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Sample records for intact microbial mat

  1. Using Intact Iron Microbial Mats to Gain Insights Into Mat Ecology and Geochemical Niche at the Microbial Scale

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    Glazer, B. T.; Chan, C. S. Y.; Mcallister, S.; Leavitt, A.; Emerson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are formed by microorganisms working in coordinated symbiosis, often benefitting the community by controlling the local geochemical or physical environment. Thus, the ecology of the mat depends on the individual roles of microbes organized into niches within a larger architecture. Chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) form distinctive Fe oxyhydroxide biominerals which constitute the building blocks of the mat. However, the majority of our progress has been in understanding the overall community structure. Understanding the physical mat structure on the microbial scale is important to unraveling FeOB evolution, the biogeochemistry and ecology of Fe-rich habitats, and ultimately interpreting FeOB biosignatures in the rock record. Mats in freshwater and marine environments contain strikingly similar biomineral morphologies, yet they are formed by phylogenetically distinct microorganisms. This suggests that the overall architecture and underlying genetics of freshwater and marine mats has evolved to serve particular roles specific to Fe oxidation. Thus, we conducted a comparative study of Fe seep freshwater mats and marine hydrothermal mats. We have developed a new approach to sampling Fe mats in order to preserve the delicate structure for analysis by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Our analyses of these intact mats show that freshwater and marine mats are similarly initiated by a single type of structure-former. These ecosystem engineers form either a hollow sheath or a twisted stalk biomineral during mat formation, with a highly directional structure. These microbes appear to be the vanguard organisms that anchor the community within oxygen/Fe(II) gradients, further allowing for community succession in the mat interior as evidenced by other mineralized morphologies. Patterns in biomineral thickness and directionality were indicative of redox gradients and temporal changes in the geochemical environment. These observations show that

  2. Diazotrophic microbial mats

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    Severin, I.; Stal, L.J.; Seckbach, J.; Oren, A.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats have been the focus of scientific research for a few decades. These small-scale ecosystems are examples of versatile benthic communities of microorganisms, usually dominated by phototrophic bacteria (e.g., Krumbein et al., 1977; Jørgensen et al., 1983). They develop as vertically stra

  3. Molecular ecology of microbial mats

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    H. Bolhuis; M.S. Cretoiu; L.J. Stal

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep

  4. MICROBIAL MATS - A JOINT VENTURE

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    VANGEMERDEN, H

    1993-01-01

    Microbial mats characteristically are dominated by a few functional groups of microbes: cyanobacteria, colorless sulfur bacteria, purple sulfur bacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Their combined metabolic activities result in steep environmental microgradients, particularly of oxygen and sulfid

  5. Molecular ecology of microbial mats.

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    Bolhuis, Henk; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Stal, Lucas J

    2014-11-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep and fluctuating physicochemical microgradients, that are the result of the ever changing environmental conditions and of the microorganisms' own activities, give rise to a plethora of potential niches resulting in the formation of one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems known to date. For several decades, microbial mats have been studied extensively and more recently molecular biological techniques have been introduced that allowed assessing and investigating the diversity and functioning of these systems. These investigations also involved metagenomics analyses using high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing. Here, we summarize some of the latest developments in metagenomic analysis of three representative phototrophic microbial mat types (coastal, hot spring, and hypersaline). We also present a comparison of the available metagenomic data sets from mats emphasizing the major differences between them as well as elucidating the overlap in overall community composition.

  6. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

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    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  7. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

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    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  8. Bacillamides from a hypersaline microbial mat bacterium.

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    Socha, Aaron M; Long, Richard A; Rowley, David C

    2007-11-01

    Chemical studies of a Bacillus endophyticus isolated from a Bahamian hypersaline microbial mat led to the isolation of bacillamides B and C, new tryptamide thiazole metabolites. Bioassay-guided fractionation using a HPLC-UV-MS bioassay technique enabled the detection of these trace fermentation products, and their total structures were elucidated by combined spectroscopic techniques.

  9. Microbial mats: an ecological niche for fungi

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    Sharon A Cantrell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungi were documented in tropical hypersaline microbial mats and their role in the degradation of complex carbohydrates (exopolimeric substance – EPS was explored. Fungal diversity is higher during the wet season with Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Penicillium among the more common genera. Diversity is also higher in the oxic layer and in young and transient mats. Enrichments with xanthan (a model EPS show that without antibiotics (full community, degradation is faster than enrichments with antibacterial (fungal community and antifungal (bacterial community agents, suggesting that degradation is performed by a consortium of organisms (bacteria and fungi. The combined evidence from all experiments indicates that bacteria carried out approximately 2/3 of the xanthan degradation. The pattern of degradation is similar between seasons and layers but degradation is faster in enrichments from the wet season. The research suggests that fungi thrive in these hypersaline consortia and may participate in the carbon cycle through the degradation of complex carbohydrates.

  10. Counting viruses and bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats

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    Carreira, C; Staal, M.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Viral abundances in benthic environments are the highest found in aquatic systems. Photosynthetic microbial mats represent benthic environments with high microbial activity and possibly high viral densities, yet viral abundances have not been examined in such systems. Existing extraction procedures

  11. Allelopathy-mediated competition in microbial mats from Antarctic lakes.

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    Slattery, Marc; Lesser, Michael P

    2017-05-01

    Microbial mats are vertically stratified communities that host a complex consortium of microorganisms, dominated by cyanobacteria, which compete for available nutrients and environmental niches, within these extreme habitats. The Antarctic Dry Valleys near McMurdo Sound include a series of lakes within the drainage basin that are bisected by glacial traverses. These lakes are traditionally independent, but recent increases in glacial melting have allowed two lakes (Chad and Hoare) to become connected by a meltwater stream. Microbial mats were collected from these lakes, and cultured under identical conditions at the McMurdo Station laboratory. Replicate pairings of the microbial mats exhibited consistent patterns of growth inhibition indicative of competitive dominance. Natural products were extracted from the microbial mats, and a disk diffusion assay was utilized to show that allelochemical compounds mediate competitive interactions. Both microscopy and 16S rRNA sequencing show that these mats contain significant populations of cyanobacteria known to produce allelochemicals. Two compounds were isolated from these microbial mats that might be important in the chemical ecology of these psychrophiles. In other disk:mat pairings, including extract versus mat of origin, the allelochemicals exhibited no effect. Taken together, these results indicate that Antarctic lake microbial mats can compete via allelopathy. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Counting Viruses and Bacteria in Photosynthetic Microbial Mats

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    Carreira, C.; Staal, M.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Viral abundances in benthic environments are the highest found in aquatic systems. Photosynthetic microbial mats represent benthic environments with high microbial activity and possibly high viral densities, yet viral abundances have not been examined in such systems. Existing extraction procedures typically used in benthic viral ecology were applied to the complex matrix of microbial mats but were found to inefficiently extract viruses. Here, we present a method for extraction and quantifica...

  13. Counting viruses and bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-03-01

    Viral abundances in benthic environments are the highest found in aquatic systems. Photosynthetic microbial mats represent benthic environments with high microbial activity and possibly high viral densities, yet viral abundances have not been examined in such systems. Existing extraction procedures typically used in benthic viral ecology were applied to the complex matrix of microbial mats but were found to inefficiently extract viruses. Here, we present a method for extraction and quantification of viruses from photosynthetic microbial mats using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and flow cytometry (FCM). A combination of EDTA addition, probe sonication, and enzyme treatment applied to a glutaraldehyde-fixed sample resulted in a substantially higher viral (5- to 33-fold) extraction efficiency and reduced background noise compared to previously published methods. Using this method, it was found that in general, intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats harbor very high viral abundances (2.8 × 10(10) ± 0.3 × 10(10) g(-1)) compared with benthic habitats (10(7) to 10(9) g(-1)). This procedure also showed 4.5- and 4-fold-increased efficacies of extraction of viruses and bacteria, respectively, from intertidal sediments, allowing a single method to be used for the microbial mat and underlying sediment.

  14. The architecture of iron microbial mats reflects the adaptation of chemolithotrophic iron oxidation in freshwater and marine environments

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    Clara S Chan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes form mats with architectures that promote efficient metabolism within a particular physicochemical environment, thus studying mat structure helps us understand ecophysiology. Despite much research on chemolithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria, Fe mat architecture has not been visualized because these delicate structures are easily disrupted. There are striking similarities between the biominerals that comprise freshwater and marine Fe mats, made by Beta- and Zetaproteobacteria, respectively. If these biominerals are assembled into mat structures with similar functional morphology, this would suggest that mat architecture is adapted to serve roles specific to Fe oxidation. To evaluate this, we combined light, confocal, and scanning electron microscopy of intact Fe microbial mats with experiments on sheath formation in culture, in order to understand mat developmental history and subsequently evaluate the connection between Fe oxidation and mat morphology. We sampled a freshwater sheath mat from Maine and marine stalk and sheath mats from Loihi Seamount hydrothermal vents, Hawaii. Mat morphology correlated to niche: stalks formed in steeper O2 gradients while sheaths were associated with low to undetectable O2 gradients. Fe-biomineralized filaments, twisted stalks or hollow sheaths, formed the highly porous framework of each mat. The mat-formers are keystone species, with nascent marine stalk-rich mats comprised of novel and uncommon Zetaproteobacteria. For all mats, filaments were locally highly parallel with similar morphologies, indicating that cells were synchronously tracking a chemical or physical cue. In the freshwater mat, cells inhabited sheath ends at the growing edge of the mat. Correspondingly, time lapse culture imaging showed that sheaths are made like stalks, with cells rapidly leaving behind an Fe oxide filament. The distinctive architecture common to all observed Fe mats appears to serve specific functions related to

  15. Denitrification and the denitrifier community in a coastal microbial mats

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    Fan, H.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification was measured in three structurally different coastal microbial mats by using the stable isotope technique. The composition of the denitrifying community was determined by analyzing the nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) genes using clone libraries and the GeoChip. The highest

  16. Denitrification and the denitrifier community in coastal microbial mats

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    Fan, H.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification was measured in three structurally different coastal microbial mats by using the stable isotope technique. The composition of the denitrifying community was determined by analyzing the nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) genes using clone libraries and the GeoChip. The highest potentia

  17. Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacteria in a Coastal Microbial Mat

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    Fan, H.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, can be performed by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). We investigated the presence of these two groups in three structurally different types of coastal microbial mats that develop along the tida

  18. Coastal Microbial Mat Diversity along a Natural Salinity Gradient

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    Bolhuis, H.; Fillinger, L.; Stal, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    The North Sea coast of the Dutch barrier island of Schiermonnikoog is covered by microbial mats that initiate a succession of plant communities that eventually results in the development of a densely vegetated salt marsh. The North Sea beach has a natural elevation running from the low water mark to

  19. Photosynthetic Microbial Mats are Exemplary Sources of Diverse Biosignatures (Invited)

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    Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    Marine cyanobacterial microbial mats are widespread, compact, self-contained ecosystems that create diverse biosignatures and have an ancient fossil record. Within the mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides organic substrates and O2 to the community. Both the absorption and scattering of light change the intensity and spectral composition of incident radiation as it penetrates a mat. Some phototrophs utilize infrared light near the base of the photic zone. A mat's upper layers can become highly reduced and sulfidic at night. Counteracting gradients of O2 and sulfide shape the chemical environment and provide daily-contrasting microenvironments separated on a scale of a few mm. Radiation hazards (UV, etc.), O2 and sulfide toxicity elicit motility and other physiological responses. This combination of benefits and hazards of light, O2 and sulfide promotes the allocation of various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Associated nonphotosynthetic communities, including anaerobes, strongly influence many of the ecosystem's overall characteristics, and their processes affect any biosignatures that enter the fossil record. A biosignature is an object, substance and/or pattern whose origin specifically requires a biological agent. The value of a biosignature depends not only on the probability of life creating it, but also on the improbability of nonbiological processes producing it. Microbial mats create biosignatures that identify particular groups of organisms and also reveal attributes of the mat ecosystem. For example, branched hydrocarbons and pigments can be diagnostic of cyanobacteria and other phototrophic bacteria, and isoprenoids can indicate particular groups of archea. Assemblages of lipid biosignatures change with depth due to changes in microbial populations and diagenetic transformations of organic matter. The 13C/12C values of organic matter and carbonates reflect isotopic discrimination by particular

  20. Ecosystem function decays by fungal outbreaks in Antarctic microbial mats.

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    Velázquez, David; López-Bueno, Alberto; Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; de los Ríos, Asunción; Alcamí, Antonio; Quesada, Antonio

    2016-03-14

    Antarctica harbours a remarkably diverse range of freshwater bodies and terrestrial ecosystems, where microbial mats are considered the most important systems in terms of biomass and metabolic capabilities. We describe the presence of lysis plaque-like macroscopic blighted patches within the predominant microbial mats on Livingston Island (Antarctic Peninsula). Those blighting circles are associated with decay in physiological traits as well as nitrogen depletion and changes in the spatial microstructure; these alterations were likely related to disruption of the biogeochemical gradients within the microbial ecosystem caused by an unusually high fungal abundance and consequent physical alterations. This phenomenon has been evidenced at a time of unprecedented rates of local warming in the Antarctic Peninsula area, and decay of these ecosystems is potentially stimulated by warmer temperatures.

  1. Ecosystem Dynamics of the Microbial Mats in Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

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    Krusor, M.; Mackey, T. J.; Hawes, I.; Jungblut, A. D.; Eisen, J.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial communities drive biogeochemical cycles on Earth at micron scales, at which microbial ecosystem networks are highly interconnected to each other and their local environment through trophic interactions and the availability of electron acceptors. Feedbacks among microorganisms and environmental conditions structure microbial communities and micron-scale geochemical gradients. We are exploring interactions among microbial community structure and local geochemistry in Lake Fryxell, a perennially ice-covered, meromictic lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. In Lake Fryxell, O2 concentration and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) decline with depth and influence layered benthic mats, which consist of microorganisms from all three domains. These layered mats change pigmentation and morphology with depth in the lake. In 2012, samples were collected for 16S rRNA and metagenomic sequencing in collaboration with the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long Term Ecological Research program. Samples were collected at 9.0, 9.35, and 9.8 m depth with temperature, pressure, O2 concentration, conductivity, PAR, irradiance, and morphology. O2 microelectrode profiles were also collected. At 9.0 and 9.35 m depths, PAR was relatively high, and the water was supersaturated with O2. At 9.8 m depth, PAR was low and lake water was anoxic, but 50 µmol L-1 of O2 was produced by cyanobacteria, creating a mm-thick zone with free O2 in the mat under anoxic water. As in many microbial mats, community-O2 correlations are present in Lake Fryxell: diversity increases with increasing depth into the mat at all lake depths, and diversity decreases with increasing depth in the lake. Microbial communities are less diverse and the dominant phototrophs change at lower PAR and O2 concentrations. Further, O2 generated by cyanobacteria creates a habitat for aerobic and microaerophilic heterotrophs under an anoxic water column. Some lineages, particularly alpha- and gammaproteobacteria and the

  2. EVAPORITE MICROBIAL FILMS, MATS, MICROBIALITES AND STROMATOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Penny Morris, P; Garriet Smith, G

    2008-01-28

    Evaporitic environments are found in a variety of depositional environments as early as the Archean. The depositional settings, microbial community and mineralogical composition vary significantly as no two settings are identical. The common thread linking all of the settings is that evaporation exceeds precipitation resulting in elevated concentrations of cations and anions that are higher than in oceanic systems. The Dead Sea and Storrs Lake are examples of two diverse modern evaporitic settings as the former is below sea level and the latter is a coastal lake on an island in the Caribbean. Each system varies in water chemistry as the Dead Sea dissolved ions originate from surface weathered materials, springs, and aquifers while Storrs Lake dissolved ion concentration is primarily derived from sea water. Consequently some of the ions, i.e., Sr, Ba are found at significantly lower concentrations in Storrs Lake than in the Dead Sea. The origin of the dissolved ions are ultimately responsible for the pH of each system, alkaline versus mildly acidic. Each system exhibits unique biogeochemical properties as the extreme environments select certain microorganisms. Storrs Lake possesses significant biofilms and stromatolitic deposits and the alkalinity varies depending on rainfall and storm activity. The microbial community Storrs Lake is much more diverse and active than those observed in the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea waters are mildly acidic, lack stromatolites, and possess a lower density of microbial populations. The general absence of microbial and biofilm fossilization is due to the depletion of HCO{sub 3} and slightly acidic pH.

  3. Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Salinity on the Microbial Diversity in Lithifying Microbial Mats

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    Steven R. Ahrendt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 are rising at an accelerated rate resulting in changes in the pH and carbonate chemistry of the world’s oceans. However, there is uncertainty regarding the impact these changing environmental conditions have on carbonate-depositing microbial communities. Here, we examine the effects of elevated CO2, three times that of current atmospheric levels, on the microbial diversity associated with lithifying microbial mats. Lithifying microbial mats are complex ecosystems that facilitate the trapping and binding of sediments, and/or the precipitation of calcium carbonate into organosedimentary structures known as microbialites. To examine the impact of rising CO2 and resulting shifts in pH on lithifying microbial mats, we constructed growth chambers that could continually manipulate and monitor the mat environment. The microbial diversity of the various treatments was compared using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The results indicated that elevated CO2 levels during the six month exposure did not profoundly alter the microbial diversity, community structure, or carbonate precipitation in the microbial mats; however some key taxa, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Deltasulfobacterales, were enriched. These results suggest that some carbonate depositing ecosystems, such as the microbialites, may be more resilient to anthropogenic-induced environmental change than previously thought.

  4. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

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    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  5. Flow of light energy in benthic photosynthetic microbial mats

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    Al-Najjar, Mohammad Ahmad A.

    2010-12-15

    The work in this thesis demonstrates the assessment of the energy budget inside microbial mat ecosystems, and the factors affecting light utilization efficiency. It presents the first balanced light energy budget for benthic microbial mat ecosystems, and shows how the budget and the spatial distribution of the local photosynthetic efficiencies within the euphotic zone depend on the absorbed irradiance (Jabs). The energy budget was dominated by heat dissipation on the expense of photosynthesis. The maximum efficiency of photosynthesis was at light limiting conditions When comparing three different marine benthic photosynthetic ecosystems (originated from Abu-Dhabi, Arctic, and Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia), differences in the efficiencies were calculated. The results demonstrated that the maximum efficiency depended on mat characteristics affecting light absorption and scattering; such as, photopigments ratio and distribution, and the structural organization of the photosynthetic organisms relative to other absorbing components of the ecosystem (i.e., EPS, mineral particles, detritus, etc.). The maximum efficiency decreased with increasing light penetration depth, and increased with increasing the accessory pigments (phycocyanin and fucoxanthin)/chlorophyll ratio. Spatial heterogeneity in photosynthetic efficiency, pigment distribution, as well as light acclimation in microbial mats originating from different geographical locations was investigated. We used a combined pigment imaging approach (variable chlorophyll fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging), and fingerprinting approach. For each mat, the photosynthetic activity was proportional to the local pigment concentration in the photic zone, but not for the deeper layers and between different mats. In each mat, yield of PSII and E1/2 (light acclimation) generally decreased in parallel with depth, but the gradients in both parameters varied greatly between samples. This mismatch between pigments concentration

  6. Microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline microbial mats from the Abu Dhabi sabkha

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    Andrade, Luiza; Dutton, Kirsten; Paul, Andreas; van der Land, Cees; Sherry, Angela; Lokier, Stephen; Head, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Microbial mats are organo-sedimentary structures that are typically found in areas with extreme environmental conditions. Since these ecosystems are considered to be representative of the oldest forms of life on Earth, the study of microbial mats can inform our understanding of the development of life early in the history of our planet. In this study, we used hypersaline microbial mats from the Abu Dhabi sabkha (coastal salt flats). Cores of microbial mats (ca. 90 mm depth) were collected within an intertidal region. The cores were sliced into layers 2-3 mm thick and genomic DNA was extracted from each layer. A fragment of the 16S rRNA encoding gene was amplified in all DNA extracts, using barcoded primers, and the amplicons sequenced with the Ion Torrent platform to investigate the composition of the microbial communities down the depth of the cores. Preliminary results revealed a high proportion of Archaea (15.5-40.8% abundance) in all layers, with Halobacteria appearing to be more significant in the first 40 mm (0.4-10.3% of the total microbial community). Members of the Deltaproteobacteria were dominant in almost all layers of the microbial mat (≤ 48.6% relative abundance); however this dominance was not reflected in the first 8 mm, where the abundance was less than 2%. Chloroflexi and Anaerolinea, representing 93% of bacterial abundance, dominated the first 8 mm depth and decreased at greater depth (≤ 3% relative abundance). Cyanobacteria were found only in the top 10 mm, with unexpected low abundance (≤ 3% of the total number of reads). These results show a vertical zonation of microbial communities and processes in the microbial mats. Further analyses are underway to investigate if these patterns are repeated at other sites along a transect of the sabkha, and to relate the microbial composition to the physical-chemical conditions of the sites.

  7. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats.

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    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per μmol L(-1) H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  8. Microsensor Measurements of Hydrogen Gas Dynamics in Cyanobacterial Microbial Mats

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    Michael eNielsen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria spp.. The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per µmol L-1 H2. Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 hours in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct photobiolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g. sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  9. Mineralogy of iron microbial mats from Loihi Seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Marie Toner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5-4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh, except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (FhSRO phases were stable at 4 °C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400 oC treatment. The observed stability of the FhSRO is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for FhSRO particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small coherent scattering domain for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered iron deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes.

  10. Exploring ancient microbial community assemblages by creating complex lipid biomarker profiles for stromatolites and microbial mats in Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, E.; Summons, R. E.; Schubotz, F.; Matys, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Stromatolites that are biogenic in origin, a characteristic that can be determined by the coexistence of microbial mats (active microbial communities) and stromatolites (lithified structures) like in Hamelin Pool, comprise one of the best modern analogs to ancient microbial community assemblages. Comprehensive lipid biomarker profiles that include lipids of varying persistence in the rock record can help determine how previously living microbial communities are represented in lithified stromatolites. To create these profiles, the samples analyzed included non-lithified smooth, pustular, and colloform microbial mats, as well as smooth and colloform stromatolites. Select samples were separated into upper and lower layers of 5cm depth each. Intact polar lipids, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, and bacteriohopanepolyols were analyzed via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) coupled to a Quadropole Time-of-Flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer; additionally, fatty acids from each sample were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to prove consistent signatures with those determined by Allen et al. in 2010 for similar microbial mat samples. In accordance with those findings, 2-methylhopanoids were detected, as well as limited signals from higher (vascular) plants, the latter of which suggests terrestrial inputs, potentially from runoff. The rarely detected presence of 3-methylhopanoids appears in a significant portion of the samples, though further isolations of the molecule are needed to confirm. While all lipid profiles were relatively similar, certain differences in relative composition are likely attributable to morphological differences of the mats, some of which allow deeper oxygen and/or sunlight penetration, which influence the microbial community. However, overall similarities of transient and persistent lipids suggest that the microbial communities of both the non-lithified microbial mats and stromatolites are similar.

  11. Coastal microbial mat diversity along a natural salinity gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Bolhuis

    Full Text Available The North Sea coast of the Dutch barrier island of Schiermonnikoog is covered by microbial mats that initiate a succession of plant communities that eventually results in the development of a densely vegetated salt marsh. The North Sea beach has a natural elevation running from the low water mark to the dunes resulting in gradients of environmental factors perpendicular to the beach. These gradients are due to the input of seawater at the low water mark and of freshwater from upwelling groundwater at the dunes and rainfall. The result is a natural and dynamic salinity gradient depending on the tide, rainfall and wind. We studied the microbial community composition in thirty three samples taken every ten meters along this natural salinity gradient by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of rRNA gene fragments. We looked at representatives from each Domain of life (Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya and with a particular emphasis on Cyanobacteria. Analysis of the DGGE fingerprints together with pigment composition revealed three distinct microbial mat communities, a marine community dominated by diatoms as primary producers, an intermediate brackish community dominated by Cyanobacteria as primary producers and a freshwater community with Cyanobacteria and freshwater green algae.

  12. Diazotrophic microbial community of coastal microbial mats of the southern North Sea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Compaoré, J.; Severin, I.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Stal, L.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The diazotrophic community in microbial mats growing along the shore of the North Sea barrier island Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) was studied using microscopy, lipid biomarkers, stable carbon (δ13CTOC) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes as well as by constructing and analyzing 16S rRNA gene

  13. Diazotrophic microbial community of coastal microbial mats of the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Compaoré, J.; Severin, I.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Stal, L.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The diazotrophic community in microbial mats growing along the shore of the North Sea barrier island Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) was studied using microscopy, lipid biomarkers, stable carbon (delta(13)C(TOC)) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) isotopes as well as by constructing and analyzing 16S rRNA

  14. Diazotrophic microbial community of coastal microbial mats of the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Compaore, J.; Severin, I.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Stal, L.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The diazotrophic community in microbial mats growing along the shore of the North Sea barrier island Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) was studied using microscopy, lipid biomarkers, stable carbon (δ13CTOC) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes as well as by constructing and analyzing 16S rRNA gene

  15. Possible evolution of mobile animals in association with microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Murray; Hagadorn, James W.; Seilacher, Adolf; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Pecoits, Ernesto; Petrash, Daniel; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2011-06-01

    Complex animals first evolved during the Ediacaran period, between 635 and 542 million years ago, when the oceans were just becoming fully oxygenated. In situ fossils of the mobile forms of these animals are associated with microbial sedimentary structures, and the animal's trace fossils generally were formed parallel to the surface of the seabed, at or below the sediment-water interface. This evidence suggests the earliest mobile animals inhabited settings with high microbial populations, and may have mined microbially bound sediments for food resources. Here we report the association of mobile animals--insect larvae, oligochaetes and burrowing shore crabs--with microbial mats in a modern hypersaline lagoon in Venezuela. The lagoon is characterized by low concentrations of dissolved O2 and pervasive biomats dominated by oxygen-producing cyanobacteria, both analogous to conditions during the Ediacaran. We find that, during the day, O2 levels in the biomats are four times higher than in the overlying water column. We therefore conclude that the animals harvest both food and O2 from the biomats. In doing so, the animals produce horizontal burrows similar to those found in Ediacaran-aged rocks. We suggest that early mobile animals may have evolved in similar environments during the Ediacaran, effectively exploiting oases rich in O2 that formed within low oxygen settings.

  16. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  17. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  18. Phototrophic phylotypes dominate mesothermal microbial mats associated with hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kimberly A; Feazel, Leah M; Robertson, Charles E; Fathepure, Babu Z; Wright, Katherine E; Turk-Macleod, Rebecca M; Chan, Mallory M; Held, Nicole L; Spear, John R; Pace, Norman R

    2012-07-01

    The mesothermal outflow zones (50-65°C) of geothermal springs often support an extensive zone of green and orange laminated microbial mats. In order to identify and compare the microbial inhabitants of morphologically similar green-orange mats from chemically and geographically distinct springs, we generated and analyzed small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons from six mesothermal mats (four previously unexamined) in Yellowstone National Park. Between three and six bacterial phyla dominated each mat. While many sequences bear the highest identity to previously isolated phototrophic genera belonging to the Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Chlorobi phyla, there is also frequent representation of uncultured, unclassified members of these groups. Some genus-level representatives of these dominant phyla were found in all mats, while others were unique to a single mat. Other groups detected at high frequencies include candidate divisions (such as the OP candidate clades) with no cultured representatives or complete genomes available. In addition, rRNA genes related to the recently isolated and characterized photosynthetic acidobacterium "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum" were detected in most mats. In contrast to microbial mats from well-studied hypersaline environments, the mesothermal mats in this study accrue less biomass and are substantially less diverse, but have a higher proportion of known phototrophic organisms. This study provides sequences appropriate for accurate phylogenetic classification and expands the molecular phylogenetic survey of Yellowstone microbial mats.

  19. The Effects of Low Sulfate Concentrations on Modern Microbial Mat Communities: A Long Term Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad; Carpenter, Steve; DesMarais, David J.; Discipulo, Mykell; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra

    2002-01-01

    Microbial mats were widespread during the first ca. 2 Ga. of our biosphere's history. To better understand microbial ecosystems and their biomarkers under the low sulfate levels present in early oceans, we attempted a long-term (ca. 1 year) manipulation of sulfate in modem mats. Mats collected from salt ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Calif. Sur were incubated in a Greenhouse "Collaboratory" at Ames. Mats were maintained in artificial seawater brine containing either: 1) sulfate levels normal for these mats (70 mM), or 2) brine in which sulfate was replaced by chloride. Sulfate concentrations in the "low sulfate" brine gradually approached their lowest (to date) value of 0. 1 mM as sulfate was consumed and/or diffused out of the mat over a period of ca. 4 months. During that period of time, a number of differences between the treatments emerged. Relative to the "low sulfate" mats, "normal sulfate" mats had: 1) lower consumption of oxygen in the lower levels of the mat, 2) higher efficiencies of oxygenic photosynthesis, and 3) higher rates of nitrogen fixation. Rates of methane production by the mats increased greatly as sulfate concentrations fell below ca. 0.2 mM. In contrast, "low" and "normal" sulfate mats had similar net rates of exchange of O2 and dissolved inorganic C between the mats and overlying water. Reduced sulfate levels have diverse impacts upon these ecosystems.

  20. Optimization of DNA Extractions from Iron-rich Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, H.; Hilton, T. S.; Moyer, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophicgrowth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Many microbes have adapted to this energy source. One such bacterial class are the Zetaproteobacteria, which dominate Iron-rich microbial mats at Loihi seamount. Although cell counts are very high (up to 5.3x108 cells/ml), efficient DNA yields are low in comparison. In this study we compared extraction efficiency across different methods and with the addition of various buffers. Regardless of protocol (i.e., kit), the addition of sodium citrate drastically increased the DNA yield. The addition of sodium citrate did not alter community structure as determined by T-RFLP and qPCR. Citrate is a well-known ferric iron chelator and will bind ferrous as well. The chelated iron is then unable to participate in the Fenton reaction and this stops the generation of hydroxyl radicals which in turn can react and degrade the extracted DNA. We have utilized this relationship to allow us to obtain nearly an order of magnitude more microbial community DNA per sample, which should also have implications when processing low biomass samples, e.g., from the deep subsurface.

  1. Eukaryotic microbial diversity of phototrophic microbial mats in two Icelandic geothermalhot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Angeles; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; González-Toril, Elena; Rendueles, Olaya; Amils, Ricardo

    2010-03-01

    The composition of the eukaryotic community and the three-dimensional structure of diverse phototrophic microbial mats from two hot springs in Iceland (Seltun and Hveradalir geothermal areas) were explored by comparing eukaryotic assemblages from microbial mats. Samples were collected in July 2007 from 15 sampling stations along thermal and pH gradients following both hot springs. Physicochemical data revealed high variability in terms of pH (ranging from 2.8 to 7), with high concentrations of heavy metals, including up to 20 g Fe/l, 80 mg Zn/l, 117 mg Cu/l, and 39 mg Ni/l at the most acidic sampling points. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA genes revealed a diversity of sequences related to several taxa, including members of the Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta, and Euglenophyta phyla as well as ciliates, amoebae, and stramenopiles. The closest relatives to some of the sequences detected came from acidophilic organisms, even when the samples were collected at circumneutral water locations. Electron microscopy showed that most of the microecosystems analyzed were organized as phototrophic microbial mats in which filamentous cyanobacteria usually appeared as a major component. Deposits of amorphous minerals rich in silica, iron, and aluminium around the filaments were frequently detected.

  2. Comparison of the active and resident community of a coastal microbial mat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, D.C.; Sandionigi, A.; Cretoiu, M.S; Casiraghi, M.; Stal, L.; Bolhuis, H.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal microbial mats form a nearly closed micro-scale ecosystem harboring a complex microbial community. Previous DNA based analysis did not necessarily provide information about the active fraction of the microbial community because it includes dormant, inactive cells as well as a potential

  3. MILLIMETER-SCALE GENETIC GRADIENTS AND COMMUNITY-LEVEL MOLECULAR CONVERGENCE IN A HYPERSALINE MICROBIAL MAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenner, Marsha W; Kunin, Victor; Raes, Jeroen; Harris, J. Kirk; Spear, John R.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Mering, Christian von; Bebout, Brad M.; Pace, Norman R.; Bork, Peer; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-04-30

    To investigate the extent of genetic stratification in structured microbial communities, we compared the metagenomes of 10 successive layers of a phylogenetically complex hypersaline mat from Guerrero Negro, Mexico. We found pronounced millimeter-scale genetic gradients that are consistent with the physicochemical profile of the mat. Despite these gradients, all layers displayed near identical and acid-shifted isoelectric point profiles due to a molecular convergence of amino acid usage indicating that hypersalinity enforces an overriding selective pressure on the mat community.

  4. Microbial life in a fjord: metagenomic analysis of a microbial mat in Chilean patagonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Ugalde

    Full Text Available The current study describes the taxonomic and functional composition of metagenomic sequences obtained from a filamentous microbial mat isolated from the Comau fjord, located in the northernmost part of the Chilean Patagonia. The taxonomic composition of the microbial community showed a high proportion of members of the Gammaproteobacteria, including a high number of sequences that were recruited to the genomes of Moritella marina MP-1 and Colwelliapsycherythraea 34H, suggesting the presence of populations related to these two psychrophilic bacterial species. Functional analysis of the community indicated a high proportion of genes coding for the transport and metabolism of amino acids, as well as in energy production. Among the energy production functions, we found protein-coding genes for sulfate and nitrate reduction, both processes associated with Gammaproteobacteria-related sequences. This report provides the first examination of the taxonomic composition and genetic diversity associated with these conspicuous microbial mat communities and provides a framework for future microbial studies in the Comau fjord.

  5. Microbial Life in a Fjord: Metagenomic Analysis of a Microbial Mat in Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Juan A.; Gallardo, Maria J.; Belmar, Camila; Muñoz, Práxedes; Ruiz-Tagle, Nathaly; Ferrada-Fuentes, Sandra; Espinoza, Carola; Allen, Eric E.; Gallardo, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study describes the taxonomic and functional composition of metagenomic sequences obtained from a filamentous microbial mat isolated from the Comau fjord, located in the northernmost part of the Chilean Patagonia. The taxonomic composition of the microbial community showed a high proportion of members of the Gammaproteobacteria, including a high number of sequences that were recruited to the genomes of Moritella marina MP-1 and Colwelliapsycherythraea 34H, suggesting the presence of populations related to these two psychrophilic bacterial species. Functional analysis of the community indicated a high proportion of genes coding for the transport and metabolism of amino acids, as well as in energy production. Among the energy production functions, we found protein-coding genes for sulfate and nitrate reduction, both processes associated with Gammaproteobacteria-related sequences. This report provides the first examination of the taxonomic composition and genetic diversity associated with these conspicuous microbial mat communities and provides a framework for future microbial studies in the Comau fjord. PMID:24015199

  6. Microbial Mat Compositional and Functional Sensitivity to Environmental Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisner, Eva C.; Fichot, Erin B.; Norman, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of ecosystems to adapt to environmental perturbations depends on the duration and intensity of change and the overall biological diversity of the system. While studies have indicated that rare microbial taxa may provide a biological reservoir that supports long-term ecosystem stability, how this dynamic population is influenced by environmental parameters remains unclear. In this study, a microbial mat ecosystem located on San Salvador Island, The Bahamas was used as a model to examine how environmental disturbance affects the protein synthesis potential (PSP) of rare and abundant archaeal and bacterial communities and how these changes impact potential biogeochemical processes. This ecosystem experienced a large shift in salinity (230 to 65 g kg-1) during 2011–2012 following the landfall of Hurricane Irene on San Salvador Island. High throughput sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA and rRNA genes from samples before and after the pulse disturbance showed significant changes in the diversity and PSP of abundant and rare taxa, suggesting overall compositional and functional sensitivity to environmental change. In both archaeal and bacterial communities, while the majority of taxa showed low PSP across conditions, the overall community PSP increased post-disturbance, with significant shifts occurring among abundant and rare taxa across and within phyla. Broadly, following the post-disturbance reduction in salinity, taxa within Halobacteria decreased while those within Crenarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, Thermoplasmata, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria, increased in abundance and PSP. Quantitative PCR of genes and transcripts involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling showed concomitant shifts in biogeochemical cycling potential. Post-disturbance conditions increased the expression of genes involved in N-fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and sulfate reduction. Together, our findings show complex community adaptation to environmental change and help

  7. Microbial Mat Compositional and Functional Sensitivity to Environmental Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Christine Preisner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of ecosystems to adapt to environmental perturbations depends on the duration and intensity of change and the overall biological diversity of the system. While studies have indicated that rare microbial taxa may provide a biological reservoir that supports long-term ecosystem stability, how this dynamic population is influenced by environmental parameters remains unclear. In this study, a microbial mat ecosystem located on San Salvador Island, The Bahamas was used as a model to examine how environmental disturbance affects the protein synthesis potential (PSP of rare and abundant archaeal and bacterial communities and how these changes impact potential biogeochemical processes. This ecosystem experienced a large shift in salinity (230 to 65 g kg-1 during 2011-2012 following the landfall of Hurricane Irene on San Salvador Island. High throughput sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA and rRNA genes from samples before and after the pulse disturbance showed significant changes in the diversity and PSP of abundant and rare taxa, suggesting overall compositional and functional sensitivity to environmental change. In both archaeal and bacterial communities, while the majority of taxa showed low PSP across conditions, the overall community PSP increased post-disturbance, with significant shifts occurring among abundant and rare taxa across and within phyla. Broadly, following the post-disturbance reduction in salinity, taxa within Halobacteria decreased while those within Crenarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, Thermoplasmata, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria, increased in abundance and PSP. Quantitative PCR of genes and transcripts involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling showed concomitant shifts in biogeochemical cycling potential. Post-disturbance conditions increased the expression of genes involved in N-fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and sulfate reduction. Together, our findings show complex community adaptation to environmental

  8. In Situ Hydrogen Dynamics in a Hot Spring Microbial Mat during a Diel Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Niels Peter; Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Lichtenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    in a hot spring microbial mat, where various ecotypes of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp.) are the only oxygenic phototrophs. In the evening, H2 accumulated rapidly after the onset of darkness, reaching peak values of up to 30 mol H2 liter1 at about 1-mm depth below the mat surface, slowly...

  9. COMPETITION BETWEEN ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND COLORLESS SULFUR BACTERIA IN A MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; VANDENENDE, FP; SCHAUB, BEM; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1992-01-01

    The populations of chemolithoautotrophic (colorless) sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were enumerated in a marine microbial mat. The highest population densities were found in the 0-5 mm layer of the mat: 2.0 X 10(9) cells CM-3 sediment, and 4.0 X 10(7) cells cm-3 sediment for th

  10. RATES OF SULFATE REDUCTION AND THIOSULFATE CONSUMPTION IN A MARINE MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; PRINS, RA; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1992-01-01

    The sulfur cycle in a microbial mat was studied by determining viable counts of sulfate-reducing bacteria, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. All three functional groups of sulfur bacteria revealed a maximum population density in the uppermost 5 mm of the mat

  11. COMPETITION BETWEEN ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND COLORLESS SULFUR BACTERIA IN A MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; VANDENENDE, FP; SCHAUB, BEM; VANGEMERDEN, H

    The populations of chemolithoautotrophic (colorless) sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were enumerated in a marine microbial mat. The highest population densities were found in the 0-5 mm layer of the mat: 2.0 X 10(9) cells CM-3 sediment, and 4.0 X 10(7) cells cm-3 sediment for

  12. Microscale spatial distributions of microbes and viruses in intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira, C; Piel, T; Staal, M.; Stuut, J.-B; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats from the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog were examined for microscale (millimetre) spatial distributions of viruses, prokaryotes and oxygenic photoautotrophs (filamentous cyanobacteria and benthic diatoms) at different times of the year. Abundances of virus

  13. Microscale spatial distributions of microbes and viruses in intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira, C; Piel, T; Staal, M.; Stuut, J.-B; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats from the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog were examined for microscale (millimetre) spatial distributions of viruses, prokaryotes and oxygenic photoautotrophs (filamentous cyanobacteria and benthic diatoms) at different times of the year. Abundances of

  14. Life in Oligotropic Desert Environments: Contrasting Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Two Microbial Mats with Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Rosso, G.; Peimbert, M.; Olmedo, G.; Alcaraz, L. D.; Eguiarte, L. E.; Souza, V.

    2010-04-01

    The metagenomic analysis of two microbial mats from the oligotrophic waters in the Cuatrociéngas basin reveals large differences both at taxonomic and functional level. These are explained in terms of environmental stability and nutrient availability.

  15. Ecophysiology of stromatolitic microbial mats, Stocking Island, exuma cays, Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckney, J; Paerl, H W; Reid, R P; Bebout, B

    1995-01-01

    Intertidal stromatolites, covered by cyanobacterial mats, were recently discovered at Stocking Island, Exuma Cays, Bahamas. Ecophysiological responses (CO2 fixation, N2 fixation, and photoacclimation) of these cyanobacterial mats to experimental manipulations were examined to identify potential environmental variables controlling community structure and function. The mats exhibit horizontal zonation that shifts from soft to crusty to hard in a seaward direction. Cluster analysis of chemotaxonomic photopigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) revealed that visually distinct mat types are composed of distinct phototrophic assemblages. Under reduced irradiance, diatoms within the mats photoacclimated by increasing accessory photopigments (diadinoxanthin, fucoxanthin, and chlorophyll c 1 c 2) and cyanobacteria reduced the photoprotective carotenoid echinenone. In a 4-day nutrient addition bioassay experiment, nitrate, phosphate, dissolved organic carbon, and trace metal enrichments did not enhance CO2 fixation, but phosphate enrichments tripled N2 fixation rates. The addition of DCMU increased N2 fixation rates relative to nonamended light and dark rates, indicating light (photosystem I) enhanced nitrogenase activity. Soft mats appear to represent the early stages of colonization and stabilization of mat communities. Active growth following stabilization results in the formation of partially-lithified crusty mats, which eventually become highly-lithified and form hard mats. Collectively, our results suggest that Stocking Island stromatolitic mats have low growth rates and consequently exhibit slow responses to increased nutrient availability and changes in ambient irradiance. In general, intertidal stromatolitic mats at Stocking Island appear to exhibit low rates of CO2 and N2 fixation relative to nonlithifying temperate cyanobacteral mats. Although production is low, respiration is likewise low, leading to the suggestion that high production to respiration ratios (P

  16. Microbial Diversity and Lipid Abundance in Microbial Mats from a Sulfidic, Saline, Warm Spring in Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, J.; Edwardson, C.; Mackey, T. J.; Dzaugis, M.; Ibarra, Y.; Course 2012, G.; Frantz, C. M.; Osburn, M. R.; Hirst, M.; Williamson, C.; Hanselmann, K.; Caporaso, J.; Sessions, A. L.; Spear, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The microbial diversity of Stinking Springs, a sulfidic, saline, warm spring northeast of the Great Salt Lake was investigated. The measured pH, temperature, salinity, and sulfide concentration along the flow path ranged from 6.64-7.77, 40-28° C, 2.9-2.2%, and 250 μM to negligible, respectively. Five sites were selected along the flow path and within each site microbial mats were dissected into depth profiles based on the color and texture of the mat layers. Genomic DNA was extracted from each layer, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced on the Roche 454 Titanium platform. Fatty acids were also extracted from the mat layers and analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The mats at Stinking Springs were classified into roughly two morphologies with respect to their spatial distribution: loose, sometimes floating mats proximal to the spring source; and thicker, well-laminated mats distal to the spring source. Loosely-laminated mats were found in turbulent stream flow environments, whereas well-laminated mats were common in less turbulent sheet flows. Phototrophs, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers, methanogens, other bacteria and archaea were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences. Diatoms, identified by microscopy and lipid analysis were found to increase in abundance with distance from the source. Methanogens were generally more abundant in deeper mat laminae. Photoheterotrophs were found in all mat layers. Microbial diversity increased significantly with depth at most sites. In addition, two distinct microbial streamers were identified and characterized at the two fast flowing sites. These two streamer varieties were dominated by either cyanobacteria or flavobacteria. Overall, our genomic and lipid analysis suggest that the physical and chemical environment is more predictive of the community composition than mat morphology. Site Map

  17. Tracing biosignatures from the Recent to the Jurassic in sabkha-associated microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Land, Cees; Dutton, Kirsten; Andrade, Luiza; Paul, Andreas; Sherry, Angela; Fender, Tom; Hewett, Guy; Jones, Martin; Lokier, Stephen W.; Head, Ian M.

    2017-04-01

    Microbial mat ecosystems have been operating at the sediment-fluid interface for over 3400 million years, influencing the flux, transformation and preservation of carbon from the biosphere to the physical environment. These ecosystems are excellent recorders of rapid and profound changes in earth surface environments and biota as they often survive crisis-induced extreme paleoenvironmental conditions. Their biosignatures, captured in the preserved organic matter and the biominerals that form the microbialite rock, constitute a significant tool in understanding geobiological processes and the interactions of the microbial communities with sediments and with the prevailing physical chemical parameters, as well as the environmental conditions at a local and global scale. Nevertheless, the exact pathways of diagenetic organic matter transformation and early-lithification, essential for the accretion and preservation in the geological record as microbialites, are not well understood. The Abu Dhabi coastal sabkha system contains a vast microbial mat belt that is dominated by continuous polygonal and internally-laminated microbial mats across the upper and middle intertidal zones. This modern system is believed to be the best analogue for the Upper Jurassic Arab Formation, which is both a prolific hydrocarbon reservoir and source rock facies in the United Arab Emirates and in neighbouring countries. In order to characterise the processes that lead to the formation of microbialites we investigated the modern and Jurassic system using a multidisciplinary approach, including growth of field-sampled microbial mats under controlled conditions in the laboratory and field-based analysis of microbial communities, mat mineralogy and organic biomarker analysis. In this study, we focus on hydrocarbon biomarker data obtained from the surface of microbial mats actively growing in the intertidal zone of the modern system. By comparing these findings to data obtained from recently

  18. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E.S.; King, S.; Tomberlin, J.K.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Barkay, T.; Geesey, G.G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Microbial mats are a visible and abundant life form inhabiting the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated with a phototrophic green/purple Zygogonium microbial mat community that inhabits low-temperature regions of acidic (pH ??? 3.0) thermal springs were found to serve as a food source for stratiomyid (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae. Mercury in spring source water was taken up and concentrated by the mat biomass. Monomethylmercury compounds (MeHg +), while undetectable or near the detection limit (0.025 ng l -1) in the source water of the springs, was present at concentrations of 4-7 ng g-1 dry weight of mat biomass. Detection of MeHg + in tracheal tissue of larvae grazing the mat suggests that MeHg+ enters this geothermal food web through the phototrophic microbial mat community. The concentration of MeHg+ was two to five times higher in larval tissue than mat biomass indicating MeHg+ biomagnification occurred between primary producer and primary consumer trophic levels. The Zygogonium mat community and stratiomyid larvae may also play a role in the transfer of MeHg+ to species in the food web whose range extends beyond a particular geothermal feature of YNP. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Eric S; King, Susan; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Krabbenhoft, David P; Barkay, Tamar; Geesey, Gill G

    2009-04-01

    Microbial mats are a visible and abundant life form inhabiting the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated with a phototrophic green/purple Zygogonium microbial mat community that inhabits low-temperature regions of acidic (pH approximately 3.0) thermal springs were found to serve as a food source for stratiomyid (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae. Mercury in spring source water was taken up and concentrated by the mat biomass. Monomethylmercury compounds (MeHg(+)), while undetectable or near the detection limit (0.025 ng l(-1)) in the source water of the springs, was present at concentrations of 4-7 ng g(-1) dry weight of mat biomass. Detection of MeHg(+) in tracheal tissue of larvae grazing the mat suggests that MeHg(+) enters this geothermal food web through the phototrophic microbial mat community. The concentration of MeHg(+) was two to five times higher in larval tissue than mat biomass indicating MeHg(+) biomagnification occurred between primary producer and primary consumer trophic levels. The Zygogonium mat community and stratiomyid larvae may also play a role in the transfer of MeHg(+) to species in the food web whose range extends beyond a particular geothermal feature of YNP.

  20. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babauta, Jerome T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Atci, Erhan [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Ha, Phuc T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Lindemann, Stephen R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ewing, Timothy [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Call, Douglas R. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Beyenal, Haluk [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode- associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community.

  1. Deposition of Biogenic Iron Minerals in a Methane Oxidizing Microbial Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  2. Deposition of biogenic iron minerals in a methane oxidizing microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Christoph; Kokoschka, Sebastian; Dreier, Anne; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  3. Marine Microbial Mats and the Search for Evidence of Life in Deep Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats in extensive seawater evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico, have been excellent subjects for microbial ecology research. The studies reviewed here have documented the steep and rapidly changing environmental gradients experienced by mat microorganisms and the very high rates of biogeochemical processes that they maintained. Recent genetic studies have revealed an enormous diversity of bacteria as well as the spatial distribution of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. These findings, together with emerging insights into the intimate interactions between these diverse populations, have contributed substantially to our understanding of the origins, environmental impacts, and biosignatures of photosynthetic microbial mats. The biosignatures (preservable cells, sedimentary fabrics, organic compounds, minerals, stable isotope patterns, etc.) potentially can serve as indicators of past life on early Earth. They also can inform our search for evidence of any life on Mars. Mars exploration has revealed evidence of evaporite deposits and thermal spring deposits; similar deposits on Earth once hosted ancient microbial mat ecosystems.

  4. Unravelling core microbial metabolisms in the hypersaline microbial mats of Shark Bay using high-throughput metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvindy, Rendy; White III, Richard Allen; Neilan, Brett Anthony; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2015-05-29

    Modern microbial mats are potential analogues of some of Earth’s earliest ecosystems. Excellent examples can be found in Shark Bay, Australia, with mats of various morphologies. To further our understanding of the functional genetic potential of these complex microbial ecosystems, we conducted for the first time shotgun metagenomic analyses. We assembled metagenomic nextgeneration sequencing data to classify the taxonomic and metabolic potential across diverse morphologies of marine mats in Shark Bay. The microbial community across taxonomic classifications using protein-coding and small subunit rRNA genes directly extracted from the metagenomes suggests that three phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominate all marine mats. However, the microbial community structure between Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay (Bahamas) marine systems appears to be distinct from each other. The metabolic potential (based on SEED subsystem classifications) of the Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay microbial communities were also distinct. Shark Bay metagenomes have a metabolic pathway profile consisting of both heterotrophic and photosynthetic pathways, whereas Highbourne Cay appears to be dominated almost exclusively by photosynthetic pathways. Alternative non-rubisco-based carbon metabolism including reductive TCA cycle and 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathways is highly represented in Shark Bay metagenomes while not represented in Highbourne Cay microbial mats or any other mat forming ecosystems investigated to date. Potentially novel aspects of nitrogen cycling were also observed, as well as putative heavy metal cycling (arsenic, mercury, copper and cadmium). Finally, archaea are highly represented in Shark Bay and may have critical roles in overall ecosystem function in these modern microbial mats.

  5. Unravelling core microbial metabolisms in the hypersaline microbial mats of Shark Bay using high-throughput metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvindy, Rendy; White, Richard Allen; Neilan, Brett Anthony; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Modern microbial mats are potential analogues of some of Earth's earliest ecosystems. Excellent examples can be found in Shark Bay, Australia, with mats of various morphologies. To further our understanding of the functional genetic potential of these complex microbial ecosystems, we conducted for the first time shotgun metagenomic analyses. We assembled metagenomic next-generation sequencing data to classify the taxonomic and metabolic potential across diverse morphologies of marine mats in Shark Bay. The microbial community across taxonomic classifications using protein-coding and small subunit rRNA genes directly extracted from the metagenomes suggests that three phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominate all marine mats. However, the microbial community structure between Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay (Bahamas) marine systems appears to be distinct from each other. The metabolic potential (based on SEED subsystem classifications) of the Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay microbial communities were also distinct. Shark Bay metagenomes have a metabolic pathway profile consisting of both heterotrophic and photosynthetic pathways, whereas Highbourne Cay appears to be dominated almost exclusively by photosynthetic pathways. Alternative non-rubisco-based carbon metabolism including reductive TCA cycle and 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathways is highly represented in Shark Bay metagenomes while not represented in Highbourne Cay microbial mats or any other mat forming ecosystems investigated to date. Potentially novel aspects of nitrogen cycling were also observed, as well as putative heavy metal cycling (arsenic, mercury, copper and cadmium). Finally, archaea are highly represented in Shark Bay and may have critical roles in overall ecosystem function in these modern microbial mats.

  6. Spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of a hypersaline microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in north-central Washington. High rates of evapotranspiration coupled with its location in an endorrheic basin contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate; hypolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M magnesium sulfate concentrations. In addition to extreme salinity, horizons within the lake seasonally exceed 50 °C, in part due to the enhanced light absorption by magnesium sulfate-saturated water. Despite extreme and highly variable seasonal conditions (salinity, temperature, photon flux), dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and bacterial heterotroph populations develop annually at the lake. These mats may exceed 5 mm in thickness and display stratification observable by eye associated with dominant bacterial phototrophic pigments. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer followed by green and purple layers at increasing depth into the mat. Carbonates including aragonite and magnesite are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial activities. While not exclusively limited to the green stratum in the mat, maximum carbonate content is within this layer. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling within the system. Namely, we seek to understand the rates of carbon accumulation in the mat and associated sediments and the various forms this carbon takes (organic or inorganic species). We are assessing mat development, community composition, and carbon accumulation in pre-cleaned devices installed at the lake as they are colonized by native mat. We are using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) to provide spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of mat cross-sections. Currently, this technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within the thickness of each major layer of the mat. We

  7. Preservation in microbial mats: mineralization by a talc-like phase of a fish embedded in a microbial sarcophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eIniesto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mats have been repeatedly suggested to promote early fossilization of macroorganisms. Yet, experimental simulations of this process remain scarce. Here, we report results of 5 year-long experiments performed onfish carcasses to document the influence of microbial mats on mineral precipitation during early fossilization. Carcasses were initially placed on top of microbial mats. After two weeks, fishes became coated by the mats forming a compact sarcophagus, which modified the microenvironment close to the corpses. Our results showed that these conditions favoured the precipitation of a poorly crystalline silicate phase rich in magnesium. This talc-like mineral phase has been detected in three different locations within the carcasses placed in microbial mats for more than 4 years: 1 within inner tissues, colonized by several bacillary cells; 2 at the surface of bones of the upper face of the corpse buried in the mat; and 3 at the surface of several bones such as the dorsal fin which appeared to be gradually replaced by the Mg-silicate phase. This mineral phase has been previously shown to promote bacteria fossilization. Here we provide first experimental evidence that such Mg-rich phase can also be involved in exceptional preservation of animals.

  8. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  9. Community structure and function of high-temperature chlorophototrophic microbial mats inhabiting diverse geothermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klatt, Christian G.; Inskeep, William P.; Herrgard, Markus;

    2013-01-01

    Six phototrophic microbial mat communities from different geothermal springs (YNP) were studied using metagenome sequencing and geochemical analyses. The primary goals of this work were to determine differences in community composition of high-temperature phototrophic mats distributed across...... the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem, and to identify metabolic attributes of predominant organisms present in these communities that may correlate with environmental attributes important in niche differentiation. Random shotgun metagenome sequences from six phototrophic communities (average 53Mbp/site) were...

  10. The Epsomitic Phototrophic Microbial Mat of Hot Lake, Washington. Community Structural Responses to Seasonal Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Stephen R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stegen, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Renslow, Ryan S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cole, Jessica K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dohnalkova, Alice [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tremblay, Julien [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singh, Kanwar [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beyenal, Haluk [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Fredrickson, Jim K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-13

    Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring, disassembles each fall, and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO2-4) and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya), and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus). Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium) and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis) that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function.

  11. The Epsomitic Phototrophic Microbial Mat of Hot Lake, Washington: Community Structural Responses to Seasonal Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Lindemann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring and disassembles each fall and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO42- and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by sequencing the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya, and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus. Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function.

  12. A Biofilm Treatment Approach for Produced Water from Hydraulic Fracturing Using Engineered Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyon, B.; Stachler, E.; Bibby, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing results in large volumes of wastewater, called "produced water". Treatment of produced water is challenged by its high salt, organic compound, and radionuclide concentrations. Current disposal approaches include deep well injection and physical-chemical treatment for surface disposal; however, deep well injection has been recently linked to induced seismicity and physical-chemical treatments suffer from fouling and high cost. The reuse of the produced water has emerged as a desirable management option; however, this requires pretreatment to generate a water of usable quality and limit microbial activity. Biological treatment is an underexplored area in produced water management and has the potential to remove organics and reduce overall costs for physiochemical treatment or reuse. Suspended growth biological treatment techniques are known to be limited by salinity motivating a more robust biofilm approach: 'microbial mats'. In this study, we used engineered microbial mats as a biofilm treatment for the produced water. Evaluation of the biodegradation performance of microbial mats in synthetic and real produced waters showed microbial activity at up to 100,000 mg/L TDS concentration (three times the salt concentration of the ocean). Organic removal rates reached to 1.45 mg COD/gramwet-day at 91,351 mg/L TDS in real produced water samples and initial evaluation demonstrated the potential for field-scale application. Metagenomic analyses of microbial mats demonstrated an adaptive shift in the microbial community treating different samples, suggesting the wide applicability of this treatment approach for produced waters with varying chemical composition. On-going studies focus on the evaluation of the removal of the organics and the contaminants of high concern in produced water using microbial mats as well as the effect of the biofilm growth conditions on the biodegradation in changing salt concentrations.

  13. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Z Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico -- permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mats (GN-S, and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mats (GN-I -- were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of dsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and nanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.

  14. Evolution of Mat Strength from the Paleoarchean to the Modern: A Record of Evolving Microbial Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, M.; Pope, M.; Thornton, D.

    2011-12-01

    Fossil microbial mats, i.e. surface-attached communities of benthic microorganisms, form the most extensive record of life on Earth. Qualitatively changing mat morphologies from 3.43-0.56-billion-years-ago may reflect the evolution of microorganism communities or changing environmental conditions. However, mat morphogenesis is not well understood or easily quantifiable, making interpretation of the mat record difficult. We show that microbial mat cohesion increased from ~1 Pa to ~13 Pa at 2.7-billion-years-ago (Ga), and has remained high for most of the rest of Earth history. This initial increase may represent an early increase in the productivity of mat communities, a change in the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by mat-formers, or a change in the composition of seawater affecting EPS strength. The appearance of early high-strength communities was coincident with the appearance of voids representing gas bubbles in the apices of conical stromatolites; together, these changes may record the emergence of productive mat communities dominated by oxygenic cyanobacteria. The earliest high-strength communities, like early bubble-forming conical stromatolites, grew in low-energy environments. The appearance of high-strength communities in shallow-water environments starting 2.63-2.52 Ga coincided with the appearance of the first barrier reef complexes. We hypothesize that the first oxygenic cyanobacteria were most competitive with anoxygenic phototrophs in diffusion-limited environments. As the cyanobacteria became more proficient at oxygenic photosynthesis, they eventually outcompeted anoxygenic phototrophs in higher-energy environments. Competition with higher strength seaweed and grazing by metazoans has displaced mat communities from essentially all modern high-energy niches.

  15. Effect of salinity on nitrogenase activity and composition of the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Stal, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats are often found in intertidal areas experiencing a large range of salinities. This study investigated the effect of changing salinities on nitrogenase activity and on the composition of the active diazotrophic community (nifH transcript libraries) of three types of microbial mats situ

  16. Temporal and spatial variability of nifH expression in three filamentous Cyanobacteria in coastal microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are often the most conspicuous structural part of microbial mats. They are also the only oxygenic phototrophs capable of N2 fixation (diazotrophy). This represents an important advantage for persistence in the often N-depleted marine intertidal microbial mats. In this study the daily p

  17. Effect of salinity on nitrogenase activity and composition of the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Stal, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats are often found in intertidal areas experiencing a large range of salinities. This study investigated the effect of changing salinities on nitrogenase activity and on the composition of the active diazotrophic community ( transcript libraries) of three types of microbial mats situated

  18. Effect of salinity on nitrogenase activity and composition of the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Stal, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats are often found in intertidal areas experiencing a large range of salinities. This study investigated the effect of changing salinities on nitrogenase activity and on the composition of the active diazotrophic community (nifH transcript libraries) of three types of microbial mats

  19. Effect of salinity on nitrogenase activity and composition of the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats

    OpenAIRE

    Severin, I.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Stal, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats are often found in intertidal areas experiencing a large range of salinities. This study investigated the effect of changing salinities on nitrogenase activity and on the composition of the active diazotrophic community (nifH transcript libraries) of three types of microbial mats situated along a littoral gradient. All three mat types exhibited highest nitrogenase activity at salinities close to ambient seawater or lower. The response to lower or higher salinity was strongest i...

  20. Effect of salinity on nitrogenase activity and composition of the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats are often found in intertidal areas experiencing a large range of salinities. This study investigated the effect of changing salinities on nitrogenase activity and on the composition of the active diazotrophic community (nifH transcript libraries) of three types of microbial mats situated along a littoral gradient. All three mat types exhibited highest nitrogenase activity at salinities close to ambient seawater or lower. The response to lower or higher salinity was strongest i...

  1. Spatially-resolved carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Lindemann, S. R.; Cory, A. B.; Courtney, S.; Cole, J. K.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington. Low annual rainfall and high evaporation rates contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate, of which monimolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M concentrations. Induced by its high salinity and meromictic nature, Hot Lake displays an inverse thermal gradient with deep horizons seasonally exceeding 50 °C. Despite extreme conditions, dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, anoxygenic photoheterotrophs, and bacterial heterotroph populations develop in the lake. These mats can exceed 1 cm in thickness and display vertical stratification in color due to bacterial pigmentation. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer underlain by green and purple layers at increasing depth. Carbonates, including aragonite and magnesite, are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial metabolic activities and associated pH excursions. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the mat and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. Secondly, we seek to understand the overall net carbon balance of the mat through a growing season. We are using a stable isotope probing approach for assessing carbon uptake and migration through representative mat samples. We performed a series of ex situ incubations of freshly harvested mat samples in lake water amended with 13C-labeled bicarbonate or substrates commonly consumed by heterotrophs (including acetate and glucose) and using multiple stable isotope techniques to track label uptake, residence time, remineralization, and location within the mat. In addition to bulk isotope

  2. The Diffusive Boundary-Layer of Sediments - Oxygen Microgradients Over a Microbial Mat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; MARAIS, DJD

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen microelectrodes were used to analyze the distribution of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) at the sedimen-water interface in relation to surface topography and flow velocity. The sediment, collected from saline ponds, was covered by a microbial mat that had high oxygen consumption rate...... the mat). The oxygen uptake rate concurrently increased from 3.9 to 9.4 nmol cm-2 min-1. The effects of surface roughness and topography on the thickness and distribution of the DBL were studied by three-dimensional mapping of the sediment-water interface and the upper DBL boundary at 0.1-mm spatial...... resolution. The DBL boundary followed mat structures that had characteristic dimensions > 1/2 DBL thickness but the DBL had a dampened relief relative to the mat. The effective surface area of the sediment-water interface and of the upper DBL boundary were 31 and 14% larger, respectively, than a flat plane...

  3. Learning Geomicrobiology as a Team Using Microbial Mats, a Multidisciplinary Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter T. Visscher

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides field trips and independent research projects focused on microbial mats, four intensive workshops and one capstone activity were designed to expose students to the different geomicrobiology subdisciplines (microbiology, molecular biology, geology, and geochemistry. The teaching-learning process was assessed using pre- and posttests, group discussions, activities including Gallery Walks and exquisite cadaver’s, case studies, and focal interviews. While the posttest showed a significant difference in conceptual understanding, the Gallery Walk and the capstone activities demonstrated increase in the depth, coherence, and thoughtfulness in answering questions, including a clear integration of the different subdisciplines during their presentations. Finally, the main themes described by the students as important outcomes of their participation in the Research at Undergraduate Institutions: Microbial Observatory (RUI-MO program were: (i the opportunity to study and learn new and different science disciplines, (ii the microbial mats were excellent tools to learn from and integrate different science disciplines, and (iii working in multidisciplinary teams gave them the opportunity to learn from their peers’ discipline backgrounds. To our knowledge this is the first educational initiative that uses tropical hypersaline microbial mats to teach geomicrobiology in a multidisciplinary fashion.

  4. Learning Geomicrobiology as a Team Using Microbial Mats, a Multidisciplinary Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rios-Velazquez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides field trips and independent research projects focused on microbial mats, four intensive workshops and one capstone activity were designed to expose students to the different geomicrobiology subdisciplines (microbiology, molecular biology, geology, and geochemistry. The teaching-learning process was assessed using pre- and posttests, group discussions, activities including Gallery Walks and exquisite cadaver’s, case studies, and focal interviews. While the posttest showed a significant difference in conceptual understanding, the Gallery Walk and the capstone activities demonstrated increase in the depth, coherence, and thoughtfulness in answering questions, including a clear integration of the different subdisciplines during their presentations. Finally, the main themes described by the students as important outcomes of their participation in the Research at Undergraduate Institutions: Microbial Observatory (RUI-MO program were: (i the opportunity to study and learn new and different science disciplines, (ii the microbial mats were excellent tools to learn from and integrate different science disciplines, and (iii working in multidisciplinary teams gave them the opportunity to learn from their peers’ discipline backgrounds. To our knowledge this is the first educational initiative that uses tropical hypersaline microbial mats to teach geomicrobiology in a multidisciplinary fashion.

  5. Analysis of lipophilic pigments from a phototrophic microbial mat community by high performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, A. C.; Cronin, S. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    As assay for lipophilic pigments in phototrophic microbial mat communities using reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography was developed which allows the separation of 15 carotenoids and chloropigments in a single 30 min program. Lipophilic pigments in a laminated mat from a commercial salina near Laguna Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico reflected their source organisms. Myxoxanthophyll, echinenone, canthaxanthin, and zeaxanthin were derived from cyanobacteria; chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin from diatoms; chlorophyll a from cyanobacteria and diatoms; bacteriochlorophylls a and c, bacteriophaeophytin a, and gamma-carotene from Chloroflexus spp.; and beta-carotene from a variety of phototrophs. Sensitivity of detection was 0.6-6.1 ng for carotenoids and 1.7-12 ng for most chloropigments. This assay represents a significant improvement over previous analyses of lipophilic pigments in microbial mats and promises to have a wider application to other types of phototrophic communities.

  6. Contribution of Chloroflexus respiration to oxygen cycling in a hypersaline microbial mat from Lake Chiprana, Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polerecky, Lubos; Bachar, Ami; Schoon, Raphaela

    2007-01-01

    in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) regions to study this coupling in more detail. Using this novel approach, we separately quantified the activity of the major players in the oxygen cycle in a hypersaline microbial mat: gross photosynthesis of cyanobacteria, NIR light-dependent respiration......In dense stratified systems such as microbial mats, photosynthesis and respiration are coupled due to a tight spatial overlap between oxygen-producing and -consuming microorganisms. We combined microsensors and a membrane inlet mass spectrometer with two independent light sources emitting...... of Chloroflexus-like bacteria (CLB) and respiration of aerobic heterotrophs. Illumination by VIS light induced oxygen production in the top 1 mm of the mat. In this zone CLB were found responsible for all respiration, while the contribution of the aerobic heterotrophs was negligible. Additional illumination...

  7. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P. Beam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA, and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3 - 3.5; temperature = 68 - 75 °C in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4 - 40 d, and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 d, and reached steady-state levels within 14 - 30 d, corresponding to visible Fe(III-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 d, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 d and in mature Fe(III-oxide mats (1 - 2 cm thick. First-order rate constants of Fe(III-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 - 0.05 d-1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III-oxide mats are useful for understanding other Fe(II-oxidizing systems.

  8. SULFIDE OXIDATION UNDER OXYGEN LIMITATION BY A THIOBACILLUS-THIOPARUS ISOLATED FROM A MARINE MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENENDE, FP; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1993-01-01

    The colorless sulfur bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus T5, isolated from a marine microbial mat, was grown in continuous culture under conditions ranging from sulfide limitation to oxygen limitation. Under sulfide-limiting conditions, sulfide was virtually completely oxidized to sulfate. Under oxygen

  9. The role of microbial mats during primary succession in calcareous dune slacks : an experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Ende, F.P. van den; Walsweer, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    Laminated microbial mats from a sandy beach plain were grown in water-saturated pots in a glass house for six months and then used to assess their effect on the establishment of juveniles of three plant species representing different successional stages in dune slack development. The selected

  10. ABUNDANCE AND SALT TOLERANCE OF OBLIGATELY AEROBIC, PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA IN A MARINE MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    YURKOV, VV; VANGEMERDEN, H

    Data have been collected on the abundance of obligately aerobic, bacteriochlorophyll-a-containing bacteria in a marine microbial mat on the West Frisian Island of Texel, The Netherlands. Plate counts on media rich in organic matter revealed average numbers of 3*10(5).cm-3 sediment in the top 10 mm

  11. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria Shunt Carbon to Microbial Mats at a Marine Hydrocarbon Seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Blair G.; Ding, Haibing; Bagby, Sarah C.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Redmond, Molly C.; Andersen, Gary L.; Valentine, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The marine subsurface is a reservoir of the greenhouse gas methane. While microorganisms living in water column and seafloor ecosystems are known to be a major sink limiting net methane transport from the marine subsurface to the atmosphere, few studies have assessed the flow of methane-derived carbon through the benthic mat communities that line the seafloor on the continental shelf where methane is emitted. We analyzed the abundance and isotope composition of fatty acids in microbial mats grown in the shallow Coal Oil Point seep field off Santa Barbara, CA, USA, where seep gas is a mixture of methane and CO2. We further used stable isotope probing (SIP) to track methane incorporation into mat biomass. We found evidence that multiple allochthonous substrates supported the rich growth of these mats, with notable contributions from bacterial methanotrophs and sulfur-oxidizers as well as eukaryotic phototrophs. Fatty acids characteristic of methanotrophs were shown to be abundant and 13C-enriched in SIP samples, and DNA-SIP identified members of the methanotrophic family Methylococcaceae as major 13CH4 consumers. Members of Sulfuricurvaceae, Sulfurospirillaceae, and Sulfurovumaceae are implicated in fixation of seep CO2. The mats’ autotrophs support a diverse assemblage of co-occurring bacteria and protozoa, with Methylophaga as key consumers of methane-derived organic matter. This study identifies the taxa contributing to the flow of seep-derived carbon through microbial mat biomass, revealing the bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of these remarkable ecosystems.

  12. UV B-Induced Vertical Migrations of Cyanobacteria in a Microbial Mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B M; Garcia-Pichel, F

    1995-12-01

    Exposure to moderate doses of UV B (0.35 to 0.79 W m(sup-2) s(sup-1) or 0.98 to 2.2 (mu)mol of photons m(sup-2) s(sup-1) at 310 nm) caused the surface layers of microbial mats from Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt, to become visibly lighter green. Concurrent with the color change were rapid and dramatic reductions in gross photosynthesis and in the resultant high porewater oxygen concentrations in the surface layers of the mats. The depths at which both maximum gross photosynthesis and maximum oxygen concentrations occurred were displaced downward. In contrast, gross photosynthesis in the deeper layers of the mats increased in response to UV B incident upon the surface. The cessation of exposure to UV B partially reversed all of these changes. Taken together, these responses suggest that photoautotrophic members of the mat community, most likely the dominant cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes, were migrating in response to the added UV B. The migration phenomenon was also observed in response to increases in visible radiation and UV A, but UV B was ca. 100-fold more effective than visible radiation and ca. 20-fold more effective than UV A in provoking the response. Migrating microorganisms within this mat are apparently able to sense UV B directly and respond behaviorally to limit their exposure to UV. Because of strong vertical gradients of light and dissolved substances in microbial mats, the migration and the resultant vertical redistribution of photosynthetic activity have important consequences for both the photobiology of the cyanobacteria and the net primary productivity of the mat ecosystem.

  13. Spatial patterns and links between microbial community composition and function in cyanobacterial mats

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Mohammad Ahmad

    2014-08-06

    We imaged reflectance and variable fluorescence in 25 cyanobacterial mats from four distant sites around the globe to assess, at different scales of resolution, spatial variabilities in the physiological parameters characterizing their photosynthetic capacity, including the absorptivity by chlorophyll a (Achl), maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Ymax), and light acclimation irradiance (Ik). Generally, these parameters significantly varied within individual mats on a sub-millimeter scale, with about 2-fold higher variability in the vertical than in the horizontal direction. The average vertical profiles of Ymax and Ik decreased with depth in the mat, while Achl exhibited a sub-surface maximum. The within-mat variability was comparable to, but often larger than, the between-sites variability, whereas the within-site variabilities (i.e., between samples from the same site) were generally lowest. When compared based on averaged values of their photosynthetic parameters, mats clustered according to their site of origin. Similar clustering was found when the community composition of the mats\\' cyanobacterial layers were compared by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), indicating a significant link between the microbial community composition and function. Although this link is likely the result of community adaptation to the prevailing site-specific environmental conditions, our present data is insufficient to identify the main factors determining these patterns. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that the spatial variability in the photosynthetic capacity and light acclimation of benthic phototrophic microbial communities is at least as large on a sub-millimeter scale as it is on a global scale, and suggests that this pattern of variability scaling is similar for the microbial community composition. © 2014 Al-Najjar, Ramette, Kühl, Hamza, Klatt and Polerecky.

  14. Total mercury and methyl-mercury contents and accumulation in polar microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Antonio; Rochera, Carlos; Hennebelle, Raphaëlle; Ferrari, Christophe; Quesada, Antonio

    2015-03-15

    Although polar regions are considered isolated and pristine areas, the organisms that inhabit these zones are exposed to global pollution. Heavy metals, such as mercury, are global pollutants and can reach almost any location on Earth. Mercury may come from natural, volcanic or geological sources, or result from anthropogenic sources, in particular industrial or mining activities. In this study, we have investigated one of the most prominent biological non-marine communities in both polar regions, microbial mats, in terms of their Hg and methyl-mercury (MeHg) concentrations and accumulation capacities. The main hypotheses posed argued on the importance of different factors, and to test them, we have measured Hg concentrations in microbial mats that were collected from 6 locations in different ecological situations. For this purpose, the direct anthropogenic impacts, volcanic influences, proximity to the seashore, latitudinal gradients and C contents were investigated. Our results show that, other than the direct anthropogenic influence, none of the other hypotheses alone satisfactorily explains the Hg content in microbial mats. In contrast, the MeHg contents were noticeably different between the investigated locations, with a higher proportion of MeHg on the McMurdo Ice Shelf (Antarctica) and a lower proportion on Ward Hunt Island (High Arctic). Furthermore, our results from in situ experiments indicated that the microbial mats from South Shetland Islands could quickly accumulate (48 h) Hg when Hg dissolved salts were supplied. Over short-term periods, these mats do not transform Hg into MeHg under field conditions.

  15. Photosynthetic microbial mats today, on early Earth, (and on early Mars?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    2008-05-01

    Marine hypersaline cyanobacterial mats offer insights about their ancient ancestors, whose fossil record is 3.43 billion years old. Studies of mat microbiota have greatly expanded the known diversity of ancient microbial lineages. Their evolution was shaped by mat microenvironments, which can differ substantially from their surroundings. Oxygenic photosynthesis perhaps developed in microbial mats and probably triggered a major evolutionary transformation and diversification of the early biosphere. Gross primary production rates in cyanobacterial mats can rival the most productive ecosystems known. Sunlight changes in intensity and spectral composition as it penetrates mats, and counteracting gradients of O2 and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, O2 and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Close inspection has revealed surprises, for example: anoxygenic phototrophs inside cyanobacterial sheaths, record- high sulfate reduction rates in O2-saturated conditions, and high H2 fluxes into overlying waters. Diverse organic biomarker compounds have been documented that are amenable to long-term preservation. Such coordinated observations of populations, processes and products are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. Cyanobacterial mats have robust fossil records in part because they populated stable continental platforms and margins, contributing to sediments having high preservation potential. Proterozoic cyanobacterial fossils and organic biomarkers are well documented. The 3.43 Ga Strelley Pool cherts, W. Australia, reveal diverse stromatolites that populated a partially restricted, low-energy shallow hypersaline basin. Molecular studies of extant bacteria hint that early chlorophyll-utilizing photosynthesizers required geochemical sources of reductants. Did these anoxygenic phototrophs once sustain an

  16. Elements redistribution between organic and mineral parts of microbial mats: SR-XRF research (Baikal Rift Zone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazareva, E.V. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy SB RAS, pr. Ac. Koptug, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: lazareva@uiggm.nsc.ru; Bryanskaya, A.V. [Institute of Cytology and Genetics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zhmodik, S.M.; Kolmogorov, Y.P. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy SB RAS, pr. Ac. Koptug, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Pestunova, O.P. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Barkhutova, D.D. [Institute of General and Experimental Biology SB RAS, Ulan-Ude (Russian Federation); Zolotarev, K.V.; Shaporenko, A.D. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-11

    In article minerals formation and elements accumulation in microbial mats of some hot springs of the Barguzin basin (Baikal Rift Zone) is discussed. The content of a wide spectrum of elements in microbial mats is studied by means of the method SR-XRF. Regularity of elements accumulation by community depending on geochemical features of hot spring's waters are discussed. These elements are distributed in different ways between organic and mineral substance of the microbial mats. The distribution of K, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe is regular, Ca, Rb, Sr are almost totally related with the mats mineral part, while Ga, Ge and Br are accumulated in mats organic substance. Germanium element is concentrated in considerable amounts in the cyanobacterial communities, that develop in sulphideless springs with a higher radon concentration.

  17. Correlative light/electron microscopy for the investigation of microbial mats from Black Sea Cold Seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Christoph; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2008-05-01

    In several fields of cell biology, correlative microscopy is applied to compare the structure of objects at high resolution under the electron microscope with low resolution light microscopy images of the same sample. It is, however, difficult to prepare samples and marker systems that are applicable for both microscopic techniques for the same specimen at the same time. In our studies, we used microbial mats from Cold Seep communities for a simple and rapid correlative microscopy method. The mats consist of bacterial and archaeal microorganisms, coupling reverse methanogenesis to the reduction of sulfate. The reverse methanogenic pathway also generates carbonates that precipitate inside the mat and may be the main reason for the formation of a microbial reef. The mat shows highly differentiated aggregates of various organisms, tightly interconnected by extracellular polysaccharides. In order to investigate the role of EPS as adhesive mucilage for the biofilm and as a precipitation matrix for carbonate minerals, samples were embedded in a hydrophilic resin (Lowicryl K4 M). Sections were suitable for light as well as electron microscopy in combination with lectins, either labeled with a fluorescent marker or with colloidal gold. This allows lectin mapping at low resolution for light microscopy in direct comparison with a highly resolved electron microscopic image.

  18. Rapid reactivation of cyanobacterial photosynthesis and migration upon rehydration of desiccated marine microbial mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun eChennu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Desiccated cyanobacterial mats are the dominant biological feature in the Earth's arid zones. While the response of desiccated cyanobacteria to rehydration is well documented for terrestrial systems, information about the response in marine systems is lacking. We used high temporal resolution hyperspectral imaging, liquid chromatography, pulse-amplitude fluorometry, oxygen microsensors and confocal laser microscopy to study this response in a desiccated microbial mat from Exmouth Gulf, Australia. During the initial 15 minutes after rehydration chlorophyll a concentrations increased 2-5 fold and cyanobacterial photosynthesis was re-established. Although the mechanism behind this rapid increase of chlorophyll a remains unknown, we hypothesize that it involves resynthesis from a precursor stored in desiccated cyanobacteria. The subsequent phase (15 min – 48 h involved migration of the reactivated cyanobacteria towards the mat surface, which led, together with a gradual increase in chlorophyll a, to a further increase in photosynthesis. We conclude that the response involving an increase in chlorophyll a and recovery of photosynthetic activity within minutes after rehydration is common for cyanobacteria from desiccated mats of both terrestrial and aquatic origin. However the response of upward migration and its triggering factor appears to be mat-specific and likely linked to other factors.

  19. Rapid Reactivation of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis and Migration upon Rehydration of Desiccated Marine Microbial Mats

    KAUST Repository

    Chennu, Arjun

    2015-12-24

    Desiccated cyanobacterial mats are the dominant biological feature in the Earth’s arid zones. While the response of desiccated cyanobacteria to rehydration is well-documented for terrestrial systems, information about the response in marine systems is lacking. We used high temporal resolution hyperspectral imaging, liquid chromatography, pulse-amplitude fluorometry, oxygen microsensors, and confocal laser microscopy to study this response in a desiccated microbial mat from Exmouth Gulf, Australia. During the initial 15 min after rehydration chlorophyll a concentrations increased 2–5 fold and cyanobacterial photosynthesis was re-established. Although the mechanism behind this rapid increase of chlorophyll a remains unknown, we hypothesize that it involves resynthesis from a precursor stored in desiccated cyanobacteria. The subsequent phase (15 min–48 h) involved migration of the reactivated cyanobacteria toward the mat surface, which led, together with a gradual increase in chlorophyll a, to a further increase in photosynthesis. We conclude that the response involving an increase in chlorophyll a and recovery of photosynthetic activity within minutes after rehydration is common for cyanobacteria from desiccated mats of both terrestrial and marine origin. However, the response of upward migration and its triggering factor appear to be mat-specific and likely linked to other factors.

  20. Diversity and distribution in hypersaline microbial mats of bacteria related to Chloroflexus spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, Ulrich; Bateson, Mary M.; Madigan, Michael T.

    2001-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria containing bacteriochlorophylls c and a were enriched from hypersaline microbial mats. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences, these organisms form a previously undescribed lineage distantly related to Chloroflexus spp. We developed and tested a set of PCR ...... and then sequenced. We found evidence of a high diversity of bacteria related to Chloroflexus which exhibit different distributions along a gradient of salinity from 5.5 to 16%.......Filamentous bacteria containing bacteriochlorophylls c and a were enriched from hypersaline microbial mats. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences, these organisms form a previously undescribed lineage distantly related to Chloroflexus spp. We developed and tested a set of PCR...

  1. Production and consumption of hydrogen in hot spring microbial mats dominated by a filamentous anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Hiroyo; Everroad, R Craig; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2012-01-01

    Microbial mats containing the filamentous anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aggregans develop at Nakabusa hot spring in Japan. Under anaerobic conditions in these mats, interspecies interaction between sulfate-reducing bacteria as sulfide producers and C. aggregans as a sulfide consumer has been proposed to constitute a sulfur cycle; however, the electron donor utilized for microbial sulfide production at Nakabusa remains to be identified. In order to determine this electron donor and its source, ex situ experimental incubation of mats was explored. In the presence of molybdate, which inhibits biological sulfate reduction, hydrogen gas was released from mat samples, indicating that this hydrogen is normally consumed as an electron donor by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Hydrogen production decreased under illumination, indicating that C. aggregans also functions as a hydrogen consumer. Small amounts of hydrogen may have also been consumed for sulfur reduction. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified from the mats indicated the existence of several species of hydrogen-producing fermentative bacteria. Among them, the most dominant fermenter, Fervidobacterium sp., was successfully isolated. This isolate produced hydrogen through the fermentation of organic carbon. Dispersion of microbial cells in the mats resulted in hydrogen production without the addition of molybdate, suggesting that simultaneous production and consumption of hydrogen in the mats requires dense packing of cells. We propose a cyclic electron flow within the microbial mats, i.e., electron flow occurs through three elements: S (elemental sulfur, sulfide, sulfate), C (carbon dioxide, organic carbon) and H (di-hydrogen, protons).

  2. The cyanobacterium Mastigocladus fulfills the nitrogen demand of a terrestrial hot spring microbial mat

    OpenAIRE

    Estrella Alcamán, María; Fernandez, Camila; Delgado, Antonio; Bergman, Birgitta; Díez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria from Subsection V (Stigonematales) are important components of microbial mats in non-acidic terrestrial hot springs. Despite their diazotrophic nature (N2 fixers), their impact on the nitrogen cycle in such extreme ecosystems remains unknown. Here, we surveyed the identity and activity of diazotrophic cyanobacteria in the neutral hot spring of Porcelana (Northern Patagonia, Chile) during 2009 and 2011–2013. We used 16S rRNA and the nifH gene to analyze the distribution and diver...

  3. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  4. Microbial Mats on the Orkney Islands Revisited: Microenvironment and Microbial Community Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, A.; Kühl, M.; McGowan, L.;

    2003-01-01

    and microalgae in mats from Waulkmill and Swanbister beach, including diatoms, Haptophyceae, cyanobacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. These analyses also indicated the presence of methanogens, especially in Swanbister beach mats, and therefore a possible role of methanogenesis for the carbon cycle...... fragment length polymorphism) analysis in Swanbister beach mats, the depth distribution of different populations of purple and sulfate-reducing bacteria could be related to the microenvironmental conditions. Oxygen, but also sulfide and other (inorganic and organic) sulfur compounds, seems to play...

  5. Linking the modern to the ancient with a comprehensive geobiological understanding of biosignature preservation in microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. L.; Lingappa, U.; Metcalfe, K.; O'Reilly, S. S.; Riedman, L. A.; Cantine, M.; Ireland, B.; Phillips, R.; Stein, N.; Orzechowski, E. A.; Strauss, J. V.; Grotzinger, H. M.; Quinn, D. P.; Trower, L.; Fischer, W. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Knoll, A. H.; Fike, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Our understanding of early life on Earth relies, in part, on morphological and geochemical signatures preserved in microbialites. Nuanced evaluation of such records requires that physical and chemical patterns in Archean and Proterozoic rocks be interpreted in terms of biological processes in play at the time of formation. Expansive microbial mats from a vast tidal marsh in the interior of Little Ambergris Cay, Turks and Caicos Islands, BWI, provide a model system for examining how local topography, tidal water flow, water chemistry, microbiology, and sediment supply interact to influence the preservation of geochemical and morphological mat signatures. Little Ambergris mats range from 20 cm-thick growths with numerous variegated microbial strata to desiccated, cm-scale mats with simple architecture, distributed in a broadly zoned pattern across the island. Mats vary among three basic surface textures: EPS-covered flat mats, tufted polygonal mats, and knobbly pustular mats. Mats consist primarily of EPS and evacuated sheaths of cyanobacteria, with upper parts of the mats displaying three principal cyanobacterial morphotypes. Below and admixed with the cyanobacteria are abundant mm-scale pink consortia comprising aerobic and phototrophic Proteobacteria. Additional diversity was recovered by iTAG metagenomic sequencing, with further taxonomic insights provided by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) imaging, microbial membrane lipids, and electron microscopy imaging of viruses. To evaluate the preservation potential of geobiological signatures we coupled these observations with analyses of extractable, sulfur-bound and kerogen-bound biomarkers, fine-scale and bulk carbon and sulfur isotopes, and microfossil distributions. Taken together, biological and geochemical analyses of Little Ambergris mats underscore the geobiological richness preservable in ancient microbialites, while highlighting aspects of microbial diversity that do not preserve readily.

  6. Carbon uptake, microbial community structure, and mineralization of layered mats from Imperial Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woycheese, K. M.; Grabenstatter, J.; Haddad, A.; Ricci, J. N.; Johnson, H.; Berelson, W.; Spear, J. R.; Caporaso, J. G.; International Geobiology Course 2011

    2011-12-01

    Layered microbial mats provide an analog for early microbial communities, and remain one of the few microbiological structures consistently preserved in the geologic record. Despite this, growth rates, metabolic capabilities, and methods of mineralization in modern communities are poorly understood. Imperial Geyser, an alkaline siliceous hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, provides a useful setting to study these parameters. Mat and water samples (T = 64-40 °C) were collected for 13C analysis and 13C-spiked bicarbonate and acetate incubation experiments. Carbon isotopes were measured for the stream water, pore water and biomass. We experimentally determined rates of bicarbonate uptake, acetate uptake and mineral content. Bicarbonate uptake rates ranged from 0 - 0.4% per day, while acetate uptake rates ranged from 0 - 2.0% per day. These results indicate that the mat biomass is capable of turnover in about 300 days resulting in potential growth rates of 1-2 cm/year. Organic carbon content (% dry weight) ranged from 2 to 16%, and decreased with depth in the mat. The mineral content of these mats is predominantly amorphous SiO2. An inverse correlation between mineral percent and bicarbonate uptake rate was observed, suggesting that there may be a link between metabolism and the prevention of mineralization. Comparing the 13C and carbon uptake rates with 16S rDNA pyrosequencing data we were able to hypothesize the carbon fixation pathways and heterotrophic interactions occurring in this environment. In general, two patterns of 13C values were observed. The first pattern was characterized by increased heterotrophy with depth. In the other, preliminary evidence supporting a photoheterotrophic lifestyle for Roseiflexus spp. was found.

  7. Metagenomic Assembly of the Dominant Zetaproteobacteria in an Iron-oxidizing Hydrothermal Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, C. L.; Fullerton, H.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Despite the rapid abiotic oxidation rate of iron, many microbes have adapted to feeding off this fleeting energy source. One such bacterial class is the Zetaproteobacteria. Iron-dominated microbial mat material was collected with a small-scale syringe sampler from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. From this sample, gDNA was extracted and prepared for paired-end Illumina sequencing. Reconstruction of SSU rDNA genes using EMERGE allowed for comparison to previous SSU rDNA surveys. Clone libraries and qPCR show these microbial mats to be dominated by Zetaproteobacteria. Results from our in silico reconstruction confirm these initial findings. RDP classification of the EMERGE reconstructed sequences resulted in 44% of the community being identified as Zetaproteobacteria. The most abundant SSU rDNA has 99% similarity to Zeta OTU-2, and only a 94% similarity to M. ferrooxidans PV-1. Zeta OTU-2 has been shown to be the most cosmopolitan population in iron-dominated hydrothermal systems from across Pacific Ocean. Metagenomic assembly has resulted in many contigs with high identity to M. ferrooxidans as identified, by BLAST. However, with large differences in SSU rRNA similarity, M. ferrooxidans PV-1 is not an adequate reference. Current work is focusing on reconstruction of the dominant microbial mat member, without the use of a reference genome through an iterative assembly approach. The resulting 'pan-genome' will be compared to other Zetaproteobacteria (at the class level) and the functional ecology of this cosmopolitan microbial mat community member will be extrapolated. Thus far, we have detected multiple housekeeping genes involved in DNA replication, transcription and translation. The most abundant metabolic gene we have found is Aconitase, a key enzyme in the

  8. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-d) by a hypersaline microbial mat and related functional changes in the mat community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötzschel, S; Köster, J; de Beer, D

    2004-08-01

    Microbial mats possibly possess degradation capacities for haloorganic pollutants because of their wide range of different functional groups of microorganisms combined with extreme diurnal changes in pH, oxygen, and sulfide gradients. In this study, 20 mg/l of the chlorinated herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was applied to a pristine hypersaline cyanobacterial mat from Guerrero Negro, Mexico, under a light regime of 12 h dark/12 h light (600 mumol photons/m(2)s). The loss of 2,4-D was followed by chemical GC analysis; functional changes within the mat were determined with microelectrodes for oxygen, photosynthesis, pH, and sulfide. The depletion of 2,4-D due to photooxidation or sorption processes was checked in control experiments. Within 13 days, the light/dark incubated mats degraded 97% of the herbicide, while in permanent darkness only 35% were degraded. Adsorption of 2,4-D to the mat material, agar, or glass walls was negligible (4.6%), whereas 21% of the herbicide was degraded photochemically. The 2,4-D removal rate in the light/dark incubations was comparable to values reported for soils. The phototrophic community of the mat was permanently inhibited by the 2,4-D addition by 17% on average. The sulfate reduction in the entire mat and the respiration in the photic zone were inhibited more strongly but returned to original levels. Since at the end of the experiment the photosynthetic and respiratory activity of the mats were almost as high as in the beginning and 2,4-D almost completely disappeared, we conclude that the examined mats represent a robust and effective system for the degradation of the herbicide where probably the aerobic heterotrophic population is a major player in the degradation process.

  9. Microscale characterization of dissolved organic matter production and uptake in marine microbial mat communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H. W.; Bebout, B. M.; Joye, S. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Intertidal marine microbial mats exhibited biologically mediated uptake of low molecular weight dissolved organic matter (DOM), including D-glucose, acetate, and an L-amino acid mixture at trace concentrations. Uptake of all compounds occurred in darkness, but was frequently enhanced under natural illumination. The photosystem 2 inhibitor, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) generally failed to inhibit light-stimulated DOM uptake. Occasionally, light plus DCMU-amended treatments led to uptake rates higher than light-incubated samples, possibly due to phototrophic bacteria present in subsurface anoxic layers. Uptake was similar with either 3H- or 14C-labeled substrates, indicating that recycling of labeled CO2 via photosynthetic fixation was not interfering with measurements of light-stimulated DOM uptake. Microautoradiographs showed a variety of pigmented and nonpigmented bacteria and, to a lesser extent, cyanobacteria and eucaryotic microalgae involved in light-mediated DOM uptake. Light-stimulated DOM uptake was often observed in bacteria associated with sheaths and mucilage surrounding filamentous cyanobacteria, revealing a close association of organisms taking up DOM with photoautotrophic members of the mat community. The capacity for dark- and light-mediated heterotrophy, coupled to efficient retention of fixed carbon in the mat community, may help optimize net production and accretion of mats, even in oligotrophic waters.

  10. Diversity, distribution and hydrocarbon biodegradation capabilities of microbial communities in oil-contaminated cyanobacterial mats from a constructed wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeid M M Abed

    Full Text Available Various types of cyanobacterial mats were predominant in a wetland, constructed for the remediation of oil-polluted residual waters from an oil field in the desert of the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, although such mats were rarely found in other wetland systems. There is scarce information on the bacterial diversity, spatial distribution and oil-biodegradation capabilities of freshwater wetland oil-polluted mats. Microbial community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Spacer Analysis (ARISA showed that the different mats hosted distinct microbial communities. Average numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUsARISA were relatively lower in the mats with higher oil levels and the number of shared OTUsARISA between the mats was 90% of the sequences affiliated to Proteobacteria (41% of total sequences, Cyanobacteria (31%, Bacteriodetes (11.5%, Planctomycetes (7% and Chloroflexi (3%. Known autotrophic (e.g. Rivularia and heterotrophic (e.g. Azospira nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as purple sulfur and non-sulfur bacteria were frequently encountered in all mats. On the other hand, sequences of known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs were rarely found, indicating that SRBs in the wetland mats probably belong to yet-undescribed novel species. The wetland mats were able to degrade 53-100% of C12-C30 alkanes after 6 weeks of incubation under aerobic conditions. We conclude that oil and ammonia concentrations are the major key players in determining the spatial distribution of the wetland mats' microbial communities and that these mats contribute directly to the removal of hydrocarbons from oil field wastewaters.

  11. Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

    1996-01-01

    Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

  12. Sulfur isotope systematics of microbial mats in shallow-sea hydrothermal vents, Milos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Fike, D. A.; Amend, J. P.; Price, R. E.; Druschel, G.

    2011-12-01

    Milos is an island arc volcano venting submarine magmatic fluids directly into overlying seawater. Our study sites are located in an extensive shallow-water hydrothermal vent field less than 200 m offshore of Paleochori Bay in 5 m water depth. The vent fluids are highly sulfidic (> 3mM), at high-temperature (50-115C), and acidic (pH 5). The seafloor vent features include large patches (> 1 m2) of white microbial mats, patches of yellow elemental sulfur, and sediments stained orange by arsenic sulfides. The microbial communities that populate the shallow-sea hydrothermal vents stand in stark contrast to other nearshore environments typically found at wave base and within the photic zone. We explore sulfur isotope patterns along sharp environmental gradients established between ambient seawater and the efflux of vent fluids in the effort to better understand resource exploitation by microbial mat communities living in extreme conditions. Pore water samples, push-cores, biofilms, and water column samples were collected by SCUBA along sampling transects radiating out from the center of white mats into background sediments. We analyzed these samples for δ34S of dissolved sulfate, sulfide, elemental sulfur, and mineral sulfides (iron monosulfides and pyrite). Free gas sulfides collected directly from vents had δ34S values ranging +2.1 to +2.8%. Pore water sulfide, collected from below white mats with δ34S values ranging +1.9 to +2.9%, was isotopically similar to free gas samples. High pore water sulfate concentrations (8-25 mM) coupled with 34S-enriched pore water sulfides are not geochemical signatures indicative of dissimilatory sulfate reduction (where δ34Ssulfide <<0%). The δ34S of pore water sulfates collected across one dive site show a mixing trend, ranging from +18% in the center, +20% mid-transect, and +21% in sediments outside of the mat. This trend may be caused by oxidation of vent sulfides by entrained seawater (δ34S = +21.2%). We continue to target

  13. Dynamics of bacterial populations during bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil bioaugmented with coastal microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nidaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Sorkhoh, Naser; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Radwan, Samir

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a bench-scale attempt to bioremediate Kuwaiti, oily water and soil samples through bioaugmentation with coastal microbial mats rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacterioflora. Seawater and desert soil samples were artificially polluted with 1% weathered oil, and bioaugmented with microbial mat suspensions. Oil removal and microbial community dynamics were monitored. In batch cultures, oil removal was more effective in soil than in seawater. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria associated with mat samples colonized soil more readily than seawater. The predominant oil degrading bacterium in seawater batches was the autochthonous seawater species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. The main oil degraders in the inoculated soil samples, on the other hand, were a mixture of the autochthonous mat and desert soil bacteria; Xanthobacter tagetidis, Pseudomonas geniculata, Olivibacter ginsengisoli and others. More bacterial diversity prevailed in seawater during continuous than batch bioremediation. Out of seven hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species isolated from those cultures, only one, Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum, was of mat origin. This result too confirms that most of the autochthonous mat bacteria failed to colonize seawater. Also culture-independent analysis of seawater from continuous cultures revealed high-bacterial diversity. Many of the bacteria belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and were hydrocarbonoclastic. Optimal biostimulation practices for continuous culture bioremediation of seawater via mat bioaugmentation were adding the highest possible oil concentration as one lot in the beginning of bioremediation, addition of vitamins, and slowing down the seawater flow rate.

  14. The impact of long-term hydrocarbon exposure on the structure, activity, and biogeochemical functioning of microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, Johanne; Senin, Pavel; Pringault, Olivier; Bonin, Patricia; Deflandre, Bruno; Bouchez, Olivier; Bru, Noëlle; Biritxinaga-Etchart, Edurne; Klopp, Christophe; Guyoneaud, Rémy; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2016-10-15

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are metabolically structured systems driven by solar light. They are ubiquitous and can grow in hydrocarbon-polluted sites. Our aim is to determine the impact of chronic hydrocarbon contamination on the structure, activity, and functioning of a microbial mat. We compared it to an uncontaminated mat harboring similar geochemical characteristics. The mats were sampled in spring and fall for 2years. Seasonal variations were observed for the reference mat: sulfur cycle-related bacteria dominated spring samples, while Cyanobacteria dominated in autumn. The contaminated mat showed minor seasonal variation; a progressive increase of Cyanobacteria was noticed, indicating a perturbation of the classical seasonal behavior. Hydrocarbon content was the main factor explaining the differences in the microbial community structure; however, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were among rare or transient Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in the contaminated mat. We suggest that in long-term contaminated systems, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria cannot be considered a sentinel of contamination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Community Structure Comparisons of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Mats Along the Mariana Arc and Back-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, K. W.; Fullerton, H.; Moyer, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents along the Mariana Arc and back-arc represent a hotspot of microbial diversity that has not yet been fully recognized. The Mariana Arc and back-arc contain hydrothermal vents with varied vent effluent chemistry and temperature, which translates to diverse community composition. We have focused on iron-rich sites where the dominant primary producers are iron oxidizing bacteria. Because microbes from these environments have proven elusive in culturing efforts, we performed culture independent analysis among different microbial communities found at these hydrothermal vents. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina sequencing of small subunit ribosomal gene amplicons were used to characterize community members and identify samples for shotgun metagenomics. Used in combination, these methods will better elucidate the composition and characteristics of the bacterial communities at these hydrothermal vent systems. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and compare taxonomic and metabolic diversity among different communities of microbial mats. We compared communities collected on a fine scale to analyze the bacterial community based on gross mat morphology, geography, and nearby vent effluent chemistry. Taxa richness and evenness are compared with rarefaction curves to visualize diversity. As well as providing a survey of diversity this study also presents a juxtaposition of three methods in which ribosomal small subunit diversity is compared with T-RFLP, next generation amplicon sequencing, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing.

  16. Geochemical characterization of the hydrous pyrolysis products from a recent cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, N.; Mendoça-Filho, J.G.; Silva, T.F.; Stojanovic, K.; Fontana, L.F.; Carvalhal-Gomes, S.B.V.; Silva, F.S.; Furukawa, G.G.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis experiments were performed on a recent microbial mat sample from Lagoa Vermelha, Brazil, to determine whether crude oil can be generated and expelled during artificial maturation of the Organic Matter (OM). The experiments were conducted at 280ºC, 330ºC and 350ºC during 20h. Two types of liquid pyrolysis products, assigned as free oil and bitumen, were isolated and analyzed. Free oil represents free organic phase released by hydrous pyrolysis, whereas bitumen was obtained by extraction from the solid pyrolysis residue with dichloromethane. Changes in the OM maturity were determined using Rock-Eval parameters and biomarker maturity ratios of original sample and pyrolysis products. Biomarker compositions of original sample extract and liquid pyrolysates were used for determination of dominant bacterial source. The yields of free oil and bitumen showed that a microbial mat OM has a high liquid hydrocarbons generation potential. Rock-Eval maturity parameters, biopolymer and biomarker compositions indicate a significant increase of the OM maturity during hydrous pyrolysis. At 280ºC the release of free, adsorbed and occluded compounds was observed; however, without a cracking of the OM. At 330ºC the generation of bitumen and free oil is mostly related to the OM cracking. The highest yield of free oil was recorded at this temperature. Distribution of biomarkers in the extract of original sample and liquid pyrolysates confirms cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats, whereas the identification of long chain n-alkane series, with maximum at C26, and prominent C30 hop-17(21)-ene additionally suggest the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria. (Author)

  17. Formation of Microbial Mats and Salt in Radioactive Paddy Soils in Fukushima, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Tazaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas in Minami-soma City, Fukushima, Japan, were seriously damaged by radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP accident that caused multiple pollution by tsunami and radionuclide exposure, after the Great East Japan Earthquake, on 11 March 2011. Some areas will remain no-go zones because radiation levels remain high. In Minami-soma, only 26 percent of decontamination work had been finished by the end of July in 2015. Here, we report the characterization of microbial mats and salt found on flooded paddy fields at Karasuzaki, Minami-soma City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan which have been heavily contaminated by radionuclides, especially by Cs (134Cs, 137Cs, 40K, Sr (89Sr, 90Sr, and 91 or 95Zr even though it is more than 30 km north of the FDNPP. We document the mineralogy, the chemistry, and the micro-morphology, using a combination of micro techniques. The microbial mats were found to consist of diatoms with mineralized halite and gypsum by using X-ray diffraction (XRD. Particular elements concentrated in microbial mats were detected using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS and X-ray fluorescence (XRF. The objective of this contribution is to illustrate the ability of various diatoms associated with minerals and microorganisms which are capable of absorbing both radionuclides and stable isotopes from polluted paddy soils in extreme conditions. Ge semiconductor analysis of the microbial mats detected 134Cs, 137Cs, and 40K without 131I in 2012 and in 2013. Quantitative analysis associated with the elemental content maps by SEM-EDS indicated the possibility of absorption of radionuclide and stable isotope elements from polluted paddy soils in Fukushima Prefecture. In addition, radionuclides were detected in solar salts made of contaminated sea water collected from the Karasuzaki ocean bath, Minami-soma, Fukushima in 2015, showing high Zr content associated

  18. Contrasted effects of natural complex mixtures of PAHs and metals on oxygen cycle in a microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringault, Olivier; Aube, Johanne; Bouchez, Olivier; Klopp, Christophe; Mariette, Jérome; Escudie, Frédéric; Senin, Pavel; Goni-Urriza, Marisol

    2015-09-01

    The contamination of polluted environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants sometimes at trace levels which nevertheless may have significant effects on the diversity and functioning of organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the functional responses of a microbial mat exposed to a natural complex mixture of PAHs and metals as a function of the maturation stage of the biofilm. Microbial mats sampled in a slightly polluted environment were exposed to contaminated water of a retention basin of an oil refinery. The responses of the microbial mats differed according to season. In spring 2012, strong inhibition of both oxygen production and respiration was observed relative to the control, with rates representing less than 5% of the control after 72 h of incubation. A decrease of microbial activities was followed by a decrease of the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs. In contrast, in autumn 2012, no significant changes for oxygen production and respiration were observed and the coupling between autotrophs and heterotrophs was not altered. The differences observed between the spring and autumn mats might be explained by the maturity of the microbial mat with dominance of heterotrophic bacteria in spring, and diatoms and cyanobacteria in autumn, as well as by the differences in the chemical composition of the complex mixture of PAHs and metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrogen fixation in microbial mat and stromatolite communities from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, L I; Cerritos, R; Eguiarte, L E; Souza, V

    2007-08-01

    Nitrogen fixation (nitrogenase activity, NA) of a microbial mat and a living stromatolite from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico, was examined over spring, summer, and winter of 2004. The goal of the study was to characterize the diazotrophic community through molecular analysis of the nifH gene and using inhibitors of sulfate reduction and oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. We also evaluated the role of ultraviolet radiation on the diazotrophic activity of the microbial communities. Both microbial communities showed patterns of NA with maximum rates during the day that decreased significantly with 3-3,4-dichlorophenyl-1',1'-dimethylurea, suggesting the potential importance of heterocystous cyanobacteria. There is also evidence of NA by sulfur-reducing bacteria in both microbial communities suggested by the negative effect exerted by the addition of sodium molybdate. Elimination of infrared and ultraviolet radiation had no effect on NA. Both microbial communities had nifH sequences that related to group I, including cyanobacteria and purple sulfur and nonsulfur bacteria, as well as group II nitrogenases, including sulfur reducing and green sulfur bacteria.

  20. A hypersaline microbial mat from the Pacific Atoll Kiritimati: insights into composition and carbon fixation using biomarker analyses and a 13C-labeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühring, S I; Smittenberg, R H; Sachse, D; Lipp, J S; Golubic, S; Sachs, J P; Hinrichs, K-U; Summons, R E

    2009-06-01

    Modern microbial mats are widely recognized as useful analogs for the study of biogeochemical processes relevant to paleoenvironmental reconstruction in the Precambrian. We combined microscopic observations and investigations of biomarker composition to investigate community structure and function in the upper layers of a thick phototrophic microbial mat system from a hypersaline lake on Kiritimati (Christmas Island) in the Northern Line Islands, Republic of Kiribati. In particular, an exploratory incubation experiment with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate was conducted to pinpoint biomarkers from organisms actively fixing carbon. A high relative abundance of the cyanobacterial taxa Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece was revealed by microscopic observation, and cyanobacterial fatty acids and hydrocarbons showed (13)C-uptake in the labeling experiment. Microscopic observations also revealed purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) in the deeper layers. A cyclic C(19:0) fatty acid and farnesol were attributed to this group that was also actively fixing carbon. Background isotopic values indicate Calvin-Benson cycle-based autotrophy for cycC(19:0) and farnesol-producing PSBs. Biomarkers from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the top layer of the mat and their (13)C-uptake patterns indicated a close coupling between SRBs and cyanobacteria. Archaeol, possibly from methanogens, was detected in all layers and was especially abundant near the surface where it contained substantial amounts of (13)C-label. Intact glycosidic tetraether lipids detected in the deepest layer indicated other archaea. Large amounts of ornithine and betaine bearing intact polar lipids could be an indicator of a phosphate-limited ecosystem, where organisms that are able to substitute these for phospholipids may have a competitive advantage.

  1. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R (2) Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R (2) > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  2. Post-eruption colonization and community succession of hydrothermal microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, C. L.; Hager, K. W.; Fullerton, H.

    2015-12-01

    T-RFLP fingerprint cluster analysis and qPCR of microbial mat communities from hydrothermal vent habitats among recent post-eruption sites exhibit similar communities containing Epsilonproteobacteria that are phylogenetically similar and capable of hydrogen-oxidation (e.g., Nitratiruptor, Caminibacter, Nautilia, Thioreductor, and/or Lebetimonas). This community is the first (Group I) of three community types that represent different stages in the transition from vapor-dominated to brine-dominated water-rock interactions (i.e., vent effluent geochemistry). We have now observed this similar transition from four hydrothermal regions from across the Pacific Ocean. The second type of mat community (Group II) that has been observed is characterized by the presence of another group of Epsilonproteobacteria; however, these are mostly sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes (e.g., Sulfurimonas, Sulfurovum, and/or Sulfuricurvum). Finally, once the transition from sulfur to iron is complete, then the third type (Group III) cluster together by the presence of Zetaproteobacteria, which are known to use iron-oxidation. Each of these community types are dominated by groups of microorganisms characterized by cultured isolates, all of which are strict chemolithoautotrophs capable of carbon fixation and are hypothesized as both ecosystem engineers and primary producers in these energy-rich ecosystems. We also consider the thermodynamic implications towards carbon fixation for each of the three groups of mat communities.

  3. Oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis in a microbial mat from an anoxic and sulfidic spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Chennu, Arjun; Hamilton, Trinity; Lott, Christian; Macalady, Jennifer; M Klatt, Judith

    2017-03-01

    Oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were studied with microsensors in microbial mats found at 9-10 m depth in anoxic and sulfidic water in Little Salt Spring (Florida, USA). The lake sediments were covered with a 1-2 mm thick red mat dominated by filamentous Cyanobacteria, below which Green Sulfur Bacteria (GSB, Chlorobiaceae) were highly abundant. Within 4 mm inside the mats, the incident radiation was attenuated to undetectable levels. In situ microsensor data showed both oxygenic photosynthesis in the red surface layer and light-induced sulfide dynamics up to 1 cm depth. Anoxygenic photosynthesis occurred during all daylight hours, with complete sulfide depletion around midday. Oxygenic photosynthesis was limited to 4 h per day, due to sulfide inhibition in the early morning and late afternoon. Laboratory measurements on retrieved samples showed that oxygenic photosynthesis was fully but reversibly inhibited by sulfide. In patches Fe(III) alleviated the inhibition of oxygenic photosynthesis by sulfide. GSB were resistant to oxygen and showed a low affinity to sulfide. Their light response showed saturation at very low intensities. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    OpenAIRE

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortés, Alejandro López; Hoehler, Tori M; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Spormann, Alfred M.; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Peter K.; Bebout, Brad M

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell is...

  5. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two hot spring microbial mats from a geothermal region in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Cristian; Drugă, Bogdan; Hegedus, Adriana; Sicora, Cosmin; Dragoş, Nicolae

    2013-05-01

    The diversity of archaea and bacteria was investigated in two slightly alkaline, mesophilic hot springs from the Western Plain of Romania. Phylogenetic analysis showed a low diversity of Archaea, only three Euryarchaeota taxa being detected: Methanomethylovorans thermophila, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and Methanococcus aeolicus. Twelve major bacterial groups were identified, both springs being dominated by Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi and Proteobacteria. While at the phylum/class-level the microbial mats share a similar biodiversity; at the species level the geothermal springs investigated seem to be colonized by specific consortia. The dominant taxa were filamentous heterocyst-containing Fischerella, at 45 °C and non-heterocyst Leptolyngbya and Geitlerinema, at 55 °C. Other bacterial taxa (Thauera sp., Methyloversatilis universalis, Pannonibacter phragmitetus, Polymorphum gilvum, Metallibacterium sp. and Spartobacteria) were observed for the first time in association with a geothermal habitat. Based on their bacterial diversity the two mats were clustered together with other similar habitats from Europe and part of Asia, most likely the water temperature playing a major role in the formation of specific microbial communities that colonize the investigated thermal springs.

  6. Titanospirillum velox: a huge, speedy, sulfur-storing spirillum from Ebro Delta microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R.; Haselton, A.; Sole, M.; Wier, A.; Margulis, L.

    1999-01-01

    A long (20-30 micrometer), wide (3-5 micrometer) microbial-mat bacterium from the Ebro Delta (Tarragona, Spain) was grown in mixed culture and videographed live. Intracellular elemental sulfur globules and unique cell termini were observed in scanning-electron-microprobe and transmission-electron micrographs. A polar organelle underlies bundles of greater than 60 flagella at each indented terminus. These Gram-negative bacteria bend, flex, and swim in a spiral fashion; they translate at speeds greater than 10 body lengths per second. The large size of the spirillum permits direct observation of cell motility in single individual bacteria. After desiccation (i.e., absence of standing water for at least 24 h), large populations developed in mat samples remoistened with sea water. Ultrastructural observations reveal abundant large sulfur globules irregularly distributed in the cytoplasm. A multilayered cell wall, pliable and elastic yet rigid, distends around the sulfur globules. Details of the wall, multiflagellated termini, and large cytoplasmic sulfur globules indicate that these fast-moving spirilla are distinctive enough to warrant a genus and species designation: Titanospirillum velox genus nov., sp. nov. The same collection techniques at a similar habitat in the United States (Plum Island, northeast Essex County, Massachusetts) also yielded large populations of the bacterium among purple phototrophic and other inhabitants of sulfurous microbial-mat muds. The months-long survival of T. velox from Spain and from the United States in closed jars filled with mud taken from both localities leads us to infer that this large spirillum has a cosmopolitan distribution.

  7. Effect of salinity on carbon and sulfur cycles in Umm Alhool sabkha microbial mat ecosystem in Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Mohammad Ahmad

    2012-10-19

    Microbial mats are only present under extreme conditions, where grazing by higher organisms is limited. Therefore, microbial mats may provide insight into extraterrestrial life, due to their adaptations to extreme temperatures, desiccation or salinity. They are faced with a diurnal cycle with variable length based on their location, which exposes them to extreme salinity conditions (i.e., water withdrawal and high evaporation). Cyanobacteria in the photic zone of a mat ecosystem supply the other microorganism with the required organic material to produce energy and grow. Subsequently, this will reproduce the nutrients needed by the phototrophs through elemental re-mineralization. In this work, we investigated the effect of water salinity that covers the microbial mat ecosystem of Umm Alhool sabkha, Qatar, regarding the most important processes within microbial mats: photosynthesis and sulfate reduction (SR). Our results showed that both photosynthetic and sulfate reduction rates decreased with increasing the salinity. The microbial community structure, assessed by 454 pyro-sequencing, revealed that the cyanobacterial community structure changed in response to the change in salinity. This was not the case for the sulfate reducer community structure, which stayed as it is in the mats incubated at different salinities. Therefore, we speculate that salinity affects the photosynthetic community structure, and consequently affects the photosynthetic activity of the whole ecosystem. However, sulfate reduction rates decreased due to less organic material supply from the upper layers and not due to change in microbial community structure of SR. Other factors such as the activity of the enzymes could also have an effect on SRR, but it was not investigated in this study.

  8. Spatial structure and activity of sedimentary microbial communities underlying a Beggiatoa spp. mat in a Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon seep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen G Lloyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subsurface fluids from deep-sea hydrocarbon seeps undergo methane- and sulfur-cycling microbial transformations near the sediment surface. Hydrocarbon seep habitats are naturally patchy, with a mosaic of active seep sediments and non-seep sediments. Microbial community shifts and changing activity patterns on small spatial scales from seep to non-seep sediment remain to be examined in a comprehensive habitat study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a transect of biogeochemical measurements and gene expression related to methane- and sulfur-cycling at different sediment depths across a broad Beggiatoa spp. mat at Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118 in the Gulf of Mexico. High process rates within the mat ( approximately 400 cm and approximately 10 cm from the mat's edge contrasted with sharply diminished activity at approximately 50 cm outside the mat, as shown by sulfate and methane concentration profiles, radiotracer rates of sulfate reduction and methane oxidation, and stable carbon isotopes. Likewise, 16S ribosomal rRNA, dsrAB (dissimilatory sulfite reductase and mcrA (methyl coenzyme M reductase mRNA transcripts of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae and methane-cycling archaea (ANME-1 and ANME-2 were prevalent at the sediment surface under the mat and at its edge. Outside the mat at the surface, 16S rRNA sequences indicated mostly aerobes commonly found in seawater. The seep-related communities persisted at 12-20 cm depth inside and outside the mat. 16S rRNA transcripts and V6-tags reveal that bacterial and archaeal diversity underneath the mat are similar to each other, in contrast to oxic or microoxic habitats that have higher bacterial diversity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The visual patchiness of microbial mats reflects sharp discontinuities in microbial community structure and activity over sub-meter spatial scales; these discontinuities have to be taken into account in geochemical and

  9. Bringing microbial diversity into focus: high-resolution analysis of iron mats from the Lō'ihi Seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jarrod J; Glazer, Brian T; Emerson, David

    2017-01-01

    Thirty kilometers south of the island of Hawai'i lies the Lō'ihi Seamount, an active submarine volcano that hosts a network of low-temperature hydrothermal vents enriched in ferrous iron that supports extensive microbial mats. These mats, which can be a half a meter deep, are composed of ferric iron bound to organic polymers - the metabolic byproduct of iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. Though the role of Zetaproteobacteria in mat formation is well established, we have a limited understanding of how differences in diversity are related to mat morphology. We used Minimum Entropy Decomposition and ZetaOtu classification to demonstrate cryptic diversity between closely related Zetaproteobacteria while showing habitat and geographic specificity. Veiled mats, common structures at Lō'ihi, exhibit distinct community composition and contain diversity not detected in other mat types, including specific Zetaproteobacteria and an unclassified Gammaproteobacteria. Our analyses also indicate that diversity can change dramatically across small spatial transects from points of active venting, yet we found comparatively few differences between major sampling sites. This study provides a better picture of the microbiome responsible for iron mat production at Lō'ihi and has broad implications for our understanding of these globally distributed communities. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. UAV, DGPS, and Laser Transit Mapping of Microbial Mat Ecosystems on Little Ambergris Cay, B.W.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, N.; Quinn, D. P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Fischer, W. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Cantine, M.; Gomes, M. L.; Grotzinger, H. M.; Lingappa, U.; Metcalfe, K.; O'Reilly, S. S.; Orzechowski, E. A.; Riedman, L. A.; Strauss, J. V.; Trower, L.

    2016-12-01

    Little Ambergris Cay is a 6 km long, 1.6 km wide uninhabited island on the Caicos platform in the Turks and Caicos. Little Ambergris provides an analog for the study of microbial mat development in the sedimentary record. Recent field mapping during July of 2016 used UAV- and satellite-based images, differential GPS (DGPS), and total station theodolite (TST) measurements to characterize sedimentology and biofacies across the entirety of Little Ambergris Cay. Nine facies were identified in-situ during DGPS island transects including oolitic grainstone bedrock, sand flats, cutbank and mat-filled channels, hardground-lined bays with EPS-rich mat particles, mangroves, EPS mats, polygonal mats, and mats with blistered surface texture. These facies were mapped onto a 15 cm/pixel visible light orthomosaic of the island generated from more than 1500 nadir images taken by a UAV at 350 m standoff distance. A corresponding stereogrammetric digital elevation map was generated from drone images and 910 DGPS measurements acquired during several island transects. More than 1000 TST measurements provide additional facies elevation constraints, control points for satellite-based water depth calculations, and means to cross-calibrate and reconstruct the topographic profile of bedrock exposed at the beach. Additionally, the thickness of the underlying Holocene sediment fill was estimated over several island transects using a depth probe. Sub-cm resolution drone-based orthophotos of microbial mats were used to quantify polygonal mat size and textures. The mapping results highlight that sedimentary and bio-facies (including mat morphology and fabrics) correlate strongly with elevation. Notably, mat morphology was observed to be highly sensitive to cm-scale variations in topography and water depth. The productivity metric NDVI was computed for mat and vegetation facies using nadir images from a UAV-mounted two-band red-NIR camera. In combination with in situ facies mapping, these

  11. Trade-offs between microbiome diversity and productivity in a stratified microbial mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Brislawn, Colin; Renslow, Ryan S.; Dana, Karl; Morton, Beau; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Song, Hyun-Seob; Atci, Erhan; Beyenal, Haluk; Fredrickson, James K.; Jansson, Janet K.; Moran, James J.

    2016-11-01

    Productivity is a major determinant of ecosystem diversity. Microbial ecosystems are the most diverse on the planet yet very few relationships between diversity and productivity have been reported as compared to macro-ecological studies. Here we evaluated the spatial relationships of productivity and microbiome diversity in a laboratory-cultivated photosynthetic mat. The goal was to determine how spatial diversification of microorganisms drives localized carbon and energy acquisition rates. We measured sub-millimeter depth profiles of net primary-productivity and gross oxygenic photosynthesis in the context of the localized microenvironment and community structure and observed negative correlations between species richness and productivity within the energy-replete, photic zone. Variations between localized community structures were associated with distinct taxa as well as environmental profiles describing a continuum of biological niches. Spatial regions corresponding to high primary productivity and photosynthesis rates had relatively low species richness and high evenness. Hence, this system exhibited negative species-productivity and species–energy relationships. These negative relationships may be indicative of photosynthetically-driven, light-controlled mat ecosystems that are able to be the most productive with a relatively smaller, even distributions of species that specialize within the highly-oxic, photic zones.

  12. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Allen White III

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid and chlorophyll biosynthesis and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase. The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 0.900. These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  13. Conversion and conservation of light energy in a photosynthetic microbial mat ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    : in light-limiting conditions, 95.5% of the absorbed light energy dissipated as heat and 4.5% was channeled into photosynthesis. This energy disproportionation changed in favor of heat dissipation at increasing irradiance, with >99% of the absorbed light energy being dissipated as heat and ...Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first balanced light energy budget for a benthic microbial mat ecosystem, and show how the budget and the spatial distribution of the local photosynthetic efficiencies within the euphotic zone depend on the absorbed irradiance (Jabs). Our approach...... uses microscale measurements of the rates of heat dissipation, gross photosynthesis and light absorption in the system, and a model describing light propagation and conversion in a scattering–absorbing medium. The energy budget was dominated by heat dissipation on the expense of photosynthesis...

  14. Conversion and conservation of light energy in a photosynthetic microbial mat ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najjar, A.A.; De Beer, D.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2011-01-01

    : in light-limiting conditions, 95.5% of the absorbed light energy dissipated as heat and 4.5% was channeled into photosynthesis. This energy disproportionation changed in favor of heat dissipation at increasing irradiance, with >99% of the absorbed light energy being dissipated as heat and 700 micromol......Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first balanced light energy budget for a benthic microbial mat ecosystem, and show how the budget and the spatial distribution of the local photosynthetic efficiencies within the euphotic zone depend on the absorbed irradiance (J(abs)). Our...... approach uses microscale measurements of the rates of heat dissipation, gross photosynthesis and light absorption in the system, and a model describing light propagation and conversion in a scattering-absorbing medium. The energy budget was dominated by heat dissipation on the expense of photosynthesis...

  15. Timescales of Growth Response of Microbial Mats to Environmental Change in an Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne D. Jungblut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Laminated photosynthetic microbial mats cover the floor of the lake from below the ice cover to >40 m depth. In recent decades, the water level of Lake Vanda has been rising, creating a “natural experiment” on development of mat communities on newly flooded substrates and the response of deeper mats to declining irradiance. Mats in recently flooded depths accumulate one lamina (~0.3 mm per year and accrue ~0.18 µg chlorophyll-a cm−2 y−1. As they increase in thickness, vertical zonation becomes evident, with the upper 2-4 laminae forming an orange-brown zone, rich in myxoxanthophyll and dominated by intertwined Leptolyngbya trichomes. Below this, up to six phycobilin-rich green/pink-pigmented laminae form a subsurface zone, inhabited by Leptolyngbya, Oscillatoria and Phormidium morphotypes. Laminae continued to increase in thickness for several years after burial, and PAM fluorometry indicated photosynthetic potential in all pigmented laminae. At depths that have been submerged for >40 years, mats showed similar internal zonation and formed complex pinnacle structures that were only beginning to appear in shallower mats. Chlorophyll-a did not change over time and these mats appear to represent resource-limited “climax” communities. Acclimation of microbial mats to changing environmental conditions is a slow process, and our data show how legacy effects of past change persist into the modern community structure.

  16. Fine-scale distribution patterns of Synechococcus ecological diversity in the microbial mats of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becraft, E.; Cohan, F.; Kühl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Past analyses of sequence diversity in high-resolution protein-encoding genes have identified putative ecological species of unicellular cyanobacteria in the genus Synechococcus, which are specialized to 60°C but not 65°C in Mushroom Spring microbial mats. Because these studies were limited to on...

  17. NifH expression by five groups of phototrophs compared with nitrogenase activity in coastal microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) Cyanobacteria are often structurally dominant in coastal microbial mats but diazotrophs from other bacterial lineages are also present and active. The expression of nifH by four nonheterocystous Cyanobacteria and one member of the Gammaproteobacteria was followed over

  18. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF THE INTERACTIONS AMONG CYANOBACTERIA, PURPLE SULFUR BACTERIA AND CHEMOTROPIC SULFUR BACTERIA IN MICROBIAL MAT COMMUNITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIT, R; VANDENENDE, FP; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1995-01-01

    A deterministic one-dimensional reaction diffusion model was constructed to simulate benthic stratification patterns and population dynamics of cyanobacteria, purple and colorless sulfur bacteria as found in marine microbial mats. The model involves the major biogeochemical processes of the sulfur c

  19. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF THE INTERACTIONS AMONG CYANOBACTERIA, PURPLE SULFUR BACTERIA AND CHEMOTROPIC SULFUR BACTERIA IN MICROBIAL MAT COMMUNITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIT, R; VANDENENDE, FP; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1995-01-01

    A deterministic one-dimensional reaction diffusion model was constructed to simulate benthic stratification patterns and population dynamics of cyanobacteria, purple and colorless sulfur bacteria as found in marine microbial mats. The model involves the major biogeochemical processes of the sulfur c

  20. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF THE INTERACTIONS AMONG CYANOBACTERIA, PURPLE SULFUR BACTERIA AND CHEMOTROPIC SULFUR BACTERIA IN MICROBIAL MAT COMMUNITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIT, R; VANDENENDE, FP; VANGEMERDEN, H

    A deterministic one-dimensional reaction diffusion model was constructed to simulate benthic stratification patterns and population dynamics of cyanobacteria, purple and colorless sulfur bacteria as found in marine microbial mats. The model involves the major biogeochemical processes of the sulfur

  1. A novel lineage of proteobacteria involved in formation of marine Fe-oxidizing microbial mat communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Emerson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For decades it has been recognized that neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB are associated with hydrothermal venting of Fe(II-rich fluids associated with seamounts in the world's oceans. The evidence was based almost entirely on the mineralogical remains of the microbes, which themselves had neither been brought into culture or been assigned to a specific phylogenetic clade. We have used both cultivation and cultivation-independent techniques to study Fe-rich microbial mats associated with hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount, a submarine volcano. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Using gradient enrichment techniques, two iron-oxidizing bacteria, strains PV-1 and JV-1, were isolated. Chemolithotrophic growth was observed under microaerobic conditions; Fe(II and Fe(0 were the only energy sources that supported growth. Both strains produced filamentous stalk-like structures composed of multiple nanometer sized fibrils of Fe-oxyhydroxide. These were consistent with mineralogical structures found in the iron mats. Phylogenetic analysis of the small subunit (SSU rRNA gene demonstrated that strains PV-1 and JV-1 were identical and formed a monophyletic group deeply rooted within the Proteobacteria. The most similar sequence (85.3% similarity from a cultivated isolate came from Methylophaga marina. Phylogenetic analysis of the RecA and GyrB protein sequences confirmed that these strains are distantly related to other members of the Proteobacteria. A cultivation-independent analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by terminal-restriction fragment (T-RF profiling showed that this phylotype was most common in a variety of microbial mats collected at different times and locations at Loihi. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological data, it is proposed that isolate PV-1(T ( = ATCC BAA-1019: JCM 14766 represents the type strain of a novel species in a new genus, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans gen. nov., sp. nov. Furthermore, the strain is

  2. Hypothesized origin of microbial life in a prebiotic gel and the transition to a living biofilm and microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Jack T

    2011-04-01

    This article hypothesizes that the origin of the first microbial cell(s) occurred as a series of increasing levels of organization within a prebiotic gel attached to a mineral surface, which made the transition to a biofilm composed of the first cell(s) capable of growth and division. A gel microenvironment attached to a surface for the origin of life, and subsequent living cells offers numerous advantages. These include acting as a water and nutrient trap on a surface, physical protection as well as protection from UV radiation. The prebiotic gel and the living biofilm contained the necessary water, does not impede diffusion of molecules including gases, provides a structured gel microscopic location for biochemical interactions and polymerisation reactions, where the necessary molecules for life need to be present and not limiting. The composition of the first gel environment may have been an oily-water mixture (or the interface between an oily-water mixture) of microscopic dimensions, but large enough for the organization of the first cell(s). The living biofilm then made the evolutionary transition to a microbial mat.

  3. Characterization of Chemosynthetic Microbial Mats Associated with Intertidal Hydrothermal Sulfur Vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Priscilla J.; McLain, Nathan K.; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Orphan, Victoria J.; Dillon, Jesse G.

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP) in Palos Verdes on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon-, and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum, and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities. PMID:27512390

  4. Bacterial composition of microbial mats in hot springs in Northern Patagonia: variations with seasons and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Roy; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Díez, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal shifts in bacterial diversity of microbial mats were analyzed in three hot springs (39-68 °C) of Patagonia, using culture-independent methods. Three major bacterial groups were detected in all springs: Phyla Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and Order Thermales. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Green Non-Sulfur Bacteria were also detected in small amounts and only in some samples. Thermophilic filamentous heterocyst-containing Mastigocladus were dominant Cyanobacteria in Porcelana Hot Spring and Geyser, and Calothrix in Cahuelmó, followed by the filamentous non-heterocyst Leptolyngbya and Oscillatoria. Bacteroidetes were detected in a wide temperature range and their relative abundance increased with decreasing temperature in almost all samples. Two Meiothermus populations with different temperature optima were found. Overall, fingerprinting analysis with universal bacterial primers showed high similarities within each hot spring despite differences in temperature. On the other hand, Cahuelmó Hot Spring showed a lower resemblance among samples. Porcelana Hot Spring and Porcelana Geyser were rather similar to each other, possibly due to a common geological substrate given their geographic proximity. This was even more evident with specific cyanobacterial primers. The different geological substrate and the seawater influence in Cahuelmó might have caused the differences in the microbial community structure with the other two hot springs.

  5. Community structure and activity of a highly dynamic and nutrient-limited hypersaline microbial mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roda Al-Thani

    Full Text Available The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1-L4 in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively, the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging, oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor, and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1. Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%-42% of the identified bacteria. Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3, evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4 was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer. Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%-97%, whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%. Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  6. Community Structure and Activity of a Highly Dynamic and Nutrient-Limited Hypersaline Microbial Mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Thani, Roda

    2014-03-21

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1–L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%–42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%–97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  7. The Effect Of microbial Mats In The Decay Of Anurans With Implications For Understanding Taphonomic Processes In The Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, M.; Villalba, I.; Buscalioni, A. D.; Guerrero, M. C.; López-Archilla, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The pattern and sequence of the decomposition of the Pipidae African dwarf frog (Hymenochirus boettgeri) is tracked in an experiment with microbial mats in order to explore soft tissue preservation over three years. Frog decay in microbial mats is preceded by rapid entombment (25–30 days) and mediated by the formation of a sarcophagus, which is built by a complex microbial community. The frog carcasses maintained a variety of soft tissues for years. Labile organic structures show greater durability within the mat, cells maintain their general shape (bone marrow cells and adipocytes), and muscles and connective tissues (adipose and fibrous tendons) exhibit their original organic structures. In addition, other soft tissues are promptly mineralized (day 540) in a Ca-rich carbonate phase (encephalic tectum) or enriched in sulphur residues (integumentary system). The result is coherent with a bias in soft-tissue preservation, as some tissues are more likely to be conserved than others. The outcomes support observations of exceptionally preserved fossil anurans (adults and tadpoles). Decomposition in mats shows singular conditions of pH and dissolved oxygen. Mineralization processes could be more diverse than in simple heterotrophic biofilms, opening new taphonomic processes that have yet to be explored. PMID:28338095

  8. Involvement of microbial mats in early fossilization by decay delay and formation of impressions and replicas of vertebrates and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Miguel; Buscalioni, Ángela D.; Carmen Guerrero, M.; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David; López-Archilla, Ana I.

    2016-05-01

    Microbial mats have been hypothesized to improve the persistence and the preservation of organic remains during fossilization processes. We test this hypothesis with long-term experiments (up to 5.5 years) using invertebrate and vertebrate corpses. Once placed on mats, the microbial community coats the corpses and forms a three-dimensional sarcophagus composed of microbial cells and exopolymeric substances (EPS). This coverage provides a template for i) moulding superficial features, resulting in negative impressions, and ii) generating replicas. The impressions of fly setulae, fish scales and frog skin verrucae are shaped mainly by small cells in an EPS matrix. Microbes also replicate delicate structures such as the three successive layers that compose a fish eye. The sarcophagus protects the body integrity, allowing the persistence of inner organs such as the ovaries and digestive apparatus in flies, the swim bladder and muscles in fish, and the bone marrow in frog legs. This study brings strong experimental evidence to the idea that mats favour metazoan fossilization by moulding, replicating and delaying decay. Rapid burial has classically been invoked as a mechanism to explain exceptional preservation. However, mats may play a similar role during early fossilization as they can preserve complex features for a long time.

  9. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies.

  10. Combined stable isotope, proteomic, metabolomics, and spatial specific analysis to track carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A.; Riha, K. M.; Huang, E. L.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; Lipton, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Tracking labeled substrates through microbial mat systems can help elucidate carbon dynamics, species interactions, and niche partitioning, but the inherent microbial complexity of these systems makes them difficult to probe with single analytical techniques. Here we use a combination of different tools to track three labeled substrates through a benthic phototrophic mat from Hot Lake. Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington which, despite extreme salinity and seasonal water temperatures (> 55 ˚C), hosts dense, phototrophic benthic microbial mats. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the system and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. We performed ex situ incubations over a complete diel cycle with 13C labeled bicarbonate, acetate, and glucose. Traditional elemental analysis IRMS provided an estimate of bulk label uptake to total biomass and showed that both bicarbonate and acetate were incorporated only during daylight while glucose uptake was nearly constant through the cycle. Spatially resolved isotope analysis using laser ablation IRMS showed distinctive patterns between the different substrates with bicarbonate having highest uptake in the top third of the mat, acetate uptake focused near the mat's center, and glucose showing similar uptake at all mat depths. Proteomic analysis showed a longer lag in substrate conversion to protein than to biomass and a distinct spike in the number of labeled peptides in the bicarbonate incubation near the end of the diel cycle. Proteomic analysis confirmed that photosynthetic organisms showed the highest rates of label conversion to protein but heterotrophic organisms also incorporated label into their peptides. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated the high conversion of organic substrates

  11. Environmental controls on photosynthetic microbial mat distribution and morphogenesis on a 3.42 Ga clastic-starved platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Michael M

    2009-12-01

    Three morphotypes of microbial mats are preserved in rocks deposited in shallow-water facies of the 3.42 Ga Buck Reef chert (BRC). Morphotype alpha consists of fine anastomosing and bifurcating carbonaceous laminations, which loosely drape underlying detrital grains or form silica-filled lenses. Morphotype beta consists of meshes of fine carbonaceous strands intergrown with detrital grains and dark laminations, which loosely drape coarse detrital grains. Morphotype gamma consists of fine, even carbonaceous laminations that tightly drape underlying detrital grains. Preservation of nearly uncompacted mat morphologies and detrital grains deposited during mat growth within a well-characterized sedimentary unit makes quantitative correlation between morphology and paleoenvironment possible. All mats are preserved in the shallowest-water interval of those rocks deposited below normal wave base and above storm wave base. This interval is bounded below by a transgressive lag formed during regional flooding and above by a small condensed section that marks a local relative sea-level maximum. Restriction of all mat morphotypes to the shallowest interval of the storm-active layer in the BRC ocean reinforces previous interpretations that these mats were constructed primarily by photosynthetic organisms. Morphotypes alpha and beta dominate the lower half of this interval and grew during deposition of relatively coarse detrital carbonaceous grains, while morphotype gamma dominates the upper half and grew during deposition of fine detrital carbonaceous grains. The observed mat distribution suggests that either light intensity or, more likely, small variations in ambient current energy acted as a first-order control on mat morphotype distribution. These results demonstrate significant environmental control on biological morphogenetic processes independent of influences from siliciclastic sedimentation.

  12. Community Structure and Function of High-temperature Chlorophototrophic Microbial Mats Inhabiting Diverse Geothermal Environments

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    William P. Inskeep

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Six phototrophic microbial mat communities from different geothermal springs (YNP were studied using metagenome sequencing and geochemical analyses. The primary goals of this work were to determine differences in community composition of high-temperature phototrophic mats distributed across the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem, and to identify metabolic attributes of predominant organisms present in these communities that may correlate with environmental attributes important in niche differentiation. Random shotgun metagenome sequences from six phototrophic communities (average~ 53 Mbp/site were subjected to multiple taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional analyses. All methods, including G+C content distribution, MEGAN analyses and oligonucleotide frequency-based clustering, provided strong support for the dominant community members present in each site. Cyanobacteria were only observed in non-sulfidic sites; de novo assemblies were obtained for Synechococcus-like populations at Chocolate Pots (CP_7 and Fischerella-like populations at White Creek (WC_6. Chloroflexi-like sequences (esp. Roseiflexus and/or Chloroflexus spp. were observed in all six samples and contained genes involved in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and the 3-hydroxypropionate carbon fixation pathway. Other major sequence assemblies were obtained for a Chlorobiales population from CP_7 (proposed family Thermochlorobacteriaceae, and an anoxygenic, sulfur-oxidizing Thermochromatium-like (Gamma-proteobacteria population from Bath Lake Vista Annex (BLVA_20. Additional sequence coverage is necessary to establish more complete assemblies of other novel bacteria in these sites (e.g., Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes; however, current assemblies suggested that several of these organisms play important roles in heterotrophic and fermentative metabolisms. Definitive linkages were established between several of the dominant phylotypes present in these habitats and important functional

  13. Community structure and function of high-temperature chlorophototrophic microbial mats inhabiting diverse geothermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Christian G; Inskeep, William P; Herrgard, Markus J; Jay, Zackary J; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Niki Parenteau, M; Ward, David M; Boomer, Sarah M; Bryant, Donald A; Miller, Scott R

    2013-01-01

    Six phototrophic microbial mat communities from different geothermal springs (YNP) were studied using metagenome sequencing and geochemical analyses. The primary goals of this work were to determine differences in community composition of high-temperature phototrophic mats distributed across the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem, and to identify metabolic attributes of predominant organisms present in these communities that may correlate with environmental attributes important in niche differentiation. Random shotgun metagenome sequences from six phototrophic communities (average ∼53 Mbp/site) were subjected to multiple taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional analyses. All methods, including G + C content distribution, MEGAN analyses, and oligonucleotide frequency-based clustering, provided strong support for the dominant community members present in each site. Cyanobacteria were only observed in non-sulfidic sites; de novo assemblies were obtained for Synechococcus-like populations at Chocolate Pots (CP_7) and Fischerella-like populations at White Creek (WC_6). Chloroflexi-like sequences (esp. Roseiflexus and/or Chloroflexus spp.) were observed in all six samples and contained genes involved in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and the 3-hydroxypropionate carbon fixation pathway. Other major sequence assemblies were obtained for a Chlorobiales population from CP_7 (proposed family Thermochlorobacteriaceae), and an anoxygenic, sulfur-oxidizing Thermochromatium-like (Gamma-proteobacteria) population from Bath Lake Vista Annex (BLVA_20). Additional sequence coverage is necessary to establish more complete assemblies of other novel bacteria in these sites (e.g., Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes); however, current assemblies suggested that several of these organisms play important roles in heterotrophic and fermentative metabolisms. Definitive linkages were established between several of the dominant phylotypes present in these habitats and important functional

  14. Microbial mats as a biological treatment approach for saline wastewaters: the case of produced water from hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyon, Benay; Stachler, Elyse; Wei, Na; Bibby, Kyle

    2015-05-19

    Treatment of produced water, i.e. wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, for reuse or final disposal is challenged by both high salinity and the presence of organic compounds. Organic compounds in produced water may foul physical-chemical treatment processes or support microbial corrosion, fouling, and sulfide release. Biological approaches have potential applications in produced water treatment, including reducing fouling of physical-chemical treatment processes and decreasing biological activity during produced water holding; however, conventional activated sludge treatments are intolerant of high salinity. In this study, a biofilm treatment approach using constructed microbial mats was evaluated for biodegradation performance, microbial community structure, and metabolic potential in both simulated and real produced water. Results demonstrated that engineered microbial mats are active at total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations up to at least 100,000 mg/L, and experiments in real produced water showed a biodegradation capacity of 1.45 mg COD/gramwet-day at a TDS concentration of 91,351 mg/L. Additionally, microbial community and metagenomic analyses revealed an adaptive microbial community that shifted based upon the sample being treated and has the metabolic potential to degrade a wide array of contaminants, suggesting the potential of this approach to treat produced waters with varying composition.

  15. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works. We infer from the data the various sinks for O2 as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. Although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount.

  16. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works. We infer from the data the various sinks for O2 as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. Although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of a microbialite-forming microbial mat from a hypersaline lake of the Kiritimati atoll, Central Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Schneider

    Full Text Available On the Kiritimati atoll, several lakes exhibit microbial mat-formation under different hydrochemical conditions. Some of these lakes trigger microbialite formation such as Lake 21, which is an evaporitic, hypersaline lake (salinity of approximately 170‰. Lake 21 is completely covered with a thick multilayered microbial mat. This mat is associated with the formation of decimeter-thick highly porous microbialites, which are composed of aragonite and gypsum crystals. We assessed the bacterial and archaeal community composition and its alteration along the vertical stratification by large-scale analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the nine different mat layers. The surface layers are dominated by aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant microbes. The bacterial community of these layers harbored Cyanobacteria (Halothece cluster, which were accompanied with known phototrophic members of the Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. In deeper anaerobic layers more diverse communities than in the upper layers were present. The deeper layers were dominated by Spirochaetes, sulfate-reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi (Anaerolineae and Caldilineae, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiales, anaerobic Bacteroidetes (Marinilabiacae, Nitrospirae (OPB95, Planctomycetes and several candidate divisions. The archaeal community, including numerous uncultured taxonomic lineages, generally changed from Euryarchaeota (mainly Halobacteria and Thermoplasmata to uncultured members of the Thaumarchaeota (mainly Marine Benthic Group B with increasing depth.

  18. The Guaymas Basin hiking guide to hydrothermal mounds, chimneys and microbial mats: complex seafloor expressions of subsurface hydrothermal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eTeske

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal mats, mounds and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heatflow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for a wider survey of the entire spreading region.

  19. Microbial mat controls on infaunal abundance and diversity in modern marine microbialites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, L G; Planavsky, N J; Laumer, C E; Stolz, J F; Reid, R P

    2013-09-01

    Microbialites are the most abundant macrofossils of the Precambrian. Decline in microbialite abundance and diversity during the terminal Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic has historically been attributed to the concurrent radiation of complex metazoans. Similarly, the apparent resurgence of microbialites in the wake of Paleozoic and Mesozoic mass extinctions is frequently linked to drastic declines in metazoan diversity and abundance. However, it has become increasing clear that microbialites are relatively common in certain modern shallow, normal marine carbonate environments-foremost the Bahamas. For the first time, we present data, collected from the Exuma Cays, the Bahamas, systematically characterizing the relationship between framework-building cyanobacteria, microbialite fabrics, and microbialite-associated metazoan abundance and diversity. We document the coexistence of diverse microbialite and infaunal metazoan communities and demonstrate that the predominant control upon both microbialite fabric and metazoan community structure is microbial mat type. These findings necessitate that we rethink prevalent interpretations of microbialite-metazoan interactions and imply that microbialites are not passive recipients of metazoan-mediated alteration. Additionally, this work provides support for the theory that certain Precambrian microbialites may have been havens of early complex metazoan life, rather than bereft of metazoans, as has been traditionally envisaged. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haichun; Obraztova, Anna; Stewart, Nathan; Popa, Radu; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Nealson, Kenneth; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-08-28

    A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4T, isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean, has been characterized. This micro-organism is orange in color, Gram-negative, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic and psychrotolerant (temperature range, 0-42 C). No growth was observed with nitrate, nitrite, DMSO or thiosulfate as the electron acceptor and lactate as the electron donor. The major fatty acid detected in strain PV-4T was iso-C15 : 0. Strain PV-4T had ubiquinones consisting mainly of Q-7 and Q-8, and possessed menaquinone MK-7. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 53.8 mol% and the genome size was about 4.5 Mbp. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed PV-4T within the genus Shewanella. PV-4T exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 99.6 and 97.5 %, respectively, with respect to the type strains of Shewanella aquimarina and Shewanella marisflavi. DNA from strain PV-4T showed low mean levels of relatedness to the DNAs of S. aquimarina (50.5%) and S. marisflavi (8.5%). On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics, the bacterium was classified in the genus Shewanella within a distinct novel species, for which the name Shewanella loihica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PV-4T (=ATCC BAA-1088T=DSM 17748T).

  1. Evidence of organic structures in Ediacara-type fossils and associated microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2001-12-01

    Ediacara-type fossils represent a group of soft-bodied organisms, mainly known from imprints in Proterozoic coarse-grained siliciclastic sedimentary rocks. Circular compressions of Beltanelliformis brunsae and remains related to Ediacara-type fossils, such as Cucullus fraudulentus, and Mucuplagum primitivum are reported here in an organic mode of preservation from the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo and Liulaobei Formations of China. They can be interpreted as prokaryotic colonies. A charnid fossil with circular attachment disc and stalk, but torn-off frond, is documented in a three-dimensional and partly organic mode of preservation from the Neoproterozoic Ust-Pinega Formation (White Sea coast, Russia). According to their morphology and structure, the Charniidae are not regarded by us as pennatulaceans. Modern Myxobacteria illustrate that macroscopic size, complexity, and even compartmentalization can also be developed by prokaryotic colonies. Part of the Ediacara-type fossils may therefore represent prokaryotic colonies or symbiotic organisms involving prokaryotes. Finally, direct evidence indicates that biofilms with associated prokaryotic sheaths, preserved in both organic and pyritic fashion, form the wrinkled surfaces (“elephant skin”) that were preferentially colonized by Ediacara-type fossils. This finding supports previous interpretations, based on comparative morphological and sedimentological approaches, that ancient wrinkle structures were microbial mats.

  2. Remarkable preservation of microbial mats in Neoproterozoic siliciclastic settings: Implications for Ediacaran taphonomic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callow, Richard H. T.; Brasier, Martin D.

    2009-10-01

    It is beyond doubt that the appearance of infaunal bioturbation and metazoan biomineralization across the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition irreversibly affected the nature of marine sediment architecture and biogeochemistry. Here we review those changes in relation to their likely effect upon the processes of fossil preservation, especially within siliciclastic sediments. Processes of soft-tissue preservation in siliciclastic settings from the Ediacaran Period, including microbes and microbial mats as well as Ediacaran macrofossils, are here reviewed within this context. Highlighted examples include the exceptional preservation of microbes found in association with wrinkle structures and Ediacaran macrofossils in England and Newfoundland (replicated by silicate minerals) and in the White Sea region of Russia (replicated by iron sulphide). These occurrences show that soft-tissue preservation in siliciclastic settings went well beyond that typical for Ediacaran macrofossils alone and also extended to similar modes of preservation in associated microbes. Using these new observations it can be argued that several existing explanations for Ediacaran fossil preservation can be united within a biogeochemical model that involves evolution of the sediment mixed layer across this transition.

  3. Rhodoferax antarcticus sp. nov., a moderately psychrophilic purple nonsulfur bacterium isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, M. T.; Jung, D. O.; Woese, C. R.; Achenbach, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    A new species of purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat is described. The organism, designated strain ANT.BR, was mildly psychrophilic, growing optimally at 15-18 degrees C with a growth temperature range of 0-25 degrees C. Cells of strain ANT.BR were highly motile curved rods and spirals, contained bacteriochlorophyll a, and showed a multicomponent in vivo absorption spectrum. A specific phylogenetic relationship was observed between strain ANT.BR and the purple bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans FR2T, and the two organisms shared several physiological and other phenotypic properties, with the notable exception of growth temperature optimum. Tests of genomic DNA hybridization, however, showed Rfx. fermentans FR2T and strain ANT.BR to be genetically distinct bacteria. Because of its unique set of properties, especially its requirement for low growth temperatures, we propose to recognize strain ANT.BR as a new species of the genus Rhodoferax, Rhodoferax antarcticus, named for its known habitat, the Antarctic.

  4. Microscopic Examination of Distribution and Phenotypic Properties of Phylogenetically Diverse Chloroflexaceae-Related Bacteria in Hot Spring Microbial Mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, U.; Bateson, Mary M.; Vandieken, V.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the diversity, distribution, and phenotypes of uncultivated Chloroflexaceae-related bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats of an alkaline hot spring (Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park). By applying a directed PCR approach, molecular cloning, and sequence analysis of 16S......-scale distribution. FISH was combined with oxygen microelectrode measurements, microscope spectrometry, and microautoradiography to examine their microenvironment, pigmentation, and carbon source usage. Abundant type C-related, filamentous bacteria were found to flourish within the cyanobacterium-dominated, highly...

  5. Microscopic examination of distribution and phenotypic properties of phylogenetically diverse Chloroflexaceae-related bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, Ulrich; Bateson, Mary M; Vandieken, Verona

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the diversity, distribution, and phenotypes of uncultivated Chloroflexaceae-related bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats of an alkaline hot spring (Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park). By applying a directed PCR approach, molecular cloning, and sequence analysis of 16S......-scale distribution. FISH was combined with oxygen microelectrode measurements, microscope spectrometry, and microautoradiography to examine their microenvironment, pigmentation, and carbon source usage. Abundant type C-related, filamentous bacteria were found to flourish within the cyanobacterium-dominated, highly...

  6. Microscopic examination of distribution and phenotypic properties of phylogenetically diverse Chloroflexaceae-related bacteria in hot spring microbial mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, Ulrich; Bateson, Mary M; Vandieken, Verona

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the diversity, distribution, and phenotypes of uncultivated Chloroflexaceae-related bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats of an alkaline hot spring (Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park). By applying a directed PCR approach, molecular cloning, and sequence analysis of 16S......-scale distribution. FISH was combined with oxygen microelectrode measurements, microscope spectrometry, and microautoradiography to examine their microenvironment, pigmentation, and carbon source usage. Abundant type C-related, filamentous bacteria were found to flourish within the cyanobacterium-dominated, highly...

  7. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and free oxygen in a microbial mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-08-01

    Complete budgets for carbon and oxygen have been constructed for cyanobacterial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes from the evaporating ponds of a salt works located in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Included in the budget are measured rates of O 2 production, sulfate reduction, and elemental exchange across the mat/brine interface, day and night, at various temperatures and times of the year. We infer from this data the various sinks for O 2, as well as the sources of carbon for primary production. To summarize, although seasonal variability exists, a major percentage of the O 2 produced during the day did not diffuse out of the mat but was used within the mat to oxidize both organic carbon and the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction. At night, most of the O 2 that diffused into the mat was used to oxidize sulfide, with O 2 respiration of minor importance. During the day, the internal mat processes of sulfate reduction and O 2 respiration generated as much or more inorganic carbon (DIC) for primary production as diffusion into the mat. Also, oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important process of carbon fixation, although anoxygenic photosynthesis may have been important at low light levels during some times of the year. At night, the DIC lost from the mat was mostly from sulfate reduction. Elemental fluxes across the mat/brine interface indicated that carbon with an oxidation state of greater than zero was taken up by the mat during the day and liberated from the mat at night. Overall, carbon with an average oxidation state of near zero accumulated in the mat. Both carbon fixation and carbon oxidation rates varied with temperature by a similar amount. These mats are thus closely coupled systems where rapid rates of photosynthesis both require and fuel rapid rates of heterotrophic carbon oxidation.

  8. Physical and Geochemical Controls on the Structure and Function of Microbial Mat Communities at El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, K. D.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2013-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are important primary producers that form the basis of most hot spring microbial mat communities in waters between 30-73°C. Primary producers shape microbial mat communities by fixing the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool to organic carbon and providing nutrients for diverse microorganisms that perform a broad range of biogeochemical transformations. This study compares the microbial community structure and net primary productivity of cyanobacterially-based and non-cyanobacterially based microbial mats collected from the El Tatio Geyser Field, a high elevation geyser complex in the Andes Mountains in Region II, Chile. In addition to extreme conditions imparted by high elevation and its location in the Atacama Desert, El Tatio has a suite of extreme geochemical stressors for life, including high arsenic as As(III) and As(V) (0.4-0.6 mM). El Tatio also has unusually low concentrations of DIC in some streams (0.1-0.3 mM), low enough to severely limit primary production in microbial mats. In contrast to other geothermal sites around the world where microbial diversity is controlled primarily by temperature, observations of unusual patterns in microbial mat composition in low-DIC streams at El Tatio suggest alternate controls their distribution. For instance, we observe less biomass in low-DIC streams compared to nearby high DIC streams, and less biomass in high temperature regions of low-DIC streams, compared to low-temperature locations that are dominated by cyanobacteria. To further investigate these patterns, a field assay was conducted to compare carbon assimilation, the relative importance of photo- and chemoautotrophy, and bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundance at two distinct sites along a low-DIC stream. Water temperature at the upstream site measured 60°C, is dominated by high As(III), and is composed of sparse, red-colored mat material, whereas the downstream site measured a water temperature of 40°C, is dominated by high As(V), and is

  9. Metabolic potential of microbial mats and microbialites: Autotrophic capabilities described by an in silico stoichiometric approach from shared genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-08-01

    Microbialites and microbial mats are complex communities with high phylogenetic diversity. These communities are mostly composed of bacteria and archaea, which are the earliest living forms on Earth and relevant to biogeochemical evolution. In this study, we identified the shared metabolic pathways for uptake of inorganic C and N in microbial mats and microbialites based on metagenomic data sets. An in silico analysis for autotrophic pathways was used to trace the paths of C and N to the system, following an elementary flux modes (EFM) approach, resulting in a stoichiometric model. The fragility was analyzed by the minimal cut sets method. We found four relevant pathways for the incorporation of CO2 (Calvin cycle, reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, and dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle), some of them present only in archaea, while nitrogen fixation was the most important source of N to the system. The metabolic potential to incorporate nitrate to biomass was also relevant. The fragility of the network was low, suggesting a high redundancy of the autotrophic pathways due to their broad metabolic diversity, and highlighting the relevance of reducing power source. This analysis suggests that microbial mats and microbialites are "metabolic pumps" for the incorporation of inorganic gases and formation of organic matter.

  10. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Mo eKim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptive and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars, wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number of predominant taxa inhabit this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms, and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2 in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1 the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2 photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3 glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4 fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their niches

  11. Micro-scale in situ characterisation of the organic and mineral composition of modern, hypersaline, photosynthetic microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, P.; Ramboz, C.; de Wit, R.; Delarue, F.; Orange, F.; Sorieul, S.; Westall, F.

    2012-04-01

    Physico-chemical and biological micro-scale environmental parameters within microbial mats formed in hypersaline conditions favour the precipitation of minerals, such as carbonates. We used optical microscopy and the technique "Fluorescence Induction Relaxation » (FIRe) to differentiate the photosynthetic activity of oxygenic photosynthesisers (cyanobacteria) from anoxygenic photosynthesisers (Chloroflexus-like bacteria, CFB) in samples obtained in 2011. After this preliminary investigation, we characterised the elemental composition of the different species of microorganisms, their extracellular substances (EPS), and the minerals precipitated on their surface. This study was made in-situ by µ-PIXE using the nuclear microprobe of the AIFIRA platform (CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan ; protons of 1.5 or 3MeV). With this microprobe it is possible to map the distribution of elements occurring in quantities down to several ppm, a resolution that is particularly favourable for studying microorganisms. SEM observation of the same zones allowed us to localise exactly the microbial structures (cells, EPS) and minerals analysed by nuclear probe. We were thus able to document the differential S and P concentrations in the different microbial species, the CLB being richer in P. Note that the CLB filaments are EPS. Thus we have shown the utility of these in situ, nano-scale methods in studying microbial structures consisting of different species with different metabolic activitie, and different functional groups on their cell walls and EPS implicated in the bioprecipitation of different kinds of minerals. Such features in ancient microbial mats could aid their interpretation and possibly the distinction between ancient oxygenic and anoxygenic mats.

  12. Towards a methodology for removing and reconstructing soil protists with intact soil microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junwei; Tsegaye Gebremikael, Mesfin; Salehi Hosseini, Pezhman; De Neve, Stefaan

    2017-04-01

    Soil ecological theories on the role of soil fauna groups in soil functions are often tested in highly artificial conditions, i.e. on completely sterilized soils or pure quartz sand re-inoculated with a small selection of these fauna groups. Due to the variable sensitivity of different soil biota groups to gamma irradiation, the precise doses that can be administered, and the relatively small disturbance of soil physical and chemical properties (relative to e.g. autoclaving, freezing-thawing and chemical agents), gamma irradiation has been employed to selectively eliminate soil organisms. In recent research we managed to realistically estimate on the contribution of the entire nematode communities to C and N mineralization in soil, by selective removal of nematodes at 5 kGy gamma irradiation doses followed by reinoculation. However, we did not assess the population dynamics of protozoa in response to this irradiation, i.e. we could not assess the potential contribution of protists to the mineralization process. Selective removal of protists from soils with minimal disturbance of the soil microflora has never been attempted and constitutes a highly challenging but potentially groundbreaking technique in soil ecology. Accordingly, the objective of this research is to modify the successful methodology of selective elimination of nematodes, to selectively eliminate soil fauna including nematodes and protists with minimal effects on the soil microbial community and reconstruct soil protists and microbial communities in completely sterilized soil. To this end, we here compared two different approaches: 1) remove nematodes and protists while keeping the microbial community intact (through optimizing gamma irradiation doses); 2) reconstruct protists and microbial communities in sterilized soil (through adding multicellular fauna free pulverized soil). The experiment consists of 7 treatments with soil collected from 0 to 15 cm layer of an organically managed agricultural

  13. Lipid biomarkers, pigments and cyanobacterial diversity of microbial mats across intertidal flats of the arid coast of the Arabian Gulf (Abu Dhabi, UAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Raeid M M; Kohls, Katharina; Schoon, Raphaela; Scherf, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Marion; Palinska, Katarzyna A; Al-Hassani, Huda; Hamza, Waleed; Rullkötter, Jürgen; Golubic, Stjepko

    2008-09-01

    Variations in morphology, fatty acids, pigments and cyanobacterial community composition were studied in microbial mats across intertidal flats of the arid Arabian Gulf coast. These mats experience combined extreme conditions of salinity, temperature, UV radiation and desiccation depending on their tidal position. Different mat forms were observed depending on the topology of the coast and location. The mats contained 63 fatty acids in different proportions. The increased amounts of unsaturated fatty acids (12-39%) and the trans/cis ratio (0.6-1.6%) of the cyanobacterial fatty acid n-18:1omega9 in the higher tidal mats suggested an adaptation of the mat microorganisms to environmental stress. Chlorophyll a concentrations suggested lower cyanobacterial abundance in the higher than in the lower intertidal mats. Scytonemin concentrations were dependent on the increase in solar irradiation, salinity and desiccation. The mats showed richness in cyanobacterial species, with Microcoleus chthonoplastes and Lyngbya aestuarii morphotypes as the dominant cyanobacteria. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns suggested shifts in the cyanobacterial community dependent on drainage efficiency and salinity from lower to higher tidal zones. We conclude that the topology of the coast and the variable extreme environmental conditions across the tidal flat determine the distribution of microbial mats as well as the presence or absence of different microorganisms.

  14. Detection and Isolation Techniques for Methanogens from Microbial Mats (in the El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E. Z.; Franks, M. A.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    Isolating methanogenic archea from an extreme environment such as El Tatio (high altitude, arid climate) gives insight to the methanogenic taxas able to adapt and grow under extreme conditions. The hydrothermal waters at El Tatio geyser field demonstrate extreme geochemical conditions, with discharge water from springs and geysers at local boiling temperature (85° C) with high levels of arsenic and low DIC levels. Despite these challenges, many of El Tatio’s hundred plus hydrothermal features host extensive microbial mat communities, many showing evidence of methanogenesis. When trying to isolate methanogens unique to this area, various approaches and techniques were used. To detect the presence of methanogens in samples taken from the field, dissolved methane concentrations were determined via gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Samples were then selected for culturing and most probable number (MPN) enumeration, where growth was assessed using both methane production and observations of fluorescence under UV light. PCR was used to see if the archeal DNA was apparent directly from the field, and shotgun cloning was done to determine phylogenetic affiliation. Several culturing techniques were carried out in an attempt to isolate methanogens from samples that showed evidence of methanogenesis. The slant culturing method was used because of the increased surface area for colonization combined with the relative ease of keeping anaerobic. After a few weeks, when colonies were apparent, some were aseptically selected and inoculated to observe growth in a liquid media containing ampicillin to inhibit bacterial growth. Culturing techniques proved successful after inoculation, showing a slow growth of methanogens via GC and autofluorescence. Further PCR tests and subsequent sequencing were done to confirm and identify isolates.

  15. Genomic Reconstruction of Carbohydrate Utilization Capacities in Microbial-Mat Derived Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen A. Leyn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two nearly identical unicyanobacterial consortia (UCC were previously isolated from benthic microbial mats that occur in a heliothermal saline lake in northern Washington State. Carbohydrates are a primary source of carbon and energy for most heterotrophic bacteria. Since CO2 is the only carbon source provided, the cyanobacterium must provide a source of carbon to the heterotrophs. Available genomic sequences for all members of the UCC provide opportunity to investigate the metabolic routes of carbon transfer between autotroph and heterotrophs. Here, we applied a subsystem-based comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and identify glycohydrolytic enzymes, carbohydrate transporters and pathway-specific transcriptional regulators in 17 heterotrophic members of the UCC. The reconstructed metabolic pathways include 800 genes, near a one-fourth of which encode enzymes, transporters and regulators with newly assigned metabolic functions resulting in discovery of novel functional variants of carbohydrate utilization pathways. The in silico analysis revealed the utilization capabilities for 40 carbohydrates and their derivatives. Two Halomonas species demonstrated the largest number of sugar catabolic pathways. Trehalose, sucrose, maltose, glucose, and beta-glucosides are the most commonly utilized saccharides in this community. Reconstructed regulons for global regulators HexR and CceR include central carbohydrate metabolism genes in the members of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, respectively. Genomics analyses were supplemented by experimental characterization of metabolic phenotypes in four isolates derived from the consortia. Measurements of isolate growth on the defined medium supplied with individual carbohydrates confirmed most of the predicted catabolic phenotypes. Not all consortia members use carbohydrates and only a few use complex polysaccharides suggesting a hierarchical carbon flow from

  16. Genomic Reconstruction of Carbohydrate Utilization Capacities in Microbial-Mat Derived Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyn, Semen A.; Maezato, Yukari; Romine, Margaret F.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2017-01-01

    Two nearly identical unicyanobacterial consortia (UCC) were previously isolated from benthic microbial mats that occur in a heliothermal saline lake in northern Washington State. Carbohydrates are a primary source of carbon and energy for most heterotrophic bacteria. Since CO2 is the only carbon source provided, the cyanobacterium must provide a source of carbon to the heterotrophs. Available genomic sequences for all members of the UCC provide opportunity to investigate the metabolic routes of carbon transfer between autotroph and heterotrophs. Here, we applied a subsystem-based comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and identify glycohydrolytic enzymes, carbohydrate transporters and pathway-specific transcriptional regulators in 17 heterotrophic members of the UCC. The reconstructed metabolic pathways include 800 genes, near a one-fourth of which encode enzymes, transporters and regulators with newly assigned metabolic functions resulting in discovery of novel functional variants of carbohydrate utilization pathways. The in silico analysis revealed the utilization capabilities for 40 carbohydrates and their derivatives. Two Halomonas species demonstrated the largest number of sugar catabolic pathways. Trehalose, sucrose, maltose, glucose, and beta-glucosides are the most commonly utilized saccharides in this community. Reconstructed regulons for global regulators HexR and CceR include central carbohydrate metabolism genes in the members of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, respectively. Genomics analyses were supplemented by experimental characterization of metabolic phenotypes in four isolates derived from the consortia. Measurements of isolate growth on the defined medium supplied with individual carbohydrates confirmed most of the predicted catabolic phenotypes. Not all consortia members use carbohydrates and only a few use complex polysaccharides suggesting a hierarchical carbon flow from cyanobacteria to

  17. Photosynthetic and Behavioral Versatility of the Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria-Boryana in a Sulfide-Rich Microbial Mat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    CASTENHOLZ, RW; JØRGENSEN, BB; DAMELIO, E.

    1991-01-01

    The diel pattern of vertical migratory movements and photosynthetic activity of Oscillatoria cf. boryana was monitored periodically in microbial mats of a shallow tepid pond fed by sulfide-rich, hot, geothermal spring water in Rotorua, New Zealand. Motile O. boryana formed a conspicuous and predo......The diel pattern of vertical migratory movements and photosynthetic activity of Oscillatoria cf. boryana was monitored periodically in microbial mats of a shallow tepid pond fed by sulfide-rich, hot, geothermal spring water in Rotorua, New Zealand. Motile O. boryana formed a conspicuous...... with dense O. boryana populations were used to make vertical profiles at intervals of 0.1-0.2 mm and also to estimate rates of oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis during rapid light-dark transitions. In addition, attenuation of irradiance was measured in mats with O. boryana by a spectroradiometer...... resulted in a downward retreat. The result was a lowered irradiance level for the Oscillatoria but, nevertheless, a high rate of oxygenic photosynthesis. O. boryana is a versatile cyanobacterium that appears to avoid photoinhibitory conditions and to optimize its light intensity for photosynthesis...

  18. Carbon isotope discrepancy between precambrian stromatolites and their modern analogs: Inferences from hypersaline microbial mats of the sinai coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schidlowski, Manfred

    1985-12-01

    The isotopic composition of organic carbon from extant stromatolite-type microbial ecosystems is commonly slanted toward heavy δ13 C values as compared to respective compositions of average organic matter (including that from Precambrian stromatolites). This seems the more enigmatic as the bulk of primary producers from benthic microbial communities are known to fix carbon via the C3 pathway normally entailing the sizable fractionations of the RuBP carboxylase reaction. There is reason to believe that the small fractionations displayed by aquatic microorganisms result from the limitations of a diffusion-controlled assimilatory pathway in which the isotope effect of the enzymatic reaction is largely suppressed. Apart from the diffusion-control exercised by the aqueous environment, transport of CO2 to the photosynthetically active sites will be further impeded by the protective slime (polysaccharide) coatings commonly covering microbial mats in which gas diffusivities are extremely low. Ineffective discrimination against13C becomes, however, most pronounced in hypersaline environments where substantially reduced CO2 solubilities tend to push carbon into the role of a limiting nutrient (brine habitats constitute preferential sanctuaries of mat-forming microbenthos since the emergence of Metazoan grazers ˜ 0.7 Ga ago). As the same microbial communities had been free to colonize normal marine environments during the Precambrian, the CO2 concentration effect was irrelevant to the carbon-fixing pathway of these ancient forms. Therefore, it might not surprise that organic matter from Precambrian stromatolites displays the large fractionations commonly associated with C3 photosynthesis. Increased mixing ratios of CO2 in the Precambrian atmosphere may have additionally contributed to the elimination of the diffusion barrier in the carbon-fixing pathways of ancient mat-forming microbiota.

  19. Spatial distribution of intact polar lipids in North Sea surface waters: Relationship with environmental conditions and microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Witte, H.J.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized and quantified the intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of the surface waters of the North Sea and investigated its relationships with environmental conditions, microbial abundances, and community composition. The total IPL pool comprised at least 600 different IPL species in seven

  20. Comparison of intact polar lipid with microbial community composition of vent deposits of the Rainbow and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, R.A.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of twelve hydrothermal vent deposits from the Rainbow (RHF) and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields (LSHF) has been investigated in order to assess its utility as a proxy for microbial community composition associated with deep-sea hydrothermal locations. Gene-b

  1. Comparison of intact polar lipid with microbial community composition of vent deposits of the Rainbow and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, R.A.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of twelve hydrothermal vent deposits from the Rainbow (RHF) and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields (LSHF) has been investigated in order to assess its utility as a proxy for microbial community composition associated with deep-sea hydrothermal locations.

  2. Isotopic biosignatures in carbonate-rich, cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats of the Cariboo Plateau, B.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, A L; Druschel, G; Leoni, L; Lim, D S S; Slater, G F

    2013-09-01

    Photosynthetic activity in carbonate-rich benthic microbial mats located in saline, alkaline lakes on the Cariboo Plateau, B.C. resulted in pCO2 below equilibrium and δ(13) CDIC values up to +6.0‰ above predicted carbon dioxide (CO2 ) equilibrium values, representing a biosignature of photosynthesis. Mat-associated δ(13) Ccarb values ranged from ~4 to 8‰ within any individual lake, with observations of both enrichments (up to 3.8‰) and depletions (up to 11.6‰) relative to the concurrent dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Seasonal and annual variations in δ(13) C values reflected the balance between photosynthetic (13) C-enrichment and heterotrophic inputs of (13) C-depleted DIC. Mat microelectrode profiles identified oxic zones where δ(13) Ccarb was within 0.2‰ of surface DIC overlying anoxic zones associated with sulphate reduction where δ(13) Ccarb was depleted by up to 5‰ relative to surface DIC reflecting inputs of (13) C-depleted DIC. δ(13) C values of sulphate reducing bacteria biomarker phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were depleted relative to the bulk organic matter by ~4‰, consistent with heterotrophic synthesis, while the majority of PLFA had larger offsets consistent with autotrophy. Mean δ(13) Corg values ranged from -18.7 ± 0.1 to -25.3 ± 1.0‰ with mean Δ(13) Cinorg-org values ranging from 21.1 to 24.2‰, consistent with non-CO2 -limited photosynthesis, suggesting that Precambrian δ(13) Corg values of ~-26‰ do not necessitate higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Rather, it is likely that the high DIC and carbonate content of these systems provide a non-limiting carbon source allowing for expression of large photosynthetic offsets, in contrast to the smaller offsets observed in saline, organic-rich and hot spring microbial mats.

  3. Physiological and metagenomic analyses of microbial mats involved in self-purification of mine waters contaminated with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Drewniak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Two microbial mats found inside two old (gold and uranium mines in Zloty Stok and Kowary located in SW Poland seem to form a natural barrier that traps heavy metals leaking from dewatering systems. We performed complex physiological and metagenomic analyses to determine which microorganisms are the main driving agents responsible for self-purification of the mine waters and identify metabolic processes responsible for the observed features. SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed accumulation of heavy metals on the mat surface, whereas, sorption experiments showed that neither microbial mats were completely saturated with heavy metals present in the mine waters, indicating that they have a large potential to absorb significant quantities of metal. The metagenomic analysis revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae families were the most abundant in both communities, moreover, it strongly suggest that backbones of both mats were formed by filamentous bacteria, such as Leptothrix, Thiothrix, and Beggiatoa. The Kowary bacterial community was enriched with the Helicobacteraceae family, whereas the Zloty Stok community consist mainly of Sphingomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Caulobacteraceae families. Functional (culture-based and metagenome (sequence-based analyses showed that bacteria involved in immobilization of heavy metals, rather than those engaged in mobilization, were the main driving force within the analyzed communities. In turn, a comparison of functional genes revealed that the biofilm formation and heavy metal resistance functions are more desirable in microorganisms engaged in water purification than the ability to utilize heavy metals in the respiratory process (oxidation-reduction. These findings provide insight on the activity of bacteria leading, from biofilm formation to self-purification, of mine waters contaminated with heavy metals

  4. A silk derived carbon fiber mat modified with Au@Pt urchilike nanoparticles: A new platform as electrochemical microbial biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liu; Guo, Shaojun; Zhou, Ming; Liu, Ling; Liu, Chang; Dong, Shaojun

    2010-06-15

    We present here a facile and efficient route to prepare silk derived carbon mat modified with Au@Pt urchilike nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) and develop an Escherichia coli (E. coli)-based electrochemical sensor using this material. Silk is a natural protein fiber, and it is abundant with kinds of functionalities which are important in the development of the derived material. The S-derived carbon fiber mat have amino, pyridine and carbonyl functional groups, these natural existent functionalities allow the Au@Pt NPs to self-assemble on the carbon fiber surface and provide a biocompatible microenvironment for bacteria. The Au@Pt NPs modified S-derived carbon fiber is sensitive to detect the E. coli activities with a low detection limit, where glucose is used as a prelimiltary substrate to evaluate them. The performance of Au@Pt/carbon fiber mat based biosensor is much better than that of commercial carbon paper based biosensor. The high sensitivity of this biosensor stems from the unique electrocatalytic properties of Au@Pt urchilike NPs and quinone groups presented in S-derived carbon fiber. This biosensor is also tested for detection of organophosphate pesticides, fenamiphos. The relative inhibition of E. coli activity is linear with -log[fenamiphos] at the concentration range from 0.5mg/L to 36.6 mg/L with lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 0.09 mg/L. The Au@Pt NPs modified S-derived carbon fiber mat possesses high conductivity, biocompatibility and high electrocatalytic activity and be can used as advanced electrode materials for microbial biosensor improvement. The microbial biosensor based on this material shows potential applications in environmental monitoring.

  5. Molecular evidence that phylogenetically diverged ciliates are active in microbial mats of deep-sea cold-seep sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Kakizoe, Natsuki; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Cold seeps are areas of the seafloor where hydrogen sulfide- and methane-rich fluid seepage occurs, often sustaining chemosynthetic ecosystems. It is well known that both archaea and bacteria oxidize sulfides and methane to produce chemical energy and that several endemic animals use this energy to thrive in cold seeps. On the other hand, there is little knowledge regarding diversity and ecology of microbial eukaryotes in this ecosystem. In this study we isolated environmental RNA and DNA from microbial mats of cold-seep sediment in Sagami Bay, Japan, and retrieved eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA sequences with polymerase chain reaction methods followed by clone library construction. Most RNA-derived clones obtained were from ciliates, although DNA-derived clones were mainly from the fungus Cryptococcus curvatus, suggesting that ciliates are active in the environment. The ciliate sequences were phylogenetically diverse, and represented eight known class lineages as well as undesignated lineages. Because most ciliates are bacterivorous, it is highly likely that the ciliates for which sequences were recovered play a role in the food web of this ecosystem as grazers of microbial mats. In addition, given that the environment studied is under highly reduced (anoxic) conditions, based on the prokaryotic community structure deduced from T-RFLP profiles, the ciliates detected may be obligatory or facultative anaerobes.

  6. Structural and functional analysis of a microbial mat ecosystem from a unique permanent hypersaline inland lake: ‘La Salada de Chiprana’ (NE Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    and sulfate, which were respectively 0.35 and 0.5 M at the time of sampling while the total salinity was 78 g l-1. Community composition was analyzed by microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment analyses and by studying culturable bacteria from different functional groups. Therefore...... and the flow of carbon through the microbial community. Microsensor techniques, porewater and sediment photopigment analysis were applied in order to estimate oxygenic photosynthetic rates, daily dynamics of (in)organic carbon porewater concentration and migration behavior of phototrophs. Chiprana microbial...... mats produced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) both during the day and night. It was estimated that 14% of the mats gross photosynthetic production and 49% of the mats net photosynthetic production diffused out of the mat in the form of low molecular mass fatty acids, although these compounds made up...

  7. Germ warfare in a microbial mat community: CRISPRs provide insights into the co-evolution of host and viral genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Heidelberg

    Full Text Available CRISPR arrays and associated cas genes are widespread in bacteria and archaea and confer acquired resistance to viruses. To examine viral immunity in the context of naturally evolving microbial populations we analyzed genomic data from two thermophilic Synechococcus isolates (Syn OS-A and Syn OS-B' as well as a prokaryotic metagenome and viral metagenome derived from microbial mats in hotsprings at Yellowstone National Park. Two distinct CRISPR types, distinguished by the repeat sequence, are found in both the Syn OS-A and Syn OS-B' genomes. The genome of Syn OS-A contains a third CRISPR type with a distinct repeat sequence, which is not found in Syn OS-B', but appears to be shared with other microorganisms that inhabit the mat. The CRISPR repeats identified in the microbial metagenome are highly conserved, while the spacer sequences (hereafter referred to as "viritopes" to emphasize their critical role in viral immunity were mostly unique and had no high identity matches when searched against GenBank. Searching the viritopes against the viral metagenome, however, yielded several matches with high similarity some of which were within a gene identified as a likely viral lysozyme/lysin protein. Analysis of viral metagenome sequences corresponding to this lysozyme/lysin protein revealed several mutations all of which translate into silent or conservative mutations which are unlikely to affect protein function, but may help the virus evade the host CRISPR resistance mechanism. These results demonstrate the varied challenges presented by a natural virus population, and support the notion that the CRISPR/viritope system must be able to adapt quickly to provide host immunity. The ability of metagenomics to track population-level variation in viritope sequences allows for a culture-independent method for evaluating the fast co-evolution of host and viral genomes and its consequence on the structuring of complex microbial communities.

  8. Microbial mat-induced sedimentary structures in siliciclastic sediments: Examples from the 1.6 Ga Chorhat Sandstone, Vindhyan Supergroup, M.P., India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subir Sarkar; Santanu Banerjee; Pradip Samanta; Silambuchelvan Jeevankumar

    2006-02-01

    This paper addresses macroscopic signatures of microbial mat-related structures within the 1.6 Ga-old Chorhat Sandstone of the Semri Group –the basal stratigraphic unit of the Vindhyan succession in Son valley.The Chorhat Sandstone broadly represents a prograding succession of three depositional facies ranging from shallow shelf to coastal margin with aeolian sandsheet.The mat-mediated structures were generated because of plastic or brittle deformation of sand,turned cohesive and even thixotropic because of microbial mat growth.Mat growth also favoured abundant preservation of structures that usually have low preservation potential. Prolific growth of microbial mat in the subtidal to intertidal zone of the Chorhat sea was facilitated due to lack of grazing and burrowing activities of organisms in the Precambrian.It further indicates low rate of sedimentation between the storms,as also attested by frequent superposition of storm-beds,even near the storm wave base.It also reduces erosion and that,in turn,would imply low sediment concentration in flows leading to development of bedforms that are likely to be smaller in size and isolated from each other in a single train in contrast to those that form in mat-free sands.

  9. Characterization of a deep-sea microbial mat from an active cold seep at the Milano mud volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijs, Sander K; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Forney, Larry J

    2005-09-01

    A white, filamentous microbial mat at the Milano mud volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea was sampled during the Medinaut cruise of the R/V Nadir in 1998. The composition of the mat community was characterized using a combination of phylogenetic and lipid biomarker methods. The mat sample was filtered through 0.2 and 5-microm filters to coarsely separate unicellular and filamentous bacteria. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from the total community DNA from these fractions showed that similar archaeal populations were present in both fractions. However, the bacterial populations in the fractions differed from one another, and were more diverse than the archaeal ones. Lipid analysis showed that bacteria were the dominant members of the mat microbial community and the relatively low delta(13)C carbon isotope values of bulk bacterial lipids suggested the occurrence of methane- and sulfide-based chemo(auto)trophy. Consistent with this, the bacterial populations in the fractions were related to Alpha-, Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria, most of which were chemoautotrophic bacteria that utilize hydrogen sulfide (or reduced sulfur compounds) and/or methane. The most common archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were related to those of previously identified Archaea capable of anaerobic methane oxidation. Although the filamentous organisms observed in the mat were not conclusively identified, our results indicated that the Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea microbial mat community might be sustained on a combination of methane- and sulfide-driven chemotrophy.

  10. Cyanobacterial Diversity in Microbial Mats from the Hypersaline Lagoon System of Araruama, Brazil: An In-depth Polyphasic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor M. C. Ramos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mats are complex, micro-scale ecosystems that can be found in a wide range of environments. In the top layer of photosynthetic mats from hypersaline environments, a large diversity of cyanobacteria typically predominates. With the aim of strengthening the knowledge on the cyanobacterial diversity present in the coastal lagoon system of Araruama (state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, we have characterized three mat samples by means of a polyphasic approach. We have used morphological and molecular data obtained by culture-dependent and -independent methods. Moreover, we have compared different classification methodologies and discussed the outcomes, challenges, and pitfalls of these methods. Overall, we show that Araruama's lagoons harbor a high cyanobacterial diversity. Thirty-six unique morphospecies could be differentiated, which increases by more than 15% the number of morphospecies and genera already reported for the entire Araruama system. Morphology-based data were compared with the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny derived from isolate sequences and environmental sequences obtained by PCR-DGGE and pyrosequencing. Most of the 48 phylotypes could be associated with the observed morphospecies at the order level. More than one third of the sequences demonstrated to be closely affiliated (best BLAST hit results of ≥99% with cyanobacteria from ecologically similar habitats. Some sequences had no close relatives in the public databases, including one from an isolate, being placed as “loner” sequences within different orders. This hints at hidden cyanobacterial diversity in the mats of the Araruama system, while reinforcing the relevance of using complementary approaches to study cyanobacterial diversity.

  11. {sup 210}Pb atmospheric flux and growth rates of a microbial mat from the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Ebro River Delta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Masque, P.; Martinez-Alonso, M.; Mir, J.; Esteve, I.

    1999-11-01

    Environmental archives are needed to study the variability of natural systems and the impact of man on them. Microbial mats, modern homologues of stromatolites, can be found in extreme environments such as the Ebro River Delta and were studied as potential environmental archives of atmospheric deposition. {sup 210}Pb, a radiotracer widely used in geochronology studies, was used both to determine the growth rates of a microbial mat from this environment and to estimate the {sup 210}Pb atmospheric flux in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The {sup 210}Pb profile showed the presence of three distinct peaks related to low growth-rate periods. This variability indicted the sensitivity of the system to external forcing. The annual atmospheric flux of {sup 210}Pb was 81.2 {+-} 1.4 B1 m{sup {minus}2}yr{sup {minus}1}, which is similar to other values found in the literature. The age profile showed two layers of differing growth rates, being 0.99 {+-} 0.10 mm yr{sup {minus}1} from the surface down to 10 mm depth. The accumulated mass profile showed a change at about 9 mm depth, corresponding to year 1983 {+-} 1. It is noteworthy that this is coincident with a strong El Nino Southern Oscillation event during 1982--1983, which has been shown to affect other ecosystems, including some in the Mediterranean area.

  12. Cyanobacterial mats and stromatolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.; Whitton, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are often the key organisms comprising microbial mats. They form dense micrometer-scale communities in which the full plethora of microbial metabolism can be present. Such mats are therefore excellent model systems and because of their analogy with Precambrian stromatolites they are al

  13. Metagenomic and biochemical characterizations of sulfur oxidation metabolism in uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium in hot spring microbial mats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tamazawa

    Full Text Available So-called "sulfur-turf" microbial mats in sulfide containing hot springs (55-70°C, pH 7.3-8.3 in Japan were dominated by a large sausage-shaped bacterium (LSSB that is closely related to the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium. Several previous reports proposed that the LSSB would be involved in sulfide oxidation in hot spring. However, the LSSB has not been isolated yet, thus there has been no clear evidence showing whether it possesses any genes and enzymes responsible for sulfide oxidation. To verify this, we investigated sulfide oxidation potential in the LSSB using a metagenomic approach and subsequent biochemical analysis. Genome fragments of the LSSB (a total of 3.7 Mb sequence including overlapping fragments were obtained from the metagenomic fosmid library constructed from genomic DNA of the sulfur-turf mats. The sequence annotation clearly revealed that the LSSB possesses sulfur oxidation-related genes coding sulfide dehydrogenase (SD, sulfide-quinone reductase and sulfite dehydrogenase. The gene encoding SD, the key enzyme for sulfide oxidation, was successfully cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme clearly showed SD activity with optimum temperature and pH of 60°C and 8.0, respectively, which were consistent with the environmental conditions in the hot spring where the sulfur-turf thrives. Furthermore, the affinity of SD to sulfide was relatively high, which also reflected the environment where the sulfide could be continuously supplied. This is the first report showing that the LSSB harbors sulfide oxidizing metabolism adapted to the hot spring environment and can be involved in sulfide oxidation in the sulfur-turf microbial mats.

  14. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  15. Zeta-Proteobacteria dominate the formation of microbial mats in low-temperature hydrothermal vents at Loihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassa, A. C.; McAllister, S. M.; Safran, S. A.; Moyer, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    Loihi Seamount is Hawaii's youngest volcano and one of the earth's most active. Loihi is located 30 km SE of the big island of Hawaii and rises over 3000m above the sea floor and summits at 1100m below sea level. An eruption in 1996 of Loihi led to the formation of Pele's Pit, a 300 meter deep caldera. The current observations have revealed diffuse hydrothermal venting causing low to intermediate temperatures (10 to 65°C). The elevated temperatures, coupled with high concentrations of Fe(II) (ranging from 50 to 750 μM) support conditions allowing for extensive microbial mat formation. The focus of this study was to identify the colonizing populations of bacteria generated by the microbial mats at Loihi Seamount. Twenty-six microbial growth chambers were deployed and recovered after placement in the flow of hydrothermal vents for 3 to 8 days from within Loihi's caldera. Genomic DNA was extracted from samples and analyzed by Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) using eight restriction enzyme treatments to generate fingerprints from bacterial amplicons of small subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNAs). Pearson product-moment coupled with UPGMA cluster analysis of these T-RFLP fingerprints showed that these communities bifurcated into two primary clusters. The first (Group 1) had an average vent effluent temperature of 44°C, and the second (Group 2) had an average vent effluent temperature of 64°C. Representative samples from within the two clusters (or groups) were chosen for further clone library and sequencing analysis. These libraries revealing a dominance of the recently discovered zeta- Proteobacteria in the lower temperature group (Group 1) indicating that they were the dominant colonizers of the microbial mats. These microaerophilic, obligately lithotrophic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria are most closely related to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. The higher temperature group (Group 2) was dominated by epsilon- Proteobacteria primarily of the genus

  16. Phototrophic biofilm assembly in microbial-mat-derived unicyanobacterial consortia: model systems for the study of autotroph-heterotroph interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Cole

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, but the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ manipulation make it challenging to elucidate the principles governing these interactions. The study of assembling phototrophic biofilm communities provides a robust means to identify such interactions and evaluate their contributions to the recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity over time. To examine primary succession in phototrophic communities, we isolated two unicyanobacterial consortia from the microbial mat in Hot Lake, Washington, characterizing the membership and metabolic function of each consortium. We then analyzed the spatial structures and quantified the community compositions of their assembling biofilms. The consortia retained the same suite of heterotrophic species, identified as abundant members of the mat and assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Autotroph growth rates dominated early in assembly, yielding to increasing heterotroph growth rates late in succession. The two consortia exhibited similar assembly patterns, with increasing relative abundances of members from Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria concurrent with decreasing relative abundances of those from Gammaproteobacteria. Despite these similarities at higher taxonomic levels, the relative abundances of individual heterotrophic species were substantially different in the developing consortial biofilms. This suggests that, although similar niches are created by the cyanobacterial metabolisms, the resulting webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions are specific to each primary producer. The relative simplicity and tractability of the Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia make them useful model systems for deciphering interspecies interactions and assembly principles relevant to natural

  17. Competition for inorganic carbon between oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs in a hypersaline microbial mat, Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Niko; Hoehler, Tori M; Polerecky, Lubos; Buehring, Benjamin; Thamdrup, Bo

    2013-05-01

    While most oxygenic phototrophs harvest light only in the visible range (400-700 nm, VIS), anoxygenic phototrophs can harvest near infrared light (> 700 nm, NIR). To study interactions between the photosynthetic guilds we used microsensors to measure oxygen and gross oxygenic photosynthesis (gOP) in a hypersaline microbial mat under full (VIS + NIR) and VIS illumination. Under normal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations (2 mM), volumetric rates of gOP were reduced up to 65% and areal rates by 16-31% at full compared with VIS illumination. This effect was enhanced (reduction up to 100% in volumetric, 50% in areal rates of gOP) when DIC was lowered to 1 mM, but diminished at 10 mM DIC or lowered pH. In conclusion, under full-light illumination anoxygenic phototrophs are able to reduce the activity of oxygenic phototrophs by efficiently competing for inorganic carbon within the highly oxygenated layer. Anoxygenic photosynthesis, calculated from the difference in gOP under full and VIS illumination, represented between 10% and 40% of the C-fixation. The DIC depletion in the euphotic zone as well as the significant C-fixation by anoxygenic phototrophs in the oxic layer influences the carbon isotopic composition of the mat, which needs to be taken into account when interpreting isotopic biosignals in geological records.

  18. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Rusch, Douglas B.;

    2015-01-01

    and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species [putative ecotypes (PEs)], which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation), exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature...

  19. Selection of bioindicators to detect lead pollution in Ebro delta microbial mats, using high-resolution microscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J; Solé, A; Puyen, Z M; Esteve, I

    2011-07-01

    Lead (Pb) is a metal that is non-essential to any metabolic process and, moreover, highly deleterious to life. In microbial mats - benthic stratified ecosystems - located in coastal areas, phototrophic microorganisms (algae and oxygenic phototrophic bacteria) are the primary producers and they are exposed to pollution by metals. In this paper we describe the search for bioindicators among phototrophic populations of Ebro delta microbial mats, using high-resolution microscopic techniques that we have optimized in previous studies. Confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to a spectrofluorometric detector (CLSM-λscan) to determine in vivo sensitivity of different cyanobacteria to lead, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), both coupled to energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), to determine the extra- and intracellular sequestration of this metal in cells, were the techniques used for this purpose. Oscillatoria sp. PCC 7515, Chroococcus sp. PCC 9106 and Spirulina sp. PCC 6313 tested in this paper could be considered bioindicators for lead pollution, because all of these microorganisms are indigenous, have high tolerance to high concentrations of lead and are able to accumulate this metal externally in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and intracellularly in polyphosphate (PP) inclusions. Experiments made with microcosms demonstrated that Phormidium-like and Lyngbya-like organisms selected themselves at the highest concentrations of lead assayed. In the present study it is shown that all cyanobacteria studied (both in culture and in microcosms) present PP inclusions in their cytoplasm and that these increase in number in lead polluted cultures and microcosms. We believe that the application of these microscopic techniques open up broad prospects for future studies of metal ecotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Selection of bioindicators to detect lead pollution in Ebro delta microbial mats, using high-resolution microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, J.; Sole, A.; Puyen, Z.M. [Departament de Genetica i Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, Campus de la UAB, Cerdanyola del Valles, Bellaterra (Spain); Esteve, I., E-mail: isabel.esteve@uab.cat [Departament de Genetica i Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, Campus de la UAB, Cerdanyola del Valles, Bellaterra (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Lead (Pb) is a metal that is non-essential to any metabolic process and, moreover, highly deleterious to life. In microbial mats - benthic stratified ecosystems - located in coastal areas, phototrophic microorganisms (algae and oxygenic phototrophic bacteria) are the primary producers and they are exposed to pollution by metals. In this paper we describe the search for bioindicators among phototrophic populations of Ebro delta microbial mats, using high-resolution microscopic techniques that we have optimized in previous studies. Confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to a spectrofluorometric detector (CLSM-{lambda}scan) to determine in vivo sensitivity of different cyanobacteria to lead, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), both coupled to energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), to determine the extra- and intracellular sequestration of this metal in cells, were the techniques used for this purpose. Oscillatoria sp. PCC 7515, Chroococcus sp. PCC 9106 and Spirulina sp. PCC 6313 tested in this paper could be considered bioindicators for lead pollution, because all of these microorganisms are indigenous, have high tolerance to high concentrations of lead and are able to accumulate this metal externally in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and intracellularly in polyphosphate (PP) inclusions. Experiments made with microcosms demonstrated that Phormidium-like and Lyngbya-like organisms selected themselves at the highest concentrations of lead assayed. In the present study it is shown that all cyanobacteria studied (both in culture and in microcosms) present PP inclusions in their cytoplasm and that these increase in number in lead polluted cultures and microcosms. We believe that the application of these microscopic techniques open up broad prospects for future studies of metal ecotoxicity.

  1. Quantifying the tensile strength of microbial mats grown over noncohesive sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignaga, E; Haynes, H; Sloan, W T

    2012-05-01

    Biofilms in marine and fluvial environments can comprise strong bacterial and diatom mats covering large areas of the bed and act to bind sediments. In this case the bed material becomes highly resistant to shear stresses applied by the overlying fluid motion and detachment, when it does occur, is manifest in patches of biofilm of the order cm(2) being entrained into the flow. This article is the first to report tensile test data specific to the centimeter scale using moist biofilm/sediment composite materials; the strain (ε)-stress (σ) relationships permit quantification of the elasticity (Young's modulus, E) and cohesive strength of each specimen. Specifically, we compare the mechanical strength of cyanobacterial biofilm-only samples to that of biofilm cultured over sediment samples (glass beads or natural sands of d ~ 1 mm) for up to 8 weeks. The range of tensile strength (1,288-3,283 Pa) for composite materials was up to three times higher than previous tensile tests conducted at smaller scale on mixed culture biofilm [Ohashi et al. (1999) Water Sci Technol 39:261-268], yet of similar range to cohesive strength values recorded on return activated sludge flocs [RAS; Poppele and Hozalski (2003) J Microbiol Methods 55:607-615]. Composite materials were 3-6 times weaker than biofilm-only samples, indicating that adhesion to sediment grains is weaker than cohesion within the biofilm. Furthermore, in order to relate the tensile test results to the more common in-situ failure of bio-mats due to shear flow, controlled erosion experiments were conducted in a hydraulic flume with live fluid flow. Here, the fluid shear stress causing erosion was 3 orders of magnitude lower than tensile stress; this highlights both the problem of interpreting material properties measured ex-situ and the need for a better mechanistic model of bio-mat detachment.

  2. A Rare Glimpse of Paleoarchean Life: Geobiology of an Exceptionally Preserved Microbial Mat Facies from the 3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Jan-Peter; Van Kranendonk, Martin J; Thiel, Volker; Ionescu, Danny; Strauss, Harald; Schäfer, Nadine; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Paleoarchean rocks from the Pilbara Craton of Western Australia provide a variety of clues to the existence of early life on Earth, such as stromatolites, putative microfossils and geochemical signatures of microbial activity. However, some of these features have also been explained by non-biological processes. Further lines of evidence are therefore required to convincingly argue for the presence of microbial life. Here we describe a new type of microbial mat facies from the 3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, which directly overlies well known stromatolitic carbonates from the same formation. This microbial mat facies consists of laminated, very fine-grained black cherts with discontinuous white quartz layers and lenses, and contains small domical stromatolites and wind-blown crescentic ripples. Light- and cathodoluminescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) reveal a spatial association of carbonates, organic material, and highly abundant framboidal pyrite within the black cherts. Nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) confirmed the presence of distinct spheroidal carbonate bodies up to several tens of μm that are surrounded by organic material and pyrite. These aggregates are interpreted as biogenic. Comparison with Phanerozoic analogues indicates that the facies represents microbial mats formed in a shallow marine environment. Carbonate precipitation and silicification by hydrothermal fluids occurred during sedimentation and earliest diagenesis. The deciphered environment, as well as the δ13C signature of bulk organic matter (-35.3‰), are in accord with the presence of photoautotrophs. At the same time, highly abundant framboidal pyrite exhibits a sulfur isotopic signature (δ34S = +3.05‰; Δ33S = 0.268‰; and Δ36S = -0.282‰) that is consistent with microbial sulfate reduction. Taken together, our results strongly support a microbial mat origin of the black chert facies, thus providing

  3. A Rare Glimpse of Paleoarchean Life: Geobiology of an Exceptionally Preserved Microbial Mat Facies from the 3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, Western Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Peter Duda

    Full Text Available Paleoarchean rocks from the Pilbara Craton of Western Australia provide a variety of clues to the existence of early life on Earth, such as stromatolites, putative microfossils and geochemical signatures of microbial activity. However, some of these features have also been explained by non-biological processes. Further lines of evidence are therefore required to convincingly argue for the presence of microbial life. Here we describe a new type of microbial mat facies from the 3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, which directly overlies well known stromatolitic carbonates from the same formation. This microbial mat facies consists of laminated, very fine-grained black cherts with discontinuous white quartz layers and lenses, and contains small domical stromatolites and wind-blown crescentic ripples. Light- and cathodoluminescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS reveal a spatial association of carbonates, organic material, and highly abundant framboidal pyrite within the black cherts. Nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS confirmed the presence of distinct spheroidal carbonate bodies up to several tens of μm that are surrounded by organic material and pyrite. These aggregates are interpreted as biogenic. Comparison with Phanerozoic analogues indicates that the facies represents microbial mats formed in a shallow marine environment. Carbonate precipitation and silicification by hydrothermal fluids occurred during sedimentation and earliest diagenesis. The deciphered environment, as well as the δ13C signature of bulk organic matter (-35.3‰, are in accord with the presence of photoautotrophs. At the same time, highly abundant framboidal pyrite exhibits a sulfur isotopic signature (δ34S = +3.05‰; Δ33S = 0.268‰; and Δ36S = -0.282‰ that is consistent with microbial sulfate reduction. Taken together, our results strongly support a microbial mat origin of the black chert facies

  4. Extensive microbial mats and their influences on the erosional and depositional dynamics of a siliciclastic cold water environment (Lower Arenigian, Montagne Noire, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, N.

    2000-11-01

    Lower Arenigian (Ordovician) rocks of the Montagne Noire, France, represent a shallow-marine environment of a high latitude position along the northern margin of Gondwana. Within the weakly metamorphosed siliciclastics six depositional units were recognized: (1) outer shelf; (2) foreshore zone, below wave base; (3) foreshore zone, above wave base; (4) sand bars of shoreface zone; (5) intertidal deposits; and (6) lagoonal zone. Wrinkle structures and various other phenomena were mediated by coherent (cyano-)bacterial mats. The structures can be related to the different facies zones of the paleoenvironment. Whereas the muddy outer shelf, and the high-energetic sand bars were not overgrown by any mat-constructing microbial populations, fine sands of the foreshore zone, the tidal flats and lagoonal areas were widely colonized. Restriction of mats due to competition of space by endobenthic macroorganisms, or by grazers was low. The microbially induced structures are composed of organic material, pyrite, clay minerals (illite, chamsonite, chlorite), and chert. The minerals precipitated in situ during degradation of the organic layers by the activity of heterotrophic bacteria at low temperatures. Because the microorganisms formed a dense organic carpet covering extensive areas of the ancient sea-bottom, they influenced significantly the erosional and depositional dynamics of the sedimentary system of the local Arenigian. Biostabilization counteracted erosion, and baffling, trapping and binding enriched mineral particles. Additionally, the in situ formed minerals contributed to the total amount of sediment. The biotic influence lead to increased accumulation of sediment within the depositional area. The study shows that microbial mats of great extension occur within Phanerozoic siliciclastics of cold paleoclimate zones, and that preservation of the mat fabrics was possible. The significant mats influenced the local sedimentary system, an aspect scarcely taken into account

  5. Microscale spatial distributions of microbes in marine intertidal sediments andphotosynthetic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira , C.

    2015-01-01

    Marine sedimentary habitats generally have their highest microbial activity in the top few centimeters. Where light reaches the sediments, benthic oxygenic photoautotrophs grow and the organic matter released is decomposed in a series ofdifferent metabolic pathways by heterotrophic prokaryotes. If g

  6. Context, Biogeochemistry, and Morphology of Diverse and Spatially Extensive Microbial Mats, Little Ambergris Cay, Turks and Caicos Islands, B.W.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotzinger, J. P.; Knoll, A. H.; Fischer, W. W.; Cantine, M.; Gomes, M. L.; Grotzinger, H. M.; Lingappa, U.; Metcalfe, K.; O'Reilly, S. S.; Orzechowski, E. A.; Quinn, D. P.; Riedman, L. A.; Stein, N.; Strauss, J. V.; Trower, L.

    2016-12-01

    Little Ambergris Cay (21.3 N°, 71.7° W) was the site of an integrated geobiological study conducted during July of 2016. The cay ( 6 km long x 1.6 km wide) is developed on a broad bank marked by converging ooid shoals, influenced by strong westerly trade winds (avg. 7.5 m/s), and culminating in a linear ooid shoal that extends almost 25 km from the western tip of the cay. 54 ooid samples were measured for grain size/shape information, organic geochemistry, and microbial community analysis. Lithified upper shoreface to eolian ooid grainstones form a 2 m high bedrock rim that protects an extensive interior tidal marsh with well-developed microbial mats. The rim is locally breached to allow tidal flows to inundate interior bays floored by microbial mats. Three mat types are observed based on texture: dark toned "blister mat", which flanks the bays where they intersect with the bedrock rim; light-toned "polygonal mat" which covers broad tracts of the bay and is exposed at low tide; and lighter-toned "eps mat" which is generally submerged even at low tide. 30 different mat locations were studied and sampled for groundwater salinity, pH, DNA content, photosynthetic efficiency, C and S isotope composition, lipid biomarkers, and taphonomic state. The island was mapped using multispectral Landsat images (m-scale resolution), Quickbird Earth images (50 cm-scale resolution), and photogrammetry from two UAVs. The UAVs captured more than 1500 nadir images from a 350 m standoff distance and were processed to generate a 3-band visible light mosaic map of the island with 15 cm resolution. The drones also captured images with a 5-20 meter standoff to quantify sub-cm-scale bed textures, including those expressed by the different microbial mats. Topography and nine sedimentologic facies were mapped at cm-scale resolution based on 910 differential GPS data points, and the thickness of the Holocene sediment fill (0 to >2m) was estimated using a depth probe and laser theodolite.

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of a photosynthetic microbial mat and comparison with Archean cherts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbin, M; Derenne, S; Gourier, D; Rouzaud, J-N; Gautret, P; Westall, F

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts.

  8. High rates of sulfate reduction in a low-sulfate hot spring microbial mat are driven by a low level of diversity of sulfate-respiring microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillon, Jesse G; Fishbain, Susan; Miller, Scott R

    2007-01-01

    The importance of sulfate respiration in the microbial mat found in the low-sulfate thermal outflow of Mushroom Spring in Yellowstone National Park was evaluated using a combination of molecular, microelectrode, and radiotracer studies. Despite very low sulfate concentrations, this mat community...... was shown to sustain a highly active sulfur cycle. The highest rates of sulfate respiration were measured close to the surface of the mat late in the day when photosynthetic oxygen production ceased and were associated with a Thermodesulfovibrio-like population. Reduced activity at greater depths...... was correlated with novel populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms, unrelated to characterized species, and most likely due to both sulfate and carbon limitation....

  9. Palaeoenvironmental and biostratigraphic implications of microbial mat-related structures:Examples from the modern Gulf of Cambay and the Precambrian Vindhyan Basin,India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santanu; Banerjee; Subir; Sarkar; Patrick; G.Eriksson

    2014-01-01

    A stretch of the modern hypersaline coastal plain of the Gulf of Cambay was chosen to examine the distribution of the microbial mat-related structures(MRS) on siliciclastic sediments in the intertidal and supratidal zones.The abundance of MRS increases from the lower intertidal zone to the upper supratidal zone while the type of MRS records a systematic change.While the lower intertidal zone exhibits wrinkle structures,sieve-like surfaces and patchy ripples in places,the upper intertidal zone exhibits diverse MRS related to reduced current activity on the mat layer and intermittent exposure.MRS in the upper intertidal zone include wrinkle structures,sieve-like surfaces,gas domes,reticulated surfaces,multi-directional ripples,patchy ripples,rolled-up mat fragments,setulfs and occasional petee ridges and cracked mat surfaces.The lower supratidal zone is characterized by increased occurrence of petee ridges,gas domes and cracked mat surfaces compared to the upper intertidal zone.The upper supratidal zone is distinguished by the presence of abundant cracked mat surfaces,petee ridges,gas domes and wrinkle structures.The presence of cm-scale,disc-shaped microbial colonies(DMC) with a variety of internal structures is a unique feature of the Gulf of Cambay study area.While wrinkle structures occur in all the coastal zones,setulfs occur close to the boundary between the upper intertidal and lower supratidal zones.An attempt has been made to compare the distribution of MRS in this modern environment with those in the ~1.6 Ga Chorhat Sandstone of the Vindhyan Supergroup for high-resolution palaeoenvironmental interpretation.The upper part of the intertidal segment of the Chorhat Sandstone is distinguished from its lower part by the presence of abundant cracked mat surfaces,petee ridges and gas domes in the former,while wrinkle structures,Kinneyia,rolled-up mat fragments,patchy ripples and multi-directional ripples are equally abundant in both parts.The lower part of the

  10. Palaeoenvironmental and biostratigraphic implications of microbial mat-related structures:Examples from the modern Gulf of Cambay and the Precambrian Vindhyan Basin, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santanu Banerjee; Subir Sarkar; Patrick GEriksson

    2014-01-01

    A stretch of the modern hypersaline coastal plain of the Gulf of Cambay was cho-sen to examine the distribution of the microbial mat-related structures (MRS) on siliciclastic sed-iments in the intertidal and supratidal zones. The abundance of MRS increases from the lower intertidal zone to the upper supratidal zone while the type of MRS records a systematic change. While the lower intertidal zone exhibits wrinkle structures, sieve-like surfaces and patchy rip-ples in places, the upper intertidal zone exhibits diverse MRS related to reduced current activity on the mat layer and intermittent exposure. MRS in the upper intertidal zone include wrinkle structures, sieve-like surfaces, gas domes, reticulated surfaces, multi-directional ripples, patchy ripples, rolled-up mat fragments, setulfs and occasional petee ridges and cracked mat surfaces. The lower supratidal zone is characterized by increased occurrence of petee ridges, gas domes and cracked mat surfaces compared to the upper intertidal zone. The upper supratidal zone is distinguished by the presence of abundant cracked mat surfaces, petee ridges, gas domes and wrinkle structures. The presence of cm-scale, disc-shaped microbial colonies (DMC) with a variety of internal structures is a unique feature of the Gulf of Cambay study area. While wrinkle structures occur in all the coastal zones, setulfs occur close to the boundary between the upper intertidal and lower supratidal zones. An attempt has been made to compare the distribution of MRS in this modern environment with those in the ~1.6 Ga Chorhat Sandstone of the Vindhyan Supergroup for high-resolution palaeoenvironmental interpretation. The upper part of the inter-tidal segment of the Chorhat Sandstone is distinguished from its lower part by the presence of abundant cracked mat surfaces, petee ridges and gas domes in the former, while wrinkle struc-tures,Kinneyia, rolled-up mat fragments, patchy ripples and multi-directional ripples are equally abundant in

  11. The dark side of the mushroom spring microbial mat: Life in the shadow of chlorophototrophs. I. Microbial diversity based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons and metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial-mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park have been studied for nearly 50 years. The emphasis has mostly focused on the chlorophototrophic bacterial organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflex...

  12. On the effects of the evolution of microbial mats and land plants on the Earth as a planet. Photometric and spectroscopic light curves of paleo-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Sanromá, E; García-Muñoz, A

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the spectral and photometric variability of the Earth and the rest of the Solar System planets has become of the utmost importance for the future characterization of rocky exoplanets. As this is not only interesting at present times but also along the planetary evolution, we studied the effect that the evolution of microbial mats and plants over land has had on the way our planet looks from afar. As life evolved, continental surfaces changed gradually and non- uniformly from deserts through microbial mats to land plants, modifying the reflective properties of the ground and most probably the distribution of moisture and cloudiness. Here, we used a radiative transfer model of the Earth, together with geological paleo-records of the continental distribution and a reconstructed cloud distribution, to simulate the visible and near-IR radiation reflected by our planet as a function of the Earth's rotation. We found that the evolution from deserts to microbial mats and to land plants produce detectabl...

  13. Microbial Communities and Their Predicted Metabolic Functions in Growth Laminae of a Unique Large Conical Mat from Lake Untersee, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunmin Koo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the distribution of microbial taxa and their predicted metabolic functions observed in the top (U1, middle (U2, and inner (U3 decadal growth laminae of a unique large conical microbial mat from perennially ice-covered Lake Untersee of East Antarctica, using NextGen sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and bioinformatics tools. The results showed that the U1 lamina was dominated by cyanobacteria, specifically Phormidium sp., Leptolyngbya sp., and Pseudanabaena sp. The U2 and U3 laminae had high abundances of Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Closely related taxa within each abundant bacterial taxon found in each lamina were further differentiated at the highest taxonomic resolution using the oligotyping method. PICRUSt analysis, which determines predicted KEGG functional categories from the gene contents and abundances among microbial communities, revealed a high number of sequences belonging to carbon fixation, energy metabolism, cyanophycin, chlorophyll, and photosynthesis proteins in the U1 lamina. The functional predictions of the microbial communities in U2 and U3 represented signal transduction, membrane transport, zinc transport and amino acid-, carbohydrate-, and arsenic- metabolisms. The Nearest Sequenced Taxon Index (NSTI values processed through PICRUSt were 0.10, 0.13, and 0.11 for U1, U2, and U3 laminae, respectively. These values indicated a close correspondence with the reference microbial genome database, implying high confidence in the predicted metabolic functions of the microbial communities in each lamina. The distribution of microbial taxa observed in each lamina and their predicted metabolic functions provides additional insight into the complex microbial ecosystem at Lake Untersee, and lays the foundation for studies that will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the formation of these unique mat structures and their evolutionary significance.

  14. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Daniel Becraft

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Stable Ecotype Model, evolution leads to the divergence of ecologically distinct populations (e.g., with different niches and/or behaviors of ecologically interchangeable membership. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to provide deep sequence coverage of Synechococcus psaA genes and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species (putative ecotypes, which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation, exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature-defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same putative ecotype formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while the putative ecotypes are ecologically distinct, the members of each ecotype are ecologically homogeneous. Putative ecotypes responded differently to experimental perturbations of temperature and light, but the genetic variation within each putative ecotype was maintained as the relative abundances of putative ecotypes changed, further indicating that each population responded as a set of ecologically interchangeable individuals. Compared to putative ecotypes that predominate deeper within the mat photic zone, the timing of transcript abundances for selected genes differed for putative ecotypes that predominate in microenvironments closer to upper surface of the mat with spatiotemporal differences in light and O2 concentration. All of these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that Synechococcus species in hot spring mats are sets of ecologically interchangeable individuals that are differently adapted, that these adaptations control their distributions, and that the resulting distributions constrain the activities of the species

  15. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becraft, Eric D; Wood, Jason M; Rusch, Douglas B; Kühl, Michael; Jensen, Sheila I; Bryant, Donald A; Roberts, David W; Cohan, Frederick M; Ward, David M

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Stable Ecotype Model, evolution leads to the divergence of ecologically distinct populations (e.g., with different niches and/or behaviors) of ecologically interchangeable membership. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to provide deep sequence coverage of Synechococcus psaA genes and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species [putative ecotypes (PEs)], which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation), exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature-defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same PE formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while the PEs are ecologically distinct, the members of each ecotype are ecologically homogeneous. PEs responded differently to experimental perturbations of temperature and light, but the genetic variation within each PE was maintained as the relative abundances of PEs changed, further indicating that each population responded as a set of ecologically interchangeable individuals. Compared to PEs that predominate deeper within the mat photic zone, the timing of transcript abundances for selected genes differed for PEs that predominate in microenvironments closer to upper surface of the mat with spatiotemporal differences in light and O2 concentration. All of these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that Synechococcus species in hot spring mats are sets of ecologically interchangeable individuals that are differently adapted, that these adaptations control their distributions, and that the resulting distributions constrain the activities of the species in space and time.

  16. Microbial-mat Sedimentology: A Young Branch fron Sedimentology%微生物席沉积学:一个年轻的沉积学分支

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅冥相

    2011-01-01

    现代实例和岩石记录的研究表明,微生物席是一个特别的微生物群落,这个特殊的微生物群落就像一个复杂的食物网一样,群落中的每一个组成成员紧密相互依赖,从而构成了地球上形成最早、延续时间最长的生态系.微生物席在沉积岩中留下了丰富而且复杂的记录,在碳酸盐岩中最为典型的产物就是叠层石,在碎屑岩中最具有代表性的产物就是"微生物诱发的沉积构造(MISS)".对这些特殊沉积记录的长期研究和探索,产生了沉积学在地球生物框架下的一个年轻分支--"微生物席沉积学";这个以微生物席为研究对象的年轻的沉积学分支,在研究地球早期生命演变、探索生物圈对水圈和大气圈的长时间影响,具有重要意义.若干的新概念和新思维,赋予这个年轻的沉积学分支强大的生命力,同时也代表了沉积学在近年来的一个重要进展之一.%Lots of studies on the microbial mat from the modern examples to the rock records show that the microbial mat is actually a complex microbial community. Just like a complex food web, microbial mats are communities of micro-organisms in which each member depends and is depended on by others in the community. Importantly, this special microbial community forms abundant and sophisticated records in sedimentary rocks. For these records , the stromatolite is the typical represent of microbial mats in carbonate rocks, and the MISS ( Microbial induced sedimentary structure) is the representative product that is related to microbial mats in siliclastic rocks. Long-term researches on these special records result in a young branch of sedimentology, I. E. " microbial-mat sedimentology" within the framework of geobiology, which plays a key role in the further studies of the evolution of the early life and in the further understanding of the evolutional rules of both the atmosphere and the hydrosphere in the earth. Lots of new concepts and

  17. Cyanobacteria in sulfidic spring microbial mats can perform oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis simultaneously during an entire diurnal period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Klatt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We used microsensors to study the regulation of oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis by light and sulfide in a cyanobacterium dominating microbial mats from cold sulfidic springs. Both photosynthetic modes were performed simultaneously over all H2S concentrations (1–2200 µM and irradiances (4–52 µmol photons m-2 s-1 tested. Anoxygenic photosynthesis increased with H2S concentration while the sum of oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic rates was constant at each light intensity. Thus, the total photosynthetically driven electron transport rate was solely controlled by the irradiance level. The partitioning between the rates of these two photosynthetic modes was regulated by both light and H2S concentration. The plastoquinone pool (PQ receives electrons from sulfide:quinone:reductase (SQR in anoxygenic photosynthesis and from photosystem II (PSII in oxygenic photosynthesis. It is thus the link in the electron transport chain where both pathways intersect, and the compound that controls their partitioning. We fitted our data with a model of the photosynthetic electron transport that includes the kinetics of plastoquinone reduction and oxidation. The model results confirmed that the observed partitioning between photosynthetic modes can be explained by a simple kinetic control based on the affinity of SQR and PSII towards PQ. The SQR enzyme and PSII have similar affinities towards PQ, which explains the concurrent oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis over an astonishingly wide range of H2S concentrations and irradiances. The elegant kinetic control of activity makes the cyanobacterium successful in the fluctuating spring environment. We discuss how these specific regulation mechanisms may have played a role in ancient H2S-rich oceans.

  18. Cyanobacteria in Sulfidic Spring Microbial Mats Can Perform Oxygenic and Anoxygenic Photosynthesis Simultaneously during an Entire Diurnal Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Judith M.; de Beer, Dirk; Häusler, Stefan; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    We used microsensors to study the regulation of anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthesis (AP and OP, respectively) by light and sulfide in a cyanobacterium dominating microbial mats from cold sulfidic springs. Both photosynthetic modes were performed simultaneously over all H2S concentrations (1–2200 μM) and irradiances (4–52 μmol photons m-2 s-1) tested. AP increased with H2S concentration while the sum of oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic rates was constant at each light intensity. Thus, the total photosynthetically driven electron transport rate was solely controlled by the irradiance level. The partitioning between the rates of these two photosynthetic modes was regulated by both light and H2S concentration. The plastoquinone pool (PQ) receives electrons from sulfide:quinone:reductase (SQR) in AP and from photosystem II (PSII) in OP. It is thus the link in the electron transport chain where both pathways intersect, and the compound that controls their partitioning. We fitted our data with a model of the photosynthetic electron transport that includes the kinetics of plastoquinone reduction and oxidation. The model results confirmed that the observed partitioning between photosynthetic modes can be explained by a simple kinetic control based on the affinity of SQR and PSII toward PQ. The SQR enzyme and PSII have similar affinities toward PQ, which explains the concurrent OP and AP over an astonishingly wide range of H2S concentrations and irradiances. The elegant kinetic control of activity makes the cyanobacterium successful in the fluctuating spring environment. We discuss how these specific regulation mechanisms may have played a role in ancient H2S-rich oceans. PMID:28018309

  19. Bacterial diversity assessment in Antarctic terrestrial and aquatic microbial mats: a comparison between bidirectional pyrosequencing and cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytgat, Bjorn; Verleyen, Elie; Obbels, Dagmar; Peeters, Karolien; De Wever, Aaike; D'hondt, Sofie; De Meyer, Tim; Van Criekinge, Wim; Vyverman, Wim; Willems, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The application of high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has increased the size of microbial diversity datasets by several orders of magnitude, providing improved access to the rare biosphere compared with cultivation-based approaches and more established cultivation-independent techniques. By contrast, cultivation-based approaches allow the retrieval of both common and uncommon bacteria that can grow in the conditions used and provide access to strains for biotechnological applications. We performed bidirectional pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity in two terrestrial and seven aquatic Antarctic microbial mat samples previously studied by heterotrophic cultivation. While, not unexpectedly, 77.5% of genera recovered by pyrosequencing were not among the isolates, 25.6% of the genera picked up by cultivation were not detected by pyrosequencing. To allow comparison between both techniques, we focused on the five phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Deinococcus-Thermus) recovered by heterotrophic cultivation. Four of these phyla were among the most abundantly recovered by pyrosequencing. Strikingly, there was relatively little overlap between cultivation and the forward and reverse pyrosequencing-based datasets at the genus (17.1-22.2%) and OTU (3.5-3.6%) level (defined on a 97% similarity cut-off level). Comparison of the V1-V2 and V3-V2 datasets of the 16S rRNA gene revealed remarkable differences in number of OTUs and genera recovered. The forward dataset missed 33% of the genera from the reverse dataset despite comprising 50% more OTUs, while the reverse dataset did not contain 40% of the genera of the forward dataset. Similar observations were evident when comparing the forward and reverse cultivation datasets. Our results indicate that the region under consideration can have a large impact on perceived diversity, and should be considered when comparing different datasets. Finally, a high number of OTUs

  20. Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel cycle in a hot spring microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Jensen, Sheila I; Brecht, Eric; Becraft, Eric D; Bateson, Mary M; Kilian, Oliver; Bhaya, Devaki; Ward, David M; Peters, John W; Grossman, Arthur R; Kühl, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation, a prokaryotic, O2-inhibited process that reduces N2 gas to biomass, is of paramount importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus ecotypes, NifH subunit and nitrogenase activity over the diel cycle in the microbial mat of an alkaline hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. The results showed a rise in nif transcripts in the evening, with a subsequent decline over the course of the night. In contrast, immunological data demonstrated that the level of the NifH polypeptide remained stable during the night, and only declined when the mat became oxic in the morning. Nitrogenase activity was low throughout the night; however, it exhibited two peaks, a small one in the evening and a large one in the early morning, when light began to stimulate cyanobacterial photosynthetic activity, but O2 consumption by respiration still exceeded the rate of O2 evolution. Once the irradiance increased to the point at which the mat became oxic, the nitrogenase activity was strongly inhibited. Transcripts for proteins associated with energy-producing metabolisms in the cell also followed diel patterns, with fermentation-related transcripts accumulating at night, photosynthesis- and respiration-related transcripts accumulating during the day and late afternoon, respectively. These results are discussed with respect to the energetics and regulation of N2 fixation in hot spring mats and factors that can markedly influence the extent of N2 fixation over the diel cycle.

  1. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. II. Metabolic Functions of Abundant Community Members Predicted from Metagenomic Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Thiel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park have been extensively characterized. Previous studies have focused on the chlorophototrophic organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. However, the diversity and metabolic functions of the other portion of the community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are poorly understood. We recently described the diverse but extremely uneven microbial assemblage in the undermat of Mushroom Spring based on 16S rRNA amplicon sequences, which was dominated by Roseiflexus members, filamentous anoxygenic chlorophototrophs. In this study, we analyzed the orange-colored undermat portion of the community of Mushroom Spring mats in a genome-centric approach and discuss the metabolic potentials of the major members. Metagenome binning recovered partial genomes of all abundant community members, ranging in completeness from ~28 to 96%, and allowed affiliation of function with taxonomic identity even for representatives of novel and Candidate phyla. Less complete metagenomic bins correlated with high microdiversity. The undermat portion of the community was found to be a mixture of phototrophic and chemotrophic organisms, which use bicarbonate as well as organic carbon sources derived from different cell components and fermentation products. The presence of rhodopsin genes in many taxa strengthens the hypothesis that light energy is of major importance. Evidence for the usage of all four bacterial carbon fixation pathways was found in the metagenome. Nitrogen fixation appears to be limited to Synechococcus spp. in the upper mat layer and Thermodesulfovibrio sp. in the undermat, and nitrate/nitrite metabolism was limited. A closed sulfur cycle is indicated by biological sulfate reduction combined with the presence of genes for sulfide oxidation mainly in phototrophs. Finally, a variety of undermat

  2. Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel cycle in a hot spring microbial mat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Jensen, Sheila I; Brecht, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, a prokaryotic, O(2)-inhibited process that reduces N(2) gas to biomass, is of paramount importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus ecotypes, NifH subunit and nitrogenase activity over the diel cycle...... in the microbial mat of an alkaline hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. The results showed a rise in nif transcripts in the evening, with a subsequent decline over the course of the night. In contrast, immunological data demonstrated that the level of the NifH polypeptide remained stable during the night...

  3. Environmental Controls on Photosynthetic Microbial Mat Distribution and Morphogenesis on a 3.42 Ga Clastic-Starved Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Michael M.

    2009-12-01

    All mats are preserved in the shallowest-water interval of those rocks deposited below normal wave base and above storm wave base. This interval is bounded below by a transgressive lag formed during regional flooding and above by a small condensed section that marks a local relative sea-level maximum. Restriction of all mat morphotypes to the shallowest interval of the storm-active layer in the BRC ocean reinforces previous interpretations that these mats were constructed primarily by photosynthetic organisms. Morphotypes α and β dominate the lower half of this interval and grew during deposition of relatively coarse detrital carbonaceous grains, while morphotype γ dominates the upper half and grew during deposition of fine detrital carbonaceous grains. The observed mat distribution suggests that either light intensity or, more likely, small variations in ambient current energy acted as a first-order control on mat morphotype distribution. These results demonstrate significant environmental control on biological morphogenetic processes independent of influences from siliciclastic sedimentation.

  4. Microbial iron mats at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and evidence that Zetaproteobacteria may be restricted to iron-oxidizing marine systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod J Scott

    Full Text Available Chemolithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the global iron cycle. Thus far, the majority of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria have been identified as Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class within the phylum Proteobacteria. Marine iron-oxidizing microbial communities have been found associated with volcanically active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and coastal waters. However, little is known about the presence and diversity of iron-oxidizing communities at hydrothermal systems along the slow crustal spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From October to November 2012, samples were collected from rust-colored mats at three well-known hydrothermal vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse, and Snake Pit using the ROV Jason II. The goal of these efforts was to determine if iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present at sites proximal to black smoker vent fields. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high iron(II concentrations and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect discrete microbial iron mat samples at the three sites. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a combination of 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and single-cell sorting, while light micros-copy revealed a variety of iron-oxyhydroxide structures, indicating that active iron-oxidizing communities exist along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Sequencing analysis suggests that these iron mats contain cosmopolitan representatives of Zetaproteobacteria, but also exhibit diversity that may be uncommon at other iron-rich marine sites studied to date. A meta-analysis of publically available data encompassing a variety of aquatic habitats indicates that Zetaproteobacteria are rare if an iron source is not readily available. This work adds to the growing understanding of Zetaproteobacteria ecology and suggests

  5. All-cis hentriaconta-9,15,22-triene in microbial mats formed by the phototrophic prokaryote Chloroflexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, M. T.; Schouten, S.; Ward, D. M.; Geenevasen, J. A.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    All-cis hentriaconta-9,15,22-triene (I) has been isolated from Chloroflexus mats, Yellowstone National Park (USA), and identified by GC-(HR)MS analysis of I and its hydrogenated and DMDS-derivatized products and by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

  6. All-cis hentriaconta-9,15,22-triene in microbial mats formed by the phototrophic prokaryote Chloroflexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Meer, M.T.J. van der; Schouten, S.; Ward, D.M.; Geenevasen, J.A.J.

    1999-01-01

    All-cis hentriaconta-9,15,22-triene (I) has been isolated from Chloroflexus mats, Yellowstone National Park (USA), and identified by GC (HR)MS analysis of I and its hydrogenated and DMDS-derivatized products and by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

  7. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 2. Synechococcus strains representative of putative ecotypes inhabiting different depths in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat exhibit different adaptive and acclimative responses to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane eNowack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Closely related strains of thermophilic Synechococcus were cultivated from the microbial mats found in the effluent channels of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YNP. These strains have identical or nearly identical 16S rRNA sequences but are representative of separate, predicted putative ecotype populations, which were identified by using the more highly resolving psaA locus and which predominate at different vertical positions within the 1-mm-thick upper-green layer of the mat. Pyrosequencing confirmed that each strain contained a single, predominant psaA genotype. Strains differed in growth rate as a function of irradiance. A strain with a psaA genotype corresponding to a predicted putative ecotype that predominates near the mat surface grew fastest at high irradiances, whereas strains with psaA genotypes representative of predominant subsurface populations grew faster at low irradiance and exhibited greater sensitivity to abrupt shifts to high light. The high-light-adapted and low-light-adapted strains also exhibited differences in pigment content and the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus (photosystem ratio when grown under different light intensities. Cells representative of the different strains had similar morphologies under low-light conditions, but under high-light conditions, cells of low-light-adapted strains became elongated and formed short chains of cells. Collectively, the results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that closely related, but distinct, ecological species of Synechococcus occupy different light niches in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat and acclimate differently to changing light environments.

  8. Talking Mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Talking Mats are visualizations in the handy size of a set of cards used to support interviews with people with mental disabilities.......Talking Mats are visualizations in the handy size of a set of cards used to support interviews with people with mental disabilities....

  9. Uncultivated cyanobacteria, Chloroflexus-like inhabitants, and spirochete-like inhabitants of a hot spring microbial mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.; Bateson, M.M.; Heimbuch, B.K.; Kopczynski, E.D.; Ward, D.M. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Several species in the thermal Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat have been identified as probable community members by classical culture-dependent approach. A more recent approach, using 16S rRNA sequences as biomarkers, has indicated that the community harbors many more bacterial species than previously identified. This study analyses several long 16S rcDNA fragments, retrieved by preparing a cDNA library by selective priming of RNA obtained from purified small ribosomal subunits and selecting long rcDNA products. In addition 16S rRNA sequence of Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a green nonsulfur bacterium, and a partial 16S rRNA sequence for Heliothrix oregonensis, a novel filamentous photosynthetic bacterium, were analysed.

  10. Development of mats composed by TiO{sub 2} and carbon dual electrospun nanofibers: A possible anode material in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gomez, Nora A.; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); Garcia-Gutierrez, Domingo I. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Centro de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería y Tecnología, PIIT, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); Mosqueda, Hugo A. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Dual nanofiber of TiO{sub 2}–C/C showed excellent electrical performance. • TiO{sub 2}–C/C dual nanofiber can host a dense biofilm of electroactivated Escherichia coli. • Dual nanofibers can be applied as anode to obtain electricity in microbial fuel cells. - Abstract: A new material based on TiO{sub 2(rutile)}–C{sub (semi-graphitic)}/C{sub (semi-graphitic)} dual nanofiber mats is presented, whose composition and synthesis methodology are fundamental factors for the development of exoelectrogenic biofilms on its surface. Therefore, this material shows the required characteristics for possible applications in the bioconversion process of an organic substrate to electricity in a microbial fuel cell. Chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and electrical conductivity analyses showed excellent electrical performance of the material for the application intended; a resistance as low as 3.149 Ω was able to be measured on this material. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirmed the morphology sought on the material for the application intended, dual nanofibres TiO{sub 2(rutile)}–C{sub (semi-graphitic)}/C{sub (semi-graphitic)} with a side by side configuration. The difference in composition of the fibers forming the dual nanofibers was clearly observed and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and their crystal structure was evident in the results obtained from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) studies. This nanostructured material presented a high surface area and is biocompatible, given that it can host a dense biofilm of electroactivated Escherichia coli. In this study, the maximum current density obtained in a half microbial fuel cell was 8 A/m{sup 2} (0.8 mA/cm{sup 2})

  11. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 3. Comparative genomics of Synechococcus strains with different light responses and in situ diel transcription patterns of associated ecotypes in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millie T. Olsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomes were obtained for three closely related strains of Synechococcus that are representative of putative ecotypes that predominate at different depths in the 1 mm-thick, upper-green layer in the 60°C mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and exhibit different light adaptation and acclimation responses. The genomes were compared to the published genome of a previously obtained, closely related strain from a neighboring spring, and differences in both gene content and orthologous gene alleles between high-light-adapted and low-light-adapted strains were identified. Evidence of genetic differences that relate to adaptation to light intensity and/or quality, CO2 uptake, nitrogen metabolism, organic carbon metabolism, and uptake of other nutrients were found between strains of the different putative ecotypes. In situ diel transcription patterns of genes, including genes unique to either low-light-adapted or high-light-adapted strains and different alleles of an orthologous photosystem gene, revealed that expression is fine-tuned to the different light environments experienced by ecotypes prevalent at various depths in the mat. This study suggests that strains of closely related putative ecotypes have different genomic adaptations that enable them to inhabit distinct ecological niches while living in close proximity within a microbial community.

  12. Implications of a 3.472-3.333 Gyr-old subaerial microbial mat from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa for the UV environmental conditions on the early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westall, Frances; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Southam, Gordon; Grassineau, Nathalie; Colas, Maggy; Cockell, Charles; Lammer, Helmut

    2006-10-29

    Modelling suggests that the UV radiation environment of the early Earth, with DNA weighted irradiances of about three orders of magnitude greater than those at present, was hostile to life forms at the surface, unless they lived in specific protected habitats. However, we present empirical evidence that challenges this commonly held view. We describe a well-developed microbial mat that formed on the surface of volcanic littoral sediments in an evaporitic environment in a 3.5-3.3Ga-old formation from the Barberton greenstone belt. Using a multiscale, multidisciplinary approach designed to strongly test the biogenicity of potential microbial structures, we show that the mat was constructed under flowing water by 0.25 microm filaments that produced copious quantities of extracellular polymeric substances, representing probably anoxygenic photosynthesizers. Associated with the mat is a small colony of rods-vibroids that probably represent sulphur-reducing bacteria. An embedded suite of evaporite minerals and desiccation cracks in the surface of the mat demonstrates that it was periodically exposed to the air in an evaporitic environment. We conclude that DNA-damaging UV radiation fluxes at the surface of the Earth at this period must either have been low (absorbed by CO2, H2O, a thin organic haze from photo-dissociated CH4, or SO2 from volcanic outgassing; scattered by volcanic, and periodically, meteorite dust, as well as by the upper layers of the microbial mat) and/or that the micro-organisms exhibited efficient gene repair/survival strategies.

  13. Benthic nutrient fluxes in the Eastern Gotland Basin (Baltic Sea) with particular focus on microbial mat ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, A.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Hall, P. O. J.; Pfannkuche, O.

    2016-06-01

    Benthic fluxes and water column distributions of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and total dissolved phosphate (PO43 -) were measured in situ at 7 sites across a redox gradient from oxic to anoxic bottom waters in the Eastern Gotland Basin (Baltic Sea). The study area was divided into the oxic zone (60 to ca. 80 m water depth, O2 > 30 μM), the hypoxic transition zone (HTZ, ca. 80 to 120 m, O2 ca. 120 m). Sediments in the HTZ were covered by mats of vacuolated sulfur bacteria. Ammonium (NH4+) fluxes in the deep basin and the HTZ were elevated at 0.6 mmol m- 2 d- 1 and 1 mmol m- 2 d- 1, respectively. Nitrate (NO3-) fluxes were directed into the sediment at all stations in the HTZ and were zero in the deep basin. PO43 - release was highest in the HTZ at 0.23 mmol m- 2 d- 1, with a further release of 0.2 mmol m- 2 d- 1 in the deep basin. Up-scaling the benthic fluxes to the Baltic Proper equals 109 kt yr- 1 of PO43 - and 266 kt yr- 1 of DIN. This is eight- and two-fold higher than the total external load of P (14 kt yr- 1) and DIN (140 kt yr- 1) in 2006 (HELCOM 2009b). The HTZ makes an important contribution to the internal nutrient loading in the Baltic Proper, releasing 70% of P (76 kt yr- 1) and 75% of DIN (200 kt yr- 1) despite covering only 51% of area.

  14. Draft genome sequence of Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T) isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats of a Himalayan hot water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Charu; Mahato, Nitish K; Rani, Pooja; Singh, Yogendra; Kamra, Komal; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    Lampropedia cohaerens strain CT6(T), a non-motile, aerobic and coccoid strain was isolated from arsenic rich microbial mats (temperature ~45 °C) of a hot water spring located atop the Himalayan ranges at Manikaran, India. The present study reports the first genome sequence of type strain CT6(T) of genus Lampropedia cohaerens. Sequencing data was generated using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and assembled with ABySS v 1.3.5. The 3,158,922 bp genome was assembled into 41 contigs with a mean GC content of 63.5 % and 2823 coding sequences. Strain CT6(T) was found to harbour genes involved in both the Entner-Duodoroff pathway and non-phosphorylated ED pathway. Strain CT6(T) also contained genes responsible for imparting resistance to arsenic, copper, cobalt, zinc, cadmium and magnesium, providing survival advantages at a thermal location. Additionally, the presence of genes associated with biofilm formation, pyrroloquinoline-quinone production, isoquinoline degradation and mineral phosphate solubilisation in the genome demonstrate the diverse genetic potential for survival at stressed niches.

  15. Isolate-specific effects of ultraviolet radiation on photosynthesis, growth and mycosporine-like amino acids in the microbial mat-forming cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Roleda, Michael Y; Schumann, Rhena; Karsten, Ulf

    2008-03-01

    Microcoleus chthonoplastes constitutes one of the dominant microorganisms in intertidal microbial mat communities. In the laboratory, the effects of repeated daily exposure to ultraviolet radiation (16:8 light:dark cycle) was investigated in unicyanobacterial cultures isolated from three different localities (Baltic Sea = WW6; North Sea = STO and Brittany = BRE). Photosynthesis and growth were measured in time series (12-15 days) while UV-absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and cellular integrity were determined after 12 and 3 days exposure to three radiation treatments [PAR (22 mumol photon m(-2) s(-1)) = P; PAR + UV-A (8 W m(-2)) = PA; PAR + UV-A + UV-B (0.4 W m(-2)) = PAB]. Isolate-specific responses to UVR were observed. The proximate response to radiation stress after 1-day treatment showed that isolate WW6 was the most sensitive to UVR. However, repeated exposure to radiation stress indicated that photosynthetic efficiency (F (v)/F (m)) of WW6 acclimated to UVR. Conversely, although photosynthesis in STO exhibited lower reduction in F (v)/F (m) during the first day, the values declined over time. The BRE isolate was the most tolerant to radiation stress with the lowest reduction in F (v)/F (m )sustained over time. While photosynthetic efficiencies of different isolates were able to acclimate to UVR, growth did not. The discrepancy seems to be due to the higher cell density used for photosynthesis compared to the growth measurement. Apparently, the cell density used for photosynthesis was not high enough to offer self-shading protection because cellular damage was also observed in those filaments under UVR. Most likely, the UVR acclimation of photosynthesis reflects predominantly the performance of the surviving cells within the filaments. Different strategies were observed in MAAs synthesis. Total MAAs content in WW6 was not significantly different between all the radiation treatments. In contrast, the additional fluence of UV-A and UV

  16. Tapetes microbianos del Salar de Llamará, norte de Chile Microbial mats from the Llamará salt flat, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA DEMERGASSO

    2003-09-01

    incluyendo cocos y bacilos no identificados. En todos los tapetes muestreados en el Salar se encontraron bacterias reductoras de sulfato.Stratified photosynthetic microbial mats are described from the Salar de Llamará, a salt flat basin located in the Atacama desert of northern Chile. Microscopic and spectrophotometric techniques were used. The thickness of the photic zone of these communities spans 8 to 30 mm. This is probably due to the grain size and mineralogical composition of associated sediments. Three different types of mats were recognized. A first one was characterized by a green pigmented layer; a second with orange and green coloured layers, and the third with orange and green layers and an additional purple layer. At one sampling site, no pigmented layers were present. Sediments underlying the mats were white, but in one site, black coloured sediments were observed; this dark colour is probably the result of iron sulphide precipitation. Predominant microorganisms in the orange pigmented layers were diatoms and unicellular cyanobacteria, mainly from the Cyanothece and Synechococcus groups. Filamentous cyanobacteria Microleus sp. and Oscillatoria sp. were the most abundant in the green layer. When interstitial brines reached salinities between 12 and 33 %, no diatoms were observed, and the coccoidal cyanobacteria from the Synechococcus, Cyanothece and Gloeocapsa groups and genus Gloeobacter predominated over filamentous Cyanobacteria in the green layer. The purple layer was built primarily of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria similar to cells of the genera Chromatium and Thiocapsa. Absorption spectra revealed that chlorophyll a is the most abundant pigment in most of analyzed samples. Integrated values of chlorophyll a and bacteriochlorophyll a reached values of up to 230 and 144 mg m-2 along all of the pigmented zone, respectively. Abundant non-photosynthetic microorganisms were found in the mats, including unidentified cocci and bacilli. Sulphate reducing

  17. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Rusch, Douglas B.;

    2015-01-01

    -defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same PE formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while...

  18. A Fiberoptic Irradiance Microsensor (Cosine Collector) - Application for In-Situ Measurements of Absorption-Coefficients in Sediments and Microbial Mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LASSEN, C.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    microsensor was used concurrently with fiber-optic microsensors for radiance and scalar irradiance in two cyanobacterial mats: a gelatinous laminated mat of Aphanothece sp. and Phormidium sp. and a compact marine intertidal mat of Microcoleus chthonoplastes. At the surface, the ratio of scalar irradiance...... at all wavelenghts and a maximum of 3.9 was reached in the gelatinous mat at both 675 and 760 nm. The results stress the importance of measuring the right light parameter when photobiological processes in sediments are investigated and the application of scalar irradiance and irradiance as quantitative...... measures of available light for photosynthesis parameter is discussed. From the distribution of scalar irradiance and irradiance, in situ absorption coefficients were calculated. Within the upper 3 mm of the gelatinous mat, the vertical attenuation coefficients of scalar irradiance, upward radiance...

  19. Usage of microbial mats in depostional environment interpretation and sea level changes: A study of carbonate deposits of members 1 to 2 of the Mila Group (Deh-Sufiyan Formation in Central Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Bayetgol

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate deposits of members 1 to 2 of the Mila Group (Middle Cambrian in Central Alborz that call Deh-Sufiyan Formation in this research, were studied in Shahmirzad, Tueh-Darvar, Mila-Kuh and Deh-Molla sections. These sediments were deposited in four facies belts on a carbonate ramp including basinal environments, outer ramp (deep subtidal sequences, mid ramp (shallow subtidal to lower intertidal sequences, and inner ramp (shoal and upper intertidal to supratidal sequences. Various microbialites were recognized in the shallow-water sediments (includes subtidal and intertidal of this unit. Based on this study, microbial mats have various morphology of form and type of growth structure and inluding laminar to wavy-laminar, domal or hemispheroidal, bulbous, columnar, regular flabellate columns, unlaminated, loaf- to mound-shaped thrombolities. Facies associations of Deh-Sufiyan Formation are arranged in small-scale of peritidal, shallow subtidal, and deep subtidal cycles and microbial mats are the major features of them. The trends of vertical changes of facies in shallowing-upward and deepening-upward cycles and distribution of various types of microbialites in these cycles had been related to depostional environments and their postions on carbonate ramp. Basal classification method used in this study can provide valuable informations for application of microbiali mats in paleo-environmental and sequence stratigraphy analysis.

  20. A Fiberoptic Irradiance Microsensor (Cosine Collector) - Application for In-Situ Measurements of Absorption-Coefficients in Sediments and Microbial Mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LASSEN, C.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    measures of available light for photosynthesis parameter is discussed. From the distribution of scalar irradiance and irradiance, in situ absorption coefficients were calculated. Within the upper 3 mm of the gelatinous mat, the vertical attenuation coefficients of scalar irradiance, upward radiance...... to downward irradiance depended on spectral absorption characteristics of the sediment and ranged from 1.2 at 430 nm in the Microcoleus mat to 2.0 at 760 nm in the Aphanothece-Phormidium mat. As the light field became more isotropic with depth, the ratio of scalar irradiance to downward irradiance increased...

  1. Disruption of photoautotrophic intertidal mats by filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc Jaap; Falkoski, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ring-like structures, 2.0-4.8cm in diameter, observed in photosynthetic microbial mats on the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog (the Netherlands) showed to be the result of the fungus Emericellopsis sp. degrading the photoautotrophic top layer of the mat. The mats were predominantly comp...

  2. Disruption of photoautotrophic intertidal mats by filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira, C.; Staal, M.; Falkoski, D; de Vries, R.P.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Ring-like structures, 2.0-4.8 cm in diameter, observed in photosynthetic microbial mats on the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog (the Netherlands) showed to be the result of the fungus Emericellopsis sp. degrading the photoautotrophic top layer of the mat. The mats were predominantly composed of cya

  3. Disruption of photoautotrophic intertidal mats by filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc; Falkoski, Daniel; De Vries, Ronald P.; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-01-01

    Ring-like structures, 2.0-4.8cm in diameter, observed in photosynthetic microbial mats on the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog (the Netherlands) showed to be the result of the fungus Emericellopsis sp. degrading the photoautotrophic top layer of the mat. The mats were predominantly composed of cyan

  4. Disruption of photoautotrophic intertidal mats by filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira, C; Staal, M.; Falkoski, D.; de Vries, R.P.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Ring-like structures, 2.0–4.8?cm in diameter, observed in photosynthetic microbial mats on the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog (the Netherlands) showed to be the result of the fungus Emericellopsis sp. degrading the photoautotrophic top layer of the mat. The mats were predominantly composed of cya

  5. A Direct-Push Sample-Freezing Drive Shoe for Collecting Sediment Cores with Intact Pore Fluid, Microbial, and Sediment Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B. A.; Trost, J.; Christy, T. M.; Mason, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic and biological reactions in shallow groundwater and bottom sediments are central to understanding groundwater contaminant attenuation and biogeochemical cycles. The laminar flow regime in unconsolidated surficial aquifers creates narrow reaction zones. Studying these reaction zones requires fine-scale sampling of water together with adjacent sediment in a manner that preserves in situ redox conditions. Collecting representative samples of these narrow zones with traditional subsurface sampling equipment is challenging. For example, use of a basket type core catcher for saturated, non-cohesive sediments results in loss of fluid and sediments during retrieval. A sample-freezing drive shoe designed for a wire line piston core sampler allowed collection of cores with intact sediment, microbial, and pore fluid distributions and has been the basis for studies documenting centimeter-scale variations in aquifer microbial populations (Murphy and Herkelrath, 1996). However, this freezing drive shoe design is not compatible with modern-day direct push sampling rigs. A re-designed sample-freezing drive shoe compatible with a direct-push dual-tube coring system was developed and field-tested. The freezing drive shoe retained sediment and fluid distributions in saturated sediment core samples by freezing a 10 centimeter plug below the core sample with liquid CO­2. Core samples collected across the smear zone at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, were successfully extracted without loss of fluid or sediment. Multiple core sections from different depths in the aquifer were retrieved from a single hole. This new design makes a highly effective sampling technology available on modern-day direct push sampling equipment to inform myriad questions about subsurface biogeochemistry processes. The re-design of the freezing drive shoe was supported by the USGS Innovation Center for Earth Sciences. References: Murphy, Fred, and W. N. Herkelrath. "A sample

  6. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk eBeyenal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA. We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl (cathodic mat system and +300 mVAg/AgCl (anodic mat system and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both anodic and cathodic mat systems. Interestingly, the cathodic mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the anodic mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the cathodic mats than in the anodic mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the cathodic mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that

  7. Diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in cyanobacterial mats

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the microbial community and the diversity of the functional gene for dinitrogenase reductase and its transcripts were investigated by analyzing >1400 16S rRNA gene and nifH sequences from two microbial mats situated in the intertidal zone of the Dutch barrier island Schiermonnikoog. Although both microbial mat communities were dominated by Cyanobacteria, they differed with respect to the composition of the total bacterial community. Proteobacteria-related sequences were retri...

  8. Autotrophy of green non-sulphur bacteria in hot spring microbial mats: biological explanations for isotopically heavy organic carbon in the geological record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, M T; Schouten, S; de Leeuw, J W; Ward, D M

    2000-08-01

    Inferences about the evidence of life recorded in organic compounds within the Earth's ancient rocks have depended on 13C contents low enough to be characteristic of biological debris produced by the well-known CO2 fixation pathway, the Calvin cycle. 'Atypically' high values have been attributed to isotopic alteration of sedimentary organic carbon by thermal metamorphism. We examined the possibility that organic carbon characterized by a relatively high 13C content could have arisen biologically from recently discovered autotrophic pathways. We focused on the green non-sulphur bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus that uses the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway for inorganic carbon fixation and is geologically significant as it forms modern mat communities analogous to stromatolites. Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus spp. alone had relatively high 13C contents (-14.9%) and lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus that were also isotopically heavy (-8.9% to -18.5%). Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus in conjunction with cyanobacteria had a more typical Calvin cycle signature (-23.5%). However, lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus were isotopically enriched (-15.1% to -24.1%) relative to lipids typical of cyanobacteria (-33.9% to -36.3%). This suggests that, in mats formed by both cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus, autotrophy must have a greater effect on Chloroflexus carbon metabolism than the photoheterotrophic consumption of cyanobacterial photosynthate. Chloroflexus cell components were also selectively preserved. Hence, Chloroflexus autotrophy and selective preservation of its products constitute one purely biological mechanism by which isotopically heavy organic carbon could have been introduced into important Precambrian geological features.

  9. The effects of UV radiation A and B on diurnal variation in photosynthesis in three taxonomically and ecologically diverse microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.; Rothschild, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    Photosynthetic primary production, the basis of most global food chains, is inhibited by UV radiation. Evaluating UV inhibition is therefore important for assessing the role of natural levels of UV radiation in regulating ecosystem behavior as well as the potential impact of stratospheric ozone depletion on global ecosystems. As both photosynthesis and UV fluxes are subject to diurnal variations, we examined the diurnal variability of the effect of UV radiation on photosynthesis in three diverse algal mats. In one of the mats (Cyanidium caldarium) a small mean decrease in primary productivity over the whole day occurred when both UVA and UVB were screened out. In two of the mats (Lyngbya aestuarii and Zygogonium sp.) we found a mean increase in the total primary productivity over the day when UVB alone was screened and a further increase when UVA and UVB were both screened out. Variations in the effects of UV radiation were found at different times of the day. This diurnal variability may be because even under the same solar radiation flux, there are different factors that may control photosynthetic rate, including nutritional status and other physiological processes in the cell. The results show the importance of assessing the complete diurnal productivity. For some of the time points the increase in the mean was still within the standard deviations in primary productivity, illustrating the difficulty in dissecting UV effects from other natural variations.

  10. Contributions of ectomycorrhizal fungal mats to forest soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Phillips

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Distinct aggregations of fungal hyphae and rhizomorphs, or "mats" formed by some genera of ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungi are common features of soils in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. We measured in situ respiration rates of Piloderma mats and neighboring non-mat soils in an old-growth Douglas-fir forest in Western Oregon to investigate whether there was an incremental increase in respiration from mat soils, and to estimate mat contributions to total soil respiration. We found that areas where Piloderma mats colonized the organic horizon often had higher soil surface flux than non-mats, with the incremental increase in respiration averaging 16 % across two growing seasons. Both soil physical factors and biochemistry were related to the higher surface flux of mat soils. When air-filled pore space was low (high soil moisture, soil CO2 production was concentrated into near-surface soil horizons where mats tend to colonize, resulting in greater apparent differences in respiration between mat and non-mat soils. Respiration rates were also correlated with the activity of chitin-degrading soil enzymes. This suggests that the elevated activity of fungal mats may be related to consumption or turnover of chitinous fungal cell-wall materials. We found Piloderma mats present across 57 % of the soil surface in the study area, and use this value to estimate a respiratory contribution from mats at the stand-scale of about 9 % of total soil respiration. The activity of EcM mats, which includes both EcM fungi and microbial associates, was estimated to constitute a substantial portion of total soil respiration in this old-growth Douglas-fir forest.

  11. EPR study of thermally treated Archean microbial mats analogues and comparison with Archean cherts: towards a possible marker of oxygenic photosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbin, M.; Derenne, S.; Westall, F.; Gourier, D.; Gautret, P.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Robert, F.

    2012-04-01

    The datation of photosynthesis apparition remains an open question nowadays: did oxygenic photosynthesis appear just before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) of the atmosphere, 2.3 to 2.4 Gyr ago, or does it originate much earlier? It is therefore of uttermost interest to find markers of oxygenic photosynthesis, applicable to samples of archean age. In order to handle this problem, Microcoleus Chtonoplastes cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus-like non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, were studied using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, a high sensitivity technique for the study of organic radicals in mature geological samples (coals, cherts, meteorites...). M. chtonoplastes and Chloroflexus-like bacteria were sampled in mats from the hypersaline lake "La Salada de Chiprana" (Spain), an analogue to an Archean environment, and were submitted to accelerated ageing through cumulative thermal treatments. For thermal treatment temperatures higher than 620° C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (M. chtonoplastes) occurred, as compared with the anoxygenic photosynthetic one (Chloroflexus-like). The EPR study of a thermally treated mixture of the two bacteria evidences that this linewidth increase is driven by catalytic reaction at high temperatures on an element selectively fixed by M. chtonoplastes. Based on comparative EDS analyses, Mg is a potential candidate for this catalytic activity but its precise role and the nature of the reaction are still to be determined. The EPR study of organic radicals in chert rocks of ages ranging from 0.42 to 3.5 Gyr, from various localities and that underwent various metamorphisms, revealed a dispersion of the signal width for the most mature samples. This comparative approach between modern bacterial samples and Precambrian cherts leads to propose the EPR linewidth of mature organic matter in cherts as a potential marker of oxygenic photosynthesis. If confirmed, this marker

  12. An Unusual Inverted Saline Microbial Mat Community in an Interdune Sabkha in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter, United Arab Emirates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P McKay

    Full Text Available Salt flats (sabkha are a recognized habitat for microbial life in desert environments and as analogs of habitats for possible life on Mars. Here we report on the physical setting and microbiology of interdune sabkhas among the large dunes in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter in Liwa Oasis, United Arab Emirates. The salt flats, composed of gypsum and halite, are moistened by relatively fresh ground water. The result is a salinity gradient that is inverted compared to most salt flat communities with the hypersaline layer at the top and freshwater layers below. We describe and characterize a rich photosynthetically-based microbial ecosystem that is protected from the arid outside environment by a translucent salt crust. Gases collected from sediments under shallow ponds in the sabkha contain methane in concentrations as high as 3400 ppm. The salt crust could preserve biomarkers and other evidence for life in the salt after it dries out. Chloride-filled depressions have been identified on Mars and although surface flow of water is unlikely on Mars today, ground water is possible. Such a near surface system with modern groundwater flowing under ancient salt deposits could be present on Mars and could be accessed by surface rovers.

  13. An Unusual Inverted Saline Microbial Mat Community in an Interdune Sabkha in the Rub' Alkhali (the Empty Quarter), UAE: an Analog for Habitats on Present Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Rask, Jon C.; Detweiler, Angela M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Everroad, R. Craig; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Mayer, Marisa H.; Caraballo, Adrian A. L.; Kapili, Bennett

    2016-01-01

    Salt flats (sabkha) are a recognized habitat for microbial life in desert environments and as analogs for habitats for life on Mars. Here we report on the physical setting and microbiology of interdune sabkhas among the large dunes in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter) in Liwa Oasis, United Arab Emirates. The salt flats, composed of gypsum and halite, between the dunes are moistened by relatively fresh ground water from below. The result is a salinity gradient that is inverted compared to most salt flat communities with the hypersaline layer at the top and freshwater layers below. We describe and characterize a rich photosynthetically-based microbial ecosystem that is protected from the arid outside environment below the translucent salt crust. Gases collected from sediments under shallow ponds in the sabkha contain methane in concentrations as high as 3400 ppm. The salt layer provides environmental protection to the habitat below and could preserve biomarkers and other evidence for life in the salt after it dries out. Chloride-filled depressions have been identified on Mars and although the surface flow of water is unlikely on Mars today, ground water is possible. Such a near surface system with modern groundwater flowing under ancient salt deposits could be present on Mars and could be accessed by surface rovers.

  14. An Unusual Inverted Saline Microbial Mat Community in an Interdune Sabkha in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter), United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Rask, Jon C.; Detweiler, Angela M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Everroad, R. Craig; Lee, Jackson Z.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Mayer, Marisa H.; Caraballo, Adrian A. L.; Kapili, Bennett; Al-Awar, Meshgan; Al-Farraj, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Salt flats (sabkha) are a recognized habitat for microbial life in desert environments and as analogs of habitats for possible life on Mars. Here we report on the physical setting and microbiology of interdune sabkhas among the large dunes in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter) in Liwa Oasis, United Arab Emirates. The salt flats, composed of gypsum and halite, are moistened by relatively fresh ground water. The result is a salinity gradient that is inverted compared to most salt flat communities with the hypersaline layer at the top and freshwater layers below. We describe and characterize a rich photosynthetically-based microbial ecosystem that is protected from the arid outside environment by a translucent salt crust. Gases collected from sediments under shallow ponds in the sabkha contain methane in concentrations as high as 3400 ppm. The salt crust could preserve biomarkers and other evidence for life in the salt after it dries out. Chloride-filled depressions have been identified on Mars and although surface flow of water is unlikely on Mars today, ground water is possible. Such a near surface system with modern groundwater flowing under ancient salt deposits could be present on Mars and could be accessed by surface rovers. PMID:26982497

  15. An Unusual Inverted Saline Microbial Mat Community in an Interdune Sabkha in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter), United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P; Rask, Jon C; Detweiler, Angela M; Bebout, Brad M; Everroad, R Craig; Lee, Jackson Z; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Mayer, Marisa H; Caraballo, Adrian A L; Kapili, Bennett; Al-Awar, Meshgan; Al-Farraj, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Salt flats (sabkha) are a recognized habitat for microbial life in desert environments and as analogs of habitats for possible life on Mars. Here we report on the physical setting and microbiology of interdune sabkhas among the large dunes in the Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter) in Liwa Oasis, United Arab Emirates. The salt flats, composed of gypsum and halite, are moistened by relatively fresh ground water. The result is a salinity gradient that is inverted compared to most salt flat communities with the hypersaline layer at the top and freshwater layers below. We describe and characterize a rich photosynthetically-based microbial ecosystem that is protected from the arid outside environment by a translucent salt crust. Gases collected from sediments under shallow ponds in the sabkha contain methane in concentrations as high as 3400 ppm. The salt crust could preserve biomarkers and other evidence for life in the salt after it dries out. Chloride-filled depressions have been identified on Mars and although surface flow of water is unlikely on Mars today, ground water is possible. Such a near surface system with modern groundwater flowing under ancient salt deposits could be present on Mars and could be accessed by surface rovers.

  16. Diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in cyanobacterial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Acinas, S.G.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the microbial community and the diversity of the functional gene for dinitrogenase reductase and its transcripts were investigated by analyzing >1400 16S rRNA gene and nifH sequences from two microbial mats situated in the intertidal zone of the Dutch barrier island Schiermonnikoog.

  17. MAT FOR LEPTOSPIROSIS DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Rahardianingtyas.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a disease caused by bacterial infection leptospira interrogans.Leptospira bacteria is a spiral bacterium with solid strands with two flagella periplasmik.Septicaemic phase patient samples taken from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, whereassamples taken at phase immune extracted from urine. The diagnosis of leptospirosis occurdirectly or indirectly. Diagnosis is done by directly isolate and identify the causative agents ofthe agent. Diagnosis is done indirectly by detecting specific antibodies from the patient's body.Gold Standard of the diagnosis of leptospirosis is MAT. Mat made by reacting antibodies toleptospira antigen. Positive results seen with clump formed.Key words: Leptospirosis, Leptospirosis Diagnostic, MAT (Microscopic Agglutination Test Leptospirosis merupakan penyakit yang disebabkan karena infeksi bakteri leptospirainterrogans. Bakteri leptospira merupakan bakteri spiral dengan untaian yang padat dengan duaflagella periplasmik. Sampel pasien pada fase septicaemic diambil dari darah dan cairanserebrospinal, sedangkan sampel yang diambil pada fase immune diambil dari urine. Diagnosisleptospirosis dilakukan secara langsung maupun tidak langsung. Diagnosis secara langsungdilakukan dengan cara mengisolasi agen penyebab dan mengidentifikasi agen tersebut. Diagnosissecara tidak langsung dilakukan dengan cara mendeteksi antibodi spesiflk dari dalam tubuhpasien. Gold Standart dari diagnosis leptospirosis adalah MAT. Mat dilakukan dengan caramereaksikan antibodi dengan antigen leptospira. Hasil positif dilihat dengan terbentuk gumpalanagglutinasiKata kunci: Leptospirosis, Leptospira, Leptospirosis Diagnosis.

  18. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  19. Juhtlaused / Mats Nõges

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nõges, Mats, 1879-1973

    2011-01-01

    19. sajandi ja 20. sajandi alguse demograafilisi seisukohti väljendavad teesid Tartu ülikooli arstiteaduskonnale arstiteaduse doktori astme omandamiseks esitatud väitekirjast: Mats Nõges. Rahwamuutused Wiljandi Maakonnas 1801.- 1923. a. = Bevölkerungsbewegung im Kreise Fellin in Jahren 1801-1923. Demograafiline töö. Tartu, 1925

  20. Disruption of photoautotrophic intertidal mats by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc; Falkoski, Daniel; de Vries, Ronald P; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-08-01

    Ring-like structures, 2.0-4.8 cm in diameter, observed in photosynthetic microbial mats on the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog (the Netherlands) showed to be the result of the fungus Emericellopsis sp. degrading the photoautotrophic top layer of the mat. The mats were predominantly composed of cyanobacteria and diatoms, with large densities of bacteria and viruses both in the top photosynthetic layer and in the underlying sediment. The fungal attack cleared the photosynthetic layer; however, no significant effect of the fungal lysis on the bacterial and viral abundances could be detected. Fungal-mediated degradation of the major photoautotrophs could be reproduced by inoculation of non-infected mat with isolated Emericellopsis sp., and with an infected ring sector. Diatoms were the first re-colonizers followed closely by cyanobacteria that after about 5 days dominated the space. The study demonstrated that the fungus Emericellopsis sp. efficiently degraded a photoautotrophic microbial mat, with potential implications for mat community composition, spatial structure and productivity.

  1. Dynamics of archaea at fine spatial scales in Shark Bay mat microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hon Lun; Visscher, Pieter T.; White, Richard Allen, III; Smith, Daniela-Lee; Patterson, Molly M.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2017-04-01

    The role of archaea in microbial mats is poorly understood. Delineating the spatial distribution of archaea with mat depth will enable resolution of putative niches in these systems. In the present study, high throughput amplicon sequencing was undertaken in conjunction with analysis of key biogeochemical properties of two mats (smooth and pustular) from Shark Bay, Australia. One-way analysis of similarity tests indicated the archaeal community structures of smooth and pustular mats were significantly different (global R = 1, p = 0.1%). Smooth mats possessed higher archaeal diversity, dominated by Parvarchaeota. The methanogenic community in smooth mats was dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, as well as methylotrophic Methanosarcinales, Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales and Methanomassiliicoccaceae. Pustular mats were enriched with Halobacteria and Parvarchaeota. Key metabolisms (bacterial and archaeal) were measured, and the rates of oxygen production/consumption and sulfate reduction were up to four times higher in smooth than in pustular mats. Methane production peaked in the oxic layers and was up to seven-fold higher in smooth than pustular mats. The finding of an abundance of anaerobic methanogens enriched at the surface where oxygen levels were highest, coupled with peak methane production in the oxic zone, suggests putative surface anoxic niches in these microbial mats.

  2. Antifouling Electrospun Nanofiber Mats Functionalized with Polymer Zwitterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Dobosz, Kerianne M; Rieger, Katrina A; Chang, Chia-Chih; Emrick, Todd; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-10-06

    In this study, we exploit the excellent fouling resistance of polymer zwitterions and present electrospun nanofiber mats surface functionalized with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC). This zwitterionic polymer coating maximizes the accessibility of the zwitterion to effectively limit biofouling on nanofiber membranes. Two facile, scalable methods yielded a coating on cellulose nanofibers: (i) a two-step sequential deposition featuring dopamine polymerization followed by the physioadsorption of polyMPC, and (ii) a one-step codeposition of polydopamine (PDA) with polyMPC. While the sequential and codeposited nanofiber mat assemblies have an equivalent average fiber diameter, hydrophilic contact angle, surface chemistry, and stability, the topography of nanofibers prepared by codeposition were smoother. Protein and microbial antifouling performance of the zwitterion modified nanofiber mats along with two controls, cellulose (unmodified) and PDA coated nanofiber mats were evaluated by dynamic protein fouling and prolonged bacterial exposure. Following 21 days of exposure to bovine serum albumin, the sequential nanofiber mats significantly resisted protein fouling, as indicated by their 95% flux recovery ratio in a water flux experiment, a 300% improvement over the cellulose nanofiber mats. When challenged with two model microbes Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus for 24 h, both zwitterion modifications demonstrated superior fouling resistance by statistically reducing microbial attachment over the two controls. This study demonstrates that, by decorating the surfaces of chemically and mechanically robust cellulose nanofiber mats with polyMPC, we can generate high performance, free-standing nanofiber mats that hold potential in applications where antifouling materials are imperative, such as tissue engineering scaffolds and water purification technologies.

  3. On Matlis dualizing modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Enochs

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider rings admitting a Matlis dualizing module E. We argue that if R admits two such dualizing modules, then a module is reflexive with respect to one if and only if it is reflexive with respect to the other. Using this fact we argue that the number (whether finite or infinite of distinct dualizing modules equals the number of distinct invertible (R,R-bimodules. We show by example that this number can be greater than one.

  4. Metagenomic and metabolic profiling of nonlithifying and lithifying stromatolitic mats of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L M Khodadad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stromatolites are laminated carbonate build-ups formed by the metabolic activity of microbial mats and represent one of the oldest known ecosystems on Earth. In this study, we examined a living stromatolite located within the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas and profiled the metagenome and metabolic potential underlying these complex microbial communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The metagenomes of the two dominant stromatolitic mat types, a nonlithifying (Type 1 and lithifying (Type 3 microbial mat, were partially sequenced and compared. This deep-sequencing approach was complemented by profiling the substrate utilization patterns of the mats using metabolic microarrays. Taxonomic assessment of the protein-encoding genes confirmed previous SSU rRNA analyses that bacteria dominate the metagenome of both mat types. Eukaryotes comprised less than 13% of the metagenomes and were rich in sequences associated with nematodes and heterotrophic protists. Comparative genomic analyses of the functional genes revealed extensive similarities in most of the subsystems between the nonlithifying and lithifying mat types. The one exception was an increase in the relative abundance of certain genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in the lithifying Type 3 mats. Specifically, genes associated with the degradation of carbohydrates commonly found in exopolymeric substances, such as hexoses, deoxy- and acidic sugars were found. The genetic differences in carbohydrate metabolisms between the two mat types were confirmed using metabolic microarrays. Lithifying mats had a significant increase in diversity and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur substrates. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The two stromatolitic mat types retained similar microbial communities, functional diversity and many genetic components within their metagenomes. However, there were major differences detected in the activity and genetic pathways of organic carbon

  5. Metagenomic and metabolic profiling of nonlithifying and lithifying stromatolitic mats of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Christina L M; Foster, Jamie S

    2012-01-01

    Stromatolites are laminated carbonate build-ups formed by the metabolic activity of microbial mats and represent one of the oldest known ecosystems on Earth. In this study, we examined a living stromatolite located within the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas and profiled the metagenome and metabolic potential underlying these complex microbial communities. The metagenomes of the two dominant stromatolitic mat types, a nonlithifying (Type 1) and lithifying (Type 3) microbial mat, were partially sequenced and compared. This deep-sequencing approach was complemented by profiling the substrate utilization patterns of the mats using metabolic microarrays. Taxonomic assessment of the protein-encoding genes confirmed previous SSU rRNA analyses that bacteria dominate the metagenome of both mat types. Eukaryotes comprised less than 13% of the metagenomes and were rich in sequences associated with nematodes and heterotrophic protists. Comparative genomic analyses of the functional genes revealed extensive similarities in most of the subsystems between the nonlithifying and lithifying mat types. The one exception was an increase in the relative abundance of certain genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in the lithifying Type 3 mats. Specifically, genes associated with the degradation of carbohydrates commonly found in exopolymeric substances, such as hexoses, deoxy- and acidic sugars were found. The genetic differences in carbohydrate metabolisms between the two mat types were confirmed using metabolic microarrays. Lithifying mats had a significant increase in diversity and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur substrates. The two stromatolitic mat types retained similar microbial communities, functional diversity and many genetic components within their metagenomes. However, there were major differences detected in the activity and genetic pathways of organic carbon utilization. These differences provide a strong link between the metagenome and the

  6. Microbial diversity of cold-seep sediments in Sagami Bay, Japan, as determined by 16S rRNA gene and lipid analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiasong; Shizuka, Arakawa; Kato, Chiaki; Schouten, Stefan

    2006-09-01

    Microbial communities in Calyptogena sediment and microbial mats of Sagami Bay, Japan, were characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and lipid biomarker analysis. Characterization of 16S rRNA gene isolated from these samples suggested a predominance of bacterial phylotypes related to Gammaproteobacteria (57-64%) and Deltaproteobacteria (27-29%). The Epsilonproteobacteria commonly found in cold seeps and hydrothermal vents were only detected in the microbial mat sample. Significantly different archaeal phylotypes were found in Calyptogena sediment and microbial mats; the former contained only Crenarchaeota clones (100% of the total archaeal clones) and the latter exclusively Euryarchaeota clones, including the anaerobic oxidation of methane archaeal groups ANME-2a and ANME-2c. Many of these lineages are as yet uncultured and undescribed groups of bacteria and archaea. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis suggested the presence of sulphate-reducing and sulphur-oxidizing bacteria. Results of intact glyceryl dialkyl glyceryl tetraether lipid analysis indicated the presence of nonthermophilic marine planktonic archaea. These results suggest that the microbial community in the Sagami Bay seep site is distinct from previously characterized cold-seep environments.

  7. Role of cyanobacteria in the biodegradation of crude oil by a tropical cyanobacterial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillan, F; Gugger, M; Saliot, A; Couté, A; Oudot, J

    2006-03-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are ubiquitous in tropical petroleum-polluted environments. They form a high biodiversity microbial consortium that contains efficient hydrocarbons degraders. A cyanobacterial mat collected from a petroleum-contaminated environment located in Indonesia was studied for its biodegradation potential. In the field, the natural mat was shown to degrade efficiently the crude oil present in the environment. This natural mat demonstrated also a strong activity of degradation on model crude oil under laboratory conditions. In axenic cultures, the monospecific cyanobacterium Phormidium animale that constitute the bulk of the biomass did not exhibit any degradative capacity on hydrocarbons in the range of C13-C35 carbon atom number either in autotrophic or heterotrophic conditions. It was concluded that this cyanobacterial strain living on a heavily contaminated site had no direct effect on biodegradation of crude oil, the degradation activity being exclusively achieved by the other microorganisms present in the microbial consortium of the mat.

  8. Biorremediación de los efluentes de cultivo del camarón Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 utilizando tapetes microbianos en un sistema de recirculación Bioremediacion of effluents ones of the culture of Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 using microbial mats in a recirculating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lezama-Cervantes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrolló un sistema de recirculación (SR integrando el cultivo del camarón con tapetes microbianos buscando mitigar los impactos ambientales de los subproductos del cultivo del camarón y avanzar hacia la biorremediación del agua de cultivo. Los consorcios microbianos obtenidos de ambientes naturales (TaM estuvieron constituidos por bacterias (55,6%, cianófitas (18,4%, diatomeas (9%, nemátodos (5,6% y clorófitas (1,4%, entre los grupos taxonómicos principales. La remoción de nutrientes y sólidos se evaluó en un SR (2 ciclos/hora conteniendo (n = 3 60 y 120 ind m-2 de Litopenaeus vannamei. Los resultados demostraron que los TaM redujeron los niveles de nitrógeno amoniacal por encima del 71% diariamente; la demanda bioquímica de oxígeno (DBO5 se redujo más de 68% y los sólidos suspendidos (SST hasta en 62% al compararse con los sistemas control (p 0,05. El agua bio-remediada tiene un efecto positivo en el cultivo de Litopenaeus vannamei, y promueve el crecimiento y sobrevivencia en presencia de TaM en el SR.We developed a recirculating system integrating shrimp culture with microbial mats aiming to mitigate the environmental impacts of by-products from shrimp culture and to advance toward the bioremediation of the shrimp culture water. The microbial consortia collected from natural environments (TaM was constituted by bacteria (55.6%, Cyanophyte (18.4%, diatoms (9%, nematods (5.6% and Chlorophyte algae (1.4% among the major taxonomic groups. The removal of nutrients and solids by these mats was assessed in a recirculating system (2 cycles/hour (n = 3 containing 60 and 120 ind m-2 of Litopenaeus vannamei. Results showed that the microbial mat reduces daily up to 71% of ammonia nitrogen, decreases around 68% of the biochemical oxygen demand (DBO5 and up to 62% of suspended solids (SST when comparing to the control systems (p 0.05. The Bioremediated culture water had a positive effect on the culture of Litopenaeus vannamei, and

  9. Mats of psychrophilic thiotrophic bacteria associated with cold seeps of the Barents Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Grünke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the bacterial diversity associated with microbial mats of polar deep-sea cold seeps. The mats were associated with high upward fluxes of sulfide produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane, and grew at temperatures close to the freezing point of seawater. They ranged from small patches of 0.2–5 m in diameter (gray mats to extensive fields covering up to 850 m2 of seafloor (white mats and were formed by diverse sulfide-oxidizing bacteria differing in color and size. Overall, both the dominant mat-forming thiotrophs as well as the associated bacterial communities inhabiting the mats differed in composition for each mat type as determined by microscopy, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. While the smaller gray mats were associated with a highly diverse composition of sulfide oxidizers, the larger white mats were composed of only 1–2 types of gliding Beggiatoa filaments. Molecular analyses showed that most of the dominant mat-forming sulfide oxidizers were phylogenetically different from, but still closely related to, thiotrophs known from warmer ocean realms. The psychrophilic nature of the polar mat-forming thiotrophs was tested by visual observation of active mats at in situ temperature compared to their warming to >4 °C. The temperature range of mat habitats and the variation of sulfide and oxygen fluxes appear to be the main factors supporting the diversity of mat-forming thiotrophs in cold seeps at continental margins.

  10. Auspicious tatami mat arrangements

    CERN Document Server

    Erickson, Alejandro; Schurch, Mark; Woodcock, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    An \\emph{auspicious tatami mat arrangement} is a tiling of a rectilinear region with two types of tiles, $1 \\times 2$ tiles (dimers) and $1 \\times 1$ tiles (monomers). The tiles must cover the region and satisfy the constraint that no four corners of the tiles meet; such tilings are called \\emph{tatami tilings}. The main focus of this paper is when the rectilinear region is a rectangle. We provide a structural characterization of rectangular tatami tilings and use it to prove that the tiling is completely determined by the tiles that are on its border. We prove that the number of tatami tilings of an $n \\times n$ square with $n$ monomers is $n2^{n-1}$. We also show that, for fixed-height, the generating function for the number of tatami tilings of a rectangle is a rational function, and outline an algorithm that produces the generating function.

  11. MRI of intact plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, H. van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  12. MRI of intact plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  13. [Intact cervical pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habek, D; Bobic, M V; Dosen, L

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe a case of intact cervical pregnancy in a 24-year-old secundigravida. The patient was treated successfully with Methotrexate. Conservative treatment is the first choice in the therapy of uncomplicated cervical pregnancy. Conservative and operative therapeutic procedures are discussed.

  14. Microbial biosynthesis of wax esters during desiccation: an adaptation for colonization of the earliest terrestrial environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, D. B.; Brassell, S. C.; Pratt, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    Biosynthesis of wax esters (WE) by prokaryotes in natural systems, notably bacteria from hot springs and marine phytoplankton, is poorly documented, primarily because saponification is a routine step in the analysis of microbial mat lipids. Use of this preparative procedure, critical for characterization of the diagnostic distributions of carboxylic acids in phospholipids, precludes recovery of intact WE. Examination of non-saponified lipids in emergent and desiccated mats with comparable microbial communities from the Warner Lake region, Oregon, reveals increases in the relative abundance (18.6 to 59.9μg/g Corg) and average chain length (C38 to C46) of WE in the latter, combined with assimilation of phytol and tocopherol moieties. Prokaryotes can accumulate WE as storage lipids in vitro, notably at elevated temperature or under nitrogen limiting conditions, but we propose that biosynthesis of long-chain WE that have a low solubility and are resistant to degradation/oxidation may represent an evolutionary strategy to survive desiccation in evaporative environments. Moreover, aeolian transport of desiccated mat-rip-ups between lake flats allows for migration of microbial communities within and between lake flats and basins during arid conditions. Subsequent rehydration within an alkaline environment would naturally saponify WE, and thereby regenerate alcohol and acid moieties that could serve as membrane lipids for the next viable microbial generation. The evolutionary cradle of WE was likely abiotic generation under hydrothermal conditions, which is consistent with the antiquity of the ester linkage necessitated by its integral role in the membranes of Eubacteria (though not Archaea) and in bacteriochlorophyll. The subsequent capability of microbes to biosynthesize WE may have facilitated their survival when nutrients were limiting, and production of long-chain WE (>C40) may represent a further critical evolutionary threshold that enabled their persistence through

  15. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  16. NanoSIP: Developing Community Imaging for Phylogenetic and Functional Characterization Using Cyanobacterial Mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woebken, D., L.C. Burow, L. Prufert-Bebout, B.M. Bebout, T. M. Hoehler, J. Pett-Ridge, A.M. Spormann; Singer, S W; McMurdie, P J; Weber, P K

    2011-10-01

    This project was to develop and optimize the following technologies: stable isotope probing + NanoSIMS analysis (nanoSIP), FISH, functional gene analysis, H2 production measurements, culturing, and metatranscriptomics for specific use in microbial mat systems. The larger goal was to further develop these methodologies in a way that facilitates their linkage, high fidelity 3-D correlation to location specific environmental change integrating geochemical characterization, such that ability to see and characterize microbial community responses to normal daily fluctuations and further ecological manipulations, in different locations of the mat communities is optimized.

  17. Proliferation of MISS-related microbial mats following the end-Permian mass extinction in terrestrial ecosystems: Evidence from the Lower Triassic of the Yiyang area, Henan Province, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chenyi; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Retallack, Gregory J.; Huang, Yuangeng; Fang, Yuheng

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISSs) are commonly present in siliciclastic shallow marine settings following the end-Permian mass extinction, but have been rarely reported in the post-extinction terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present six types of well-preserved MISSs from the upper Sunjiagou Formation and lower Liujiagou Formation of Induan (Early Triassic) age in the Yiyang area, Henan Province, North China. These MISSs include: polygonal sand cracks, worm-like structures, wrinkle structures, sponge pore fabrics, gas domes, and leveled ripple marks. Microanalysis shows that these MISSs are characterized by thin clayey laminae and filamentous mica grains arranged parallel to bedding plane as well as oriented matrix supported quartz grains, which are indicative of biogenic origin. Facies analysis suggests that the MISS-hosting sediments were deposited in a fluvial sedimentary system during the Early Triassic, including lake delta, riverbeds/point bars, and flood plain paleoenvironments. Abundant MISSs from Yiyang indicate that microbes also proliferated in terrestrial ecosystems in the aftermath of the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) biocrisis, like they behaved in marine ecosystems. Microbial blooms, together with dramatic loss of metazoans, may reflect environmental stress and degradation of terrestrial ecosystems or arid climate immediately after the severe Permian-Triassic ecologic crisis.

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of Thermoresponsive Polystyrene Nanofibrous Mats for Cultured Cell Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hwan Hee; Uyama, Hiroshi; Park, Won Ho; Cho, Donghwan; Kwon, Oh Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    Rapid cell growth and rapid recovery of intact cultured cells are an invaluable technique to maintain the biological functions and viability of cells. To achieve this goal, thermoresponsive polystyrene (PS) nanofibrous mat was fabricated by electrospinning of PS solution, followed by the graft polymerization of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PIPAAm) on PS nanofibrous mats. Image analysis of the PS nanofiber revealed a unimodal distribution pattern with 400 nm average fiber diameter. Graft polymerization of PIPAAm on PS nanofibrous mats was confirmed by spectroscopic methods such as ATR-FTIR, ESCA, and AFM. Human fibroblasts were cultured on four different surfaces, PIPAAm-grafted and ungrafted PS dishes and PIPAAm-grafted and ungrafted PS nanofibrous mats, respectively. Cells on PIPAAm-grafted PS nanofibrous mats were well attached, spread, and proliferated significantly much more than those on other surfaces. Cultured cells were easily detached from the PIPAAm-grafted surfaces by decreasing culture temperature to 20°C, while negligible cells were detached from ungrafted surfaces. Moreover, cells on PIPAAm-grafted PS nanofibrous mats were detached more rapidly than those on PIPAAm-grafted PS dishes. These results suggest that thermoresponsive nanofibrous mats are attractive cell culture substrates which enable rapid cell growth and recovery from the culture surface for application to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24696851

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of Thermoresponsive Polystyrene Nanofibrous Mats for Cultured Cell Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan Hee Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid cell growth and rapid recovery of intact cultured cells are an invaluable technique to maintain the biological functions and viability of cells. To achieve this goal, thermoresponsive polystyrene (PS nanofibrous mat was fabricated by electrospinning of PS solution, followed by the graft polymerization of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PIPAAm on PS nanofibrous mats. Image analysis of the PS nanofiber revealed a unimodal distribution pattern with 400 nm average fiber diameter. Graft polymerization of PIPAAm on PS nanofibrous mats was confirmed by spectroscopic methods such as ATR-FTIR, ESCA, and AFM. Human fibroblasts were cultured on four different surfaces, PIPAAm-grafted and ungrafted PS dishes and PIPAAm-grafted and ungrafted PS nanofibrous mats, respectively. Cells on PIPAAm-grafted PS nanofibrous mats were well attached, spread, and proliferated significantly much more than those on other surfaces. Cultured cells were easily detached from the PIPAAm-grafted surfaces by decreasing culture temperature to 20°C, while negligible cells were detached from ungrafted surfaces. Moreover, cells on PIPAAm-grafted PS nanofibrous mats were detached more rapidly than those on PIPAAm-grafted PS dishes. These results suggest that thermoresponsive nanofibrous mats are attractive cell culture substrates which enable rapid cell growth and recovery from the culture surface for application to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  1. Sparse Coding for Alpha Matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jubin; Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Cholakkal, Hisham; Rajan, Deepu

    2016-04-21

    Existing color sampling based alpha matting methods use the compositing equation to estimate alpha at a pixel from pairs of foreground (F) and background (B) samples. The quality of the matte depends on the selected (F,B) pairs. In this paper, the matting problem is reinterpreted as a sparse coding of pixel features, wherein the sum of the codes gives the estimate of the alpha matte from a set of unpaired F and B samples. A non-parametric probabilistic segmentation provides a certainty measure on the pixel belonging to foreground or background, based on which a dictionary is formed for use in sparse coding. By removing the restriction to conform to (F,B) pairs, this method allows for better alpha estimation from multiple F and B samples. The same framework is extended to videos, where the requirement of temporal coherence is handled effectively. Here, the dictionary is formed by samples from multiple frames. A multi-frame graph model, as opposed to a single image as for image matting, is proposed that can be solved efficiently in closed form. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations on a benchmark dataset are provided to show that the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art in image and video matting.

  2. Changing Microspatial Patterns of Sulfate-Reducing Microorganisms (SRM during Cycling of Marine Stromatolite Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru I. Petrisor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microspatial arrangements of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM in surface microbial mats (~1.5 mm forming open marine stromatolites were investigated. Previous research revealed three different mat types associated with these stromatolites, each with a unique petrographic signature. Here we focused on comparing “non-lithifying” (Type-1 and “lithifying” (Type-2 mats. Our results revealed three major trends: (1 Molecular typing using the dsrA probe revealed a shift in the SRM community composition between Type-1 and Type-2 mats. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH coupled to confocal scanning-laser microscopy (CSLM-based image analyses, and 35SO42−-silver foil patterns showed that SRM were present in surfaces of both mat types, but in significantly (p < 0.05 higher abundances in Type-2 mats. Over 85% of SRM cells in the top 0.5 mm of Type-2 mats were contained in a dense 130 µm thick horizontal layer comprised of clusters of varying sizes; (2 Microspatial mapping revealed that locations of SRM and CaCO3 precipitation were significantly correlated (p < 0.05; (3 Extracts from Type-2 mats contained acylhomoserine-lactones (C4- ,C6- ,oxo-C6,C7- ,C8- ,C10- ,C12- , C14-AHLs involved in cell-cell communication. Similar AHLs were produced by SRM mat-isolates. These trends suggest that development of a microspatially-organized SRM community is closely-associated with the hallmark transition of stromatolite surface mats from a non-lithifying to a lithifying state.

  3. Mats made from fibronectin support oriented growth of axons in the damaged spinal cord of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Von R; Henseler, Manuel; Brown, Robert A; Priestley, John V

    2003-08-01

    A variety of biological as well as synthetic implants have been used to attempt to promote regeneration into the damaged spinal cord. We have implanted mats made from fibronectin (FN) into the damaged spinal cord to determine their effectiveness as a substrate for regeneration of axons. These mats contain oriented pores and can take up and release growth factors. Lesion cavities 1 mm in width and depth and 2 mm in length were created on one side of the spinal cord of adult rats. FN mats containing neurotrophins or saline were placed into the lesion. Mats were well integrated into surrounding tissue and showed robust well-oriented growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, GABAergic, cholinergic, glutamatergic, and noradrenergic axons into FN mats. Transganglionic tracing using cholera toxin B indicated large-diameter primary afferents had grown into FN implants. Schwann cells had also infiltrated FN mats. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of axons within implants sites, with most axons either ensheathed or myelinated by Schwann cells. Mats incubated in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 showed significantly more neurofilament-positive and glutamatergic fibers compared to saline- and nerve growth factor-incubated mats, while mats incubated with nerve growth factor showed more calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive axons. In contrast, neurotrophin treatment had no effect on PGP 9.5-positive axons. In addition, in some animals with neurotrophin-3-incubated mats, cholera toxin B-labelled fibers had grown from the mat into adjoining intact areas of spinal cord. The results indicate that FN mats provide a substrate that is permissive for robust oriented axonal growth in the damaged spinal cord, and that this growth is supported by Schwann cells.

  4. Sulfate Reduction and Thiosulfate Transformations in a Cyanobacterial Mat during a Diel Oxygen Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction and transformations of thiosulfate were studied with radiotracers in a Microcoleus chthono-plastes-dominated microbial mat growing in a hypersaline pond at the Red Sea. The study showed how a diel cycle of oxygen evolution affected respiration by sulfate......-reducing bacteria and the metabolism of thiosulfate through oxidative and reductive pathways. Sulfate reduction occurred in both oxic and anoxic layers of the mat and varied diurnally, apparently according to temperature rather than to oxygen. Time course experiments showed that the radiotracer method...... of the mat, there was a shift from predominant oxidation in the oxic zone to predominant reduction below. Concurrent disproportionation of thiosulfate to sulfate and sulfide occurred in all zones and was an important pathway of the sulfur cycle in the mat....

  5. Organismal and spatial partitioning of energy and macronutrient transformations within a hypersaline mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Moran, James J.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome; Hu, Dehong; Beyenal, Haluk; Nelson, William C.

    2017-03-21

    Phototrophic mat communities are model ecosystems for studying energy cycling and elemental transformations because complete biogeochemical cycles occur over millimeter-to-centimeter scales. Characterization of energy and nutrient capture within hypersaline phototrophic mats has focused on specific processes and organisms, however little is known about community-wide distribution of and linkages between these processes. To investigate energy and macronutrient capture and flow through a structured community, the spatial and organismal distribution of metabolic functions within a compact hypersaline mat community from Hot Lake have been broadly elucidated through species-resolved metagenomics and geochemical, microbial diversity, and metabolic gradient measurements. Draft reconstructed genomes of abundant organisms revealed three dominant cyanobacterial populations differentially distributed across the top layers of the mat suggesting niche separation along light and oxygen gradients. Many organisms contained diverse functional profiles, allowing for metabolic response to changing conditions within the mat. Organisms with partial nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms were widespread indicating dependence upon metabolite exchange. In addition, changes in community spatial structure were observed over the diel. These results indicate that organisms within the mat community have adapted to the temporally dynamic environmental gradients in this hypersaline mat through metabolic flexibility and fluid syntrophic interactions, including shifts in spatial arrangements.

  6. Permeability of Electrospun Superhydrophobic Nanofiber Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz U. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the fabrication and characterization of electrospun nanofiber mats made up of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene polymer. The polymer was electrospun in different weight concentrations. The mats were characterized by their basis weight, fiber diameter distribution, contact angles, contact angle hysteresis, and air permeability. All of the electrospun nonwoven fiber mats had water contact angles greater than 150 degrees making them superhydrophobic. The permeabilities of the mats were empirically fitted to the mat basis weight by a linear relation. The experimentally measured air permeabilities were significantly larger than the permeabilities predicted by the Kuwabara model for fibrous media.

  7. Validation of FRP Matting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    conducted at the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Plant 42 Facility in Palmdale, California, revealed that FFM matting was not strong enough to withstand traffic...MTX-60 jumping jack compactors. The final lift was compacted with a self-propelled vibratory steel wheeled roller. The timing data for installing...to operate in the smaller craters. It was suggested to add a small steel wheel roller rather than use the jumping jack compactor. A steel wheel

  8. Community ecology of hot spring cyanobacterial mats: predominant populations and their functional potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klatt, C. G.; Wood, J. M.; Rusch, D. B.

    2011-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mat communities from 60¿°C and 65¿°C regions in the effluent channels of Mushroom and Octopus Springs (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) were investigated by shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Analyses of assembled metagenomic sequences resolved six dominant chlorophototrophic...

  9. Biomassa microbiana e matéria orgânica leve em solos sob sistemas agrícolas orgânico e convencional na Chapada da Ibiapaba - CE Microbial biomass and light organic matter in soils under organic and conventional systems in the Chapada da Ibiapaba - CE, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alisson da Silva Xavier

    2006-04-01

    superficial. Os resultados indicaram que o manejo realizado nas áreas sob cultivo orgânico com acerola e pastagem contribuiu para a manutenção e recuperação dos conteúdos de C e N da biomassa microbiana (BMS e da matéria orgânica leve (MOL do solo. Os incrementos e, ou, reduções de C e N nos compartimentos BMS e MOL, comparativamente à área nativa de referência, foram proporcionalmente maiores que os valores obtidos, quando considerados somente os estoques de C orgânico e N totais, principalmente na área sob sistema de cultivo convencional. Isto indica serem tais compartimentos sensíveis às mudanças no estado da matéria orgânica de acordo com o manejo. Os sistemas de manejo orgânico e pastagem constituem estratégias de manejo importantes que devem ser consideradas para a conservação e, ou, aumento da matéria orgânica e, conseqüentemente, para a melhoria da qualidade do solo e implementação do seqüestro de C na região da Chapada da Ibiapaba, Ceará.Several studies reveal that the substitution of native vegetation by agricultural systems results in decreases in the C and N soil organic matter pools. Aiming to test the hypothesis that management practices favoring organic residue inputs promote increases in the most sensitive organic matter pools, the present study intended to study areas of an organic management system of acerola fruit production and a conventional cultivation area cropped with carrot and beet in crop rotation with corn. These areas belong to the Farm Amway Nutrilite do Brasil and Central Pivot Farmers Association, respectively, both in the Chapada da Ibiapaba, Ceará State, Brazil. A pasture area on the former was also selected. Areas under native forest, located near the cultivation areas, were sampled. Samples of a Quartzipsamment soil were collected from the depths 0-5 and 5-15 cm. The total soil organic C, microbial C and N (Cmic and Nmic, light organic matter C and N (Cmol and Nmol and the mineralizable C were determined

  10. Alterações na matéria orgânica e na biomassa microbiana em solo de mata natural submetido a diferentes manejos Changes in organic matter and in microbial biomass of a natural forest soil under different management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILTON MARCHIORI JÚNIOR

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se, em um Latossolo Roxo, o efeito de diferentes formas de manejo do solo sobre a matéria orgânica do solo e na biomassa microbiana. Os tratamentos usados foram: mata natural; mata natural até 1976 e café até 1994 (amostragem na projeção da copa e na entrelinha; mata natural até 1976, café até 1991 e milho até 1994; mata natural até 1940, café até 1960, citros até 1978, e cana-de-açúcar até 1994 (amostragem na linha e na entrelinha. A mata natural apresentou os maiores valores de C orgânico no solo e na fração humina e os menores valores foram obtidos nas áreas com cana-de-açúcar, que apresentaram os maiores valores de C microbiano em relação à mata natural. O uso agrícola do solo aumentou a porcentagem de C orgânico na forma de ácidos húmicos e fúlvicos, em relação à mata natural. Em geral, o solo apresentou mais de 74% do C orgânico na forma de húmus residual.The effect of soil management on forms of carbon and microbial biomass was studied in a Typic Euthortox soil. The treatments tested were: natural forest; natural forest till 1976 and coffee till 1994 (sampling on the shoot projection and between lines ; natural forest till 1976, coffee till 1991 and corn till 1994; natural forest till 1940, coffee till 1960, citrus till 1978 and sugar cane till 1994 (sampling on the planting line and between lines . The treatment with sugar cane presented the largest values of microbial carbon in relation to the natural forest. The agricultural management of soil increased the percentage of organic carbon in humic and fulvic acids forms. The soil presented more than 74% of organic carbon in the form of residual humus.

  11. Self-sedimented diatom mats as agents of exceptional fossil preservation in the Oligocene Florissant lake beds, Colorado, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ian C.; Chant, Loraine S.

    2000-03-01

    Microbial mats play a major role in the formation of exceptionally preserved fossil deposits by overgrowing and binding organic remains and sedimentary particles. This minimizes hydrodynamic and biological disruption of dead organisms and sedimentary laminae, but published works all implicate prokaryotic cyanobacteria as the microbial agent. However, exceptionally well preserved macrofossils of the Oligocene Florissant lake beds (Colorado, United States) are enveloped in matted aggregations of mucous-secreting, pennate diatom frustules. It is suggested that the macrobiota became entrapped in mucous-secreting mats of surface water blooms of planktonic diatoms in lake Florissant. As the mats and the incorporated macrobiota were sedimented out of the water column, the mucosic mats and their associated bacterial communities arrested decay and promoted preservation of refractory tissues. Thus, by a completely different mechanism, the diatom mats fulfilled the same preservational role previously suggested for cyanobacterial mats. This hitherto unrecognized mode of preservation may be an important causative factor in the formation of exceptionally preserved lacustrine fossil biotas.

  12. Fossilization and degradation of intact polar lipids in deep subsurface sediments: A theoretical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) are frequently used as markers for living microbial cells in sedimentary environments. The assumption with these studies is that IPLs are rapidly degraded upon cell lysis and therefore IPLs present in sediments are derived from in situ microbial production. We use

  13. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  14. Matérn's hard core models of types I and II with arbitrary compact grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Hörig, Mario

    Matérn's classical hard core models can be interpreted as models obtained from a stationary marked Poisson process by dependent thinning. The marks are balls of fixed radius, and a point is retained when its associated ball does not hit any other balls (type I) or when its random birth time is st...... of this model with the process of intact grains of the dead leaves model and the Stienen model leads to analogous results for the latter....

  15. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  16. Effects of mat characteristics on plantar pressure patterns and perceived mat properties during landing in gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Perez-Turpin, Jose Antonio; Cortell-Tormo, Juan Manuel; van den Tillaar, Roland

    2010-11-01

    Shock absorption and stability during landings is provided by both, gymnast ability and mat properties. The aims of this study were to determine the influence of different mat constructions on their energy absorption and stability capabilities, and to analyse how these properties affect gymnast's plantar pressures as well as subjective mat perception during landing. Six mats were tested using a standard mechanical drop test. In addition, plantar pressures and subjective perception during landing were obtained from 15 expert gymnasts. The different mats influenced plantar pressures and gymnasts' subjective perception during landing of gymnasts. Significant correlations between plantar pressures at the medial metatarsal and lateral metatarsal zones of the gymnasts' feet with the different shock absorption characteristics of the mats were found. However, subjective perception tests were not able to discriminate mat functionality between the six mats as no significant correlations between the mechanical mat properties with the subjective perception of these properties were found. This study demonstrated that plantar pressures are a useful tool for discriminating different landing mats. Using similar approaches, ideally including kinematics as well, could help us in our understanding about the influences of different mats upon gymnast-mat interaction.

  17. The calcium carbonate saturation state in cyanobacterial mats throughout Earth’s history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisi, Giovanni

    2008-12-01

    Through early lithification, cyanobacterial mats produced vast amounts of CaCO 3 on Precambrian carbonate platforms (before 540 Myr ago). The superposition of lithified cyanobacterial mats forms internally laminated, macroscopic structures known as stromatolites. Similar structures can be important constituents of Phanerozoic carbonate platforms (540 Myr to present). Early lithification in modern marine cyanobacterial mats is thought to be driven by a metabolically-induced increase of the CaCO 3 saturation state ( Ω) in the mat. However, it is uncertain which microbial processes produce the Ω increase and to which extent similar Ω shifts were possible in Precambrian oceans whose chemistry differed from that of the modern ocean. I developed a numerical model that calculates Ω in cyanobacterial mats and used it to tackle these questions. The model is first applied to simulate Ω in modern calcifying cyanobacterial mats forming at Highborne Cay (Bahamas); it shows that while cyanobacterial photosynthesis increases Ω considerably, sulphate reduction has a small and opposite effect on mat Ω because it is coupled to H 2S oxidation with O 2 which produces acidity. Numerical experiments show that the magnitude of the Ω increase is proportional to DIC in DIC-limited waters (DIC concentration of Ca 2+ in ambient waters. With oceanic Ca 2+ concentrations greater than a few millimolar, an appreciable increase in Ω occurs in mats under a wide range of environmental conditions, including those supposed to exist in the oceans of the past 2.8 Gyr. The likely lithological expression is the formation of the microsparitic stromatolite microtexture—indicative of CaCO 3 precipitation within the mats under the control of microbial activity—which is found in carbonate rocks spanning from the Precambrian to recent. The model highlights the potential for an increase in the magnitude of the Ω shift in cyanobacterial mats throughout Earth's history produced by a decrease in

  18. Mat-related sedimentary structures in Neoproterozoic peritidal passive margin deposits of the West African Craton (Anti-Atlas, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouougri, E.; Porada, H.

    2002-11-01

    Proterozoic inliers in the central Anti-Atlas mountains expose predominantly siliciclastic sedimentary successions deposited in peritidal zones along the Neoproterozoic continental margin of the West African Craton (WAC). The low-grade metamorphic and modestly deformed sediments contain a wealth of sedimentary structures related to the former presence and activities of microbial mats and respective physicobiological processes. The well-preserved structures include wrinkle structures, erosion marks, microbial sand chips, spindle-shaped and subcircular microbial shrinkage cracks, and possibly gas domes and cabbage-head structures. Thin sections exhibit mat fragments and dispersed grains of hematite/limonite after pyrite in fine-grained quartzitic storm deposits. Post-storm layers frequently consist of matrix-supported sand-sized to silt-sized grains and are overlain by argillaceous veneers including isolated silt-sized grains and black carbonaceous laminae. The muddy veneers are considered to represent compacted stacks of microbial mats (biolaminites), which colonized and biostabilized storm and post-storm layers, and thus prevented them from eroding. In the absence of grazing and burrowing organisms and at suitable depositional and hydrodynamic conditions, it may be expected that Proterozoic microbial mats extensively grew from the supratidal to the intertidal zones and occasionally, e.g. behind protective barriers, in the subtidal zone and beyond. Mat-related structures, however, need specific conditions for their formation and preservation: Wrinkle structures, erosion marks, and microbial sand chips require tractional currents and soon deposition and burial, respectively. Such conditions are preferably met in intertidal and supratidal zones. Spindle-shaped and subcircular cracks require mat shrinkage due to either desiccation or "syneresis". Crack propagation implies progressive shrinkage, while superposition of crack generations indicates repeated alternation

  19. Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in a marine microbial mat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, Lucas Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle in nature ia essentially driven by prokaryotic microorganisms. Nitrogen is one of the most important elements for the synthesis of cell material; it accounts for approximately I4%. of. dry weight. All eukaryotes and the majority of the prokaryotic organisms are dependent on a

  20. The MAT1-1:MAT1-2 ratio of Sporothrix globosa isolates in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Rui; Tsui, Clement K-M; Hamelin, Richard C; Anzawa, Kazushi; Mochizuki, Takashi; Nishimoto, Katsutaro; Hiruma, Masataro; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2015-02-01

    In order to understand the reproductive biology of pathogenic species in the Sporothrix schenckii complex, we characterized the partial mating type (MAT1-1) loci of Sporothrix schenckii, as well as the S. globosa MAT1-1-1 gene, which encoded 262 amino acid sequences. The data confirmed that the MAT1-1 locus of S. globosa was divergent from the MAT1-2 locus of the opposite mating type, suggesting that the fungus is heterothallic. To determine the mating type ratio of 20 isolates from Japanese patients, we analyzed the MAT loci by specific PCR amplification of MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes. The MAT1-1-1 was detected in 5 isolates but not in the other 15 isolates with the presence of MAT1-2-1. The MAT1-1:1-2 ratio of S. globosa isolates in Japan was estimated to be 1:3. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences of the MAT1-1-1 were identical among S. globosa isolates but different from S. schenckii and Ophiostoma montium.

  1. Microstructuring of electrospun mats employing femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Adomavičiūtė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun mats from nano/micro-fibers with control porosity and pore shape may be ideal candidate for tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study three type of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA mats of 48-65 µm thickness with different nano/micro-fibers diameters mostly of 100-200 nm were deposited by electrospinning process. Controlled density porosity in the electrospun mats was introduced by Yb:KGW femtosecond laser micromachining system. The influence of electrospun mat micro structure, the distance between the adjacent laser ablation points, the number of femtosecond laser pulses on quality and structure of laser irradiated holes were investigated. It was demonstrated that the quality of irradiated holes depend on structure of electrospun mats (diameter of nano/micro-fibers, thickness of mats and femtosecond laser processing parameters. Varying the distance between points and number of applied femtosecond laser pulses it is possible to fabricate electrospun mats with pores of 22-36 μm diameter.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.10249

  2. Composição bromatológica e digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca de silagens de milho e sorgo tratadas com inoculantes microbianos Chemical composition and "in vitro" dry matter digestibility of corn and sorghum silages with and without microbial inoculants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Vieira Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a composição bromatológica e a digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS de silagens de milho e sorgo, tratadas ou não com inoculantes microbianos, em diferentes períodos de fermentação. Utilizou-se um arranjo fatorial 6 x 2 x 3 (períodos de fermentação x silagens x inoculantes, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, para avaliação dos teores de matéria seca (MS e proteína bruta (PB, e um arranjo fatorial 4 x 2 x 3 para avaliação dos constituintes fibrosos e da DIVMS, ambos com três repetições. Observou-se os efeitos da interação período de fermentação ´ silagem ´ inoculante sobre os teores de MS e da interação inoculante ´ período, sobre os teores de PB das silagens. Constatou-se efeito da interação tríplice também sobre os teores de fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e fibra em detergente ácido (FDA. Estimaram-se teores mínimos de FDN nas silagens de milho tratadas com os inoculantes Silobac e Maize-All, respectivamente, de 52,14 e 50,75%, aos 37,34 e 46,1 dias após a ensilagem. Quanto à celulose, verificou-se, entre as silagens de milho, menores valores nas silagens tratadas, mas não foi detectado efeito de inoculante nas silagens de sorgo. Os teores médios de hemicelulose foram influenciados por silagem, período e inoculante, registrando-se na silagem de milho (29,8% valor maior que na de sorgo (28,4%. Houve efeito quadrático do período de fermentação sobre a DIVMS da silagem de milho tratada com os inoculantes Silobac e Maize-All, estimando-se valores máximos de 71,1 e 71,7%, aos 42,29 e 50,3 dias de ensilagem, respectivamente. As DIVMS das silagens de sorgo, no entanto, não foram influenciadas pelo período de fermentação.The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD of corn and sorghum silages with and without microbial inoculants after several fermentation periods were evaluated in laboratory silos. A 6 x 2 x 3 factorial treatment combination (6

  3. Benthic cyanobacterial mats in the high Arctic: multi-layer structure and fluorescence responses to osmotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eLionard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial mats are often a major biological component of extreme aquatic ecosystems, and in polar lakes and streams they may account for the dominant fraction of total ecosystem biomass and productivity. In this study we examined the vertical structure and physiology of Arctic microbial mats relative to the question of how these communities may respond to ongoing environmental change. The mats were sampled from Ward Hunt Lake at the northern coast of Arctic Canada, and were composed of three visibly distinct layers. Microsensor profiling showed that there were strong gradients in oxygen within each layer, with an overall decrease from 100 % saturation at the mat surface to 0 %, at the bottom, accompanied by an increase of 0.6 pH units down the profile. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed the presence of Oscillatorian sequences throughout the mat, while Nostoc related species dominated the two upper layers, and Nostocales and Synechococcales sequences were common in the bottom layer. HPLC analyses showed a parallel gradient in pigments, from high concentrations of scytonemin in the upper layer to increasing zeaxanthin and myxoxanthin in the bottom layer, and an overall shift from photoprotective to photosynthetic carotenoids down the profile. Climate change is likely to be accompanied by increased evaporation and osmotic stress of the littoral mat communities. To assess their capacity to adjust to rising osmolarities, mat sections were exposed to a gradient of increasing salinities, and PAM measurements of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence were made to assess changes in maximum quantum yield. The results showed that the mats were tolerant of up to a 46-fold increase in salinity. These features imply that cyanobacterial mats are resilient to ongoing climate change, and that in the absence of major biological perturbations, these vertically structured communities will continue to be a prominent feature of polar aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Liberação de CO2, biomassa microbiana e fósforo disponível em solo adicionado de matéria seca de poaia-branca CO2 liberation, microbial biomass and available phosphorus in soil supplemented with Brasil callality dry matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete S. Machado

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente experimento, inteiramente casualizado, foi desenvolvido em condições de laboratório no Departamento de Defesa Fitossanitária, FCA/UNESP - Botucatu, entre julho e setembro de 1992. Amostras de Areia Quartzosa equivalentes à 40 g de terra seca à 105 oC ± 2 com ou sem adição de 1,9 g de matéria seca de plantas de poaia-branca (Richardia brasiliensis, 0,19 g de nitrogênio (NH42SO4 e 0,88 g de apatita de Araxá, foram incubadas no escuro a 25 o C ± 2 , com umidade mantida a 60% da capacidade de retenção de água. Durante a incubação, determinou-se o CO2 liberado, utilizando-se o método de retenção em NAOH seguida de titulometria com HCl; a biomassa microbiana, método de fumigação-incubação; o pH e a quantidade de fósforo extraído por resina. A maior liberação de CO2 ocorreu durante os dez primeiros dias de incubação, com 77% do total de carbono liberado nos tratamentos com adição de poaia, e 37% nos tratamentos sem adição da mesma. A liberação de CO2 foi 57 vezes maior nos tratamentos com poaia em relação ao controle. A poaia também provocou aumentos na biomassa microbiana (média de 8 vezes a biomassa do tratamento controle, e a adição de nitrogênio e/ou fosfato de rocha junto à poaia antecipou os picos de formação de biomassa de 20 para 10 dias de incubação. Os níveis de fósforo disponível foram maiores no tratamento com adição de fosfato de rocha apenas. A poaia também alcalinizou o sistema, não permitindo desta forma, observar-se relação significativa entre pH e teor de fósforo disponível.The present experiment, totally randomized, was carried out under laboratory conditions at the Departamento de Defesa Fitossanitária, FCA/UNESP-Botucatu, between July and September, 1992. Fresh air-dry samples of quartz sand representing 40g of dry soil each, at 105 o C ± 2, with or without addition of 1.90g of dry matter of "poaia-branca" (Richardia brasiliensis plants, 0.19g of nitrogen (NH

  5. Functional-Structural Analysis of Nitrogen-Cycle Bacteria in a Hypersaline Mat from the Omani Desert

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abed, Raeid M M; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Potential rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and anammox were measured in a hypersaline microbial mat. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification had potential rates of 0.8 § 0.4 and 2.0 § 1.0 nmol N g¡1 h¡1, respectively, anammox was not detectable. The rate of N2O production under anoxic...... to sequences from the Rhizobiales group. Sequences of the nosZ gene were the most diverse and clustered with sequences from various genera. Our results demonstrate that the hypersaline mat from Oman harbors nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria with the potential to perform respective processes at detectable...

  6. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  7. Biomassa microbiana e matéria orgânica leve em solos sob sistemas agrícolas orgânico e convencional na Chapada da Ibiapaba - CE Microbial biomass and light organic matter in soils under organic and conventional systems in the Chapada da Ibiapaba - CE, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Alisson da Silva Xavier; Stoécio Malta Ferreira Maia; Teógenes Senna Oliveira; Eduardo de Sá Mendonça

    2006-01-01

    Em muitos casos, a substituição da vegetação nativa por sistemas agrícolas resulta em decréscimo nos conteúdos de C e N nos diferentes compartimentos da matéria orgânica do solo. Para testar se as práticas de manejo que priorizam o aporte de resíduos orgânicos promovem aumento dos compartimentos da matéria orgânica mais sensíveis ao manejo, este estudo se propôs estudar áreas de uma propriedade que utiliza um sistema de produção de acerola em larga escala, sob manejo orgânico, e uma área sob ...

  8. The origin and fate of intact polar lipids in the marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.

    2011-01-01

    A promising method for the identification, characterization and enumeration of microbial communities in the natural environment is the measurement of intact polar lipids (IPLs), the basic building blocks of biomembranes. These complex molecules are ubiquitous in nature and have several characterist

  9. Carbon and Oxygen Budgets of Hypersaline Cyanobacterial Mats: Effects of Tidal Cycle and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; Bebout, Brad M.; Carpenter, Steven; Discipulo, Mykell; Turk, Kendra

    2003-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines the rates of processes that shape Earth#s environment, define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred, and create biosignatures in sediments and atmospheres. In cyanobacterial mats, oxygenic photosynthesis provides energy, organic substrates and oxygen to the ecosystem. Incident light changes with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition, and counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide shape the chemical microenvironment. A combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods and to various depths in the mat. Microbiota produce hydrogen, small organic acids, and nitrogen and sulfur species. Such compounds fuel a flow of energy and electrons in these ecosystems and thus shape interactions between groups of microorganisms. Coordinated observations of population distribution, abundance, and activity for an entire community are making fundamental questions in ecology accessible. These questions address those factors that sustain the remarkable diversity of microorganisms that are now being revealed by molecular techniques. These questions also target the processes that shape the various kinds of biosignatures that we will seek, both in ancient rocks from Earth and Mars, and in atmospheres of distant planets beyond our Solar System.

  10. The effects of silver nanoparticles on intact wastewater biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiya eSheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs have strong antibacterial properties, which may adversely affect biological wastewater treatment processes. To determine the overall effect, intact biofilm samples were collected from the rotating biological contactor (RBC at the local wastewater treatment plant and treated with 200 mg Ag/L Ag-NPs for 24 h. The biofilm uptake of Ag-NPs was monitored with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Forty-five min after Ag-NP application, Ag-NPs were seen in the biofilm extracellular polymeric substances (EPS. After 24 h, Ag-NPs had entered certain microbial cells, while other cells contained no observable Ag-NPs. Some cells were dying after the uptake of Ag-NPs. However, there was no significant reduction in cultivable bacteria in the biofilms, based on heterotrophic plate counts (HPC. While this may indicate that wastewater biofilms are highly resistant to Ag-NPs, the HPC represents only a small portion of the total microbial population. To further investigate the effects of Ag-NPs, a GeoChip microarray was used to directly detect changes in the functional gene structure of the microbial community in the biofilm. A clear decrease (34.6% decrease in gene number in gene diversity was evident in the GeoChip analysis. However, the complete loss of any specific gene was rare. Some gene families present in both treated and untreated biofilms. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that there was no change in these families. Signal intensity decreased in certain variants in each family while other variants increased to compensate the effects of Ag-NPs. The results indicate that Ag-NP treatment decreased microbial community diversity but did not significantly affect the microbial community function. This provides direct evidence for the functional redundancy of microbial community in engineered ecosystems such as wastewater biofilms.

  11. HiRadMat: materials under scrutiny

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    CERN's new facility, HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials), which is designed to test materials for the world's future particle accelerators, should be operational and welcoming its first experiments by the end of the year.   The HiRadMat facility, located in the TNC tunnel. The materials used in the LHC and its experiments are exposed to very high-energy particles. The LHC machine experts obviously didn't wait for the first collisions in the world's most powerful accelerator to put the materials through their paces - the equipment was validated following a series of stringent tests. And these tests will get even tougher now, with the arrival of HiRadMat. The tunnel that formerly housed the West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF) has been completely revamped to make way for CERN's latest facility, HiRadMat. Supported by the Radioprotection service, a team from the Engineering (EN) Department handled the dismantling operations from October 2009 to December 2010. "We could only work on disman...

  12. When to Go to the Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol A.

    2017-01-01

    School leaders rightly tend toward collaboration and consensus-building when it comes to important decisions affecting students. But there are moments when, perhaps to their own surprise, they may find themselves willing to "go to the mat" on an important decision, whether consensus has been reached or not. Smith, a professor and chair…

  13. Electromagnetic shielding mats: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, N; Cech, R

    2007-01-01

    The use of electricity is accompanied by electric and magnetic fields which, intended or not, became a part of our environment. However, fear from environmental electromagnetic fields (EMFs) is widespread and so is business with fear. A number of more or less serious products including miracle products are placed on the market partly at excessive costs. By numerical simulation the efficiency of electromagnetic shielding mats was investigated and claims of manufacturers and their cited expert opinions checked. It could be shown that such products do not fulfil the justified expectations of customers, neither in the extremely low frequency (ELF) nor in the radiofrequency (RF) range. On the contrary, these mats usually make things even worse. The connection to ground, if available, might increase the belief on shielding efficiency, but in fact it even enhances fields instead of improving shielding. The electric conductivity of the mat material plays a minor role in the ELF range and enhances field increase in the RF range. It can not explain the enormous price differences. It could be shown that positive reports can be explained by result picking and exceptional arrangements of selected field sources. Overall, the investigation showed that manufacturer's claims about the shielding effectiveness are misleading and fool the customers about the real situation. Therefore, acquisition and use of electromagnetic shielding mats must be strongly discouraged.

  14. Thermodynamics and phase transformations the selected works of Mats Hillert

    CERN Document Server

    Lilensten, Jean

    2006-01-01

    This book is a compendium of Mat Hillert's publications. Mat Hillert is a world specialist in metal alloy at the origin of a universal computing code used to calculate the diagrams of phase. This work is in English.

  15. High-resolution (SIMS) versus bulk sulfur isotope patterns of pyrite in Proterozoic microbialites with diverse mat textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. L.; Fike, D. A.; Bergmann, K.; Knoll, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur (S) isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite preserved in marine rocks provide a rich suite of information about changes in biogeochemical cycling associated with the evolution of microbial metabolisms and oxygenation of Earth surface environments. Conventionally, these S isotope records are based on bulk rock measurements. Yet, in modern microbial mat environments, S isotope compositions of sulfide can vary by up to 40‰ over a spatial range of ~ 1 mm. Similar ranges of S isotope variability have been found in Archean pyrite grains using both Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and other micro-analytical techniques. These micron-scale patterns have been linked to changes in rates of microbial sulfate reduction and/or sulfide oxidation, isotopic distillation of the sulfate reservoir due to microbial sulfate reduction, and post-depositional alteration. Fine-scale mapping of S isotope compositions of pyrite can thus be used to differentiate primary environmental signals from post-depositional overprinting - improving our understanding of both. Here, we examine micron-scale S isotope patterns of pyrite in microbialites from the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic Sukhaya Tunguska Formation and Neoproterozoic Draken Formation in order to explore S isotope variability associated with different mat textures and pyrite grain morphologies. A primary goal is to link modern observations of how sulfide spatial isotope distributions reflect active microbial communities present at given depths in the mats to ancient processes driving fine-sale pyrite variability in microbialites. We find large (up to 60‰) S isotope variability within a spatial range of less than 2.5cm. The micron-scale S isotope measurements converge around the S isotope composition of pyrite extracted from bulk samples of the same microbialites. These micron-scale pyrite S isotope patterns have the potential to reveal important information about ancient biogeochemical cycling in Proterozoic mat environments

  16. Intact Transition Epitope Mapping (ITEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Danquah, Bright D.; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2017-08-01

    Intact transition epitope mapping (ITEM) enables rapid and accurate determination of protein antigen-derived epitopes by either epitope extraction or epitope excision. Upon formation of the antigen peptide-containing immune complex in solution, the entire mixture is electrosprayed to translate all constituents as protonated ions into the gas phase. There, ions from antibody-peptide complexes are separated from unbound peptide ions according to their masses, charges, and shapes either by ion mobility drift or by quadrupole ion filtering. Subsequently, immune complexes are dissociated by collision induced fragmentation and the ion signals of the "complex-released peptides," which in effect are the epitope peptides, are recorded in the time-of-flight analyzer of the mass spectrometer. Mixing of an antibody solution with a solution in which antigens or antigen-derived peptides are dissolved is, together with antigen proteolysis, the only required in-solution handling step. Simplicity of sample handling and speed of analysis together with very low sample consumption makes ITEM faster and easier to perform than other experimental epitope mapping methods.

  17. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  18. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  19. Beaded Fiber Mats of PVA Containing Unsaturated Heteropoly Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Cheng YANG; Yan PAN; Jian GONG; Chang Lu SHAO; Shang Bin WEN; Chen SHAO; Lun Yu QU

    2004-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fiber mats containing unsaturated heteropoly salt was prepared for the first time. IR, X-ray diffraction and SEM photographs characterized the beaded fiber mats.The viscoelasticity and the conductivity of the solution were the key factors that influence the formation of the beaded fiber mats.

  20. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  1. Mudd's disease (MAT I/III deficiency) : a survey of data for MAT1A homozygotes and compound heterozygotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Abdenur, Jose E.; Baronio, Federico; Bannick, Allison Anne; Corrales, Fernando; Couce, Maria; Donner, Markus G.; Ficicioglu, Can; Freehauf, Cynthia; Frithiof, Deborah; Gotway, Garrett; Hirabayashi, Koichi; Hofstede, FC; Hoganson, George; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; James, Philip; Kim, Sook; Korman, Stanley H.; Lachmann, Robin; Levy, Harvey; Lindner, Martin; Lykopoulou, Lilia; Mayatepek, Ertan; Muntau, Ania; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Raymond, Kimiyo; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine; Schulze, Andreas; Singh, Rani; Stabler, Sally; Stuy, Mary; Thomas, Janet; Wagner, Conrad; Wilson, William G.; Wortmann, Saskia; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Pao, Maryland; Blom, Henk J.; Hofstede, FC

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper summarizes the results of a group effort to bring together the worldwide available data on patients who are either homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutations in MAT1A. MAT1A encodes the subunit that forms two methionine adenosyltransferase isoenzymes, tetrameric MAT I

  2. Spatial distribution of diatom and cyanobacterial mats in the Dead Sea is determined by response to rapid salinity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Stefan; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacteria and diatom mats are ubiquitous in hypersaline environments but have never been observed in the Dead Sea, one of the most hypersaline lakes on Earth. Here we report the discovery of phototrophic microbial mats at underwater freshwater seeps in the Dead Sea. These mats are either dominated by diatoms or unicellular cyanobacteria and are spatially separated. Using in situ and ex situ O2 microsensor measurements we show that these organisms are photosynthetically active in their natural habitat. The diatoms, which are phylogenetically associated to the Navicula genus, grew in culture at salinities up to 40 % Dead Sea water (DSW) (14 % total dissolved salts, TDS). The unicellular cyanobacteria belong to the extremely halotolerant Euhalothece genus and grew at salinities up to 70 % DSW (24.5 % TDS). As suggested by a variable O2 penetration depth measured in situ, the organisms are exposed to drastic salinity fluctuations ranging from brackish to DSW salinity within minutes to hours. We could demonstrate that both phototrophs are able to withstand such extreme short-term fluctuations. Nevertheless, while the diatoms recover better from rapid fluctuations, the cyanobacteria cope better with long-term exposure to DSW. We conclude that the main reason for the development of these microbial mats is a local dilution of the hypersaline Dead Sea to levels allowing growth. Their spatial distribution in the seeping areas is a result of different recovery rates from short or long-term fluctuation in salinity.

  3. Two-step activation of meiosis by the mat1 locus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, M; Hoffmann, Ulla-Lisbeth; Styrkársdóttir, U

    1995-01-01

    The mat1 locus is a key regulator of both conjugation and meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Two alternative DNA segments of this locus, mat1-P and mat1-M, specify the haploid cell types (Plus and Minus). Each segment includes two genes: mat1-P includes mat1-Pc and mat1-Pm, w...

  4. Impregnation of thermoplastic resin in jute fiber mat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Impregnation rate of thermoplastic resin (polypropylene) in jute fiber mat and influence of relative factors on impregnation were studied,aiming to develop the continuous melt impregnation technique and to investigate the effect of impregnation rate and temperature on processing conditions and mechanical properties of natural fiber mat-reinforced thermoplastics.Influence of pressure on porosity of fiber mat and effect of melt viscosity on impregnation rate were also investigated.The modified capillary rheometer was used as apparatus and experimental data were analyzed based on the one-dimension Darcy's law.Results showed that at a given pressure,the impregnation rate is inversely proportional to melt viscosity and jute fiber mat has higher porosity than glass fiber mat.The architecture,compressibility,permeability and fiber diameter of jute fiber mat were compared with those of glass fiber mat and their effects on impregnation were discussed further.It could be seen that the average diameter of jute fiber is much bigger;the porosity of jute fiber mat is significantly higher and inner bundle impregnation does not exist in jute fiber mat.Therefore,it is not difficult to understand why the impregnation rate in jute fiber mat is 3.5 times higher and permeability is 14 times greater.Kozeny constants of jute and glass fiber mats calculated based on the capillary model are 2950 and 442,respectively.

  5. The Sirius Passet Lagerstätte: silica death masking opens the window on the earliest mat ground community of the Cambrian Explosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strang, Katie M; Armstrong, Howard; Harper, David A. T.; Trabucho-Alexandre, João

    2016-01-01

    The Sirius Passet Lagerstätte (SP), Peary Land, North Greenland, occurs in black slates deposited at or just below storm wave base. It represents the earliest Cambrian microbial mat community with exceptional preservation, predating the Burgess Shale by 10 million years. Trilobites from the SP are p

  6. Microbial Diversity Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Population in Present Day Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Maya C.

    2011-01-01

    Stromatolites are layered sedimentary structures resulting from microbial mat communities that remove carbon dioxide from their environment and biomineralize it as calcium carbonate. Although prevalent in the fossil record, stromatolites are rare in the modem world and are only found in a few locations including Highbome Cay in the Bahamas. The stromatolites found at this shallow marine site are analogs to ancient microbial mat ecosystems abundant in the Precambrian period on ancient Earth. To understand how stromatolites form and develop, it is important to identify what microorganisms are present in these mats, and how these microbes contribute to geological structure. These results will provide insight into the molecular and geochemical processes of microbial communities that prevailed on ancient Earth. Since stromatolites are formed by lithifying microbial mats that are able to mineralize calcium carbonate, understanding the biological mechanisms involved may lead to the development of carbon sequestration technologies that will be applicable in human spaceflight, as well as improve our understanding of global climate and its sustainability. The objective of my project was to analyze the archaeal and bacterial dIversity in stromatolites from Highborn Cay in the Bahamas. The first step in studying the molecular processes that the microorganisms carry out is to ascertain the microbial complexity within the mats, which includes identifying and estimating the numbers of different microbes that comprise these mats.

  7. Intacting Integrity in coping with health issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Stine Leegaard; Bastrup Jørgensen, Lene; Fridlund, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a formal substantive theory (FST) on the multidimensional behavioral process of coping with health issues. Intacting integrity while coping with health issues emerged as the core category of this FST. People facing health issues strive to safeguard and keep...... intact their integrity not only on an individual level but also as members of a group or a system. This intacting process is executed by attunement, continuously minimizing the discrepancy between personal values, personal health, self-expectations and external conditions as health- and cultural...

  8. Distribution and Composition of Thiotrophic Mats in the Hypoxic Zone of the Black Sea (150–170 m Water Depth, Crimea Margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Gerdhard L.; Lichtschlag, Anna; Struck, Ulrich; Boetius, Antje

    2016-01-01

    At the Black Sea chemocline, oxygen- and sulfide-rich waters meet and form a niche for thiotrophic pelagic bacteria. Here we investigated an area of the Northwestern Black Sea off Crimea close to the shelf break, where the chemocline reaches the seafloor at around 150–170 m water depth, to assess whether thiotrophic bacteria are favored in this zone. Seafloor video transects were carried out with the submersible JAGO covering 20 km2 on the region between 110 and 200 m depth. Around the chemocline we observed irregular seafloor depressions, covered with whitish mats of large filamentous bacteria. These comprised 25–55% of the seafloor, forming a belt of 3 km width around the chemocline. Cores from the mats obtained with JAGO showed higher accumulations of organic matter under the mats compared to mat-free sediments. The mat-forming bacteria were related to Beggiatoa-like large filamentous sulfur bacteria based on 16S rRNA sequences from the mat, and visual characteristics. The microbial community under the mats was significantly different from the surrounding sediments and enriched with taxa affiliated with polymer degrading, fermenting and sulfate reducing microorganisms. Under the mats, higher organic matter accumulation, as well as higher remineralization and radiotracer-based sulfate reduction rates were measured compared to outside the mat. Mat-covered and mat-free sediments showed similar degradability of the bulk organic matter pool, suggesting that the higher sulfide fluxes and subsequent development of the thiotrophic mats in the patches are consequences of the accumulation of organic matter rather than its qualitative composition. Our observations suggest that the key factors for the distribution of thiotrophic mat-forming communities near to the Crimean shelf break are hypoxic conditions that (i) repress grazers, (ii) enhance the accumulation and degradation of labile organic matter by sulfate-reducers, and (iii) favor thiotrophic filamentous bacteria

  9. Distribution and Composition of Thiotrophic Mats in the Hypoxic Zone of the Black Sea (150-170 m Water Depth, Crimea Margin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Gerdhard L; Lichtschlag, Anna; Struck, Ulrich; Boetius, Antje

    2016-01-01

    At the Black Sea chemocline, oxygen- and sulfide-rich waters meet and form a niche for thiotrophic pelagic bacteria. Here we investigated an area of the Northwestern Black Sea off Crimea close to the shelf break, where the chemocline reaches the seafloor at around 150-170 m water depth, to assess whether thiotrophic bacteria are favored in this zone. Seafloor video transects were carried out with the submersible JAGO covering 20 km(2) on the region between 110 and 200 m depth. Around the chemocline we observed irregular seafloor depressions, covered with whitish mats of large filamentous bacteria. These comprised 25-55% of the seafloor, forming a belt of 3 km width around the chemocline. Cores from the mats obtained with JAGO showed higher accumulations of organic matter under the mats compared to mat-free sediments. The mat-forming bacteria were related to Beggiatoa-like large filamentous sulfur bacteria based on 16S rRNA sequences from the mat, and visual characteristics. The microbial community under the mats was significantly different from the surrounding sediments and enriched with taxa affiliated with polymer degrading, fermenting and sulfate reducing microorganisms. Under the mats, higher organic matter accumulation, as well as higher remineralization and radiotracer-based sulfate reduction rates were measured compared to outside the mat. Mat-covered and mat-free sediments showed similar degradability of the bulk organic matter pool, suggesting that the higher sulfide fluxes and subsequent development of the thiotrophic mats in the patches are consequences of the accumulation of organic matter rather than its qualitative composition. Our observations suggest that the key factors for the distribution of thiotrophic mat-forming communities near to the Crimean shelf break are hypoxic conditions that (i) repress grazers, (ii) enhance the accumulation and degradation of labile organic matter by sulfate-reducers, and (iii) favor thiotrophic filamentous bacteria

  10. Astrobiological Significance of Microbial Extremophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath and the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The importance of study alkaliphilic microorganisms for astrobiology was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology. The study of halophilic microorganisms was started from work with saline soils and lakes, and one of the record of good growth for Haloferax mediterranei was shown at 30 percent NaC1. Although alkali-tolerant nitrifying bacteria had previously been reported, the first described alkaliphilic microorganism was the bacterium Streptococcus faecalis. Halophilic and alkaliphilic forms are relevant to conditions that might be found in closed impact basins and craters on Mars filled with evaporite deposits. The first obligately acidophilic bacterium described was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxydans (formally Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Later thermophilic lithotrophic acidophiles were found, and the hyperacidophilic moderately thermophilic species of the genus Picrophilus were found to grow at negative p

  11. Degradation products of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene by a microbial consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, O.; Parker, C.; Bender, J. [Clark Atlanta Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Remediation of contaminated soils can be accomplished using microbial species. Of particular interest is the remediation of explosive contaminated soils. A microbial consortia has been developed which removes TNT by an unexplained mechanism. Our goal is to understand the degradation of TNT by this microbial mat. Constructed mats have been generated in our laboratory by enriching water with ensiled grass and adding specific microbial components for organic degradation. Microbial mats are natural mixed microbial communities dominated by cyanobacterias (blue-green algae). In this research, degradation products of TNT have been identified using GC/MS. Ninety-seven percent of TNT (1000 mg/L), was removed in < 1 day by floating mats placed over TNT-contaminated water in quiescent ponds. Metabolites of TNT, 2, 4-Dinitro-6 amminotoluene and 2-Nitro-4,6 diaminotoluene has been observed after 1 day of mat treatment. A mechanism is postulated for this degradation showing that two of the nitro groups of the TNT molecule are being reduced to amino groups systematically. Anoxic zones in the mat, containing sulfur-reducing bacteria, may account for the reduction of TNT. GC/MS shows significant decreases in metabolite concentrations in 4-7 days, indicating continued degradation of TNT. It has been found by toxicity assays that these metabolites appeared to be nontoxic and nonmutagenic. These results suggest that floating microbial mats may be useful for the decontamination of sites in the environment contaminated with TNT. Further studies using {sup 13}C TNT will focus on the fate of the carbon, to determine the intermediates products prior to transformations into hydrocarbons or utilization by the bacteria consortia.

  12. Biogeophysical interactions control the formation of iron oxide microbial biofilms in acidic geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, J.; Berstein, H. C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, M. A.; Jennings, R. D.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide microbial mats in acidic (pH ~ 3) geothermal outflow channels of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are habitats for diverse populations of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms from the domains Archaea and Bacteria. These systems have been extensively characterized with regards to geochemical, physical, and microbiological (e.g., metagenomics) analyses; however, there is minimal data describing the formation of these iron oxide microbial mats. A conceptual model of Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was created, which includes four distinct stages. Autotrophic archaea (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis) and bacteria (Hydrogenobaculum spp.) are the first colonizers (Stage I) that provide pools of organic carbon for heterotrophic thermophiles (Stage II). M. yellowstonensis is an autotrophic Sulfolobales that is responsible for the oxidation of Fe(II) and can thus be defined as the mat 'architect' creating suitable habitats for microbial niches (e.g., anaerobic microorganisms) (Stage III). The last phase of mat formation (Stage IV) represents a pseudo-steady state mature microbial mat, which has been the subject of all previous microbial surveys of these systems. The conceptual model for Fe(III)-oxide microbial mat development was tested by inserting glass (SiO2) microscope slides into the main flow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP. Slides were removed at various time intervals and analyzed for total iron accretion, microbial community structure (i.e., 16S rRNA gene abundance), and mRNA expression of community members. Routine geochemical and physical (e.g., flow) parameters were also measured to decipher their relative contribution to mat development. Initial and previous results show that autotrophic microorganisms (e.g, M. yellowstonensis) are often the first to colonize the glass slides and their activity was confirmed by mRNA expression of genes related to iron oxidation and carbon fixation. Heterotrophs are rare

  13. Under Ground Cable Sizing Using MAT LAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. R. Uday Kiran

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main theme of this paper is to explain the procedure to calculate the cross sectional area of a conductor of an underground cable for a specified power & voltage ratings. This paper will also explain one of the simplest ways to calculate the cross section. In this paper we analyzed various factors that effect in deciding the ampacity of the conductor. We developed a Mat lab code to find the cross sectional area by including some of the parameters and also the voltage drop , maximum permissible voltage drop for that size of the conductor and also the number of runs of the cable that are to be laid.

  14. Benthic cyanobacterial mats in the high arctic: multi-layer structure and fluorescence responses to osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionard, Marie; Péquin, Bérangère; Lovejoy, Connie; Vincent, Warwick F

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are often a major biological component of extreme aquatic ecosystems, and in polar lakes and streams they may account for the dominant fraction of total ecosystem biomass and productivity. In this study we examined the vertical structure and physiology of Arctic microbial mats relative to the question of how these communities may respond to ongoing environmental change. The mats were sampled from Ward Hunt Lake (83°5.297'N, 74°9.985'W) at the northern coast of Arctic Canada, and were composed of three visibly distinct layers. Microsensor profiling showed that there were strong gradients in oxygen within each layer, with an overall decrease from 100% saturation at the mat surface to 0%, at the bottom, accompanied by an increase of 0.6 pH units down the profile. Gene clone libraries (16S rRNA) revealed the presence of Oscillatorian sequences throughout the mat, while Nostoc related species dominated the two upper layers, and Nostocales and Synechococcales sequences were common in the bottom layer. High performance liquid chromatography analyses showed a parallel gradient in pigments, from high concentrations of UV-screening scytonemin in the upper layer to increasing zeaxanthin and myxoxanthin in the bottom layer, and an overall shift from photoprotective to photosynthetic carotenoids down the profile. Climate change is likely to be accompanied by lake level fluctuations and evaporative concentration of salts, and thus increased osmotic stress of the littoral mat communities. To assess the cellular capacity to tolerate increasing osmolarity on physiology and cell membrane integrity, mat sections were exposed to a gradient of increasing salinities, and PAM measurements of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence were made to assess changes in maximum quantum yield. The results showed that the mats were tolerant of up to a 46-fold increase in salinity. These features imply that cyanobacterial mats are resilient to ongoing climate change, and that in the

  15. Inoculação microbiana da silagem de alfafa (Medicago sativa e seu efeito sobre o consumo de matéria seca e sobre a fermentação ruminal em bovinos - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v25i2.2074 Microbial inoculation of alfalfa silage (Medicago sativa and its effect on dry matter intake and ruminal fermentation in bovines - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v25i2.2074

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Mazza Rodrigues

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar os efeitos da inoculação microbiana da alfafa (Medicago sativa para ensilagem sobre o consumo de matéria seca, fermentação ruminal e taxa de passagem de líquidos em bovinos. Doze vacas não-gestantes e não-lactantes foram distribuídas em um delineamento em blocos, e os tratamentos corresponderam à silagem pré-secada de alfafa (60% de MS e 19,5% de PB controle ou inoculada com o produto Silobac® (Lactobacillus plantarum e Pediococcus pentosaceus. A dieta experimental continha 50% de silagem de alfafa e 50% de concentrado. O experimento teve duração total de 21 dias, sendo o 21º dia utilizado para colheitas de líquido ruminal realizadas às 0h, 2h, 4h, 6h, 8h, 10h e 12h, após a 1a refeição. A inoculação microbiana da silagem de alfafa não alterou o consumo de MS (inoculada = 2,56 vs. controle = 2,39% PV, o pH do líquido ruminal (6,15 vs. 6,27, a concentração ruminal de N-NH3 (19,0 vs. 18,2mg/dl, a concentração total de AGVs (122,5 vs. 113,8mM ou a proporção molar de ácido acético (66,1 vs. 66,8% molar, propiônico (21,1 vs. 19,6% molar e butírico (12,8 vs. 13,6% molar. Parâmetros relativos à dinâmica líquida ruminal, como o volume líquido (59,5 vs. 63,4 litros e a taxa de passagem de líquidos (8,6 vs. 8,0%/h, também não foram alterados com a inoculação.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of microbial inoculation of alfalfa (Medicago sativa for ensiling on dry matter intake, ruminal fermentation and liquid passage rate in twelve non pregnant dry cows. A randomized block design was used and the treatments were alfalfa haylage control (60% DM and 19.5% CP or inoculated with Silobac® product (Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Experimental diet contained 50% of alfalfa silage and 50% of concentrate. Experimental period lasted for twenty-one days; the 21st day was used for ruminal liquid sampling at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 e 12 hours

  16. Contributions of ectomycorrhizal fungal mats to forest soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillips; L.A. Kluber; J.P. Martin; B.A. Caldwell; B.J. Bond

    2012-01-01

    Distinct aggregations of fungal hyphae and rhizomorphs, or “mats”, formed by some genera of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi are common features of soils in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. We measured in situ respiration rates of Piloderma mats and neighboring non-mat soils in an old-growth Douglas-fir forest in western Oregon to investigate whether there was...

  17. Mats Reidius : Rootsi taluliit tahab üle minna eurole / Mats Reidius ; interv. Annika Poldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reidius, Mats

    2003-01-01

    Rootsi majandusteadlane Mats Reidius Rootsi põllumajanduse olukorrast enne Rootsi liitumist EL-iga, Rootsi talunike võitudest-kaotustest El-iga ühinemisel, muutustest Rootsi toiduaineturul pärast EL-iga liitumist, Rootsi talunike arvamusest euro kohta

  18. Mats Reidius : Rootsi taluliit tahab üle minna eurole / Mats Reidius ; interv. Annika Poldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reidius, Mats

    2003-01-01

    Rootsi majandusteadlane Mats Reidius Rootsi põllumajanduse olukorrast enne Rootsi liitumist EL-iga, Rootsi talunike võitudest-kaotustest El-iga ühinemisel, muutustest Rootsi toiduaineturul pärast EL-iga liitumist, Rootsi talunike arvamusest euro kohta

  19. An improved Bayesian matting method based on image statistic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Luo, Siwei; Wu, Lina

    2015-03-01

    Image matting is an important task in image and video editing and has been studied for more than 30 years. In this paper we propose an improved interactive matting method. Starting from a coarse user-guided trimap, we first perform a color estimation based on texture and color information and use the result to refine the original trimap. Then with the new trimap, we apply soft matting process which is improved Bayesian matting with smoothness constraints. Experimental results on natural image show that this method is useful, especially for the images have similar texture feature in the background or the images which is hard to give a precise trimap.

  20. Pigment profiles and bacterial communities from Thailand thermal mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, M C; Sririn, V; Kanoksilapatham, W; Gonzalez, J M

    2009-11-01

    Differently colored layers of freshwater hot spring mats at Boekleung (Western Thailand) were studied. Temperatures ranged from over 50 up to 57 degrees C. Two mats were characterized: a laminated mat with a green and a red layers, and a monolayer, greenish-yellow mat. Bacterial communities in green, red, and yellow layers were investigated using molecular, culturing and pigment analysis methods. Pigment profiles covered a wide spectrum from chlorophylls to carotenoids. A green mat layer showed higher relative content of chlorophyll than yellow and red layers which presented higher proportion of carotenoids. Cyanobacterial isolates grow up to 55-56 degrees C and their pigment profiles showed a relatively high content of chlorophylls suggesting the importance of other bacterial groups in the mat pigment profiles. Bacterial communities were analyzed by 16S rDNA surveys showing Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi as the mayor components of the community. Other significant members were Candidate Division OP10, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes and Actinobacteria. These results highlight a major participation of Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in thermal mat communities, and the preferential presence of Candidate Division OP10 in green mat layers. Differently colored mat layers showed characteristic bacterial communities which could be discriminated from pigment profiles and molecular surveys.

  1. Use of palm-mat geotextiles for rainsplash erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Fullen, M. A.; Davies, K.; Booth, C. A.

    2010-07-01

    Soil detachment by raindrop action (rainsplash erosion) is a very important subprocess of erosion by water. It is a particular problem in the UK as most soils are sandy or loamy sand in texture and lands have gentle to medium slope. However, few studies report potential rainsplash erosion control options under field conditions. Hence, the utilization of palm-mat geotextiles as a rainsplash erosion control technique was investigated at Hilton, east Shropshire, U.K. (52°33'5.7″ N, 2°19'18.3″ W). Geotextile-mats constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Borassus palm of West Africa) and Mauritia flexuosa (Buriti palm of South America) leaves are termed Borassus mats and Buriti mats, respectively. Two-year field experiments were conducted at Hilton to study the effects of emplacing Borassus and Buriti mats on rainsplash erosion of a loamy sand soil. Two sets (12 plots each) of experiments were established to study the effects of these mats on splash height and splash erosion. Splash height needs to be known to assess the transport mechanism of major soil fraction and its constituents on sloping land by rainsplash. In both sets, six randomly-selected plots were covered with mats, and the rest were bare. Results (during 22/01/2007‒23/01/2009; total precipitation = 1731.5 mm) show that Borassus mat-covered plots had ˜ 89% ( P 0.05) effect in rainsplash erosion control during that period, although plots with Buriti mats significantly ( P 0.05) improve selected soil properties (i.e., soil organic matter, particle size distribution, aggregate stability and total soil carbon) as soil organic matter (SOM) input from mat-decomposition was much less than total SOM content. However, the changes in fine and medium sand contents (after 2 years) in the Borassus covered plots were significantly ( P < 0.05; n = 6) related to the total rainsplash erosion during 2007‒2009. Emplacement of Borassus and Buriti mats on bare soils did not decrease SOM contents after 2 years, indicating

  2. New universal matK primers for DNA barcoding angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing YU; Jian-Hua XUE; Shi-Liang ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    The chloroplast maturase K gene (matK) is one of the most variable coding genes of angiosperms and has been suggested to be a "barcode" for land plants. However, matK exhibits low amplification and sequencing rates due to low universality of currently available primers and mononucleotide repeats. To resolve these technical problems, we evaluated the entire matK region to find a region of 600-800 bp that is highly variable, represents the best of all matK regions with priming sites conservative enough to design universal primers, and avoids the mononucleotide repeats. After careful evaluation, a region in the middle was chosen and a pair of primers named natK472F and matK1248R was designed to amplify and sequence the matK fragment of approximately 776 bp. This region encompasses the most variable sites, represents the entire matK region best, and also exhibits high amplification rates and quality of sequences. The universality of this primer pair was tested using 58 species from 47 families of angiosperm plants. The primers showed a strong amplification (93.1%) and sequencing (92.6%)successes in the species tested. We propose that the new primers will solve, in part, the problems encountered when using matK and promote the adoption of matK as a DNA barcode for angiosperms.

  3. Microbial shaping of sedimentary wrinkle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, G.; Pruss, S. B.; Perron, J. T.; Bosak, T.

    2014-10-01

    Wrinkle structures on sandy bed surfaces were present in some of the earliest sedimentary environments, but are rare in modern environments. These enigmatic millimetre- to centimetre-scale ridges or pits are particularly common in sediments that harbour trace fossils and imprints of early animals, and appeared in the aftermath of some large mass extinctions. Wrinkle structures have been interpreted as possible remnants of microbial mats, but the formation mechanism and associated palaeoenvironmental and palaeoecological implications of these structures remain debated. Here we show that microbial aggregates can form wrinkle structures on a bed of bare sand in wave tank experiments. Waves with a small orbital amplitude at the bed surface do not move sand grains directly. However, they move millimetre-size, light microbial fragments and thereby produce linear sand ridges and rounded scour pits at the wavelengths observed in nature within hours. We conclude that wrinkle structures are morphological biosignatures that form at the sediment-water interface in wave-dominated environments, and not beneath microbial mats as previously thought. During early animal evolution, grazing by eukaryotic organisms may have temporarily increased the abundance of microbial fragments and thus the production of wrinkle structures.

  4. Microbial contributions to the Precambrian Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Bermudes, D.; Obar, R.

    1986-01-01

    Life has existed on Earth for approximately 3.5 billion years. For most of this time, prokaryotic communities provided the major biological forces changing the Earth. Many changes in atmospheric gas composition occurred during the Archean and Proterozoic eons as a result of microbial activity. Extant microbial communities were used to help understand the dynamics which contributed to these atmospheric changes. The microbial mat communities were characterized according to the organismic constituents. Symbiosis in microbial communities is recognized as a major force in cell evolution. Among the evolutinary enigmas investigated is the problem of the origin of the undulipodia. Undulipodial microtubules are still deployed for major cellular processes such as mitosis and meiosis. Several prokaryotes were tested for the presence of the S1-type protein, so far only spirochetes were found to possess it. The S1-type protein is being sought in cyanobacteria reported to contain microtubules.

  5. Low temporal variation in the intact polar lipid composition of North Sea coastal marine water reveals limited chemotaxonomic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Veldhuis, M.J.W.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of intact polar lipids (IPLs) in North Sea coastal marine water were assessed over a one-year seasonal cycle, and compared with environmental parameters and the microbial community composition. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was the most abu

  6. Mercury in water and biomass of microbial communities in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S.A.; Behnke, S.; Slack, K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Burr, M.D.; Striegl, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Ultra-clean sampling methods and approaches typically used in pristine environments were applied to quantify concentrations of Hg species in water and microbial biomass from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, features that are geologically enriched with Hg. Microbial populations of chemically-diverse hot springs were also characterized using modern methods in molecular biology as the initial step toward ongoing work linking Hg speciation with microbial processes. Molecular methods (amplification of environmental DNA using 16S rDNA primers, cloning, denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) screening of clone libraries, and sequencing of representative clones) were used to examine the dominant members of microbial communities in hot springs. Total Hg (THg), monomethylated Hg (MeHg), pH, temperature, and other parameters influential to Hg speciation and microbial ecology are reported for hot springs water and associated microbial mats. Several hot springs indicate the presence of MeHg in microbial mats with concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 ng g-1 (dry weight). Concentrations of THg in mats ranged from 4.9 to 120,000 ng g-1 (dry weight). Combined data from surveys of geothermal water, lakes, and streams show that aqueous THg concentrations range from l to 600 ng L-1. Species and concentrations of THg in mats and water vary significantly between hot springs, as do the microorganisms found at each site. ?? 2006.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD.

  8. The Ububele Baby Mat Service – A primary preventative mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... by the Baby Mat practitioners in relation to culturally diverse understandings of ... The therapeutic couple engages with culturally-informed frames of reference in ... it was found to help those accessing the mat to find symbolic meaning in the ...

  9. Matting Of Hair Due To ′Sunsilk′ Shampoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Mohd

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Matting of hair been reported from time to time due to treatment of hair with detergent, shampoos, waving lotions, setting lotions and bleaches. A case of matting of hairs in a young girl due to a change in the brand of shampoo is reported.

  10. Matting of hair: what is the role of conditioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulos, D; Kontochristopoulos, G; Kalogirou, O; Gregoriou, S; Katsambas, A

    2006-03-01

    Matting of the hair is a very rare and multifactorial condition affecting usually women. We present three female patients with matting of the hair as a result of the shampoo used. In all three cases, cutting of the affected hair was unavoidable.

  11. Microbial reefs in the Black Sea fueled by anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelis, W.; Seifert, R.; Nauhaus, K.

    2002-01-01

    Massive microbial mats covering up to 4-meter-high carbonate buildups prosper at methane seeps in anoxic waters of the northwestern Black Sea shelf. Strong (13)C depletions indicate an incorporation of methane carbon into carbonates, bulk biomass, and specific lipids. The mats mainly consist of d...... precipitation and substantial biomass accumulation, which has implications for our understanding of carbon cycling during earlier periods of Earth's history.......Massive microbial mats covering up to 4-meter-high carbonate buildups prosper at methane seeps in anoxic waters of the northwestern Black Sea shelf. Strong (13)C depletions indicate an incorporation of methane carbon into carbonates, bulk biomass, and specific lipids. The mats mainly consist...

  12. Chimie des matériaux hybrides

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Cours : chimie des matériaux hybrides Depuis plus d’une vingtaine d’années, les méthodes d’élaboration de nanomatériaux inorganiques ou hybrides reposant sur la « chimie douce » suscitent un très fort intérêt, aussi bien dans le monde universitaire qu’industriel. Ces méthodes de synthèse mettent en jeu des réactions de « polymérisation » au sens large s’effectuant à température ambiante, en solvant aqueux ou organique, à partir de précurseurs moléculaires ou nanoparticulaires. Ces conditions ...

  13. MAT2A mutations predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K; Johnson, Ralph J; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Leal, Suzanne M; Raman, C S; Swindell, Eric C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-01-08

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease.

  14. Benthic Marine Cyanobacterial Mat Ecosystems: Biogeochemistry and Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats are complete ecosystems that can include processes of primary production, diagenesis and lithification. Light sustains oxygenic photosynthesis, which in turn provides energy, organic matter and oxygen to the community. Due to both absorption and scattering phenomena, incident light is transformed with depth in the mat, both in intensity and spectral composition. Mobile photo synthesizers optimize their position with respect to this light gradient. When photosynthesis ceases at night, the upper layers of the mat become reduced and sulfidic. Counteracting gradients of oxygen and sulfide combine to provide daily-contrasting environments separated on a scale of a few mm. The functional complexity of mats, coupled with the highly proximal and ordered spatial arrangement of biota, offers the potential for a staggering number of interactions. At a minimum, the products of each functional group of microorganisms affect the other groups both positively and negatively. For example, cyanobacteria generate organic matter (potential substrates) but also oxygen (a toxin for many anaerobes). Anaerobic activity recycles nutrients to the photosynthesizers but also generates potentially toxic sulfide. The combination of benefits and hazards of light, oxygen and sulfide promotes the allocation of the various essential mat processes between light and dark periods, and to various depths in the mat. Observations of mats have produced numerous surprises. For example, obligately anaerobic processes can occur in the presence of abundant oxygen, highly reduced gases are produced in the presence of abundant sulfate, meiofauna thrive at high sulfide concentrations, and the mats' constituent populations respond to environmental changes in complex ways. While photosynthetic bacteria dominate the biomass and productivity of the mat, nonphotosynthetic, anaerobic processes constitute the ultimate biological filter on the ecosystem's emergent biosignatures, including those

  15. Organic and mineral imprints in fossil photosynthetic mats of an East Antarctic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepot, K; Compère, P; Gérard, E; Namsaraev, Z; Verleyen, E; Tavernier, I; Hodgson, D A; Vyverman, W; Gilbert, B; Wilmotte, A; Javaux, E J

    2014-09-01

    Lacustrine microbial mats in Antarctic ice-free oases are considered modern analogues of early microbial ecosystems as their primary production is generally dominated by cyanobacteria, the heterotrophic food chain typically truncated due to extreme environmental conditions, and they are geographically isolated. To better understand early fossilization and mineralization processes in this context, we studied the microstructure and chemistry of organo-mineral associations in a suite of sediments 50-4530 cal. years old from a lake in Skarvsnes, Lützow Holm Bay, East Antarctica. First, we report an exceptional preservation of fossil autotrophs and their biomolecules on millennial timescales. The pigment scytonemin is preserved inside cyanobacterial sheaths. As non-pigmented sheaths are also preserved, scytonemin likely played little role in the preservation of sheath polysaccharides, which have been cross-linked by ether bonds. Coccoids preserved thylakoids and autofluorescence of pigments such as carotenoids. This exceptional preservation of autotrophs in the fossil mats argues for limited biodegradation during and after deposition. Moreover, cell-shaped aggregates preserved sulfur-rich nanoglobules, supporting fossilization of instable intracellular byproducts of chemotrophic or phototrophic S-oxidizers. Second, we report a diversity of micro- to nanostructured CaCO3 precipitates intimately associated with extracellular polymeric substances, cyanobacteria, and/or other prokaryotes. Micro-peloids Type 1 display features that distinguish them from known carbonates crystallized in inorganic conditions: (i) Type 1A are often filled with globular nanocarbonates and/or surrounded by a fibrous fringe, (ii) Type 1B are empty and display ovoid to wrinkled fringes of nanocrystallites that can be radially oriented (fibrous or triangular) or multilayered, and (iii) all show small-size variations. Type 2 rounded carbonates 1-2 μm in diameter occurring inside autofluorescent

  16. Inhibition of hepatocelluar carcinoma MAT2A and MAT2beta gene expressions by single and dual small interfering RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Quan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA interference (RNAi has been successfully applied in suppression of hepatic cancer genes. In hepatocelluar carcinoma cell, one methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT isozyme, MATII was found to have two catalytic subunits which were encoded by MAT2A and MAT2β respectively. During tumorigeness of hepatocelluar carcinoma, expressions of the two genes were discovered to be increased combining with a switch of MAT (form MATI to MATII, To figure out the role played by MATII in hepatic cancer, In this study, for the first time we established a dual small interfering RNA (siRNA expression system, which could simultaneously express two different siRNA molecules specifically targeting two genes. To test the effectiveness of this system, we applied this approach to express simultaneously two different siRNA duplexes that specifically target MAT2A and MAT2β genes of hepatocelluar carcinoma respectively in HepG2 cell. Results indicated that dual siRNA could simultaneously inhibit the expression of MAT2A and MAT2β gene by 89.5% and 97.8% respectively, In addition, dual siRNA molecules were able to significantly suppress growth of hepatocelluar carcinoma cell in vitro as well as induce apoptosis which was involved in arrest cell cycle at the G1/S checkpoint and the expressions of p21, p27 and Bax.

  17. First insights into fern matK phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Li-Yaung; Li, Fay-Wei; Chiou, Wen-Liang; Wang, Chun-Neng

    2011-06-01

    MatK, the only maturase gene in the land plant plastid genome, is a very popular phylogenetic marker that has been extensively applied in reconstructing angiosperm phylogeny. However, the use of matK in fern phylogeny is largely unknown, due to difficulties with amplification: ferns have lost the flanking trnK exons, typically the region used for designing stable priming sites. We developed primers that are either universal or lineage-specific that successfully amplify matK across all fern families. To evaluate whether matK is as powerful a phylogenetic marker in ferns as in angiosperms, we compared its sequence characteristics and phylogenetic performance to those of rbcL and atpA. Among these three genes, matK has the highest variability and substitution evenness, yet shows the least homoplasy. Most importantly, applying matK in fern phylogenetics better resolved relationships among families, especially within eupolypods I and II. Here we demonstrate the power of matK for fern phylogenetic reconstruction, as well as provide primers and extensive sequence data that will greatly facilitate future evolutionary studies of ferns.

  18. Geosynthetic Reinforcement of Sand-Mat Layer above Soft Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Beom Park

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the bearing capacity of soft ground for the purpose of getting trafficability of construction vehicles, the reinforcement of geosynthetics for sand-mat layers on soft ground has often been used. As the strength of the geosynthetics increases, and the sand-mat system becomes stronger, the bearing capacity of sand-mat systems will be increased. The depths of geosynthetics, reinforced in sand-mat layers, were varied with respect to the width of footing. The tensile strengths of geosynthetics were also varied to evaluate the effect of reinforcement on the bearing capacity of soft ground. The dispersion angles, with varying sand-mat thicknesses, were also determined in consideration of the tensile strength of geosynthetics and the depths of reinforcement installations. The bearing capacity ratios, with the variation of footing width and reinforced embedment depth, were determined for the geosynthetics-only, reinforced soft ground, 1-layer sand-mat system and 2-layer sand-mat system against the non-reinforced soft ground. From the test results of various models, a principle that better explains the concept of geosynthetic reinforcement has been found. On the basis of this principle, a new bearing capacity equation for practical use in the design of geosynthetically reinforced soft ground has been proposed by modifying Yamanouchi’s equation.

  19. Geosynthetic Reinforcement of Sand-Mat Layer above Soft Ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Beom; Park, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Daehyeon

    2013-11-19

    In order to improve the bearing capacity of soft ground for the purpose of getting trafficability of construction vehicles, the reinforcement of geosynthetics for sand-mat layers on soft ground has often been used. As the strength of the geosynthetics increases, and the sand-mat system becomes stronger, the bearing capacity of sand-mat systems will be increased. The depths of geosynthetics, reinforced in sand-mat layers, were varied with respect to the width of footing. The tensile strengths of geosynthetics were also varied to evaluate the effect of reinforcement on the bearing capacity of soft ground. The dispersion angles, with varying sand-mat thicknesses, were also determined in consideration of the tensile strength of geosynthetics and the depths of reinforcement installations. The bearing capacity ratios, with the variation of footing width and reinforced embedment depth, were determined for the geosynthetics-only, reinforced soft ground, 1-layer sand-mat system and 2-layer sand-mat system against the non-reinforced soft ground. From the test results of various models, a principle that better explains the concept of geosynthetic reinforcement has been found. On the basis of this principle, a new bearing capacity equation for practical use in the design of geosynthetically reinforced soft ground has been proposed by modifying Yamanouchi's equation.

  20. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  1. Electrospun graphene-ZnO nanofiber mats for photocatalysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Seongpil; Joshi, Bhavana N.; Lee, Min Wook; Kim, Na Young; Yoon, Sam S., E-mail: skyoon@korea.ac.kr

    2014-03-01

    Graphene-decorated zinc oxide (G-ZnO) nanofibers were fabricated, for the first time, by electrospinning. The effect of graphene concentration on the properties of G-ZnO mats were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis. The G-ZnO mats decorated with 0.5 wt.% of graphene showed excellent photocatalytic activity through degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. The highest photocatalytic activity (80% degradation) was observed for 0.5 wt.% G-ZnO mats annealed at 400 °C after 4 h of UV irradiation.

  2. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  3. Degradabilidade ruminal da matéria seca e proteína bruta, e tempo de colonização microbiana de oleaginosas, utilizadas na alimentação de ovinos=Ruminal degradability of dry matter and crude protein, and microbial colonization time of oil grains in sheep feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides Reuter de Oliveira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a degradabilidade in situ, dos grãos de linhaça, canola, colza e milho, caroço de algodão, e dos concentrados casca e farelo de soja, em ovinos. Foram utilizados três animais da raça Santa Inês, fistulados e providos de cânulas ruminais, mantidos em baias individuais, recebendo diariamente capim picado e ração concentrada. Os alimentos foram incubados em ordem decrescente de 72, 48, 24, 18, 6, 3 e 0h. O teor de proteína dos alimentos avaliados foram 34,77; 30,07; 23,70; 10,64; 26,12; 14,65 e 56,90% para canola, colza, linhaça, milho, caroço de algodão, casca de soja e farelo de soja, respectivamente. A canola e a colza apresentaram baixa degradabilidade efetiva para a MS, com valor médio de 33,68%. O grão de linhaça apresentou degradabilidade efetiva para a MS de 64,24%, com fração potencialmente degradável de 87,89%. O milho apresentou fração solúvel de 12,33% e uma degradação de 39,67% para a MS. O farelo de soja apresentou-se dentro dos parâmetros normais de degradação com 52,61% para a MS e 52,83% para PB. Para a linhaça, canola e colza a degradabilidade da proteína apresentou valor médio de 18,34%. Os grãos de avaliados apresentaram baixa degradabilidade efetiva para a matéria seca e proteína bruta.This study evaluated in situ ruminal degradability of grains of linseed, canola, rapeseed and corn, whole cottonseed, as well as soybean hulls and soybean meal, in sheep. Three Santa Inês sheep were fistulated and fitted with rumen cannulas. The animals were housed in individual stalls, receiving chopped grass and concentrated feed daily. Feeds were incubated in descending order of 72, 48, 24, 18, 6, 3 and 0h. Protein content was 34.77% for canola, 30.07% for rapeseed, 23.70% for linseed, 10.64% for corn, 26.12% for cottonseed, 14.65% for soybean hulls, and 56.90% for soybean meal. Canola and rapeseed showed low effective degradability of DM, with mean value of 33.68%. Linseed grain had DM

  4. Cyanobacterial ecotypes in different optical microenvironments of a 68 C hot spring mat community revealed by 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Mike J.; Kühl, Michael; Wieland, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic photosynth......We examined the population of unicellular cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) in the upper 3-mm vertical interval of a 68°C region of a microbial mat in a hot spring effluent channel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Fluorescence microscopy and microsensor measurements of O2 and oxygenic...... distinct populations over the vertical interval. We were unable to identify patterns in genetic variation in Synechococcus 16S rRNA sequences that correlate with different vertically distributed populations. However, patterns of variation at the internal transcribed spacer locus separating 16S and 23S r...

  5. Development of the leptospirosis by experimental infection in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus with Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola, strain LO4, by intact and scratched skin exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Sousa Américo Batista

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The establishment and evolution of leptospirosis in hamster (Mesocricetus auratus by experimental infection with Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola, LO4 strain, by intact and scratched skin exposures, having as control the intraperitoneal route, were evaluated. Hundred-twenty female hamsters distributed in two groups according to inoculation route (intact and scratched skin were used. Infectious inoculum was constituted by a pure culture of L. interrogans serovar Canicola (strain LO4, isolated from liver from a slaughtered swine in Londrina, Paraná state and typified by agglutinins adsortion technique with monoclonal antibody kit at the Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The animals were observed twice a day during 21 days. Animals that died were necropsied and kidneys, liver, genital tract (uterus and ovaries and brain were aseptically collected. On the 21st post-inoculation day, surviving animals were euthanized. In these animals, serum samples were also collected by cardiac puncture to antileptospires agglutinins research using microscopic agglutination test (MAT. Fresh direct microscopy and microbiological culture were used for the detection of leptospires. Scratched skin route induced larger lethality when compared to intact skin route, with establishment and evolution of leptospirosis. On the other hand, intact skin route induced renal and/or genital carrier state more frequently. LO4 strain presented low immunogenic power, characterized by soroconversion at the MAT in only one inoculated animal.

  6. Fabrication of nanofiber mats from electrospinning of functionalized polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Burcu; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Erdem-Kuruca, Serap

    2014-08-01

    Electrospinning technique enabled us to prepare nanofibers from synthetic and natural polymers. In this study, it was aimed to fabricate electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based nanofibers by reactive electrospinning process. To improve endurance of fiber toward to many solvents, PVA was functionalized with photo-crosslinkable groups before spinning. Afterward PVA was crosslinked by UV radiation during electrospinning process. The nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that homogenous, uniform and crosslinked PVA nanofibers in diameters of about 200 nm were obtained. Thermal stability of the nanofiber mat was investigated with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Also the potential use of this nanofiber mats for tissue engineering was examined. Osteosarcoma (Saos) cells were cultured on the nanofiber mats.

  7. Thermal Protection System Materials (TPSM): 3D MAT Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 3D MAT Project seeks to design and develop a game changing Woven Thermal Protection System (TPS) technology tailored to meet the needs of the Orion Multi-Purpose...

  8. Electrospun antimicrobial hybrid mats: Innovative packaging material for meat and meat-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amna, Touseef; Yang, Jieun; Ryu, Kyeong-Seon; Hwang, I H

    2015-07-01

    To prevent the development and spread of spoilage/pathogenic microorganisms via meat foodstuffs, antimicrobial nanocomposite packaging can serve as a potential alternative. The objective of this study was to develop a new class of antimicrobial hybrid packaging mat composed of biodegradable polyurethane supplemented with virgin olive oil and zinc oxide via electrospinning. Instead of mixing antimicrobial compounds directly with food, incorporation in packaging materials allows the functional effect at food surfaces where microbial activity is localized. The nanofibers were characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD and TEM. The antibacterial activity was tested against two common foodborne pathogens viz., Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium. The present results indicated that incorporation of olive oil in the polymer affected morphology of PU nanofibers and nanocomposite packaging were able to inhibit growth of pathogens. Thus; as-spun mat can be used as prospective antimicrobial packaging, which potentially reduces contamination of meat/meat-products. Moreover, introduced biodegradable packaging for meat products could serve to replace PVC films and simultaneously help to protect natural environment.

  9. AM2 Mat End Connector Modeling and Performance Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    operational conditions. After completion of the program, a thorough investigation of both the subgrade and the mat revealed that the manufacturer’s drawing...28 2 After completion of the test program, a thorough investigation of both the subgrade and the mat revealed that the manufacturer’s drawing used...less than 20. The existing ML material was leveled with a bulldozer and compacted with a pneumatic roller and a vibratory steel -wheel compactor to

  10. Characterization of Carbon Mat Thermoplastic Composites: Flow and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Caba, Aaron C.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon mat thermoplastics (CMT) consisting of 12.7 mm or 25.4 mm long, 7.2 micrometer diameter, chopped carbon fibers in a polypropylene (PP) or poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) thermoplastic matrix were manufactured using the wetlay technique. This produces a porous mat with the carbon fibers well dispersed and randomly oriented in a plane. CMT composites offer substantial cost and weight savings over typical steel construction in new automotive applications. In production vehicles, aut...

  11. High universality of matK primers for barcoding gymnosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan LI; Lian-Ming GAO; RAM C.POUDEL; De-Zhu Li; Alan FORREST

    2011-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a tool to provide rapid and accurate taxonomic identification using a standard DNA region. A two-marker combination of rnatK+rbcL was formally proposed as the core barcode for land plants by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life Plant Working Group. However, there are currently no barcoding primers for matK showing high universality in gymnosperms. We used 57 gymnosperm species representing 40 genera, 11families and four subclasses to evaluate the universality of nine candidate matK primers and one rbcL primer in this study. Primer (1F/724R) of rbcL is proposed here as a universal primer for gymnosperms due to high universality. One of the nine candidate matK primers (Gym_F1A/Gym_R1A) is proposed as the best "universal" matK primer for gynnosperms because of high polymerase chain reaction success and routine generation of high quality bidirectional sequences. A specific matK primer for Ephedra was newly designed in this study, which performed well on the sampled species. The primers proposed here for rbcL and matK can be easily and successfully amplified for most gymnosperms.

  12. Mechanical behavior of ultralong multiwalled carbon nanotube mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Christian P.; Flowers, Jason; McKee, Gregg S. B.; Vecchio, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a subject of great interest partially due to their potential for exceptional material properties. Improvements in synthesis methods have facilitated the production of ultralong CNT mats, with lengths in the millimeter range. The increased length of these ultralong mats has, in return, opened the way to greater flexibility to probe their mechanical response. In this work, mats of dense, well-aligned, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown with a vapor-phase chemical vapor deposition technique using ferrocene and benzene as reactants, and subsequently tested in both tension and compression using two methods, in a thermomechanical analyzer and in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. In compression, measured stiffness was very low, due to buckling of the nanotubes. In tension, the nanotube mats behaved considerably stiffer; however, they were still more compliant than expected for nanotubes (˜1TPa). Analysis of both the growth method used and the nanotube mat fracture surface suggests that the mats grown in this method are not composed of continuous nanotubes and their strengths actually closely match those of woven nanotube yarns and ropes.

  13. Le matérialisme scientifique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jean-François

    2004-03-01

    De nos jours, il arrive quotidiennement aux grands hommes d'avoir à fréquenter d'ignorants mortels épris d'une conviction maladive que la science est la grande responsable de tous les maux du monde. Évidemment sans physique atomique, il n'y aurait pas eu d'Hiroshima et sans révolution industrielle, pas de pollution et etc. Cependant, ces accusations envers le progrès technique sont tout à fait injustes, irréfléchies et, j'irai même jusqu'à dire, irresponsables, puisque le calcul, i.e. la planification, même la plus élémentaire, est ce qui caractérise le mieux, pragmatiquement, la société humaine. À mon avis, les problèmes sociaux tireraient plutôt leur origine de sciences sociales irréalistes, qui, concrètment, inspireraient ou serviraient d'alibis à ceux qui détiennent véritablement le pouvoir. Dans cet article, je tenterai donc de démontrer la meilleure véracité et efficacité du matérialisme scientifique. Cette doctrine, dont Mario Bunge est le plus illustre représentant, s'appuy sur les résultats théoriques et expérimentaux des sciences factuelles ainsi que sur l'exactitude logique des mathématiques, utilisées ici comme langage universel de l'expression des idées. Cette conception philosophique qui s'inspire principalement du modèle des théories physiques, stipule que les réalités sociales sont, comme tout autre réalité, matérielles, mathématisables et représentables comme des systèmes en interaction. En fait, le modèle des physiciens ayant historiquement fait ses preuves en matière de testabilité et de cohérence interne est proposé d'être appliquer aux sciences sociales, aujourd'hui scindées des sciences dites pures sous l'inspiration des pseudo penseurs néo-kantiens, phénoménologiques et post-moderne. Cette nouvelle approche permettrait ainsi d'évoluer plus exactement vers une compréhension des bases sociales et biologiques du comportement humain afin de développer une éthique sans cesse plus r

  14. Amniotic Fluid Infection in Preterm Pregnancies with Intact Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkonen, Leena; Nupponen, Irmeli; Pätäri-Sampo, Anu; Tikkanen, Minna; Sorsa, Timo; Juhila, Juuso; Andersson, Sture; Paavonen, Jorma; Stefanovic, Vedran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Intra-amniotic infection (IAI) is a major cause of preterm labor and adverse neonatal outcome. We evaluated amniotic fluid (AF) proteolytic cascade forming biomarkers in relation to microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and IAI in preterm pregnancies with intact membranes. Material and Methods. Amniocentesis was made to 73 women with singleton pregnancies; 27 with suspected IAI; and 46 controls. AF biomarkers were divided into three cascades: Cascade 1: matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), MMP-9, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and interleukin-6; Cascade 2: neutrophil elastase (HNE), elafin, and MMP-9; Cascade 3: MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), MMP-8/TIMP-1 molar ratio, and C-reactive protein (CRP). MMP-8 was measured by an immunoenzymometric assay and the others were measured by ELISA. Standard biochemical methods, molecular microbiology, and culture techniques were used. Results. MMP-8, MMP-9, MPO, elafin, and TIMP-1 concentrations were higher in IAI suspected cases compared to controls and also in IAI suspected cases with MIAC compared to those without MIAC when adjusted by gestational age at amniocentesis. All biomarkers except elafin and MMP-2 had the sensitivity of 100% with thresholds based on ROC-curve. Odd ratios of biomarkers for MIAC were 1.2-38 and 95% confidential intervals 1.0-353.6. Conclusions. Neutrophil based AF biomarkers were associated with IAI and MIAC. PMID:28167848

  15. Using Spores for Fusarium spp. Classification by MALDI-Based Intact Cell/Spore Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Winkler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium is a widespread genus of filamentous fungi and a member of the soil microbial community. Certain subspecies are health threatening because of their mycotoxin production that affects the human and animal food chain. Thus, for early and effective pest control, species identification is of particular interest; however, differentiation on the subspecies level is challenging and time-consuming for this fungus. In the present study, we show the possibilities of intact cell mass spectrometry for spore analysis of 22 different Fusarium strains belonging to six Fusarium subspecies. We found that species differentiation is possible if mass spectrometric analyses are performed under well-defined conditions with fixed parameters. A critical point for analysis is a proper sample preparation of spores, which increases the quality of mass spectra with respect to signal intensity and m/z value variations. It was concluded that data acquistion has to be performed automatically; otherwise, user-specific variations are introduced generating data which cannot fit the existing datasets. Data that show clearly that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-based intact cell/intact spore mass spectrometry (IC/ISMS can be applied to differentiate closely related Fusarium spp. are presented. Results show a potential to build a database on Fusarium species for accurate species identification, for fast response in the case of infections in the cornfield. We furthermore demonstrate the high precision of our approach in classification of intact Fusarium species according to the location of their collection.

  16. Mats Traat : eesti kirjanik on trumbid juba käest andnud / Mats Traat ; küsitles Urve Eslas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Traat, Mats, 1936-

    2007-01-01

    Selgusid Eesti Kultuurkapitali kirjanduse sihtkapitali aastapreemiate saajad. Intervjuu romaaniga "Naised ja pojad" proosapreemia võitnud Mats Traadiga. Esseistikapreemia pälvis Hasso Krulli "Loomise mõnu ja kiri"

  17. How can we conserve intact tropical peatlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Ian; Roucoux, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    The scientific community has, for more than three decades, been expressing increasing alarm about the fate of peatlands in parts of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive land-use conversion and drainage for rice and oil palm have greatly compromised peatland hydrology, ecology, biological richness, and carbon storage. The discourse in the literature on these peatlands is now moving on from attempts to preserve the last remaining fragments of peat-swamp forest, towards discussion of how best to restore damaged ecosystems, and whether it is possible to manage plantations more 'sustainably'. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that peatlands occur quite widely in other parts of the lowland tropics, including parts of Amazonia and the Congo Basin, and many of these peatlands can reasonably be described as 'intact': although few if any parts of the tropics are totally unaffected by human actions, the hydrology and functional ecology of these systems appear to be close to a 'natural' state. The question then arises as to what should be done with the knowledge of their existence. Here we analyse the arguments in favour of protecting intact peatlands, and the potential conflicts with other priorities such as economic development and social justice. We evaluate alternative mechanisms for protecting intact peatlands, focusing on the particular issues raised by peatlands as opposed to other kinds of tropical ecosystem. We identify ways in which natural science agendas can help to inform these arguments, using our own contributions in palaeoecology and carbon mapping as examples. Finally, we argue for a radical reconsideration of research agendas in tropical peatlands, highlighting the potential contribution of methodologies borrowed from the social sciences and humanities.

  18. Late Archean mineralised cyanobacterial mats and their modern analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, J.; Altermann, W.; Kremer, B.; Kempe, S.; Eriksson, P. G.

    2008-09-01

    ,c) reminiscent of common sheaths (glycocalix), typical for coccoidal colonial (pseudoparenchymatous) entophysalidacean or pleurocapsalean cyanobacteria (Fig. 2d-f). The remains of the coccoid sheaths and capsules are visible as a system of rimmed subglobular or irregularly polygonal pits separated from adjacent pits by 2-3 μm thick walls. Microprobe analyses show that the interiors of the pits are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate whereas the rims and walls of calcium carbonate with high admixture of silicates (mostly Al-Fe clay-like silicates) and dolomite. High magnification images of rims and walls confirm the microprobe data indicating authigenic character of the minerals forming both the carbonate infilling the pits interiors (CaCO3) and their rims and walls (CaCO3 + Al-Fe silicates + dolomite). EPSC Abstracts, Vol. 3, EPSC2008-A-00493, 2008 European Planetary Science Congress, Author(s) 2008 It seems that carbonates were the first mineral phase filling the spaces remained after the plasmolysis of the cyanobacterial cell contents, whereas the formation of silicates within the exopolysaccharides forming the bulk of the sheaths and capsules was a later diagenetic process. Microprobe analyses of mineralised modern coccoid cyanobacterial mats forming tower-like structures in the highly alkaline Lake Van, Turkey [3,4] display a set of elements indicative for the presence of authigenic carbonate and silicate minerals which are almost identical with that occurring in the studied Neoarchean samples. Also the optical and SEM images of polished and etched platelets of permineralised Lake Van microbialites are strikingly similar (Fig. 2d-f). Similarly as in modern cyanobacterial and other microbial mats, the process of early post mortem mineralisation, in the case of the Nauga Formation, was most probably associated with the action of heterotrophic bacteria upon the dead cyanobacterial biomass. Heterotrophic bacteria occupying EPS layers of living and dead cyanobacterial

  19. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  20. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicates that the replicate assemblies represent a new candidate phylum within the domain Archaea referred to here as 'Geoarchaeota' or 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in the metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen-sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron-oxide mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogs active in YNP today.

  1. Recollections of Parent Characteristics and Attachment Patterns for College Women of Intact vs. Non-Intact Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmann, Peter R.; Carranza, Laura V.; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasted offsprings' attachment patterns and recollections of parent characteristics in two college samples: 147 females from intact biological parents and 157 females of parental divorce. Secure females from intact or non-intact families rated parents positively, while insecure females rated parents as absent, distant, and demanding.…

  2. Electrospun chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre mats for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-04-01

    Chitosan (CS) aqueous salt blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibre mats was prepared by electrospinning. CS was dissolved with hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in distilled water without the use of toxic or hazardous solvents. The CS aqueous salts were blended with PVA at different weight ratios, and the effect of the solution ratios was investigated. The morphologies and mechanical and swelling properties of the generated fibres were analysed. Indirect cytotoxicity studies indicated that the CS/PVA nanofibre mats were non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The CS-HOBt/PVA and CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test showed that the CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats performed better than gauze in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the biodegradable, biocompatible and antibacterial CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats have potential for use as wound dressing materials.

  3. Cyanobacterial life at low O(2): community genomics and function reveal metabolic versatility and extremely low diversity in a Great Lakes sinkhole mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, A A; Biddanda, B A; Kendall, S T; Jain, S; Marcus, D N; Nold, S C; Sheldon, N D; Dick, G J

    2012-05-01

    Cyanobacteria are renowned as the mediators of Earth's oxygenation. However, little is known about the cyanobacterial communities that flourished under the low-O(2) conditions that characterized most of their evolutionary history. Microbial mats in the submerged Middle Island Sinkhole of Lake Huron provide opportunities to investigate cyanobacteria under such persistent low-O(2) conditions. Here, venting groundwater rich in sulfate and low in O(2) supports a unique benthic ecosystem of purple-colored cyanobacterial mats. Beneath the mat is a layer of carbonate that is enriched in calcite and to a lesser extent dolomite. In situ benthic metabolism chambers revealed that the mats are net sinks for O(2), suggesting primary production mechanisms other than oxygenic photosynthesis. Indeed, (14)C-bicarbonate uptake studies of autotrophic production show variable contributions from oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis and chemosynthesis, presumably because of supply of sulfide. These results suggest the presence of either facultatively anoxygenic cyanobacteria or a mix of oxygenic/anoxygenic types of cyanobacteria. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing revealed a remarkably low-diversity mat community dominated by just one genotype most closely related to the cyanobacterium Phormidium autumnale, for which an essentially complete genome was reconstructed. Also recovered were partial genomes from a second genotype of Phormidium and several Oscillatoria. Despite the taxonomic simplicity, diverse cyanobacterial genes putatively involved in sulfur oxidation were identified, suggesting a diversity of sulfide physiologies. The dominant Phormidium genome reflects versatile metabolism and physiology that is specialized for a communal lifestyle under fluctuating redox conditions and light availability. Overall, this study provides genomic and physiologic insights into low-O(2) cyanobacterial mat ecosystems that played crucial geobiological roles over long stretches of Earth history.

  4. NANOFIBROUS MATS WITH BIRD'S NEST PATTERNS BY ELECTROSPINNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yu Ye; Xiao-jun Huang; Zhi-kang Xu

    2012-01-01

    Electrospun material with bio-inspired ordered architectures and patterns is very interesting,yet remains a challenge.We report here that nanofibrous mats with bird's nest patterned structures can be directly electrospun from chlorinated polypropylene solutions doped with an ionic liquid.The solution viscosity and the ionic liquid content are two dominant factors to influence the lopological morphology of the nanofibrous mats.The patterned structures can be further modulated by the collection time of electrospinning,the humidity of environment and the design of collector.We suggest the electrostatic repulsion between the residual charges of the mat surface and the upcoming nanofibers plays a key role in the formation of the bird's nest patterns.

  5. Storage of yerba maté in controlled atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lemos Cogo Prestes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of controlled atmosphere in the change of color, chlorophyll degradation and phenolic compounds concentration in yerba maté thickly ground (“cancheada” and thinly milled (“socada”. Yerba maté samples from the towns of Arvorezinha (RS - Brazil and São Mateus do Sul (PR - Brazil were stored in four levels of oxygen (1, 3, 6 and 20.9kPa of O2 and four levels of carbon dioxide (0, 3, 6 and 18kPa of CO2 and then were analyzed, after nine months of storage. According to the results, the O2 partial pressure reduction decreased the loss of green coloration, kept a higher content of chlorophylls and of total phenolic compounds. In relation to the different levels of CO2, a response as remarkable as O2 was not observed. The yerba maté that was thickly ground (“cancheada” presented a better storage potential than the one thinly milled (“socada” in the storage with O2 and with CO2. The 1kPa of O2 condition kept the yerba maté greener and with a higher content of chlorophylls and of total phenolic compounds after nine months of storage. The CO2 partial pressure kept the yerba maté coloration greener and with a higher content of chlorophylls and of total phenolic compounds, regardless of the level used, in the maté from both cultivation areas.

  6. MAT 300  Assignment 1: Bottling Company Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril

    2017-01-01

     MAT 300  Assignment 1: Bottling Company Case Study Click Link Below To Buy: http://hwcampus.com/shop/mat-300-assignment-1-bottling-company-case-study/   Due Week 10 and worth 140 points Imagine you are a manager at a major bottling company. Customers have begun to complain that the bottles of the brand of soda produced in your company contain less than the advertised sixteen (16) ounces of product. Your boss wants to solve the problem at hand and has asked you to investig...

  7. Evaluation of Parameters Affecting Horizontal Stability of Landing Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    1974. A rmathematical 11aodel tio silluatet the buckling response oif thte tria’i to th;: hora /ttntal ltAds way, atso elp. 1 h reuls o th...NO. 19R-20-0 MAT XU19, 4-FT X 4*PT ZERO ECCENTRICITY WIT420T EJGH48F NOTE NUMBERS SL LINES .RE HORIZONTAL FORC~E (LEFT) AND HORIZONTAL MOVEMENT ,RIGH...connector bars 14- TEST NO. 19-20-0 MAT XM19, 4-FT X 4-FT WIDTH 20-FT, LENGTH 48-FT ZERO ECCENTRICITY S-NG NUMBERS BYLINES ARE HORIZONTAL FORCE (LEFT) AND

  8. Polymer solution, fiber mat, and nanofiber membrane-electrode-assembly therewith, and method of fabricating same

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    In one aspect of the present invention, a fiber mat is provided. The fiber mat includes at least one type of fibers, which includes one or more polymers. The fiber mat may be a single fiber mat which includes one type of fibers, or may be a dual or multi fiber mat which includes multiple types...... of fibers. The fibers may further include particles of a catalyst. The fiber mat may be used to form an electrode or a membrane. In a further aspect, a fuel cell membrane-electrode-assembly has an anode electrode, a cathode electrode, and a membrane disposed between the anode electrode and the cathode...

  9. Comparison of deep-sea sediment microbial communities in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, Sander K.; Laverman, Anniet M.; Forney, Larry J.; Hardoim, Pablo R.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    Bacterial and archaeal communities in sediments obtained from three geographically-distant mud volcanoes, a control site and a microbial mat in the Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea were characterized using direct 16S rRNA gene analyses. The data were thus in relation to the chemical characteristics of

  10. Effects of hydrolysed casein, intact casein and intact whey protein on energy expenditure and appetite regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Gomes, Sisse

    2014-01-01

    Casein and whey differ in amino acid composition and in the rate of absorption; however, the absorption rate of casein can be increased to mimic that of whey by exogenous hydrolysis. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of hydrolysed casein (HC), intact casein (IC......) and intact whey (IW) on energy expenditure (EE) and appetite regulation, and thereby to investigate the influence of amino acid composition and the rate of absorption. In the present randomised cross-over study, twenty-four overweight and moderately obese young men and women consumed three isoenergetic...... dietary treatments that varied in protein source. The study was conducted in a respiration chamber, where EE, substrate oxidation and subjective appetite were measured over 24 h at three independent visits. Moreover, blood and urine samples were collected from the participants. The results showed...

  11. Comparison of Intact PTH and Bio-Intact PTH Assays Among Non-Dialysis Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbinder, Yael; Benchetrit, Sydney; Golan, Eliezer; Zitman-Gal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    The third-generation bio-intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-84) assay was designed to overcome problems associated with the detection of C-terminal fragments by the second-generation intact PTH assay. The two assays have been compared primarily among dialysis populations. The present study evaluated the correlations and differences between these two PTH assays among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 to 5 not yet on dialysis. Blood samples were collected from 98 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5. PTH concentrations were measured simultaneously by using the second-generation - PTH intact-STAT and third-generation bio-intact 1-84 PTH assays. Other serum biomarkers of bone mineral disorders were also assessed. CKD stage was calculated by using the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration (EPI) formula. Serum bio-intact PTH concentrations were strongly correlated but significantly lower than the intact PTH concentrations (r=0.963, Pbio-intact PTH) positively correlated with urea (r=0.523, r=0.504; P=0.002, respectively), phosphorus (r=0.532, r=0.521; Pbio-intact PTH assay detected significantly lower PTH concentrations compared with intact PTH assay. Additional studies that correlate the diagnosis and management of CKD mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometric findings are needed to determine whether bio-intact PTH assay results are better surrogate markers in these early stages of CKD.

  12. Microbial Extremophiles in Evolutionary Aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. For astrobiology the focus on the study alkaliphilic microorganisms was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and" filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology and the evolution of life. Extremophilic microorganisms on Earth are models for life that might endure high radiation environments in the ice near the surface of comets or on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and in the seafloor deep beneath the icy crusts of Europa and Enceladus.

  13. The ecology of nitrogen fixation in cynobacterial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.; Severin, I.; Bolhuis, H.; Hallenbeck, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    All cyanobacterial mats that have been investigated have been proven to be diazotrophic, i.e., use atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) as the source of nitrogen. Many cyanobacteria possess the capacity to fix N2 and different species have evolved various ways to cope with the sensitivity of nitrogenase towa

  14. The ecology of nitrogen fixation in cyanobacterial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.; Severin, I.; Bolhuis, H.; Hallenbeck, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    All cyanobacterial mats that have been investigated have been proven to be diazotrophic, i.e., use atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) as the source of nitrogen. Many cyanobacteria possess the capacity to fix N2 and different species have evolved various ways to cope with the sensitivity of nitrogenase towa

  15. Electrospinning of caseinates to create protective fibrous mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrospinning is a nonthermal process that produces fibers on the micron- or nano-scale from a polymer solution. If produced by electrospinning of biopolymer solutions, fibrous mats may be created for protecting foods and allowing for the preservation and controlled release of bioactives for healt...

  16. MultiMatTest, Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-02-01

    MultiMatTest is a demonstration code to support a talk and paper titled A Comparative Study of Multi-material Data Structures for Computational Physics Applications. The application times basic operations for different representations of multi-material data structures.

  17. Myocardial Cell Pattern on Piezoelectric Nanofiber Mats for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhao, H.; Du, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents in vitro contractile myocardial cell pattern on piezoelectric nanofiber mats with applications in energy harvesting. The cell-based energy harvester consists of myocardial cell sheet and a PDMS substrate with a PVDF nanofiber mat on. Experimentally, cultured on specifically distributed nanofiber mats, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized with the related morphology and contraction. Previously, we have come up with the concept of energy harvesting from heart beating using piezoelectric material. A bio-hybrid energy harvester combined living cardiomyocytes, PDMS polymer substrate and piezoelectric PVDF film with the electrical output of peak current 87.5nA and peak voltage 92.3mV. However, the thickness of the cardiomyocyte cultured on a two-dimensional substrate is much less than that of the piezoelectric film. The Micro Contact Printing (μCP) method used in cell pattern on the PDMS thin film has tough requirement for the film surface. As such, in this paper we fabricated nanofiber-constructed PDMS thin film to realize cell pattern due to PVDF nanofibers with better piezoelectricity and microstructures of nanofiber mats guiding cell distribution. Living cardiomyocytes patterned on those distributed piezoelectric nanofibers with the result of the same distribution as the nanofiber pattern.

  18. Angiosperm phylogeny based on matK sequence information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilu, K.W.; Borsch, T.; Müller, K.; Soltis, D.E.; Savolainen, V.; Chase, M.W.; Powell, M.; Alice, L.A.; Evans, R.; Sauquet, H.; Neinhuis, C.; Slotta, T.A.B.; Rohwer, J.G.; Campbell, C.; Chatrou, L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Plastid matK gene sequences for 374 genera representing all angiosperm orders and 12 genera of gymnosperms were analyzed using parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) approaches. Traditionally, slowly evolving genomic regions have been preferred for deep-level phylogenetic inference in angiosperm

  19. Social yoga mats: reinforcing synergy between physical and social activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagargoje, Arun; Sokoler, Tomas; Maybach, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our early research into the design space for digital technologies that extend the existing synergistic relationship between physical and social activity from fitness centers to the home. We focus on yoga activity for senior citizens and explore the concept of social yoga mats...

  20. Microbial xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids abundant in the human food supply. Lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin are major xanthophyll carotenoids in human plasma. The consumption of these xanthophylls is directly associated with reduction in the risk of cancers, cardiovascular disease, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract formation. Canthaxanthin and astaxanthin also have considerable importance in aquaculture for salmonid and crustacean pigmentation, and are of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. Chemical synthesis is a major source for the heavy demand of xanthophylls in the consumer market; however, microbial producers also have potential as commercial sources. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis, commercial utility, and major microbial sources of xanthophylls. We also present a critical review of current research and technologies involved in promoting microbes as potential commercial sources for mass production.

  1. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  2. Effects of Source and Concentrations of Nitrogen and Carbohydrate on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss microbial protein synthesis and the effects of sources and concentrations of nitrogen and carbohydrate on microbial protein synthesis. Even though ammonia-N is a satisfactory source of nitrogen for the growth of the majority of rumen microbes, substitution of intact protein for urea usually stimulates ruminal microbial protein synthesis. While protein sources high in degradable intake protein (DIP), such as soybean meal, appear to have properties ...

  3. production and cost of cold patch road mats with bitumen extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jamiu

    1, 2 DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF ILORIN, ILORIN, NIGERIA ... maintenance repairs is road mat products patented as. BRP mat in South Africa .... maintenance work involving patching of pothole on busy or peak.

  4. Positive Youth Development, Life Satisfaction and Problem Behaviors of Adolescents in Intact and Non-Intact Families in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tan Lei Shek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether Chinese adolescents living in intact and non-intact families differed in their positive development, life satisfaction, and risk behavior. A total of 3,328 Secondary 1 students responded to measures of positive youth development (such as resilience and psychosocial competencies, life satisfaction, and risk behavior (substance abuse, delinquency, Internet addiction, consumption of pornographic materials, self-harm, and behavioral intention to engage in problem behavior. Findings revealed that adolescents growing up in intact families reported higher levels of positive developmental outcomes and life satisfaction as compared with adolescents from non-intact families. Adolescents in non-intact families also reported higher levels of risk behaviors than those growing up in intact families.

  5. Community structure and function of high-temperature chlorophototrophic microbial mats inhabiting diverse geothermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klatt, Christian G.; Inskeep, William P.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    -sulfidic sites; de novo assemblies were obtained for Synechococcus-like populations at Chocolate Pots (CP_7) and Fischerella-like populations at White Creek (WC_6). Chloroflexi-like sequences (esp. Roseiflexus and/or Chloroflexus spp.) were observed in all six samples and contained genes involved...

  6. Salinity-dependent limitation of photosynthesis and oxygen exchange in microbial mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Kühl, Michael; Nübel, U.

    1999-01-01

    was specific for each community and in accordance with optimal performance at the respective salinity of origin. This pattern was lost after long-term exposure to varying salinities when responses to salinity were found to approach a general pattern of decreasing photosynthesis and oxygen exchange capacity...... with increasing salinity. Exhaustive measurements of oxygen export in the light, oxygen consumption in the dark and gross photosynthesis indicated that a salinity-dependent limitation of all three parameters occurred. Maximal values for all three parameters decreased exponentially with increasing salinity...

  7. Apparent light requirement for activation of photosynthesis upon rehydration of desiccated beachrock microbial mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Gademann, Rolf; Bird, Paul

    2002-01-01

    excitation. Even after desiccation for long time periods under full sunlight, beachrock showed rapid recovery of photosynthesis after rehydration in the light (t1/2~ 15 min). However, when rehydrated in the dark, the quantum yield of energy conversion of PSII remained zero over extended periods of time...

  8. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    OpenAIRE

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacte...

  9. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    OpenAIRE

    III, Richard Allen White; Ian Malcolm Power; Dipple, Gregory M.; Gordon eSoutham; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bact...

  10. Formation of microbial mats and salt in radioactive paddy soils in Fukushima, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kazue Tazaki; Yasuhiro Shimojima; Teruaki Takehara; Mikio Nakano

    2015-01-01

    Coastal areas in Minami-soma City, Fukushima, Japan, were seriously damaged by radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident that caused multiple pollution by tsunami and radionuclide exposure, after the Great East Japan Earthquake, on 11 March 2011. Some areas will remain no-go zones because radiation levels remain high. In Minami-soma, only 26 percent of decontamination work had been finished by the end of July in 2015. Here, we report the charact...

  11. The Varian MAT-250 mass spectrometer. Steady isotopes laboratory; Espectrometro de masas Varian MAT-250. Laboratorio de isotopos estables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, V.; Tavera D, M.L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    This work treats over the performance and applications of the Varian Mat-250 mass spectrometer which is in the environmental isotope laboratory. It can be applied over topics such as: ions formation, acceleration and collimation, ions separation, ions detection, data transformation, sampling, {delta} notation. (Author)

  12. Preparation of PVA/ H3PW12O40 Fiber Mats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian GONG; Chang Lu SHAO; Guo Cheng YANG; Yan PAN; Lun Yu QU

    2004-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fiber mats containing 20 and 80 wt% H3PW12O40 were prepared by using electrospinning technique. The fiber mats were characterized by IR, XRD spectra and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The diameter of the fiber mats is ca. 400 nm.

  13. 46 CFR 28.570 - Intact righting energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intact righting energy. 28.570 Section 28.570 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.570 Intact righting energy. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of...

  14. X-ray inspection for boreholes in intact trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.; Hemming, J.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray systems are commonly used for luggage inspection. The size of these systems is sufficient for inspection of intact trees. The first objective of this study is to determine whether such an X-ray system is able to visualise boreholes in intact trees. The present study is partly based on human in

  15. Aspects of the ecology of mat-forming lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Crittenden

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Lichen species in the genera Cladonia (subgenus Cladina, Cetraria, Stereocaulon and Alectoria are important vegetation components on well-drained terrain and on elevated micro-sites in peatlands in boreal-Arctic regions. These lichens often form closed mats, the component thalli in which grow vertically upwards at the apices and die off in the older basal regions; they are therefore only loosely attached to the underlying soil. This growth habit is relatively unusual in lichens being found in <0.5% of known species. It might facilitate internal nutrienr recycling and higher growth rates and, together with the production of allelochemicals, it might underlie the considerable ecological success of mat-forming lichens; experiments to critically assess the importance of these processes are required. Mat-forming lichens can constitute in excess of 60% of the winter food intake of caribou and reindeer. Accordingly there is a pressing need for data on lichen growth rates, measured as mass increment, in order to help determine the carrying capacity of winter ranges for rhese herbivores and to better predict recovery rates following grazing. Trampling during the snow-free season fragments lichen thalli; mat-forming lichens regenerate very successfully from thallus fragments provided trampling does nor re-occur. Frequent recurrence of trampling creates disturbed habitats from which lichens will rapidly become eliminated consistent with J.P. Grime's CSR strategy theory. Such damage to lichen ground cover has occurred where reindeer or caribou are unable to migrate away from their winter range such as on small islands or where political boundaries have been fenced; it can also occur on summer range that contains a significant lichen component and on winter range where numbers of migrarory animals become excessive. Species of Stereocaulon, and other genera that contain cyanobacteria (most notably Peltigera and Nephroma, are among the principal agents of

  16. In vitro and ex vivo microbial leakage assessment in endodontics: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Savadkouhi, Sohrab Tour; Bakhtiar, Hengameh; Ardestani, Safoura Emami

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a literature review of published in-vitro and ex-vivo studies, which evaluated microbial leakage in endodontics in the past 10 years. A comprehensive electronic literature search was carried out in PubMed database for English articles published from 2005 to 2016 using the keywords “endodontics,” “in vitro,” “ex vivo,” “microbial leakage,” “microbial penetration,” “saliva,” “Enterococcus faecalis,” “E. faecalis,” “endodontic sealers,” “temporary filling mat...

  17. Microbial Metalloproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter-Leon Hagedoorn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metalloproteomics is a rapidly developing field of science that involves the comprehensive analysis of all metal-containing or metal-binding proteins in a biological sample. The purpose of this review is to offer a comprehensive overview of the research involving approaches that can be categorized as inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS based methods, X-ray absorption/fluorescence, radionuclide based methods and bioinformatics. Important discoveries in microbial proteomics will be reviewed, as well as the outlook to new emerging approaches and research areas.

  18. Development of spatial database on intact forest landscapes of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar Reddy, C.; Singh, Jyoti; Jha, C. S.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increased interest in identifying the status of biodiversity in different spatial and temporal scales. The objective of the current research is to prepare a consistent spatial database of intact forest landscapes of India. The intact forest landscapes are located in the Himalayas, Andaman & Nicobar Islands, Western Ghats and Sunderbans. At national level 237 forest landscapes and 5.4% of the total natural forest remained as intact in India. Current intact forest landscapes of India consists of blocks larger than 10 km2 covering an area of 34,061 km2. Of the total area under intact forest landscapes, Eastern Himalayas represent 76.7% of the area, followed by Western Himalayas (8.8%), Andaman & Nicobar Islands (6.2%) and Western Ghats (5.7%). The largest intact forest landscape block occupies an area of 3342.9 km2 (9.8%) is found in western Arunachal Pradesh. Temperate forest zone represents the highest intactness (56.6%), followed by subtropical zone (19.2%), tropical zone (18.6%) and alpine zone (5.6%). Himalayan moist temperate forests represent the highest area (39.1%) of intact forest landscapes followed by subtropical broad-leaved hill forests, wet evergreen forests, and montane wet temperate forests. It is estimated that 4.4% of the area of intact forest landscapes fall inside the existing 47 protected areas. The results of the analysis best suited as input for the process of identification of new protected areas. The study recommends fine-scale mapping of biodiversity within the intact forest landscapes and to prepare efficient conservation plans.

  19. Vesta Is Not an Intact Protoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolmagno, Guy; Turrini, Diego; Golabeck, Gregor; Jutzi, Martin; Sirono, Sin-iti; Svetsov, Vladimir; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2014-11-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta has been identified as the likely source of howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) basaltic achondrite meteorites, whose parent body differentiated and started solidifying within 3 Ma after the condensation of the Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). The formation of Jupiter and the disk-driven migration of the giant planets also occurred during this period; thus it was expected that Vesta could provide an intact record of large-scale early episodes of planetary migration and bombardment as in the proposed Jovian Early Bombardment and the “Grand Tack” scenarios. However, the results of the Dawn mission detailing Vesta’s mass, volume, density, and surface characteristics provide challenges for modeling the structure and evolution of this asteroid. All proposed models for the generation of the HEDs require the presence of a substantial olivine-rich mantle. But recent work on the depth of excavation of the large basins at the south pole of Vesta suggests that because there is not abundant mantle olivine visible on Vesta or in the Vestoid family asteroids, the crust of Vesta must be at least 80 km thick. Such a thick crust is radically at odds with previous models; should it exist, it ought to manifest itself in other ways such as Vesta’s density structure and bulk chemical composition. However, we find that no Vesta model of iron core, olivine-rich mantle, and HED crust can match the joint constraints of (a) Vesta’s density as derived from the gravity field observed by Dawn; (b) the observed depletion of sodium and potassium and trace element enrichments of the HED meteorites; and (c) the absence of exposed olivine on Vesta’s surface, among Vestoid asteroids, or in our collection of basaltic meteorites. Either Vesta was subjected to a radical change in composition, presumably due to the intense collisional environment where and when it formed, or the asteroid we see today is in fact a reaccretion of material formed elsewhere from now

  20. Microbial Ecosystems, Protection of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Nelson, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Synonyms Conservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes; Preservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes Definition The use, management, and conservation of ecosystems in order to preserve microbial diversity and functioning.

  1. Microbial Ecosystems, Protection of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Nelson, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Synonyms Conservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes; Preservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes Definition The use, management, and conservation of ecosystems in order to preserve microbial diversity and functioning. Introdu

  2. Electrospun mats from styrene/maleic anhydride copolymers: modification with amines and assessment of antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Milena; Stoilova, Olya; Manolova, Nevena; Markova, Nadya; Rashkov, Iliya

    2010-08-11

    New antimicrobial microfibrous electrospun mats from styrene/maleic anhydride copolymers were prepared. Two approaches were applied: (i) grafting of poly(propylene glycol) monoamine (Jeffamine® M-600) on the mats followed by formation of complex with iodine; (ii) modification of the mats with amines of 8-hydroxyquinoline or biguanide type with antimicrobial activity. Microbiological screening against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans revealed that both the formation of complex with iodine and the covalent attachment of 5-amino-8-hydroxyquinoline or of chlorhexidine impart high antimicrobial activity to the mats. In addition, S. aureus bacteria did not adhere to modified mats.

  3. Electrospun Thermoplastic Polyurethane Mats Containing Naproxen– Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akduman Çiğdem

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of cyclodextrins (CDs into electrospun nanofibrous materials can be considered as potential candidates for functional medical textile applications. Naproxen (NAP is a type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly administered for the treatment of pain, inflammation and fever. Drug-inclusion complex formation with CDs is an approach to improve the aqueous solubility via molecular encapsulation of the drug within the cavity of the more soluble CD molecule. In this study, NAP or different NAP-CD inclusion complexes loaded nanofibres were successfully produced through electrospinning and characterised. The inclusion complex loaded mats exhibited significantly faster release profiles than NAP-loaded thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU mats. Overall, NAP-inclusion complex loaded TPU electrospun nanofibres could be used as drug delivery systems for acute pain treatments since they possess a highly porous structure that can release the drug immediately.

  4. Projet ATI : Halle des matériaux

    OpenAIRE

    Babin, Matthieu; Busom Descarrega, Josep; Frisk, Nikolina; Haye, Pierre; Raymond Llorens, Santiago; Thaller, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Le Projet halle des matériaux est un projet qui a été créé cette année spécialement pour mettre en place une procédure qualité au sein de celle-ci dans le but in fine de mettre aux normes la machine de Traction MTS 10/M ainsi que la machine de Dureté REICHERTER 250 UV. La mise aux normes attendue par les encadrants est, en fait, la création d'un dossier qualité regroupement les documents nécessaires à l'obtention de l'accréditation. Dans le cas de la Halle des Matériaux, nous pouvions vise...

  5. Radon and thoron anomalies along Mat fault in Mizoram, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Prasad Jaishi; Sanjay Singh; Raghavendra Prasad Tiwari; Ramesh Chandra Tiwari

    2013-12-01

    In this study, radon and thoron concentrations in soil gas has been monitored using LR-115(II) solid state nuclear track detectors since 15th July 2011 to February 2012. The study was carried out along Mat fault in Serchip district, Mizoram, India at two different sites – Mat Bridge (23°18′N, 92° 48′E) and Tuichang (23° 13′N, 92° 56′E). The results obtained have been correlated to the seismic events that occurred within 800km from the measuring sites over the mentioned period of time. Anomalous behaviour in radon concentrations have been observed prior to some earthquakes. Interestingly, some thoron anomalies were also recorded.

  6. Trimap generation for digital matting using camera exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lu; OUYANG Binlin; LI Chengrong

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposed a method to automatically generate the trimap for digital matting. Camera parameters of aperture and shutter speed are used to control its exposure, and accordingly to take pictures of stationary foreground with blurred background. Our method was inspired by color difference matting, both of which require a pre-record background image. In our method, only one image was required. Upon this input image, the process of blurring-deblurring, subtraction, thresholding and dilation were applied to finally generate the trimap. No user's direct interface with the image was needed, and the user only needed to adjust the threshold or width of dilation for some input images. It reduces users' conservative interaction, and results are reliable for most of the pictures.

  7. Multivariate and phylogenetic analyses assessing the response of bacterial mat communities from an ancient oligotrophic aquatic ecosystem to different scenarios of long-term environmental disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Souza, Valeria; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the response of bacterial communities to environmental change is extremely important in predicting the effect of biogeochemical modifications in ecosystem functioning. The Cuatro Cienegas Basin is an ancient oasis in the Mexican Chihuahuan desert that hosts a wide diversity of microbial mats and stromatolites that have survived in extremely oligotrophic pools with nearly constant conditions. However, thus far, the response of these unique microbial communities to long-term environmental disturbances remains unexplored. We therefore studied the compositional stability of these bacterial mat communities by using a replicated (3x) mesocosm experiment: a) Control; b) Fluct: fluctuating temperature; c) 40C: increase to 40 ºC; d) UVplus: artificial increase in UV radiation; and f) UVmin: UV radiation protection. In order to observe the changes in biodiversity, we obtained 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from microbial mats at the end of the experiment (eight months) and analyzed them using multivariate and phylogenetic tools. Sequences were assigned to 13 major lineages, among which Cyanobacteria (38.8%) and Alphaproteobacteria (25.5%) were the most abundant. The less extreme treatments (Control and UVmin) had a more similar composition and distribution of the phylogenetic groups with the natural pools than the most extreme treatments (Fluct, 40C, and UVplus), which showed drastic changes in the community composition and structure, indicating a different community response to each environmental disturbance. An increase in bacterial diversity was found in the UVmin treatment, suggesting that protected environments promote the establishment of complex bacterial communities, while stressful environments reduce diversity and increase the dominance of a few Cyanobacterial OTUs (mainly Leptolyngbya sp) through environmental filtering. Mesocosm experiments using complex bacterial communities, along with multivariate and phylogenetic analyses of molecular data, can

  8. Multivariate and phylogenetic analyses assessing the response of bacterial mat communities from an ancient oligotrophic aquatic ecosystem to different scenarios of long-term environmental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pajares

    Full Text Available Understanding the response of bacterial communities to environmental change is extremely important in predicting the effect of biogeochemical modifications in ecosystem functioning. The Cuatro Cienegas Basin is an ancient oasis in the Mexican Chihuahuan desert that hosts a wide diversity of microbial mats and stromatolites that have survived in extremely oligotrophic pools with nearly constant conditions. However, thus far, the response of these unique microbial communities to long-term environmental disturbances remains unexplored. We therefore studied the compositional stability of these bacterial mat communities by using a replicated (3x mesocosm experiment: a Control; b Fluct: fluctuating temperature; c 40C: increase to 40 ºC; d UVplus: artificial increase in UV radiation; and f UVmin: UV radiation protection. In order to observe the changes in biodiversity, we obtained 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from microbial mats at the end of the experiment (eight months and analyzed them using multivariate and phylogenetic tools. Sequences were assigned to 13 major lineages, among which Cyanobacteria (38.8% and Alphaproteobacteria (25.5% were the most abundant. The less extreme treatments (Control and UVmin had a more similar composition and distribution of the phylogenetic groups with the natural pools than the most extreme treatments (Fluct, 40C, and UVplus, which showed drastic changes in the community composition and structure, indicating a different community response to each environmental disturbance. An increase in bacterial diversity was found in the UVmin treatment, suggesting that protected environments promote the establishment of complex bacterial communities, while stressful environments reduce diversity and increase the dominance of a few Cyanobacterial OTUs (mainly Leptolyngbya sp through environmental filtering. Mesocosm experiments using complex bacterial communities, along with multivariate and phylogenetic analyses of molecular

  9. Antimicrobial activity of electrospun poly(butylenes succinate) fiber mats containing PVP-capped silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ligang; Wang, Pingli; Zhao, Zhiguo; Ji, Junhui

    2013-12-01

    In this study, biodegradable poly(butylenes succinate) (PBS) fiber mats containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by the electrospinning process. Small AgNPs (fiber mats and the distribution of the AgNPs were well characterized by TEM and SEM. The release of Ag from the PBS fiber mats was quantitively determined by ICP. The PBS fiber mats with 0.29 % AgNPs content showed strong antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli with the efficacy as high as 99 %. The effective bactericidal activity on E. coli was demonstrated for a short contacting time with the PBS-AgNPs fiber mats. In addition, the long-term release performance of Ag from the fiber mats can keep inhibiting the bacterial growth in the mats over a long period of time.

  10. Hydroponic root mats for wastewater treatment-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongbing; Cuervo, Diego Paredes; Müller, Jochen A; Wiessner, Arndt; Köser, Heinz; Vymazal, Jan; Kästner, Matthias; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Hydroponic root mats (HRMs) are ecotechnological wastewater treatment systems where aquatic vegetation forms buoyant filters by their dense interwoven roots and rhizomes, sometimes supported by rafts or other floating materials. A preferential hydraulic flow is created in the water zone between the plant root mat and the bottom of the treatment system. When the mat touches the bottom of the water body, such systems can also function as HRM filter; i.e. the hydraulic flow passes directly through the root zone. HRMs have been used for the treatment of various types of polluted water, including domestic wastewater; agricultural effluents; and polluted river, lake, stormwater and groundwater and even acid mine drainage. This article provides an overview on the concept of applying floating HRM and non-floating HRM filters for wastewater treatment. Exemplary performance data are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of this technology are discussed in comparison to those of ponds, free-floating plant and soil-based constructed wetlands. Finally, suggestions are provided on the preferred scope of application of HRMs.

  11. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Huiluo

    2015-07-21

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  12. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiluo eCao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of ammonia oxidizing archaea in different habitats (water versus sediment potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  13. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  14. Microbial communities associated with benthic faunal assemblages at cold seep sediments of the Sonora Margin, Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine eCruaud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Sonora Margin cold seeps present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To better understand if sedimentary microbial communities reflect this patchy distribution, all major habitats were investigated using four complementary approaches: 16S rRNA 454 pyrosequencing, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence in situ hybridization and geochemistry analyses. This study reveals that sediments populated by different surface assemblages show distinct porewater geochemistry features and are associated with distinct microbial communities. In the sediments underlying the microbial mat and the surrounding macrofauna, microbial communities were dominated by anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph ANME and sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. In contrast, sediment-associated microbial communities underlying the megafauna habitats (vesicomyids and siboglinids were characterized by a lower biomass and important proportions of the Marine Benthic Group D (MBG-D, Chloroflexi as well as filamentous Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria. Together, geochemical and microbial surveys indicate that porewater methane concentrations play an important role in the microbial community structure and subsequently in the establishment of the surface colonizers. Furthermore, presence and activity of the surface colonizers influence the underlying microbial communities probably because of modification of energy source availabilities.

  15. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  16. The effect of sulfate concentration on (sub)millimeter-scale sulfide δ 34S in hypersaline cyanobacterial mats over the diurnal cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David A.; Finke, Niko; Zha, Jessica; Blake, Garrett; Hoehler, Tori M.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2009-10-01

    Substantial isotopic fractionations are associated with many microbial sulfur metabolisms and measurements of the bulk δ 34S isotopic composition of sulfur species (predominantly sulfates and/or sulfides) have been a key component in developing our understanding of both modern and ancient biogeochemical cycling. However, the interpretations of bulk δ 34S measurements are often non-unique, making reconstructions of paleoenvironmental conditions or microbial ecology challenging. In particular, the link between the μm-scale microbial activity that generates isotopic signatures and their eventual preservation as a bulk rock value in the geologic record has remained elusive, in large part because of the difficulty of extracting sufficient material at small scales. Here we investigate the potential for small-scale (˜100 μm-1 cm) δ 34S variability to provide additional constraints for environmental and/or ecological reconstructions. We have investigated the impact of sulfate concentrations (0.2, 1, and 80 mM SO 4) on the δ 34S composition of hydrogen sulfide produced over the diurnal (day/night) cycle in cyanobacterial mats from Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Sulfide was captured as silver sulfide on the surface of a 2.5 cm metallic silver disk partially submerged beneath the mat surface. Subsequent analyses were conducted on a Cameca 7f-GEO secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) to record spatial δ 34S variability within the mats under different environmental conditions. Isotope measurements were made in a 2-dimensional grid for each incubation, documenting both lateral and vertical isotopic variation within the mats. Typical grids consisted of ˜400-800 individual measurements covering a lateral distance of ˜1 mm and a vertical depth of ˜5-15 mm. There is a large isotopic enrichment (˜10-20‰) in the uppermost mm of sulfide in those mats where [SO 4] was non-limiting (field and lab incubations at 80 mM). This is attributed to rapid recycling of

  17. Treatment for burn blisters: debride or leave intact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Faye; Amblum, Jeshi

    2014-05-01

    This article presents findings from a systematic literature review of whether blisters arising from minor burns should be de-roofed or left intact. It discusses the risks of infection, healing outcomes, discomfort, choice of dressings and costs associated with each method, and reveals that debriding blisters larger than the patient's little fingernail while leaving smaller ones intact is generally agreed to be the best option. The article also explains external factors that influence the choice of whether to debride or leave blisters intact, reviews policy at the trust where one of the authors works in the context of the research and makes recommendations for practice.

  18. Geochemical Influence on Microbial Diversity in the Warm, Salty, Stinking Spring, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Little is known of the geochemistry and microbiology in the Stinking Springs, a sulfidic, saline, warm spring northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Utah. The International Geobiology Course of 2012 investigated the geochemistry, lipid abundances, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake rates and microbial diversity on different kinds of samples from a number of locations in the spring. The measured pH, temperature, salinity, and sulfide concentration along the 100 m flow path ranged from 6.64-7.77, 40-28° C, 2.9-2.2%, and 250 μM - negligible, respectively. Five sites were selected along the flow path and within each site microbial mats were sub-sampled according to their morphological characteristics; a range from floating to streamer-style in zones of higher flow rates to highly-layered mats in low- or sheet-flow zones. Geochemical characterization of the above plus metals, anions and cations were conducted at each site. Genomic DNA was extracted from each microbial sample / layer, and 16S rRNA genes were amplified and subjected to pyrosequencing. Fatty acids and pigments were extracted from the mat samples / layers and analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for lipid / pigment composition. Bicarbonate uptake rates for mat samples / layers were determined with 24 hour light and dark incubations of 13HCO3-spiked spring water. Microbial diversity varied by site and was generally high in all three domains of life with phototrophs, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers, methanogens, and other bacteria / archaea identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence. Diatoms, identified by both microscopy and lipid analyses were found to increase in abundance with distance from the source. Methanogens were generally more abundant in deeper mat laminae and underlying sediments. Photoheterotrophs were found in all mat layers. Microbial diversity increased significantly with depth at most sites. In addition, two distinct microbial streamers were also identified and

  19. 16S rRNA sequences of uncultivated hot spring cyanobacterial mat inhabitants retrieved as randomly primed cDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.; Ward, D.M. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman (United States)); Weller, J.W. (Univ. of Montana, Missoula (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Cloning and analysis of cDNAs synthesized from rRNAs is one approach to assess the species composition of natural microbial communities. In some earlier attempts to synthesize cDNA from 16S rRNA (16S rcDNA) from the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat, a dominance of short 16S rcDNAs was observed, which appear to have originated only from certain organisms. Priming of cDNA synthesis from small ribosomal subunit RNA with random deoxyhexanucleotides can retrieve longer sequences, more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. Here we report the retrieval of 16S rRNA sequences form three formerly uncultured community members. One sequence type, which was retrieved three times from a total of five sequences analyzed, can be placed in the cyanobacterial phylum. A second sequence type is related to 16S rRNAs from green nonsulfur bacteria. The third sequence type may represent a novel phylogenetic type.

  20. Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on Caribbean coral reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J Brocke

    Full Text Available Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised areas. Reefs with high BCM abundance were also characterised by high benthic cover of macroalgae and low cover of corals. Nutrient concentrations in the water-column were consistently low, but markedly increased just above substrata (both sandy and hard covered with BCMs. This was true for sites with both high and low BCM coverage, suggesting that BCM growth is stimulated by a localised, substrate-linked release of nutrients from the microbial degradation of organic matter. This hypothesis was supported by a higher organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and by an in situ experiment which showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter (Spirulina. We propose that nutrient runoff from urbanised areas stimulates phototrophic blooms and enhances organic matter concentrations on the reef. This organic matter is transported by currents and settles on the seabed at sites with low hydrodynamics. Subsequently, nutrients released from the organic matter degradation fuel the growth of BCMs. Improved management of nutrients generated on land should lower organic loading of sediments and other benthos (e.g. turf and macroalgae to reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs.

  1. Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on Caribbean coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocke, Hannah J; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised areas. Reefs with high BCM abundance were also characterised by high benthic cover of macroalgae and low cover of corals. Nutrient concentrations in the water-column were consistently low, but markedly increased just above substrata (both sandy and hard) covered with BCMs. This was true for sites with both high and low BCM coverage, suggesting that BCM growth is stimulated by a localised, substrate-linked release of nutrients from the microbial degradation of organic matter. This hypothesis was supported by a higher organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and by an in situ experiment which showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter (Spirulina). We propose that nutrient runoff from urbanised areas stimulates phototrophic blooms and enhances organic matter concentrations on the reef. This organic matter is transported by currents and settles on the seabed at sites with low hydrodynamics. Subsequently, nutrients released from the organic matter degradation fuel the growth of BCMs. Improved management of nutrients generated on land should lower organic loading of sediments and other benthos (e.g. turf and macroalgae) to reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs.

  2. BOTH MAT1-1 AND MAT1-2 MATING TYPES OF MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA OCCUR AT EQUAL FREQUENCIES IN ALGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allioui, N; Siah, A; Brinis, L; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P

    2014-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola is currently the most devastating disease on wheat crops worldwide. Mycosphaerella graminicola sexual reproduction involves two mating type idiomorphs that were previously studied in several areas around the world, but not in Algeria so far. The objective of this study was thus to determine the frequencies and distribution of M. graminicola mating types in this country. One hundred and twenty monoconidial isolates of this fungus (60 from bread wheat and 60 from durum wheat) were collected during the 2012 growing season from five distinct geographical locations in Algeria. The mating type of each isolate was identified using a multiplex PCR that amplifies either MAT1-1 or MAT1-2 fragment from mating type loci. Both idiomorphs were found at equal frequencies according to the chi-square test at the whole country level (46% MAT1-1 and 54% MAT1-2) and in each of the sampled locations. The two mating types were also detected at equal frequencies on both host species (47% MAT1-1 vs 53% MAT1-2 on bread wheat and 45% MAT1-1 vs 55% MAT1-2 on durum wheat). Our study showed that the two mating types of M. graminicola occur at equal proportions in Algeria and suggests a strong potential for sexual reproduction of the pathogen in this country that may eventually lead to either adaptation to local conditions, plant resistance overcoming or the emergence of resistance to fungicides.

  3. Vesta is not an intact protoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolmagno, G.; Turrini, D.; Golabek, G.; Svetsov, V.; Sirono, S.; Tsiganis, K.

    2014-07-01

    The Dawn mission was designed to explore ''remnant intact protoplanets from the earliest epoch of solar system formation'' [1]. However, models of Vesta composed of an iron core, olivine mantle, and HED crust in chondritic proportions cannot match the joint constraints from Dawn [1] of Vesta's density, core size, and the extremely limited presence of exposed olivine on its surface. Vesta has a mean density of 3456 kg/m3 and its surface composition is well matched by howardites. The Dawn gravity data suggest a nickel-iron core of radius 110 km and density 7500--7800 kg/m3. The Rheasilvia impact basin, formed within a pre-existing large basin, Veneneia, should have excavated material from a depth of 50 km to 80 km or more below Vesta's surface [2]. If the howardite crust were thinner than 50--80 km, a significant amount of olivine-rich material, derived from depth, would have been exposed within this basin; models suggest that olivine would also be distributed both on Vesta's surface and in space as meteorite-source Vestoids. Such olivine is rare on Vesta, among the Vestoids, or in our meteorite collection. Vesta's density is similar to an L chondrite, but the Na and K abundances in Vesta are strongly depleted compared to chondrites and the average metal content of an L chondrite, 8.4% by mass, would give a core radius less than 90 km. A 110 km radius metallic core, via the Dawn data, represents 15% of Vesta's mass. The Mg/Al ratio in cosmic abundances is about 10:1, but roughly 1:1 within the eucrites; thus if Vesta started with cosmic abundances, the eucrites can only represent 10% of the parent body total mass. Likewise the 10 x chondritic rare earth trace elements (REE) abundance seen in most eucrites demands that, regardless of formation mechanism, these basalts were crystallized from a melt representing 10% of the mass of the source region [3]. Thus the howardite crust of a chondritic HED parent body, mixing all the available eucritic and diogenitic material

  4. Non-intact zona improves development of murine preimplantation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl5

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 11(77), pp. ... Key words: Mouse, non-intact zona embryos, adenovirus vector with green fluorescent protein (pAd-GFP), embryos ..... informational molecule, could be lysised or its function.

  5. Gross nitrogen fluxes in intact beech-soil-microbe systems under experimentally simulated climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Javier; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Dannenmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The vulnerability of beech forests of Central Europe to projected climate change conditions is a current matter of debate and concern. In order to investigate the response of N cycling in a typical beech forest to projected climate change conditions, we transplanted small lysimeters with intact beech-soil systems from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Lysimeters transfers within the N exposure served as control. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed: (1) comparison between N and S slopes under ambient conditions; (2) comparison between N and S slopes after intensified drought at S exposure; (3) rewetting after the drought period. Homogenous triple isotope labeling (15N/13C glutamine, 15NH4+, 15NO3-) in combination with 15N tracing and -pool dilution approaches as well as molecular analyses of nitrogen cycling genes and mycorrhiza morphotyping allowed to simultaneously quantify all N turnover processes in the intact beech-soil-microbe system. Nitrate was the major N source of beech seedlings with little importance of ammonium and no importance of glutamine. Experimental simulation of climate change resulted in significantly reduced gene copies of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB), a dramatic attenuation of microbial gross nitrate production from 252±83 mg N m-2 day-1 for the control treatment to 49±29 mg N m-2 day-1 for the climate change treatment and associated strong declines in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech, which could not be compensated by uptake of ammonium or glutamine. Therefore, N content of beech seedlings was strongly reduced in the climate change treatment. Hence our data provide a microbial mechanism to explain nutritional limitations of beech under higher temperatures and drought and raise questions about

  6. A laboratory experiment of intact polar lipid degradation in sandy sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Logemann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Intact polar lipids (IPLs are considered biomarkers for living biomass. Their degradation in marine sediments, however, is poorly understood and complicates interpretation of their occurrence in geological samples. To investigate the turnover of IPLs, a degradation experiment with anoxic sandy sediments from the North Sea was conducted. Intact cells of two organisms that do not naturally occur in North Sea sediments were chosen as IPL sources: (i Saccharomyces cerevisiae, representative for ester-bound acyl lipids that also occur in Bacteria, and (ii the archaeon Haloferax volcanii, representative for ether-bound isoprenoid lipids. Surprisingly, IPLs with phosphoester-bound head groups showed approximately the same degradation rate as IPLs with glycosidic head groups. Furthermore, the results indicate a relatively fast degradation of S. cerevisiae IPLs with ester-bound moieties (analogs of bacterial membrane lipids and no significant degradation of archaeal IPLs with ether-bound moieties. Pore water and 16S rRNA-based DGGE analysis showed only a minor influence of the IPL source on microbial metabolism and community profiles. Due to our results, the IPL-based quantification of Archaea and Bacteria should be interpreted with caution.

  7. A laboratory experiment of intact polar lipid degradation in sandy sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Logemann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intact polar lipids (IPLs are considered biomarkers for living biomass. Their degradation in marine sediments, however, is poorly understood and complicates interpretation of their occurrence in geological samples. To investigate the turnover of IPLs, a degradation experiment with anoxic sandy sediments from the North Sea was conducted. Intact cells of two organisms that do not naturally occur in North Sea sediments were chosen as IPL sources: (i Saccharomyces cerevisiae, representative for ester-bound acyl lipids that also occur in Bacteria, and (ii the archaeon Haloferax volcanii, representative for ether-bound isoprenoid lipids. Surprisingly, IPLs with phosphoester-bound head groups showed approximately the same degradation rate as IPLs with glycosidic head groups. Furthermore, the results indicate a relatively fast degradation of S. cerevisiae IPLs with ester-bound moieties (analogs of bacterial membrane lipids and no significant degradation of archaeal IPLs with ether-bound moieties. Pore water and 16S rRNA-based DGGE analysis showed only a minor influence of the IPL source on microbial metabolism and community profiles. Due to our results, the IPL-based quantification of Archaea and Bacteria should be interpreted with caution.

  8. Are floating algal mats a refuge from hypoxia for estuarine invertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knysh, Kyle M.; Theriault, Emma F.; Pater, Christina C.; Courtenay, Simon C.; van den Heuvel, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophic aquatic habitats are characterized by the proliferation of vegetation leading to a large standing biomass that upon decomposition may create hypoxic (low-oxygen) conditions. This is indeed the case in nutrient impacted estuaries of Prince Edward Island, Canada, where macroalgae, from the genus Ulva, form submerged ephemeral mats. Hydrological forces and gases released from photosynthesis and decomposition lead to these mats occasionally floating to the water’s surface, henceforth termed floating mats. Here, we explore the hypothesis that floating mats are refugia during periods of sustained hypoxia/anoxia and examine how the invertebrate community responds to it. Floating mats were not always present, so in the first year (2013) sampling was attempted monthly and limited to when both floating and submerged mats occurred. In the subsequent year sampling was weekly, but at only one estuary due to logistical constraints from increased sampling frequency, and was not limited to when both mat types occurred. Water temperature, salinity, and pH were monitored bi-weekly with dissolved oxygen concentration measured hourly. The floating and submerged assemblages shared many of the same taxa but were statistically distinct communities; submerged mats tended to have a greater proportion of benthic animals and floating mats had more mobile invertebrates and insects. In 2014, sampling happened to occur in the weeks before the onset of anoxia, during 113 consecutive hours of sustained anoxia, and for four weeks after normoxic conditions returned. The invertebrate community on floating mats appeared to be unaffected by anoxia, indicating that these mats may be refugia during times of oxygen stress. Conversely, there was a dramatic decrease in animal abundances that remained depressed on submerged mats for two weeks. Cluster analysis revealed that the submerged mat communities from before the onset of anoxia and four weeks after anoxia were highly similar to each other

  9. Are floating algal mats a refuge from hypoxia for estuarine invertebrates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R.S. Coffin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophic aquatic habitats are characterized by the proliferation of vegetation leading to a large standing biomass that upon decomposition may create hypoxic (low-oxygen conditions. This is indeed the case in nutrient impacted estuaries of Prince Edward Island, Canada, where macroalgae, from the genus Ulva, form submerged ephemeral mats. Hydrological forces and gases released from photosynthesis and decomposition lead to these mats occasionally floating to the water’s surface, henceforth termed floating mats. Here, we explore the hypothesis that floating mats are refugia during periods of sustained hypoxia/anoxia and examine how the invertebrate community responds to it. Floating mats were not always present, so in the first year (2013 sampling was attempted monthly and limited to when both floating and submerged mats occurred. In the subsequent year sampling was weekly, but at only one estuary due to logistical constraints from increased sampling frequency, and was not limited to when both mat types occurred. Water temperature, salinity, and pH were monitored bi-weekly with dissolved oxygen concentration measured hourly. The floating and submerged assemblages shared many of the same taxa but were statistically distinct communities; submerged mats tended to have a greater proportion of benthic animals and floating mats had more mobile invertebrates and insects. In 2014, sampling happened to occur in the weeks before the onset of anoxia, during 113 consecutive hours of sustained anoxia, and for four weeks after normoxic conditions returned. The invertebrate community on floating mats appeared to be unaffected by anoxia, indicating that these mats may be refugia during times of oxygen stress. Conversely, there was a dramatic decrease in animal abundances that remained depressed on submerged mats for two weeks. Cluster analysis revealed that the submerged mat communities from before the onset of anoxia and four weeks after anoxia were highly

  10. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  11. Rigid Polyurethane Foam Thermal Insulation Protected with Mineral Intumescent Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirpluks Mikelis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest disadvantages of rigid polyurethane (PU foams is its low thermal resistance, high flammability and high smoke production. Greatest advantage of this thermal insulation material is its low thermal conductivity (λ, which at 18-28 mW/(m•K is superior to other materials. To lower the flammability of PU foams, different flame retardants (FR are used. Usually, industrially viable are halogenated liquid FRs but recent trends in EU regulations show that they are not desirable any more. Main concern is toxicity of smoke and health hazard form volatiles in PU foam materials. Development of intumescent passive fire protection for foam materials would answer problems with flammability without using halogenated FRs. It is possible to add expandable graphite (EG into PU foam structure but this increases the thermal conductivity greatly. Thus, the main advantage of PU foam is lost. To decrease the flammability of PU foams, three different contents 3%; 9% and 15% of EG were added to PU foam formulation. Sample with 15% of EG increased λ of PU foam from 24.0 to 30.0 mW/(m•K. This paper describes the study where PU foam developed from renewable resources is protected with thermally expandable intumescent mat from Technical Fibre Products Ltd. (TFP as an alternative to EG added into PU material. TFP produces range of mineral fibre mats with EG that produce passive fire barrier. Two type mats were used to develop sandwich-type PU foams. Also, synergy effect of non-halogenated FR, dimethyl propyl phosphate and EG was studied. Flammability of developed materials was assessed using Cone Calorimeter equipment. Density, thermal conductivity, compression strength and modulus of elasticity were tested for developed PU foams. PU foam morphology was assessed from scanning electron microscopy images.

  12. Microbial Precipitation and Diagenesis in Salt Ponds from Little Darby Island, Exumas, Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggot, A. M.; Klaus, J.; Swart, P. K.; Reid, P.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is responsible for the majority of carbonate precipitation and early diagenesis in restricted hypersaline ponds on Little Darby Island, Bahamas. The four ponds on Little Darby exhibit a range of salinities (10-69) and sedimentary deposits that record the evolution of ponds from restricted shallow marine embayments to isolated hypersaline ponds. Only the largest and most hypersaline pond, Anaconda, was covered by a classically defined multi-layered microbial mat (3 cm thick) with calcium carbonate precipitates. Microbial laminations and organosedimentary layers were preserved throughout the 90cm sediment core. The brackish ponds had thinner (Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Planctomycetes, with metabolisms previously linked to carbonate producing mat systems. Sulfate reduction and heterotrophic degradation of exopolymeric substances were identified as the primary mechanism for microbial carbonate precipitation. The δ13C values of carbonate sediments ranged from -5.5‰ to 3‰, with the more negative values representing the heterotrophic involvement in carbonate precipitation. The more positive values (0-3‰) were associated with the deeper sediments deposited in a marine environment before the ponds were isolated. Pore fluid chemical ratios of Ca2+/Cl-, Mg2+/Cl-, and Sr2+/Cl- ratios also suggest that precipitation and recrystallization of carbonate minerals is occurring in the buried sediments and indicates that the microbial influence on buried sediments is not limited to surface mats. The results reported here demonstrate that the absence of microbially induced sedimentary structures, such as laminations in hypersaline ponds, does not imply the absence of microbially mediated carbonate precipitation.

  13. Organo-mineral imprints in fossil cyanobacterial mats of an Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, E.; Lepot, K.; Deremiens, L.; Namsaraev, Z.; Compere, P.; Gerard, E.; Verleyen, E.; Tavernier, I.; Hodgson, D.; Vyverman, W.; Wilmotte, A.

    2010-12-01

    Lacustrine microbial mats in Antarctic ice-free oases are considered to be modern analogues of early microbial ecosystems because they are dominated by cyanobacteria that need to cope with elevated UV radiation during summer by producing protective compounds such as UV-screening pigments. These microbial consortia offer a unique opportunity to (i) identify biogeochemical signatures to study the fossil record of microorganisms, and (ii) better understand their imprint mineral record. We studied sediment cores from a meromictic brackish-water lake, Kobachi Ike, Skarvsnes Peninsula, Lützow Holm Bay, East Antarctica, where primary production is dominated by photosynthetic benthic communities. The faintly to finely laminated (stromatolitic) sediments include variable amounts of organic-rich laminae, micritic carbonate, clays and silicate sand. We studied the microstructure and chemistry of organo-mineral associations in a suite of sediments ranging in age from several tens to ca. 3500 years. We examined Os- and U- stained polished resin-embedded sediments in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). We imaged photosynthetic pigments of microorganisms in fluorescence by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). We analyzed organic matter chemistry in demineralized sediments and cultured cyanobacteria using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy. Molecular analyses of fossil cyanobacterial DNA were performed using Denaturating Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of partial 16S rRNA genes and sequencing. SEM revealed an intimate association between nanostructured Ca-carbonate peloids, fossil cell clusters resembling colonies of unicellular coccoid cyanobacteria, and cell-like imprints preserved in nanocarbonates. Diffuse organic matter (kerogen or EPS) is associated with nanoclays to form a laminae-building network around the carbonates. These organo-mineral microstructures strongly resemble those of the 2.7 Gyrs old Tumbiana stromatolites. CLSM imaging and fossil DNA

  14. Microbial hydrolysis of steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, A G; Tarka, S M

    2008-07-01

    A review of the role of gut microbiota in the metabolism of the steviol glycosides, stevioside and rebaudioside A, indicates that they are not absorbed intact but undergo hydrolysis by the intestinal microflora to steviol. Steviol is not metabolized by the intestinal flora and is absorbed from the intestine. The rate of hydrolysis for stevioside is greater than for rebaudioside A. Recent studies using mass spectrometry have shown that steviol-16,17-epoxide is not a microbial metabolite of steviol glycosides. Bacteroides species are primarily responsible for hydrolysis via their beta-glucosidase activity. Fecal incubation studies with both human and animal mixed flora provide similar results, and this indicates that the rat is an appropriate model for studies on steviol glycosides. Given the similarity in the microbial metabolism of stevioside and rebaudioside A with the formation of steviol as the single hydrolysis product that is absorbed from the intestinal tract, the toxicological data on stevioside are relevant to the risk assessment of rebaudioside A.

  15. Electrospun magnetic nanofibre mats – A new bondable biomaterial using remotely activated magnetic heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yi [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Key Laboratory of Science & Technology of Eco-Textile, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Leung, Victor; Yuqin Wan, Lynn [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Dutz, Silvio [Institut für Biomedizinische Technik und Informatik, Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany); Department of Nano Biophotonics, Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Ko, Frank K., E-mail: frank.ko@ubc.ca [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Häfeli, Urs O., E-mail: urs.hafeli@ubc.ca [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    A solvothermal process was adopted to produce hydrophilic magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles which were subsequently emulsified with a chloroform/methanol (70/30 v/v) solution of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and then electrospun into a 0.2 mm thick PCL mat. The magnetic heating of the mats at a field amplitude of 25 kA/m and frequency of 400 kHz exhibited promising efficiency for magnetic hyperthermia, with a specific absorption rate of about 40 W/g for the magnetic mat. The produced heat was used to melt the magnetic mat onto the surrounding non-magnetic polymer mat from within, without destroying the nanostructure of the non-magnetic polymer more than 0.5 mm away. Magnetic nanofibre mats might thus be useful for internal heat sealing applications, and potentially also for thermotherapy.

  16. Hydroxypropyl chitosan/organic rectorite-based nanofibrous mats with intercalated structure for bacterial inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongbing; Lin, Penghua; Li, Wei; Xin, Shangjing; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Jianhong

    2013-01-01

    This paper reported antibacterial hydroxypropyl chitosan (HPCS)/organic rectorite (OREC)-based nanofibrous mats with intercalated structure fabricated via solution intercalation method and electrospinning. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inhibition zone surrounding circular mats disks measurement were performed to characterize the morphology, intercalation structure, elements analysis, and the antibacterial properties of the as-spun nanofibrous mats. The results showed that the nanofibrous mats were with better fiber shape with the addition of OREC, the polymer chains were successfully intercalated into the interlayer of OREC, and nanofibrous mats containing HPCS exhibited good antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the bacterial inhibition ability of the nanofibrous mats was enhanced when OREC was added.

  17. Glutaraldehyde vapor cross-linked nanofibrous PVA mat with in situ formed silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destaye, Addisu Getachew; Lin, Cheng-Keng; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2013-06-12

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous mat can be easily prepared via electrospinning its aqueous solution. However, the obtained nanofibrous mat is instantaneously dissolved in water. Therefore, rendering the environmentally friendly nanofibrous mat water insoluble by cross-linking mechanism is of great interest. The electrospun PVA nanofibrous mat with an average fiber diameter of ca. 400 nm could be effectively cross-linked by glutaraldehyde vapor at room temperature. The cross-linking not only resulted in a water-insoluble nanofibrous mat but also generated an excess amount of unreacted aldehyde functional groups that could reduce silver salts into silver nanoparticles. The in situ formed silver nanoparticles along the fibrous surface showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. The vapor cross-linked nanofibrous mat shows a high potential to be used for efficiently capturing and killing pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Effects of algae-mat thickness on survival and growth of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Olesen, Birgit

    further impairing growth and survival. Our objectives were to assess the impact of algal mat thickness on seedling performance. A laboratory experiment was set up early in summers 2009 and 2010 using a 2-factorial design. Eelgrass seedlings were grown under three levels of algae and with two types of mats...... for the mortality we here focus on the potential negative impact of macroalgal mats on seedling growth and survival. The high productivity of these fast-growing algae results in large diurnal variations in the oxygen concentrations within the mats and the lower parts may experience prolonged periods of anoxia......: Chaetomorpha linum and artificial macroalgae. The two types of mats were used to separate physical and metabolic effects of algal presence. During the growth period concentrations of oxygen and sulphide and their diurnal variations in the mats were measured using microelectrodes....

  19. New crosslinkers for electrospun chitosan fibre mats. Part II: mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Donius, Amalie E.; Kiechel, Marjorie A.; Schauer, Caroline L.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies exist on the mechanical performance of crosslinked electrospun chitosan (CS) fibre mats. In this study, we show that the mat structure and mechanical performance depend on the different crosslinking agents genipin, epichlorohydrin (ECH), and hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate (HDACS), as well as the post-electrospinning heat and base activation treatments. The mat structure was imaged by field emission scanning electron microscopy and the mechanical performance was tested ...

  20. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.;

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than...... the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density...... and mass spectrometry for biomolecule analyses. Because cell extracts from density centrifugation still contained considerable amounts of detrital particles and non-cellular biomolecules, we further purified cells from two samples by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Cells from these highly...

  1. Perfect simulation and moment properties for the Matérn type III process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Huber, Mark L.; Wolpert, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    In a seminal work, Bertil Matérn introduced several types of processes for modeling repulsive point processes. In this paper an algorithm is presented for the perfect simulation of the Matérn III process within a bounded window in , fully accounting for edge effects. A simple upper bound on the m......In a seminal work, Bertil Matérn introduced several types of processes for modeling repulsive point processes. In this paper an algorithm is presented for the perfect simulation of the Matérn III process within a bounded window in , fully accounting for edge effects. A simple upper bound...

  2. Aligned Electrospun Polyvinyl Pyrrolidone/Poly ɛ-Caprolactone Blend Nanofiber Mats for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2016-02-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous materials are widely used in medical applications such as tissue engineering scaffolds, wound dressing material and drug delivery carriers. For tissue engineering scaffolds, the structure of the nanofiber is similar to extracellular matrix (ECM) which promotes the cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, the aligned nanofiber mats of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) blended poly ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) was successfully generated using electrospinning technique. The morphology of PVP/PCL nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microspore (SEM). The chemical and crystalline structure of PVP/PCL nanofiber mats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffactometer (PXRD). The water contact angle of mats was investigated. Cell culture studies using normal human fibroblasts (NHF) were performed to assess cell morphology, cell alignment and cell proliferation. The results indicated that the fiber were in nanometer range. The PVP/PCL was well dispersed in nanofiber mats and was in amorphous form. The water contact angle of PVP/PCL nanofiber mats was lower than PCL nanofiber mats. The PVP/PCL nanofiber mats exhibited good biocompatibility with NHF cells. In summary, the PVP/PCL nanofiber mats had potential to be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. New crosslinkers for electrospun chitosan fibre mats. Part II: mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donius, Amalie E; Kiechel, Marjorie A; Schauer, Caroline L; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-04-06

    Few studies exist on the mechanical performance of crosslinked electrospun chitosan (CS) fibre mats. In this study, we show that the mat structure and mechanical performance depend on the different crosslinking agents genipin, epichlorohydrin (ECH), and hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate (HDACS), as well as the post-electrospinning heat and base activation treatments. The mat structure was imaged by field emission scanning electron microscopy and the mechanical performance was tested in tension. The elastic modulus, tensile strength, strain at failure and work to failure were found to range from 52 to 592 MPa, 2 to 30 MPa, 2 to 31 per cent and 0.041 to 3.26 MJ m(-3), respectively. In general, neat CS mats were found to be the stiffest and the strongest, though least ductile, while CS-ECH mats were the least stiff, weakest, but the most ductile, and CS-HDACS fibre mats exhibited intermediary mechanical properties. The mechanical performance of the mats is shown to reflect differences in the fibre diameter, number of fibre-fibre contacts formed within the mat, as well as varying intermolecular bonding and moisture content. The findings reported here complement the chemical properties of the mats, described in part I of this study.

  4. Un matérialisme « stupéfiant »

    OpenAIRE

    Berdet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Ce texte se veut programmatique. Il dresse le portrait politique d’un Walter Benjamin en « matérialiste anthropologique », portrait sous le signe duquel se place la présente revue. En suivant certaines indications du philosophe, il dégage cinq grandes familles du matérialisme anthropologique, en démontre le dénominateur commun, pour en proposer finalement une première définition minimale. Il montre comment le matérialisme anthropologique déplace le cadre conceptuel du matérialisme dialectique...

  5. Mechanisms of mindfulness training: Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Emily K; Creswell, J David

    2017-02-01

    Despite evidence linking trait mindfulness and mindfulness training with a broad range of effects, still little is known about its underlying active mechanisms. Mindfulness is commonly defined as (1) the ongoing monitoring of present-moment experience (2) with an orientation of acceptance. Building on conceptual, clinical, and empirical work, we describe a testable theoretical account to help explain mindfulness effects on cognition, affect, stress, and health outcomes. Specifically, Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT) posits that (1), by enhancing awareness of one's experiences, the skill of attention monitoring explains how mindfulness improves cognitive functioning outcomes, yet this same skill can increase affective reactivity. Second (2), by modifying one's relation to monitored experience, acceptance is necessary for reducing affective reactivity, such that attention monitoring and acceptance skills together explain how mindfulness improves negative affectivity, stress, and stress-related health outcomes. We discuss how MAT contributes to mindfulness science, suggest plausible alternatives to the account, and offer specific predictions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrospun nanofibrous mats: from vascular repair to osteointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribba, L; Parisi, M; D'Accorso, N B; Goyanes, S

    2014-12-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique for generating a mat of continuous fibers with diameters from a few nanometers to several micrometers. The diversity of electrospinnable materials, and the unique features associated with electrospun fibers make this technique and its resultant structures attractive for applications in the biomedical field. This article presents an overview of this technique focusing on its application for tissue engineering. In particular, the advantages and disadvantages of using an electrospinning mat for biomedical applications are discussed. It reviews the different available electrospinning configurations, detailing how the different process variables and material types determine the obtained fibers characteristics. Then a description of how nanofiber based scaffolds offer great promise in the regeneration or function restoration of damaged or diseased bones, muscles or nervous tissue is reported. Different methods for incorporating active agents on nanofibers and controlling their release mechanisms are also reviewed. The review concludes with some personal perspectives on the future work to be done in order to include electrospinning technique in the industrial development of biomedical materials.

  7. Vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change moderated by habitat intactness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrod, Felix; Gonzalez, Patrick; Dash, Jadunandan; Steyl, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of climate change and habitat loss represent a major threat to species and ecosystems around the world. Here, we analyse the vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change based on current levels of habitat intactness and vulnerability to biome shifts, using multiple measures of habitat intactness at two spatial scales. We show that the global extent of refugia depends highly on the definition of habitat intactness and spatial scale of the analysis of intactness. Globally, 28% of terrestrial vegetated area can be considered refugia if all natural vegetated land cover is considered. This, however, drops to 17% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 48×48 km are considered and to 10% if only areas that are at least 50% wilderness at a scale of 4.8×4.8 km are considered. Our results suggest that, in regions where relatively large, intact wilderness areas remain (e.g. Africa, Australia, boreal regions, South America), conservation of the remaining large-scale refugia is the priority. In human-dominated landscapes, (e.g. most of Europe, much of North America and Southeast Asia), focusing on finer scale refugia is a priority because large-scale wilderness refugia simply no longer exist. Action to conserve such refugia is particularly urgent since only 1 to 2% of global terrestrial vegetated area is classified as refugia and at least 50% covered by the global protected area network. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Ryan M; Whitmore, Laura M; Moran, James J; Kreuzer, Helen W; Inskeep, William P

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of diverse organic compounds that support heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of a dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organism (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) originally isolated from these environments. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon dioxide fixation pathway were identified in M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Highly similar M. yellowstonensis genes for this pathway were identified in metagenomes of replicate Fe(III)-oxide mats, as were genes for the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable-isotope ((13)CO2) labeling demonstrated CO2 fixation by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. The results showed that strain MK1 fixes CO2 with a fractionation factor of ∼2.5‰. Analysis of the (13)C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C, and microbial mat C showed that mat C is from both DIC and non-DIC sources. An isotopic mixing model showed that biomass C contains a minimum of 42% C of DIC origin, depending on the fraction of landscape C that is present. The significance of DIC as a major carbon source for Fe(III)-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms (i.e., Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.) in simplified natural communities.

  9. Degradabilidade ruminal da matéria seca e proteína bruta, e tempo de colonização microbiana de oleaginosas, utilizadas na alimentação de ovinos - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v33i4.11388 Ruminal degradability of dry matter and crude protein, and microbial colonization time of oil grains in sheep feeding - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v33i4.11388

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides Reuter de Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a degradabilidade in situ, dos grãos de linhaça, canola, colza e milho, caroço de algodão, e dos concentrados casca e farelo de soja, em ovinos. Foram utilizados três animais da raça Santa Inês, fistulados e providos de cânulas ruminais, mantidos em baias individuais, recebendo diariamente capim picado e ração concentrada. Os alimentos foram incubados em ordem decrescente de 72, 48, 24, 18, 6, 3 e 0h. O teor de proteína dos alimentos avaliados foram 34,77; 30,07; 23,70; 10,64; 26,12; 14,65 e 56,90% para canola, colza, linhaça, milho, caroço de algodão, casca de soja e farelo de soja, respectivamente. A canola e a colza apresentaram baixa degradabilidade efetiva para a MS, com valor médio de 33,68%. O grão de linhaça apresentou degradabilidade efetiva para a MS de 64,24%, com fração potencialmente degradável de 87,89%. O milho apresentou fração solúvel de 12,33% e uma degradação de 39,67% para a MS. O farelo de soja apresentou-se dentro dos parâmetros normais de degradação com 52,61% para a MS e 52,83% para PB. Para a linhaça, canola e colza a degradabilidade da proteína apresentou valor médio de 18,34%. Os grãos de avaliados apresentaram baixa degradabilidade efetiva para a matéria seca e proteína bruta.This study evaluated in situ ruminal degradability of grains of linseed, canola, rapeseed and corn, whole cottonseed, as well as soybean hulls and soybean meal, in sheep. Three Santa Inês sheep were fistulated and fitted with rumen cannulas. The animals were housed in individual stalls, receiving chopped grass and concentrated feed daily. Feeds were incubated in descending order of 72, 48, 24, 18, 6, 3 and 0h. Protein content was 34.77% for canola, 30.07% for rapeseed, 23.70% for linseed, 10.64% for corn, 26.12% for cottonseed, 14.65% for soybean hulls, and 56.90% for soybean meal. Canola and rapeseed showed low effective degradability of DM, with mean value of 33.68%. Linseed grain had DM

  10. Assessing the utility of trace and rare earth elements as biosignatures in microbial iron oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eHeim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial iron oxyhydroxides are common deposits in natural waters, recent sediments and mine drainage systems and often contain significant accumulations of trace and rare earth elements (TREE. TREE patterns are widely used to characterize minerals and rocks, and to elucidate their evolution and origin. Whether and which characteristic TREE signatures distinguish between a biological and an abiological origin of iron minerals is still not well understood. Long-term flow reactor studies were performed in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory to investigate the development of microbial mats dominated by iron-oxidizing bacteria, namely Mariprofundus sp. and Gallionella sp. The experiments investigated the accumulation and fractionation of TREE under controlled conditions and enabled us to assess potential biosignatures evolving within the microbial iron oxyhydroxides. Concentrations of Be, Y, Zn, Zr, Hf, W, Th, Pb, and U in the microbial mats were 1e3- to 1e5-fold higher than in the feeder fluids whereas the rare earth elements and Y (REE+Y contents were 1e4 and 1e6 fold enriched. Except for a hydrothermally induced Eu anomaly, the normalized REE+Y patterns of the microbial iron oxyhydroxides were very similar to published REE+Y distributions of Archaean Banded Iron Formations. The microbial iron oxyhydroxides from the flow reactors were compared to iron oxyhydroxides that were artificially precipitated from the same feeder fluid. These abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides show the same REE+Y distribution patterns. Our results indicate that the REE+Y mirror quite exactly the water chemistry, but they do not allow to distinguish microbially mediated from inorganic iron precipitates. All TREE studied showed an overall similar fractionation behavior in biogenic, abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides. Exceptions are Ni and Tl, which were only accumulated in the microbial iron oxyhydroxides and may point to a potential usage of these elements as

  11. Persistent truncus arteriosus with intact ventricular septum diagnosed by echocardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-qi; SHEN Rong; SUN Kun; ZHONG Shu-wen; WU Yu-rong

    2009-01-01

    Persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly, and has an incidence of about 0.5 to 0.9 per 10 000 live births. Almost all cases described in the literatures had a large ventricular septal defect, only few rare cases were reported with intact ventricular septum. From June 1998 to December 2008, cardiac angiography were performed in 10 880 patients with congenital heart disease in our hospital, 47 patients with PTA were diagnosed, one case with tricuspid atresia,hypoplastic right ventricle, and intact ventricular septum was encountered.

  12. Microbial conversions of terpenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Parshikov, Igor A

    2015-01-01

    The monograph describes examples of the application of microbial technology for obtaining of derivatives of terpenoids. Obtaining new derivatives of terpenoids, including artemisinin derivatives with increased antimalarial activity, is an important goal of research in microbial biotechnology and medicinal chemistry.

  13. Oriënterende emissiemetingen aan de Comfort Slat Mats voor melkvee = Explorative emission measurements on Comfort Slat Mats for dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooren, van H.J.C.; Blanken, K.; Gunnink, H.

    2009-01-01

    Emissions of ammonia and methane from the comfort slat mats (a new floor type for dairy cattle) were measured with a dynamic box method. Emissions were reduced up to 50% for ammonia and for 75% for methane.

  14. Comparison of contact angle measurement and microbial adhesion to solvents for assaying electron donor-electron acceptor (acid-base) properties of bacterial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadi, Fatima; Latrache, Hassan

    2008-08-01

    The electron donor-electron acceptor (acid-base properties) of cell surfaces of a series of bacteria were determined by two methods, namely, Microbial Adhesion to Solvents (MATS) and Contact Angle Measurements (CAM) combined with equation of Van Oss. The efficiency of these two methods was then compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Bacillus subtilis ILP 142B, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and four Escherichia coli strains including HB101, AL52, O128B12 and ATCC 25922, acid-base properties were examined under the two different conditions mentioned above. The results showed that the correlation between acid-base properties determined by MATS and CAM was very weak. We have also found that when the microbial cell surface was electron donor by CAM method, similar result was found by MATS, but the reverse was not always true. In contrast, a good correlation between the two methods was obtained when the four E. coli strains were examined.

  15. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platfo