is formulated and solved. It is shown that a state space model is not necessary to solve this problem; rather a finite sequence from the impulse response is the only model data required to synthesize an optimal controller. The new theory avoids unnecessary reliance on a model, required in the conventional design procedure. The infinite horizon model predictive control problem is addressed for multivariable systems. The basic properties of the receding horizon implementation strategy is investigated and the complete framework for solving the problem is established. The new theory allows the accommodation of hard input constraints and time delays. The developed control algorithms guarantee the closed loop stability. A closed loop identification and infinite horizon model predictive control design procedure is established for engine speed regulation. The developed algorithms are tested on the Cummins Engine Simulator and desired results are obtained. A finite signal-to-noise ratio model is considered for noise signals. An information quality index is introduced which measures the essential information precision required for stabilization. The problems of minimum variance control and covariance control are formulated and investigated. Convergent algorithms are developed for solving the problems of interest. The problem of the integrated passive and active control design is addressed in order to improve the overall system performance. A design algorithm is developed, which simultaneously finds: (i) the optimal values of the stiffness and damping ratios for the structure, and (ii) an optimal output variance constrained stabilizing

  12. Vertically Integrated Models for Carbon Storage Modeling in Heterogeneous Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical modeling is an essential tool for studying the impacts of geologic carbon storage (GCS). Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep saline aquifers leads to multi-phase flow (injected CO2 and resident brine), which can be described by a set of three-dimensional governing equations, including mass-balance equation, volumetric flux equations (modified Darcy), and constitutive equations. This is the modeling approach on which commonly used reservoir simulators such as TOUGH2 are based. Due to the large density difference between CO2 and brine, GCS models can often be simplified by assuming buoyant segregation and integrating the three-dimensional governing equations in the vertical direction. The integration leads to a set of two-dimensional equations coupled with reconstruction operators for vertical profiles of saturation and pressure. Vertically-integrated approaches have been shown to give results of comparable quality as three-dimensional reservoir simulators when applied to realistic CO2 injection sites such as the upper sand wedge at the Sleipner site. However, vertically-integrated approaches usually rely on homogeneous properties over the thickness of a geologic layer. Here, we investigate the impact of general (vertical and horizontal) heterogeneity in intrinsic permeability, relative permeability functions, and capillary pressure functions. We consider formations involving complex fluvial deposition environments and compare the performance of vertically-integrated models to full three-dimensional models for a set of hypothetical test cases consisting of high permeability channels (streams) embedded in a low permeability background (floodplains). The domains are randomly generated assuming that stream channels can be represented by sinusoidal waves in the plan-view and by parabolas for the streams' cross-sections. Stream parameters such as width, thickness and wavelength are based on values found at the Ketzin site in Germany. Results from the

  13. Testing an integral conceptual model of frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbens, Robbert J; van Assen, Marcel A; Luijkx, Katrien G; Schols, Jos M

    2012-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to test three hypotheses derived from an integral conceptual model of frailty.   The integral model of frailty describes the pathway from life-course determinants to frailty to adverse outcomes. The model assumes that life-course determinants and the three domains of frailty (physical, psychological, social) affect adverse outcomes, the effect of disease(s) on adverse outcomes is mediated by frailty, and the effect of frailty on adverse outcomes depends on the life-course determinants. In June 2008 a questionnaire was sent to a sample of community-dwelling people, aged 75 years and older (n = 213). Life-course determinants and frailty were assessed using the Tilburg frailty indicator. Adverse outcomes were measured using the Groningen activity restriction scale, the WHOQOL-BREF and questions regarding healthcare utilization. The effect of seven self-reported chronic diseases was examined. Life-course determinants, chronic disease(s), and frailty together explain a moderate to large part of the variance of the seven continuous adverse outcomes (26-57%). All these predictors together explained a significant part of each of the five dichotomous adverse outcomes. The effect of chronic disease(s) on all 12 adverse outcomes was mediated at least partly by frailty. The effect of frailty domains on adverse outcomes did not depend on life-course determinants. Our finding that the adverse outcomes are differently and uniquely affected by the three domains of frailty (physical, psychological, social), and life-course determinants and disease(s), emphasizes the importance of an integral conceptual model of frailty. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. A Model to Predict Student Failure in the First Year of the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard J.A. Baars

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: The earliest moment with the highest specificity to predict student failure in the first-year curriculum seems to be at 6 months. However, additional factors are needed to improve this prediction or to bring forward the predictive moment.

  15. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  16. A watershed model to integrate EO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eduardo; Chambel-Leitao, Pedro; Carina, Almeida; Brito, David; Cherif, Ines; Alexandridis, Thomas; Neves, Ramiro

    2013-04-01

    MOHID LAND is a open source watershed model developed by MARETEC and is part of the MOHID Framework. It integrates four mediums (or compartments): porous media, surface, rivers and atmosphere. The movement of water between these mediums are based on mass and momentum balance equations. The atmosphere medium is not explicity simulated. Instead, it's used as boundary condition to the model through meteorological properties: precipitation, solar radiation, wind speed/direction, relative humidity and air temperature. The surface medium includes the overland runoff and vegetation growth processes and is simulated using a 2D grid. The porous media includes both the unsaturated (soil) and saturated zones (aquifer) and is simulated using a 3D grid. The river flow is simulated through a 1D drainage network. All these mediums are linked through evapotranspiration and flow exchanges (infiltration, river-soil growndwater flow, surface-river overland flow). Besides the water movement, it is also possible to simulate water quality processes and solute/sediment transport. Model setup include the definition of the geometry and the properties of each one of its compartments. After the setup of the model, the only continuous input data that MOHID LAND requires are the atmosphere properties (boundary conditions) that can be provided as timeseries or spacial data. MOHID LAND has been adapted the last 4 years under FP7 and ESA projects to integrate Earth Observation (EO) data, both variable in time and in space. EO data can be used to calibrate/validate or as input/assimilation data to the model. The currently EO data used include LULC (Land Use Land Cover) maps, LAI (Leaf Area Index) maps, EVTP (Evapotranspiration) maps and SWC (Soil Water Content) maps. Model results are improved by the EO data, but the advantage of this integration is that the model can still run without the EO data. This means that model do not stop due to unavailability of EO data and can run on a forecast mode

  17. Integration of Environmental Issues in a Physics Course: 'Physics by Inquiry' High School Teachers' Integration Models and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimori, David Abiya

    As we approach the second quarter of the twenty-first century, one may predict that the environment will be among the dominant themes in the political and educational discourse. Over the past three decades, particular perspectives regarding the environment have begun to emerge: (i) realization by human beings that we not only live on earth and use its resources at an increasingly high rate but we also actually belong to the earth and the total ecology of all living systems, (ii) there are strong interactions among different components of the large and complex systems that make up our environment, and (iii) the rising human population and its impact on the environment is a great concern (Hughes & Mason, 2014). Studies have revealed that although the students do not have a deep understanding of environmental issues and lack environmental awareness and attitudes necessary for protecting the environment, they have great concern for the environment (Chapman & Sharma, 2001; Fien, Yencken, & Sykes, 2002). However, addressing environmental issues in the classroom and other disciplines has never been an easy job for teachers (Pennock & Bardwell, 1994; Edelson, 2007). Using multiple case studies, this study investigated how three purposefully selected physics teachers teaching a 'Physics by Inquiry' course integrated environmental topics and issues in their classroom. Particularly this study looked at what integration models and practices the three physics teachers employed in integrating environmental topics and issues in their classroom and what challenges the teachers faced while integrating environmental topics in their classrooms. Data collection methods including field notes taken from observations, teachers' interviews and a collection of artifacts and documents were used. The data were coded analyzed and organized into codes and categories guided by Fogarty (1991) models of curriculum integration and Ham and Sewing (1988) four categories of barriers to environmental

  18. Integrated Pest Management, Preliminary. Curriculum Guide and Instructional Materials for a Secondary School Vo-Ag Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady County Board of Education, Cairo, GA.

    This curriculum guide presents methods to disseminate information to students interested in dealing with pests, or who have concerns about the environmental impacts of modern pest control methods. Options are encouraged for pest control methods using a combination of natural, biological, cultural, and chemical means of control. Specifically…

  19. Movement Education: Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Its Benefits and Their Competence in Integrating It across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimli Celik, Serap

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pre-service teachers' (PT) perceptions about movement education, perceived benefits from participating in a 12-week movement education module, and confidence and competency to incorporate movement into curriculum after experiencing the module. The data were generated through pre and post open-ended…

  20. Integration of behavioral medicine competencies into physiotherapy curriculum in an exemplary Swedish program: rationale, process, and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandborgh, Maria; Dean, Elizabeth; Denison, Eva; Elvén, Maria; Fritz, Johanna; Wågert, Petra von Heideken; Moberg, Johan; Overmeer, Thomas; Snöljung, Åsa; Johansson, Ann-Christin; Söderlund, Anne

    2018-06-21

    In 2004, Mälardalen University, Sweden, introduced a new undergraduate entry-level physiotherapy program. Program developers constructed the curriculum with behavioral medicine content that reflected the contemporary definition and values of the physiotherapy profession aligning it with current best practices, evidence, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The new curriculum conceptualized movement and function as modifiable behaviors in that they reflect behavioral contingencies, perceptions, beliefs, and lifestyle factors as well as pathophysiology and environmental factors. The purpose of this article is to describe how one university accordingly structured its new curriculum and its review. We describe the rationale for the curriculum's behavioral medicine content and competencies, its development and implementation, challenges, long-term outcomes, and its related research enterprise. We conclude that physiotherapy practiced by our graduates augments that taught in other programs based on accreditation reviews. With their expanded practice scope, graduates are systematically practicing within the constructs of health and function conceptualized within the ICF. Our intent in sharing our experience is to exemplify one university's initiative to best prepare students with respect to maximizing physiotherapy outcomes as well as establish a dialogue regarding minimum standards of behavioral medicine competencies in physiotherapy education and practice.

  1. Integrating Research-Informed Teaching within an Undergraduate Level 4 (Year 1) Diagnostic Radiography Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Robert; Hogg, Peter; Robinson, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the piloting and evaluation of the Research-informed Teaching experience (RiTe) project. The aim of RiTe was to link teaching and learning with research within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum. A preliminary pilot study of RiTe was undertaken with a group of level 4 (year 1) volunteer BSc (Hons) diagnostic…

  2. The Effects of Integrating LEGO Robotics into a Mathematics Curriculum to Promote the Development of Proportional Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler-Failing, Shelli L.

    2017-01-01

    This mixed methods, action research case study sought to investigate the effects of incorporating LEGO robotics into a seventh grade mathematics curriculum focused on the development of proportional reasoning through the lens of Social Constructivist Theory. Quantitative data was collected via pre- and post-tests from the mathematics class of six…

  3. Improving Students' Transfer of Learning among Subject Areas through the Use of an Integrated Curriculum and Alternative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boidy, Tish; Moran, Michelle

    An intervention program sought to improve third- and fifth- grade students' ability to transfer learning among subject areas and to apply their learning to everyday occurrences. Surveys and interviews revealed the lack of student transference of knowledge among subject areas; teacher surveys and an interview with the curriculum director provided…

  4. Multiscale sampling model for motion integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbakov, Lena; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash

    2013-09-30

    Biologically plausible strategies for visual scene integration across spatial and temporal domains continues to be a challenging topic. The fundamental question we address is whether classical problems in motion integration, such as the aperture problem, can be solved in a model that samples the visual scene at multiple spatial and temporal scales in parallel. We hypothesize that fast interareal connections that allow feedback of information between cortical layers are the key processes that disambiguate motion direction. We developed a neural model showing how the aperture problem can be solved using different spatial sampling scales between LGN, V1 layer 4, V1 layer 6, and area MT. Our results suggest that multiscale sampling, rather than feedback explicitly, is the key process that gives rise to end-stopped cells in V1 and enables area MT to solve the aperture problem without the need for calculating intersecting constraints or crafting intricate patterns of spatiotemporal receptive fields. Furthermore, the model explains why end-stopped cells no longer emerge in the absence of V1 layer 6 activity (Bolz & Gilbert, 1986), why V1 layer 4 cells are significantly more end-stopped than V1 layer 6 cells (Pack, Livingstone, Duffy, & Born, 2003), and how it is possible to have a solution to the aperture problem in area MT with no solution in V1 in the presence of driving feedback. In summary, while much research in the field focuses on how a laminar architecture can give rise to complicated spatiotemporal receptive fields to solve problems in the motion domain, we show that one can reframe motion integration as an emergent property of multiscale sampling achieved concurrently within lamina and across multiple visual areas.

  5. Role-modelling and the hidden curriculum: New graduate nurses' professional socialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kiri; Cook, Catherine

    2018-05-12

    To explore new graduate nurses' experiences of professional socialisation by registered nurses in hospital-based practice settings, and identify strategies that support professional identity development. Professionalism is reinforced and stabilised in the clinical environment through the 'hidden curriculum', with major learning coming from practice role-models. New graduates observe attitudes, behaviours, decision-making and skills, and gain feedback from registered nurses, which they translate into their own practice. Professional socialisation occurs through encounters with desirable and undesirable role-modelling; both are significant in professional identity formation. Qualitative descriptive design. Data collection was undertaken through semi-structured interviews with five new graduate nurse participants. A general inductive approach guided analysis. The meaningful descriptions gained provided insight into their experiences. Three main themes identified from the data include: 'Lessons from the wilderness'; 'Life in the wild'; and 'Belonging to a wolf pack'. The data set highlighted the major transitional process from student identity to registered nurse. New graduates' rethinking of beliefs and professional nursing identities were influenced by organisational pressures and experienced nurses role-modelling practices contrary to professional values. Despite encountering a range of professional behaviours, attitudes and dilemmas, new graduates were capable of moral agency and critical thinking. However, they rapidly acculturated and described compromises to cope. To promote high morale and a sense of belonging, a concerted effort is required by all nurses to facilitate the socialisation process to encourage self-authorship. A well-developed professional identity enhances nursing as a profession, contributing towards better healthcare delivery and outcomes. It is critically important how professional values are learnt within the culture of nursing. Tensions in

  6. Organizational buying behavior: An integrated model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Beba

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizational buying behavior is decision making process by which formal organizations establish the need for purchased products and services, and identify, evaluate, and choose among alternative brands and suppliers. Understanding the buying decision processes is essential to developing the marketing programs of companies that sell to organizations, or to 'industrial customers'. In business (industrial marketing, exchange relationships between the organizational selling center and the organizational buying center are crucial. Integrative model of organizational buying behavior offers a systematic framework in analyzing the complementary factors and what effect they have on the behavior of those involved in making buying decisions.

  7. Differential and Integral Models of TOKAMAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Dolezel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of 3D electromagnetic phenomena in TOKAMAK with typically distributed main and additional coils is not an easy business. Evaluated must be not only distribution of the magnetic field, but also forces acting in particular coils. Use of differential methods (such as FDM or FEM for this purpose may be complicated because of geometrical incommensurability of particular subregions in the investigated area or problems with the boundary conditions. That is why integral formulation of the problem may sometimes be an advantages. The theoretical analysis is illustrated on an example processed by both methods, whose results are compared and discussed.

  8. INTEGRATED SPEED ESTIMATION MODEL FOR MULTILANE EXPREESSWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungjoon; Oguchi, Takashi

    In this paper, an integrated speed-estimation model is developed based on empirical analyses for the basic sections of intercity multilane expressway un der the uncongested condition. This model enables a speed estimation for each lane at any site under arb itrary highway-alignment, traffic (traffic flow and truck percentage), and rainfall conditions. By combin ing this model and a lane-use model which estimates traffic distribution on the lanes by each vehicle type, it is also possible to es timate an average speed across all the lanes of one direction from a traffic demand by vehicle type under specific highway-alignment and rainfall conditions. This model is exp ected to be a tool for the evaluation of traffic performance for expressways when the performance me asure is travel speed, which is necessary for Performance-Oriented Highway Planning and Design. Regarding the highway-alignment condition, two new estimators, called effective horizo ntal curvature and effective vertical grade, are proposed in this paper which take into account the influence of upstream and downstream alignment conditions. They are applied to the speed-estimation model, and it shows increased accuracy of the estimation.

  9. Integrated Modeling of Complex Optomechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torben; Enmark, Anita

    2011-09-01

    Mathematical modeling and performance simulation are playing an increasing role in large, high-technology projects. There are two reasons; first, projects are now larger than they were before, and the high cost calls for detailed performance prediction before construction. Second, in particular for space-related designs, it is often difficult to test systems under realistic conditions beforehand, and mathematical modeling is then needed to verify in advance that a system will work as planned. Computers have become much more powerful, permitting calculations that were not possible before. At the same time mathematical tools have been further developed and found acceptance in the community. Particular progress has been made in the fields of structural mechanics, optics and control engineering, where new methods have gained importance over the last few decades. Also, methods for combining optical, structural and control system models into global models have found widespread use. Such combined models are usually called integrated models and were the subject of this symposium. The objective was to bring together people working in the fields of groundbased optical telescopes, ground-based radio telescopes, and space telescopes. We succeeded in doing so and had 39 interesting presentations and many fruitful discussions during coffee and lunch breaks and social arrangements. We are grateful that so many top ranked specialists found their way to Kiruna and we believe that these proceedings will prove valuable during much future work.

  10. Treatment of pathological gambling - integrative systemic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović, Ivica; Lažetić, Goran; Lečić-Toševski, Dušica; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Pathological gambling was classified under impulse control disorders within the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) (WHO 1992), but the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-V), (APA 2013), has recognized pathological gambling as a first disorder within a new diagnostic category of behavioral addictions - Gambling disorder. Pathological gambling is a disorder in progression, and we hope that our experience in the treatment of pathological gambling in the Daily Hospital for Addictions at The Institute of Mental Health, through the original "Integrative - systemic model" would be of use to colleagues, dealing with this pathology. This model of treatment of pathological gambling is based on multi-systemic approach and it primarily represents an integration of family and cognitive-behavioral therapy, with traces of psychodynamic, existential and pharmacotherapy. The model is based on the book "Pathological gambling - with self-help manual" by Dr Mladenovic and Dr Lazetic, and has been designed in the form of a program that lasts 10 weeks in the intensive phase, and then continues for two years in the form of "extended treatment" ("After care"). The intensive phase is divided into three segments: educational, insight with initial changes and analysis of the achieved changes with the definition of plans and areas that need to be addressed in the extended treatment. "Extended treatment" lasts for two years in the form of group therapy, during which there is a second order change of the identified patient, but also of other family members. Pathological gambling has been treated in the form of systemic-family therapy for more than 10 years at the Institute of Mental Health (IMH), in Belgrade. For second year in a row the treatment is carried out by the modern "Integrative-systemic model". If abstinence from gambling witihin the period of one year after completion of the intensive phase of treatment is taken as the main criterion of

  11. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  12. Learning models for multi-source integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejada, S.; Knoblock, C.A.; Minton, S. [Univ. of Southern California/ISI, Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Because of the growing number of information sources available through the internet there are many cases in which information needed to solve a problem or answer a question is spread across several information sources. For example, when given two sources, one about comic books and the other about super heroes, you might want to ask the question {open_quotes}Is Spiderman a Marvel Super Hero?{close_quotes} This query accesses both sources; therefore, it is necessary to have information about the relationships of the data within each source and between sources to properly access and integrate the data retrieved. The SIMS information broker captures this type of information in the form of a model. All the information sources map into the model providing the user a single interface to multiple sources.

  13. Gauge theories and integrable lattice models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witten, E.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of new knot polynomials discovered in the last few years have shown them to be intimately connected with soluble models of two dimensional lattice statistical mechanics. In this paper, these results, which in time may illuminate the whole question of why integrable lattice models exist, are reconsidered from the point of view of three dimensional gauge theory. Expectation values of Wilson lines in three dimensional Chern-Simons gauge theories can be computed by evaluating the partition functions of certain lattice models on finite graphs obtained by projecting the Wilson lines to the plane. The models in question - previously considered in both the knot theory and statistical mechanics literature - are IRF models in which the local Boltzmann weights are the matrix elements of braiding matrices in rational conformal field theories. These matrix elements, in turn, can be represented in three dimensional gauge theory in terms of the expectation value of a certain tetrahedral configuration of Wilson lines. This representation makes manifest a surprising symmetry of the braiding matrix elements in conformal field theory. (orig.)

  14. Integration von Schulungsveranstaltungen der Bibliothek ins Curriculum - am Beispiel der Fakultät für Klinische Medizin Mannheim der Universität Heidelberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semmler-Schmetz, Martina

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In the winter semester 2004/05 the Faculty for Clinical Medicine Mannheim of Heidelberg University implemented the new Querschnittsschein "Epidemiology, medical biometrics and medical informatics" and integrated the first library instructional classes into its medical curriculum. In order to meet the new requirements the medical library established an instructional team that designed tailor-made courses for the student target group and put into practice the experiences gathered both in workshops (such as the continuing education course "Teaching Library" offered by the BIB in May 2004 and from the relevant literature. With a maximum participation of library staff almost all of the first clinical semster medical students finished three different instructional modules of the beginners and intermediate skill levels. Resonance to these courses was ascertained by evaluation forms completed by the participants immediately after the classes. The feedback was predominantly positive, and the members of the instructional team unanimously regarded the experiences made as new and inspiring. As a further development of the orientation and instruction classes integrated in the curriculum the medical library intends to participate in the navigation system LOTSE of the Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Münster starting in the academic year 2005/06. Moreover, by then, one of the aforementioned classes is planned to be offered on the e-Learning platform ATHENA of Heidelberg University.

  15. A Model Curriculum for an Emergency Medical Services (EMS Rotation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mancera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This EMS curriculum is designed for Emergency Medicine residents at all levels of training. Introduction: Emergency Medicine (EM physicians have routine interaction with Emergency Medical Services (EMS in their clinical practice. Additionally, the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandates that all Emergency Medicine resident physicians receive specific training in the area of EMS.1 Historically, EMS training for EM residents has been conducted in the absence of a standardized didactic curriculum. Despite advancements in the area of prehospital training, there remains wide inconsistency in EMS training experiences among EM residency training programs.2 To our knowledge a standardized and reproducible EMS curriculum for EM residents does not exist. Objectives: The aim of this curriculum is to provide a robust learning experience for EM residents around prehospital care and EMS that fulfills the ACGME requirements and which can be easily replicated and implemented in a variety of EM residency training programs. Method: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include didactics, asynchronous learning through online modules and a focused reading list, experiential learning through ride-alongs, structured small group discussion, supervised medical command shifts, and mentored practice in organizing and delivering didactics to EMS providers.

  16. Institutional Assessment and the Integrative Core Curriculum: Involving Students in the Development of an ePortfolio System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mary Lourdes; Adams Delaney, Susan; Cochran, Jolene; Jackson, Ruth; Olivares, Cory

    2015-01-01

    The majority of research on the implementation of ePortfolios focuses on curriculum, faculty development, or student buy-in. When ePortfolio systems have been described in technical terms, the focus has been on the functionality, affordances, and limitations of ePortfolio systems (e.g., TaskStream, LiveText), free web tools (e.g., Google Docs),…

  17. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  18. Project-Based Learning in Post-WWII Japanese School Curriculum: An Analysis via Curriculum Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    In the 2000s, the new national curriculum, dubbed as the "yutori curriculum," introduced a new subject for project-based learning "Integrated Study" as its prominent feature. Comparing curriculum orientations in project-based learning in three historical periods after the WWII including Integrated Study, this paper aims to…

  19. ["Flipped classroom" teaching model into the curriculum of Theories of Different Schools of Acupuncture and Moxibustion:exploration and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mailan; Yuan, Yiqin; Chang, Xiaorong; Tang, Yulan; Luo, Jian; Li, Nan; Yu, Jie; Yang, Qianyun; Liu, Mi

    2016-08-12

    The "flipped classroom" teaching model practiced in the teaching of Theories of Different Schools of Acupuncture and Moxibustion curriculum was introduced. Firstly, the roles and responsibilities of teachers were clarified, indicating teachers provided examples and lectures, and a comprehensive assessment system was established. Secondly, the "flipped classroom" teaching model was split into online learning, classroom learning and offline learning. Online learning aimed at forming a study report by a wide search of relevant information, which was submitted to teachers for review and assessment. Classroom learning was designed to communicate study ideas among students and teachers. Offline learning was intended to revise and improve the study report and refined learning methods. Lastly, the teaching practice effects of "flip classroom" were evaluated by comprehensive rating and questionnaire assessment, which assessed the overall performance of students and overall levels of paper; the learning ability was enhanced, and the interest and motivation of learning were also improved. Therefore, "flipped classroom" teaching mode was suitable for the curriculum of Theories of Different Schools of Acupuncture and Moxibustion , and could be recommended into the teaching practice of related curriculum of acupuncture and tuina.

  20. Integrated Safety Culture Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊; 孙瑞山; 刘汉辉

    2009-01-01

    A new safety culture model is constructed and is applied to analyze the correlations between safety culture and SMS. On the basis of previous typical definitions, models and theories of safety culture, an in-depth analysis on safety culture's structure, composing elements and their correlations was conducted. A new definition of safety culture was proposed from the perspective of sub-cuhure. 7 types of safety sub-culture, which are safety priority culture, standardizing culture, flexible culture, learning culture, teamwork culture, reporting culture and justice culture were defined later. Then integrated safety culture model (ISCM) was put forward based on the definition. The model divided safety culture into intrinsic latency level and extrinsic indication level and explained the potential relationship between safety sub-culture and all safety culture dimensions. Finally in the analyzing of safety culture and SMS, it concluded that positive safety culture is the basis of im-plementing SMS effectively and an advanced SMS will improve safety culture from all around.