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Sample records for integral reaction-rate measurements

  1. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  2. Measurements of astrophysical reaction rates for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P.E.; O'Brien, H.A.; Bowman, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis can be obtained from the measurement of (n,p) and (n,γ) cross sections for radioactive nuclei. In the past, large backgrounds associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half lives. The advent of the low-energy, high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Results of (n,p) measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days will be given. The astrophysics to be learned from these data will be discussed. Additional difficulties are encountered when making (n,γ) rather than (n,p) measurements. However, with a properly designed detector, and with the high peak neutron intensities now available, (n,γ) measurements can be made for nuclei with half lives as short as several weeks. Progress on the Los Alamos (n,γ) cross-section measurement program for radioactive samples will be discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Neutron detector for fusion reaction-rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Tietbohl, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a fast, sensitive neutron detector for recording the fusion reaction-rate history of inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator (BC-422) and has a response 7 neutrons

  4. A modified Gaussian integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation in U- and Pu-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Fredin, B.

    1966-01-01

    An advanced multi-group cell calculations a lot of data information is very often necessary, and hence the data administration will be elaborate, and the spectrum calculation will be time consuming. We think it is possible to reduce the necessary data information by using an effective reaction rate integration method well suited for U- and Pu-absorptions (author)

  5. Reactivity and reaction rate measurements in U--D2O lattices with coaxial fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellarin, D.J.; Morris, B.M.

    1976-12-01

    Integral reaction rate parameters, intracell thermal neutron flux profiles, and material bucklings were measured for D 2 O-moderated uniform lattices in the exponential facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. Two different slightly enriched coaxial uranium fuel assemblies were examined over a wide range of triangular lattice pitches. Integral parameters are reported for inner and outer fuel separately providing data for a more detailed and rigorous comparison with computation than has been previously available. Results are compared with RAHAB calculations using ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Large discrepancies in agreement between calculation and experiment, outside of experimental errors and uncertainties in the input cross sections, probably result from the resonance capture models used by RAHAB

  6. Reactor dosimetry integral reaction rate data in LMFBR Benchmark and standard neutron fields: status, accuracy and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Ceulemans, H.; Vandeplas, P.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper provides conclusions that may be drawn regarding the consistency and accuracy of dosimetry cross-section files on the basis of integral reaction rate data measured in U.S. and European benchmark and standard neutron fields. In a discussion of the major experimental facilities CFRMF (Idaho Falls), BIGTEN (Los Alamos), ΣΣ (Mol, Bucharest), NISUS (London), TAPIRO (Roma), FISSION SPECTRA (NBS, Mol, PTB), attention is paid to quantifying the sensitivity of computed integral data relative to the presently evaluated accuracy of the various neutron spectral distributions. The status of available integral data is reviewed and the assigned uncertainties are appraised, including experience gained by interlaboratory comparisons. For all reactions studied and for the various neutron fields, the measured integral data are compared to the ones computed from the ENDF/B-IV and the SAND-II dosimetry cross-section libraries as well as to some other differential data in relevant cases. This comparison, together with the proposed sensitivity and accuracy assessments, is used, whenever possible, to establish how well the best cross-sections evaluated on the basis of differential measurements (category I dosimetry reactions) are reliable in terms of integral reaction rates prediction and, for those reactions for which discrepancies are indicated, in which energy range it is presumed that additional differential measurements might help. For the other reactions (category II), the inconsistencies and trends are examined. The need for further integral measurements and interlaboratory comparisons is also considered

  7. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrasi, F.; D''Onofrio, A.; Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G.; Gialanella, L.; Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Straniero, O.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely 7 Be(p,γ) 8 B and 12 C(α,γ) 16 O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  8. A method of inferring k-infinity from reaction rate measurements in thermal reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmarch, D.A.

    1967-05-01

    A scheme is described for inferring a value of k-infinity from reaction rate measurements. The method is devised with the METHUSELAH group structure in mind and was developed for the analysis of S.G.H.W. reactor experiments; the underlying principles, however, are general. (author)

  9. Measurement and analysis of reaction rate distributions of cores with spectrum shifter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shigekazu; Shiroya, Seiji; Unesaki, Hironobu; Takeda, Toshikazu; Aizawa, Otohiko; Kanda, Keiji.

    1995-01-01

    A study for the neutronic characteristics of the spectrum-controlled neutron irradiation fields using various reflector materials was performed. Spectrum shifter regions were constructed in the upper reflector region of the solid moderated core (B-Core) of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). Beryllium, graphite and aluminum were selected as the loading materials for the spectrum shifter. Two tight-pitch lattice cores with different moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (V m /V f ) of 0.97 and 0.65 have been used. Axial reaction rate distributions of gold, nickel and indium wires were measured, and the spectrum index was defined as the Cd ratio of the gold wire and the ratio of gold reaction rate to nickel reaction rate. Using the conventional design calculation procedure, the experimental and calculated reaction rate and spectrum index show several disagreements. Detailed treatment of the neutron streaming effect, heterogeneous cell structure and depression factor are shown to be necessary for improving the agreement between experimental and calculated values. (author)

  10. Reaction rate distribution measurement and the core performance evaluation in the prototype FBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, S.; Suzuoki, Z.; Deshimaru, T. [Monju Construction Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Fukui-ken (Japan); Nakashima, F. [Tsuruga head Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Fukui-ken (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Monju is a prototype fast breeder reactor designed to have an output of 280 MW (714 MWt), fueled with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium and cooled by liquid sodium. The principal data on plant design and performance are shown in Table 1. Monju attained initial criticality in April 1994 and the reactor physics tests were carried out from May through November 1994. The reaction rate distribution measurement by the foil activation method was one of these tests and was carried out in order to verify the core performance and to contribute to the development of the core design methods. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the Monju initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution were evaluated. (author)

  11. An analysis of ZEEP reaction rate measurements using the iterative five group scheme of METHUSELAH I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F R; Askew, J R [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-02-15

    The five group iterative scheme of METHUSELAH I has been used to provide estimates of reaction rates for comparison with measurements in a number of loop experiments in ZEEP. Theory and experiment show good agreement for individual fission rate distributions and for the Pu-239/U-235 reaction rate ratios. Estimates of Lu/Mn ratios are in reasonable agreement with measurements in the H{sub 2}O cores, but become progressively less satisfactory as the D{sub 2}O content of the coolant is increased. It is concluded that for assessment calculations, the introduction of an iterative five group scheme improves the representation of thermal spectra in pressure tube reactor lattices. (author)

  12. Reaction rate distribution measurement and the core performance evaluation in the prototype FBR Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, S.; Suzuoki, Z.; Deshimaru, T.; Nakashima, F.

    2001-01-01

    Monju is a prototype fast breeder reactor designed to have an output of 280 MW (714 MWt), fueled with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium and cooled by liquid sodium. The principal data on plant design and performance are shown in Table 1. Monju attained initial criticality in April 1994 and the reactor physics tests were carried out from May through November 1994. The reaction rate distribution measurement by the foil activation method was one of these tests and was carried out in order to verify the core performance and to contribute to the development of the core design methods. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the Monju initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution were evaluated. (author)

  13. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F; D` Onofrio, A [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); [INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L; Imbriani, G [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U; Rolfs, C; Strieder, F; Trautvetter, H P [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V; Romano, M [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  14. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rates measurements: elaboration of a standard techniques basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudelot, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronics calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronics parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronics reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO 2 ) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of 238 U (defined as the ratio of 238 U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for 242 Pu (on MOX rods) and 232 Th (on

  15. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rate measurements: elaboration of a base of standard techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudelot, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronic calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronic parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronic reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO 2 ) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of 238 U (defined as the ratio of 238 U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for 242 Pu (on MOX rods) and 232 Th (on Thorium

  16. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Niobium

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 93Nb(n,n′)93mNb. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for monitoring neutrons with energies above approximately 0.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 30 years. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fast-neutron reaction rates for neutrons with energy distribution similar to fission neutrons can be determined in fast-neutron fluences above about 1016cm−2. In the presence of high thermal-neutron fluence rates (>1012cm−2·s−1), the transmutation of 93mNb due to neutron capture should be investigated. In the presence of high-energy neutron spectra such as are associated with fusion and spallation sources, the transmutation of 93mNb by reactions such as (n,2n) may occur and should be investigated. 1.4 Procedures for other fast-neutron monitors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 Fast-neutron fluence rates can be determined from the reaction rates provided that the appropriate cross section information ...

  17. Comparison of measured and calculated reaction rate distributions in an scwr-like test lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetz, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.raetz@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Jordan, Kelly A., E-mail: kelly.jordan@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Murphy, Michael F., E-mail: mike.murphy@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Perret, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.perret@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh.chawla@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, EPFL (Switzerland)

    2011-04-15

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements were performed on 61 rods of an SCWR-like fuel lattice, after irradiation in the central test zone of the PROTEUS zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The derived reaction rates are the capture rate in {sup 238}U (C{sub 8}) and the total fission rate (F{sub tot}), and also the reaction rate ratio C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}. Each of these has been mapped rod-wise on the lattice and compared to calculated results from whole-reactor Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX. Ratios of calculated to experimental values (C/E's) have been assessed for the C{sub 8}, F{sub tot} and C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} distributions across the lattice. These C/E's show excellent agreement between the calculations and the measurements. For the {sup 238}U capture rate distribution, the 1{sigma} level in the comparisons corresponds to an uncertainty of {+-}0.8%, while for the total fission rate the corresponding value is {+-}0.4%. The uncertainty for C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}, assessed as a reaction rate ratio characterizing each individual rod position in the test lattice, is significantly higher at {+-}2.2%. To determine the reproducibility of these results, the measurements were performed twice, once in 2006 and again in 2009. The agreement between these two measurement sets is within the respective statistical uncertainties.

  18. Neutron spectra determination methods using the measured reaction rates in SAPIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondars, Kh.Ya.; Lapenas, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical basis of algorithms is given for methods of neutron spectra restoration in accordance with the measured reaction rates of the activation detectors included into the information-determination system SAIPS aimed at generalization of the most popular home and foreign neutron spectra determination methods as well as the establishment of their mutual relations. The following neutron spectra determination methods are described: SAND-II, CRYSTAL BALL, WINDOWS, SPECTRA, RESP, JUL; polynominal and directed divergence methods. The algorithms have been realized on the ES computer

  19. A comparison of reaction rate calculations using Endf/B-VII with critical assembly measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, C.; Mac Innes, M.; Barr, D.; Trellue, H.; MacFarlane, R.; Chadwick, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present critical assembly reaction rate data, and modeling of the same using the recently released Endf/B-VII library. While some of the experimental measurements were performed as long as 50 years ago, the results have not been widely used/available outside of Los Alamos. Over the years, a variety of target foils were fabricated and placed in differing neutron spectrum/fluence environments within critical assemblies. Neutron-induced reactions such as (n,γ), (n,2n), and (n,f) on these targets were measured, typically referenced to 235 U(n,f) or 239 Pu(n,f). Because the cross section for the latter reactions are now well known, these experiments provide a rich data set for testing evaluated cross sections. Due to the large variety of critical assemblies that were historically available at Los Alamos, it was possible to make measurements in spectral environments ranging from hard (Pu Jezebel, center of Pu Flattop) through intermediate (Big Ten) to degraded (reflector region of Flattop). This broad range of configurations allows us to test both the cross section magnitudes and their energy dependencies. We will present data, along with reaction rate predictions using primarily MCNP5 in conjunction with Endf/B-VII, for a number of target nuclei, including iridium, isotopes of uranium (e.g., 233, 235, 237, 238), neptunium (237), plutonium (239), and americium (241). (authors)

  20. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Aluminum

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 27Al(n,α)24Na. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 6.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 2 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 106 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E261. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Light elements burning reaction rates at stellar temperatures as deduced by the Trojan Horse measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Puglia, S. M. R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Experimental nuclear astrophysics aims at determining the reaction rates for astrophysically relevant reactions at their Gamow energies. For charged-particle induced reactions, the access to these energies is usually hindered, in direct measurements, by the presence of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting particles or by electron screening effects, which make hard the determination of the bare-nucleus S(E)-factor of interest for astrophysical codes. The use of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) appears as one of the most suitable tools for investigating nuclear processes of interest for astrophysics. Here, in view of the recent TH measurements, the main destruction channels for deuterium ({sup 2}H), for the two lithium {sup 6,7}Li isotopes, for the {sup 9}Be and the one for the two boron {sup 10,11}B isotopes will be discussed.

  2. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Nickel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 58Ni(n,p)58Co. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 2.1 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 200 days in the absence of high thermal neutron fluence rates (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques fission-neutron fluence rates densities above 107 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Note—The burnup corrections were com...

  3. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Titanium

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reactions 46Ti(n,p) 46Sc + 47Ti(n, np)46Sc. Note 1—Since the cross section for the (n,np) reaction is relatively small for energies less than 12 MeV and is not easily distinguished from that of the (n,p) reaction, this test method will refer to the (n,p) reaction only. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 4.4 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 250 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 109 cm–2·s–1 can be determined. However, in the presence of a high thermal-neutron fluence rate, 46Sc depletion should be investigated. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all...

  4. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Uranium-238

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 238U(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 1.5 to 7 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other unites of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Neptunium-237

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 237Np(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 0.7 to 6 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Measurement from sun-synchronous orbit of a reaction rate controlling the diurnal NOx cycle in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dudhia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A reaction rate associated with the nighttime formation of an important diurnally varying species, N2O5, is determined from MIPAS-ENVISAT. During the day, photolysis of N2O5 in the stratosphere contributes to nitrogen-catalysed ozone destruction. However, at night concentrations of N2O5 increase, temporarily sequestering reactive NOx NO and NO2 in a natural cycle which regulates the majority of stratospheric ozone. In this paper, the reaction rate controlling the formation of N2O5 is determined from this instrument for the first time. The observed reaction rate is compared to the currently accepted rate determined from laboratory measurements. Good agreement is obtained between the observed and accepted experimental reaction rates within the error bars.

  7. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

  8. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Copper

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 63Cu(n,α)60Co. The cross section for 60Co produced in this reaction increases rapidly with neutrons having energies greater than about 5 MeV. 60Co decays with a half-life of 1925.27 days (±0.29 days)(1) and emits two gamma rays having energies of 1.1732278 and 1.332492 MeV (1). The isotopic content of natural copper is 69.17 % 63Cu and 30.83 % 65Cu (2). The neutron reaction, 63Cu(n,γ)64Cu, produces a radioactive product that emits gamma rays which might interfere with the counting of the 60Co gamma rays. 1.2 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 109 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. The 63Cu(n,α)60Co reaction can be used to determine fast-neutron fluences for irradiation times up to about 15 years (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E261. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the...

  9. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Analysis of Barium-140 From Fission Dosimeters

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes two procedures for the measurement of reaction rates by determining the amount of the fission product 140Ba produced by the non-threshold reactions 235U(n,f), 241Am(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f), and by the threshold reactions 238U(n,f), 237Np(n,f), and 232Th(n,f). 1.2 These reactions produce many fission products, among which is 140Ba, having a half-life of 12.752 days. 140Ba emits gamma rays of several energies; however, these are not easily detected in the presence of other fission products. Competing activity from other fission products requires that a chemical separation be employed or that the 140Ba activity be determined indirectly by counting its daughter product 140La. This test method describes both procedure (a), the nondestructive determination of 140Ba by the direct counting of 140La several days after irradiation, and procedure (b), the chemical separation of 140Ba and the subsequent counting of 140Ba or its daughter 140La. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission neutron fl...

  10. Measurements and calculations of 10B(n,He) reaction rates in a control rod in ZPPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Grasseschi, G.L.; Oliver, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) technique has been used to measure the 10 B(n,He) reaction rate within B 4 C pellets in a control rod in ZPPR. Knowledge of this reaction rate is important to control rod design studies because helium production leads to control rod swelling, buildup of gas pressure and a reduction in thermal conductivity which can limit the lifetime of a control rod. We believe these to be the first measurements of boron capture within boron pins in a fast reactor spectrum. Previously reported measurements used 235 U foils to measure fission rates in a control rod, and to infer boron capture rates

  11. [Impact of sperm DNA and acrosome integrity and acrosome reaction rate on outcomes of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongzhi; Li, Dawen; Cheng, Junping; Huo, Zhongchao; Huang, Hongyi; Xiao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of sperm DNA integrity rate, acrosome integrity rate and acrosome reaction rate on the outcomes of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This retrospective analysis was conducted among 97 infertile couples receiving rescue ICSI due to failure of in vitro fertilization procedures in our Reproductive Medicine Center. Of these 97 women, 41 had clinical pregnancy and 56 did not, and the effects of sperm DNA integrity rate (estimated by DNA fragmentation index, DFI), acrosome integrity rate and acrosome reaction rate on rescue ICSI outcomes were analyzed. No significant difference was found in paternal age, testosterone value, testicular volume, FSH, female patient' age or the number of eggs retrieved between the two groups (P>0.05), but the infertility years was significantly shorter in the pregnancy group than in the non-pregnancy group (Prate and cleavage rate were similar between the two groups (P>0.05), but the good embryo rate was significantly higher in the pregnancy group (Preaction rate did not differ significantly between the two groups (P>0.05), but the acrosome integrity rate was significantly higher in the pregnancy group (Prate, acrosome integrity or acrosome reaction rate were not correlated with the fertilization rate, cleavage rate or good embryo rate (P>0.05). The pregnancy rate, twin and single fetus rates were 42.3%, 10.3% and 32.0% in this cohort after recue ICSI, respectively. Rescue ICSI is an effective treatment after failed in vitro fertilization procedure, and sperm acrosome integrity rate is associated with the outcome of rescue ICSI.

  12. Verification of dosimetry cross sections above 10 MeV based on measurement of activation reaction rates in fission neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, Naoteru; Miura, Toshimasa; Yamaji, Akio.

    1996-01-01

    To validate the dosimetry cross sections in fast neutron energy range, activation reaction rates were measured for 5 types of dosimetry cross sections which have sensitivity in the energy rage above 10 MeV utilizing JRR-4 reactor of JAERI. The measured reaction rates were compared with the calculations reaction rates by a continuous energy monte carlo code MVP. The calculated reaction rates were based on two dosimetry files, JENDL Dosimetry File and IRDF-90.2. (author)

  13. Estimation of the rate of volcanism on Venus from reaction rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory rate data for the reaction between SO2 and calcite to form anhydrite are presented. If this reaction rate represents the SO2 reaction rate on Venus, then all SO2 in the Venusian atmosphere will disappear in 1.9 Myr unless volcanism replenishes the lost SO2. The required volcanism rate, which depends on the sulfur content of the erupted material, is in the range 0.4-11 cu km of magma erupted per year. The Venus surface composition at the Venera 13, 14, and Vega 2 landing sites implies a volcanism rate of about 1 cu km/yr. This geochemically estimated rate can be used to determine if either (or neither) of two discordant geophysically estimated rates is correct. It also suggests that Venus may be less volcanically active than the earth.

  14. Reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 measured by detecting HO2 from photofragment fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, E. R.; Suto, Masako; Lee, Long C.; Coffey, Dewitt, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A room-temperature discharge-flow system investigation of the rate constant for the reaction 'HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2O2' has detected HO2 through the OH(A-X) fluorescence produced by photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. A reaction rate constant of 1.9 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the -15th cu cm/molecule per sec is obtained from first-order decay of HO2 in excess O3; this agrees well with published data.

  15. Measurements of activation reaction rate distributions on a mercury target bombarded with high-energy protons at AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ino, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Jerde, Eric; Glasgow, David [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-02-01

    A neutronics experiment was carried out using a thick mercury target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory in a framework of the ASTE (AGS Spallation Target Experiment) collaboration. Reaction rate distributions around the target were measured by the activation technique at incident proton energies of 1.6, 12 and 24 GeV. Various activation detectors such as the {sup 115}In(n,n'){sup 115m}In, {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb, and {sup 209}Bi(n,xn) reactions with threshold energies ranging from 0.3 to 70.5 MeV were employed to obtain the reaction rate data for estimating spallation source neutron characteristics of the mercury target. It was found from the measured {sup 115}In(n,n'){sup 115m}In reaction rate distribution that the number of leakage neutrons becomes maximum at about 11 cm from the top of hemisphere of the mercury target for the 1.6-GeV proton incidence and the peak position moves towards forward direction with increase of the incident proton energy. The similar result was observed in the reaction rate distributions of other activation detectors. The experimental procedures and a full set of experimental data in numerical form are summarized in this report. (author)

  16. Measurements of activation reaction rate distributions on a mercury target bombarded with high-energy protons at AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yujiro; Jerde, Eric; Glasgow, David

    2000-02-01

    A neutronics experiment was carried out using a thick mercury target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory in a framework of the ASTE (AGS Spallation Target Experiment) collaboration. Reaction rate distributions around the target were measured by the activation technique at incident proton energies of 1.6, 12 and 24 GeV. Various activation detectors such as the 115 In(n,n') 115m In, 93 Nb(n,2n) 92m Nb, and 209 Bi(n,xn) reactions with threshold energies ranging from 0.3 to 70.5 MeV were employed to obtain the reaction rate data for estimating spallation source neutron characteristics of the mercury target. It was found from the measured 115 In(n,n') 115m In reaction rate distribution that the number of leakage neutrons becomes maximum at about 11 cm from the top of hemisphere of the mercury target for the 1.6-GeV proton incidence and the peak position moves towards forward direction with increase of the incident proton energy. The similar result was observed in the reaction rate distributions of other activation detectors. The experimental procedures and a full set of experimental data in numerical form are summarized in this report. (author)

  17. Methods of neutron spectrum calculation from measured reaction rates in saips. Part 1. Review of mathematical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondars, Kh.Ya.; Lapenas, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    We adapted or used on ES EhVM, operating under the control of OS ES, the currently most common algorithms for calculating neutron spectra from measured reaction rates. These programs, together with the neutron cross-section and spectrum libraries, are part of the computerized information system SAIPS. The present article descibes the basic mathematical concepts used in the algorithms of the SAIPS calculation programs

  18. Diagnostic technique for measuring fusion reaction rate for inertial confinement fusion experiments at Shen Guang-III prototype laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiao-Shi; Liu Shen-Ye; Xu Tao; Kang Dong-Guo

    2013-01-01

    A study is conducted using a two-dimensional simulation program (Lared-s) with the goal of developing a technique to evaluate the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a neutron fusion reaction region. Two peaks of fusion reaction rate are simulated by using a two-dimensional simulation program (Lared-s) and confirmed by the experimental results. A neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) system is developed with a high temporal resolution of ∼ 30 ps at the Shen Guang-III (SG-III) prototype laser facility in China, to measure the fusion reaction rate history. With the shape of neutron reaction rate curve and the spherical harmonic function in this paper, the degree of Rayleigh-Taylor growth and the main source of the neutron yield in our experiment can be estimated qualitatively. This technique, including the diagnostic system and the simulation program, may provide important information for obtaining a higher neutron yield in implosion experiments of inertial confinement fusion

  19. Capture and photonuclear reaction rates involving charged-particles: Impacts of nuclear ingredients and future measurement on ELI-NP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Y.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the impact of nuclear ingredients, especially the nuclear potential, level density and strength function, to the astrophysical re-action rates of (p,γ, (α,γ, (γ,p, and (γ,α reactions are systematically studied. The calculations are performed basad on the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12≤Z≤110. In particular, both of the Wood-Saxon potential and the microscopic folding potential are taken into account. It is found that both the capture and photonuclear reaction rates are very sensitive to the nuclear potential, thus the better determination of nuclear potential would be important to reduce the uncertainties of reaction rates. Meanwhile, the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p and 96Ru(γ,α are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  20. Capture and photonuclear reaction rates involving charged-particles: Impacts of nuclear ingredients and future measurement on ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Goriely, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Guardo, G. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lan, H. Y.; Lattuada, D.; Luo, W.; Matei, C.

    2018-05-01

    The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the impact of nuclear ingredients, especially the nuclear potential, level density and strength function, to the astrophysical re-action rates of (p,γ), (α,γ), (γ,p), and (γ,α) reactions are systematically studied. The calculations are performed basad on the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12≤Z≤110. In particular, both of the Wood-Saxon potential and the microscopic folding potential are taken into account. It is found that both the capture and photonuclear reaction rates are very sensitive to the nuclear potential, thus the better determination of nuclear potential would be important to reduce the uncertainties of reaction rates. Meanwhile, the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p) and 96Ru(γ,α) are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  1. Measurement of nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of fuel pellets from IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mura, Luis Felipe Liambos

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the measurements of the nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO 2 with 4,3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission have been measured as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Lead collimators has been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin UO 2 disk is used. This disk is inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of around 9 x 10 8 n/cm 2 s. For gamma spectrometry 10 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the nuclear reactions of radioactive capture that occurs in atoms of 238 U and fissions that occur on both 235 U and 238 U are measured in function of 10 different region (diameter of collimator) of the fuel pellet disk. Corrections in the geometric efficiency due to introduction of collimators on HPGe detection system were estimated using photon transport of MCNP-4C code. Some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology, using the MCNP-4C code, are presented and compared to the experimental data showing very good agreement. Besides nuclear reaction rates, the spectral indices 28 ρ and 25 δ have been obtained at each different radius of the fuel pellet disk. (author)

  2. Methods of neutron spectrum calculation from measured reaction rates in SAIPS. Part 2: Software and data input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzonis, M.A.; Bondars, H.Ya.

    1981-08-01

    A brief description of the SAIPS software and the basic principles of its application is given. SAIPS contains programs needed to unfold spectra, libraries of neutron cross sections and reference spectra, and software for automatic calculation and for system maintenance. SAIPS offers the possibility of determining the reliability of an unfolded neutron spectrum and of planning measurements and calculations by varying different factors: the errors in the reaction rates, the errors in the cross sections used, the detector assembly, the unfolding programs, etc. SAIPS runs on the ES 1022 computer

  3. Determination of deuterium concentrations in JET plasmas from fusion reaction rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.; Morgan, P.D.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van; Conroy, S.; Elevant, T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of deuterium in the central regions of JET plasmas, expressed as a fraction of the electron concentration (n d /n e ), has been determined using four different methods involving neutron detection. These measurements are found to be consistent and agree within experimental errors with values deduced from Z eff measurements using visible bremsstrahlung radiation. (author) 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Measurements of activation reaction rates in transverse shielding concrete exposed to the secondary particle field produced by intermediate energy heavy ions on an iron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Morev, M.N.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2012-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions were measured inside a 60-cm thick concrete pile placed at the lateral position of a thick (stopping length) iron target that was bombarded with heavy ions, 400 MeV/u C and 800 MeV/u Si. Foils of aluminum and gold, as well as gold, tungsten and manganese covered with cadmium were inserted at various locations in the concrete pile to serve as activation detectors. Features of reaction rate distribution, such as the shape of the reaction rate profile, contribution of the neutrons from intra-nuclear cascade and that from evaporation to the activation reactions are determined by the analysis of measured reaction rates. The measured reaction rates were compared with those calculated with radiation transport simulation codes, FLUKA and PHITS, to verify their capability to predict induced activity. The simulated reaction rates agree with the experimental results within a factor of three in general. However, systematic discrepancies between simulated reaction rates and measured reaction rates attributed to the neutron source terms are observed.

  5. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  6. Impact of newly-measured gadolinium cross sections on BWR fuel rod reaction rate distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatuff, F.; Perret, G.; Murphy, M.; Grimm, P.; Seiler, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Recent measurements of capture and total cross sections performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the USA confirmed many of the gadolinium thermal and resonant neutron cross section parameters within uncertainties, but they also showed up important discrepancies well out of uncertainties, such as an approx11% overestimation of the {sup 157}Gd thermal capture cross section in ENDF/B-VI and -VII with respect to the newly measured data. In this work, the impact of the newly measured gadolinium cross sections on BWR reactor physics parameters has been preliminarily evaluated. The comparisons of rod-by-rod fission rate and modified conversion ratio predictions with selected cold critical experiments at the PROTEUS reactor in Switzerland show the potential to resolve long-term unexplained discrepancies. (authors)

  7. First measurement of the 34S(p ,γ )35Cl reaction rate through indirect methods for presolar nova grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, S. A.; Parikh, A.; Barton, C. J.; Faestermann, T.; José, J.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; de Séréville, N.; Riley, J. E.; Williams, M.

    2017-08-01

    Sulphur isotopic ratio measurements may help to establish the astrophysical sites in which certain presolar grains were formed. Nova model predictions of the 34S/32S ratio are, however, unreliable due to the lack of an experimental 34S(p ,γ )35Cl reaction rate. To this end, we have measured the 34S(3He,d )35Cl reaction at 20 MeV using a high resolution quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole magnetic spectrograph. Twenty-two levels over 6.2 MeV rate has been determined using a Monte Carlo method. Hydrodynamic nova model calculations have been performed using this new reaction rate. These models show that remaining uncertainties in the 34S(p ,γ ) rate affect nucleosynthesis predictions by less than a factor of 1.4, and predict a 34S/32S isotopic ratio of 0.014-0.017. Since recent type II supernova models predict 34S/32S=0.026 -0.053 , the 34S/32S isotopic ratio may be used, in conjunction with other isotopic signatures, to distinguish presolar grains from oxygen-neon nova and type II supernova origin. Our results address a key nuclear physics uncertainty on which recent considerations discounting the nova origin of several grains depend.

  8. Constraining the 19Ne(p,γ)20Na Reaction Rate Using a Direct Measurement at DRAGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, R.; Lotay, G.; Lennarz, A.; Ruiz, C.; Christian, G.; Akers, C.; Catford, W. N.; Chen, A. A.; Connolly, D.; Davids, B.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Jedrejcic, D.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; McNeice, E.; Riley, J.; Williams, M.

    2018-01-01

    A direct measurement of the 19Ne(p, γ)20 Na reaction has been performed in inverse kinematics at the DRAGON recoil separator, at an energy ˜ 10 keV higher than previous measurements. The key resonance in the 19 Ne + p system relevant for ONe novae and Type-I X-ray burst temperatures have been successfully measured for the first time. Preliminary estimates of the resonance energy and strength are reported as Ec.m. ≈ 458 keV and ωγ ≈ 18 meV. These results are consistent with previous direct measurements, but disagree with the most recent study of the 19Ne(p, γ)20 Na reaction rate. These preliminary results will be finalised after a forthcoming negative log-likelihood analysis.

  9. Material interactions with the Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment: Accurate reaction rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentine, James T.; Leger, Lubert J.

    1987-01-01

    To resolve uncertainties in estimated LEO atomic oxygen fluence and provide reaction product composition data for comparison to data obtained in ground-based simulation laboratories, a flight experiment has been proposed for the space shuttle which utilizes an ion-neutral mass spectrometer to obtain in-situ ambient density measurements and identify reaction products from modeled polymers exposed to the atomic oxygen environment. An overview of this experiment is presented and the methodology of calibrating the flight mass spectrometer in a neutral beam facility prior to its use on the space shuttle is established. The experiment, designated EOIM-3 (Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials, third series), will provide a reliable materials interaction data base for future spacecraft design and will furnish insight into the basic chemical mechanisms leading to atomic oxygen interactions with surfaces.

  10. Mass-transport limitation to in-cloud reaction rates: Implications of new accommodation coefficient measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1988-10-01

    Although it has been recognized for some time that the rate of reactive uptake of gases in cloudwater can depend on the value of the mass-accommodation coefficient (α) describing interfacial mass transport (MT), definitive evaluation of such rates is only now becoming possible with the availability of measurements of α for gases of atmospheric interest at air-water interfaces. Examination of MT limitation to the rate of in-cloud aqueous-phase oxidation of SO 2 by O 3 and H 2 O 2 shows that despite the low value of α/sub O3/ (5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/), interfacial MT of this species is not limiting under essentially all conditions of interest; the high values of α for SO 2 (≥ 0.2) and H 2 O 2 (≥ 0.08) indicate no interfacial MT limitation for these species also. Although gas- and aqueous-phase MT can be limiting under certain extremes of conditions, treating the system as under chemical kinetic control is generally an excellent approximation. Interfacial MT limitation also is found not to hinder the rate of H 2 O 2 formation by aqueous-phase disproportionation of HO 2 . Finally, the rapid uptake of N 2 O 5 by cloud droplets implies that the yield of aqueous HNO 3 from in-cloud gas-phase oxidation of NO 2 by O 3 can be substantial even under daytime conditions. This report consists of copies of viewgraphs prepared for this presentation

  11. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  12. Application of semi-empirical modeling and non-linear regression to unfolding fast neutron spectra from integral reaction rate data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.

    1976-01-01

    A semi-empirical analytical expression representing a fast reactor neutron spectrum has been developed. This expression was used in a non-linear regression computer routine to obtain from measured multiple foil integral reaction data the neutron spectrum inside the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility. In this application six parameters in the analytical expression for neutron spectrum were adjusted in the non-linear fitting process to maximize consistency between calculated and measured integral reaction rates for a set of 15 dosimetry detector foils. In two-thirds of the observations the calculated integral agreed with its respective measured value to within the experimental standard deviation, and in all but one case agreement within two standard deviations was obtained. Based on this quality of fit the estimated 70 to 75 percent confidence intervals for the derived spectrum are 10 to 20 percent for the energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV, 10 to 50 percent for 1 MeV to 10 MeV and 50 to 90 percent for 10 MeV to 18 MeV. The analytical model has demonstrated a flexibility to describe salient features of neutron spectra of the fast reactor type. The use of regression analysis with this model has produced a stable method to derive neutron spectra from a limited amount of integral data

  13. First measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering for the 30S(α ,p ) reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kubono, S.; Chen, A. A.; Parikh, A.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Type I x-ray bursts are the most frequently observed thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy, resulting from thermonuclear runaway on the surface of an accreting neutron star. The 30S(α ,p ) reaction plays a critical role in burst models, yet insufficient experimental information is available to calculate a reliable, precise rate for this reaction. Purpose: Our measurement was conducted to search for states in 34Ar and determine their quantum properties. In particular, natural-parity states with large α -decay partial widths should dominate the stellar reaction rate. Method: We performed the first measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering up to a center-of-mass energy of 5.5 MeV using a radioactive ion beam. The experiment utilized a thick gaseous active target system and silicon detector array in inverse kinematics. Results: We obtained an excitation function for 30S(α ,α ) near 150∘ in the center-of-mass frame. The experimental data were analyzed with R -matrix calculations, and we observed three new resonant patterns between 11.1 and 12.1 MeV, extracting their properties of resonance energy, widths, spin, and parity. Conclusions: We calculated the resonant thermonuclear reaction rate of 30S(α ,p ) based on all available experimental data of 34Ar and found an upper limit about one order of magnitude larger than a rate determined using a statistical model. The astrophysical impact of these two rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. We find that our new upper limit for the 30S(α ,p )33Cl rate significantly affects the predicted nuclear energy generation rate during the burst.

  14. Understanding and Improvement of an Experiment Measuring Chemical Reaction Rates by Monitoring Volume Change of a Gas: On the Reaction between HCl(aq) and Mg(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Jeong Ah; Yoon, Hee Sook; Jeong, Dae Hong; Choi, Won Ho

    2006-01-01

    In this study we analyzed and improved an experiment measuring chemical reaction rates introduced in the high school science textbooks through an understanding of the phenomena observed in carrying out the experiment. For this purpose, the contents of textbooks related to the experiment were analyzed, and the problems observed in carrying out the experiment were addressed through experimental analysis. When the experiment was carried out by the method of aquatic transposition presented in textbooks, the observed volume change of H 2 gas was delayed and chemical reaction rate was increased in the early stage of reaction period. To resolve these problems, an improved method for measuring the reaction rates was suggested. In the improved experiment the reaction rate was measured to be constant on time, which was interpreted in terms of the concentration of H + and the surface area of magnesium

  15. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    31 P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na + reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP

  16. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: measurements and site-specific rate rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-06-28

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (C=O) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (C=O), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):

  17. Measurement of activation reaction rate distributions in a lead assembly bombarded with 500-MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, H; Sasa, T; Tsujimoto, K; Yasuda, H

    2000-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co, /sup 197/Au(n,2n)/sup 196/Au, and /sup 197/Au(n,4n)/sup 194/Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code. (32 refs).

  18. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  19. Site-specific reaction rate constant measurements for various secondary and tertiary H-abstraction by OH radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-02-01

    Reaction rate constants for nine site-specific hydrogen atom (H) abstraction by hydroxyl radicals (OH) have been determined using experimental measurements of the rate constants of Alkane+OH→Products reactions. Seven secondary (S 20, S 21, S 22, S 30, S 31, S 32, and S 33) and two tertiary (T 100 and T 101) site-specific rate constants, where the subscripts refer to the number of carbon atoms (C) connected to the next-nearest-neighbor (N-N-N) C atom, were obtained for a wide temperature range (250-1450K). This was done by measuring the reaction rate constants for H abstraction by OH from a series of carefully selected large branched alkanes. The rate constant of OH with four different alkanes, namely 2,2-dimethyl-pentane, 2,4-dimethyl-pentane, 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), and 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-pentane were measured at high temperatures (822-1367K) using a shock tube and OH absorption diagnostic. Hydroxyl radicals were detected using the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of OH spectrum near 306.69nm.Previous low-temperature rate constant measurements are added to the current data to generate three-parameter rate expressions that successfully represent the available direct measurements over a wide temperature range (250-1450. K). Similarly, literature values of the low-temperature rate constants for the reaction of OH with seven normal and branched alkanes are combined with the recently measured high-temperature rate constants from our group [1]. Subsequent to that, site-specific rate constants for abstractions from various types of secondary and tertiary H atoms by OH radicals are derived and have the following modified Arrhenius expressions:. S20=8.49×10-17T1.52exp(73.4K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1450K) S21=1.07×10-15T1.07exp(208.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(296-1440K) S22=2.88×10-13T0.41exp(-291.5K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(272-1311K) S30=3.35×10-18T1.97exp(323.1K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1366K) S31=1.60×10-18T2.0exp(500.0K/T)cm3

  20. REACTION RATE SENSITIVITY OF 44Ti PRODUCTION IN MASSIVE STARS AND IMPLICATIONS OF A THICK TARGET YIELD MEASUREMENT OF 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, R. D.; Sheets, S. A.; Burke, J. T.; Scielzo, N. D.; Norman, E. B.; Tumey, S.; Brown, T. A.; Grant, P. G.; Hurst, A. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wooddy, T.; Fisker, J. L.; Bleuel, D.; Rauscher, T.; Phair, L.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate two dominant nuclear reaction rates and their uncertainties that affect 44 Ti production in explosive nucleosynthesis. Experimentally we develop thick target yields for the 40 Ca(α, γ) 44 Ti reaction at E α = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using γ-ray spectroscopy. At the highest beam energy, we also performed an activation measurement which agrees with the thick target result. From the measured yields a stellar reaction rate was developed that is smaller than current statistical-model calculations and recent experimental results, which would suggest lower 44 Ti production in scenarios for the α-rich freezeout. Special attention has been paid to assessing realistic uncertainties of stellar reaction rates produced from a combination of experimental and theoretical cross sections. With such methods, we also develop a re-evaluation of the 44 Ti(α, p) 47 V reaction rate. Using these two rates we carry out a sensitivity survey of 44 Ti synthesis in eight expansions representing peak temperature and density conditions drawn from a suite of recent supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that the current uncertainty in these two reaction rates could lead to as large an uncertainty in 44 Ti synthesis as that produced by different treatments of stellar physics.

  1. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  2. Measurement of the 2H(7Be, 6Li)3He reaction rate and its contribution to the primordial lithium abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Er-Tao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Yan, Sheng-Quan; Su, Jun; Guo, Bing; Li, Yun-Ju; Wang, You-Bao; Lian, Gang; Zeng, Sheng; Chen, Si-Zhe; Ma, Shao-Bo; Li, Xiang-Qing; He, Cao; Sun, Hui-Bin; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2018-04-01

    In the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN) model, the lithium puzzle has attracted intense interest over the past few decades, but still has not been solved. Conventionally, the approach is to include more reactions flowing into or out of lithium, and study the potential effects of those reactions which were not previously considered. 7Be(d, 3He)6Li is a reaction that not only produces 6Li but also destroys 7Be, which decays to 7Li, thereby affecting 7Li indirectly. Therefore, this reaction could alleviate the lithium discrepancy if its reaction rate is sufficiently high. However, there is not much information available about the 7Be(d, 3He)6Li reaction rate. In this work, the angular distributions of the 7Be(d, 3He)6Li reaction are measured at the center of mass energies E cm = 4.0 MeV and 6.7 MeV with secondary 7Be beams for the first time. The excitation function of the 7Be(d, 3He)6Li reaction is first calculated with the computer code TALYS and then normalized to the experimental data, then its reaction rate is deduced. A SBBN network calculation is performed to investigate its influence on the 6Li and 7Li abundances. The results show that the 7Be(d, 3He)6Li reaction has a minimal effect on 6Li and 7Li because of its small reaction rate. Therefore, the 7Be(d, 3He)6Li reaction is ruled out by this experiment as a means of alleviating the lithium discrepancy. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375269, 11505117, 11490560, 11475264, 11321064), Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province (2015A030310012), 973 program of China (2013CB834406) and National key Research and Development Province (2016YFA0400502)

  3. Experimental measurements of the 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisker, J; Tan, W; Goerres, J; Wiescher, M; Cooper, R

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations

  4. Reaction rates for neutrino processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalitin, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some integrals involved in neutrino processes are evaluated by transformation to a special system of reference - usually to the center of mass system (CM). Rather simple analytic expressions are obtained for reaction rates and, though less simple, for moments. An interesting result thus obtained is for an isotropic interaction (in CM) of a neutrino with a monoenergetic isotropic gas of extreme relativistic electrons: it is found that the probability of the scattered neutrino to have energy in a certain range is independent of this energy. (Auth.)

  5. Measurements of the nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of the fuel pellets of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d'Utra; Mura, Luis Felipe L.; Fanaro, Leda C.C.B.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the measures of the nuclear reaction rates along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO 2 at 4.3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission are measures as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Diverse lead collimators of changeable diameters have been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin disk is used, being inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of 5.10 8 n/cm 2 s. The nuclear reaction of radioactive capture occurs in the atoms of U- 238 that when absorbs a neutron transmutes into U- 239 of half-life of only 23 minutes. Thus, it is opted for the detection of the Np- 239 , radionuclide derivative of the radioactive decay of the U- 239 and that has a measurable half-life (2.335 days). In gamma spectrometry 11 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the gamma spectrometry is made in function of the diameter (radius) of the irradiated UO 2 fuel pellet disk, thus is possible to get the average value of the counting for each collimator in function of the specific pellet radius. These values are directly proportional to the radioactive capture nuclear reaction rates. The same way the nuclear fission rate occurs in the atoms of the U- 235 that produce different fission products such as Ce- 143 with a yield fission of 5.9% and applying the same procedure the fission nuclear reaction rate is obtained. This work presents some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology using the MCNP-4C code. The relative values obtained are compared with experimental

  6. Deterministic 3D transport, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of TPR and reaction rate measurements in HCPB Breeder Blanket mock-up benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodeli, I.

    2006-01-01

    The Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Breeder Blanket mock-up benchmark experiment was analysed using the deterministic transport, sensitivity and uncertainty code system in order to determine the Tritium Production Rate (TPR) in the ceramic breeder and the neutron reaction rates in beryllium, both nominal values and the corresponding uncertainties. The experiment, performed in 2005 to validate the HCPB concept, consists of a metallic beryllium set-up with two double layers of breeder material (Li 2 CO 3 powder). The reaction rate measurements include the Li 2 CO 3 pellets for the tritium breeding monitoring and activation foils, inserted at several axial and lateral locations in the block. In addition to the well established and validated procedure based on the 2-dimensional (2D) code DORT, a new approach for the 3D modelling was validated based on the TORT/GRTUNCL3D transport codes. The SUSD3D code, also in 3D geometry, was used for the cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty calculations. These studies are useful for the interpretation of the experimental measurements, in particular to assess the uncertainties linked to the basic nuclear data. The TPR, the neutron activation rates and the associated uncertainties were determined using the EFF-3.0 9 Be nuclear cross section and covariance data, and compared with those from other evaluations, like FENDL-2.1. Sensitivity profiles and nuclear data uncertainties of the TPR and detector reaction rates with respect to the cross-sections of 9 Be, 6 Li, 7 Li, O and C were determined at different positions in the experimental block. (author)

  7. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    -pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct

  8. Site-specific reaction rate constant measurements for various secondary and tertiary H-abstraction by OH radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    absorption of the R1(5) transition of OH spectrum near 306.69nm.Previous low-temperature rate constant measurements are added to the current data to generate three-parameter rate expressions that successfully represent the available direct measurements over a

  9. Comparison of 3D reaction rate distributions measured in an Optima2 BWR assembly with MCNPX predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: mike.murphy@psi.ch; Jatuff, F.; Perret, G.; Plaschy, M.; Bergmann, U. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    As part of a joint research programme between the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and swissnuclear, with the co-operation of the Leibstadt nuclear power plant in Switzerland and fuel suppliers Westinghouse Sweden, measurements and calculations have been made of the axial and radial distributions of fission and {sup 238}U capture rates in the fuel rods of a Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 boiling water reactor assembly. The measurements, made in the zero-energy research reactor PROTEUS at PSI, have been compared with calculations carried out using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The results reported are for the regions near the ends of the part-length fuel rods, which are a feature of SVEA-96 Optima2 assemblies. The sudden increase in moderation above the ends of the part-length rods leads to power peaking in the adjacent rods. Careful attention needs to be given to this phenomenon in the deployment of such fuel, the present paper providing experimental evidence for the ability of a stochastic code to predict such effects.

  10. Activation method for measuring the reaction rates and studying the neutron spectra parameters, based on using the unified composition detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, A.M.; Dikarev, V.S.; Efimov, B.V.; Ionov, V.S.; Marin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    The method proposed for estimation of parameters thermal and epithermal parts of energy distribution of neutrons is described. The method based on application of activation measuring with use of unified composition detectors (UCD) and samples of fuel. The method is applicable for definition of neutron spectrum parameters and velocities of division in fuel of nuclear installations. Theoretical bases and the description of a method, expedients of manufacturing and calibration for the detectors, the experimental data, carried out in RRC KI are given and processing of experimental data, and also. The parametric model of a spectrum constructed on the basis of Westcott's formalism is described. The parameter of stiffness is entered and its role for temperature of neutron gas, spectral coefficients of isotopes of detectors, the transition area thermal and epithermal parts of neutron spectra is observationally appreciated. It is offered to confirm the found results by calculations with use of MCU Monte Carlo code [ru

  11. Measurement of activation reaction rate distribution on a mercury target with a lead-reflector and light-water-moderator for high energy proton bombardment using AGS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasugai, Yoshimi; Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichiro

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic of spallation neutrons driven by GeV protons from a mercury target with a lead-reflector and light-water-moderator was studied experimentally using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory in a framework of the ASTE (AGS Spallation Target Experiment) collaboration. Several reaction rates along with the mercury target were measured with the activation method at incident proton energies of 1.94, 12 and 24 GeV. Indium, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, nickel and bismuth were used as activation detectors to cover the threshold energy of between 0.33 and 40.9 MeV. This report summarizes the experimental procedure with all the measured data. (author)

  12. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  13. Improvement of the high-accuracy O-17(p, alpha)N-14 reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to O-17 nucleosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; Irgaziev, B.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Kroha, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2015), s. 065803 ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : thermonuclear reaction rates * cross section * O-17 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.146, year: 2015

  14. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Measurement of key resonances for the 24Al(p ,γ )25Si reaction rate using in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfellow, B.; Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Richter, W. A.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; Bowry, M.; Elman, B.; Lunderberg, E.; Weisshaar, D.; Williams, S. J.

    2018-05-01

    Energy levels and branching ratios for the rp-process nucleus 25Si were determined from the reactions 9Be(26Si,25Si)X and 9Be(25Al,25Si)X using in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy with both high-efficiency and high-resolution detector arrays. Proton-unbound states at 3695(14) and 3802(11) keV were identified and assigned tentative spins and parities based on comparison to theory and the mirror nucleus. The 24Al(p ,γ )25Si reaction rate was calculated using the experimental states and states from charge-dependent USDA and USDB shell-model calculations with downward shifts of the 1 s1 /2 proton orbital to account for the observed Thomas-Ehrman shift, leading to a factor of 10-100 increase in rate for the temperature region of 0.22 GK as compared to a previous calculation. These shifts may be applicable to neighboring nuclei, impacting the proton capture rates in this region of the chart.

  17. Reaction rate of the 13C(α,n)16O neutron source using the ANC of the -3 keV resonance measured with the THM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M; Spitaleri, C; Trippella, O; Kiss, G G; Guardo, G L; Puglia, S M R; Romano, S; Spartà, R; Rogachev, G V; Avila, M; Koshchiy, E; Kuchera, A; Santiago, D; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Lamia, L

    2016-01-01

    The s-process is responsible of the synthesis of most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≤ A ≤ 208. It consists in a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays, since the neutron accretion rate is slower than the β-decay rate. Such small neutron flux is supplied by the 13 C(α,n) 16 O reaction. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 10 8 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140–230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S (E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17 O. In this work, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13 C( 6 Li,n 16 O)d quasi-free reaction to extract the 6.356 MeV level resonance parameters, in particular the asymptotic normalization coefficient . A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to , slightly larger than the values in the literature. However, the deduced 13 C(α, n) 16 O reaction rate is in agreement with most results in the literature at ∼ 10 8 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to our innovative approach merging together ANC and THM. (paper)

  18. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rate measurements: elaboration of a base of standard techniques; Developpement, amelioration et calibration des mesures de taux de reaction neutroniques: elaboration d`une base de techniques standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudelot, J.P

    1998-06-19

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronic calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronic parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronic reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO{sub 2}) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of {sup 238}U (defined as the ratio of {sup 238}U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for {sup 242}Pu (on MOX rods) and

  19. BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF THERMONUCLEAR REACTION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliadis, C.; Anderson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Coc, A. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris–Saclay, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Timmes, F. X.; Starrfield, S., E-mail: iliadis@unc.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The problem of estimating non-resonant astrophysical S -factors and thermonuclear reaction rates, based on measured nuclear cross sections, is of major interest for nuclear energy generation, neutrino physics, and element synthesis. Many different methods have been applied to this problem in the past, almost all of them based on traditional statistics. Bayesian methods, on the other hand, are now in widespread use in the physical sciences. In astronomy, for example, Bayesian statistics is applied to the observation of extrasolar planets, gravitational waves, and Type Ia supernovae. However, nuclear physics, in particular, has been slow to adopt Bayesian methods. We present astrophysical S -factors and reaction rates based on Bayesian statistics. We develop a framework that incorporates robust parameter estimation, systematic effects, and non-Gaussian uncertainties in a consistent manner. The method is applied to the reactions d(p, γ ){sup 3}He, {sup 3}He({sup 3}He,2p){sup 4}He, and {sup 3}He( α , γ ){sup 7}Be, important for deuterium burning, solar neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  20. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: II. Tables and graphs of reaction rates and probability density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.; Champagne, A.E.; Coc, A.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this issue (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, 'lower limit', 'nominal value' and 'upper limit' of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters μ and σ at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this issue (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this issue (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  1. Reaction rate of hydrolysis of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Yoshikazu; Eguchi, Wataru; Adachi, Motonari

    1979-01-01

    Absorption rates of dilute iodine vapor contained in air by aqueous mixtures of sodium hydroxide and boric acid were measured using a laminar liquid jet column absorber at 298 K. Absorption rates in this system are controlled by a series of complex reactions taking place in the liquid phase. The reaction rate constant of iodine hydrolysis in the aqueous phase was determined from the absorption rates observed under the conditions that the base-catalytic hydrolysis reaction of iodine can be considered to be irreversible and that other reactions can be neglected. The absorption rates calculated theoretically with the rate constant value obtained above were in good accordance with the whole experimental data observed for a wide range of experimental conditions. (author)

  2. Advanced foil activation techniques for the measurement of within-pin distributions of the 63Cu(n,γ)64Cu reaction rate in nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macku, K.; Jatuff, F.; Murphy, M.F.; Joneja, O.P.; Bischofberger, R.; Chawla, R.

    2006-01-01

    Different foil activation techniques have been used for measuring spatial distributions of the 63 Cu(n,γ) 64 Cu reaction within two pins of a SVEA-96 Optima2 boiling water reactor fuel assembly, at the critical facility PROTEUS. This reaction is of interest because its 1/v cross-section gives it a good representation of the 235 U fission rate. Initially, radial capture rate profiles were measured with mechanically punched copper foils. More detailed profiles were then determined by using a 0.2 mm copper wire spiral (∼200 μm resolution), as well as 5-, 10-, and 20-ring UV-lithography, electroplating, and molding (UV-LIGA) foils (up to a 100 μm resolution). For azimuthal measurements, apart from manually cut activation foils (into 8 sectors), 8- and 12-sector LIGA foils were used. The highly versatile LIGA foils have the additional advantage of being very easily separated into individual pieces after irradiation without the use of punches or other cutting tools. In order to account for the invasive character of the foil activation techniques, corrections to account for sample perturbations and for self-shielding effects were determined via simplified Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) modeling of the experimental setup. The final results from the various measurements of 63 Cu(n,γ) 64 Cu within-pin distributions have been compared with MCNP computations employing a detailed model of the full SVEA Optima2 fuel assembly

  3. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  4. Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biney, P.O.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li 17 Pb 83 ) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional

  5. CH3CO + O2 + M (M = He, N2) Reaction Rate Coefficient Measurements and Implications for the OH Radical Product Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Karafas, Emmanuel S; Gierczak, Tomasz; Burkholder, James B

    2015-07-16

    The gas-phase CH3CO + O2 reaction is known to proceed via a chemical activation mechanism leading to the formation of OH and CH3C(O)OO radicals via bimolecular and termolecular reactive channels, respectively. In this work, rate coefficients, k, for the CH3CO + O2 reaction were measured over a range of temperature (241-373 K) and pressure (0.009-600 Torr) with He and N2 as the bath gas and used to characterize the bi- and ter-molecular reaction channels. Three independent experimental methods (pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF), pulsed laser photolysis-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PLP-CRDS), and a very low-pressure reactor (VLPR)) were used to characterize k(T,M). PLP-LIF was the primary method used to measure k(T,M) in the high-pressure regime under pseudo-first-order conditions. CH3CO was produced by PLP, and LIF was used to monitor the OH radical bimolecular channel reaction product. CRDS, a complementary high-pressure method, measured k(295 K,M) over the pressure range 25-600 Torr (He) by monitoring the temporal CH3CO radical absorption following its production via PLP in the presence of excess O2. The VLPR technique was used in a relative rate mode to measure k(296 K,M) in the low-pressure regime (9-32 mTorr) with CH3CO + Cl2 used as the reference reaction. A kinetic mechanism analysis of the combined kinetic data set yielded a zero pressure limit rate coefficient, kint(T), of (6.4 ± 4) × 10(-14) exp((820 ± 150)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (with kint(296 K) measured to be (9.94 ± 1.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)), k0(T) = (7.39 ± 0.3) × 10(-30) (T/300)(-2.2±0.3) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1), and k∞(T) = (4.88 ± 0.05) × 10(-12) (T/300)(-0.85±0.07) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with Fc = 0.8 and M = N2. A He/N2 collision efficiency ratio of 0.60 ± 0.05 was determined. The phenomenological kinetic results were used to define the pressure and temperature dependence of the OH radical yield in the CH3CO + O2 reaction. The

  6. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  7. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J.

    1965-07-01

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author)

  8. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Gibson, M; King, D C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Richards, A E; Wass, T; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  9. Temperature effects on lithium-nitrogen reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijams, W.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1985-08-01

    A series of experiments have been run with the aim of measuring the reaction rate of lithium and nitrogen over a wide spectrum of lithium pool temperatures. In these experiments, pure nitrogen was blown at a controlled flow rate over a preheated lithium pool. The pool had a surface area of approximately 4 cm 2 and a total volume of approximately 6 cm 3 . The system pressure varied from 0 to 4 psig. The reaction rate was very small - approximately 0.002 to 0.003 g Li min cm 2 for lithium temperatures below 500 0 C. Above 500 0 C the reaction rate began to increase sharply, and reached a maximum of approximately 0.80 g Li min cm 2 above 700 0 C. It dropped off beyond 1000 0 C and seemed to approach zero at 1150 0 C. The maximum reaction rate observed in these forced convection experiments was higher by 60% than those previously observed in experiments where the nitrogen flowed to the reaction site by means of natural convection. During a reaction, a hard nitride layer built up on the surface of the lithium pool - its effect on the reaction rate was observed. The effect of the nitrogen flow rate on the reaction rate was also observed

  10. Charged particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal reason for setting up the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The main goal of NACRE network was the transparency in the procedure of calculating the rates. More specifically this compilation aims at: 1. updating the experimental and theoretical data; 2. distinctly identifying the sources of the data used in rate calculation; 3. evaluating the uncertainties and errors; 4. providing numerically integrated reaction rates; 5. providing reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. The compilation is concerned with the reaction rates that are large enough for the target lifetimes shorter than the age of the Universe, taken equal to 15 x 10 9 y. The reaction rates are provided for temperatures lower than T = 10 10 K. In parallel with the rate compilation a cross section data base has been created and located at the site http://pntpm.ulb.ac.be/nacre..htm. (authors)

  11. Effects of ion and electron screening on thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of screening by ions and electrons on thermonuclear reaction rates in stellar plasmas are considered. The enhancement of the reaction rate ranges from negligible to extremely large (on the order of 10 26 or greater). In order to calculate these effects, the potential about a given reacting nucleus is determined. First, Boltzmann-Vlasov and Poisson-Boltzmann equations are solved to yield a Yukawa potential. A suitable approximation to this potential is integrated in the action integral to give the barrier penetration. The screened reaction rate is then found by the saddle-point method. In developing a general formalism to calculate the screened reaction rate and the screening factor, effects due to the finite size of the nucleus are considered and found to be negligible. An expression for the screening factor for resonant reaction rates is also derived. A different and relatively simple approach, based on work of Stewart and Pyatt (1966), is used to find the barrier penetration from the action integral in two approximations: a modified Coulomb potential and a constant-shift potential. Screening factors are calculated for carbon burning at T 6 = 100 and T 6 = 400 for a wide range of densities and also for several examples in late stellar evolution. These screening factors are, for the most part, greater than those given by most others by a few percent at low density to 4 or more orders of magnitude at T 6 = 100 and rho = 10 10 g/cm 3 . Near the edge of the crystalline lattice region, however, they are significantly lower than those of some others. The increase in reaction rates for carbon burning indicates that carbon ignition may occur at lower densities than previously thought and may affect the density at which a supernova shock may occur

  12. Measurement of creatine kinase reaction rate in human brain using magnetization transfer image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (MT-ISIS) and a volume ³¹P/¹H radiofrequency coil in a clinical 3-T MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun-Kee; Sung, Young-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Zuo, Chun; Shi, Xianfeng; Mellon, Eric A; Renshaw, Perry F

    2011-08-01

    High-energy phosphate metabolism, which allows the synthesis and regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), is a vital process for neuronal survival and activity. In particular, creatine kinase (CK) serves as an energy reservoir for the rapid buffering of ATP levels. Altered CK enzyme activity, reflecting compromised high-energy phosphate metabolism or mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain, can be assessed using magnetization transfer (MT) MRS. MT (31)P MRS has been used to measure the forward CK reaction rate in animal and human brain, employing a surface radiofrequency coil. However, long acquisition times and excessive radiofrequency irradiation prevent these methods from being used routinely for clinical evaluations. In this article, a new MT (31)P MRS method is presented, which can be practically used to measure the CK forward reaction rate constant in a clinical MRI system employing a volume head (31)P coil for spatial localization, without contamination from the scalp muscle, and an acquisition time of 30 min. Other advantages associated with the method include radiofrequency homogeneity within the regions of interest of the brain using a volume coil with image-selected in vivo spectroscopy localization, and reduction of the specific absorption rate using nonadiabatic radiofrequency pulses for MT saturation. The mean value of k(f) was measured as 0.320 ± 0.075 s(-1) from 10 healthy volunteers with an age range of 18-40 years. These values are consistent with those obtained using earlier methods, and the technique may be used routinely to evaluate energetic processes in the brain on a clinical MRI system. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Nuclear reaction rates and the nova outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.G.; Iliadis, C.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we examined the consequences of improving the nuclear reaction library on our simulations of TNRs on 1.25M, WD and 1.35M, WDS. We have found that the changes in the rates have affected the nucleosynthesis predictions of our calculations but not, to any great extent, the gross features. In addition, we have used a lower mass accretion rate than in our previous studies in order to accrete (and eject) more material. This has, as expected, caused the peak values of some important parameters to increase over our previous studies at the same WD mass. However, because some important reaction rates have declined in the new compilation this has not increased the abundances for nuclei above aluminum and, in fact, they have declined while the abundances of both 26 Al and 27 Al have increased at both WD masses. In contrast, the abundance of 22 Na has declined at both WD masses over the values predicted in our earlier work. This has important implications with respect to predictions of the observability of novae with INTEGRAL

  14. BIG-10 fission product generation and reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission product generation rates for high quality fission foils and reaction rates of nonfission foils have been measured by gamma ray activation analyses. These foils were irradiated in the BIG-10 facility and the activities were measured by NaI counting techniques

  15. Measure and integration theory

    CERN Document Server

    Burckel, Robert B

    2001-01-01

    This book gives a straightforward introduction to the field as it is nowadays required in many branches of analysis and especially in probability theory. The first three chapters (Measure Theory, Integration Theory, Product Measures) basically follow the clear and approved exposition given in the author's earlier book on ""Probability Theory and Measure Theory"". Special emphasis is laid on a complete discussion of the transformation of measures and integration with respect to the product measure, convergence theorems, parameter depending integrals, as well as the Radon-Nikodym theorem. The fi

  16. Temperature dependence of muonium reaction rates in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Garner, D.M.; Mikula, R.J.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1981-01-01

    A study of the temperature dependence of reaction rates has long been an important tool in establishing reaction pathways in chemical reactions. This is particularly true for the reactions of muonium (in comparison with those of hydrogen) since a measurement of the activation energy for chemical reaction is sensitive to both the height and the position of the potential barrier in the reaction plane. For collision controlled reactions, on the other hand, the reaction rate is expected to exhibit a weak T 1 sup(/) 2 dependence characteristic of the mean collision velocity. These concepts are discussed and their effects illustrated in a comparison of the chemical and spin exchange reaction rates of muonium and hydrogen in the temperature range approx.300-approx.500 K. (orig.)

  17. Reaction rate studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in sections of rat liver using four tetrazolium salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butcher, R. G.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction rate of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in liver sections from fed and starved rats has been monitored by the continuous measurement at 37 degrees C of the reaction product as it is formed using scanning and integrating microdensitometry. Control media lacked either substrate

  18. Reaction rate constant for uranium in water and water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    1998-11-09

    The literature on uranium oxidation in water and oxygen free water vapor was reviewed. Arrhenius rate equations were developed from the review data. These data and equations will be used as a baseline from which to compare reaction rates measured for K Basin fuel.

  19. Fuzzy measures and integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mesiar, Radko

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 156 (2005), s. 365-370 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA402/04/1026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : fuzzy measures * fuzzy integral * regular fuzzy integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.039, year: 2005

  20. Reaction rate of 24Mg(p,γ)25Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, D.C.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A.E.; Grossmann, C.A.; Hale, S.E.; Hansper, V.Y.; McLean, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    The proton-capture reaction on 24 Mg has been investigated in the bombarding energy range of E p =0.2-1.7 MeV. Resonance properties (strengths, branching ratios and lifetimes) of low-energy resonances have been measured. From the experimental results, accurate proton partial widths, γ-ray partial widths and total widths (Γ p , Γ γ , and Γ) have been deduced. The present experimental information establishes the 24 Mg+p reaction rates over the temperature range T=0.02-2.0 GK with statistical uncertainties of 5% to 21%. Our recommended reaction rates deviate from previous estimates by 18% to 45%. Based on our results, we can rule out the recent suggestion that the total width of the E R =223 keV resonance has a significant influence on the reaction rates. We also discuss several effects that might give rise to systematic uncertainties in the reaction rates. The astrophysical implications for hydrogen burning of 24 Mg at low stellar temperatures are presented

  1. Measuring integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    respond to these needs, patients and providers face the multiple challenges of today's healthcare environment. Decision makers, planners and managers need evidence based policy options and information on the scope of the integrated care challenges they are facing. The US managed care organization Kaiser...... differences were found in the perception of clinical integration in the two settings. More primary care clinicians in the Northern California region of Kaiser Permanente reported being part of a clinical integrated environment than did Danish general practitioners. By measuring the level of clinical...... and performance of the Danish healthcare system and the managed care organization Kaiser Permanente, California, US. 5) To compare primary care clinicians' perception of clinical integration in two healthcare systems: Kaiser Permanente, Northern California and the Danish healthcare system. Further to examine...

  2. Reaction rate calculations via transmission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Alder, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission coefficient of a wavepacket traversing a potential barrier can be determined by steady state calculations carried out in imaginary time instead of by real time dynamical calculations. The general argument is verified for the Eckart barrier potential by a comparison of transmission coefficients calculated from real and imaginary time solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The correspondence demonstrated here allows a formulation for the reaction rate that avoids difficulties due to both rare events and explicitly time dependent calculations. 5 refs., 2 figs

  3. Measuring integrated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2011-02-01

    The positive outcomes of coordination of healthcare services are to an increasing extent becoming clear. However the complexity of the field is an inhibiting factor for vigorously designed trial studies. Conceptual clarity and a consistent theoretical frame-work are thus needed. While researchers respond to these needs, patients and providers face the multiple challenges of today's healthcare environment. Decision makers, planners and managers need evidence based policy options and information on the scope of the integrated care challenges they are facing. The US managed care organization Kaiser Permanente has been put forward as an example for European healthcare systems to follow, although the evidence base is far from conclusive. The thesis has five objectives: 1) To contribute to the understanding of the concept of integration in healthcare systems and to identify measurement methods to capture the multi-dimensional aspects of integrated healthcare delivery. 2) To assess the level of integration of the Danish healthcare system. 3) To assess the use of joint health plans as a tool for coordination between the regional and local level in the Danish healthcare system. 4) To compare the inputs and performance of the Danish healthcare system and the managed care organization Kaiser Permanente, California, US. 5) To compare primary care clinicians' perception of clinical integration in two healthcare systems: Kaiser Permanente, Northern California and the Danish healthcare system. Further to examine the associations between specific organizational factors and clinical integration within each system. The literature was systematically searched to identify methods for measurement of integrated healthcare delivery. A national cross-sectional survey was conducted among major professional stake-holders at five different levels of the Danish healthcare system. The survey data were used to allow for analysis of the level of integration achieved. Data from the survey were

  4. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  5. Actinide integral measurements in the CFRMF and integral tests for ENDF/B-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Integral capture and/or fission rates have been reported earlier for several actinides irradiated in the fast neutron field of the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF). These nuclides include 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 242 Pu, 241 Am and 243 Am. This paper forucses on the utilization of these integral data for testing the respective cross sections on ENDF/B-V. Integral cross sections derived from the measured reaction rates are tabulated. Results are presented for cross-section data testing which includes integral testing based on a comparison of calculated and measured integral cross sections and testing based on least-squares-adjustment analyses

  6. Compilation of neutron flux density spectra and reaction rates in different neutron fields. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertek, C.

    1980-04-01

    Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group of Reactor Radiation Measurements (IWGRRM) a compilation of documents containing neutron flux density spectra and the reaction rates obtained by activiation and fission foils in different neutron fields is presented

  7. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  8. Neutron Scattering in Hydrogenous Moderators, Studied by Time Dependent Reaction Rate Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L G; Moeller, E; Purohit, S N

    1966-03-15

    The moderation and absorption of a neutron burst in water, poisoned with the non-1/v absorbers cadmium and gadolinium, has been followed on the time scale by multigroup calculations, using scattering kernels for the proton gas and the Nelkin model. The time dependent reaction rate curves for each absorber display clear differences for the two models, and the separation between the curves does not depend much on the absorber concentration. An experimental method for the measurement of infinite medium reaction rate curves in a limited geometry has been investigated. This method makes the measurement of the time dependent reaction rate generally useful for thermalization studies in a small geometry of a liquid hydrogenous moderator, provided that the experiment is coupled to programs for the calculation of scattering kernels and time dependent neutron spectra. Good agreement has been found between the reaction rate curve, measured with cadmium in water, and a calculated curve, where the Haywood kernel has been used.

  9. Radon integral measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Radon Integral Measurement System (SMIR) is a device designed specially to detect, to count and to store the data of the acquisition of alpha particles emitted by Radon-222 coming from the underground. The system includes a detection chamber, a radiation detector, a digital system with bateries backup and an auxiliary photovoltaic cell. A personal computer fixes the mode in which the system works, transmitting the commands to the system by the serial port. The heart of the system is a microprocesor working with interrupts by hardware. Every external device to the microprocessor sends his own interrupt request and the microprocessor handles the interrupts with a defined priority. The system uses a real time clock, compatible with the microprocessor, to take care of the real timing and date of the acquisition. A non volatile RAM is used to store data of two bytes every 15 minutes along 41 days as a maximum. After the setting up to the system by the computer, it can operate in stand alone way for up 41 days in the working place without the lose of any data. If the memory is full the next data will be written in the first locations of the memory. The memory is divided in pages corresponding every one of this to a different day of the acquisition. The counting time for every acquisition can be programmed by the user from 15 minutes to 65535 minutes but it is recommended to use a small time not to reach the limit of 65535 counts in every acquisition period. We can take information of the system without affecting the acquisition process in the field by using a lap top computer, then the information can be stored in a file. There is a program in the computer that can show the information in a table of values or in a bar graph. (Author)

  10. Integration, measure and probability

    CERN Document Server

    Pitt, H R

    2012-01-01

    Introductory treatment develops the theory of integration in a general context, making it applicable to other branches of analysis. More specialized topics include convergence theorems and random sequences and functions. 1963 edition.

  11. Effect of excited states on thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargood, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Values of the ratio of the thermonuclear reaction rate of a reaction, with target nuclei in a thermal distribution of energy states, to the reaction rate with all target nuclei in their ground states are tabulated for neutron, proton and α-particle induced reactions on the naturally occurring nuclei from 20 Ne to 70 Zn, at temperatures of 1, 2, 3.5 and 5x10 9 K. The ratios are determined from reaction rates based on statistical model cross sections

  12. Quantum measure and integration theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudder, Stan

    2009-01-01

    This article begins with a review of quantum measure spaces. Quantum forms and indefinite inner-product spaces are then discussed. The main part of the paper introduces a quantum integral and derives some of its properties. The quantum integral's form for simple functions is characterized and it is shown that the quantum integral generalizes the Lebesgue integral. A bounded, monotone convergence theorem for quantum integrals is obtained and it is shown that a Radon-Nikodym-type theorem does not hold for quantum measures. As an example, a quantum-Lebesgue integral on the real line is considered.

  13. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  14. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103(n,n')Rh-103m reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103(n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to approximately +-5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the IAEA. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  15. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lu, C [Georgia Institute of Technology; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Cheng, H. [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  16. Measure and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Bercovici, Hari; Pearcy, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the material of a one year course in real analysis. It includes an original axiomatic approach to Lebesgue integration which the authors have found to be effective in the classroom. Each chapter contains numerous examples and an extensive problem set which expands considerably the breadth of the material covered in the text. Hints are included for some of the more difficult problems. .

  17. Raman Spectral Determination of Chemical Reaction Rate Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakhnina, I. A.; Brandt, N. N.; Mankova, A. A.; Chikishev, A. Yu.; Shpachenko, I. G.

    2017-09-01

    The feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to determine chemical reaction rates and activation energies has been demonstrated for the saponification of ethyl acetate. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate was found in the range from 15 to 45°C.

  18. Theoretical Time Dependent Thermal Neutron Spectra and Reaction Rates in H2O and D2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, S.N.

    1966-04-01

    The early theoretical and experimental time dependent neutron thermalization studies were limited to the study of the transient spectrum in the diffusion period. The recent experimental measurements of the time dependent thermal neutron spectra and reaction rates, for a number of moderators, have generated considerable interest in the study of the time dependent Boltzmann equation. In this paper we present detailed results for the time dependent spectra and the reaction rates for resonance detectors using several scattering models of H 2 O and D 2 O. This study has been undertaken in order to interpret the integral time dependent neutron thermalization experiments in liquid moderators which have been performed at the AB Atomenergi. The proton gas and the deuteron gas models are inadequate to explain the measured reaction rates in H 2 O and D 2 O. The bound models of Nelkin for H 2 O and of Butler for D 2 O give much better agreement with the experimental results than the gas models. Nevertheless, some disagreement between theoretical and experimental results still persists. This study also indicates that the bound model of Butler and the effective mass 3. 6 gas model of Brown and St. John give almost identical reaction rates. It is also surprising to note that the calculated reaction rate for Cd for the Butler model appears to be in better agreement with the experimental results of D 2 O than of the Nelkin model with H 2 O experiments. The present reaction rate studies are sensitive enough so as to distinguish between the gas model and the bound model of a moderator. However, to investigate the details of a scattering law (such as the effect of the hindered rotations in H 2 O and D 2 O and the weights of different dynamical modes) with the help of these studies would require further theoretical as well as experimental investigations. Theoretical results can be further improved by improving the source for thermal neutrons, the group structure and the scattering

  19. A comparison of the predicted and observed reaction rates of various neutron detectors in a thermal reactor spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardiman, J.P.; Maunders, E.J.

    1963-08-01

    A number of the detectors commonly used in integral neutron spectrum measurements have been irradiated in the pitch moderator position of a Calder Hall lattice where the detailed energy spectrum is known from time of flight measurements. Predicted and observed reaction rates are generally in good agreement although they are brought into better agreement by a small modification to the spectrum. The predicted cadmium ratios are quite sensitive to the value adopted for the effective cadmium cut off energy, values of which were determined for various detectors using the Ferranti Mercury computer. The values varied over a wide range, although in every case only 40 mil. cadmium filters were used. (author)

  20. Effect of nuclear reaction rates on primordial abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical predictions of the primordial abundances of elements in the big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction rates. The effect of modifying these reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN by replacing the thirty-five reaction rates out of the existing eighty-eight has been investigated. Also the study have been taken of these yields as functions of evolution time or temperature. Here it has been found that using these new reaction rates results in only a little increase in helium mass fraction over that obtained previously in BBN calculations. This allows insights into the role of the nuclear reaction rates in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We observe that most of these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the standard BBN abundance yields of 6 Li and 7 Li

  1. Measurement of nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of fuel pellets from IPEN/MB-01 reactor; Medidas de taxas de reacao nuclear e de indices espectrais ao longo do raio das pastilhas combustiveis do reator IPEN/MB-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mura, Luis Felipe Liambos

    2010-07-01

    This work presents the measurements of the nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO{sub 2} with 4,3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission have been measured as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Lead collimators has been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin UO{sub 2} disk is used. This disk is inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of around 9 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. For gamma spectrometry 10 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the nuclear reactions of radioactive capture that occurs in atoms of {sup 238}U and fissions that occur on both {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U are measured in function of 10 different region (diameter of collimator) of the fuel pellet disk. Corrections in the geometric efficiency due to introduction of collimators on HPGe detection system were estimated using photon transport of MCNP-4C code. Some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology, using the MCNP-4C code, are presented and compared to the experimental data showing very good agreement. Besides nuclear reaction rates, the spectral indices {sup 28{rho}} and {sup 25{delta}} have been obtained at each different radius of the fuel pellet disk. (author)

  2. Integral measurements on Caliban and Prospero assemblies for nuclear data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Richard, B.; Ducauze-Philippe, M.; Cartier, J.

    2011-01-01

    How can the quality of nuclear data libraries be checked? Performing reference experiments also called benchmarks allows the testing of evaluated data. During these experiments, integral values such as reaction rates or neutron effective multiplication coefficients are measured. In this paper, the principles of benchmark construction are explained and illustrated with several works performed on the CALIBAN et PROSPERO critical assemblies operated by the Valduc center: benchmarks for dosimetry, activation reactions studies, neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  3. Reevaluation of the O+(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from atmosphere explorer C observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D.G.; Richards, P.G.; Solomon, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    O + ( 2 P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 angstrom can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N 2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of O + ( 2 P). The reaction rates that are generally used were determined from aeronomic data by Rusch et al. but there is evidence that several important inputs that they used should be changed. The authors have recalculated the O and N 2 reaction rates for O + ( 2 P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N 2 reaction rate of 3.4 ± 1.5 x 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al., but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 ± 1.9 x 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al. and they are in reasonable agreement with data from five additional orbits that are used in this study. The authors have also examined the effect of uncertainties in the solar EUV flux on the derived reaction rates and found that 15% uncertainties in the solar flux could cause additional uncertainties of up to a factor of 1.5 in the O quenching rate. 19 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Preston, C.C.

    1980-09-01

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup

  5. Helium generation reaction rates for 6Li and 10B in benchmark facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, Harry IV; Oliver, B.M.; Lippincott, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The helium generation rates for 10 B and 6 Li have been measured in two benchmark reactor facilities having neutron spectra similar to those found in a breeder reactor. The irradiations took place in the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF) and in the 10% enriched 235 U critical assembly, BIG-10. The helium reaction rates were obtained by precise high-sensitivity gas mass spectrometric analyses of the helium content of numerous small samples. Comparison of these reaction rates with other reaction rates measured in the same facilities, and with rates calculated from published cross sections and from best estimates of the neutron spectral shapes, indicate significant discrepancies in the calculated values. Additional irradiations in other benchmark facilities have been undertaken to better determine the energy ranges where the discrepancies lie

  6. Methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers (CH3OC7F13): measured OH radical reaction rate coefficients for several isomers and enantiomers and their atmospheric lifetimes and global warming potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Aaron M; Gierczak, Tomasz; Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Waterland, Robert L; Burkholder, James B

    2014-05-06

    Mixtures of methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers (CH3OC7F13, MPHEs) are currently in use as replacements for perfluorinated alkanes (PFCs) and poly-ether heat transfer fluids, which are persistent greenhouse gases with lifetimes >1000 years. At present, the atmospheric processing and environmental impact from the use of MPHEs is unknown. In this work, rate coefficients at 296 K for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with six key isomers (including stereoisomers and enantiomers) of MPHEs used commercially were measured using a relative rate method. Rate coefficients for the six MPHE isomers ranged from ∼ 0.1 to 2.9 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with a strong stereoisomer and -OCH3 group position dependence; the (E)-stereoisomers with the -OCH3 group in an α- position relative to the double bond had the greatest reactivity. Rate coefficients measured for the d3-MPHE isomer analogues showed decreased reactivity consistent with a minor contribution of H atom abstraction from the -OCH3 group to the overall reactivity. Estimated atmospheric lifetimes for the MPHE isomers range from days to months. Atmospheric lifetimes, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials for these short-lived MPHE isomers were estimated based on the measured OH rate coefficients along with measured and theoretically calculated MPHE infrared absorption spectra. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying the atmospheric impact of individual components in an isomeric mixture.

  7. Reevaluation of the O(+)(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from Atmosphere Explorer C observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Solomon, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    O(+)(2P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 A can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of (O+)(2p). We have recalculated the O and N2 reaction rates for O(+) (2P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N2 reaction rate of 3.4 +/- 1.5 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/s is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al. (1977), but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 +/- 1.9 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/sec is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al.

  8. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  9. The development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/steam interaction. Final report 9-21-90--3-31-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biney, P.O.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this research to experimentally determine the hydrogen generation rate during the beginning and subsequent stages of liquid metal (Li 17 Pb 83 ) and water reaction. The experimental set-up has been built. It includes a metal sample preparation apparatus, a reaction system, a measurement system and a PC based data acquisition and control system. The most important feature of the reaction system is a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature, all stainless steel valve used the system for reaction time control. The PC system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all the systems except the metal preparation apparatus. Due to the reactivity of the lithium, all the metal sampling, preparation and loading procedures are executed in a glove box under argon protection. The metal temperature was varied between 350 degrees C-650 degrees C and water temperature fixed at 60 degrees C during the experiments. A set of experimental procedures and two analyses methods: (1) thermodynamics method and (2) heat transfer method are discussed. All the measurements and data collections are executed under the PC system control. A data analysis program is used to calculate both the partial pressure of hydrogen and the hydrogen generation rate. The experiment results indicate that the amount of hydrogen generated is relate to the initial liquid metal temperature when the reaction surface is fixed. The mass of hydrogen generated as a function of initial liquid metal temperature and time of reaction is presented, The hydrogen generation over a time period of 240 seconds and the calculated errors are summarized in Table 1

  10. Primordial lithium: New reaction rates, new abundances, new constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, L.; Schramm, D.; Steigman, G.

    1986-12-01

    Newly measured nuclear reaction rates for 3 H(α,γ) 7 Li (higher than previous values) and 7 Li(p,α) 4 He (lower than previous values) are shown to increase the 7 Li yield from big bang nucleosynthesis for lower baryon to photon ratio (eta ≤ 4 x 10 -10 ); the yield for higher eta is not affected. New, independent determinations of Li abundances in extreme Pop II stars are in excellent agreement with the earlier work of the Spites and give continued confidence in the use of 7 Li in big bang baryon density determinations. The new 7 Li constraints imply a lower limit on eta of 2 x 10 -10 and an upper limit of 5 x 10 -10 . This lower limit to eta is concordant with that obtained from considerations of D + 3 He. The upper limit is consistent with, but even more restrictive than, the D bound. With the new rates, any observed primordial Li/H ratio below 10 -10 would be inexplicable by the standard big bang nucleosynthesis. A review is made of the strengths and possible weaknesses of utilizing conclusions drawn from big bang lithium considerations. An appendix discusses the null effect of a factor of 32 increase in the experimental rate for the D(d,γ) 4 He reaction. 28 refs., 1 fig

  11. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in tritium, hydrogen and deuterium mixed gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates in H 2 +T 2 , D 2 +T 2 and H 2 +D 2 +T 2 mixed gases, as induced by tritium decay and beta radiation, were experimentally measured by laser Raman spectrometry. Initially a glass cell was filled with T 2 gas to a pressure of 30-40 kPa, and an equivalent partial pressure of H 2 and/or D 2 was added. The first-order hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates were 5.54x10 -2 h -1 for H 2 +T 2 mixed gas and 4.76x10 -2 h -1 for D 2 +T 2 . The actual HT producing rate was nearly equivalent to the rate of DT, but the reverse reaction rate of HT was faster than that of DT. The exchange reaction rates between H, D and T showed the isotope effect, HD>HT>DT. The hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rates observed were about twenty times larger than ion formation rates by beta radiation. This result suggests that a free radical chain reaction in hydrogen isotopes is occurring. (orig.)

  12. Astrophysical Nuclear Reaction Rates in the Dense Metallic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ali Ihsan

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear reaction rates can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude in dense and relatively cold astrophysical plasmas such as in white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, and giant planets. Similar conditions are also present in supernova explosions where the ignition conditions are vital for cosmological models. White dwarfs are compact objects that have both extremely high interior densities and very strong local magnetic fields. For the first time, a new formula has been developed to explain cross section and reaction rate quantities for light elements that includes not only the nuclear component but also the material dependence, magnetic field, and crystal structure dependency in dense metallic environments. I will present the impact of the developed formula on the cross section and reaction rates for light elements. This could have possible technological applications in energy production using nuclear fusion reactions.

  13. APUAMA: a software tool for reaction rate calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euclides, Henrique O; P Barreto, Patricia R

    2017-06-01

    APUAMA is a free software designed to determine the reaction rate and thermodynamic properties of chemical species of a reagent system. With data from electronic structure calculations, the APUAMA determine the rate constant with tunneling correction, such as Wigner, Eckart and small curvature, and also, include the rovibrational level of diatomic molecules. The results are presented in the form of Arrhenius-Kooij form, for the reaction rate, and the thermodynamic properties are written down in the polynomial form. The word APUAMA means "fast" in Tupi-Guarani Brazilian language, then the code calculates the reaction rate on a simple and intuitive graphic interface, the form fast and practical. As program output, there are several ASCII files with tabulated information for rate constant, rovibrational levels, energy barriers and enthalpy of reaction, Arrhenius-Kooij coefficient, and also, the option to the User save all graphics in BMP format.

  14. Quantum theory of enhanced unimolecular reaction rates below the ergodicity threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, David M.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of unimolecular reactions exhibit measured rates that exceed Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) predictions. We show using the local random matrix theory (LRMT) of vibrational energy flow how the quantum localization of the vibrational states of a molecule, by violating the ergodicity assumption, can give rise to such an enhancement of the apparent reaction rate. We present an illustrative calculation using LRMT for a model 12-vibrational mode organic molecule to show that below the ergodicity threshold the reaction rate may exceed many times the RRKM prediction due to quantum localization of vibrational states

  15. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R. [Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1979-05-15

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to {approx}{+-}5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the I.A.E.A. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  16. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to ∼±5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the I.A.E.A. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  17. Measuring of a few integral data in the ΣΣ neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlea, I.; Miron, C.; Lupu, M.; Ilie, P.; Thurzo, A.; Stanica, N.; Popa, F.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of absolute reaction rates for the nonfissionable isotopes were obtained at the Institute for Nuclear Technology (ITN) Romania, using activation detector foils exposed at the centre of ΣΣ. The average microscopic integral cross sections sigma were obtained for the following reactions: 197 Au(n,γ), 115 In(n,γ), 115 In(n,n'), 27 Al(n,α), 46 Ti(n,p), 47 Ti(n,p), 48 Ti(n,p) and 58 Ni(n,p). The same data, the absolute reaction rates and the average microscopic integral cross sections, for the principal fissionable isotopes were performed in the ΣΣ-ITN facility by means of absolute fission chambers. These average fission cross sections for 235 U, 239 Pu, 238 U, 237 Np, 232 Th, 233 U, 241 Pu were determined. (author)

  18. Liquid Film Diffusion on Reaction Rate in Submerged Biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Hollesen, Line; Harremoës, Poul

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate in a submerged biofilter with denitrification and in order to compare with a theoretical study of the mass transfer coefficient. The experiments were carried out with varied flow, identified...... by the empty bed velocity of inflow and recirculation, respectively 1.3, 2.8, 5.6 and 10.9 m/h. The filter material consisted of 3 mm biostyren spheres. The results indicate that the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate can be ignored....

  19. The Influence of Particle Charge on Heterogeneous Reaction Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of particle charge on heterogeneous reaction rates are presented. Many atmospheric particles, whether liquid or solid are charged. This surface charge causes a redistribution of charge within a liquid particle and as a consequence a perturbation in the gaseous uptake coefficient. The amount of perturbation is proportional to the external potential and the square of the ratio of debye length in the liquid to the particle radius. Previous modeling has shown how surface charge affects the uptake coefficient of charged aerosols. This effect is now included in the heterogeneous reaction rate of an aerosol ensemble. Extension of this analysis to ice particles will be discussed and examples presented.

  20. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E. [Schools of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T. [Departments of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences Somerset, West, 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  1. Upper atmosphere research: Reaction rate and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide photochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic information necessary for photochemical models of the Earth's upper atmosphere and to examine reactions or reactants not presently in the models to either confirm the correctness of their exclusion or provide evidence to justify future inclusion in the models. New initiatives are being taken in technique development (many of them laser based) and in the application of established techniques to address gaps in the photochemical/kinetic data base, as well as to provide increasingly reliable information.

  2. Compilation of neutron flux density spectra and reaction rates in different neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertek, C.

    1979-07-01

    Upon the recommendation of International Working Group of Reactor Radiation Measurements (IWGRRM), the compilation of neutron flux density spectra and the reaction rates obtained by activation and fission foils in different neutron fields is presented. The neutron fields considered are as follows: 1/E; iron block; LWR core and pressure vessel; LMFBR core and blanket; CTR first wall and blanket; fission spectrum

  3. Large area isotopic silicon targets for astrophysical reaction rate studies in Si-26

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greene, JP; Berg, GPA

    2005-01-01

    For measurements of stellar reaction rates of proton rich nuclei involving resonance levels just above threshold, targets of Si-28 were used in studies of the Si-21(He-4, He-6)Si-26 reaction using the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) Ring Cyclotron at Osaka University. Resonance structure

  4. Calculation of multigroup reaction rates for the Ghana Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discrete ordinate spatial model, which pro-vides solution to the differential form of the transport equation by the Carlson-SN (N=4) approach was adopted to solve the Ludwig-Boltzmann multigroup neutron transport equation for this analysis. The results show that for any fissile resonance absorber, the reaction rates ...

  5. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Motohiko

    1993-01-01

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range10 16-18 eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above10 16 eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  6. Reactivity and reaction rate ratio changes with moderator voidage in a light water high converter reactor lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, R.; Gmuer, K.; Hager, H.; Seiler, R.

    1986-01-01

    Integral reaction rate ratios and other k ∞ related parameters have been measured in the first three cores of the experimental program on light water high converter reactor (LWHCR) test lattices in the PROTEUS reactor. The reference tight-pitch lattice consisted of two rod types, with an average fissile-plutonium enrichment of 6% and a fuel/moderator ratio of 2.0. The moderators were H 2 O, Dowtherm (simulating an H 2 O voidage of 42.5%), and air (100% void). Comparisons of the measured parameters have been made with calculational results based mainly on the use of two separate codes and their associated data libraries, namely, WIMS-D and EPRI-CPM. A reconstruction of individual components of the k-infinity void coefficient has been carried out on the basis of the measured changes with voidage of the various reaction rate ratios, as well as of k-infinity itself. The subsequent more detailed comparisons between experiment and calculation should provide a useful basis for resolving the conflicting calculational results that have been reported in the past for the void coefficient characteristics of LWHCRs. (author)

  7. Integral-capture measurements and cross-section adjustments for Nd, Sm, and Eu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Schmittroth, F.; Harker, Y.D.

    1981-07-01

    Integral-capture reaction rates are reported for 143 Nd, 144 Nd, 145 Nd, 147 Sm, 151 Eu, 152 Eu, 153 Eu, and 154 Eu irradiated in different neutron spectra in EBR-II. These reaction rates are based primarily on mass-spectrometric measurements of the isotopic atom ratios of the capture product to the target nuclide. The neutron spectra are characterized using passive neutron dosimetry and spectrum-unfolding with the FERRET least-squares data analysis code. Reaction rates for the neutron spectrum monitors were determined by the radiometric technique using Ge(Li) spectrometers. These rates are also reported here. The integral data for the rare-earth samples and for the spectrum monitors were used in multigroup flux/cross-section adtustment analyses with FERRET to generate adjustments to 47 group representations of the ENDF/B-IV capture cross sections for the rare-earth isotopes. These adjusted cross sections are in good agreement with recent differential data and with adjusted cross sections based on STEK integral data. Examples are given of the use of the adjusted cross sections and covariance matrices for cross-section evaluation

  8. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  9. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  10. X particle effect for 6Li reaction rates calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, G.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    The inferred primordial 6 L i-7 L i abundances are different from standard big bang nucleosynthesis results, 6 L i is 1000 times larger and 7 L i is 3 times smaller than the big bang prediction. In big bang nucleosynthesis, negatively charged massive X particles a possible solution to explain this primordial Li abundances problem [1]. In this study, we consider only X particle effect for nuclear reactions to obtain S-factor and reaction rates for Li. All S-factors calculated within the Optical Model framework for d(α,γ)6 L i system. We showed that the enhancement effect of massive negatively charged X particle for 6 L i system reaction rate.(author)

  11. The path to improved reaction rates for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, T.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on nuclear reactions in astrophysics and, more specifically, on reactions with light ions (nucleons and α particles) proceeding via the strong interaction. It is intended to present the basic definitions essential for studies in nuclear astrophysics, to point out the differences between nuclear reactions taking place in stars and in a terrestrial laboratory, and to illustrate some of the challenges to be faced in theoretical and experimental studies of those reactions. The discussion revolves around the relevant quantities for astrophysics, which are the astrophysical reaction rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates to the uncertainties in the prediction of various nuclear properties is explored and some guidelines for experimentalists are also provided. (author)

  12. The reaction rates of electrons with native and irradiated ribonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.; Ebert, M.; Davies, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of reaction of hydrated electrons with proteins depends, amongst other things, on the conformational structure of the protein, and irradiation itself causes conformational changes in proteins. A study has been made of variations in the reaction rates of hydrated electrons with RNase pre-irradiated by the Linac or by a 60 Co γ-source. The reaction rate constants varied with the pre-irradiation dose, the concentration of phosphate buffer, the enzyme concentration and also the presence of 10 -2 M ethanol. These variations serve to emphasize the importance of the tertiary structure of biological molecules in irradiation processes and have significant implications in the mathematical analysis of the inactivation of enzymes in steady-state irradiation processes. (U.K.)

  13. Kinetic aspects of the embedded clusters: Reaction - Rate Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despa, F.; Apostol, M.

    1995-07-01

    The main stages of the cluster growth process are reviewed using Reaction - Rate Theory. The precipitation stage is shown as a relaxation of the solute towards a cluster state characterized by a higher stability. The kinetic of the late stage of phase separation, the coarsening process, is analyzed by an off-centre diffusion mechanism. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental ones. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs

  14. Impact of New Gadolinium Cross Sections on Reaction Rate Distributions in 10 * 10 BWR Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G.; Murphy, M.F.; Jatuff, F.; Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst, CH-5232 Villigen, (Switzerland); Sublet, J.Ch.; Bouland, O. [DEN, Commissariat Energie Atom, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France); Chawla, R. [Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    Radial distributions of the total fission rate and the {sup 238}U-capture-to-total-fission (C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}) ratio were measured in SVEA-96+ and SVEA-96 Optima2 assemblies during the LWR-PROTEUS program. Fission rates predicted using MCNPX with JEFF-3.1 cross sections underestimated the measured values in the gadolinium-poisoned pins of the SVEA-96 Optima2 assembly; similarly, C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} ratios were overestimated in some gadolinium-poisoned pins of the SVEA-96+ assembly. A considerable effort was invested at the Paul Scherrer Institut to explain the discrepancies in gadolinium pins, without success. Recently, gadolinium cross sections were measured at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute by Leinweber et al. and differed significantly from current library values. ENDF/B-VII.0 gadolinium cross sections have currently been modified to include the new measurements, and these data have been processed with NJOY to yield files usable by MCNPX. Fission rates in the gadolinium-poisoned fuel pins of the SVEA-96 Optima2 pins were increased by 1.4 to 2.0% using the newly produced cross sections, yielding to a better agreement with the experimental values. Predicted C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} ratios were decreased on average by 1.7% in both clustered and un-clustered groups of gadolinium-poisoned fuel pins of the SVEA-96+ assembly correcting the over predictions previously reported in the clustered gadolinium pins. Earlier reported discrepancies observed in PROTEUS integral experiments, between measured and calculated reaction rates in the gadolinium-poisoned pins, might thus be due to inaccurate gadolinium cross sections. The PROTEUS results support the new thermal and epithermal gadolinium data measured by Leinweber et al. (authors)

  15. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Simplified method of ''push-pull'' test data analysis for determining in situ reaction rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, R.; Schroth, M.H.; Istok, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The single-well, ''''push-pull'''' test method is useful for obtaining information on a wide variety of aquifer physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics. A push-pull test consists of the pulse-type injection of a prepared test solution into a single monitoring well followed by the extraction of the test solution/ground water mixture from the same well. The test solution contains a conservative tracer and one or more reactants selected to investigate a particular process. During the extraction phase, the concentrations of tracer, reactants, and possible reaction products are measured to obtain breakthrough curves for all solutes. This paper presents a simplified method of data analysis that can be used to estimate a first-order reaction rate coefficient from these breakthrough curves. Rate coefficients are obtained by fitting a regression line to a plot of normalized concentrations versus elapsed time, requiring no knowledge of aquifer porosity, dispersivity, or hydraulic conductivity. A semi-analytical solution to the advective-dispersion equation is derived and used in a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a homogeneous, confined aquifer with a fully-penetrating injection/extraction well and varying porosity, dispersivity, test duration, and reaction rate. A numerical flow and transport code (SUTRA) is used to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a heterogeneous, unconfined aquifer with a partially penetrating well. In all cases the simplified method provides accurate estimates of reaction rate coefficients; estimation errors ranged from 0.1 to 8.9% with most errors less than 5%

  17. Theoretical Time Dependent Thermal Neutron Spectra and Reaction Rates in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, S N

    1966-04-15

    The early theoretical and experimental time dependent neutron thermalization studies were limited to the study of the transient spectrum in the diffusion period. The recent experimental measurements of the time dependent thermal neutron spectra and reaction rates, for a number of moderators, have generated considerable interest in the study of the time dependent Boltzmann equation. In this paper we present detailed results for the time dependent spectra and the reaction rates for resonance detectors using several scattering models of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. This study has been undertaken in order to interpret the integral time dependent neutron thermalization experiments in liquid moderators which have been performed at the AB Atomenergi. The proton gas and the deuteron gas models are inadequate to explain the measured reaction rates in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. The bound models of Nelkin for H{sub 2}O and of Butler for D{sub 2}O give much better agreement with the experimental results than the gas models. Nevertheless, some disagreement between theoretical and experimental results still persists. This study also indicates that the bound model of Butler and the effective mass 3. 6 gas model of Brown and St. John give almost identical reaction rates. It is also surprising to note that the calculated reaction rate for Cd for the Butler model appears to be in better agreement with the experimental results of D{sub 2}O than of the Nelkin model with H{sub 2}O experiments. The present reaction rate studies are sensitive enough so as to distinguish between the gas model and the bound model of a moderator. However, to investigate the details of a scattering law (such as the effect of the hindered rotations in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O and the weights of different dynamical modes) with the help of these studies would require further theoretical as well as experimental investigations. Theoretical results can be further improved by improving the source for thermal neutrons, the

  18. Integral measurement system for radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.; Pena E, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Integral measurement system for Radon is an equipment to detect, counting and storage data of alpha particles produced by Radon 222 which is emanated through the terrestrial peel surface. This equipment was designed in the Special Designs Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. It supplies information about the behavior at long time (41 days) on each type of alpha radiation that is present into the environment as well as into the terrestrial peel. The program is formed by an User program, where it is possible to determine the operation parameters of a portable probe that contains, a semiconductor detector, a microprocessor as a control central unit, a real time clock and calendar to determine the occurred events chronology, a non-volatile memory device for storage the acquired data and an interface to establish the serial communications with other personal computers. (Author)

  19. Metal-silicon reaction rates - The effects of capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is presented showing that the presence of the commonly used anti-reflection coating material Ta2O5 on the free surface of contact metallization can either suppress or enhance, depending on the system, the interaction that takes place at elevated temperatures between the metallization and the underlying Si. The cap layer is shown to suppress both the generation and annihilation of vacancies at the free surface of the metal which are necessary to support metal-Si interactons. Evidence is also presented indicating that the mechanical condition of the free metal surface has a significant effect on the metal-silicon reaction rate.

  20. Chemical changes in groundwater and their reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talma, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of the major ion concentrations of groundwater (Na, K, Ca, Mg, HCO 3 , SO 4 , Cl and NO 3 ) can be described as the consequence of a number of competing chemical reactions. With the aid of the naturally occuring radioactive and stable isotopes some of these reactions can be separated, identified and followed in space and time. In some field studies, especialy of artesian water, the rates of reactions can be estimated. A number of processes observed in South African sandstones aquifers are discussed and the variable reaction rates demonstrated. Reactions that can be identified include carbonate solution, chemical weathering, salt leaching, cation exchange and redox processes

  1. General properties of astrophysical reaction rates in explosive nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental differences in the prediction of reaction rates with intermediate and heavy target nuclei compared to the ones with light nuclei are discussed, with special emphasis on stellar modifications of the rates. Ground and excited state contributions to the stellar rates are quantified, deriving a linear weighting of excited state contributions despite of a Boltzmann population of the nuclear states. A Coulomb suppression effect of the excited state contributions is identified, acting against the usual Q-value rule in some reactions. The proper inclusion of experimental data in revised stellar rates is shown, containing revised uncertainties. An application to the s-process shows that the actual uncertainties in the neutron capture rates are larger than would be expected from the experimental errors alone. Sensitivities of reaction rates and cross sections are defined and their application in reaction studies is discussed. The conclusion provides a guide to experiment as well as theory on how to best improve the rates used in astrophysical simulations and how to assess their uncertainties.

  2. Cross sections and thermonuclear reaction rates of proton-induced reactions on 37Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.O.; Tingwell, C.I.W.; Mitchell, L.W.; Sevior, M.E.; Sargood, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The yields of γ-rays from the reactions of 37 Cl(p,γ) 38 Ar and 37 Cl(p,αγ) 34 S have been measured as a of bombarding energy over the ranges 0.65 - 2.15 MeV and 1.25 -2.15 MeV respectively, and the yield of neutrons from 37 Cl(p,n) 37 Ar from threshold to 2.50 MeV. The results are compared with global statistical-model calculations and thermonuclear reaction rates are calculated for the temperature range 5 x 10 8 - 10 10 K. The significance of these thermonuclear reaction rates for stellar nucleosynthesis calculations is discussed

  3. Measurements and calculations of integral capture cross-sections of structural materials in fast reactor spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, S.; Brunson, G.; Gmuer, K.; Jermann, M.; McCombie, C.; Richmond, R.; Schmocker, U.

    1979-01-01

    This paper relates the checking of integral data of steel and iron in fast reactor lattices. The fully-rodded GCFR benchmark lattice of the zero-energy reactor PROTEUS was successively modified by replacing the PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods by steel-18/8 or steel-37 (iron) rods. The neutron spectra of the modified lattices in fact have median energies close to that of a typical LMFBR. The replacement of fuel by the structural material of interest was such that in each case the value of k(infinity) was reduced to near-unity. This allowed the measurement of the lattice-k(infinity) by the null-reactivity technique. In addition, the principal reaction rates (namely U238 capture and fission, relative to Pu239 fission) and the neutron spectrum were measured. These directly measured integral data which are particularly sensitive to the steel cross-sections can be used for the checking and systematic adjustment of data sets. The results may also be analysed so as to derive specific values for the integral capture cross-sections of steel and iron. Neutron balance equations were set-up for each of the lattices using the measured k(infinity) and reaction rates

  4. Enhancement of nuclear reaction rates in asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerouin, J.; Arnault, P.; Desbiens, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); White, A.; Ticknor, C.; Kress, J.D.; Collins, L.A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Using orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations we study the structure and dynamics of increasingly asymmetric mixtures such as hydrogen-carbon, hydrogen-aluminium, hydrogen-copper, and hydrogen-silver. We show that, whereas the heavy component structure is close to an effective one-component plasma (OCP), the light component appears more structured than the corresponding OCP. This effect is related to the crossover towards a Lorentz-type diffusion triggered by strongly coupled, highly charged heavy ions, and witnessed by the change of temperature scaling laws of diffusion. This over-correlation translates into an enhancement of nuclear reaction rates much higher than its classical OCP counterpart. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  6. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-01-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth–death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics. (paper)

  7. The effects of vacuum polarization on thermonuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Added to the pure Coulomb potential, the contribution from vacuum polarization increases the barrier, reducing the wave function (u) for reacting nuclei within the range of nuclear forces. The cross section and reaction rate are then reduced accordingly by a factor proportional to u squared. The effect is treated by evaluating the vacuum polarization potential as a small correction to the Coulomb term, then computing u in a WKB formulation. The calculation is done analytically employing the small r power-series expansion for the Uehling potential to express the final result in terms of convenient parameters. At a temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 7th K the (negative) correction is 1.3 percent for the fundamental fusion process p + p yields d + e(+) + nu.

  8. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear Data and Reaction Rate Databases in Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas

    2018-06-01

    Astrophysical simulations and models require a large variety of micro-physics data, such as equation of state tables, atomic opacities, properties of nuclei, and nuclear reaction rates. Some of the required data is experimentally accessible, but the extreme conditions present in many astrophysical scenarios cannot be reproduced in the laboratory and thus theoretical models are needed to supplement the empirical data. Collecting data from various sources and making them available as a database in a unified format is a formidable task. I will provide an overview of the data requirements in astrophysics with an emphasis on nuclear astrophysics. I will then discuss some of the existing databases, the science they enable, and their limitations. Finally, I will offer some thoughts on how to design a useful database.

  10. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.; Allen, J.W.; Green, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross-section and reaction rates for some reactions involved in explosive nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.W.

    1979-03-01

    Total proton-induced and alpha-induced reaction cross sections have been determined for the 24 Mg(α,n), 25 Mg(p,n), 26 Mg(p,n), 27 Al(p,n), 28 Si(α,n), 42 Ca(p,γ), 42 Ca(α,n) and 44 Ca(p,n) reactions from energies near threshold (except the exothermic (p,γ) reaction) to about 3 to 4 MeV above threshold. The product nuclei are all positron emitters with half-lives ranging from about 3 sec to about 4 hours. From the measured cross sections reaction rates have been calculated in the temperature range 1 9 9 =1, at which the discrepancy is large. Included also are analytic forms for (p,n), (α,n), and (p,γ) reactions which can be used to describe the reaction rate within the temperature range 1 9 <=6 and which agree with the experimental rates at the discrete temperatures where the reaction rates have been calculated

  12. Non extensive corrections to stellar nuclear reactions rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (DCET/UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra; Silveira, F.E.M. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IAG/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Stellar nucleosynthesis is widely accepted as the basic mechanism for creation of chemical elements in the Universe. In particular, nuclear reactions occurring in the Sun are recognized as responsible for its energy generation. The problem of to determine the energy generation mechanism in stars was firstly attacked by Gamow in the framework of his quantum mechanical theory of potential barrier penetration. According to that approach, the reactions rate is calculated by averaging the penetration factor over the velocity distribution of the plasma particles. A randomization of that distribution is expected as a consequence of the reactions. However, diffusion processes in the macroscopic environment should balance the resulting particles number depletion. Therefore, matter, energy, and momentum might steadily flow. In other words, a quasi-stationary equilibrium state must be attained. In this work, the potential barrier penetration approach to stellar nuclear reactions rate has been rediscussed with basis on Tsallis nonextensive statistics. The investigation has been restricted to non-resonant reactions, for which the S-factor can be regarded as a constant. It has been found that, within the extended formulation, the nonextensive q-parameter is constrained to a maximum value. Accordingly, the q-energy has been shown to exhibit a minimum. The q-Gamow peak has been derived and, in connection with the usual Gaussian approximation, the corresponding half q-width has been also estimated. Plots of the q-energy, q-Gamow peak and half q-width for some reactions with stellar physics interest have been produced. (author)

  13. Astrophysical reaction rate for α(αn,γ)9Be by photodisintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiyoshi, K.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goko, S.; Kajino, T.

    2002-01-01

    We study the astrophysical reaction rate for the formation of 9 Be through the three body reaction α(αn,γ). This reaction is one of the key reactions which could bridge the mass gap at A=8 nuclear systems to produce intermediate-to-heavy mass elements in alpha- and neutron-rich environments such as r-process nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions, s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and primordial nucleosynthesis in baryon inhomogeneous cosmological models. To calculate the thermonuclear reaction rate in a wide range of temperatures, we numerically integrate the thermal average of cross sections assuming a two-steps formation through a metastable 8 Be, α+α[rlhar2] 8 Be(n,γ) 9 Be. Off-resonant and on-resonant contributions from the ground state in 8 Be are taken into account. As input cross section, we adopt the latest experimental data by photodisintegration of 9 Be with laser-electron photon beams, which covers all relevant resonances in 9 Be. Experimental data near the neutron threshold are added with γ-ray flux corrections and a new least-squares analysis is made to deduce resonance parameters in the Breit-Wigner formulation. Based on the photodisintegration cross section, we provide the reaction rate for α(αn,γ) 9 Be in the temperature range from T 9 =10 -3 to T 9 =10 1 (T 9 is the temperature in units of 10 9 K) both in the tabular form and in the analytical form for potential usage in nuclear reaction network calculations. The calculated reaction rate is compared with the reaction rates of the CF88 and the NACRE compilations. The CF88 rate, which is based on the photoneutron cross section for the 1/2 + state in 9 Be by Berman et al., is valid at T 9 >0.028 due to lack of the off-resonant contribution. The CF88 rate differs from the present rate by a factor of two in a temperature range T 9 ≥0.1. The NACRE rate, which adopted different sources of experimental information on resonance states in 9 Be, is 4-12 times

  14. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  15. Corrosion potential detection method, potential characteristic simulation method for reaction rate and plant monitoring system using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Onaka, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    In a calculation controlling device for a plant monitoring system, concentrations of materials concerning reaction materials in a certain state of a reaction process, and an actually measured value for the potential of a material in this state are substituted into a reaction rate equation obtained in accordance with a reaction process model. With such procedures, a relation between the reaction rate (current value) and the potential of the material can be obtained. A potential at which the reaction rates of an anode reaction and a cathode reaction contained in a corrosion reaction are made equal is determined by a numerical value calculation, based on an electrochemical hybrid potential logic by using the reaction rate equation, the reaction rate information relative to the corrosion reaction of the material and the concentration of the material concerning the corrosion reaction is obtained by a numerical value calculation. Then, simulation for the corrosion potential is enabled based on the handling corresponding to the actual reaction. Further, even for a portion which can not be measured actually, the corrosion potential can be recognized by simulation. (N.H.)

  16. Measuring the degree of integration for an integrated service network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration involves the coordination of services provided by autonomous agencies and improves the organization and delivery of multiple services for target patients. Current measures generally do not distinguish between agencies' perception and expectation. We propose a method for quantifying the agencies' service integration. Using the data from the Children's Treatment Network (CTN, we aimed to measure the degree of integration for the CTN agencies in York and Simcoe.  Theory and Methods: We quantified the integration by the agreement between perceived and expected levels of involvement and calculated four scores from different perspectives for each agency. We used the average score to measure the global network integration and examined the sensitivity of the global score.  Results: Most agencies' integration scores were less than 65%. As measured by the agreement between every other agency's perception and expectation, the overall integration of CTN in Simcoe and York was 44% (95% CI: 39% - 49% and 52% (95% CI: 48% - 56%, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the global scores were robust.  Conclusion: Our method extends existing measures of integration and possesses a good extent of validity. We can also apply the method in monitoring improvement and linking integration with other outcomes.

  17. Measuring the degree of integration for an integrated service network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration involves the coordination of services provided by autonomous agencies and improves the organization and delivery of multiple services for target patients. Current measures generally do not distinguish between agencies' perception and expectation. We propose a method for quantifying the agencies' service integration. Using the data from the Children's Treatment Network (CTN, we aimed to measure the degree of integration for the CTN agencies in York and Simcoe. Theory and Methods: We quantified the integration by the agreement between perceived and expected levels of involvement and calculated four scores from different perspectives for each agency. We used the average score to measure the global network integration and examined the sensitivity of the global score. Results: Most agencies' integration scores were less than 65%. As measured by the agreement between every other agency's perception and expectation, the overall integration of CTN in Simcoe and York was 44% (95% CI: 39% - 49% and 52% (95% CI: 48% - 56%, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the global scores were robust. Conclusion: Our method extends existing measures of integration and possesses a good extent of validity. We can also apply the method in monitoring improvement and linking integration with other outcomes. 

  18. Measuring resilience in integrated planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apneseth, K.; Wahl, A. M.; Hollnagel, E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how a Resilience Analysis Grid (RAG) can be used to profile the performance of a company in terms of the four abilities that characterize a resilient organization. It describes the development of a new, RAG-based tool founded on Resilience Engineering principles that can...... be used to assess an organization's resilience. The tool was tested in a case study involving a company in the offshore oil and gas industry. The company had decided to adopt an Integrated Operations (IO) approach to operations and maintenance planning and the tool was used to evaluate the impact...... of the Integrated Planning (IPL) process on its resilience....

  19. MURLI, 1-D Flux, Reaction Rate in Cylindrical Geometry Thermal Reactor Lattice by Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huria, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: MURLI is an integral transport theory code to calculate fluxes and reaction rates in one- dimensional cylindrical geometry lattice cells of a thermal reactor. For a specified buckling, it computes k-effective using few-group diffusion theory and a few-group collapsed set of Cross sections. The code can optionally be used to solve a first order differential equation for the number density of fissile, fertile and fission product nuclei as a function of time, and to recalculate fluxes, reaction rates and k-effective at different stages of burnup. A 27-group cross section data library is included. There are four pseudo-fission products each associated with the decay chains of plutonium and uranium isotopes in addition to Rh-105, Xe-135, Np-239, U-236, Am-241, Am-242 and Am-243. There is also data for one lumped pseudo-fission product. 2 - Method of solution: Multiple collision probabilities and escape probabilities are calculated for each cylindrical shell region assuming protons are born uniformly and isotropically over the entire region volume. The equations of integral transport theory can then be solved for neutron flux. The first order differential burnup equation is solved by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: There are maxima of 8 fissionable elements, 8 resonant elements, and 20 spatial regions

  20. STEEP4 code for computation of specific thermonuclear reaction rates from pointwise cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Dei, D.E.; Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Hale, G.M.

    1976-05-01

    A code module, STEEP4, is developed to calculate the fusion reaction rates in terms of the specific reactivity [sigma v] which is the product of cross section and relative velocity averaged over the actual ion distributions of the interacting particles in the plasma. The module is structured in a way suitable for incorporation in thermonuclear burn codes to provide rapid and yet relatively accurate on-line computation of [sigma v] as a function of plasma parameters. Ion distributions are modified to include slowing-down contributions which are characterized in terms of plasma parameters. Rapid and accurate algorithms are used for integrating [sigma v] from cross sections and spectra. The main program solves for [sigma v] by the method of steepest descent. However, options are provided to use Gauss-Hermite and dense trapezoidal quadrature integration techniques. Options are also provided for rapid calculation of screening effects on specific reaction rates. Although such effects are not significant in cases of plasmas of laboratory interest, the options are included to increase the range of applicability of the code. Gamow penetration form, log-log interpolation, and cubic interpolation routines are included to provide the interpolated values of cross sections

  1. Generalized measures and the Feynman path integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.P.; Chebotarev, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Generalizations are obtained for the earlier results by the authors concerning the inclusion of the Feynmann path integral in the momentum representation into the general integration theory. Feynmann path integrals are considered which do not represent T-products. Generalized Feynmann measure in the configuration representation is introduced

  2. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  3. Possibility and necessity measures and integral equivalence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, T.; Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Stupňanová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-72 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Integral equivalence * Necessity measure * Possibility measure * Survival function * Universal integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477092.pdf

  4. The 12C+α reaction rate from the elastic 16O breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiener, J.; Kraus, L.; Lefebvre, A.; Mittig, W.; Motobayashi, T.; De Oliveira-Santos, F.; Stephan, C.; Thibaud, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Evidence for direct elastic breakup of 16 O into the α- 12 C continuum with relative energies ranging from 900 to 1800 keV has been obtained in the scattering of 1527 MeV 16 O projectiles off 208 Pb. An interpretation of E2 breakup including nuclear and Coulomb contributions leads to reduced electromagnetic transition probabilities and astrophysical S E2 factors in reasonable agreement with direct measurements, showing that the method can be applied to extract the E2 part of the 12 C(α,γ) reaction rate. (orig.)

  5. APPLE, Plot of 1-D Multigroup Neutron Flux and Gamma Flux and Reaction Rates from ANISN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Seki, Yasushi

    1983-01-01

    A - Description of problem or function: The APPLE-2 code has the following functions: (1) It plots multi-group energy spectra of neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes calculated by ANISN, DOT-3.5, and MORSE. (2) It gives an overview plot of multi-group neutron fluxes calculated by ANISN and DOT-3.5. The scalar neutron flux phi(r,E) is plotted with the spatial parameter r linear along the Y-axis, logE along the X-axis and log phi(r,E) in the Z direction. (3) It calculates the spatial distribution and region volume integrated values of reaction rates using the scalar flux calculated with ANISN and DOT-3.5. (4) Reaction rate distribution along the R or Z direction may be plotted. (5) An overview plot of reaction rates or scalar fluxes summed over specified groups may be plotted. R(ri,zi) or phi(ri,zi) is plotted with spatial parameters r and z along the X- and Y-axes in an orthogonal coordinate system. (6) Angular flux calculated by ANISN is rearranged and a shell source at any specified spatial mesh point may be punched out in FIDO format. The shell source obtained may be employed in solving deep penetration problems with ANISN, when the entire reactor system is divided into two or more parts and the neutron fluxes in two adjoining parts are connected by using the shell source. B - Method of solution: (a) The input data specification is made as simple as possible by making use of the input data required in the radiation transport code. For example, geometry related data in ANISN and DOT are transmitted to APPLE-2 along with scalar flux data so as to reduce duplicity and errors in reproducing these data. (b) Most the input data follow the free form FIDO format developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and used in the ANISN code. Furthermore, the mixture specifying method used in ANISN is also employed by APPLE-2. (c) Libraries for some standard response functions required in fusion reactor design have been prepared and are made available to users of the 42-group neutron

  6. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: IV. Comparison to previous work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.; Champagne, A.E.; Coc, A.

    2010-01-01

    We compare our Monte Carlo reaction rates (see Paper II of this issue) to previous results that were obtained by using the classical method of computing thermonuclear reaction rates. For each reaction, the comparison is presented using two types of graphs: the first shows the change in reaction rate uncertainties, while the second displays our new results normalized to the previously recommended reaction rate. We find that the rates have changed significantly for almost all reactions considered here. The changes are caused by (i) our new Monte Carlo method of computing reaction rates (see Paper I of this issue), and (ii) newly available nuclear physics information (see Paper III of this issue).

  7. On the existence of and mechanism for microwave-specific reaction rate enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Gregory B; Richert, Ranko; Stiegman, A E

    2015-04-01

    The use of microwave radiation to drive chemical reactions has become ubiquitous in almost all fields of chemistry. In all of these areas it is principally due to rapid and convenient heating resulting in significantly higher rates of reaction, with other advantages including enhanced product selectivity and control of materials properties. Although microwave heating continues to grow as an enabling technology, fundamental research into the nature of microwave heating has not grown at the same rate. In the case of chemical reactions run in homogeneous solution, particularly synthetic organic reactions, there is considerable controversy over the origins of rate enhancement, with a fundamental question being whether there exist microwave-specific effects, distinct from what can be attained under conventional convective heating, that can accelerate a reaction rate. In this Perspective, we discuss unique aspects of microwave heating of molecules in solution and discuss the origin and nature of microwave-specific effects arising from the process of "selective heating" of reactants in solution. Integral to this discussion is work from the field of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which provides a model for selective heating by Debye relaxation processes. The Perspective also includes a critical discussion of hypotheses of non-thermal effects (alternatively classified here as resonant processes) and an outline of specific reaction parameters for chemical systems in which microwave-specific Debye relaxation processes can result in observable reaction rate enhancement.

  8. Ozonation of norfloxacin and levofloxacin in water: Specific reaction rate constants and defluorination reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wencui; Ben, Weiwei; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Qiang, Zhimin

    2018-03-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of two typical fluoroquinolones (FQs), norfloxacin (NF) and levofloxacin (LOF), by ozone in water were investigated. Semi-continuous mode and competition kinetics mode experiments were conducted to determine the reaction rate constants of target FQs with ozone and OH, separately. Results indicate that both NF and LOF were highly reactive toward ozone, and the reactivity was strongly impacted by the solution pH. The specific reaction rate constants of the diprotonated, monoprotonated and deprotonated species were determined to be 7.20 × 10 2 , 8.59 × 10 3 , 4.54 × 10 5  M -1  s -1 respectively for NF and 1.30 × 10 3 , 1.40 × 10 4 , 1.33 × 10 6  M -1  s -1 respectively for LOF. The reaction rate constants of target FQs toward OH were measured to be (4.81-7.41) × 10 9  M -1  s -1 in the pH range of 6.3-8.3. Furthermore, NF was selected as a model compound to clarify the degradation pathways, with a particular focus on the defluorination reaction. The significant release of F - ions and the formation of three F-free organic byproducts indicated that defluorination was a prevalent pathway in ozonation of FQs, while six F-containing organic byproducts indicated that ozone also attacked the piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. Escherichia coli growth inhibition tests revealed that ozonation could effectively eliminate the antibacterial activity of target FQ solutions, and the residual antibacterial activity had a negative linear correlation with the released F - concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-additive measure and integral

    CERN Document Server

    Denneberg, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Non-Additive Measure and Integral is the first systematic approach to the subject. Much of the additive theory (convergence theorems, Lebesgue spaces, representation theorems) is generalized, at least for submodular measures which are characterized by having a subadditive integral. The theory is of interest for applications to economic decision theory (decisions under risk and uncertainty), to statistics (including belief functions, fuzzy measures) to cooperative game theory, artificial intelligence, insurance, etc. Non-Additive Measure and Integral collects the results of scattered and often isolated approaches to non-additive measures and their integrals which originate in pure mathematics, potential theory, statistics, game theory, economic decision theory and other fields of application. It unifies, simplifies and generalizes known results and supplements the theory with new results, thus providing a sound basis for applications and further research in this growing field of increasing interest. It also co...

  10. Integral measurements on Caliban and Prospero assemblies for nuclear data validation; Mesures integrales sur les assemblages Caliban et Prospero pour la validation des donnees nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Richard, B. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Ducauze-Philippe, M.; Cartier, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-07-15

    How can the quality of nuclear data libraries be checked? Performing reference experiments also called benchmarks allows the testing of evaluated data. During these experiments, integral values such as reaction rates or neutron effective multiplication coefficients are measured. In this paper, the principles of benchmark construction are explained and illustrated with several works performed on the CALIBAN et PROSPERO critical assemblies operated by the Valduc center: benchmarks for dosimetry, activation reactions studies, neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  11. Structural Integrity in Measures of Self Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, A. Jackson; Katzenmeyer, W.G.

    Structural integrity of a measure is defined in terms of its replicability, constancy, invariance, and stability. Work completed in the development and validation of the Self Observation Scales (SOS) Primary Level (Stenner and Katzenmeyer, 1973) serves to illustrate one method of establishing structural integrity. The name of each scale of the SOS…

  12. Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Mary Ann C; Nurjono, Milawaty; Lim, Yee Wei; Dessers, Ezra; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Jm

    2016-12-01

    Policy Points: Investigations on systematic methodologies for measuring integrated care should coincide with the growing interest in this field of research. A systematic review of instruments provides insights into integrated care measurement, including setting the research agenda for validating available instruments and informing the decision to develop new ones. This study is the first systematic review of instruments measuring integrated care with an evidence synthesis of the measurement properties. We found 209 index instruments measuring different constructs related to integrated care; the strength of evidence on the adequacy of the majority of their measurement properties remained largely unassessed. Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite its growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. Our systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. Our comprehensive systematic review framework builds on the Rainbow Model for Integrated Care (RMIC). We searched MEDLINE/PubMed for published articles on the measurement properties of instruments measuring integrated care and identified eligible articles using a standard set of selection criteria. We assessed the methodological quality of every validation study reported using the COSMIN checklist and extracted data on study and instrument characteristics. We also evaluated the measurement properties of each examined instrument per validation study and provided a best evidence synthesis on the adequacy of measurement properties of the index instruments. From the 300 eligible articles, we assessed the methodological quality of 379 validation studies from which we identified 209 index instruments measuring integrated care constructs. The majority of studies reported on instruments measuring constructs related to care integration (33%) and patient

  13. Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAUTISTA, MARY ANN C.; NURJONO, MILAWATY; DESSERS, EZRA; VRIJHOEF, HUBERTUS JM

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points: Investigations on systematic methodologies for measuring integrated care should coincide with the growing interest in this field of research.A systematic review of instruments provides insights into integrated care measurement, including setting the research agenda for validating available instruments and informing the decision to develop new ones.This study is the first systematic review of instruments measuring integrated care with an evidence synthesis of the measurement properties.We found 209 index instruments measuring different constructs related to integrated care; the strength of evidence on the adequacy of the majority of their measurement properties remained largely unassessed. Context Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite its growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. Our systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. Methods Our comprehensive systematic review framework builds on the Rainbow Model for Integrated Care (RMIC). We searched MEDLINE/PubMed for published articles on the measurement properties of instruments measuring integrated care and identified eligible articles using a standard set of selection criteria. We assessed the methodological quality of every validation study reported using the COSMIN checklist and extracted data on study and instrument characteristics. We also evaluated the measurement properties of each examined instrument per validation study and provided a best evidence synthesis on the adequacy of measurement properties of the index instruments. Findings From the 300 eligible articles, we assessed the methodological quality of 379 validation studies from which we identified 209 index instruments measuring integrated care constructs. The majority of studies reported on instruments measuring constructs related to care

  14. Measuring cross-border regional STI integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, T

    2016-07-01

    Earlier quantitative studies on cross-border regional integration processes have commonly neglected science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators: even the most notable example of a composite indicator approach to measuring cross-border regional integration, i.e. the Oresund index, lacks a sub-category for STI. Consequently, by ignoring cross-border innovation and knowledge flows, the Oresund integration index fails to take into account one of the most important drivers of economic growth in cross-border regions. Therefore, a new composite STI indicator (sub-category) was introduced to strengthen the Oresund integration index. This was compiled from patent, publication and collaborative R&D project data. The findings show that this index performs reasonably well in depicting STI integration, while at the same time remaining simple and straightforward enough to be adopted in other crossborder regions. (Author)

  15. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  16. Introduction to Measure Theory and Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, Luigi; Mennucci, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This textbook collects the notes for an introductory course in measure theory and integration. The course was taught by the authors to undergraduate students of the Scuola Normale Superiore, in the years 2000-2011. The goal of the course was to present, in a quick but rigorous way, the modern point of view on measure theory and integration, putting Lebesgue's Euclidean space theory into a more general context and presenting the basic applications to Fourier series, calculus and real analysis. The text can also pave the way to more advanced courses in probability, stochastic processes or geomet

  17. Experimental determination of reaction rates of water. Hydrogen exchange of tritium with hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Hartzell, B.W.; Park, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain data needed for further development of a process for the enrichment and removal of tritium from the water associated with light-water reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, and tritium-handling laboratories. The approach is based on the use of antiwetting, hydrophobic catalysts which permit the chemical exchange reactions between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen in direct contact, thus eliminating problems of catalyst deactivation and the complexity of reactor design normally associated with current catalytic-detritiation techniques involving gas-phase catalysis. An apparatus and procedure were developed for measuring reaction rates of water-hydrogen chemical exchange with hydrophobic catalysts. Preliminary economic evaluations of the process were made as it might apply to the AGNS fuel reprocessing plant

  18. Reaction Rate Distributions and Ratios in FR0 Assemblies 1, 2 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, T L

    1966-06-15

    The spatial distribution of different reaction rates and reaction ratios in Assemblies 1, 2 and 3 of the fast reactor FR0 was measured by fission chamber scans and foil activation technique. Assemblies 1 and 2 had cores of undiluted fuel (uranium metal enriched to 20 % U{sup 235}) while the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with about 30 vol. % graphite. All the systems had a thick copper reflector, The experimental results were compared with calculated values obtained from DSN and TDC multigroup spectra and group cross-section sets for the reactions. Good agreement between experiment and calculations is generally obtained in the core region but in the reflector the neutron spectrum is calculated too hard.

  19. Pop-It Beads to Introduce Catalysis of Reaction Rate and Substrate Depletion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehret, Austin U.

    2017-01-01

    A kinesthetic classroom activity was designed to help students understand enzyme activity and catalysis of reaction rate. Students served the role of enzymes by manipulating Pop-It Beads as the catalytic event. This activity illuminates the relationship between reaction rate and reaction progress by allowing students to experience first-hand the…

  20. Constrained least squares methods for estimating reaction rate constants from spectroscopic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Model errors, experimental errors and instrumental noise influence the accuracy of reaction rate constant estimates obtained from spectral data recorded in time during a chemical reaction. In order to improve the accuracy, which can be divided into the precision and bias of reaction rate constant

  1. Estimating reaction rate constants: comparison between traditional curve fitting and curve resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Boelens, H. F. M.; Hoefsloot, H. C. J.; Smilde, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    A traditional curve fitting (TCF) algorithm is compared with a classical curve resolution (CCR) approach for estimating reaction rate constants from spectral data obtained in time of a chemical reaction. In the TCF algorithm, reaction rate constants an estimated from the absorbance versus time data

  2. Reaction-rate formula in out of equilibrium quantum field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Niegawa, A.; Okano, K.; Ozaki, H.

    1999-01-01

    A complete derivation, from first principles, of the reaction-rate formula for a generic reaction taking place in an out of equilibrium quantum-field system is given. It is shown that the formula involves no finite-volume correction. Each term of the reaction-rate formula represents a set of physical processes that contribute to the reaction under consideration.

  3. Students' Ideas about Reaction Rate and Its Relationship with Concentration or Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Gultekin; Leach, John; Donnelly, James

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identifies key conceptual difficulties experienced by upper secondary school and pre-service chemistry teachers (N = 191) in the area of reaction rates. Students' ideas about reaction rates were elicited through a series of written tasks and individual interviews. In this paper, students' ideas related to reaction rate…

  4. Putting Reaction Rates and Collision Theory in the Hands of Your Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Andy

    2002-01-01

    Describes a simulation that can be used to give concrete analogies of collision theory and the factors that affect reaction rates including temperature, concentration, catalyst, and molecular orientation. The simulation works best if done as an introduction to the concepts to help prevent misconceptions about reaction rates and collision theory.…

  5. Applications of the absolute reaction rate theory to biological responses in electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannen, J.P.; Wayland, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper develops a theoretical foundation for the study of biological responses of electric and magnetic fields. The basis of the development is the absolute reaction rate theory and the effects of fields on reaction rates. A simple application to the response of Bacillus subtilis var niger in a microwave field is made. Potential areas of application are discussed

  6. Enhancement of D-T reaction rate due to D-T contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitoki, Shigehisa; Ogasawara, Masatada; Aono, Osamu.

    1979-09-01

    The reaction rate that is appropriate for magnetized nonuniform plasma is numerically calculated to investigate the enhancement of the D-T reaction rate. Spatial separation of the guiding center distributions of D and T enhances the reaction rate. Cases of several guiding center configurations are investigated. The largest enhancement is obtained, when both guiding center distributions are delta-functions which are separated by a length that corresponds to the Gamow peak energy. As compared with the case of no separation of D and T, the maximum enhancing factors obtained are 2.3 for total reaction rate and 1.6 for local reaction rate. Cases of the guiding center distributions with finite widths are also investigated. (author)

  7. Influence of refreshment/activation cycles and temperature rise on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, R G; Verhaagen, B; Wesselink, P R; Versluis, M; van der Sluis, L W M

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of multiple refreshment/activation cycles and temperature on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation (UAI) under laboratory conditions. The root canal walls of 24 standardized root canals in bovine incisors were exposed to a standardized volume of NaOCl at different temperatures (24 °C and 38 °C) and exposure times (20, 60 and 180 s). The irrigant was refreshed and ultrasonically activated four times for 20 s followed by a 40 s rest interval, with no refreshment and no activation as the controls. The reaction rate was determined by measuring the amount of active chlorine in the NaOCl solution before and after being exposed to dentine during the specific experimental conditions. Calorimetry was used to measure the electrical-to-sonochemical conversion efficiency during ultrasonic activation. Refreshment, activation and exposure time all increased the reaction rate of NaOCl (P reaction rate of NaOCl (P > 0.125). The reaction rate of NaOCl with dentine is enhanced by refreshment, ultrasonic activation and exposure time. Temperature rise of irrigant during ultrasonic activation was not sufficient to alter the reaction rate. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Actinides integral measurements on FCA assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Okajima, Shigeaki

    1984-01-01

    Actinide integral measurements were performed on eight assemblies of FCA where neutron energy spectra were shifted systematically from soft to hard in order to evaluate and modify the nuclear cross section data of major actinides. Experimental values on actinide fission rates and sample reactivity worths are compared with the calculated values using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (or IV) data sets. (author)

  9. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: I. Monte Carlo method and statistical distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A.E.; Newton, J.R.; Ugalde, C.; Coc, A.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on Monte Carlo techniques is presented for evaluating thermonuclear reaction rates. We begin by reviewing commonly applied procedures and point out that reaction rates that have been reported up to now in the literature have no rigorous statistical meaning. Subsequently, we associate each nuclear physics quantity entering in the calculation of reaction rates with a specific probability density function, including Gaussian, lognormal and chi-squared distributions. Based on these probability density functions the total reaction rate is randomly sampled many times until the required statistical precision is achieved. This procedure results in a median (Monte Carlo) rate which agrees under certain conditions with the commonly reported recommended 'classical' rate. In addition, we present at each temperature a low rate and a high rate, corresponding to the 0.16 and 0.84 quantiles of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. These quantities are in general different from the statistically meaningless 'minimum' (or 'lower limit') and 'maximum' (or 'upper limit') reaction rates which are commonly reported. Furthermore, we approximate the output reaction rate probability density function by a lognormal distribution and present, at each temperature, the lognormal parameters μ and σ. The values of these quantities will be crucial for future Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. Our new reaction rates, appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory, are tabulated in the second paper of this issue (Paper II). The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the third paper of this issue (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this issue (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  10. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Böhlke, John Karl; Bekins, Barbara A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field‐scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local‐scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample‐based estimates of “apparent” parameters with “true“ (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non‐Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport.

  11. Thermonuclear reaction rates in a deuterium-tritium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, L.

    1978-12-01

    In a deuterium-tritium plasma six thermonuclear reactions take place between the deuterons, tritons and the 3 He-particles formed in about half of the d-d-reactions. The rate constants for these six reactions have been calculated from the latest evaluations of the reaction cross sections which were available. In some cases, notably the reactions t+t, t+ 3 He and 3 He+ 3 He, the number of published cross section measurements is small, and the uncertainty in the calculated rate constants consequently large. Analytical expressions for the rate constants as functions of the plasma temperature have been set up. (author)

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF UNCERTAINTIES IN THE 15O(α, γ)19Ne REACTION RATE ON MODELS OF TYPE I X-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davids, Barry; Cyburt, Richard H.; Jose, Jordi; Mythili, Subramanian

    2011-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo calculation of the astrophysical rate of the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction based on an evaluation of published experimental data. By considering the likelihood distributions of individual resonance parameters derived from measurements, estimates of upper and lower limits on the reaction rate at the 99.73% confidence level are derived in addition to the recommended, median value. These three reaction rates are used as input for three separate calculations of Type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) using spherically symmetric, hydrodynamic simulations of an accreting neutron star. In this way the influence of the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate on the peak luminosity, recurrence time, and associated nucleosynthesis in models of Type I XRBs is studied. Contrary to previous findings, no substantial effect on any of these quantities is observed in a sequence of four bursts when varying the reaction rate between its lower and upper limits. Rather, the differences in these quantities are comparable to the burst-to-burst variations with a fixed reaction rate, indicating that uncertainties in the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate do not strongly affect the predictions of this Type I XRB model.

  13. Determination of constant of chemical reaction rate in the process of steel treatment in the endothermal atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulikhandanov, E.L.; Kislenkov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The high-temperature method was applied to measuring a relative variation in the electrical resistance of a thin steel foil prepared from the 12KhN3A, 18Kh2N4VA, 20KhGNR, and 20Kh3MVF steels during its carburization and decarburization, and determined was the temperature dependence of the reaction rate of the interaction of the endothermal atmosphere of different compositions with the analloyed γ-Fe. A connection has been established between the reaction rate constant and the thermodynamic activity of carbon in the alloyed austenite at the temperature of about 925 deg C, corresponding to the cementation temperature. This provides the quantitative estimation of the above value for any alloyed steels and with the presence of numerical values of diffusion coefficients; this also enables one to carry out an accurate calculation of the distribution of carbon throughout the depth of a layer when effecting the cementation in the endothermal atmosphere

  14. Integrated water resources management using engineering measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The management process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) consists of aspects of policies/strategies, measures (engineering measures and non-engineering measures) and organizational management structures, etc., among which engineering measures such as reservoirs, dikes, canals, etc., play the backbone that enables IWRM through redistribution and reallocation of water in time and space. Engineering measures are usually adopted for different objectives of water utilization and water disaster prevention, such as flood control and drought relief. The paper discusses the planning and implementation of engineering measures in IWRM of the Changjiang River, China. Planning and implementation practices of engineering measures for flood control and water utilization, etc., are presented. Operation practices of the Three Gorges Reservoir, particularly the development and application of regulation rules for flood management, power generation, water supply, ecosystem needs and sediment issues (e.g. erosion and siltation), are also presented. The experience obtained in the implementation of engineering measures in Changjiang River show that engineering measures are vital for IWRM. However, efforts should be made to deal with changes of the river system affected by the operation of engineering measures, in addition to escalatory development of new demands associated with socio-economic development.

  15. Integrated water resources management using engineering measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The management process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM consists of aspects of policies/strategies, measures (engineering measures and non-engineering measures and organizational management structures, etc., among which engineering measures such as reservoirs, dikes, canals, etc., play the backbone that enables IWRM through redistribution and reallocation of water in time and space. Engineering measures are usually adopted for different objectives of water utilization and water disaster prevention, such as flood control and drought relief. The paper discusses the planning and implementation of engineering measures in IWRM of the Changjiang River, China. Planning and implementation practices of engineering measures for flood control and water utilization, etc., are presented. Operation practices of the Three Gorges Reservoir, particularly the development and application of regulation rules for flood management, power generation, water supply, ecosystem needs and sediment issues (e.g. erosion and siltation, are also presented. The experience obtained in the implementation of engineering measures in Changjiang River show that engineering measures are vital for IWRM. However, efforts should be made to deal with changes of the river system affected by the operation of engineering measures, in addition to escalatory development of new demands associated with socio-economic development.

  16. Path integral measure for gravitational interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Fujikawa

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that the path-integral variables as well as the local measure for gravitational interactions are uniquely specified if one imposes the anomaly-free condition on the Becchi-Rouet-Stora supersymmetry associated with general coordinate transformations. This prescription is briefly illustrated for the Einstein gravity and supergravity in four space-time dimensions and the relativistic string theory in two dimensions.

  17. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  18. "Depletion": A Game with Natural Rules for Teaching Reaction Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbris, Donald J.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2002-01-01

    Depletion is a game that reinforces central concepts of reaction rate theory through simulation. Presents the game with a set of follow-up questions suitable for either a quiz or discussion. Also describes student reaction to the game. (MM)

  19. Experiences in integrated leak rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirk, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During a hypothetical design basis accident for nuclear power plants, the reactor containment system is relied upon to maintain radioactive exposure limits below acceptable limits. Integrated leak rate testing is a means of verifying that the leakage of radioactivity material from the reactor containment will be below allowable limits. Leakage rate computations are based on the ideal gas law. The absolute method of leakage rate testing utilizing mass point method of data analysis is recommended. Integrated leak rate testing data is obtained from pressure, drybulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, and flow measuring systems. Test data does not support the usual leakage (flow) - pressure square root relationship. The major source of potential leakage from the reactor containment is reactor containment isolation valves

  20. Video integrated measurement system. [Diagnostic display devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, B.; Eilbert, L.; Finando, S.; Fukuda, F.

    1982-06-01

    A Video Integrated Measurement (VIM) System is described which incorporates the use of various noninvasive diagnostic procedures (moire contourography, electromyography, posturometry, infrared thermography, etc.), used individually or in combination, for the evaluation of neuromusculoskeletal and other disorders and their management with biofeedback and other therapeutic procedures. The system provides for measuring individual diagnostic and therapeutic modes, or multiple modes by split screen superimposition, of real time (actual) images of the patient and idealized (ideal-normal) models on a video monitor, along with analog and digital data, graphics, color, and other transduced symbolic information. It is concluded that this system provides an innovative and efficient method by which the therapist and patient can interact in biofeedback training/learning processes and holds considerable promise for more effective measurement and treatment of a wide variety of physical and behavioral disorders.

  1. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchopár M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  2. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Tichý, P.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Závorka, L.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Bielewicz, M.; Kilim, S.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Szuta, M.

    2017-03-01

    The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW) performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS) setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  3. From cutting-edge pointwise cross-section to groupwise reaction rate: A primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublet, Jean-Christophe; Fleming, Michael; Gilbert, Mark R.

    2017-09-01

    The nuclear research and development community has a history of using both integral and differential experiments to support accurate lattice-reactor, nuclear reactor criticality and shielding simulations, as well as verification and validation efforts of cross sections and emitted particle spectra. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the neutron spectrum in its entirety, with correct propagation of uncertainties and standard deviations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, to the local and total uncertainty in the simulated reactions rates (RRs), which usually only apply to one application at a time. This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment, and discusses correct handling of the RR uncertainty quantification and propagation, including details of the cross section components in the RR uncertainty estimates, which are verified for relevant applications. The methodology that rigorously captures the spectral shift and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR are discussed with quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment of the spectrum profile and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR and subsequent response functions. The recently developed inventory code FISPACT-II, when connected to the processed nuclear data libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u or JEFF-3.2, forms an enhanced multi-physics platform providing a wide variety of advanced simulation methods for modelling activation, transmutation, burnup protocols and simulating radiation damage sources terms. The system has extended cutting-edge nuclear data forms, uncertainty quantification and propagation methods, which have been the subject of recent integral and differential, fission, fusion and accelerators validation efforts. The simulation system is used to accurately and predictively probe, understand and underpin a modern and sustainable understanding

  4. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  5. Reaction Rate Benchmark Experiments with Miniature Fission Chambers at the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štancar, Žiga; Kaiba, Tanja; Snoj, Luka; Barbot, Loïc; Destouches, Christophe; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François AD(; )

    2018-01-01

    A series of fission rate profile measurements with miniature fission chambers, developed by the Commisariat á l'énergie atomique et auxénergies alternatives, were performed at the Jožef Stefan Institute's TRIGA research reactor. Two types of fission chambers with different fissionable coating (235U and 238U) were used to perform axial fission rate profile measurements at various radial positions and several control rod configurations. The experimental campaign was supported by an extensive set of computations, based on a validated Monte Carlo computational model of the TRIGA reactor. The computing effort included neutron transport calculations to support the planning and design of the experiments as well as calculations to aid the evaluation of experimental and computational uncertainties and major biases. The evaluation of uncertainties was performed by employing various types of sensitivity analyses such as experimental parameter perturbation and core reaction rate gradient calculations. It has been found that the experimental uncertainty of the measurements is sufficiently low, i.e. the total relative fission rate uncertainty being approximately 5 %, in order for the experiments to serve as benchmark experiments for validation of fission rate profiles. The effect of the neutron flux redistribution due to the control rod movement was studied by performing measurements and calculations of fission rates and fission chamber responses in different axial and radial positions at different control rod configurations. It was confirmed that the control rod movement affects the position of the maximum in the axial fission rate distribution, as well as the height of the local maxima. The optimal detector position, in which the redistributions would have minimum effect on its signal, was determined.

  6. DEPENDENCE OF X-RAY BURST MODELS ON NUCLEAR REACTION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyburt, R. H.; Keek, L.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Amthor, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Heger, A.; Meisel, Z.; Smith, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Johnson, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars, and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p, γ ), ( α , γ ), and ( α , p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the Kepler stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron-deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 changes in reaction rate with the highest impact were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reaction rates that affect predictions of light curves and burst ashes significantly. The results provide insights into the nuclear processes that shape observables from X-ray bursts, and guidance for future nuclear physics work to reduce nuclear uncertainties in X-ray burst models.

  7. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J. R.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates toward high stellar temperatures (T>1 GK) by using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Reliable reaction rates at such temperatures are required for studies of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae, and x-ray bursts. Generally accepted methods are based on the concept of a Gamow peak. We follow recent ideas that emphasized the fundamental shortcomings of the Gamow peak concept for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures. Our new method defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8th, 50th, and 92nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction rate contributions. This definition is unambiguous and has a straightforward probability interpretation. The ETER is used to define a temperature at which Hauser-Feshbach rates can be matched to experimental rates. This matching temperature is usually much higher compared to previous estimates that employed the Gamow peak concept. We suggest that an increased matching temperature provides more reliable extrapolated reaction rates since Hauser-Feshbach results are more trustwhorthy the higher the temperature. Our ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α), and (α,γ) reactions on A=20-40 target nuclei. For many of the cases studied here, our extrapolated reaction rates at high temperatures differ significantly from those obtained using the Gamow peak concept

  9. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  10. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates with the TALYS reaction code for astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J

    2008-01-01

    Context. Nuclear reaction rates of astrophysical applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes. These codes adopt a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as a simplified width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed or multiple-particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade, or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. Aims. The reaction code TALYS has been recently updated to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates that are of astrophysical relevance. These new developments enable the reaction rates to be calculated with increased accuracy and reliability and the approximations of previous codes to be investigated. Methods. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of relevance to astrophysics are detailed and compared with those derived by widely-used codes for the same nuclear ingredients. Results. It is shown that TALYS predictions may differ significantly from those of previous codes, in particular for nuclei for which no or little nuclear data is available. The pre-equilibrium process is shown to influence the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei significantly. For the first time, the Maxwellian- averaged (n, 2n) reaction rate is calculated for all nuclei and its competition with the radiative capture rate is discussed. Conclusions. The TALYS code provides a new tool to estimate all nuclear reaction rates of relevance to astrophysics with improved accuracy and reliability. (authors)

  11. Benchmark experiments at ASTRA facility on definition of space distribution of 235U fission reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, A. E.; Glushkov, E. S.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Moroz, N. P.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Nosov, V. I.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Zimin, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of critical experiments performed at five ASTRA facility configurations modeling the high-temperature helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors are presented. Results of experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate performed at four from these five configurations are presented more detail. Analysis of available information showed that all experiments on criticality at these five configurations are acceptable for use them as critical benchmark experiments. All experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate are acceptable for use them as physical benchmark experiments. (authors)

  12. Waste assay measurement integration system user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, K.C.; Hempstead, A.R.; Becker, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Assay Measurement Integration System (WAMIS) is being developed to improve confidence in and lower the uncertainty of waste characterization data. There are two major components to the WAMIS: a data access and visualization component and a data interpretation component. The intent of the access and visualization software is to provide simultaneous access to all data sources that describe the contents of any particular container of waste. The visualization software also allows the user to display data at any level from raw to reduced output. Depending on user type, the software displays a menuing hierarchy, related to level of access, that allows the user to observe only those data sources s/he has been authorized to view. Access levels include system administrator, physicist, QA representative, shift operations supervisor, and data entry. Data sources are displayed in separate windows and presently include (1) real-time radiography video, (2) gamma spectra, (3) passive and active neutron, (4) radionuclide mass estimates, (5) total alpha activity (Ci), (6) container attributes, (7) thermal power (w), and (8) mass ratio estimates for americium, plutonium, and uranium isotopes. The data interpretation component is in the early phases of design, but will include artificial intelligence, expert system, and neural network techniques. The system is being developed on a Pentium PC using Microsoft Visual C++. Future generations of WAMIS will be UNIX based and will incorporate more generically radiographic/tomographic, gamma spectroscopic/tomographics, neutron, and prompt gamma measurements

  13. Time-Lapse Measurement of Wellbore Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, A.

    2017-12-01

    Well integrity is becoming more important as wells are used longer or repurposed. For CO2, shale gas, and other projects it has become apparent that wells represent the most likely unintended migration pathway for fluids out of the reservoir. Comprehensive logging programs have been employed to determine the condition of legacy wells in North America. These studies provide examples of assessment technologies. Logging programs have included pulsed neutron logging, ultrasonic well mapping, and cement bond logging. While these studies provide examples of what can be measured, they have only conducted a single round of logging and cannot show if the well has changed over time. Recent experience with time-lapse logging of three monitoring wells at a US Department of Energy sponsored CO2 project has shown the full value of similar tools. Time-lapse logging has shown that well integrity changes over time can be identified. It has also shown that the inclusion of and location of monitoring technologies in the well and the choice of construction materials must be carefully considered. Two of the wells were approximately eight years old at the time of study; they were constructed with steel and fiberglass casing sections and had lines on the outside of the casing running to the surface. The third well was 68 years old when it was studied and was originally constructed as a production well. Repeat logs were collected six or eight years after initial logging. Time-lapse logging showed the evolution of the wells. The results identified locations where cement degraded over time and locations that showed little change. The ultrasonic well maps show clearly that the lines used to connect the monitoring technology to the surface are visible and have a local effect on cement isolation. Testing and sampling was conducted along with logging. It provided insight into changes identified in the time-lapse log results. Point permeability testing was used to provide an in-situ point

  14. From cutting-edge pointwise cross-section to groupwise reaction rate: A primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sublet Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear research and development community has a history of using both integral and differential experiments to support accurate lattice-reactor, nuclear reactor criticality and shielding simulations, as well as verification and validation efforts of cross sections and emitted particle spectra. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the neutron spectrum in its entirety, with correct propagation of uncertainties and standard deviations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, to the local and total uncertainty in the simulated reactions rates (RRs, which usually only apply to one application at a time. This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment, and discusses correct handling of the RR uncertainty quantification and propagation, including details of the cross section components in the RR uncertainty estimates, which are verified for relevant applications. The methodology that rigorously captures the spectral shift and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR are discussed with quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment of the spectrum profile and cross section contributions to the uncertainty in the RR and subsequent response functions. The recently developed inventory code FISPACT-II, when connected to the processed nuclear data libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0u or JEFF-3.2, forms an enhanced multi-physics platform providing a wide variety of advanced simulation methods for modelling activation, transmutation, burnup protocols and simulating radiation damage sources terms. The system has extended cutting-edge nuclear data forms, uncertainty quantification and propagation methods, which have been the subject of recent integral and differential, fission, fusion and accelerators validation efforts. The simulation system is used to accurately and predictively probe, understand and underpin a modern and

  15. SENSMG: First-Order Sensitivities of Neutron Reaction Rates, Reaction-Rate Ratios, Leakage, keff, and α Using PARTISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-21

    SENSMG is a tool for computing first-order sensitivities of neutron reaction rates, reaction-rate ratios, leakage, keff, and α using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. SENSMG computes sensitivities to all of the transport cross sections and data (total, fission, nu, chi, and all scattering moments), two edit cross sections (absorption and capture), and the density for every isotope and energy group. It also computes sensitivities to the mass density for every material and derivatives with respect to all interface locations. The tool can be used for one-dimensional spherical (r) and two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometries. The tool can be used for fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. The tool implements Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) as discussed by Williams and Stacey. Section II of this report describes the theory behind adjoint-based sensitivities, gives the equations that SENSMG solves, and defines the sensitivities that are output. Section III describes the user interface, including the input file and command line options. Section IV describes the output. Section V gives some notes about the coding that may be of interest. Section VI discusses verification, which is ongoing. Section VII lists needs and ideas for future work. Appendix A lists all of the input files whose results are presented in Sec. VI.

  16. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne and 18 Ne(α, p) 21 Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  17. Thermonuclear F-19(p,alpha(0))O-16 reaction rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    He, J. J.; Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Xu, Yi; Zang, L. Y.; Liu, W. P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2018), č. článku 015001. ISSN 1674-1137 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star * nucleosynthesis * astrophysical S factor * cross section * reaction rate Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2016

  18. Efficient Computation of Transition State Resonances and Reaction Rates from a Quantum Normal Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Roman; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent formulation of transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed provides an algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and the associated Gamov-Siegert resonances with very high accuracy. The algorithm is especially efficient for

  19. High-precision (p,t) reactions to determine reaction rates of explosive stellar processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matić, Andrija

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my study was to investigate the nuclear structure of 22Mg and 26Si. These two nuclei play a significant role in stellar reaction processes at high temperatures. On base of the obtained nuclear structure we calculated the stellar reaction rates for the following reactions: 18Ne(α,p)21Na,

  20. Accurate quantum calculations of the reaction rates for H/D+ CH4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrevelt, R. van; Nyman, G.; Manthe, U.

    2007-01-01

    In previous work [T. Wu, H. J. Werner, and U. Manthe, Science 306, 2227 (2004)], accurate quantum reaction rate calculations of the rate constant for the H+CH4 -> CH3+H-2 reaction have been presented. Both the electronic structure calculations and the nuclear dynamics calculations are converged with

  1. REACLIB: A Reaction Rate Library for the Era of Collaborative Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Zachary

    2008-10-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and weak decay rates are of great importance to modern nuclear astrophysics. They are critical in the study of many topics such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, X-ray bursts, Supernovae, and S-process element formation, among others. The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) has been created to increase connectivity amongst nuclear astrophysicists in our modern age of highly collaborative science. Within JINA there has been an effort to create a frequently updated and readily accessible database of thermonuclear reactions and weak decay rates. This database is the REACLIB library, which can be accessed at the web address: http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜nero/db/. Here I will discuss the JINA REACLIB Project, including a new procedure to fit reaction rates as a function of temperature that takes full advantage of physicality. With these updated reaction rates, astrophysical modelers will no longer have to worry about the adverse effects of using obsolete reaction rate libraries lacking physical behavior.

  2. Effect of Conceptual Change Approach on Students' Understanding of Reaction Rate Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of conceptual change text oriented instruction compared to traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of reaction rate concepts. 45 students from two classes of the same teacher in a public high school participated in this study. Students in the experimental group…

  3. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction-Activation Strain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Houk, Kendall N.

    2017-01-01

    The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction

  4. Nuclear-reaction rates in the thermonuclear runaway phase of accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiescher, M.; Barnard, V.; Goerres, J.; Fisker, J.L.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Langanke, K.; Rembges, F.; Thielemann, F.K.; Schatz, H.

    2002-01-01

    The rp-process has been suggested as the dominant nucleosynthesis process in explosive hydrogen burning at high temperature and density conditions. The process is characterized by a sequence of fast proton capture reactions and subsequent β-decays. The reaction path of the rp-process runs along the drip line up to Z∼50. Most of the charged-particle reaction rates for the reaction path are presently based on statistical Hauser-Feshbach calculations. While these rates are supposed to be reliable within a factor of two for conditions of high density in the compound nuclei, discrepancies may occur for nuclei near closed shells or near the proton drip line where the Q-values of proton capture processes are typically very small. It has been argued that the thermonuclear runaway is less sensitive to the reaction rates because of the rapid time-scale of the event. However, since these processes may operate at the same time-scale as fast mixing and convection processes, a change in reaction rates indeed may have a significant impact. In this paper we present two examples, the break-out from the hot CNO cycles, and the thermonuclear runaway in X-ray bursts itself, where changes in reaction rates have a direct impact on time-scale, energy generation and nucleosynthesis predictions for the explosive event. (orig.)

  5. Charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, Cornelia; Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidly growing wealth of nuclear data becomes less and less easily accessible to the astrophysics community. Mastering this volume of information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into stellar evolution or nucleosynthesis models become urgent goals of prime necessity. we report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal motivation for the setting-up of the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. When cross section data are not available in the whole needed range of energies, the theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach model is used. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. Reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates are also provided. (authors)

  6. Charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, Cornelia

    1999-01-01

    The rapidly growing wealth of nuclear data becomes less and less easily accessible to the astrophysics community. Mastering this volume of information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into stellar evolution or nucleosynthesis models become urgent goals of prime necessity. We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal motivation for the setting-up of the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged -particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. When cross section data are not available in the whole needed range of energies the theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach model are used. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. Reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates are also provided. (author)

  7. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  8. Compilation and R-matrix analysis of Big Bang nuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre; Adahchour, Abderrahim; Angulo, Carmen; Coc, Alain; Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    We use the R-matrix theory to fit low-energy data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Special attention is paid to the rate uncertainties which are evaluated on statistical grounds. We provide S factors and reaction rates in tabular and graphical formats

  9. Energy dependence of the reaction rate constants of Ar+, Ar++ and N2+ ions with Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, P.; Holubcik, L.; Morva, I.; Lindinger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Dry etching processes using low temperature plasmas in Cl 2 and in Cl 2 -noble gas or nitrogen mixtures are common in the manufacture of semiconductor devices, but their chemical mechanisms are often poorly understood. Results are given for the reaction rate constant measurements of Ar + , Ar ++ , N 2 + ions with chlorine as a function of mean relative kinetic energy. The experiments were performed by using the innsbruck flow drift tube (IFDT) apparatus. Measurements were done at various E/N values, where E is the electric field strength and N the buffer gas density in the drift section. The mean relative kinetic energy KE CM between the ions and the neutral chlorine Cl 2 was calculated using the Wanniers formula. It was found that The N 2 + , Ar + and Ar ++ positive ions react with chlorine Cl 2 very fast and the corresponding reaction rate coefficients depend on the mean relative kinetic energy. For the reaction of Ar - with Cl 2 , its reaction coefficient depends also on the buffer gas. It can imply the enhancement of Cl 2 + ions during etching of Si in the Ar/Cl 2 mixtures. (nevyjel)

  10. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Getting elections right? Measuring electoral integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Holding elections has become a global norm. Unfortunately, the integrity of elections varies strongly, ranging from “free and fair” elections with genuine contestation to “façade” elections marred by manipulation and fraud. Clearly, electoral integrity is a topic of increasing concern. Yet electoral

  12. Decomposition approaches to integration without a measure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greco, S.; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, F.; Sipeky, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 1 (2016), s. 37-47 ISSN 0165-0114 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Choquet integral * Decision making * Decomposition integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/E/mesiar-0457408.pdf

  13. Preliminary study on 2-dimensional distributions of 10B reaction rate in a water phantom with boron-doped CR-39 for 7Li(p, n)7Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tsuruta, T.

    2000-01-01

    In an Accelerator-based neutron irradiation field using 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons, the distributions of 10 B reaction rates and thermal neutron fluence in a water phantom were measured using Boron-doped CR-39 and Au activation analysis, respectively. Comparing the results of the measurements, we discussed the validity of the evaluation method of 10 B reaction rate using thermal neutron fluence. (author)

  14. MEASURING INFORMATION INTEGR-ATION MODEL FOR CAD/CMM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A CAD/CMM workpiece modeling system based on IGES file is proposed. The modeling system is implemented by using a new method for labelling the tolerance items of 3D workpiece. The concept-"feature face" is used in the method. First the CAD data of workpiece are extracted and recognized automatically. Then a workpiece model is generated, which is the integration of pure 3D geometry form with its corresponding inspection items. The principle of workpiece modeling is also presented. At last, the experiment results are shown and correctness of the model is certified.

  15. Numerical Analysis Of Hooke Jeeves-Runge Kutta To Determine Reaction Rate Equation In Pyrrole Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan, Indra; Sulistyo, Harry; Rochmad

    2001-01-01

    The numerical analysis of Hooke Jeeves Methods combined with Runge Kutta Methods is used to determine the exact model of reaction rate equation of pyrrole polymerization. Chemical polymerization of pyrrole was conducted with FeCI 3 / pyrrole solution at concentration ratio of 1.62 mole / mole and 2.18 mole / mole with varrying temperature of 28, 40, 50, and 60 o C. FeCl 3 acts as an oxidation agent to form pyrrole cation that will polymerize. The numerical analysis was done to examine the exact model of reaction rate equation which is derived from reaction equation of initiation, propagation, and termination. From its numerical analysis, it is found that the pyrrole polymerization follows third order of pyrrole cation concentration

  16. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Libraries and Software Tools for Nuclear Astrophysics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Cyburt, Richard; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Karl; Warren, Scott; Ferguson, Ryan; Wiescher, Michael; Lingerfelt, Eric; Buckner, Kim; Nesaraja, Caroline D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates are a crucial input for simulating a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A new collaboration has been formed to ensure that astrophysical modelers have access to reaction rates based on the most recent experimental and theoretical nuclear physics information. To reach this goal, a new version of the REACLIB library has been created by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), now available online at http://www.nscl.msu.edu/~nero/db. A complementary effort is the development of software tools in the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics, online at nucastrodata.org, to streamline, manage, and access the workflow of the reaction evaluations from their initiation to peer review to incorporation into the library. Details of these new projects will be described

  17. Covariances of fission-integral measurements at the NBS 252Cf and ISNF facilities and at the ORNL-PCA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagschal, J.J.; Maerker, R.E.; Gilliam, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    Integral measurements together with accompanying uncertainty estimates have been used for the past fifteen years in cross section adjustments. As the field of cross section adjustment came of age, the crude uncertainty estimates were replaced - only in principle, initially - by a quantitative cross section uncertainty covariance description and by uncertainty correlations of integral experiments. There is current interest in the fission reaction rate ratio measurements in the NBS standard neutron fields by people involved in fast reactor cross sections. Also those in the LWR pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry program are interested in these measurements and in similar measurements performed in the Oak Ridge Pool Critical Assembly (PCA). A careful re-examination of uncertainty analysis is presented

  18. Thermonuclear reaction rate of 17O(p,γ)18F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, C.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A.E.; Fitzgerald, R.P.; Longland, R.; Newton, J.; Pollanen, J.; Runkle, R.

    2005-01-01

    The 17 O(p,γ) 18 F and 17 O(p,α) 14 N reactions have a profound influence on hydrogen-burning nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. Previously evaluated thermonuclear rates for both reactions carry large uncertainties. We investigated the proton-capture reaction on 17 O in the bombarding energy range of E p lab = 180-540 keV. We observed a previously undiscovered resonance at E R lab = 193.2 ± 0.9 keV. The resonance strength amounts to (ωγ) pγ (1.2±0.2)x10 -6 eV. With this value, the uncertainties of the 17 O(p,γ) 18 F reaction rates are reduced by orders of magnitude in the peak temperature range of classical novae (T=0.1-0.4 GK). We also report on a reevaluation of the 17 O(p,γ) 18 F reaction rates at lower temperatures that are pertinent to red giants, AGB stars, or massive stars. The present work establishes the 17 O(p,γ) 18 F reaction rates over a temperature range of T= 0.01-1.5 GK with statistical uncertainties of 10-50%. The new recommended reaction rates deviate from the previously accepted values by an order of magnitude around T≅0.2 GK and by factors of 2-3 at T < 0.1 GK

  19. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, I.R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Reed, D.L.; Wilson, D.J.

    1963-08-01

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  20. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, I R; Freemantle, R G; Reed, D L; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  1. Thermonuclear 19F(p, {{\\boldsymbol{\\alpha }}}_{0})16O reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Jun; Lombardo, Ivano; Dell'Aquila, Daniele; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Li-Yong; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2018-01-01

    The thermonuclear 19F(p, {{{α }}}0)16O reaction rate in the temperature region 0.007-10 GK has been derived by re-evaluating the available experimental data, together with the low-energy theoretical R-matrix extrapolations. Our new rate deviates by up to about 30% compared to the previous results, although all rates are consistent within the uncertainties. At very low temperature (e.g. 0.01 GK) our reaction rate is about 20% lower than the most recently published rate, because of a difference in the low energy extrapolated S-factor and a more accurate estimate of the reduced mass used in the calculation of the reaction rate. At temperatures above ˜1 GK, our rate is lower, for instance, by about 20% around 1.75 GK, because we have re-evaluated the previous data (Isoya et al., Nucl. Phys. 7, 116 (1958)) in a meticulous way. The present interpretation is supported by the direct experimental data. The uncertainties of the present evaluated rate are estimated to be about 20% in the temperature region below 0.2 GK, and are mainly caused by the lack of low-energy experimental data and the large uncertainties in the existing data. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars evolve at temperatures below 0.2 GK, where the 19F(p, {{α }})16O reaction may play a very important role. However, the current accuracy of the reaction rate is insufficient to help to describe, in a careful way, the fluorine over-abundances observed in AGB stars. Precise cross section (or S factor) data in the low energy region are therefore needed for astrophysical nucleosynthesis studies. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11490562, 11490560, 11675229) and National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFA0400503)

  2. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeltzig, A. [Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cavanna, F.; Ferraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); INFN, Genova (Italy); Cristallo, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, Teramo (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Depalo, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); DeBoer, R.J.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, Indiana (United States); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Marigo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Terrasi, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions. (orig.)

  3. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  4. Hybrid integrated sensor for position measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, B.; Schott, H.; Just, H.-J.

    1986-01-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of an integrated two-dimensional position sensitive photodetector are presented. The optoelectronic device used as sensitive element in the circuit is a full area position sensitive photodiode (PPD) with high linearity over the full sensitive area. The PPD is integrated with the analog electronics in a hybrid circuit using thick film technology. The analog electronics includes the signal amplification and the signal conditioning to form the output signals proportional to the light beam center position at the sensor surface and an output signal proportional to the light beam intensity. Using hybrid integration a new position sensitive transducer is developed giving output signals, transmiting in large distances without problems and driving directly actuators in any control system

  5. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  6. Relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency of nanomachine-based targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingying; Li, Min; Luo, Jun

    2017-12-04

    In nanomachine applications towards targeted drug delivery, drug molecules released by nanomachines propagate and chemically react with tumor cells in aqueous environment. If the nanomachines release drug molecules faster than the tumor cells react, it will result in loss and waste of drug molecules. It is a potential issue associated with the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency. This paper aims to investigate the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency based on two drug reception models. We expect to pave a way for designing a control method of drug release. We adopted two analytical methods that one is drug reception process based on collision with tumors and another is based on Michaelis Menten enzymatic kinetics. To evaluate the analytical formulations, we used the well-known simulation framework N3Sim to establish simulations. The analytical results of the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency is obtained, which match well with the numerical simulation results in a 3-D environment. Based upon two drug reception models, the results of this paper would be beneficial for designing a control method of nanomahine-based drug release.

  7. Data and software for calculating neutron spectra from measured reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzonis, M.A.; Bonbars, Kh.Ya.

    1981-01-01

    The information system SAIPS is presented, which allows the automated calculation of neutron spectra and the use of cross section libraries on EC type computers. The following programmes can be applied: SAND II, WINDOWS, CRYSTAL BALL, RFSP JUEL, etc. The system includes both cross section libraries established by means of the code mentioned and libraries recommended by several laboratories. (author)

  8. Path integral measure for first-order and metric gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aros, Rodrigo; Contreras, Mauricio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    The equivalence between the path integrals for first-order gravity and the standard torsion-free, metric gravity in 3 + 1 dimensions is analysed. Starting with the path integral for first-order gravity, the correct measure for the path integral of the metric theory is obtained

  9. Grid Based Integration Technologies of Virtual Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D P; He, L S; Yang, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel integrated architecture of measurement system for the new requirements of measurement collaboration, measurement resource interconnection and transparent access etc in the wide-area and across organization in the context of a grid. The complexity of integration on a grid arises from the scale, dynamism, autonomy, and distribution of the measurement resources. The main argument of this paper is that these complexities should be made transparent to the collaborative measurement, via flexible reconfigurable mechanisms and dynamic virtualization services. The paper is started by discussing the integration-oriented measurement architecture which provides collaborative measurement services to distributed measurement resources and then the measurement mechanisms are discussed which implements the transparent access and collaboration of measurement resources by providing protocols, measurement schedule and global data driven model

  10. Financial integration in the European Union. Measurement and determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, J.J.G.

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this study addresses the measurement of financial integration in the European Union (EU). First, we present empirical evidence on the degree of financial integration as measured with interest parity conditions. Second, the study applies an error-correction model of

  11. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications with the TALYS reaction code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes, like MOST. These codes use simplified schemes to calculate the capture reaction cross section on a given target nucleus, not only in its ground state but also on the different thermally populated states of the stellar plasma at a given temperature. Such schemes include a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as an approximate width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. New developments have been brought to the reaction code TALYS to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates of astrophysics relevance. These new developments give us the possibility to calculate with an improved accuracy the reaction cross sections and the corresponding astrophysics rates. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of astrophysics relevance are presented and compared with those obtained with the MOST code on the basis of the same nuclear ingredients for nuclear structure properties, optical model potential, nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength. It is shown that, in particular, the pre-equilibrium process significantly influences the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reciprocity theorem traditionally used in astrophysics to determine photo-rates is also shown no to be valid for exotic nuclei. The predictions obtained with different nuclear inputs are also analyzed to provide an estimate of the theoretical uncertainties still affecting the reaction rate prediction far away from the experimentally known regions. (authors)

  12. Comparing transfusion reaction rates for various plasma types: a systematic review and meta-analysis/regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Schipperus, Martin R; le Cessie, Saskia; Middelburg, Rutger A; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-09-01

    We estimated rates for common plasma-associated transfusion reactions and compared reported rates for various plasma types. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed articles that reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Random-effects pooled rates were calculated and compared between plasma types. Meta-regression was used to compare various plasma types with regard to their reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Forty-eight studies reported transfusion reaction rates for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; mixed-sex and male-only), amotosalen INTERCEPT FFP, methylene blue-treated FFP, and solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma. Random-effects pooled average rates for FFP were: allergic reactions, 92/10 5 units transfused (95% confidence interval [CI], 46-184/10 5 units transfused); febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), 12/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 7-22/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), 6/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1-30/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), 1.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1.2-2.7/10 5 units transfused); and anaphylactic reactions, 0.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 0-45.7/10 5 units transfused). Risk differences between plasma types were not significant for allergic reactions, TACO, or anaphylactic reactions. Methylene blue-treated FFP led to fewer FNHTRs than FFP (risk difference = -15.3 FNHTRs/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -24.7 to -7.1 reactions/10 5 units transfused); and male-only FFP led to fewer cases of TRALI than mixed-sex FFP (risk difference = -0.74 TRALI/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -2.42 to -0.42 injuries/10 5 units transfused). Meta-regression demonstrates that the rate of FNHTRs is lower for methylene blue-treated compared with FFP, and the rate of TRALI is lower for male-only than for mixed-sex FFP; whereas no significant differences are observed between plasma types for allergic reactions, TACO

  13. Classical Wigner method with an effective quantum force: application to reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage; Li, Huaqing; Nyman, Gunnar

    2009-07-14

    We construct an effective "quantum force" to be used in the classical molecular dynamics part of the classical Wigner method when determining correlation functions. The quantum force is obtained by estimating the most important short time separation of the Feynman paths that enter into the expression for the correlation function. The evaluation of the force is then as easy as classical potential energy evaluations. The ideas are tested on three reaction rate problems. The resulting transmission coefficients are in much better agreement with accurate results than transmission coefficients from the ordinary classical Wigner method.

  14. A simple recipe for modeling reaction-rate in flows with turbulent-combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1991-01-01

    A computationally viable scheme to account for chemical reaction in turbulent flows is presented. The multivariate beta-pdf model for multiple scalar mixing forms the basis of this scheme. Using the model scalar joint pdf and a general form of the instantaneous reaction-rate, the unclosed chemical reaction terms are expressed as simple functions of scalar means and the turbulent scalar energy. The calculation procedure requires that the mean scalar equations and only one other transport equation - for the turbulent scalar energy - be solved.

  15. Survival behavior in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model with a randomly switching reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Mobilia, Mauro; Rucklidge, Alastair M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of a randomly switching reproduction-predation rate on the survival behavior of the nonspatial cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, also known as the zero-sum rock-paper-scissors game, used to metaphorically describe the cyclic competition between three species. In large and finite populations, demographic fluctuations (internal noise) drive two species to extinction in a finite time, while the species with the smallest reproduction-predation rate is the most likely to be the surviving one (law of the weakest). Here we model environmental (external) noise by assuming that the reproduction-predation rate of the strongest species (the fastest to reproduce and predate) in a given static environment randomly switches between two values corresponding to more and less favorable external conditions. We study the joint effect of environmental and demographic noise on the species survival probabilities and on the mean extinction time. In particular, we investigate whether the survival probabilities follow the law of the weakest and analyze their dependence on the external noise intensity and switching rate. Remarkably, when, on average, there is a finite number of switches prior to extinction, the survival probability of the predator of the species whose reaction rate switches typically varies nonmonotonically with the external noise intensity (with optimal survival about a critical noise strength). We also outline the relationship with the case where all reaction rates switch on markedly different time scales.

  16. Reaction rate of a composite core-shell nanoreactor with multiple nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-07-27

    We present a detailed theory for the total reaction rate constant of a composite core-shell nanoreactor, consisting of a central solid core surrounded by a hydrogel layer of variable thickness, where a given number of small catalytic nanoparticles are embedded at prescribed positions and are endowed with a prescribed surface reaction rate constant. Besides the precise geometry of the assembly, our theory accounts explicitly for the diffusion coefficients of the reactants in the hydrogel and in the bulk as well as for their transfer free energy jump upon entering the hydrogel shell. Moreover, we work out an approximate analytical formula for the overall rate constant, which is valid in the physically relevant range of geometrical and chemical parameters. We discuss in depth how the diffusion-controlled part of the rate depends on the essential variables, including the size of the central core. In particular, we derive some simple rules for estimating the number of nanocatalysts per nanoreactor for an efficient catalytic performance in the case of small to intermediate core sizes. Our theoretical treatment promises to provide a very useful and flexible tool for the design of superior performing nanoreactor geometries with optimized nanoparticle load.

  17. Survival behavior in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model with a randomly switching reaction rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Mobilia, Mauro; Rucklidge, Alastair M

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of a randomly switching reproduction-predation rate on the survival behavior of the nonspatial cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, also known as the zero-sum rock-paper-scissors game, used to metaphorically describe the cyclic competition between three species. In large and finite populations, demographic fluctuations (internal noise) drive two species to extinction in a finite time, while the species with the smallest reproduction-predation rate is the most likely to be the surviving one (law of the weakest). Here we model environmental (external) noise by assuming that the reproduction-predation rate of the strongest species (the fastest to reproduce and predate) in a given static environment randomly switches between two values corresponding to more and less favorable external conditions. We study the joint effect of environmental and demographic noise on the species survival probabilities and on the mean extinction time. In particular, we investigate whether the survival probabilities follow the law of the weakest and analyze their dependence on the external noise intensity and switching rate. Remarkably, when, on average, there is a finite number of switches prior to extinction, the survival probability of the predator of the species whose reaction rate switches typically varies nonmonotonically with the external noise intensity (with optimal survival about a critical noise strength). We also outline the relationship with the case where all reaction rates switch on markedly different time scales.

  18. Advanced methods comparisons of reaction rates in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Ott, K.O.

    1988-01-01

    A review of worldwide results revealed that reaction rates in the blanket region are generally underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration; however, these results vary widely. Experiments in the large uniform Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) blanket yield an accurate quantification of this discrepancy. Using standard production code methods (diffusion theory with 50 group cross sections), a consistent Calculated/Experimental (C/E) drop-off was observed for various reaction rates. A 50% increase in the calculated results at the outer edge of the blanket is necessary for agreement with experiments. The usefulness of refined group constant generation utilizing specialized weighting spectra and transport theory methods in correcting this discrepancy was analyzed. Refined group constants reduce the discrepancy to half that observed using the standard method. The surprising result was that transport methods had no effect on the blanket deviations; thus, transport theory considerations do not constitute or even contribute to an explanation of the blanket discrepancies. The residual blanket C/E drop-off (about half the standard drop-off) using advanced methods must be caused by some approximations which are applied in all current methods. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Black Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-06-01

    The kinetic modeling for the carbothermal reduction reaction rate in quartz and carbon black pellets is studied at different temperatures, under varying CO partial pressures in ambient atmosphere, varying carbon contents, different quartz particle sizes, and different crucible opening areas. Carbon black is produced by the cracking of natural gas. The activation energy of the SiC-producing step was determined to be 594 kJ/mol. The averaged pre-exponential factor A obtained from 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) is 2.62E+16 min-1. The reaction rate of the gas-solid interface factor, fix-C content ( X fix-C), temperature ( T), and CO partial pressure ( X CO) can be expressed as follows: {{d/pct}}{{{d}t}} = (1 - 0.40 × X_{{{fix} - C}}^{ - 0.86} × {pct}) × 2.62 × 10^{16} × \\exp ( { - 594000/RT} ) × (2.6 - 0.015 × X_{co} ).

  20. Mandatory Integration Measures and Differential Inclusion. The Italian Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuttitta, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 migrants arriving regularly in Italy must sign an integration agreement and declare their agreement with a ‘Charter of the values’. Insufficient integration (measured through a point-based system) results in deportation. While the point-based system discriminates against the poor, the

  1. Integrated Measurement of Crew Resource Management and Technical Flying Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the findings of a study designed with two objectives: to produce a prototype performance : measurement instrument (PMI) that integrates the assessment of Crew Resource Management (CRM) and technical flying : skills and to investi...

  2. Establishing and integrating performance measures : a TPCB peer exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    This report highlights key recommendations and noteworthy practices identified at Establishing and Integrating Performance Measures Peer Exchange held on April 27-28, 2015 in Dimondale, Michigan and via video teleconference. This event was spon...

  3. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of

  4. Integrating institutional bribery and behavioral measures of bribery

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Richard; Peiffer, Caryn

    2016-01-01

    Bribery involves individuals exchanging material benefits for a service of a public institution. To understand the process of bribery we need to integrate measures of individual behaviour and institutional attributes rather than rely exclusively on surveys of individual perceptions and experience or macro-level corruption indexes of national institutions. This paper integrates institutional and behavioural measures to show that where you live and who you are have independent influence on whet...

  5. Limits of reliability for the measurement of integral count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbeszkorn, L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for exact and approximate calculation of reliability limits of measured nuclear integral count. The formulae are applicable in measuring conditions which assure the Poisson distribution of the counts. The coefficients of the approximate formulae for 90, 95, 98 and 99 per cent reliability levels are given. The exact reliability limits for 90 per cent reliability level are calculated up to 80 integral counts. (R.J.)

  6. A punctual flux estimator and reactions rates optimization in neutral particles transport calculus by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authier, N.

    1998-12-01

    One of the questions asked in radiation shielding problems is the estimation of the radiation level in particular to determine accessibility of working persons in controlled area (nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants) or to study the dose gradients encountered in material (iron nuclear vessel, medical therapy, electronics in satellite). The flux and reaction rate estimators used in Monte Carlo codes give average values in volumes or on surfaces of the geometrical description of the system. But in certain configurations, the knowledge of punctual deposited energy and dose estimates are necessary. The Monte Carlo estimate of the flux at a point of interest is a calculus which presents an unbounded variance. The central limit theorem cannot be applied thus no easy confidence level may be calculated. The convergence rate is then very poor. We propose in this study a new solution for the photon flux at a point estimator. The method is based on the 'once more collided flux estimator' developed earlier for neutron calculations. It solves the problem of the unbounded variance and do not add any bias to the estimation. We show however that our new sampling schemes specially developed to treat the anisotropy of the photon coherent scattering is necessary for a good and regular behavior of the estimator. This developments integrated in the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code add the possibility of an unbiased punctual estimate on media interfaces. (author)

  7. SGV: a code to evaluate plasma reaction rates to a specified accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, R.S.; Hanson, J.D.

    1978-09-22

    A FORTRAN code to evaluate binary reaction rates (sigmav) for a plasma to a specified accuracy is described. Distribution functions permitted are (1) two Maxwellian species at different temperatures, (2) beam-Maxwellian, (3) cold gas with Maxwellian, and (4) beam-plasma with mirror distribution of the form f(v) varies as f(v) M (cos theta). Several functional forms are permitted for f(v) and M(cos theta). Cross-section subroutines for a number of interactions involving hydrogen, helium, and electrons are included, as is a routine allowing input of numerical data. The code is written as a subroutine to allow ready incorporation into larger plasma codes.

  8. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye sentisised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Winter-Jensen, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide / tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide / tri......-iodide couple should be fast at the counter electrode, i.e. this electrode must have a high catalytic activity towards the redox couple, and the same reaction must be slow on the photo electrode. The catalytic activity is investigated for platinum, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPy......), and polyaniline (PANI) - all deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. Both Pt and PEDOT are found to have sufficiently high catalytic activities for practical use as counter electrode in DSSC. The reaction resistance on FTO and anatase confirmed the beneficial effect of a compact anatase layer on top...

  9. Real analysis measure theory, integration, and Hilbert spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Elias M

    2005-01-01

    Real Analysis is the third volume in the Princeton Lectures in Analysis, a series of four textbooks that aim to present, in an integrated manner, the core areas of analysis. Here the focus is on the development of measure and integration theory, differentiation and integration, Hilbert spaces, and Hausdorff measure and fractals. This book reflects the objective of the series as a whole: to make plain the organic unity that exists between the various parts of the subject, and to illustrate the wide applicability of ideas of analysis to other fields of mathematics and science. After

  10. A gateless charge integrator for Borexino energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagomarsino, V.; Testera, G.

    1999-01-01

    A gateless charge integrator designed for the energy measurement in the Borexino experiment is described and the results of various tests performed on prototypes are shown. The circuit integrates always its input taking advantage of the AC coupling to the photomultipliers that equalizes to zero the charge associated with each event signal. A double sampling of the integrator output allows to perform a charge measurement in principle without dead time, avoiding the use of gate signals and baseline restoration networks and permitting a precise detection of the fast correlated events (delayed coincidences due to the decay of a nuclide producing a daughter having a lifetime in the tens of ns time range). The precision of the charge measurement is discussed together with the performances of the front end Borexino board where the integrator is mounted

  11. Towards an interpretive measurement framework to assess the levels of integrated and integrative thinking within organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schörger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research study is located within the context of corporate reporting and is relevant for the agenda of sustainability and sustainable development. The specific context for this study is the South African mining industry, within which three units in the form of three companies, were chosen to provide a coherent case for this study. The sample for the analysis is based on the integrated reports of these companies for the years 2012 and 2013. This gives this research a total sample size of six reports. Based on the research findings an initial interpretive measurement framework to assess the levels of capital integration has been theorised which enables the various stakeholders of an organisation to assess the integrated and integrative thinking capabilities. The level of integration is represented as a maturity scale on which integrated thinking is associated with the lower levels, while integrative thinking is attributed to higher levels of maturity. In the elaborated framework, integrated thinking is perceived as being a prerequisite for integrative thinking. The practical implication of this study is that it provides a potential measurement framework for various organisational stakeholders, including investors, to assess the thinking capabilities that are more likely to lead to long term financial stability and sustainability. The value of this research study is that it provides an initial step towards measuring the level of integrated and integrative thinking capabilities within organisations where no such measurement framework currently exists. The limitations and implications of this research study are that the interpretive measurement framework represents merely an initial step and an ongoing working hypothesis which requires further research to develop its maturity and usefulness.

  12. Cross sections and reaction rates of d+{sup 8}Li reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbes, M.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Farrell, M.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Boyd, R.N. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gu, X. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hencheck, M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kalen, J.D. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Mitchell, C.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kolata, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Lamkin, K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Smith, R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Tighe, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ashktorab, K. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Becchetti, F.D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, J. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Roberts, D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wang, T.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Humphrey, D. [Department of Physics, University of Western Kentucky, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Vourvopoulos, G. [Department of Physics, University of Western Kentucky, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Islam, M.S. [Department of Physics, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States)

    1995-02-20

    We have measured angular distributions of the {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Li){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Be)n reactions at E{sub c.m.}=1.5 to 2.8 MeV using an {sup 8}Li-radioactive-beam technique. Astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates were calculated from the measured cross sections. Although the {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Be)n cross section is small, it can contribute to {sup 9}Be synthesis. The {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Li){sup 3}H reaction has a sufficiently large cross section to destroy {sup 8}Li, which may decrease the synthesis of heavier elements. No products from the {sup 2}H({sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Li)p reaction were detected. We also present the results of calculations using the inhomogeneous model of primordial nucleosynthesis in several regions of parameter space. ((orig.))

  13. Experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates in 238U and 235U along of the radius of fuel pellets of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mura, Luis Felipe Liambos

    2015-01-01

    This research presents and consolidates an alternative methodology for determining nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellets which does not require high neutron flux. This technique is based on irradiating a thin UO 2 disk inserted into a removable fuel rod at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core. Several gamma spectrometry are performed after irradiation using a HPGe detector. Six lead collimators with different diameters are sequentially alternated during this process, thus, the nuclear radioactive capture which occurs in 238 U and the fissions which occur in both 235 U and 238 U are measured according to six different radial regions of the fuel disk. Geometric efficiency corrections due to the introduction of collimators in HPGe detection system are determined by MCNP-5 code. The fission rate measurements are performed using the 99 Mo. This radionuclide was studied and proved ideal for these measurements because it is formed in linear behavior in the reactor core, have a high yield fission and emits low-energy photons. Measurements were performed irradiating UO 2 disks (with 4.3% enrichment) in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 core at 100 watts power level during one hour. Some measurements were performed using a cadmium glove wrapped in the fuel rod to determine the nuclear reaction rates in the epithermal energy range. The experimental results obtained are compared with nuclear reaction rate calculations by means of MCNP-5 with ENDF/B-VII.0 data library showing discrepancies of up to 9% in 238 U capture rates and 14% for U fission rates for epithermal energies. Uncertainties regarding the nuclear capture rates have maximum values of 4.5% and the fission rates has maximum values of 11.3%. (author)

  14. Measuring cross-border regional integration with composite indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu

    2016-01-01

    Earlier quantitative studies on cross-border regional integration processes have commonly neglected science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators: even the most notable example of a composite indicator approach to measuring cross-border regional integration, i.e. the Oresund index, lacks...... a sub-category for STI. Consequently, by ignoring cross-border innovation and knowledge flows, the Oresund integration index fails to take into account one of the most important drivers of economic growth in cross-border regions. Therefore, a new composite STI indicator (sub-category) was introduced......-border regions....

  15. Thermal measurement a requirement for monolithic microwave integrated circuit design

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Richard; Oxley, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal management of structures such as Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) is important, given increased circuit packing densities and RF output powers. The paper will describe the IR measurement technology necessary to obtain accurate temperature profiles on the surface of semiconductor devices. The measurement procedure will be explained, including the device mounting arrangement and emissivity correction technique. The paper will show how the measurement technique has be...

  16. AN UPDATED 6Li(p, α)3He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Pappalardo, L.

    2013-01-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. 6 Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low 6 Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of 6 Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U e . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the 6 Li(p, α) 3 He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U e value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the 2 H( 6 Li, α 3 He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T 9 and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  17. Surface reaction rate and probability of ozone and alpha-terpineol on glass, polyvinyl chloride, and latex paint surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shi; Morrison, Glenn C

    2011-05-15

    Ozone can react homogeneously with unsaturated organic compounds in buildings to generate undesirable products. However, these reactions can also occur on indoor surfaces, especially for low-volatility organics. Conversion rates of ozone with α-terpineol, a representative low-volatility compound, were quantified on surfaces that mimic indoor substrates. Rates were measured for α-terpineol adsorbed to beads of glass, polyvinylchloride (PVC), and dry latex paint, in a plug flow reactor. A newly defined second-order surface reaction rate coefficient, k(2), was derived from the flow reactor model. The value of k(2) ranged from 0.68 × 10(-14) cm(4)s(-1)molecule(-1) for α-terpineol adsorbed to PVC to 3.17 × 10(-14) cm(4)s(-1)molecule(-1) for glass, but was insensitive to relative humidity. Further, k(2) is only weakly influenced by the adsorbed mass but instead appears to be more strongly related to the interfacial activity α-terpineol. The minimum reaction probability ranged from 3.79 × 10(-6) for glass at 20% RH to 6.75 × 10(-5) for PVC at 50% RH. The combination of high equilibrium surface coverage and high reactivity for α-terpineol suggests that surface conversion rates are fast enough to compete with or even overwhelm other removal mechanisms in buildings such as gas-phase conversion and air exchange.

  18. Energy saving and recovery measures in integrated urban water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, Gabriele; Sambito, Mariacrocetta

    2017-11-01

    The present paper describes different energy production, recovery and saving measures which can be applied in an integrated urban water system. Production measures are often based on the installation of photovoltaic systems; the recovery measures are commonly based on hydraulic turbines, exploiting the available pressure potential to produce energy; saving measures are based on substitution of old pumps with higher efficiency ones. The possibility of substituting some of the pipes of the water supply system can be also considered in a recovery scenario in order to reduce leakages and recovery part of the energy needed for water transport and treatment. The reduction of water losses can be obtained through the Active Leakage Control (ALC) strategies resulting in a reduction in energy consumption and in environmental impact. Measures were applied to a real case study to tested it the efficiency, i.e., the integrated urban water system of the Palermo metropolitan area in Sicily (Italy).

  19. Innovative Performance Measurement: an Integrative Perspective of Stakeholder's View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Fresno Palmira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Business Process Management (BPM has been increasingly focused as an holistic approach to manage organizations for better organizational effectiveness. BPM involves the use of innovative performance measurement systems to follow up, coordinate, control and improve processes and overall business efficacy and efficiency. In this paper we propose a global holistic perspective of integrated information, combining the view of all stakeholders and both qualitative and quantitative information, as a basic prerequisite for quality of information for better decision making. The paper includes findings from an empirical case study of measuring Parkinson's Disease Neurosurgery process, including stakeholder's view with an integrative perspective.

  20. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic modeling of quartz and carbon pellet at temperatures of 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) was investigated in this study. The carbon materials used were charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal. The overall SiC producing reaction can be described by the reaction SiO2 + 3C = SiC + 2CO. In the SiC-producing step, the reaction rate of quartz and carbon pellet can be expressed as {d{ pct}}/dt = ( {1 - 0.40 × X_{fix - C}^{ - 0.86} × FC × {pct}} ) × A × \\exp ( { - E/{{RT}}} ) The carbon factor F C was used to describe the influence of different carbon materials that effect the gas-solid interface reaction. For charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal, the F C values were 0.83, 0.80, 0.94, and 0.83, respectively. The pre-exponential factor A values for the preceding four carbon materials were 1.06 × 1016 min-1, 4.21 × 1015 min-1, 3.85 × 109 min-1, and 1.00 × 1025 min-1, respectively. The activation energies E for the SiC-producing step were 570, 563, 336, and 913 kJ/mole for charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal pellets, respectively.

  1. The effect of inquiry-flipped classroom model toward students' achievement on chemical reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paristiowati, Maria; Fitriani, Ella; Aldi, Nurul Hanifah

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research is to find out the effect of Inquiry-Flipped Classroom Models toward Students' Achievement on Chemical Reaction Rate topic. This study was conducted at SMA Negeri 3 Tangerang in Eleventh Graders. The Quasi Experimental Method with Non-equivalent Control Group design was implemented in this study. 72 students as the sample was selected by purposive sampling. Students in experimental group were learned through inquiry-flipped classroom model. Meanwhile, in control group, students were learned through guided inquiry learning model. Based on the data analysis, it can be seen that there is significant difference in the result of the average achievement of the students. The average achievement of the students in inquiry-flipped classroom model was 83,44 and the average achievement of the students in guided inquiry learning model was 74,06. It can be concluded that the students' achievement with inquiry-flipped classroom better than guided inquiry. The difference of students' achievement were significant through t-test which is tobs 3.056 > ttable 1.994 (α = 0.005).

  2. Control rod effects on reaction rate distributions in tight pitched PuO2-UO2 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Okumura, Keisuke; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1991-11-01

    Investigations were made for the heterogeneity effects caused by insertion or withdrawal of a B 4 C control rod on fine structure of reaction rates distributions in a tight pitched PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel assembly. Analysis was carried out by using the VIM and SRAC codes with the libraries based on JENDL-2 for the hexagonal fuel assembly basically corresponding to the PROTEUS-LWHCR experimental core. The reaction rates are affected more remarkably by the withdrawal of the control rod rather than its insertion. The changes of the reaction rates were decomposed into three terms of spectrum shifts, the changes of effective cross sections with fine groups, and their higher order components. From the analysis, it is concluded that most changes of reaction rates are caused by spectral shifts. The SRAC code with fine group constants can predict the distribution of reaction rates and their ratios with the accuracy of about 5 % except for the values related to Pu-242 capture rate, as compared with the VIM results. To increase the accuracy, it is necessary to generate the effective cross sections of the fuel near control rods with consideration of the heterogeneities in the fuel assembly. (author)

  3. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates: BIOFILM DISTRIBUTION AND RATE SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng [Institute of Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen China; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Earth Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Bailey, Vanessa L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models, and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  5. Contribution of 194.1 keV Resonance to 17O(p, alpha) 14N Reaction Rate using R Matrix Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafa, A.; Messili, F.Z.; Barhoumi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the 17 O(p, alpha ) 14 N reaction rates is required for evaluating elemental abundances in a number of hydrogen - burning stellar sites. This reaction is specifically very important for nucleosynthesis of the rare oxygen isotope 17 O. Classical novae are thought to be a major source of 17 O in the Galaxy and produce the short-live radioisotope 18 F whose + decay is followed by a gamma ray emission which could be observed with satellites such as the Integral observatory. As the 17 O(p, alpha) 14 N and 17 O(p, alpha ) 18 F reactions govern the destruction of 17 O and the formation of 1 '8F, their rates are decisive in determining the final abundances of these isotopes. Stellar temperatures of primary importance for nucleosynthesis are typically in the ranges T = 0.01-0.1 GK for red giant, AGB, and massive stars, and T 0.01-0.4 GK for classical nova explosions In recent work, we observed, for the first time, a resonance a 183.3 keV corresponding to level in 18 F at Ex 5789.8 ± 0.3 keV. A new astrophysical parameters of this resonance are found. In this work we study this reaction using numerical code based on R matrix method including the new values of level energy and parameters of 183.3 keV resonance in order to show his contribution to 17 O(p, alpha) 14 N reaction rates. We also use old parameters values of this resonance given in Keiser work for comparison. We show that this resonance predominate the reaction rates in all range of stellar temperature for classical nova explosions. This is in good agreement with our work with experimental method. We also study cross section and differential cross section 17 O(p, alpha ) 14 N reaction with R matrix method

  6. measurements of the absorption resonance integrals by reactor oscillator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, V.; Kocic, A.

    1965-12-01

    Experimental values of resonance integrals for silver vary significantly dependent on authors. That is why we have chosen this sample to measure RI. On the other hand, nuclear fuel (for example natural uranium) still represents an interesting objective for research in reactor physics. Measurements of natural uranium are done as a function of S/M. Measurements were done by amplitude reactor oscillator ROB-1/5 with precision from 0.5% - 2% dependent on the conditions of the oscillator. Measurements were completed at the heavy water reactor RB with 2% enriched uranium fuel [fr

  7. Towards integrating environmental performance in divisional performance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C Ngwakwe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests an integration of environmental performance measurement (EPM into conventional divisional financial performance measures as a catalyst to enhance managers’ drive toward cleaner production and sustainable development. The approach is conceptual and normative; and using a hypothetical firm, it suggests a model to integrate environmental performance measure as an ancillary to conventional divisional financial performance measures. Vroom’s motivation theory and other literature evidence indicate that corporate goals are achievable in an environment where managers’ efforts are recognised and thus rewarded. Consequently the paper suggests that environmentally motivated managers are important to propel corporate sustainability strategy toward desired corporate environmental governance and sustainable economic development. Thus this suggested approach modestly adds to existing environmental management accounting (EMA theory and literature. It is hoped that this paper may provide an agenda for further research toward a practical application of the suggested method in a firm.

  8. Mars Atmospheric Entry Integrated Navigation with Partial Intermittent Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-shan Lou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal degradation suffered by the vehicle is a combination brownout and blackout during Mars atmospheric entry. The communications brownout means that signal fades and blackout means that the signal is lost completely. The communications brownout and blackout periods are analyzed and predicted with an altitude and velocity profiles. In the brownout period, the range measurements between the vehicle and the orbiters are modeled as intermittent measurements with the radio signal arrival probabilities, which are distributed as a Rayleigh distribution of the electron number density around the entry vehicle. A new integrated navigation strategy during the Mars atmospheric entry phase is proposed to consider the probabilities of the radio measurements in the communications brownout and blackout periods under the IMU/beacon scenario based on the information filter with intermittent measurements. Numerical navigation simulations are designed to show the performance of the proposed navigation strategy under the integrated navigation scenario.

  9. A simple thermometric technique for reaction-rate determination of inorganic species, based on the iodide-catalysed cerium(IV)-arsenic(III) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, F; Forteza, R; March, J G; Cerda, V

    1985-02-01

    A very simple reaction-rate thermometric technique is used for determination of iodide (5-20 ng ml ), based on its catalytic action on the cerium(IV)-arsenic(III) reaction, and for determination of mercury(II) (1.5-10 ng ml ) and silver(I) (2-10 ng ml ), based on their inhibitory effect on this reaction. The reaction is followed by measuring the rate of temperature increase. The method suffers from very few interferences and is applied to determination of iodide in biological and inorganic samples, and Hg(II) and Ag(I) in pharmaceutical products.

  10. Integral tightness measurements at the Paks-1 nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubner, R.; Techy, Z. (Villamosenergiaipari Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1983-01-01

    The containment system experiments of the Paks-1 nuclear reactor are described. The integrated tightness measurements of the hermetic system were completed in 1982. The principles and methods and the evaluation of the results of the measurements are discussed. Some features of the filtration characteristics are demonstrated using relative values and a method enabling the description of the physical contents of the characteristics by flow technical functions is outlined.

  11. Prospects for direct measurement of time-integrated Bs mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siccama, I.

    1994-01-01

    This note investigates the prospects of measuring time-integrated B s mixing. Three inclusive decay modes of the B s meson are discussed. For each reconstruction mode, the expected number of events and the different background channels are discussed. Estimates are given for the uncertainty on the mixing parameter χ s . (orig.)

  12. Variational measures and the Kurzweil-Henstock integral

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwabik, Štefan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2009), s. 731-752 ISSN 0139-9918 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : variational measure * Kurzweil-Henstock integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.308, year: 2009

  13. Integration of parametric measures and the statics of masonry panels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lucchesi, M.; Šilhavý, Miroslav; Zani, N.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2011), s. 33-44 ISSN 1867-6936 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : masonry panels * limit analysis * integration of measures Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.springerlink.com/content/e0086750m731182u/

  14. Alpha-capture reaction rates for 22 Ne (α , n) via sub-Coulomb alpha-transfer and its effect on final abundances of s-process isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatissa, Heshani; Rogachev, Grigory; Koshchiy, Yevgeny; Goldberg, Vladilen; Hooker, Joshua; Hunt, Curtis; Magana, Cordero; Roeder, Brian; Saastamoinen, Antti; Spiridon, Alexandria; Upadhyayula, Sriteja; Trippella, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    The 22 Ne (α , n) reaction is a very important neutron source reaction for the slow neutron capture process (s-process) in asymptotic giant branch stars. These direct measurements are very difficult to carry out at the energy regimes of interest for astrophysics (Gamow energies) due to the extremely small reaction cross section. The large uncertainties introduced when extrapolating direct measurements at high energies down to the Gamow energies can be overcome by measuring the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) of the relevant states using α-transfer reactions at sub-Coulomb energies to reduce the optical model dependence. The study of the 22Ne(6Li,d) and 22Ne(7Li,t) reaction was carried out at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The α-ANC measurements for the near α-threshold resonances of 26Mg provide constraints for the 22Ne(α,n) reaction rate. The effect of this reaction rate on the final abundances of the s-process isotopes will be discussed.

  15. A sensitivity study of s-process: the impact of uncertainties from nuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyoles, N.; Serenelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow neutron capture process (s-process) is responsible for the production of about half the elements beyond the Fe-peak. The production sites and the conditions under which the different components of s-process occur are relatively well established. A detailed quantitative understanding of s-process nucleosynthesis may yield light in physical processes, e.g. convection and mixing, taking place in the production sites. For this, it is important that the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear physics is well understood. In this work we perform a study of the sensitivity of s-process nucleosynthesis, with particular emphasis in the main component, on the nuclear reaction rates. Our aims are: to quantify the current uncertainties in the production factors of s-process elements originating from nuclear physics and, to identify key nuclear reactions that require more precise experimental determinations. In this work we studied two different production sites in which s-process occurs with very different neutron exposures: 1) a low-mass extremely metal-poor star during the He-core flash (nn reaching up to values of ∼ 1014cm-3); 2) the TP-AGB phase of a M⊙, Z=0.01 model, the typical site of the main s-process component (nn up to 108 — 109cm-3). In the first case, the main variation in the production of s-process elements comes from the neutron poisons and with relative variations around 30%-50%. In the second, the neutron poison are not as important because of the higher metallicity of the star that actually acts as a seed and therefore, the final error of the abundances are much lower around 10%-25%.

  16. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2016-01-25

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER kinetics were investigated. For electrocatalysis, a NiFeOx catalyst was hydrothermally decorated on Ni foam. In 1 M KOH solution, the NiFeOx electrocatalyst achieved 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 260 mV. The same catalyst was decorated on the surface of Ta3N5 photocatalyst powder. The reaction was conducted in the presence of 0.1 M Na2S2O8 as a strong electron scavenger, thus likely leading to the OER being kinetically relevant. When compared with the bare Ta3N5, NiFeOx/Ta3N5 demonstrated a 5-fold improvement in photocatalytic activity in the OER under visible light irradiation, achieving a quantum efficiency of 24 % at 480 nm. Under the conditions investigated, a strong correlation between the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performances was identified: an improvement in electrocatalysis corresponded with an improvement in photocatalysis without altering the identity of the materials. The rate change at different pH was likely associated with electrocatalytic kinetics that accordingly influenced the photocatalytic rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates with respective to the reaction temperature resulted in an apparent activation energy of 25 kJ mol-1 in electrocatalysis, whereas that in photocatalysis was 16 kJ mol-1. The origin of the difference in these activation energy values is likely attributed to the possible effects of temperature on the individual thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reaction process. The work described herein demonstrates a method of “transferring the knowledge of electrocatalysis to photocatalysis” as a strong tool to rationally and quantitatively understand the complex reaction schemes involved in photocatalytic reactions.

  17. The Role of Compliance and Reaction Rate in Dehydration Weakening and Frictional Stability of Antigorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E.; Okazaki, K.; Hirth, G.

    2017-12-01

    The complicated brittle-ductile rheology of antigorite at subduction zone pressures and temperatures, resulting from its anisotropic mechanical properties, low dehydration temperature, and high water content has made interpretation of dehydration weakening problematic. Recent analyses indicate that antigorite is both ductile and brittle at high temperatures, and follows effective pressure frictional laws while dehydrating. In this study we focus on the role of rig compliance and reaction kinetics on frictional weakening and frictional stability. In addition, we correlate the evolution of mechanical behavior with AE activity at conditions within and above the thermal stability limit of antigorite. We conducted experiments at confining pressures from 0.25 GPa to 1GPa in a Griggs apparatus and modified rig compliance by including compliant components within the loading frame. We also modeled in-situ reaction progress using parameters from Sawai et al. (2013) to quantify relationships between weakening and fluid production. Without modifying the compliance, low pressure runs show stable dehydration weakening. With a modified, low compliance, results were nearly identical to stable weakening at standard compliance at 1 GPa. However, at lower pressures, many acoustic emissions were recorded at peak reaction rates during temperature ramping, with a rapid failure event occurring several minutes afterward (with the caveat that we still need to verify that AEs occur within the sample). No AEs are observed during room temperature experiments in samples that fault, nor were any observed in the high temperature experiments at conditions within the antigorite stability field - consistent with prior studies. Our results demonstrate that understanding in-situ dehydration reaction kinetics and their feedback with rheology and system compliance are key to scaling laboratory antigorite rheology to earth.

  18. Influence of the medium on the reaction rate of the t-butoxyl radical with iron(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Tert-butoxyl radicals (t-BuO.) were generated by homolytic photodecomposition of di-tert-butylperoxide using ruby laser flashes at 347 nm. The reaction of t-BuO. radicals with Fe 2+ was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The quantum yield Φ(Fe 3+ ) was determined by measuring the absorbance of Fe 3+ ion as [FeCl] 2+ complex at 360 nm 2 μs after the flash. According to the equation derived from the reaction scheme, the rate constant k 3 was obtained from the relative rate constant k r (k r =k 0 /k 3 ) and the value of k 0 ; the latter refers to the overall rate of the competing disappearance of t-BuO. radicals from the system (reaction 2), including the highest contribution of β-cleavage. The rate constant k 0 was determined using diphenylmethanol instead of Fe 2+ . The known rate constant of the reaction of t-BuO. radical with diphenylmethanol giving ketyl radicals (6.9 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) was applied. The quantum yield of ketyl radicals was determined by measuring the maximum of absorbance at 535 nm. At acid concentration of 0.023 mol dm -3 HCl the rate constant k 3 = 3.4 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 was determined. The relative rate constant increased with an increase of the hydrochloric acid concentration which has been ascribed to the lower stability of t-BuO. radical at higher acidity of the medium. The effect of polarity of the medium on the reaction rate was also determined. Decreasing k 3 in media of increasing polarity were explained by increasing of the β-scission rate of t-BuO. radical with increasing polarity of the medium

  19. Consistency among integral measurements of aggregate decay heat power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, H.; Sagisaka, M.; Oyamatsu, K.; Kukita, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Persisting discrepancies between summation calculations and integral measurements force us to assume large uncertainties in the recommended decay heat power. In this paper, we develop a hybrid method to calculate the decay heat power of a fissioning system from those of different fissioning systems. Then, this method is applied to examine consistency among measured decay heat powers of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu at YAYOI. The consistency among the measured values are found to be satisfied for the {beta} component and fairly well for the {gamma} component, except for cooling times longer than 4000 s. (author)

  20. Device for the integral measurement of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheron, Francois.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to devices for the integral determination of ionizing radiations, particularly to the construction of a portable dosemeter. Portable measuring instruments have been suggested in the past, particularly dosemeters in which the discharge of a capacitor under the action of ionizing radiations is measured. Since the charge of a capacitor is not stable owing to dielectric imperfections, these measuring instruments have to be recalibrated at frequent intervals. To overcome this drawback, the invention suggests using the discharge of an electret, electrically charged to a pre-set initial value, under the action of ionizing radiations, as the transducer means of a dosemeter used in conjunction with display or warning systems [fr

  1. Cultural adaptation and translation of measures: an integrated method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidani, Souraya; Guruge, Sepali; Miranda, Joyal; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Varcoe, Colleen

    2010-04-01

    Differences in the conceptualization and operationalization of health-related concepts may exist across cultures. Such differences underscore the importance of examining conceptual equivalence when adapting and translating instruments. In this article, we describe an integrated method for exploring conceptual equivalence within the process of adapting and translating measures. The integrated method involves five phases including selection of instruments for cultural adaptation and translation; assessment of conceptual equivalence, leading to the generation of a set of items deemed to be culturally and linguistically appropriate to assess the concept of interest in the target community; forward translation; back translation (optional); and pre-testing of the set of items. Strengths and limitations of the proposed integrated method are discussed. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Electronics/avionics integrity - Definition, measurement and improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, W.; Rasty, J.; Chen, M.; Kim, Y.

    The authors report on the results obtained from an extensive, three-fold research project: (1) to search the open quality and reliability literature for documented information relative to electronics/avionics integrity; (2) to interpret and evaluate the literature as to significant concepts, strategies, and tools appropriate for use in electronics/avionics product and process integrity efforts; and (3) to develop a list of critical findings and recommendations that will lead to significant progress in product integrity definition, measurement, modeling, and improvements. The research consisted of examining a broad range of trade journals, scientific journals, and technical reports, as well as face-to-face discussions with reliability professionals. Ten significant recommendations have been supported by the research work.

  3. Development of an integrated control and measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manges, W.W.

    1984-03-01

    This thesis presents a tutorial on the issues involved in the development of a minicomputer-based, distributed intelligence data acquisition and process control system to support complex experimental facilities. The particular system discussed in this thesis is under development for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). In the AVLIS program, we were careful to integrate the computer sections of the implementation into the instrumentation system rather than adding them as an appendage. We then addressed the reliability and availability of the system as a separate concern. Thus, our concept of an integrated control and measurement (ICAM) system forms the basis for this thesis. This thesis details the logic and philosophy that went into the development of this system and explains why the commercially available turn-key systems generally are not suitable. Also, the issues involved in the specification of the components for such an integrated system are emphasized

  4. New determination of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction rates at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute Texas A and M University-College Station, Texas (United States); Typel, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH-Theorie Darmstadt (Germany); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, and INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR-Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Lamia, L., E-mail: tumino@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    The cross sections of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,p {sup 3}H){sup 1}H and {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,n {sup 3}He){sup 1}H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in {sup 3}He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction is quite influential on {sup 7}Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (≤1 Myr) with masses ≥1 M {sub ☉}.

  5. New determination of the 2H(d,p)3H and 2H(d,n)3He reaction rates at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Typel, S.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    The cross sections of the 2 H(d,p) 3 H and 2 H(d,n) 3 He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free 2 H( 3 He,p 3 H) 1 H and 2 H( 3 He,n 3 He) 1 H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in 3 He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the 2 H(d,n) 3 He reaction is quite influential on 7 Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (≤1 Myr) with masses ≥1 M ☉ .

  6. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs.

  7. Computational and experimental studies on stabilities, reactions and reaction rates of cations and ion-dipole complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ervasti, H.K.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, ion stability, ion-molecule reactions and reaction rates are studied using mass spectrometry and molecular modelling. In Chapter 2 the effect of functional group substitution on neutral and ionised ketene are studied. Electron-donating substituents show a stabilising positive

  8. The reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001): Six-dimensional quantum calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001) are presented. Converged six-dimensional quantum calculations for this heavy-atom reaction have been performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. A potential...

  9. In Search of an Integrative Measure of Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamond H. Madden

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available International trends towards people-centred, integrative care and support require any measurement of functioning and disability to meet multiple aims. The information requirements of two major Australian programs for disability and rehabilitation are outlined, and the findings of two searches for suitable measures of functioning and disability are analysed. Over 30 current measures of functioning were evaluated in each search. Neither search found a generic measure of functioning suitable for these multibillion dollar programs, relevant to a wide range of people with a variety of health conditions and functioning experiences, and capable of indicating support needs, associated costs, progress and outcomes. This unsuccessful outcome has implications internationally for policy-relevant information for disability, rehabilitation and related programs. The paper outlines the features of an Integrative Measure of Functioning (IMF based on the concepts of functioning and environmental factors in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. An IMF would be applicable across a variety of health conditions, settings and purposes, ranging from individual assessment to public health. An IMF could deliver person-centred, policy-relevant information for a range of programs, promoting harmonised language and measurement and supporting international trends in human services and public health.

  10. In search of an integrative measure of functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Rosamond H; Glozier, Nick; Fortune, Nicola; Dyson, Maree; Gilroy, John; Bundy, Anita; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Lukersmith, Sue; Mpofu, Elias; Madden, Richard

    2015-05-26

    International trends towards people-centred, integrative care and support require any measurement of functioning and disability to meet multiple aims. The information requirements of two major Australian programs for disability and rehabilitation are outlined, and the findings of two searches for suitable measures of functioning and disability are analysed. Over 30 current measures of functioning were evaluated in each search. Neither search found a generic measure of functioning suitable for these multibillion dollar programs, relevant to a wide range of people with a variety of health conditions and functioning experiences, and capable of indicating support needs, associated costs, progress and outcomes. This unsuccessful outcome has implications internationally for policy-relevant information for disability, rehabilitation and related programs. The paper outlines the features of an Integrative Measure of Functioning (IMF) based on the concepts of functioning and environmental factors in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). An IMF would be applicable across a variety of health conditions, settings and purposes, ranging from individual assessment to public health. An IMF could deliver person-centred, policy-relevant information for a range of programs, promoting harmonised language and measurement and supporting international trends in human services and public health.

  11. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated with th...... with two dyes, fluorescein, and Bodipy 650/665 X, showed good linear behavior over a wide range of concentrations. Minimally detected concentrations were 250 pM for fluorescein and 100 nM for Bodipy....

  12. Irradiance Impact on Pollution by Integrating Nephelometer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Perrone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-wavelength integrating nephelometer measurements combined with short- (SW and long-wave (LW irradiance measurements were used to investigate the irradiance effects on the daily evolution of the particulate matter (PM at the ground level, and contribute to the characterization of the land–atmosphere interaction in pollution dispersal. The integrating nephelometer measurements have allowed characterizing the daily changes of the PM optical and microphysical properties by the aerosol scattering coefficient (σp and the scattering Ångström coefficient (å. We found that on a daily basis σp reached the minimum values when the irradiance reached the maximum values, since the convective motions, which favor the particle dispersion at the surface, increase with the irradiance. The å value, which is commonly used as qualitative indicator of the dominant particle size, has allowed evaluating the irradiance effects on the mean particle size distribution at the surface and revealed that the irradiance increase favors mainly the dispersion of the ground-level fine particles. Particle size-distribution measurements supported the last comment. Measurements were performed from 4 to 10 May 2015 when the study site was affected by a Saharan dust outbreak, to also evaluate the impact of long-range transported particles on the daily evolution of the ground-level particle’s properties and the SW and LW irradiance.

  13. Integral alpha and gamma radiation measurements in dwelling houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paripas, B.; Takacs, S.; Somogyi, G.; Nikl, I.

    1984-01-01

    A solid state nuclear track detector method is applied to determine radon and total alpha-exposures (time integral of activity concentrations). The mathematical description of the method of measurement by a passive device equipped with two plastic sheets is presented. Measurements have been carried out in 88 houses over a five-month period and in 20 houses every season for a whole year. Simultaneously with the seasonal measurements of alpha-exposures, the gamma doses were also determined by means of TL dosemeters. The mean exposures due to thoron and its progeny have been estimated by statistical methods. A possible connection between the measured quantities and the lung cancer rates in two settlements were examined. (Author)

  14. Reaction rate and energy-loss rate for photopair production by relativistic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek

    1992-01-01

    The process of e(+/-) pair production by relativistic nuclei on ambient photons is considered. The process is important for cosmic-ray nuclei in interstellar and intergalactic space as well as in galactic and extragalactic compact objects. The rate of this process is given by an integral of the cross section over the photon angular and energy distribution. In the case of isotropic photons, the angular integration is performed to provide an expression for the rate at given photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. The total rate then becomes a single integral of that rate over the photon energy distribution. Formulas are also given for the fractional energy loss of a relativistic nucleus colliding with a photon of a given energy in the rest frame. The nucleus energy-loss rate is integrated over the photon angular distribution in the case of isotropic photons, and simple fits are provided.

  15. Accurate fluid force measurement based on control surface integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David

    2018-01-01

    Nonintrusive 3D fluid force measurements are still challenging to conduct accurately for freely moving animals, vehicles, and deforming objects. Two techniques, 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a new technique, the aerodynamic force platform (AFP), address this. Both rely on the control volume integral for momentum; whereas PIV requires numerical integration of flow fields, the AFP performs the integration mechanically based on rigid walls that form the control surface. The accuracy of both PIV and AFP measurements based on the control surface integration is thought to hinge on determining the unsteady body force associated with the acceleration of the volume of displaced fluid. Here, I introduce a set of non-dimensional error ratios to show which fluid and body parameters make the error negligible. The unsteady body force is insignificant in all conditions where the average density of the body is much greater than the density of the fluid, e.g., in gas. Whenever a strongly deforming body experiences significant buoyancy and acceleration, the error is significant. Remarkably, this error can be entirely corrected for with an exact factor provided that the body has a sufficiently homogenous density or acceleration distribution, which is common in liquids. The correction factor for omitting the unsteady body force, {{{ {ρ f}} {1 - {ρ f} ( {{ρ b}+{ρ f}} )}.{( {{{{ρ }}b}+{ρ f}} )}}} , depends only on the fluid, {ρ f}, and body, {{ρ }}b, density. Whereas these straightforward solutions work even at the liquid-gas interface in a significant number of cases, they do not work for generalized bodies undergoing buoyancy in combination with appreciable body density inhomogeneity, volume change (PIV), or volume rate-of-change (PIV and AFP). In these less common cases, the 3D body shape needs to be measured and resolved in time and space to estimate the unsteady body force. The analysis shows that accounting for the unsteady body force is straightforward to non

  16. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, W. Brent; Jones, Keith W.; Um, Wooyong; Rockhold, mark; Peters, Catherine A.; Celia, Michael A.

    2013-02-15

    This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site - specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE’s legacy waste problems. We established three key issues of reactive flow upscaling, and organized this project in three corresponding thrust areas. 1) Reactive flow experiments. The combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation alters pore network structure and the subsequent flow velocities, thereby creating a complex interaction between reaction and transport. To examine this phenomenon, we conducted controlled laboratory experimentation using reactive flow-through columns. Results and Key Findings: Four reactive column experiments (S1, S3, S4, S5) have been completed in which simulated tank waste leachage (STWL) was reacted with pure quartz sand, with and without Aluminum. The STWL is a caustic solution that dissolves quartz. Because Al is a necessary element in the formation of

  17. A shock tube and laser absorption study of ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of ketones: 2-Butanone and 3-buten-2-one

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-03-01

    Ketones are potential biofuel candidates and are also formed as intermediate products during the oxidation of large hydrocarbons or oxygenated fuels, such as alcohols and esters. This paper presents shock tube ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of 2-butanone (C2H5COCH3) and 3-buten-2-one (C2H3COCH3). Ignition delay measurements were carried out over temperatures of 1100-1400K, pressures of 3-6.5atm, and at equivalence ratios (F{cyrillic}) of 0.5 and 1. Ignition delay times were monitored using two different techniques: pressure time history and OH absorption near 306nm. The reaction rates of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with these two ketones were measured over the temperature range of 950-1400K near 1.5atm. The OH profiles were monitored by the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) line in the OH A-X (0, 0) band near 306.69nm. We found that the ignition delay times of 2-butanone and 3-buten-2-one mixtures scale with pressure as P-0.42 and P-0.52, respectively. The ignition delay times of 3-buten-2-one were longer than that of 2-butanone for stoichiometric mixtures, however, for lean mixtures (F{cyrillic}=0.5), 2-butanone had longer ignition delay times. The chemical kinetic mechanism of Serinyel et al. [1] over-predicted the ignition delay times of 2-butanone at all tested conditions, however, the discrepancies were smaller at higher pressures. The mechanism was updated with recent rate measurements to decrease discrepancy with the experimental data. A detailed chemistry for the oxidation of 3-buten-2-one was developed using rate estimation method and reasonable agreements were obtained with the measured ignition delay data. The measured reaction rate of 2-butanone with OH agreed well with the literature data, while we present the first high-temperature measurements for the reaction of OH with 3-buten-2-one. The following Arrhenius expressions are suggested over the temperature range of 950-1450K: kC2H5COCH3+OH=6.78×1013exp

  18. Experimental Investigation of the ^{19}Ne(p,γ)^{20}Na Reaction Rate and Implications for Breakout from the Hot CNO Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belarge, J; Kuvin, S A; Baby, L T; Baker, J; Wiedenhöver, I; Höflich, P; Volya, A; Blackmon, J C; Deibel, C M; Gardiner, H E; Lai, J; Linhardt, L E; Macon, K T; Need, E; Rasco, B C; Quails, N; Colbert, K; Gay, D L; Keeley, N

    2016-10-28

    The ^{19}Ne(p,γ)^{20}Na reaction is the second step of a reaction chain which breaks out from the hot CNO cycle, following the ^{15}O(α,γ)^{19}Ne reaction at the onset of x-ray burst events. We investigate the spectrum of the lowest proton-unbound states in ^{20}Na in an effort to resolve contradictions in spin-parity assignments and extract reliable information about the thermal reaction rate. The proton-transfer reaction ^{19}Ne(d,n)^{20}Na is measured with a beam of the radioactive isotope ^{19}Ne at an energy around the Coulomb barrier and in inverse kinematics. We observe three proton resonances with the ^{19}Ne ground state, at 0.44, 0.66, and 0.82 MeV c.m. energies, which are assigned 3^{+}, 1^{+}, and (0^{+}), respectively. In addition, we identify two resonances with the first excited state in ^{19}Ne, one at 0.20 MeV and one, tentatively, at 0.54 MeV. These observations allow us for the first time to experimentally quantify the astrophysical reaction rate on an excited nuclear state. Our experiment shows an efficient path for thermal proton capture in ^{19}Ne(p,γ)^{20}Na, which proceeds through ground state and excited-state capture in almost equal parts and eliminates the possibility for this reaction to create a bottleneck in the breakout from the hot CNO cycle.

  19. A Differential Monolithically Integrated Inductive Linear Displacement Measurement Microsystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Podhraški

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An inductive linear displacement measurement microsystem realized as a monolithic Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC is presented. The system comprises integrated microtransformers as sensing elements, and analog front-end electronics for signal processing and demodulation, both jointly fabricated in a conventional commercially available four-metal 350-nm CMOS process. The key novelty of the presented system is its full integration, straightforward fabrication, and ease of application, requiring no external light or magnetic field source. Such systems therefore have the possibility of substituting certain conventional position encoder types. The microtransformers are excited by an AC signal in MHz range. The displacement information is modulated into the AC signal by a metal grating scale placed over the microsystem, employing a differential measurement principle. Homodyne mixing is used for the demodulation of the scale displacement information, returned by the ASIC as a DC signal in two quadrature channels allowing the determination of linear position of the target scale. The microsystem design, simulations, and characterization are presented. Various system operating conditions such as frequency, phase, target scale material and distance have been experimentally evaluated. The best results have been achieved at 4 MHz, demonstrating a linear resolution of 20 µm with steel and copper scale, having respective sensitivities of 0.71 V/mm and 0.99 V/mm.

  20. Measure and integral an introduction to real analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeden, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Now considered a classic text on the topic, Measure and Integral: An Introduction to Real Analysis provides an introduction to real analysis by first developing the theory of measure and integration in the simple setting of Euclidean space, and then presenting a more general treatment based on abstract notions characterized by axioms and with less geometric content.Published nearly forty years after the first edition, this long-awaited Second Edition also:Studies the Fourier transform of functions in the spaces L1, L2, and Lp, 1 p Shows the Hilbert transform to be a bounded operator on L2, as an application of the L2 theory of the Fourier transform in the one-dimensional caseCovers fractional integration and some topics related to mean oscillation properties of functions, such as the classes of Hölder continuous functions and the space of functions of bounded mean oscillationDerives a subrepresentation formula, which in higher dimensions plays a role roughly similar to the one played by the fundamental theor...

  1. Integral image rendering procedure for aberration correction and size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Holger; Ihrig, Andreas; Ebenau, Melanie; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2014-05-20

    The challenge in rendering integral images is to use as much information preserved by the light field as possible to reconstruct a captured scene in a three-dimensional way. We propose a rendering algorithm based on the projection of rays through a detailed simulation of the optical path, considering all the physical properties and locations of the optical elements. The rendered images contain information about the correct size of imaged objects without the need to calibrate the imaging device. Additionally, aberrations of the optical system may be corrected, depending on the setup of the integral imaging device. We show simulation data that illustrates the aberration correction ability and experimental data from our plenoptic camera, which illustrates the capability of our proposed algorithm to measure size and distance. We believe this rendering procedure will be useful in the future for three-dimensional ophthalmic imaging of the human retina.

  2. Integrating patient satisfaction into performance measurement to meet improvement challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J E; Fisher, D L; Endorf-Olson, J J

    2000-05-01

    A Value Compass has been proposed to guide health care data collection. The "compass corners" represent the four types of data needed to meet health care customer expectations: appropriate clinical outcomes, improved functional status, patient satisfaction, and appropriate costs. Collection of all four types of data is necessary to select processes in need of improvement, guide improvement teams, and monitor the success of improvement efforts. INTEGRATED DATA AT BRYANLGH: BryanLGH Medical Center in Lincoln, Nebraska, has adopted multiple performance measurement systems to collect clinical outcome, financial, and patient satisfaction data into integrated databases. Data integration allows quality professionals at BryanLGH to identify quality issues from multiple perspectives and track the interrelated effects of improvement efforts. A CASE EXAMPLE: Data from the fourth quarter of 1997 indicated the need to improve processes related to cesarean section (C-section) deliveries. An interdisciplinary team was formed, which focused on educating nurses, physicians, and the community about labor support measures. Physicians were given their own rates of C-section deliveries. The C-section rate decreased from 27% to 19%, but per-case cost increased. PickerPLUS+ results indicated that BryanLGH obstetric patients reported fewer problems with receiving information than the Picker norm, but they reported more problems with the involvement of family members and friends. The data collected so far have indicated a decrease in the C-section rate and a need to continue to work on cost and psychosocial issues. A complete analysis of results was facilitated by integrated performance management systems. Successes have been easily tracked over time, and the need for further work on related processes has been clearly identified.

  3. The inclusion of shadowing effect in the reaction-rates calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, M.A.M.

    1990-03-01

    A method for the Resonance Integral calculation in the fuel and moderator regions is presented including the Shadowing effect. This effect appears due to the presence of several fuel rods in a infinite moderator region. The method is based on the approximations to the J (ζ, β) function and theirs partial derivatives in relation to β. The dependence of the Resonance Integral in the J (ζ, β) comes from the rational approximation to the neutron escape probability. The final results are obtained in a very simple and fast way, and show the good accuracy of the method. (author)

  4. Vision and dual IMU integrated attitude measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoting; Sun, Changku; Wang, Peng; Lu, Huang

    2018-01-01

    To determination relative attitude between two space objects on a rocking base, an integrated system based on vision and dual IMU (inertial determination unit) is built up. The determination system fuses the attitude information of vision with the angular determinations of dual IMU by extended Kalman filter (EKF) to obtain the relative attitude. One IMU (master) is attached to the measured motion object and the other (slave) to the rocking base. As the determination output of inertial sensor is relative to inertial frame, thus angular rate of the master IMU includes not only motion of the measured object relative to inertial frame but also the rocking base relative to inertial frame, where the latter can be seen as redundant harmful movement information for relative attitude determination between the measured object and the rocking base. The slave IMU here assists to remove the motion information of rocking base relative to inertial frame from the master IMU. The proposed integrated attitude determination system is tested on practical experimental platform. And experiment results with superior precision and reliability show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed attitude determination system.

  5. Integrated CMOS dew point sensors for relative humidity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Nicolo; Baglio, Salvatore; Castorina, Salvatore; Sacco, Vincenzo; Tringali, Cristina

    2004-07-01

    This work deals with the development of integrated relative humidity dew point sensors realized by adopting standard CMOS technology for applications in various fields. The proposed system is composed by a suspended plate that is cooled by exploiting integrated Peltier cells. The cold junctions of the cells have been spread over the plate surface to improve the homogeneity of the temperature distribution over its surface, where cooling will cause the water condensation. The temperature at which water drops occur, named dew point temperature, is a function of the air humidity. Measurement of such dew point temperature and the ambient temperature allows to know the relative humidity. The detection of water drops is achieved by adopting a capacitive sensing strategy realized by interdigited fixed combs, composed by the upper layer of the adopted process. Such a capacitive sensor, together with its conditioning circuit, drives a trigger that stops the cooling of the plate and enables the reading of the dew point temperature. Temperature measurements are achieved by means of suitably integrated thermocouples. The analytical model of the proposed system has been developed and has been used to design a prototype device and to estimate its performances. In such a prototype, the thermoelectric cooler is composed by 56 Peltier cells, made by metal 1/poly 1 junctions. The plate has a square shape with 200 μm side, and it is realized by exploiting the oxide layers. Starting from the ambient temperature a temperature variation of ΔT = 15 K can be reached in 10 ms thus allowing to measure a relative humidity greater than 40%.

  6. Path integral measure and triangulation independence in discrete gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2012-02-01

    A path integral measure for gravity should also preserve the fundamental symmetry of general relativity, which is diffeomorphism symmetry. In previous work, we argued that a successful implementation of this symmetry into discrete quantum gravity models would imply discretization independence. We therefore consider the requirement of triangulation independence for the measure in (linearized) Regge calculus, which is a discrete model for quantum gravity, appearing in the semi-classical limit of spin foam models. To this end we develop a technique to evaluate the linearized Regge action associated to Pachner moves in 3D and 4D and show that it has a simple, factorized structure. We succeed in finding a local measure for 3D (linearized) Regge calculus that leads to triangulation independence. This measure factor coincides with the asymptotics of the Ponzano Regge Model, a 3D spin foam model for gravity. We furthermore discuss to which extent one can find a triangulation independent measure for 4D Regge calculus and how such a measure would be related to a quantum model for 4D flat space. To this end, we also determine the dependence of classical Regge calculus on the choice of triangulation in 3D and 4D.

  7. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  8. APPLE-2: an improved version of APPLE code for plotting neutron and gamma ray spectra and reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Seki, Yasushi.

    1982-07-01

    A computer code APPLE-2 which plots the spatial distribution of energy spectra of multi-group neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes, and reaction rates has been developed. This code is an improved version of the previously developed APPLE code and has the following features: (1) It plots energy spectra of neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes calculated by ANISN, DOT and MORSE. (2) It calculates and plots the spatial distribution of neutron and gamma ray fluxes and various types of reaction rates such as nuclear heating rates, operational dose rates, displacement damage rates. (3) Input data specification is greatly simplified by the use of standard, response libraries and by close coupling with radiation transport calculation codes. (4) Plotting outputs are given in camera ready form. (author)

  9. EDITAR: a module for reaction rate editing and cross-section averaging within the AUS neutronics code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    The EDITAR module of the AUS neutronics code system edits one and two-dimensional flux data pools produced by other AUS modules to form reaction rates for materials and their constituent nuclides, and to average cross sections over space and energy. The module includes a Bsub(L) flux calculation for application to cell leakage. The STATUS data pool of the AUS system is used to enable the 'unsmearing' of fluxes and nuclide editing with minimal user input. The module distinguishes between neutron and photon groups, and printed reaction rates are formed accordingly. Bilinear weighting may be used to obtain material reactivity worths and to average cross sections. Bilinear weighting is at present restricted to diffusion theory leakage estimates made using mesh-average fluxes

  10. Integral measurement of fission products capture in fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Deidier, Loick.

    1979-12-01

    For the SUPERPHENIX reactor project, it was necessary to know fission products capture with about 10% accuracy in the fast breeder reactor spectra. In this purpose, integral measurements have been carried out on the main separated products by different experimental technics (oscillation, activation and irradiation methods), but particularly on irradiated fuel pins from RAPSODIE and PHENIX reactors in order to directly obtain total effect of fission products. Same tendencies have been observed for both enriched uranium fuel and LMFBR characteristic plutonium fuel. All experimental results have been introduced in CARNAVAL cross section set [fr

  11. Muon decay: Measurement of the integral asymmetry parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltrami, I.; Burkard, H.; Dincklage, R.D. von; Fetscher, W.; Gerber, H.J.; Johnson, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    The positron directional distribution following muon decay is measured. The polarized muons are derived from pion decay in flight and are brought to rest in Be metal. Using the μSR-technique P μ ξ = 1.0027 ± 0.0084 is deduced. The integral asymmetry parameters ξ bears on the mass of the W tilde (wino, the supersymmetrical partner of the gauge boson W), mediating such decay as μ → eν tilde ν tilde. Assuming very light scalar neutrini msub(n tilde) μ a new lower limit on the wino mass msub(w tilde) > 270 GeV/c 2 (90% CL) is inferred. (orig.)

  12. Calculation of homogenized Pickering NGS stainless steel adjuster rod neutron cross-sections using conservation of reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, R C [Atlantic Nuclear Services Ltd. (Canada); Tran, F [Ontario Hydro, Pickering, ON (Canada). Pickering Generating Station

    1996-12-31

    A homogenization methodology for calculation of reactivity device incremental cross-sections has been developed using reaction rate conservation (RRC). A heterogeneous transport calculation of flux was utilised to produce the homogenized cross-sections for a finite difference two group diffusion code. The RRC cross-sections have been shown to improve significantly the prediction of reactivity worth for stainless steel adjuster rods installed in Pickering NGS reactors. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  13. Determination of the 13N(p,γ)14O reaction rate through the Coulomb break-up of a 14O radioactive beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiener, J.; Lefebvre, A.; Aguer, P.; Bogaert, G.; Coc, A.; Pasquier, G.; Thibaud, J.P.; Bacri, C.O.; Bimbot, R.; Borderie, B.; Clapier, F.; Fortier, S.; Rivet, M.F.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Disdier, D.; Kraus, L.; Linck, I.; Grunberg, C.; Laurent, F.S.

    1993-01-01

    In stellar-evolution models, the 13 N(p,γ) 14 O reaction plays an important role in the hot CNO cycle. Its reaction rate depends directly on the magnitude of the radiative width of the 5.17 MeV level in 14 O. That width has been measured using the Coulomb break-up technique. A 70 MeV/u 14 O beam was excited in the Coulomb field of a 208 Pb target, the 13 N and proton fragments being recorded using a magnetic spectrometer and CsI scintillators, respectively. The experimental value Γ γ =2.4±0.9 eV in overall agreement with other recent measurements. (orig.)

  14. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part I—Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Roque; D’Amato, Roberto; Gómez, Emilio; Domingo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    The development of an error compensation model for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) and its integration into feature measurement is presented. CMMs are widespread and dependable instruments in industry and laboratories for dimensional measurement. From the tip probe sensor to the machine display, there is a complex transformation of probed point coordinates through the geometrical feature model that makes the assessment of accuracy and uncertainty measurement results difficult. Therefore, error compensation is not standardized, conversely to other simpler instruments. Detailed coordinate error compensation models are generally based on CMM as a rigid-body and it requires a detailed mapping of the CMM’s behavior. In this paper a new model type of error compensation is proposed. It evaluates the error from the vectorial composition of length error by axis and its integration into the geometrical measurement model. The non-explained variability by the model is incorporated into the uncertainty budget. Model parameters are analyzed and linked to the geometrical errors and uncertainty of CMM response. Next, the outstanding measurement models of flatness, angle, and roundness are developed. The proposed models are useful for measurement improvement with easy integration into CMM signal processing, in particular in industrial environments where built-in solutions are sought. A battery of implementation tests are presented in Part II, where the experimental endorsement of the model is included. PMID:27690052

  15. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part I—Model Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Calvo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of an error compensation model for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs and its integration into feature measurement is presented. CMMs are widespread and dependable instruments in industry and laboratories for dimensional measurement. From the tip probe sensor to the machine display, there is a complex transformation of probed point coordinates through the geometrical feature model that makes the assessment of accuracy and uncertainty measurement results difficult. Therefore, error compensation is not standardized, conversely to other simpler instruments. Detailed coordinate error compensation models are generally based on CMM as a rigid-body and it requires a detailed mapping of the CMM’s behavior. In this paper a new model type of error compensation is proposed. It evaluates the error from the vectorial composition of length error by axis and its integration into the geometrical measurement model. The non-explained variability by the model is incorporated into the uncertainty budget. Model parameters are analyzed and linked to the geometrical errors and uncertainty of CMM response. Next, the outstanding measurement models of flatness, angle, and roundness are developed. The proposed models are useful for measurement improvement with easy integration into CMM signal processing, in particular in industrial environments where built-in solutions are sought. A battery of implementation tests are presented in Part II, where the experimental endorsement of the model is included.

  16. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A [Princeton University

    2013-05-15

    This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE legacy waste problems.

  17. Integrated method for the measurement of trace nitrogenous atmospheric bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Key

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenous atmospheric bases are thought to play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their sources, transport, and sinks remain poorly understood. Of the many methods available to measure such compounds in ambient air, few meet the current need of being applicable to the complete range of potential analytes and fewer still are convenient to implement using instrumentation that is standard to most laboratories. In this work, an integrated approach to measuring trace, atmospheric, gaseous nitrogenous bases has been developed and validated. The method uses a simple acid scrubbing step to capture and concentrate the bases as their phosphite salts, which then are derivatized and analyzed using GC/MS and/or LC/MS. The advantages of both techniques in the context of the present measurements are discussed. The approach is sensitive, selective, reproducible, as well as convenient to implement and has been validated for different sampling strategies. The limits of detection for the families of tested compounds are suitable for ambient measurement applications (e.g., methylamine, 1 pptv; ethylamine, 2 pptv; morpholine, 1 pptv; aniline, 1 pptv; hydrazine, 0.1 pptv; methylhydrazine, 2 pptv, as supported by field measurements in an urban park and in the exhaust of on-road vehicles.

  18. High temperature spectral emissivity measurement using integral blackbody method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Dong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Zundong; Bloembergen, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Spectral emissivity is a critical material's thermos-physical property for heat design and radiation thermometry. A prototype instrument based upon an integral blackbody method was developed to measure material's spectral emissivity above 1000 °. The system was implemented with an optimized commercial variable-high-temperature blackbody, a high speed linear actuator, a linear pyrometer, and an in-house designed synchronization circuit. A sample was placed in a crucible at the bottom of the blackbody furnace, by which the sample and the tube formed a simulated blackbody which had an effective total emissivity greater than 0.985. During the measurement, the sample was pushed to the end opening of the tube by a graphite rod which was actuated through a pneumatic cylinder. A linear pyrometer was used to monitor the brightness temperature of the sample surface through the measurement. The corresponding opto-converted voltage signal was fed and recorded by a digital multi-meter. A physical model was proposed to numerically evaluate the temperature drop along the process. Tube was discretized as several isothermal cylindrical rings, and the temperature profile of the tube was measurement. View factors between sample and rings were calculated and updated along the whole pushing process. The actual surface temperature of the sample at the end opening was obtained. Taking advantages of the above measured voltage profile and the calculated true temperature, spectral emissivity under this temperature point was calculated.

  19. Integrating measurements of indoor thoron and its progeny concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo, W.H.; Iida, T.; Hashiguchi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, indoor surveys in Europe and Asia revealed that the dose contribution from thoron and its progeny can equal or even exceed that of radon and its progeny. For measuring thoron and its progeny, several methods had been reported. However, convenient, low-cost and time-integrating measuring methods which are suitable for large-scale surveys are still unavailable. To solve this problem, three integrating measuring methods with allyl diglycol carbonate plastic (CR-39) as detectors have recently been. The results indicated that they are suitable for estimating the indoor thoron and its progeny concentrations when the public exposure to thoron and its progeny is taken into account. Cup monitor - Former types of passive integrating 222 Rn and 220 Rn cup monitors had been reported. Recently, in order to improve the sensitivity of thoron detection, the air exchange rate between the inner and outer cup was enhanced, and the radius of the hemisphere was reduced to 37.5 mm. Furthermore, the procedure of detector exchange was made to be more convenient. Equilibrium-equivalent 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations monitor (EEC monitor) - The measuring system is composed of a monitor head and a diaphragm pump. The total weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg, which makes it portable. The construction of the monitor head and the measuring principle were also reported by the authors. Thoron progeny deposition rate monitor - The monitor is simply constituted a piece of CR-39 covered with thin sheets of absorbers. The thickness of the absorbers are adjusted to let only the α particles emitted from 212 Pb impinge on the detector. The concentrations of thoron progeny are estimated from the deposition rates, assuming that the deposition velocities of thoron progeny are constant in general dwellings. The improved cup monitor has higher sensitivity than former monitors, with a calibration factor of 1.59x10 -3 tracks·cm -2 (Bq·m -3 ·h) -1 for thoron. The accuracy of the ECC

  20. Performance measurement integrated information framework in e-Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Hilaida; Hernandez, Juan Carlos; Vizán, Antonio; Ríos, José

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of Internet technologies has led to e-Manufacturing technologies becoming more widely used and to the development of tools for compiling, transforming and synchronising manufacturing data through the Web. In this context, a potential area for development is the extension of virtual manufacturing to performance measurement (PM) processes, a critical area for decision making and implementing improvement actions in manufacturing. This paper proposes a PM information framework to integrate decision support systems in e-Manufacturing. Specifically, the proposed framework offers a homogeneous PM information exchange model that can be applied through decision support in e-Manufacturing environment. Its application improves the necessary interoperability in decision-making data processing tasks. It comprises three sub-systems: a data model, a PM information platform and PM-Web services architecture. A practical example of data exchange for measurement processes in the area of equipment maintenance is shown to demonstrate the utility of the model.

  1. From cutting-edge pointwise cross-section to groupwise reaction rate: A primer

    OpenAIRE

    Sublet Jean-Christophe; Fleming Michael; Gilbert Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear research and development community has a history of using both integral and differential experiments to support accurate lattice-reactor, nuclear reactor criticality and shielding simulations, as well as verification and validation efforts of cross sections and emitted particle spectra. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the neutron spectrum in its entirety, with correct propagation of uncertainties and standard deviatio...

  2. Integral Criteria for Measuring the Quality of Teacher Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Navickienė

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—To construct the knowledge evaluation quality integral criteria, which allows to ascertain whether the different teachers properly assess the students’ knowledge. The criteria has been tested setting up the educational experiment and examining the six mathematics lecturers’ assessments.Design/methodology/approach—This research involved the Mykolas Romeris University students of Public Administration degree second year and Management of Organizations degree first year. The test questions for students were designed using the mathematical knowledge assessment information system, which allows for closed-ended mathematical test, to obtain statistical data about test takers, to perform quality analysis of the test; in the middle and the end of the semester.Findings—The construction technique for the evaluation quality criteria of the students’ working results assessment, which were performed by six different lecturers, during practical trainings, seminars, laboratory and other sessions is proposed in this article.Research limitations/implications—The constructed evaluation criteria is universal: it does not depend on the particular subject; it can be applied to several groups, courses or lecturers. It depends on three calculated indicators I, S, K, which show in two ways obtained estimates of the measured information compatibility of degrees, marks matching and correlation terms.Practical implications—The integral criteria has been tested examining the six mathematics lecturers’ assessments.Originality/Value—Constructing the criteria have been used the educational measurement models of authors of this article and other researchers, however its’ connection to general (integral criteria, best of authors’ knowledge, is original and have not be researched before.Keywords: knowledge evaluation, quality of teacher evaluation, evaluation of teachers, mathematical modeling.Research type: research paper.

  3. Regularization of the path integral measure for anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we show that the variation of the integral measure is fully equivalent to the authentic field theoretical treatment for a two-point function. To do this we first examine various ways of solving the factor A(x) in Fujikawa's expression for the functional integral measure. We define the anomaly as A(x)-A f (x), where A f (x) is the Fujikawa factor for the free field. We then propose a regulator which leads to a finite result for any anomaly. We then show that the A(x) can be defined in terms of the proper-time through a splitting procedure. The original Fujikawa prescription for A(x) is shown to be closely related to the proper-time description of the anomaly, initiated by Schwinger. Its equivalence to the authentic field theoretical treatment will be proven as a consequence of these investigations. The ξ-functional regularization for A(x) is also examined. Then we will examine the way to deduce the anomaly from the effective potential by adopting the Φ 4 model as an example. The renormalization group equation for the effective potential is solved exactly to obtain the precise form of the β-function in terms of which we reexpress the result obtained in a previous section for A(x). We discuss the physical significance of the renormalization group equation for the case of broken symmetry

  4. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-01-01

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity σv is calculated, where σ is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the TDF

  5. Improved thermodynamics of the dense solar plasma and molecular-dynamics simulations of the nuclear-reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dan

    available, there is no alternative source. The official OPAL tables, however, have disadvantages. First, they are inflexible regarding the chemical mix, which is set once and for all by the producers of the tables. Our equation of state will allow the user to choose, in principle, an arbitrary mix. Second, the OPAL tables by their very nature are limited by the errors of interpolation within tables. The second equation of state model is a density expansion based on the Feynman-Kac path-integral formalism. By making use of the equivalence of quantum Hamiltonian matrix and the classical action of closed and open filaments (paths), an analytic formalism of equation of state. Although the character of density expansion limits its application, the formalism can still be valid in most region in the Sun. Our work provides the link between the abstract theoretical formalism that was developed in the 1990s and a numerically smooth realization that can be used in solar and stellar models. Since it is so far the most exact and systematic approach for an EOS, it provides another way to study the influence of different very fine physical effects, despite considerable limitations in its domain of applicability. In the nuclear-reaction part of the thesis, we have used a molecular-dynamics method to simulate the motion of protons in a hydrogen plasma (which is a good approximation for this purpose). Quantum tunneling explains why nuclear fusion can occur in the first place, considering the "low" temperature in the solar core. It is well known that this tunneling is enhanced (which leads to higher nuclear reaction rates) in the presence of Coulomb screening. In the 1950, Salpeter formulated a theory based on the static-screened Coulomb potential, as derived by Debye and H=FCckel in the 1920s. As expected, Salpeter obtained enhanced reaction rates. But from our simulation, we confirmed the results of a recent controversy about the existence of a dynamic effect. Since the bulk of fusion

  6. Study of the reduction in detection limits of track detectors used for {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction rate measure through annealing and chemical etching experiments; Estudo da reducao nos limites de deteccao de detectores de tracos utilizados na medida de taxa de reacao {sup 10}B(n, α){sup 7}Li atraves de experimentos de annealing e ataque quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Herminiane L.; Smilgys, Barbara; Guedes, Sandro, E-mail: hluizav@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Castro, Vinicius A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-08-15

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiotherapy for cancer treatment. It is based on {sup 10}B(n, α){sup 7}Li reaction, which can be measured by track detectors capable of recording events that strike them. With this recording, it is possible to determine the number of alpha particles and recoiling Lithium-7 nucleus, reaction products, and from this information, which amount of radiation dose a patient is exposed to. In this work, PADC detectors were characterized, irradiated at the IEA-R1 IPEN/CNEN reactor to assess the contribution of the{sup 10}B(n, α){sup 7}Li reaction and protons from fast neutron scattering with the elements that compounds the tissue. With the aim of reducing the proton background, the detectors were subjected to heating experiments at 80°C for periods in the range 0-100 hours. This was done in order to restore partially modified structure of the detector, causing a reduction in the size and density of tracks. This effect is known as annealing. For the visualization of tracks at microscope, detectors were made three chemical attacks with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) for 30, 60 and 90 minutes at 70°C. It was observed a reduction in the track density achieving a plateau heating time of 50 hours. For detectors that have not undergone annealing and were etched with another etchant, PEW solution, a reduction of 87% in track density was obtained. (author)

  7. Astrophysical reaction rate for the neutron-generator reaction 13C(alpha,n)16O in asymptotic giant branch stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E D; Rogachev, G V; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Baby, L T; Brown, S; Cluff, W T; Crisp, A M; Diffenderfer, E; Goldberg, V Z; Green, B W; Hinners, T; Hoffman, C R; Kemper, K W; Momotyuk, O; Peplowski, P; Pipidis, A; Reynolds, R; Roeder, B T

    2006-11-10

    The reaction 13C(alpha,n) is considered to be the main source of neutrons for the s process in asymptotic giant branch stars. At low energies, the cross section is dominated by the 1/2+ 6.356 MeV subthreshold resonance in (17)O whose contribution at stellar temperatures is uncertain by a factor of 10. In this work, we performed the most precise determination of the low-energy astrophysical S factor using the indirect asymptotic normalization (ANC) technique. The alpha-particle ANC for the subthreshold state has been measured using the sub-Coulomb alpha-transfer reaction ((6)Li,d). Using the determined ANC, we calculated S(0), which turns out to be an order of magnitude smaller than in the nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates.

  8. Simple Closed-Form Expression for Penning Reaction Rate Coefficients for Cold Molecular Collisions by Non-Hermitian Time-Independent Adiabatic Scattering Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Ben-Asher, Anael; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2018-01-09

    We present a simple expression and its derivation for reaction rate coefficients for cold anisotropic collision experiments based on adiabatic variational theory and time-independent non-Hermitian scattering theory. We demonstrate that only the eigenenergies of the resulting one-dimensional Schrödinger equation for different complex adiabats are required. The expression is applied to calculate the Penning ionization rate coefficients of an excited metastable helium atom with molecular hydrogen in an energy range spanning from hundreds of kelvins down to the millikelvin regime. Except for trivial quantities like the masses of the nuclei and the bond length of the diatomic molecule participating in the collision, one needs as input data only the complex potential energy surface (CPES). In calculations, we used recently obtained ab initio CPES by D. Bhattacharya et al. ( J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2017 , 13 , 1682 - 1690 ) without fitting parameters. The results show good accord with current measurements ( Nat. Phys. 2017 , 13 , 35 - 38 ).

  9. An integrity measure to benchmark quantum error correcting memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaosi; de Beaudrap, Niel; O'Gorman, Joe; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2018-02-01

    Rapidly developing experiments across multiple platforms now aim to realise small quantum codes, and so demonstrate a memory within which a logical qubit can be protected from noise. There is a need to benchmark the achievements in these diverse systems, and to compare the inherent power of the codes they rely upon. We describe a recently introduced performance measure called integrity, which relates to the probability that an ideal agent will successfully ‘guess’ the state of a logical qubit after a period of storage in the memory. Integrity is straightforward to evaluate experimentally without state tomography and it can be related to various established metrics such as the logical fidelity and the pseudo-threshold. We offer a set of experimental milestones that are steps towards demonstrating unconditionally superior encoded memories. Using intensive numerical simulations we compare memories based on the five-qubit code, the seven-qubit Steane code, and a nine-qubit code which is the smallest instance of a surface code; we assess both the simple and fault-tolerant implementations of each. While the ‘best’ code upon which to base a memory does vary according to the nature and severity of the noise, nevertheless certain trends emerge.

  10. Optimization of the German integrated information and measurement system (IMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.; Weiss, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to a widespread contamination of the environment in most European countries. In Germany, like in all other countries, it took some time to evaluate the radiological situation, time which is extremely valuable in the early phases of an accident when decisions on countermeasures like sheltering, iodine prophylaxis or evacuation have to be taken. For a better emergency preparedness the Integrated Information and Measurement System (IMIS) has been developed and established in Germany. In case of a widespread contamination of the environment, the system will provide the decision makers with all information necessary to evaluate the radiological situation and to decide on countermeasures. Presently this system is upgraded due to the adoption of the European decision supporting system RODOS and by the improvement of the national information exchange. For this purpose the web based information system ELAN has been developed. The national systems have to be integrated into the European and international communication systems. In this presentation the IMIS system is briefly described and the new features and modules of the system are discussed in greater detail

  11. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  12. Integral and measure from rather simple to rather complex

    CERN Document Server

    Mackevicius, Vigirdas

    2014-01-01

    This book is devoted to integration, one of the two main operations in calculus. In Part 1, the definition of the integral of a one-variable function is different (not essentially, but rather methodically) from traditional definitions of Riemann or Lebesgue integrals. Such an approach allows us, on the one hand, to quickly develop the practical skills of integration as well as, on the other hand, in Part 2, to pass naturally to the more general Lebesgue integral. Based on the latter, in Part 2, the author develops a theory of integration for functions of several variables. In Part 3, within

  13. CONCERNING CHAIN GROWTH SPECIFIC REACTION RATE AS A PART OF THE PROCESS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE MASS RADICAL POLYMERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sultanova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It is the chain growth specific reaction rate that was determined for the process of methyl methacrylate mass radical polymerization within the temperature range of 40–900 С in quasi-steady approximation by means of Monte Carlo method. The theoretical model of radical polymerization was developed taking the gel effect into account. Computer software was developed that enables to imitate radical polymerization process taking gel effect into account within the minimum run time. The programme was tested on asymptotic examples as well as was applied for methyl methacrylate mass radical polymerization. The programme makes it possible to calculate monomer conversion, molecular mass variation, molecular-mass distribution, etc.

  14. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  15. A survey of the reaction rate constants for the thermal dissociation and recombination of nitrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraffa, Lionel; Dulikravich, George S.; Keeney, Timothy C.; Deiwert, George S.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the present report is to survey the various values of forward and backward reaction rate constants used by investigators in the field of high-temperature (T greater than 2000 K) gas reactions involving nitrogen and oxygen only. The objective is to find those values that correlate well so that they can be used for the studies of hypersonic flow and supersonic combustion with reasonable confidence. Relatively good agreement among these various values is observed for temperatures lower than 10,000 K.

  16. The effect of weak resonances on the sup 25 Mg(p,gamma) sup 26 Al reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics; Howard, A J [Trinity Coll., Hartford, CT (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Smith, M S; Magnus, P V; Parker, P D [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Wright Nuclear Structure Lab.

    1989-12-11

    The {sup 25}Mg({sup 3}He,d){sup 26}Al reaction has been used to estimate proton spectroscopic factors for states which could be weak {sup 25}Mg+p resonances located near the proton-capture threshold. One of these states (corresponding to a resonance energy E{sub c.m.}=92.2 keV) is found to have a significant effect on the {sup 25}Mg(p,gamma){sup 26}Al reaction rate for temperatures characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars or late-stage red giants. (orig.).

  17. Validation of Cross Sections with Criticality Experiment and Reaction Rates: the Neptunium Case

    CERN Document Server

    Leong, L S; Audouin, L; Berthier, B; Le Naour, C; Stéphan, C; Paradela, C; Tarrío, D; Duran, I

    2014-01-01

    The Np-237 neutron-induced fission cross section has been recently measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n\\_TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements the n\\_TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7\\% beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of the n\\_TOF data, we considered a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of Np-237, surrounded by uranium highly enriched in U-235 so as to approach criticality with fast neutrons. The multiplication factor k(eff) of the calculation is in better agreement with the experiment when we replace the ENDF/B-VII. 0 evaluation of the Np-237 fission cross section by the n\\_TOF data. We also explored the hypothesis of deficiencies of the inelastic cross section in U-235 which has been invoked by some authors to explain the deviation of 750 pcm. The large modification needed to reduce the deviation seems to be incompatible with existing inelastic cross section measurements. Also we show that t...

  18. New high accuracy measurement of the O-17(p,alpha)N-14 reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Coc, A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Burjan, Václav; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hons, Zdeněk; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G.G.; Kroha, Václav; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; de Sereville, N.; Somorjai, E.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2010), 032801/1-032801/5 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH * CNO CYCLE * NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2010

  19. MEASURE: An integrated data-analysis and model identification facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaidip; Iyer, Ravi K.

    1990-01-01

    The first phase of the development of MEASURE, an integrated data analysis and model identification facility is described. The facility takes system activity data as input and produces as output representative behavioral models of the system in near real time. In addition a wide range of statistical characteristics of the measured system are also available. The usage of the system is illustrated on data collected via software instrumentation of a network of SUN workstations at the University of Illinois. Initially, statistical clustering is used to identify high density regions of resource-usage in a given environment. The identified regions form the states for building a state-transition model to evaluate system and program performance in real time. The model is then solved to obtain useful parameters such as the response-time distribution and the mean waiting time in each state. A graphical interface which displays the identified models and their characteristics (with real time updates) was also developed. The results provide an understanding of the resource-usage in the system under various workload conditions. This work is targeted for a testbed of UNIX workstations with the initial phase ported to SUN workstations on the NASA, Ames Research Center Advanced Automation Testbed.

  20. Investigating the Effectiveness of Case-based Learning Instruction on Students’ Understanding the Subject of Reaction Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Ünal SÜMEN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study has been carried out to determine the effectiveness of case-based learning related to reaction rate on students’ conceptual understanding and conceptual change. In this respect, a class of 11th grade students in an Anatolian High School in the center of Izmir city was chosen randomly as experimental group (n=26 and another as control group (n=22. Reaction rate unit was taught to the experimental group within case-based learning method, and to the control group through activities defined in Chemistry curriculum. Comprehension Test developed by Cakmakci (2005 was utilized as data collecting instrument. The Comprehension Test was applied simultaneously to both experimental and control groups before and after the teaching. The data collected via the Comprehension Test was analyzed in terms of both quantity and quality. As a result of the study, it was noted that there was a significant difference between the groups after the instruction in favor of the experimental group. Also, it was determined that case-based learning was more effective in promoting conceptual change and assuring higher level of conceptual understanding for students.

  1. Reactions and reaction rates in the regional aquifer beneath the Pajarito Plateau, north-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, Anne G.; Keating, Elizabeth H.; Guthrie, George D.; Zhu, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Reactions and reaction rates within aquifers are fundamental components of critical hydrological processes. However, reactions simulated in laboratory experiments typically demonstrate rates that are much faster than those observed in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct more reaction rate analyses in natural settings. This study of geochemical reactions in the regional aquifer in the Pajarito Plateau near Los Alamos, New Mexico combines modeling with petrographic assessment to further knowledge and understanding of complex natural hydrologic systems. Groundwater geochemistry shows marked evolution along assumed flow paths. The flow path chosen for this study was evaluated using inverse mass balance modeling to calculate the mass transfer. X-ray diffraction and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy were used to identify possible reactants and products. Considering the mineralogy of the aquifer and saturation indices for the regional water refined initial interpretations. Calculations yielded dissolution rates for plagioclase on the order of 10-15 mol s-1 m-2 and for K-feldspar on the order of 10-17 mol s-1 m-2, orders of magnitude slower than laboratory rates. While these rates agree with other aquifer studies, they must be considered in the light of the uncertainty associated with geometric surface area estimates, 14C ages, and aquifer properties.

  2. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  3. Experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates (n,γ) by the gamma-rays capture spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of the gamma-rays capture spectrometry was used in the experimental determination of nuclear reaction rates of the type (n,γ). This technique consists in the incidence of a thermal neutrons collimated beam upon a sample, detecting the capture spectrum of gamma rays emitted at a solid fixed angle. In the determination of the efficiency curve intrinsic to the detection electronic system the reactions 199 Hg(n,γ) 200 Hg, 56 Fe(n,γ) 57 Fe and 63 Cu(n,γ) 64 Cu were used with the energy of the gamma rays capture of 5.976, 7.635 and 7.915 Mev respectively, through the irradiation of standard samples of Hg(175.3g), Fe(110.4g) and Cu(108.5g) of cylindrical geometry the two former and parallelepiped the latter. The problem concerning the corrections due to the thermal neutrons flux depression, the gammas auto-attenuation, and the geometric factor due to the cylindrical and parallelepiped geometry are involved in the data process. The experimental determination of the reaction 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl rate was made through the observation of the gamma caputre of 6.111 Mev when a sample of CaCl 2 of cylindrical geometry was irradiated. This rate can be favorably compared with the reaction rate determined theoretically. (author)

  4. Determination of the reaction rate coefficient of sulphide mine tailings deposited under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoh, Akué Sylvette; Mbonimpa, Mamert; Bussière, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    The efficiency of a water cover to limit dissolved oxygen (DO) availability to underlying acid-generating mine tailings can be assessed by calculating the DO flux at the tailings-water interface. Fick's equations, which are generally used to calculate this flux, require knowing the effective DO diffusion coefficient (Dw) and the reaction (consumption) rate coefficient (Kr) of the tailings, or the DO concentration profile. Whereas Dw can be accurately estimated, few studies have measured the parameter Kr for submerged sulphide tailings. The objective of this study was to determine Kr for underwater sulphide tailings in a laboratory experiment. Samples of sulphide mine tailings (an approximately 6 cm layer) were placed in a cell under a water cover (approximately 2 cm) maintained at constant DO concentration. Two tailings were studied: TA1 with high sulphide content (83% pyrite) and TA2 with low sulphide content (2.8% pyrite). DO concentration was measured with a microelectrode at various depths above and below the tailings-water interface at 1 mm intervals. Results indicate that steady-state condition was rapidly attained. As expected, a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was observed in all cases. An iterative back-calculation process using the numerical code POLLUTEv6 and taking the DBL into account provided the Kr values used to match calculated and experimental concentration profiles. Kr obtained for tailings TA1 and TA2 was about 80 d(-1) and 6.5 d(-1), respectively. For comparison purposes, Kr obtained from cell tests on tailings TA1 was lower than Kr calculated from the sulphate production rate obtained from shake-flask tests. Steady-state DO flux at the water-tailings interface was then calculated with POLLUTEv6 using tailings characteristics Dw and Kr. For the tested conditions, DO flux ranged from 608 to 758 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA1 and from 177 to 221 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA2. The impact of placing a protective layer of inert material over

  5. Co-solvent effects on reaction rate and reaction equilibrium of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, A; Canales, R; Held, C; Luong, T Q; Winter, R; Zaitsau, D H; Verevkin, S P; Sadowski, G

    2018-04-25

    This work presents an approach that expresses the Michaelis constant KaM and the equilibrium constant Kth of an enzymatic peptide hydrolysis based on thermodynamic activities instead of concentrations. This provides KaM and Kth values that are independent of any co-solvent. To this end, the hydrolysis reaction of N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide catalysed by the enzyme α-chymotrypsin was studied in pure buffer and in the presence of the co-solvents dimethyl sulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, urea, and two salts. A strong influence of the co-solvents on the measured Michaelis constant (KM) and equilibrium constant (Kx) was observed, which was found to be caused by molecular interactions expressed as activity coefficients. Substrate and product activity coefficients were used to calculate the activity-based values KaM and Kth for the co-solvent free reaction. Based on these constants, the co-solvent effect on KM and Kx was predicted in almost quantitative agreement with the experimental data. The approach presented here does not only reveal the importance of understanding the thermodynamic non-ideality of reactions taking place in biological solutions and in many technological applications, it also provides a framework for interpreting and quantifying the multifaceted co-solvent effects on enzyme-catalysed reactions that are known and have been observed experimentally for a long time.

  6. Neutron spectrum adjustment using reaction rate data acquired with a liquid dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Ikeda, Y.; Uno, Y.; Maekawa, F.

    1997-01-01

    A dosimetry technique based on neutron activation of circulating water with dissolved salts is discussed. The neutron source was the FNS accelerator at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. Yttrium chloride hexahydrate (YCl 3· 6H 2 O) was the salt (264.9 grams dissolved in 16.094 liters of water). Gamma-ray yields were measured with an intrinsic Ge detector. The following reactions were examined: (1) 16 O(n,p) 16 N (E thresh = 10.245 MeV, t 1/2 = 7.13 sec, E γ = 6.129 MeV); (2) 37 Cl(n,p) 37 S (E thresh = 4.194 MeV, t 1/2 = 5.05 min, E γ = 3.104 MeV); (3) 89 Y(n,n') 89m Y (E thresh = 0.919 MeV, t 1/2 = 16.06 sec, E γ = 0.909 MeV). This paper describes use of the generalized least-squares (GLS) method to adjust the neutron spectrum

  7. 31 P magnetic resonance fingerprinting for rapid quantification of creatine kinase reaction rate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlie Y; Liu, Yuchi; Huang, Shuying; Griswold, Mark A; Seiberlich, Nicole; Yu, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 31 P spectroscopic magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) method for fast quantification of the chemical exchange rate between phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via creatine kinase (CK). A 31 P MRF sequence (CK-MRF) was developed to quantify the forward rate constant of ATP synthesis via CK ( kfCK), the T 1 relaxation time of PCr ( T1PCr), and the PCr-to-ATP concentration ratio ( MRPCr). The CK-MRF sequence used a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP)-type excitation with ramped flip angles and a unique saturation scheme sensitive to the exchange between PCr and γATP. Parameter estimation was accomplished by matching the acquired signals to a dictionary generated using the Bloch-McConnell equation. Simulation studies were performed to examine the susceptibility of the CK-MRF method to several potential error sources. The accuracy of nonlocalized CK-MRF measurements before and after an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) protocol was compared with the magnetization transfer (MT-MRS) method in rat hindlimb at 9.4 T (n = 14). The reproducibility of CK-MRF was also assessed by comparing CK-MRF measurements with both MT-MRS (n = 17) and four angle saturation transfer (FAST) (n = 7). Simulation results showed that CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was robust, with less than 5% error in the presence of model inaccuracies including dictionary resolution, metabolite T 2 values, inorganic phosphate metabolism, and B 1 miscalibration. Estimation of kfCK by CK-MRF (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 at baseline and 0.42 ± 0.03 s -1 post-IR) showed strong agreement with MT-MRS (0.39 ± 0.03 s -1 at baseline and 0.44 ± 0.04 s -1 post-IR). kfCK estimation was also similar between CK-MRF and FAST (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 for CK-MRF and 0.38 ± 0.11 s -1 for FAST). The coefficient of variation from 20 s CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was 42% of that by 150 s MT-MRS acquisition and was 12% of that by 20 s FAST

  8. Spent nuclear fuel project recommended reaction rate constants for corrosion of N-Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.; Pajunen, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the Hanford Site's K Basins. The SNF Project has been tasked by the DOE with moving the spent N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to contained dry storage in order to reduce operating costs and environmental hazards. The chemical reactivity of the fuel must be understood at each process step and during long-term dry storage. Normally, the first step would be to measure the N-fuel reactivity before attempting thermal-hydraulic transfer calculations; however, because of the accelerated project schedule, the initial modeling was performed using literature values for uranium reactivity. These literature values were typically found for unirradiated, uncorroded metal. It was fully recognized from the beginning that irradiation and corrosion effects could cause N-fuel to exhibit quite different reactivities than those commonly found in the literature. Even for unirradiated, uncorroded uranium metal, many independent variables affect uranium metal reactivity resulting in a wide scatter of data. Despite this wide reactivity range, it is necessary to choose a defensible model and estimate the reactivity range of the N-fuel until actual reactivity can be established by characterization activities. McGillivray, Ritchie, and Condon developed data and/or models that apply for certain samples over limited temperature ranges and/or reaction conditions (McGillivray 1994, Ritchie 1981 and 1986, and Condon 1983). These models are based upon small data sets and have relatively large correlation coefficients

  9. Aerial Measuring System Technical Integration Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory

    2003-06-01

    Fiscal Year 2002 is the second year of a five-year commitment by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to invest in development of new and state-of-the-art technologies for the Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) project. In 2000, NNSA committed to two million dollars for AMS Technical Integration (TI) for each of five years. The tragedy of September 11, 2001, profoundly influenced the program. NNSA redirected people and funding resources at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to more immediate needs. Funds intended for AMS TI were redirected to NNSA's new posture of leaning further forward throughout. AMS TI was brought to a complete halt on December 10, 2001. Then on April 30, 2002, NNSA Headquarters allowed the restart of AMS TI at the reduced level of $840,000. The year's events resulted in a slow beginning of several projects, some of which were resumed only a few weeks before the AMS TI Symposium held at RSL on July 30.

  10. Multi-channel normal speed gated integrator in the measurement of the laser scattering light energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dong; Yu Xiaoqi; Hu Yuanfeng

    2005-01-01

    With the method of integration in a limited time, a Multi-channel normal speed gated integrator based on VXI system has been developed for measuring the signals with changeable pulse width in laser scattering light experiment. It has been tested with signal sources in ICF experiment. In tests, the integral nonlinearity between the integral results of the gated integrator and that of an oscilloscope is less than 1%. In the ICF experiments the maximum error between the integral results of the gated integrator and that of oscilloscope is less than 3% of the full scale range of the gated integrator. (authors)

  11. Decomposition reaction rate of BCl3-C3H6(propene)-H2 in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jun; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Ren, Hongjiang; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2012-07-05

    The decomposition reaction rate in the BCl(3)-C(3)H(6)-H(2) gas phase reaction system in preparing boron carbides was investigated based on the most favorable reaction pathways proposed by Jiang et al. [Theor. Chem. Accs. 2010, 127, 519] and Yang et al. [J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2012, 11, 53]. The rate constants of all the elementary reactions were evaluated with the variational transition state theory. The vibrational frequencies for the stationary points as well as the selected points along the minimum energy paths (MEPs) were calculated with density functional theory at the B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were refined with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction associated with a transition state, the MEP was obtained with the intrinsic reaction coordinates, while for the elementary reaction without transition state, the relaxed potential energy surface scan was employed to obtain the MEP. The rate constants were calculated for temperatures within 200-2000 K and fitted into three-parameter Arrhenius expressions. The reaction rates were investigated by using the COMSOL software to solve numerically the coupled differential rate equations. The results show that the reactions are, consistent with the experiments, appropriate at 1100-1500 K with the reaction time of 30 s for 1100 K, 1.5 s for 1200 K, 0.12 s for 1300 K, 0.011 s for 1400 K, or 0.001 s for 1500 K, for propene being almost completely consumed. The completely dissociated species, boron carbides C(3)B, C(2)B, and CB, have very low concentrations, and C(3)B is the main product at higher temperatures, while C(2)B is the main product at lower temperatures. For the reaction time 1 s, all these concentrations approach into a nearly constant. The maximum value (in mol/m(3)) is for the highest temperature 1500 K with the orders of -13, -17, and -23 for C(3)B, C(2)B, and CB, respectively. It was also found that the logarithm of the overall reaction rate and reciprocal

  12. An integrative review: Developing and measuring creativity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xue; Zang, Yuli

    2018-03-01

    To analyze and synthesise the existing evidence on creativity in nursing. An integrative review. A systematic search was conducted using seven English databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, Wiley, and Medline) and the top three best Chinese databases (CNKI, Wanfang Data, and VIP). The combined keywords, creativity and nursing/nurse, were used to search for relevant journal articles that were written in English or Chinese from January 1995 to December 2016. The components of articles, i.e. title, abstract, full-text and the cited reference, were screened, filtered, evaluated and recorded according to the PRISMA statements and Joanna Briggs Institute Checklists. Thematic analysis was performed to synthesise evidence from the full-texts of studies. Fifteen quantitative and seven qualitative studies were included in this review. A joyful affective perspective enriched the conceptualization of creativity in nursing. Many intrinsic factors (e.g. learning styles, thinking styles, intrinsic passion, interest in nursing and achievement motivation) or extrinsic factors (mostly workplace problems and nurses' shortage) could influence nurses' and nursing students' creativity. Artistic expressions (e.g. painting, music, and pottery), self-directed learning and group/team work were reported to have a positive effect on creativity enhancement. None of existing instruments can adequately measure nurses' or nursing students' creativity. The concept of creativity requires an explicit definition, which is essential to the development and evaluation of creativity in nursing education and practice. Many factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' creativity can be implemented to achieve positive outcomes through efforts at artistic expressions, self-directed learning and teamwork. An instrument with satisfactory psychometric properties should be available for monitoring creativity development among nurses and nursing students. Copyright © 2017

  13. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  14. Calculation of astrophysical S-factor and reaction rate in 12C(p, γ)13N reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, A.; Sadeghi, H.; Pourimani, R.

    2018-02-01

    The 12C(p, γ)13N reaction is the first process in the CNO cycle. Also it is a source of low-energy solar neutrinos in various neutrino experiments. Therefore, it is of high interest to gain data of the astrophysical S-factor in low energies. By applying Faddeev's method, we calculated wave functions for the bound state of 13N. Then the cross sections for resonance and non-resonance were calculated through using Breit-Wigner and direct capture cross section formulae, respectively. After that, we calculated the total S-factor and compared it with previous experimental data, revealing a good agreement altogether. Then, we extrapolated the S-factor in zero energy and the result was 1.32 ± 0.19 (keV.b). In the end, we calculated reaction rate and compared it with NACRE data.

  15. Study of the Reaction Rate of Gold Nanotube Synthesis from Sacrificial Silver Nanorods through the Galvanic Replacement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out about the gold nanotube synthesis via a galvanic replacement reaction. The progress of the gold nanotube synthesis was investigated using electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, the reaction rates of gold nanotube formation in the early stage of the reaction were studied. The chlorine ion concentration linearly increased with the gold precursor concentration but deviated from the stoichiometric amounts. This deviation was probably due to AgCl precipitates formed by the reaction of chlorine ions with dissolved silver ions. The replacement reaction was promoted with increased temperature and was nonlinearly proportional to the gold ion concentration. The outcomes of this research will enhance the current understanding of the galvanic replacement reaction.

  16. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye-sensitised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, L.; West, K.; Winther-Jensen, B.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide/tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide....../tri-iodide couple should be fast at the counter electrode, i.e. this electrode must have a high catalytic activity towards the redox couple, and the same reaction must be slow on the photo electrode. The catalytic activity is investigated for platinum, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPy......), and polyaniline (PANI)-all deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. Both Pt and PEDOT are found to have sufficiently high catalytic activities for practical use as counter electrodes in DSSC. The reaction resistance on FTO and anatase confirmed the beneficial effect of a compact anatase layer on top...

  18. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  19. Constraints on the ^22Ne(α,n)^25Mg reaction rate from ^natMg+n Total and ^25Mg(n,γ ) Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Paul

    2002-10-01

    The ^22Ne(α,n)^25Mg reaction is the neutron source during the s process in massive and intermediate mass stars as well as a secondary neutron source during the s process in low mass stars. Therefore, an accurate determination of this rate is important for a better understanding of the origin of nuclides heavier than iron as well as for improving s-process models. Also, because the s process produces seed nuclides for a later p process in massive stars, an accurate value for this rate is important for a better understanding of the p process. Because the lowest observed resonance in direct ^22Ne(α,n)^25Mg measurements is considerably above the most important energy range for s-process temperatures, the uncertainty in this rate is dominated by the poorly known properties of states in ^26Mg between this resonance and threshold. Neutron measurements can observe these states with much better sensitivity and determine their parameters much more accurately than direct ^22Ne(α,n)^25Mg measurements. I have analyzed previously reported Mg+n total and ^25Mg(n,γ ) cross sections to obtain a much improved set of resonance parameters for states in ^26Mg in this region, and an improved estimate of the uncertainty in the ^22Ne(α,n)^25Mg reaction rate. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battell, LLC.

  20. Defining and measuring integrated patient care: promoting the next frontier in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Burgers, Jako; Friedberg, Mark; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Leape, Lucian; Schneider, Eric

    2011-02-01

    Integration of care is emerging as a central challenge of health care delivery, particularly for patients with multiple, complex chronic conditions. The authors argue that the concept of "integrated patient care" would benefit from further clarification regarding (a) the object of integration and (b) its essential components, particularly when constructing measures.To address these issues, the authors propose a definition of integrated patient care that distinguishes it from integrated delivery organizations, acknowledging that integrated organizational structures and processes may fail to produce integrated patient care. The definition emphasizes patients' central role as active participants in managing their own health by including patient centeredness as a key element of integrated patient care. Measures based on the proposed definition will enable empirical assessment of the potential relationships between the integration of organizations, the integration of patient care, and patient outcomes, providing valuable guidance to health systems reformers.

  1. APMS: An Integrated Set of Tools for Measuring Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, Irving C.; Reynard, William D. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This is a report of work in progress. In it, I summarize the status of the research and development of the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS) for managing, processing, and analyzing digital flight-recorded data. The objectives of the NASA-FAA APMS research project are to establish a sound scientific and technological basis for flight-data analysis, to define an open and flexible architecture for flight-data-analysis systems, and to articulate guidelines for a standardized database structure on which to continue to build future flight-data-analysis extensions. APMS will offer to the air transport community an open, voluntary standard for flight-data-analysis software, a standard that will help to ensure suitable functionality, and data interchangeability, among competing software programs. APMS will develop and document the methodologies, algorithms, and procedures for data management and analyses to enable users to easily interpret the implications regarding safety and efficiency of operations. APMS does not entail the implementation of a nationwide flight-data-collection system. It is intended to provide technical tools to ease the large-scale implementation of flight-data analyses at both the air-carrier and the national-airspace levels in support of their Flight Operations and Quality Assurance (FOQA) Programs and Advanced Qualifications Programs (AQP). APMS cannot meet its objectives unless it develops tools that go substantially beyond the capabilities of the current commercially available software and supporting analytic methods that are mainly designed to count special events. These existing capabilities, while of proven value, were created primarily with the needs of air crews in mind. APMS tools must serve the needs of the government and air carriers, as well as air crews, to fully support the FOQA and AQP programs. They must be able to derive knowledge not only through the analysis of single flights (special-event detection), but through

  2. A Prospective Validation Study of a Rainbow Model of Integrated Care Measurement Tool in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjono, Milawaty; Valentijn, Pim P; Bautista, Mary Ann C; Wei, Lim Yee; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Johannes Maria

    2016-04-08

    The conceptual ambiguity of the integrated care concept precludes a full understanding of what constitutes a well-integrated health system, posing a significant challenge in measuring the level of integrated care. Most available measures have been developed from a disease-specific perspective and only measure certain aspects of integrated care. Based on the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care, which provides a detailed description of the complex concept of integrated care, a measurement tool has been developed to assess integrated care within a care system as a whole gathered from healthcare providers' and managerial perspectives. This paper describes the methodology of a study seeking to validate the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care measurement tool within and across the Singapore Regional Health System. The Singapore Regional Health System is a recent national strategy developed to provide a better-integrated health system to deliver seamless and person-focused care to patients through a network of providers within a specified geographical region. The validation process includes the assessment of the content of the measure and its psychometric properties. If the measure is deemed to be valid, the study will provide the first opportunity to measure integrated care within Singapore Regional Health System with the results allowing insights in making recommendations for improving the Regional Health System and supporting international comparison.

  3. Bayesian Integrated Data Analysis of Fast-Ion Measurements by Velocity-Space Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, M.; Nocente, M.; Jacobsen, A.S.

    2018-01-01

    Bayesian integrated data analysis combines measurements from different diagnostics to jointly measure plasma parameters of interest such as temperatures, densities, and drift velocities. Integrated data analysis of fast-ion measurements has long been hampered by the complexity of the strongly non...... framework. The implementation for different types of diagnostics as well as the uncertainties are discussed, and we highlight the importance of integrated data analysis of all available detectors....

  4. Recruitment recommendation system based on fuzzy measure and indeterminate integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Song, Jinjie

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we propose a comprehensive evaluation approach based on indeterminate integral. By introducing the related concepts of indeterminate integral and their formulas into the recruitment recommendation system, we can calculate the suitability of each job for different applicants with the defined importance for each criterion listed in the job advertisements, the association between different criteria and subjective assessment as the prerequisite. Thus we can make recommendations to the applicants based on the score of the suitability of each job from high to low. In the end, we will exemplify the usefulness and practicality of this system with samples.

  5. IMPACT OF A REVISED {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al REACTION RATE ON THE OPERATION OF THE Mg-Al CYCLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Imbriani, G.; DiLeva, A.; Limata, B. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Strieder, F. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Bemmerer, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400 (Germany); Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A. [Universita di Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Formicola, A.; Gustavino, C.; Junker, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Gervino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Guglielmetti, A., E-mail: straniero@oa-teramo.inaf.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-02-15

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H-burning regions. In particular, low-energy nuclear resonances in the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al reaction affect the production of radioactive {sup 26}Al{sup gs} as well as the resulting Mg/Al abundance ratio. Reliable estimations of these quantities require precise measurements of the strengths of low-energy resonances. Based on a new experimental study performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, we provide revised rates of the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup gs} and the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} reactions with corresponding uncertainties. In the temperature range 50-150 MK, the new recommended rate of {sup 26}Al {sup m} production is up to five times higher than previously assumed. In addition, at T = 100 MK, the revised total reaction rate is a factor of two higher. Note that this is the range of temperature at which the Mg-Al cycle operates in a H-burning zone. The effects of this revision are discussed. Due to the significantly larger {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} rate, the estimated production of {sup 26}Al{sup gs} in H-burning regions is less efficient than previously obtained. As a result, the new rates should imply a smaller contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars to the galactic {sup 26}Al budget. Similarly, we show that the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extra-mixing scenario does not appear able to explain the most extreme values of {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, i.e., >10{sup -2}, found in some O-rich presolar grains. Finally, the substantial increase of the total reaction rate makes the hypothesis of self-pollution by massive AGBs a more robust explanation for the Mg-Al anticorrelation observed in globular-cluster stars.

  6. Emergence of Integrated Water Resources Management : Measuring implementation in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, M.; Khanh, N.T.; Witter, M.; Rutten, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the changes in laws and regulations, such as the revised Law on Water Resources in 2012, have sought to provide a legal framework for the internationally recognized practices of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Vietnam. With IWRM being a novel approach for Vietnam, it would

  7. Setting up measuring campaigns for integrated wastewater modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanrolleghem, P.A.; Schilling, W.; Rauch, W.; Krebs, P.; Aalderink, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The steps of calibration/confirmation of models in a suggested 11-step procedure for analysis, planning and implementation of integrated urban wastewater management systems is focused upon in this paper. Based on ample experience obtained in comprehensive investigations throughout Europe

  8. Measuring School Principals' Support for ICT Integration in Palermo, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    School principals play an important role in managing media and technology integration into school teaching since they can foster the use of information communication technologies (ICT) at a strategic level, even supporting the introduction of media literacy education activities into teaching. Starting from a review on the role of principals'…

  9. OSMOSE: An experimental program for the qualification of integral cross sections of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudelot, J. P.; Klann, R.; Fougeras, P.; Jorion, F.; Drin, N.; Donnet, L.

    2004-01-01

    The accurate integral cross sectional reaction rates in representative spectra for the actinides are discussed at OSMOSE program. The first step in obtaining better nuclear data consists of measuring accurate integral data and comparing it to integrated energy dependent data: this comparison provides a direct assessment of the effect of deficiencies in the differential data. The OSMOSE program includes a complete analytical program associated with experimental measurement program and aims at understanding and resolving discrepancies between calculated and measured values. The measurement covers a wide range of neutron spectra, from over-moderate thermal spectra to fast spectra. (authors)

  10. AN UPDATED {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universita di Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. {sup 6}Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low {sup 6}Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of {sup 6}Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U{sub e} . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U{sub e} value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the {sup 2}H({sup 6}Li, {alpha} {sup 3}He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T{sub 9} and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  11. Setting up measuring campaigns for integrated wastewater modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanrolleghem, P.A.; Schilling, W.; Rauch, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    The steps of calibration/confirmation of models in a suggested Ii-step procedure far analysis, planning and implementation of integrated urban wastewater management systems is focused upon in this paper. Based on ample experience obtained in comprehensive investigations throughout Europe recommen...... problems related to suspended solids, specific contaminants, hygienic hazards and total pollutant loss illustrate the recommendations presented. (C) 1999 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Indicators and Measurement Tools for Health Systems Integration: A Knowledge Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Suter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite far reaching support for integrated care, conceptualizing and measuring integrated care remains challenging. This knowledge synthesis aimed to identify indicator domains and tools to measure progress towards integrated care. Methods: We used an established framework and a Delphi survey with integration experts to identify relevant measurement domains. For each domain, we searched and reviewed the literature for relevant tools. Findings: From 7,133 abstracts, we retrieved 114 unique tools. We found many quality tools to measure care coordination, patient engagement and team effectiveness/performance. In contrast, there were few tools in the domains of performance measurement and information systems, alignment of organizational goals and resource allocation. The search yielded 12 tools that measure overall integration or three or more indicator domains. Discussion: Our findings highlight a continued gap in tools to measure foundational components that support integrated care. In the absence of such targeted tools, “overall integration” tools may be useful for a broad assessment of the overall state of a system. Conclusions: Continued progress towards integrated care depends on our ability to evaluate the success of strategies across different levels and context. This study has identified 114 tools that measure integrated care across 16 domains, supporting efforts towards a unified measurement framework.

  13. Indicators and Measurement Tools for Health Systems Integration: A Knowledge Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelke, Nelly D.; da Silva Lima, Maria Alice Dias; Stiphout, Michelle; Janke, Robert; Witt, Regina Rigatto; Van Vliet-Brown, Cheryl; Schill, Kaela; Rostami, Mahnoush; Hepp, Shelanne; Birney, Arden; Al-Roubaiai, Fatima; Marques, Giselda Quintana

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite far reaching support for integrated care, conceptualizing and measuring integrated care remains challenging. This knowledge synthesis aimed to identify indicator domains and tools to measure progress towards integrated care. Methods: We used an established framework and a Delphi survey with integration experts to identify relevant measurement domains. For each domain, we searched and reviewed the literature for relevant tools. Findings: From 7,133 abstracts, we retrieved 114 unique tools. We found many quality tools to measure care coordination, patient engagement and team effectiveness/performance. In contrast, there were few tools in the domains of performance measurement and information systems, alignment of organizational goals and resource allocation. The search yielded 12 tools that measure overall integration or three or more indicator domains. Discussion: Our findings highlight a continued gap in tools to measure foundational components that support integrated care. In the absence of such targeted tools, “overall integration” tools may be useful for a broad assessment of the overall state of a system. Conclusions: Continued progress towards integrated care depends on our ability to evaluate the success of strategies across different levels and context. This study has identified 114 tools that measure integrated care across 16 domains, supporting efforts towards a unified measurement framework. PMID:29588637

  14. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N 2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure

  15. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  16. Development of Chemistry Triangle Oriented Module on Topic of Reaction Rate for Senior High School Level Grade XI Chemistry Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. R.; Hardeli; Bayharti

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to produce chemistry triangle oriented module on topic of reaction rate, and to reveal the validity and practicality level of the generated module. The type of research used is EducationalDesign Research (EDR) with development model is Plompmodel. This model consists of three phases, which are preliminary research, prototyping phase, and assessment phase. The instrument used in this research is questionnaire validity and practicality. The data of the research were analyzed by using Kappa Cohen formula. The chemistry triangle oriented module validation sheet was given to 5 validators consisting of 3 chemistry lecturers and 2 high school chemistry teachers, while the practicality sheet was given to 2 chemistry teachers, 6 students of SMAN 10 Padang grade XII MIA 5 on the small groupevaluation and 25 students of SMAN 10 Padang grade XII MIA 6 on the field test. Based on the questionnaire validity analysis, the validity level of the module is very high with the value of kappa moment 0.87. The level of practicality based on teacher questionnaire response is very high category with a kappa moment value 0.96. Based on the questionnaire of student responses on small group evaluation, the level of practicality is very high category with a kappa moment 0.81, and the practicality is very high category with kappa moment value 0.83 based on questionnaire of student response on field test.

  17. Indicators and measurement tools for health system integration : a knowledge synthesis protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Oelke, Nelly Donszelmann; Suter, Esther; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva; Vliet-Brown, Cheryl Van

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health system integration is a key component of health system reform with the goal of improving outcomes for patients, providers, and the health system. Although health systems continue to strive for better integration, current delivery of health services continues to be fragmented. A key gap in the literature is the lack of information on what successful integration looks like and how to measure achievement towards an integrated system. This multi-site study protocol builds on a ...

  18. Joint Integration Test Facility (JITF) Engineering II Performance Measurement Plans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boucher, Joanne

    2001-01-01

    ..., effectiveness, and accountability in federal programs and spending. The plan establishes six separate performance measurements, which correlate directly to customer satisfaction, Intelligence Mission Application (IMA...

  19. Model Predictive Control for Integrating Traffic Control Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegyi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic traffic control measures, such as ramp metering and dynamic speed limits, can be used to better utilize the available road capacity. Due to the increasing traffic volumes and the increasing number of traffic jams the interaction between the control measures has increased such that local

  20. Cluster of Sound Speed Fields by an Integral Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    the same cost in time. The increasing the number of sensor depths does not cause execution time to increase. And finally assume that the time required...to be P = Z − ∫ 0 b ∂C(ρ, θ, λ) ∂ρ ∂C(ρ, θ, λ) ∂ρ dρ (2) where (ρ,θ,λ) are the usual geocentric spherical coordinates, and the limits of integration...but using spherical coordinates requires that the horizontal (θ , λ) terms be normalized by the radius. In the case of geocentric coordinates this

  1. Simultaneous integral measurement of electron energy and charge albedoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    Results of a series of experiments in which backscattered energy has been determined from precise energy deposition measurements using an improved technique are presented. The fraction of the energy backscattered for electrons incident on Be, Ti, Mo, and Ta is determined as a function of energy and angle of incidence. The improved technique for the absolute measurement of energy deposition using calorimeters involves square-wave (on-off) modulation of the beam. Uncertainties in the measured backscattered energy are 1 to 6 percent, except for Be at normal incidence where they must agree by definition. Experiment and theory agree quite well for Mo and Be at 60 0 . The measured data for Ta and Ti are clearly higher than the calculated results, which is not completely understood. (U.S.)

  2. Multidisciplinary group performance – measuring integration intensity in the context of the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Harris

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidisciplinary Group meeting (MDGs are seen as key facilitators of integration, moving from individual to multi-disciplinary decision making, and from a focus on individual patients to a focus on patient groups.  We have developed a method for coding MDG transcripts to identify whether they are or are not vehicles for delivering the anticipated efficiency improvements across various providers and apply it to a test case in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot.  Methods:  We defined 'integrating' as the process within the MDG meeting that enables or promotes an improved collaboration, improved understanding, and improved awareness of self and others within the local healthcare economy such that efficiency improvements could be identified and action taken.  Utterances within the MDGs are coded according to three distinct domains grounded in concepts from communication, group decision-making, and integrated care literatures - the Valence, the Focus, and the Level.  Standardized weighted integrative intensity scores are calculated across ten time deciles in the Case Discussion providing a graphical representation of its integrative intensity. Results: Intra- and Inter-rater reliability of the coding scheme was very good as measured by the Prevalence and Bias-adjusted Kappa Score.  Standardized Weighted Integrative Intensity graph mirrored closely the verbatim transcript and is a convenient representation of complex communication dynamics. Trend in integrative intensity can be calculated and the characteristics of the MDG can be pragmatically described. Conclusion: This is a novel and potentially useful method for researchers, managers and practitioners to better understand MDG dynamics and to identify whether participants are integrating.  The degree to which participants use MDG meetings to develop an integrated way of working is likely to require management, leadership and shared values.

  3. Multidisciplinary group performance – measuring integration intensity in the context of the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Harris

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidisciplinary Group meeting (MDGs are seen as key facilitators of integration, moving from individual to multi-disciplinary decision making, and from a focus on individual patients to a focus on patient groups.  We have developed a method for coding MDG transcripts to identify whether they are or are not vehicles for delivering the anticipated efficiency improvements across various providers and apply it to a test case in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot. Methods:  We defined 'integrating' as the process within the MDG meeting that enables or promotes an improved collaboration, improved understanding, and improved awareness of self and others within the local healthcare economy such that efficiency improvements could be identified and action taken.  Utterances within the MDGs are coded according to three distinct domains grounded in concepts from communication, group decision-making, and integrated care literatures - the Valence, the Focus, and the Level.  Standardized weighted integrative intensity scores are calculated across ten time deciles in the Case Discussion providing a graphical representation of its integrative intensity.Results: Intra- and Inter-rater reliability of the coding scheme was very good as measured by the Prevalence and Bias-adjusted Kappa Score.  Standardized Weighted Integrative Intensity graph mirrored closely the verbatim transcript and is a convenient representation of complex communication dynamics. Trend in integrative intensity can be calculated and the characteristics of the MDG can be pragmatically described.Conclusion: This is a novel and potentially useful method for researchers, managers and practitioners to better understand MDG dynamics and to identify whether participants are integrating.  The degree to which participants use MDG meetings to develop an integrated way of working is likely to require management, leadership and shared values.

  4. Integral measurements of neutron production in spallation targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frehaut, J.; Deneuville, D.; Ledoux, X.; Lochard, J.P.; Longuet, J.L.; Petibon, E.; Alrick, K.; Bownan, D.; Cverna, F.; King, N.S.P.; Morgan, G.L.; Greene, G.; Hanson, A.; Snead, L.; Thompson, R.; Ward, T.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of neutron production for thick iron, tungsten and lead targets of different diameter prototypic for spallation systems have been made at SATURNE in an incident proton energy range from 400 MeV to 2 GeV. TIERCE code system calculations are in good agreement with experiment for iron and large diameter tungsten and lead targets. They overestimate the measured neutron production for tungsten and lead targets for diameter ≤20 cm. (author)

  5. Measuring fragmentation in dissociative identity disorder: the integration measure and relationship to switching and time in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, M Rose; Chu, James A

    2014-01-01

    Some people with dissociative identity disorder (DID) have very little communication or awareness among the parts of their identity, while others experience a great deal of cooperation among alternate identities. Previous research on this topic has been sparse. Currently, there is no empirical measure of integration versus fragmentation in a person with DID. In this study, we report the development of such a measure. The goal of this study was to pilot the integration measure (IM) and to address its psychometric properties and relationships to other measures. The IM is the first standardized measure of integration in DID. Eleven women with DID participated in an experiment that included a variety of tasks. They filled out questionnaires about trauma and dissociation as well as the IM. They also provided verbal results about switching among alternate identities during the study sessions. Participants switched among identities an average of 5.8 times during the first session, and switching was highly correlated with trauma. Integration was related to switching, though this relationship may be non-linear. Integration was not related to time in psychotherapy. The IM provides a useful beginning to quantify and study integration and fragmentation in DID. Directions for future research are also discussed, including expanding the IM from this pilot. The IM may be useful in treatment settings to assess progress or change over time.

  6. Measuring fragmentation in dissociative identity disorder: the integration measure and relationship to switching and time in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Rose Barlow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some people with dissociative identity disorder (DID have very little communication or awareness among the parts of their identity, while others experience a great deal of cooperation among alternate identities. Previous research on this topic has been sparse. Currently, there is no empirical measure of integration versus fragmentation in a person with DID. In this study, we report the development of such a measure. Objective: The goal of this study was to pilot the integration measure (IM and to address its psychometric properties and relationships to other measures. The IM is the first standardized measure of integration in DID. Method: Eleven women with DID participated in an experiment that included a variety of tasks. They filled out questionnaires about trauma and dissociation as well as the IM. They also provided verbal results about switching among alternate identities during the study sessions. Results: Participants switched among identities an average of 5.8 times during the first session, and switching was highly correlated with trauma. Integration was related to switching, though this relationship may be non-linear. Integration was not related to time in psychotherapy. Conclusions: The IM provides a useful beginning to quantify and study integration and fragmentation in DID. Directions for future research are also discussed, including expanding the IM from this pilot. The IM may be useful in treatment settings to assess progress or change over time.

  7. Processing horizontal networks measured by integrated terrestrial and GPS technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Jakub

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Local horizontal networks in which GPS and terrestrial measurements (TER are done are often established at present. Iin other networks, the previous terrestrial measurements can be completed with quantities from contemporary GPS observations (tunnel nets, mining nets with surface and underground parts and other long-shaped nets.The processing of such heterobeneous (GPS, TER networks whose terrestrial measurements are performed as point coordinate measurements (∆X, ∆Y using (geodetic total stationIn is presented in this paper. In such network structures it is then available:- the values ∆X, ∆Y from TER observations which are transformed in the plane of S-JTSK for adjustement,- the values ∆X, ∆Y in the plane S-JTSK that can be obtained by 3D transformation of WGS84 netpoint coordinates from GPS observations to corresponding coordinates S-JTSK.For common adjusting all the ∆X, ∆Y, some elements of the network geometry (e.g. distances should be measured by both methods (GPS, TER. This approach makes possible an effective homogenisation of both network parts what is equivalent to saying that an expressive influence reduction on local frame realizations of S-JTSK in the whole network can be made.Results of network processing obtained in proposed manner are acceptable in general and they are equivalent (accuracy, reliability to results of another processing methods.

  8. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molins, Sergi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Steefel, Carl I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Shen, Chaopeng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division

    2012-03-30

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO2. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. In this study we investigate the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is composed of high-performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1-D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high-resolution model is used to demonstrate that nonuniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. In conclusion, the effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  9. Direct Dynamics Simulation of the Thermal 3CH2 + 3O2 Reaction. Rate Constant and Product Branching Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Sandhiya; Pratihar, Subha; Machado, Francisco Bolivar Correto; Hase, William Louis

    2018-04-26

    The reaction of 3CH2 with 3O2 is of fundamental importance in combustion and the reaction is complex as a result of multiple extremely exothermic product channels. In the present study, direct dynamics simulations were performed to study the reaction on both the singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PESs). The simulations were performed at the UM06/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Trajectories were calculated at a temperature of 300 K and all reactive trajectories proceeded through the carbonyl oxide Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, on both the singlet and triplet PESs. The triplet surface leads to only one product channel, H2CO + O(3P), while the singlet surface leads to 8 product channels with their relative importance as: CO + H2O > CO + OH + H ~ H2CO + O(1D) > HCO + OH ~ CO2 + H2 ~ CO + H2 + O(1D) > CO2 + H + H > HCO + O(1D) + H. Reaction on the singlet PES is barrierless, consistent with experiment and the total rate constant on the singlet surface is 0.93 ± 0.22 x 10-12 cm3molecule-1s-1 in comparison to the recommended experimental rate constant of 3.3 x 10-12 cm3molecule-1s-1. The simulation product yields for the singlet PES are compared with experiment and the most significant differences are for H, CO2, and H2O. Reaction on the triplet surface is also barrierless, inconsistent with experiment. A discussion is given of the need for future calculations to address the: (1) barrier on the triplet PES for 3CH2 + 3O2 → 3CH2OO; (2) temperature dependence of the 3CH2 + 3O2 reaction rate constant and product branching ratios; and (3) possible non-RRKM dynamics of the 1CH2OO Criegee intermediate.

  10. CRSEC: a general purpose Hauser--Feshbach code for the calculation of nuclear cross-sections and thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.; Fowler, W.A.

    1977-09-01

    CRSEC is a FORTRAN IV computer code designed for the efficient calculation of average nuclear cross sections in situations where a statistical theory of nuclear reactions is applicable and where compound nuclear formation is the dominant reaction mechanism. This code generates cross sections of roughly factor of 2 accuracy for incident particle energies in the range of 10 keV to 10 MeV for most target nuclei from magnesium to bismuth. Exceptions usually involve reactions that enter the compound nucleus at such a low energy that fewer than 10 levels are present in the ''energy window of interest.'' The incident particle must be a neutron, proton, or alpha particle, and only binary reactions resulting in the emission of a single n, p, α, or γ (cascade) are calculated. CRSEC is quite fast, a complete calculation of 12 different reactions over a grid of roughly 150 energy points and the generation of Maxwellian averaged rates taking about 30 seconds of CDC7600 time. Also the semi-empirical parameterization of nuclear properties contained in CRSEC is very general. Greater accuracy may be obtained, however, by furnishing specific low-lying excited states, level density parameterization, and nuclear strength functions. A more general version of CRSEC, called CRSECI, is available that conserves isospin properly in all reactions and allows the user to specify a given degree of isospin mixing in the highly excited states of the compound nucleus. Besides the cross section as a function of center-of-mass energy, CRSEC also generates the Maxwell--Boltzmann averaged thermonuclear reaction rate and temperature dependent nuclear partition function for a grid of temperatures from 10 8 to 10 10 0 K. Sections of this report describe in greater detail the physics employed in CRSEC and how to use the code. 2 tables

  11. Seamless variation of isometric and anisometric dynamical integrity measures in basins's erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, P.; Lenci, S.; Rega, G.

    2018-03-01

    Anisometric integrity measures defined as improvement and generalization of two existing measures (LIM, local integrity measure, and IF, integrity factor) of the extent and compactness of basins of attraction are introduced. Non-equidistant measures make it possible to account for inhomogeneous sensitivities of the state space variables to perturbations, thus permitting a more confident and targeted identification of the safe regions. All four measures are used for a global dynamics analysis of the twin-well Duffing oscillator, which is performed by considering a nearly continuous variation of a governing control parameter, thanks to the use of parallel computation allowing reasonable CPU time. This improves literature results based on finite (and commonly large) variations of the parameter, due to computational constraints. The seamless evolution of key integrity measures highlights the fine aspects of the erosion of the safe domain with respect to the increasing forcing amplitude.

  12. More plant availability by local and integral strain measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulshof, H J.M.; Welberg, P G.M. [KEMA Nederland B.V., Arnhem (Netherlands); Bruijn, L.E. de [E.ON Benelux Generation N.V., Rotterdam (Netherlands). Power Plant Maasvlakte

    2002-07-01

    Industrial installations that are under pressure and are operating at high temperatures have a limited life due to creep and fatigue. It is, therefore, of critical importance to know the location of any possible weak spots in the installation. Welds in steam pipes, especially the heat-affected zones in these welds, are such weak spots in the long term. The material deforms and cracks may develop, with significant failure in the worst case. To avoid safety risks, unforeseen plant shutdown and, as a consequence, high costs for unavailability and repair, periodic inspections and strain measurements are recommended. KEMA's SPICA (Speckle Image Correlation Analysis) system is able to measure on-stream (during operation) deformation due to creep in critical areas, like the heat-affected zone in welds. (orig.)

  13. A precision analogue integrator system for heavy current measurement in MFDC resistance spot welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Dian; Xia, Zhen-Xin; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    In order to control and monitor the quality of middle frequency direct current (MFDC) resistance spot welding (RSW), precision measurement of the welding current up to 100 kA is required, for which Rogowski coils are the only viable current transducers at present. Thus, a highly accurate analogue integrator is the key to restoring the converted signals collected from the Rogowski coils. Previous studies emphasised that the integration drift is a major factor that influences the performance of analogue integrators, but capacitive leakage error also has a significant impact on the result, especially in long-time pulse integration. In this article, new methods of measuring and compensating capacitive leakage error are proposed to fabricate a precision analogue integrator system for MFDC RSW. A voltage holding test is carried out to measure the integration error caused by capacitive leakage, and an original integrator with a feedback adder is designed to compensate capacitive leakage error in real time. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that the new analogue integrator system could constrain both drift and capacitive leakage error, of which the effect is robust to different voltage levels of output signals. The total integration error is limited within  ±0.09 mV s −1 0.005% s −1 or full scale at a 95% confidence level, which makes it possible to achieve the precision measurement of the welding current of MFDC RSW with Rogowski coils of 0.1% accuracy class. (paper)

  14. Integrated Assessment of Air Pollution Control Measures for Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, R.; Theloke, J.; Denier-van-der-Gon, H.; Kugler, U.; Kampffmeyer, T.; Roos, J.; Torras, S.

    2012-04-01

    Air pollution in large cities is still a matter of concern. Especially the concentration of fine particles (PM10 and PM2.5) is largest in large cities leading to severe health impacts. Furthermore the PM10 thresholds of the EU Air Quality Directive are frequently exceeded. Thus the question arises, whether the initiated policies and measures for mitigating air pollution are sufficient to meet the air quality targets and - if not - which efficient further pollution mitigation measures exist. These questions have been addressed in the EU research project MEGAPOLI for the four European megacities respectively agglomerations London, Paris, Rhine-Ruhr area and Po valley. Firstly, a reference scenario of future activities and emissions has been compiled for the megacities for the years 2020, 2030 and 2050 for all relevant air pollutants (CO, NH3, NMVOC, NOx, PM10, PM2.5 and SO2) and greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O). The reference scenario takes into account as well population changes as technical progress and economic growth. As pollution flowing in from outside the city is about as important as pollution caused by emissions in the city, the analysis covers the whole of Europe and not only the city area. Emissions are then transformed into concentrations using atmospheric models. The higher concentrations in cities were estimated with a newly developed 'urban increment' model. Results show, that in the megacities the limits of the Air Quality Directive (2008/50/EC) will be exceeded. Thus additional efforts are necessary to reduce emissions further. Thus, a number of further measures (not implemented in current legislation) were selected and assessed. These included mitigation options for road transport, other mobile sources, large combustion plants, small and medium combustion plants and industry. For each measure and in addition for various bundles of measures a cost-benefit analysis has been carried out. Benefits (avoided health risks and climate change risks) have

  15. Optimal distribution of integration time for intensity measurements in degree of linear polarization polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Hu, Haofeng; Liu, Tiegen; Huang, Bingjing; Song, Zhanjie

    2016-04-04

    We consider the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) polarimetry system, which performs two intensity measurements at orthogonal polarization states to estimate DOLP. We show that if the total integration time of intensity measurements is fixed, the variance of the DOLP estimator depends on the distribution of integration time for two intensity measurements. Therefore, by optimizing the distribution of integration time, the variance of the DOLP estimator can be decreased. In this paper, we obtain the closed-form solution of the optimal distribution of integration time in an approximate way by employing Delta method and Lagrange multiplier method. According to the theoretical analyses and real-world experiments, it is shown that the variance of the DOLP estimator can be decreased for any value of DOLP. The method proposed in this paper can effectively decrease the measurement variance and thus statistically improve the measurement accuracy of the polarimetry system.

  16. Optimal distribution of integration time for intensity measurements in Stokes polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Liu, Tiegen; Huang, Bingjing; Song, Zhanjie; Hu, Haofeng

    2015-10-19

    We consider the typical Stokes polarimetry system, which performs four intensity measurements to estimate a Stokes vector. We show that if the total integration time of intensity measurements is fixed, the variance of the Stokes vector estimator depends on the distribution of the integration time at four intensity measurements. Therefore, by optimizing the distribution of integration time, the variance of the Stokes vector estimator can be decreased. In this paper, we obtain the closed-form solution of the optimal distribution of integration time by employing Lagrange multiplier method. According to the theoretical analysis and real-world experiment, it is shown that the total variance of the Stokes vector estimator can be significantly decreased about 40% in the case discussed in this paper. The method proposed in this paper can effectively decrease the measurement variance and thus statistically improves the measurement accuracy of the polarimetric system.

  17. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  18. Influence of refreshment/activation cycles and temperature rise on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macedo, R.G.; Verhaagen, B.; Wesselink, P.R.; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effect of multiple refreshment/activation cycles and temperature on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation (UAI) under laboratory conditions. Methodology The root canal walls of 24 standardized root canals in

  19. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang; Lindquist, W. Brent

    2013-01-01

    new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against

  20. New reaction rate for 16O( p, γ )17F and its influence on the oxygen isotopic ratios in massive AGB stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iliadis, C.; Angulo, C.; Descouvement, P.; Lugaro, M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833975; Mohr, P.

    2008-01-01

    The 16O(p, γ )17F reaction rate is revisited with special emphasis on the stellar temperature range of T=60-100 MK, important for hot bottom burning in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We evaluate existing cross-section data that were obtained since 1958 and, if appropriate, correct published

  1. Estimating reaction rate constants from a two-step reaction: a comparison between two-way and three-way methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, S.; Smilde, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, two different spectral datasets are used in order to estimate reaction rate constants using different algorithms. Dataset 1 consists of short-wavelength near-infrared (SW NIR) spectra taken in time of the two-step epoxidation of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone using tert-butyl

  2. Implementation of 5E Inquiry Incorporated with Analogy Learning Approach to Enhance Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Reaction Rate for Grade 11 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supasorn, Saksri; Promarak, Vinich

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to enhance student understanding of the scientific concepts of chemical reaction rate. Forty-four grade 11 students were the target group. The treatment tools were seven learning plans of 5E inquiry incorporated with an analogy learning approach during 15 hours of class time. In each learning plan, the students…

  3. Effect of Drying Conditions on the Catalytic Performance, Structure, and Reaction Rates over the Fe-Co-Mn/MgO Catalyst for Production of Light Olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Abdouss

    2018-01-01

    How to Cite: Abdouss, M., Arsalanfar, M., Mirzaei, N., Zamani, Y. (2018. Effect of Drying Conditions on the Catalytic Performance, Structure, and Reaction Rates over the Fe-Co-Mn/MgO Catalyst for Production of Light Olefins. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 97-112 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1222.97-112

  4. The Nature of the Interplay among Components of Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Reaction Rate and Chemical Equilibrium Topics of Novice and Experienced Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Fatma Nur; Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen

    2018-01-01

    We examined the interactions among pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) components of novice and experienced chemistry teachers in teaching reaction rate and chemical equilibrium topics in this qualitative multiple-case design study. For this aim, three chemistry teachers who had different levels of teaching experience in chemistry teaching were…

  5. Comparing removal efficiency and reaction rates of organic micro-pollutants during ozonation from different municipal waste water treatment plants effluents in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-taliawy, Haitham; Ekblad, Maja; Nilsson, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The Removal of about 50 micro-pollutants from 7 waste water treatment plant effluents –in Sweden- was tested on pilot scale. Different ozone doses and two different pilots with different reactor sizes and retention times were tested. Ozone reaction rates depended on DOC concentration in the water...

  6. Using Patient Reported Outcomes Measures to Promote Integrated Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs have been introduced as standardised outcomes, but have not been implemented widely for disease targeted pathways of care, nor for geriatric patients who prefer functional performance and quality of life. Discussion: We describe innovative multipurpose implementation of PROMs as evidenced by two best practices of PROMs application in geriatric and physiotherapy practice. We show that PROMs can show meaningful outcomes in older subjects’ patient journeys, which can at the same time serve individuals and groups of both patients and professionals. Key lesson: PROMs can deliver generic outcomes relevant for older patients, may improve patient-physician relationship, quality of care and prediction of future outcomes in geriatric care, if they are valid, reliable and responsive, but still short and simple. A precondition to make the hard tip from research to practice is that PROMs are carefully positioned in the clinical encounters and in electronic health records.

  7. Temporal integration of loudness measured using categorical loudness scaling and matching procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Daniel L.; Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Jesteadt, Walt

    2011-01-01

    integration of loudness and previously reported nonmonotonic behavior observed at mid-sound pressure level levels is replicated with this procedure. Stimuli that are assigned to the same category are effectively matched in loudness, allowing the measurement of temporal integration with CLS without curve...

  8. Measuring Integration of Information and Communication Technology in Education: An Item Response Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraer, Jef; Van Petegem, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This research describes the development and validation of an instrument to measure integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education. After literature research on definitions of integration of ICT in education, a comparison is made between the classical test theory and the item response modeling approach for the…

  9. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  10. Integrated solidity test measurement of the airtight compartment system at the Paks nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osztheimer, M.; Taubner, R.; Techy, Zs. (Villamosenergiaipari Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1983-01-01

    A brief report on the purpose of the integrated solidity test measurements of the airtight compartment system of the Paks nuclear power plant and on the applied measuring principles is given. The measuring system and the selected measuring methods are evaluated. The characteristic features of the airtight system of the Paks nuclear power plant's 1st block and their effects on the measurement are mentioned.

  11. The Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS): An Integrated Suite of Tools for Measuring Performance and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, Irving C.; Connor, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This is a report of work in progress. In it, I summarize the status of the research and development of the Aviation Performance Measuring System (APMS) for managing, processing, and analyzing digital flight-recorded data, The objectives of the NASA-FAA APMS research project are to establish a sound scientific and technological basis for flight-data analysis, to define an open and flexible architecture for flight-data analysis systems, and to articulate guidelines for a standardized database structure on which to continue to build future flight-data-analysis extensions. APMS offers to the air transport community an open, voluntary standard for flight-data-analysis software; a standard that will help to ensure suitable functionality and data interchangeability among competing software programs. APMS will develop and document the methodologies, algorithms, and procedures for data management and analyses to enable users to easily interpret the implications regarding safety and efficiency of operations. APMS does not entail the implementation of a nationwide flight-data-collection system. It is intended to provide technical tools to ease the large-scale implementation of flight-data analyses at both the air-carrier and the national-airspace levels in support of their Flight Operations and Quality Assurance (FOQA) Programs and Advanced Qualifications Programs (AQP). APMS cannot meet its objectives unless it develops tools that go substantially beyond the capabilities of the current commercially available software and supporting analytic methods that are mainly designed to count special events. These existing capabilities, while of proven value, were created primarily with the needs-of aircrews in mind. APMS tools must serve the needs of the government and air carriers, as well as aircrews, to fully support the FOQA and AQP programs. They must be able to derive knowledge not only through the analysis of single flights (special-event detection), but also through

  12. Integration of a silicon-based microprobe into a gear measuring instrument for accurate measurement of micro gears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, N; Krah, T; Jeong, D C; Kniel, K; Härtig, F; Metz, D; Dietzel, A; Büttgenbach, S

    2014-01-01

    The integration of silicon micro probing systems into conventional gear measuring instruments (GMIs) allows fully automated measurements of external involute micro spur gears of normal modules smaller than 1 mm. This system, based on a silicon microprobe, has been developed and manufactured at the Institute for Microtechnology of the Technische Universität Braunschweig. The microprobe consists of a silicon sensor element and a stylus which is oriented perpendicularly to the sensor. The sensor is fabricated by means of silicon bulk micromachining. Its small dimensions of 6.5 mm × 6.5 mm allow compact mounting in a cartridge to facilitate the integration into a GMI. In this way, tactile measurements of 3D microstructures can be realized. To enable three-dimensional measurements with marginal forces, four Wheatstone bridges are built with diffused piezoresistors on the membrane of the sensor. On the reverse of the membrane, the stylus is glued perpendicularly to the sensor on a boss to transmit the probing forces to the sensor element during measurements. Sphere diameters smaller than 300 µm and shaft lengths of 5 mm as well as measurement forces from 10 µN enable the measurements of 3D microstructures. Such micro probing systems can be integrated into universal coordinate measuring machines and also into GMIs to extend their field of application. Practical measurements were carried out at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt by qualifying the microprobes on a calibrated reference sphere to determine their sensitivity and their physical dimensions in volume. Following that, profile and helix measurements were carried out on a gear measurement standard with a module of 1 mm. The comparison of the measurements shows good agreement between the measurement values and the calibrated values. This result is a promising basis for the realization of smaller probe diameters for the tactile measurement of micro gears with smaller modules. (paper)

  13. Measurement of resonance integral of the 90Sr(n,γ)91Sr reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Wada, Hiroaki; Katoh, Toshio; Harada, Hideo; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2001-01-01

    To obtain fundamental data for research on nuclear transmutation method of radioactive wastes, the resonance integral (I 0 ) of the 90 Sr(n,γ) 91 Sr reaction was measured with an activation method. (author)

  14. Time-integrated CP violation measurements in the B mesons system at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinale, R

    2016-01-01

    Time-integrated CP violation measurements in the B meson system provide information for testing the CKM picture of CP violation in the Standard Model. A review of recent results from the LHCb experiment is presented.

  15. Implementing and measuring the level of laboratory service integration in a program setting in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Mbah

    Full Text Available The surge of donor funds to fight HIV&AIDS epidemic inadvertently resulted in the setup of laboratories as parallel structures to rapidly respond to the identified need. However these parallel structures are a threat to the existing fragile laboratory systems. Laboratory service integration is critical to remedy this situation. This paper describes an approach to quantitatively measure and track integration of HIV-related laboratory services into the mainstream laboratory services and highlight some key intervention steps taken, to enhance service integration.A quantitative before-and-after study conducted in 122 Family Health International (FHI360 supported health facilities across Nigeria. A minimum service package was identified including management structure; trainings; equipment utilization and maintenance; information, commodity and quality management for laboratory integration. A check list was used to assess facilities at baseline and 3 months follow-up. Level of integration was assessed on an ordinal scale (0 = no integration, 1 = partial integration, 2 = full integration for each service package. A composite score grading expressed as a percentage of total obtainable score of 14 was defined and used to classify facilities (≤ 80% FULL, 25% to 79% PARTIAL and <25% NO integration. Weaknesses were noted and addressed.We analyzed 9 (7.4% primary, 104 (85.2% secondary and 9 (7.4% tertiary level facilities. There were statistically significant differences in integration levels between baseline and 3 months follow-up period (p<0.01. Baseline median total integration score was 4 (IQR 3 to 5 compared to 7 (IQR 4 to 9 at 3 months follow-up (p = 0.000. Partial and fully integrated laboratory systems were 64 (52.5% and 0 (0.0% at baseline, compared to 100 (82.0% and 3 (2.4% respectively at 3 months follow-up (p = 0.000.This project showcases our novel approach to measure the status of each laboratory on the integration continuum.

  16. Integrated nondestructive assay solutions for plutonium measurement problems of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, T.E.; Cremers, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe automated and integrated NDA systems configured to measure many of the materials that will be found in the DOE complex in the dismantlement, disposition, residue stabilization, immobilization, and MOX fuel programs. These systems are typified by the ARIES (Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System) nondestructive assay system which is under construction at Los Alamos to measure the outputs of a weapon component dismantlement system

  17. How European unification has shaped the debate on measuring international financial integration

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse-Bloem, Mary; Eijffinger, Sylvester

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyse a chronicle of economic theory on international financial integration post-WWII to the present date. Our focus is on theories that have somehow quantify the state and speed of international financial integration. We are able to contrast and compare three distinct strands that have brought forward conditions for its measurement. It is shown that European unification provides much of the empirical testing ground for these measures of international financial ...

  18. Integrated nondestructive assay solutions for plutonium measurement problems of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, T.E.; Cremers, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    The authors describe automated and integrated nondestructive assay (NDA) systems configured to measure many of the materials that will be found in the Department of Energy complex in the dismantlement, disposition, residue stabilization, immobilization, and mixed oxide fuel programs. These systems are typified by the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System NDA system which is under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the outputs of a weapon component dismantlement system

  19. Stellar reaction rate for 22Mg+p→23Al from the asymptotic normalization coefficient in the mirror nuclear system 22Ne+n→23Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Abdullah, T.; Carstoiu, F.; Chen, X.; Clark, H. L.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Lui, Y.-W.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Tokimoto, Y.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2010-01-01

    The production of 22 Na in ONe novae can be influenced by the 22 Mg(p,γ) 23 Al reaction. To investigate this reaction rate at stellar energies, we have determined the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for 22 Mg+p→ 23 Al through measurements of the ANCs in the mirror nuclear system 22 Ne+n→ 23 Ne. The peripheral neutron-transfer reactions 13 C( 12 C, 13 C) 12 C and 13 C( 22 Ne, 23 Ne) 12 C were studied. The identical entrance and exit channels of the first reaction make it possible to extract independently the ground-state ANC in 13 C. Our experiment gives C p 1/2 2 ( 13 C)=2.24±0.11 fm -1 , which agrees with the value obtained from several previous measurements. The weighted average for all the obtained C p 1/2 2 is 2.31±0.08 fm -1 . This value is adopted to be used in obtaining the ANCs in 23 Ne. The differential cross sections for the reaction 13 C( 22 Ne, 23 Ne) 12 C leading to the J π =5/2 + and 1/2 + states in 23 Ne have been measured at 12 MeV/u. Optical model parameters for use in the DWBA calculations were obtained from measurements of the elastic scatterings 22 Ne+ 13 C and 22 Ne+ 12 C. The extracted ANC for the ground state in 23 Ne, C d 5/2 2 =0.86±0.08±0.12 fm -1 , is converted to its corresponding value in 23 Al using mirror symmetry to give C d 5/2 2 ( 23 Al)=(4.63±0.77)x10 3 fm -1 . The astrophysical S factor S(0) for the 22 Mg(p,γ) reaction was determined to be 0.96±0.11 keV b. The consequences for nuclear astrophysics are discussed.

  20. The flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Seo, J. K.; Lee, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    It is the common features of the integral reactors that the main components of the primary system are installed within the reactor vessel, and so there are no any flow pipes connecting the reactor coolant pumps or steam generators. Due to no any flow pipes, it is impossible to measure the differential pressure at the primary system of the integral reactors, and it also makes impossible measure the primary coolant flow rate. The objective of the study is to draw up the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. As a result of the review, we have made a selection of the flow measurement method by pump speed, bt HBM, and by pump motor power as the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. Peculiarly, we did not found out a precedent which the direct pump motor power-flow rate curve is used as the flow measurement method in the existing commercial nuclear power reactors. Therefore, to use this method for integral reactors, it is needed to bear the follow-up measures in mind. The follow-up measures is included in this report

  1. Implementing and measuring the level of laboratory service integration in a program setting in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, Henry; Negedu-Momoh, Olubunmi Ruth; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Ikani, Patrick Anibbe; Balogun, Oluseyi; Sanwo, Olusola; Ochei, Kingsley; Ekanem, Maurice; Torpey, Kwasi

    2014-01-01

    The surge of donor funds to fight HIV&AIDS epidemic inadvertently resulted in the setup of laboratories as parallel structures to rapidly respond to the identified need. However these parallel structures are a threat to the existing fragile laboratory systems. Laboratory service integration is critical to remedy this situation. This paper describes an approach to quantitatively measure and track integration of HIV-related laboratory services into the mainstream laboratory services and highlight some key intervention steps taken, to enhance service integration. A quantitative before-and-after study conducted in 122 Family Health International (FHI360) supported health facilities across Nigeria. A minimum service package was identified including management structure; trainings; equipment utilization and maintenance; information, commodity and quality management for laboratory integration. A check list was used to assess facilities at baseline and 3 months follow-up. Level of integration was assessed on an ordinal scale (0 = no integration, 1 = partial integration, 2 = full integration) for each service package. A composite score grading expressed as a percentage of total obtainable score of 14 was defined and used to classify facilities (≤ 80% FULL, 25% to 79% PARTIAL and laboratory systems were 64 (52.5%) and 0 (0.0%) at baseline, compared to 100 (82.0%) and 3 (2.4%) respectively at 3 months follow-up (p = 0.000). This project showcases our novel approach to measure the status of each laboratory on the integration continuum.

  2. [Toward a deeper understanding of motivation towards exercise: measurement of integrated regulation in the Spanish context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cutre, David; Sicilia, Álvaro; Fernández, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire in the Spanish context, including items to measure integrated regulation. Participants were 524 exercisers, mean age 29.59 years. The results revealed acceptable fit indices in the confirmatory factor analysis and good internal consistency (with a Cronbach alpha of .87 for integrated regulation). The diverse subscales also conformed to a simplex pattern and the factor structure was invariant across gender and age. Integrated regulation reflected high temporal stability over a 4-week period (ICC=.90). The criterion validity analysis of integrated regulation indicated that this variable was positively predicted by satisfaction of the needs for competence and autonomy. The results regarding the importance of measuring integrated regulation in exercise are discussed.

  3. Measurement of the effect of the lattice pitch on the effective resonance integral of natural uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krcevinac, S; Takac, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    The present work investigates the dependence of the effective resonance integral on the lattice pitch. Theoretically, the dependence is determined starting from Wigner's rational approximation in which the lattice is characterized by the effective ratio (s/M). Later this allows correlation between the lattice resonance integral and the resonance integral of the single rod (the rod in infinite medium). Using two approximations for Dancoff's factor we give the measured functional dependence of the effective resonance integral on the effective (s/M) ratio. The activation method and the differential technique of measuring absorption distribution in U-238 are used to determine the resonance integral experimentally. Since the effective lattice pitch cannot be defined with certain reliability, due to the use of cadmium in determining the cadmium ratio in the fuel rod, besides other perturbing effects, the method of comparing thermal activations of U-238 and a suitable thermal detector are used to determine the cadmium ratio.

  4. Measurement of the effect of the lattice pitch on the effective resonance integral of natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcevinac, S.; Takac, S.

    1966-04-01

    The present work investigates the dependence of the effective resonance integral on the lattice pitch. Theoretically, the dependence is determined starting from Wigner's rational approximation in which the lattice is characterized by the effective ratio (s/M). Later this allows correlation between the lattice resonance integral and the resonance integral of the single rod (the rod in infinite medium). Using two approximations for Dancoff's factor we give the measured functional dependence of the effective resonance integral on the effective (s/M) ratio. The activation method and the differential technique of measuring absorption distribution in U-238 are used to determine the resonance integral experimentally. Since the effective lattice pitch cannot be defined with certain reliability, due to the use of cadmium in determining the cadmium ratio in the fuel rod, besides other perturbing effects, the method of comparing thermal activations of U-238 and a suitable thermal detector are used to determine the cadmium ratio

  5. New approach to the adjustment of group cross sections fitting integral measurements - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    The method developed in the first paper concerning group cross sections fitting integral measurements is generalized to cover the case when the source of the extracted negligence discrepancy cannot be identified and the theoretical relation between the integral and differential measurements is also subject to uncertainty. The question of how to divide in such a case the negligence discrepancy between the integral and differential data is resolved. Application to a specific problem with real experimental data is shown as a demonstration of the method. 4 refs

  6. IMIS (Integrated Measurement and Information System) - the German integrated radioactivity information and decision support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.; Leeb, H.

    1993-01-01

    IMIS is being set up as part of the German Government's National Response Plan for dealing with the consequences of a large scale radioactive contamination of the environment. The IMIS system has three operational action levels. Level 3 covers the collection of radiological data from state-of-the-art monitoring networks and measurement laboratories. Level 2 involves computerised data processing and quality control, based on standardised procedures for the collection and presentation of measurements. This level also includes the use of transport and dose assessment models. Level 1 includes evaluation of the data, management of the consequences of a given situation, legal enforcement of protective measures and provision of information to the public. In its final form the IMIS system will consist of a total of 75 RISC computers linked together by an efficient packet-switched Wide Area Network. Owing to various demands of the individual users, three different types of RISC computers are used. The system software includes ULTRIX, TCP/IP and X windows. The relational database management system ORACLE is used together with the query language SQL-Plus. Statistical analyses are carried out with the standard product SAS. The geographical information system TERRA provides all the tools necessary for a detailed geographic presentation of the data. (author)

  7. Development and initial feasibility of an organizational measure of behavioral health integration in medical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Mark P; Urada, Darren; Lambert-Harris, Chantal; Sullivan, Steven T; Mazade, Noel A

    2012-12-01

    In the advent of health care reform, models are sought to integrate behavioral health and routine medical care services. Historically, the behavioral health specialty has not itself been integrated, but instead bifurcated by substance use and mental health across treatment systems, care providers and even research. With the present opportunity to transform the health care delivery system, it is incumbent upon policymakers, researchers and clinicians to avoid repeating this historical error, and provide integrated behavioral health services in medical contexts. An organizational measure designed to assess this capacity is described: the Dual Diagnosis Capability in Health Care Settings (DDCHCS). The DDCHCS was used to assess a sample of federally-qualified health centers (N=13) on the degree of behavioral health integration. The measure was found to be feasible and sensitive to detecting variation in integrated behavioral health services capacity. Three of the 13 agencies were dual diagnosis capable, with significant variation in DDCHCS dimensions measuring staffing, treatment practices and program milieu. In general, mental health services were more integrated than substance use. Future research should consider a revised version of the measure, a larger and more representative sample, and linking organizational capacity with patient outcomes. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Reaction rate prediction in the supercritical region of H · + OH"- → e"-_a_q + H_2O using μSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, T.; Liu, G.; Beninger, J.; Ghandi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of reaction rates in the supercritical region for reactions caused by the radiolysis of water is needed to prevent damage to future Supercritical Water-Cooled reactors. In particular, the H · + OH"- → e"-_a_q + H_2O reaction is examined experimentally within the supercritical region by usage of muon spin rotation spectroscopy. Using the obtained data and the 'cage effect' theory, the reaction was modelled and plateau-like behaviour near the critical point was accounted for. (author)

  9. A review of reaction rates and thermodynamic and transport properties for the 11-species air model for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium calculations to 30000 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Yos, Jerrold M.; Thompson, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Reaction rate coefficients and thermodynamic and transport properties are provided for the 11-species air model which can be used for analyzing flows in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium. Such flows will likely occur around currently planned and future hypersonic vehicles. Guidelines for determining the state of the surrounding environment are provided. Approximate and more exact formulas are provided for computing the properties of partially ionized air mixtures in such environments.

  10. A comparison of lattice parameters for CANDU-type lattices obtained using MCNP, WIMS, and WIMS with resonance reaction rates from MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to check the accuracy of the WIMS calculation of the resolved resonance capture rate in CANDU-type lattices. Reactivities, relative conversion ratios, and fast fission factors are compared with experiments. Values of ρ 28 and reaction rates for U-238 are given as a function of position in the fuel bundle. A check was made on the correction made in WIMS to allow for endcaps on the fuel bundles. (26 refs)

  11. Integration of the effects of air quality measures in the SOLVE mix of measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmans, T.; Heijnis, F.

    2008-01-01

    SOLVE is the Dutch abbreviation for fast solutions for air and traffic and is a website by means of which provinces and municipalities in the Netherlands can gain insight into the best measures for traffic to improve the quality of the ambient air. Since halfway June 2008, the effects on air quality of approximately 35 traffic measures were included in the SOLVE mix of measures. The effects of traffic measures on emissions of particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide have been calculated. The effects are expressed in a decrease of the contribution of traffic indicated in a scale from A (very large decrease) to E (no decrease). The outcome depends on the location where the measure is implemented. [mk] [nl

  12. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2013-11-01

    We have extended reactive flow simulation in pore-network models to include geometric changes in the medium from dissolution effects. These effects include changes in pore volume and reactive surface area, as well as topological changes that open new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against the predictions of a continuum model. Specifically, we modeled anorthite and kaolinite reactions under acidic flow conditions during which the anorthite reactions remain far from equilibrium (dissolution only), while the kaolinite reactions can be near-equilibrium. Under dissolution changes, core-scale reaction rates continuously and nonlinearly evolved in time. At higher injection rates, agreement with predictions of the continuum model degraded significantly. For the far-from-equilibrium reaction, our results indicate that the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in dissolution changes in the reactive mineral surface area is critical to accurately predict upscaled reaction rates. For the near-equilibrium reaction, the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in the saturation state remains critical. Inclusion of a Nernst-Planck term to ensure neutral ionic currents under differential diffusion resulted in at most a 9% correction in upscaled rates.

  13. Measurement of integrated healthcare delivery: a systematic review of methods and future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Strandberg-Larsen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated healthcare delivery is a policy goal of healthcare systems. There is no consensus on how to measure the concept, which makes it difficult to monitor progress. Purpose: To identify the different types of methods used to measure integrated healthcare delivery with emphasis on structural, cultural and process aspects. Methods: Medline/Pubmed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, WHOLIS, and conventional internet search engines were systematically searched for methods to measure integrated healthcare delivery (published – April 2008. Results: Twenty-four published scientific papers and documents met the inclusion criteria. In the 24 references we identified 24 different measurement methods; however, 5 methods shared theoretical framework. The methods can be categorized according to type of data source: a questionnaire survey data, b automated register data, or c mixed data sources. The variety of concepts measured reflects the significant conceptual diversity within the field, and most methods lack information regarding validity and reliability. Conclusion: Several methods have been developed to measure integrated healthcare delivery; 24 methods are available and some are highly developed. The objective governs the method best used. Criteria for sound measures are suggested and further developments should be based on an explicit conceptual framework and focus on simplifying and validating existing methods.

  14. Canonical path integral measures for Holst and Plebanski gravity: I. Reduced phase space derivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Han Muxin; Thiemann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An important aspect in defining a path integral quantum theory is the determination of the correct measure. For interacting theories and theories with constraints, this is non-trivial, and is normally not the heuristic 'Lebesgue measure' usually used. There have been many determinations of a measure for gravity in the literature, but none for the Palatini or Holst formulations of gravity. Furthermore, the relations between different resulting measures for different formulations of gravity are usually not discussed. In this paper we use the reduced phase technique in order to derive the path-integral measure for the Palatini and Holst formulation of gravity, which is different from the Lebesgue measure up to local measure factors which depend on the spacetime volume element and spatial volume element. From this path integral for the Holst formulation of general relativity we can also give a new derivation of the Plebanski path integral and discover a discrepancy with the result due to Buffenoir, Henneaux, Noui and Roche whose origin we resolve. This paper is the first in a series that aims at better understanding the relation between canonical loop quantum gravity and the spin-foam approach.

  15. Measurement of the effect of the lattice pitch on the effective resonance integral of natural uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krcevinac, S; Takac, S [Institut za nuklearne nauke ' Boris Kidric' , Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-07-01

    The analytical theory of resonance absorption, as well as the numerical Monte Carlo method, allows calculation of the resonance integral. However, it is based on specific approximations so it may be used accurately enough in a limited number of cases. Likewise, insufficiently accurate know ledge of the basic nuclear constants (e.g. resonance parameters, etc.) used as input data in analytical calculation, leads to inaccurate determination of the resonance integral.. Therefore, experimental determination of the effective resonance integral is still indispensable. In some cases the experimental results are used as the exclusive source of information, or as the basis for the semiempirical technique of calculation, and in others as a check of the new theoretical procedures. There are several experimental methods of direct determination of the resonance integral: the activation method (1,2), the reactor oscillator and the danger coefficient method. Indirectly, using the results of critical experiments, it is possible to determine correlated values of the effective resonance integral. The present work investigates the dependence of the effective resonance integral on the lattice pitch. Theoretically, the dependence is determined starting from Wigner's rational approximation in which the lattice is characterized by the effective ratio (S/M) {sup X}. Later this allows correlation between the lattice resonance integral and the resonance integral of the single rod (the rod in infinite medium). Using two approximations for Dancoff's factor we give the measured functional dependence of the effective resonance integral on the effective (S/M){sup X} ratio. To determine the resonance integral experimentally we used the activation method and the differential technique of measuring absorption distribution in U{sup 2}38. Since, because of the use of cadmium in determining the cadmium ratio in the fuel rod the effective lattice pitch cannot be defined with certain reliability, besides

  16. Stock Market Integration Measurement: Investigation of Malaysia and Singapore Stock Markets

    OpenAIRE

    B. K. Yeoh; Z. Arsad; C. W. Hooy

    2010-01-01

    This paper tests the level of market integration between Malaysia and Singapore stock markets with the world market. Kalman Filter (KF) methodology is used on the International Capital Asset Pricing Model (ICAPM) and the pricing errors estimated within the framework of ICAPM are used as a measure of market integration or segmentation. The advantage of the KF technique is that it allows for time-varying coefficients in estimating ICAPM and hence able to capture the varying degree of market int...

  17. Measurement and evaluation of EDM bearing currents by the normalized Joule integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidmar, Gregor; Miljavec, Damijan; Agrež, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Apparent current density is the most common criterion used in literature to estimate bearing endangerment due to bearing currents. In the paper, a new criterion called the normalized Joule integral is proposed as a more reliable and accurate one. This approach is more general and gives good correlation between current in the bypass bridge and bearing current. Furthermore, it considers the whole current that causes bearing damage, not just its peak value. The choice of the normalized Joule integral is theoretically explained and supported by measurements and simulations. The levels of bearing endangerment related to the normalized Joule integral of bearing currents are estimated. (paper)

  18. Development of a switched integrator amplifier for high-accuracy optical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, John; Porrovecchio, Geiland; Smid, Marek; Smid, Radislav

    2008-01-01

    In the field of low flux optical measurements, the development and use of large area silicon detectors is becoming more frequent. The current/voltage conversion of their photocurrent presents a set of problems for traditional transimpedance amplifiers. The switched integration principle overcomes these limitations. We describe the development of a fully characterized current-voltage amplifier using the switched integrator technique. Two distinct systems have been developed in parallel at the United Kingdom's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) laboratories. We present the circuit theory and best practice in the design and construction of switched integrators. In conclusion the results achieved and future developments are discussed

  19. Development of a switched integrator amplifier for high-accuracy optical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, John; Porrovecchio, Geiland; Smid, Marek; Smid, Radislav

    2008-11-01

    In the field of low flux optical measurements, the development and use of large area silicon detectors is becoming more frequent. The current/voltage conversion of their photocurrent presents a set of problems for traditional transimpedance amplifiers. The switched integration principle overcomes these limitations. We describe the development of a fully characterized current-voltage amplifier using the switched integrator technique. Two distinct systems have been developed in parallel at the United Kingdom's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) laboratories. We present the circuit theory and best practice in the design and construction of switched integrators. In conclusion the results achieved and future developments are discussed.

  20. Characterization of the Caliban and Prospero Critical Assemblies Neutron Spectra for Integral Measurements Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Jacquet, X.; Cartier, J.

    2014-04-01

    Caliban and Prospero are two highly enriched uranium metallic core reactors operated on the CEA Center of Valduc. These critical assemblies are suitable for integral experiments, such as fission yields measurements or perturbation measurements, which have been carried out recently on the Caliban reactor. Different unfolding methods, based on activation foils and fission chambers measurements, are used to characterize the reactor spectra and especially the Caliban spectrum, which is very close to a pure fission spectrum.

  1. Measurement of the Ecological Integrity of Cerrado Streams Using Biological Metrics and the Index of Habitat Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deusiano Florêncio dos Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, aquatic communities reflect the effects of anthropogenic changes such as deforestation or organic pollution. The Cerrado stands among the most threatened ecosystems by human activities in Brazil. In order to evaluate the ecological integrity of the streams in a preserved watershed in the Northern Cerrado biome corresponding to a mosaic of ecosystems in transition to the Amazonia biome in Brazil, biological metrics related to diversity, structure, and sensitivity of aquatic macroinvertebrates were calculated. Sampling included collections along stretches of 200 m of nine streams and measurements of abiotic variables (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, total dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, and discharge and the Index of Habitat Integrity (HII. The values of the abiotic variables and the HII indicated that most of the streams have good ecological integrity, due to high oxygen levels and low concentrations of dissolved solids and electric conductivity. Two streams showed altered HII scores mainly related to small dams for recreational and domestic use, use of Cerrado natural pasture for cattle raising, and spot deforestation in bathing areas. However, this finding is not reflected in the biological metrics that were used. Considering all nine streams, only two showed satisfactory ecological quality (measured by Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP, total richness, and EPT (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera richness, only one of which had a low HII score. These results indicate that punctual measures of abiotic parameters do not reveal the long-term impacts of anthropic activities in these streams, including related fire management of pasture that annually alters the vegetation matrix and may act as a disturbance for the macroinvertebrate communities. Due to this, biomonitoring of low order streams in Cerrado ecosystems of the Northern Central Brazil by different biotic metrics and also physical attributes of the

  2. Evaluating airline energy efficiency: An integrated approach with Network Epsilon-based Measure and Network Slacks-based Measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xin; Cui, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on evaluating airline energy efficiency, which is firstly divided into four stages: Operations Stage, Fleet Maintenance Stage, Services Stage and Sales Stage. The new four-stage network structure of airline energy efficiency is a modification of existing models. A new approach, integrated with Network Epsilon-based Measure and Network Slacks-based Measure, is applied to assess the overall energy efficiency and divisional efficiency of 19 international airlines from 2008 to 2014. The influencing factors of airline energy efficiency are analyzed through the regression analysis. The results indicate the followings: 1. The integrated model can identify the benchmarking airlines in the overall system and stages. 2. Most airlines' energy efficiencies keep steady during the period, except for some sharply fluctuations. The efficiency decreases mainly centralized in the year 2008–2011, affected by the financial crisis in the USA. 3. The average age of fleet is positively correlated with the overall energy efficiency, and each divisional efficiency has different significant influencing factors. - Highlights: • An integrated approach with Network Epsilon-based Measure and Network Slacks-based Measure is developed. • 19 airlines' energy efficiencies are evaluated. • Garuda Indonesia has the highest overall energy efficiency.

  3. Development of a precise long-time digital integrator for magnetic measurements in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Kenichi; Kawamata, Youichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Long-time D-T burning operation in a tokamak requires that a magnetic sensor must work in an environment of 14-MeV intense neutron field, and that the measurement system must output precise magnetic field values. A method of time-integration of voltage produced in a simple pick-up coil seems to have preferable features of good time response, easy maintenance, and resistance to neutron irradiation. However, an inevitably-produced signal drift makes it difficult to apply the method to the long-time integral operation. To solve this problem, we have developed a new digital integrator (a voltage-to-frequency converter and an up-down counter) with testing the trial boards in the JT-60 magnetic measurements. This reports all of the problems and their measures through the development steps in details, and shows how to apply this method to the ITER operation. (author)

  4. Safety measures for integrity test apparatus for IS process. Sulfuric acid decomposition section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroki; Kubo, Shinji; Iwatsuki, Jin; Onuki, Kaoru

    2013-07-01

    Hazardous substances such as sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen iodide acid are employed in thermochemical Iodine-Sulfur (IS) process. It is necessary to take safety measure against workers and external environments to study experimentally on IS process. Presently we have been conducting to verify the soundness of main components made of engineering material in actual corrosive condition. An integrity test apparatus for the components of sulfuric acid decomposition was set up. We will use the hazardous substances such as sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide and perform the experiment in pressurized condition in this integrity test. Safety measures for the test apparatus, operation and abnormal situation were considered prior to starting the test. This report summarized the consideration results for the safety measures on the integrity test apparatus for the components of sulfuric acid decomposition. (author)

  5. Using a staircase procedure for the objective measurement of auditory stream integration and segregation thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Isabel Spielmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Auditory scene analysis describes the ability to segregate relevant sounds out from the environment and to integrate them into a single sound stream using the characteristics of the sounds to determine whether or not they are related. This study aims to contrast task performances in objective threshold measurements of segregation and integration using identical stimuli, manipulating two variables known to influence streaming, inter-stimulus-interval (ISI and frequency difference (Δf. For each measurement, one parameter (either ISI or Δf was held constant while the other was altered in a staircase procedure. By using this paradigm, it is possible to test within-subject across multiple conditions, covering a wide Δf and ISI range in one testing session. The objective tasks were based on across-stream temporal judgments (facilitated by integration and within-stream deviance detection (facilitated by segregation. Results show the objective integration task is well suited for combination with the staircase procedure, as it yields consistent threshold measurements for separate variations of ISI and Δf, as well as being significantly related to the subjective thresholds. The objective segregation task appears less suited to the staircase procedure. With the integration-based staircase paradigm, a comprehensive assessment of streaming thresholds can be obtained in a relatively short space of time. This permits efficient threshold measurements particularly in groups for which there is little prior knowledge on the relevant parameter space for streaming perception.

  6. Measurement of H'(0.07) with pulse height weighting integration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liye, LIU; Gang, JIN; Jizeng, MA

    2002-01-01

    H'(0.07) is an important quantity for radiation field measurement in health physics. One of the plastic scintillator measurement methods is employing the weak current produced by PMT. However, there are some weaknesses in the current method. For instance: sensitive to environment humidity and temperature, non-linearity energy response. In order to increase the precision of H'(0.07) measurement, a Pulse Height Weighting Integration Method is introduced for its advantages: low noise, high sensitivity, data processable, wide measurement range. Pulse Height Weighting Integration Method seems to be acceptable to measure directional dose equivalent. The representative theoretical energy response of the pre-described method accords with the preliminary experiment result

  7. Measures of School Integration: Comparing Coleman's Index to Measures of Species Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercil, Steven Bray; Williams, John Delane

    This study used species diversity indices developed in ecology as a measure of socioethnic diversity, and compared them to Coleman's Index of Segregation. The twelve indices were Simpson's Concentration Index ("ell"), Simpson's Index of Diversity, Hurlbert's Probability of Interspecific Encounter (PIE), Simpson's Probability of…

  8. Measurement and Evaluation of the Activation Resonance Integral of 146Nd, 148Nd and 150Nd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, M. D.; Turjanski, R.; Ricabarra, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Values of the ratio of the reduced activation resonance integral to the thermal cross section, I'/σ 0 of 146 Nd, 148 Nd and 150 Nd were determined relative to gold by measuring cadmium ratios. A lithium-drifted germanium gamma ray spectrometer was used to resolve the activities of the irradiated samples. The results are for 146 Nd I'/σ 0 = 1.42±0.1 0 and with an assumed σ 0 = 1.4 barn, I' = 1 .99±0.20; for 148 Nd I'/ σ 0 = 4.22±0.1 4 and with an assumed σ 0 = 2.5 barn, I' = 10.5±0. 9 barn, and for 150 Nd I'/σ 0 = 13.7±0. 8 and with an assumed σ 0 = 1.2 barn, I' = 16.4±2.8. The resolved and unresolved epithermal integrals of 146 Nd, 148 Nd and 150 Nd were calculated. Values of the spectral correction factor were also calculated, so the resonance integral could be obtained from the epithermal integral data measured in our reactor spectrum in this experiment. Epithermal integral and spectral correction factors are listed in the text. The most important result of this investigation is that the 148 Nd activation reduced resonance integral is about half of the previously recommended value and consequently the radiative width for 148 Nd is also about half of the previously accepted value. (author)

  9. Indicators and measurement tools for health system integration: a knowledge synthesis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelke, Nelly D; Suter, Esther; da Silva Lima, Maria Alice Dias; Van Vliet-Brown, Cheryl

    2015-07-29

    Health system integration is a key component of health system reform with the goal of improving outcomes for patients, providers, and the health system. Although health systems continue to strive for better integration, current delivery of health services continues to be fragmented. A key gap in the literature is the lack of information on what successful integration looks like and how to measure achievement towards an integrated system. This multi-site study protocol builds on a prior knowledge synthesis completed by two of the primary investigators which identified 10 key principles that collectively support health system integration. The aim is to answer two research questions: What are appropriate indicators for each of the 10 key integration principles developed in our previous knowledge synthesis and what measurement tools are used to measure these indicators? To enhance generalizability of the findings, a partnership between Canada and Brazil was created as health system integration is a priority in both countries and they share similar contexts. This knowledge synthesis will follow an iterative scoping review process with emerging information from knowledge-user engagement leading to the refinement of research questions and study selection. This paper describes the methods for each phase of the study. Research questions were developed with stakeholder input. Indicator identification and prioritization will utilize a modified Delphi method and patient/user focus groups. Based on priority indicators, a search of the literature will be completed and studies screened for inclusion. Quality appraisal of relevant studies will be completed prior to data extraction. Results will be used to develop recommendations and key messages to be presented through integrated and end-of-grant knowledge translation strategies with researchers and knowledge-users from the three jurisdictions. This project will directly benefit policy and decision-makers by providing an easy

  10. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  11. Integrated cost-effectiveness analysis of agri-environmental measures for water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balana, Bedru B; Jackson-Blake, Leah; Martin-Ortega, Julia; Dunn, Sarah

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents an application of integrated methodological approach for identifying cost-effective combinations of agri-environmental measures to achieve water quality targets. The methodological approach involves linking hydro-chemical modelling with economic costs of mitigation measures. The utility of the approach was explored for the River Dee catchment in North East Scotland, examining the cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) pollutants. In-stream nitrate concentration was modelled using the STREAM-N and phosphorus using INCA-P model. Both models were first run for baseline conditions and then their effectiveness for changes in land management was simulated. Costs were based on farm income foregone, capital and operational expenditures. The costs and effects data were integrated using 'Risk Solver Platform' optimization in excel to produce the most cost-effective combination of measures by which target nutrient reductions could be attained at a minimum economic cost. The analysis identified different combination of measures as most cost-effective for the two pollutants. An important aspect of this paper is integration of model-based effectiveness estimates with economic cost of measures for cost-effectiveness analysis of land and water management options. The methodological approach developed is not limited to the two pollutants and the selected agri-environmental measures considered in the paper; the approach can be adapted to the cost-effectiveness analysis of any catchment-scale environmental management options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. INFLUENCE OF THE ISOBUTENE METHANOL RATIO AND OF THE METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER CONTENT ON THE REACTION-RATE OF THE SYNTHESIS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1995-01-01

    The forward reaction rate constant of the MtBE synthesis was determined for different reaction mixture compositions. The forward rate constant decreases continuously with increasing isobutene/methanol ratio, while an increase in reaction rate constant is observed with an increasing amount of MtBE in

  13. The Community Integration Questionnaire - Revised: Australian normative data and measurement of electronic social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Libby; Winkler, Dianne; Tippett, Alice; Herd, Natalie; Migliorini, Christine; Willer, Barry

    2016-06-01

    Consideration of the relationship between meaningful participation, health and wellbeing underpins occupational therapy intervention, and drives measurement of community integration following acquired brain injury (ABI). However, utility of community integration measures has been limited to date by lack of normative data against which to compare outcomes, and none examine the growing use of electronic social networking (ESN) for social participation. This research had four aims: (i) develop and pilot items assessing ESN to add to the Community Integration Questionnaire, producing the Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised (CIQ-R); (ii) examine factor structure of the CIQ-R; (iii) collect Australian CIQ-R normative data; and (iv) assess test-retest reliability of the revised measure. Australia. A convenience sample of adults without ABI (N = 124) was used to develop and pilot ESN items. A representative general population sample of adults without ABI aged 18-64 years (N = 1973) was recruited to gather normative CIQ-R data. Cross-sectional survey. Demographic items and the CIQ-R. The CIQ-R demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties, with minor modification to the original scoring based on the factor analyses provided. Large representative general population CIQ-R normative data have been established, detailing contribution of a range of independent demographic variables to community integration. The addition of electronic social networking items to the CIQ-R offers a contemporary method of assessing community integration following ABI. Normative CIQ-R data enhance the understanding of community integration in the general population, allowing occupational therapists and other clinicians to make more meaningful comparisons between groups. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  14. Validation of double-pulse 1572 nm integrated path differential absorption lidar measurement of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Liu, Jiqiao; Bi, Decang; Ma, Xiuhua; Hou, Xia; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2018-04-01

    A ground-based double-pulse 1572 nm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar was developed for carbon dioxide (CO2) column concentrations measurement. The lidar measured the CO2 concentrations continuously by receiving the scattered echo signal from a building about 1300 m away. The other two instruments of TDLAS and in-situ CO2 analyzer measured the CO2 concentrations on the same time. A CO2 concentration measurement of 430 ppm with 1.637 ppm standard error was achieved.

  15. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  16. Total luminous flux measurement for flexible surface sources with an integrating sphere photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hsueh-Ling; Liu, Wen-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Applying an integrating sphere photometer for total luminous flux measurement is a widely used method. However, the measurement accuracy depends on the spatial uniformity of the integrating sphere, especially when the test sample has a different light distribution from that of the standard source. Therefore, spatial correction is needed to eliminate the effect caused by non-uniformity. To reduce the inconvenience of spatial correction but retain the measurement accuracy, a new type of working standard is designed for flexible and curved surface sources. Applying this new type standard source, the measurement deviation due to different orientations is reduced by an order of magnitude compared with using a naked incandescent lamp as the standard source. (paper)

  17. Integrating sphere based reflectance measurements for small-area semiconductor samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylan, S.; Howells, C. T.; Dahlem, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    This article describes a method that enables reflectance spectroscopy of small semiconductor samples using an integrating sphere, without the use of additional optical elements. We employed an inexpensive sample holder to measure the reflectance of different samples through 2-, 3-, and 4.5-mm-diameter apertures and applied a mathematical formulation to remove the bias from the measured spectra caused by illumination of the holder. Using the proposed method, the reflectance of samples fabricated using expensive or rare materials and/or low-throughput processes can be measured. It can also be incorporated to infer the internal quantum efficiency of small-area, research-level solar cells. Moreover, small samples that reflect light at large angles and develop scattering may also be measured reliably, by virtue of an integrating sphere insensitive to directionalities.

  18. Measurements of integrated components' parameters versus irradiation doses gamma radiation (60Co) dosimetry-methodology-tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuan, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used for the irradiation of the integrated components and the measurements of their parameters, using Quality Insurance of dosimetry: - Measurement of the integrated dose using the competences of the Laboratoire Central des Industries Electriques (LCIE): - Measurement of irradiation dose versus source/component distance, using a calibrated equipment. - Use of ALANINE dosimeters, placed on the support of the irradiated components. - Assembly and polarization of components during the irradiations. Selection of the irradiator. - Measurement of the irradiated components's parameters, using the competences of the societies: - GenRad: GR130 tests equipement placed in the DEIN/SIR-CEN SACLAY. - Laboratoire Central des Industries Electriques (LCIE): GR125 tests equipment and this associated programmes test [fr

  19. Measurements of Turbulent Flame Speed and Integral Length Scales in a Lean Stationary Premixed Flame

    OpenAIRE

    Klingmann, Jens; Johansson, Bengt

    1998-01-01

    Turbulent premixed natural gas - air flame velocities have been measured in a stationary axi-symmetric burner using LDA. The flame was stabilized by letting the flow retard toward a stagnation plate downstream of the burner exit. Turbulence was generated by letting the flow pass through a plate with drilled holes. Three different hole diameters were used, 3, 6 and 10 mm, in order to achieve different turbulent length scales. Turbulent integral length scales were measured using two-point LD...

  20. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...