WorldWideScience

Sample records for insurance influence retirement

  1. Early retirement and the influence on healthcare budgets and insurance premiums in a diabetes population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    To contribute to current discussions about budget impact modeling, two different approaches for the impact of a new pharmaceutical product were analyzed: firstly considering the impact on annual healthcare expenditures only, and secondly additional inclusion of lost insurance premiums due to possible early retirement in patients with chronic diseases. The dynamic model calculates the budget impact from two different perspectives: (a) the impact on healthcare expenditures and (b) on expenditures as well as on health insurance revenues due to premiums. The latter approach could especially be useful for patients with chronic diseases who have higher probabilities of early retirement. Early retirement rates and indirect costs were derived from published data. Healthcare premiums were calculated based on an average premium and a mean income. Epidemiological input data were obtained from the literature. Time horizon was 10 years. Results in terms of reimbursement decisions of the budget impact analysis varied depending on the assumptions made for the insurance premiums, costs, and early retirement rate. Sensitivity analyses revealed that in extreme cases the decision for accepting a new pharmaceutical product would probably be negative using approach (a), but positive using approach (b). Depending on the disease and population of interest in a budget impact analysis, not only the healthcare expenditures for a health insurance have to be considered but also the revenue side for an insurance due to retirement should be included.

  2. Pensions as Retirement Income Insurance.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodie, Zvi

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops the view that employer-sponsored pension plans are best understood as retirement income insurance for employees and from that perspective addresses a number of questions regarding the reasons for their existence, their design, and their funding and investment policies. The most important of these questions are: - Why do employers provide pension plans for their employees and why is participation usually mandatory? - Why is the defined benefit form of pension plan the domin...

  3. Love or Money? Health Insurance and Retirement Among Married Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Kanika Kapur; Jeannette Rogowski

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the role of employer provided health insurance in the retirement decisions of dual working couples. The near elderly have high-expected medical expenditures; therefore, availability of health insurance is an important factor in their retirement decisions. We determine if access to retiree health insurance for early retirement enables couples to time their retirement together %u2013 a behavior called %u201Cjoint retirement.%u201D We find that wives%u2019 retiree health insu...

  4. Health, Disability Insurance and Retirement in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Jørgensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There are large differences in labor force participation rates by health status. We examine to what extent these differences are determined by the provisions of Disability Insurance and other pension programs. Using administrative data for Denmark we find that those in worse health and with less...... schooling are more likely to receive DI. The gradient of DI participation across health quintiles is almost twice as steep as for schooling - moving from having no high school diploma to college completion. Using an option value model that accounts for different pathways to retirement, applied to a period...... spanning a major pension reform, we find that pension program incentives in general are important determinants of retirement age. Individuals in poor health and with low schooling are significantly more responsive to economic incentives than those who are in better health and with more schooling. Similar...

  5. 5 CFR 352.309 - Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Organizations § 352.309 Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance. (a) Agency action. An employee... entitled to retain coverage for retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance purposes if he or she... he or she wishes to retain coverage under the retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance...

  6. Active and retired public employees' health insurance: potential data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Melinda Sandler

    2014-12-01

    Employer-provided health insurance for public sector workers is a significant public policy issue. Underfunding and the growing costs of benefits may hinder the fiscal solvency of state and local governments. Findings from the private sector may not be applicable because many public sector workers are covered by union contracts or salary schedules and often benefit modifications require changes in legislation. Research has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently large and representative data on public sector employees. This article highlights data sources researchers might utilize to investigate topics concerning health insurance for active and retired public sector employees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Did the Great Recession influence retirement plans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E; Davey, Adam; Martin, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    The recent recession constitutes one of the macro forces that may have influenced workers' retirement plans. We evaluate a multilevel model that addresses the influence of macro-, meso-, and micro-level factors on retirement plans, changes in these plans, and expected retirement age. Using data from Waves 8 and 9 of the Health and Retirement Study (N=2,618), we find that individuals with defined benefit plans are more prone to change toward plans to stop work before the stock market declined, whereas the opposite trend holds for those without pensions. Debts, ability to reduce work hours, and firm unionization also influenced retirement plans. Findings suggest retirement planning education may be particularly important for workers without defined pensions, especially in times of economic volatility. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Social Security Administration Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (RSDI) Improper Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset shows improper payment experience for the Social Security Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program paid to workers, their dependents, and...

  9. Retiree Health Insurance for Public School Employees: Does it Affect Retirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread provision of retiree health insurance for public sector workers, little attention has been paid to its effects on employee retirement. This is in contrast to the large literature on health-insurance-induced “job-lock” in the private sector. I use the introduction of retiree health insurance for public school employees in combination with administrative data on their retirement to identify the effects of retiree health insurance. As expected, the availability of retiree health insurance for older workers allows employees to retire earlier. These behavioral changes have budgetary implications, likely making the programs self-financing rather than costly to taxpayers. PMID:25479889

  10. 38 CFR 8.4 - Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Premiums § 8.4 Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. The insured under a National Service life insurance policy which is not lapsed may authorize the monthly deduction of premiums from disability...

  11. A modeling framework for optimal long-term care insurance purchase decisions in retirement planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aparna; Li, Lepeng

    2004-05-01

    The level of need and costs of obtaining long-term care (LTC) during retired life require that planning for it is an integral part of retirement planning. In this paper, we divide retirement planning into two phases, pre-retirement and post-retirement. On the basis of four interrelated models for health evolution, wealth evolution, LTC insurance premium and coverage, and LTC cost structure, a framework for optimal LTC insurance purchase decisions in the pre-retirement phase is developed. Optimal decisions are obtained by developing a trade-off between post-retirement LTC costs and LTC insurance premiums and coverage. Two-way branching models are used to model stochastic health events and asset returns. The resulting optimization problem is formulated as a dynamic programming problem. We compare the optimal decision under two insurance purchase scenarios: one assumes that insurance is purchased for good and other assumes it may be purchased, relinquished and re-purchased. Sensitivity analysis is performed for the retirement age.

  12. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  13. Establishment of radioactive source retirement mechanism based on the method of environmental liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    The retirement of radioactive source is a difficult problem that we are facing during the radiation safety regulation in China. This paper analyses the reason of the problem regarding the retirement of radioactive source both from the utilization units and the regulatory body. It is considered that the basic reason is the enterprises don't arrange and use the retirement funds reasonably, which is an economic problem. There exists a limitation when facing the radioactive source retirement in light of licensing and regulation mechanism of the manufacture, selling, uses of radioactive sources in China, and the key to solve this economic problem is to introduce economic method, Some measures and suggestions are given to establish radioactive sources retirement mechanism by using economic methods, based on the comprehensive analysis of the concept, development and function of the environmental liability insurance. (author)

  14. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, New York, NY. College Retirement Equities Fund.

    This report, the eighth in a regular biennial survey series, provides standardized comparative information on expenditures by colleges and universities for employee retirement and insurance benefits in 26 tables and 5 charts. The data, collected in 1992 from 577 institutions, reflect information supplied for either fiscal or calendar year 1981.…

  15. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, New York, NY. College Retirement Equities Fund.

    This report, the seventh in a regular biennial survey series, provides standardized comparative information on expenditures by colleges and universities for employee retirement and insurance benefits in 25 tables and 5 charts. The data, collected in 1990 from 634 institutions, reflect information supplied for either fiscal or calendar year 1989.…

  16. To Retire or Not to Retire? That Is the Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    During the 1960s, there was extensive hiring of college and university faculty members. This large group of professors are now at or nearing retirement age. Concerns about the economy, the availability of good health insurance, increased life expectancy, and removal of mandatory retirement laws may influence decisions about when to retire.…

  17. The role of retiree health insurance in the early retirement of public sector employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2014-12-01

    Most government employees have access to retiree health coverage, which provides them with group health coverage even if they retire before Medicare eligibility. We study the impact of retiree health coverage on the labor supply of public sector workers between the ages of 55 and 64. We find that retiree health coverage raises the probability of stopping full time work by 4.3 percentage points (around 38 percent) over two years among public sector workers aged 55-59, and by 6.7 percentage points (around 26 percent) over two years among public sector workers aged 60-64. In the younger age group, retiree health insurance mostly seems to facilitate transitions to part-time work rather than full retirement. However, in the older age group, it increases the probability of stopping work entirely by 4.3 percentage points (around 22 percent). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. How does retiree health insurance influence public sector employee saving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert L; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2014-12-01

    Economic theory predicts that employer-provided retiree health insurance (RHI) benefits have a crowd-out effect on household wealth accumulation, not dissimilar to the effects reported elsewhere for employer pensions, Social Security, and Medicare. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any similar research on the impacts of retiree health insurance per se. Accordingly, the present paper utilizes a unique data file on respondents to the Health and Retirement Study, to explore how employer-provided retiree health insurance may influence net household wealth among public sector employees, where retiree healthcare benefits are still quite prevalent. Key findings include the following: Most full-time public sector employees anticipate having employer-provided health insurance coverage in retirement, unlike most private sector workers.Public sector employees covered by RHI had substantially less wealth than similar private sector employees without RHI. In our data, Federal workers had about $82,000 (18%) less net wealth than private sector employees lacking RHI; state/local workers with RHI accumulated about $69,000 (or 15%) less net wealth than their uninsured private sector counterparts.After controlling on socioeconomic status and differences in pension coverage, net household wealth for Federal employees was $116,000 less than workers without RHI and the result is statistically significant; the state/local difference was not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Medicaid Crowd-Out of Private Long-Term Care Insurance Demand : Evidence from the Health and Retirement Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.R.; Coe, N.B.; Finkelstein, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence of Medicaid crowd out of demand for private long-term care insurance. Using data on the near- and young-elderly in the Health and Retirement Survey, our central estimate suggests that a $10,000 decrease in the level of assets an individual can keep while

  20. How Does Retiree Health Insurance Influence Public Sector Employee Saving?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Clark; Olivia S. Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Economic theory predicts that employer-provided retiree health insurance (RHI) benefits have a crowd-out effect on household wealth accumulation, not dissimilar to the effects reported elsewhere for employer pensions, Social Security, and Medicare. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any similar research on the impacts of retiree health insurance per se. Accordingly, the present paper utilizes a unique data file on respondents to the Health and Retirement Study, to explore how employer-provided r...

  1. Factors influencing early retirement intentions in Australian rural general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pit, S W; Hansen, V

    2014-06-01

    The Australian general practice workforce is ageing. This and a trend towards higher exit intentions and earlier retirement make it increasingly important to identify those work and personal factors affecting intention to leave, which are amenable to change. To assess the various work, occupational and individual health factors associated with early retirement intentions among Australian rural general practitioners (GPs) that may be amenable to intervention. A cross-sectional study of GPs practising in rural Australia. Odds ratios of early retirement intentions across work, occupational and individual health factors were calculated. There were 92 participants (response rate 56%), and 47% of responders intended to retire before 65. GPs with medium to high burnout levels had higher odds of intending to retire. Increased job satisfaction and work ability scores were associated with decreased retirement intentions, whereas increased physical and mental work ability demands were associated with an increase in retirement intentions. Absenteeism was not related to retirement intentions but presenteeism was. GPs reporting any work-related sleep problems were found to have a 3-fold increase in the odds of early retirement intentions. The odds of early retirement intentions also increased with higher psychological distress, worsening general health and longer working hours. From a health policy reform perspective, the greatest impact on reducing early retirement intentions among ageing GPs could potentially be made by intervening in areas of working hours, burnout and work-related sleep issues, followed by job satisfaction, psychological distress, health, general workability and mental and physical work ability. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. [Who's afraid of retirement? Social factors influencing the attitude toward retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadourek, I; van Gelder, B A

    1985-10-01

    The four dimensions of the attitudes towards retirement (see Bela A. van Gelder in this journal) of 553 male older employees from the northern Netherlands were analyzed in relation to over 250 predictor-variables by means of stepwise regressions and other techniques of multivariate analysis. A simple recursive model of Palmore, George and Fillenbaum served as a theoretical guideline. It was tested by means of a path-analysis as applied to 20 variables (see figure I). Many of over 100 hypotheses derived from the model and from the literature pertaining to the matter were upheld by the findings: Single persons, widowers, or persons not happily married, appeared more afraid of retirement. If married, the spouse's judgment (as perceived by the interviewee) was another factor of importance. Age also affected the attitude: the closer one approaches retirement, the less positive the attitude (though age showed little variation in our sample). Social status affected the attitude indirectly: manual workers performing physically exacting (dirty, irregular, etc.) jobs, who have been working for the same firm (or: service) over a long period of time, who started earning money early in life--these were positive in their attitude towards retirement (needless to say that all these findings concern the attribute of lower status jobs). Finally, the pattern of and the attitude towards leisure played a decisive role: employees with strong work-involvement, with less intensive and rich leisure time, with intensive ties with people from their work-scene--these showed more negative attitudes towards retirement than their counterparts.

  3. Retirement Planning: Important Factors Influencing a Service Member’s Decision to Prepare for Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    sector had a defined benefit pension plan. However, in the 1980s, due to the high cost of funding defined benefit plans, corporations began to favor a...rate in February 2017 was 5.6%. Dave Ramsey (n.d.), a personal finance expert, recommends individuals save at least 15% of their income for retirement...is explicitly clear that “service members are responsible for their personal finances ” (DOD, 2012, p. 15). The FRS offers personal financial

  4. Social Predictors Influencing the Attitudes of Top Executives towards Retirement: a Cross-cultural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Helena de Freitas Pinho França

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the influence of social predictors on the attitudes towards retirement in 517 Brazilian and New Zealand top executives. The social predictors were represented by four measures: the job perception scale (JPS, the diversity of time allocation of activities and relationships index (SOD, the influence of family and friends on retirement decision (FFIRD; and the perception of quality of life in the country (PCQL. The influence of these predictors were analysed by multiple regression on other two scales: the executive’s perception of gains in retirement (EPGR and the executive’s perception of losses in retirement (EPLR. The results point out that the importance of gains is increased by the influence of family and friends on retirement decision, for both nationalities. This is also increased by the diversity of time allocation for activities and relationships, but only for Brazilians. Brazilian executives who perceive their jobs positively have more positive attitudes towards relationships, leisure, hobbies and cultural activities in retirement. The perception of the quality of life in the country does not influence retirement attitudes, but represents the main significant difference between Brazilians and New Zealanders.

  5. Redistribution by insurance market regulation: Analyzing a ban on gender-based retirement annuities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Amy; Poterba, James; Rothschild, Casey

    2009-01-01

    We illustrate how equilibrium screening models can be used to evaluate the economic consequences of insurance market regulation. We calibrate and solve a model of the United Kingdom's compulsory annuity market and examine the impact of gender-based pricing restrictions. We find that the endogenous adjustment of annuity contract menus in response to such restrictions can undo up to half of the redistribution from men to women that would occur with exogenous Social Security-like annuity contracts. Our findings indicate the importance of endogenous contract responses and illustrate the feasibility of employing theoretical insurance market equilibrium models for quantitative policy analysis.

  6. VALUING THE CHINESE REIMBURSEMENT SYSTEM OF THE RETIREMENT PENSION INSURANCE FOR URBAN EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the funding and implementation of China's reformed pension system, particularly the impact of population aging on the system and the government’s recessive debt on pensions. We performed a literature review of relevant publications on the pension system in China as well as similar systems abroad. We also performed an in-depth analysis of the pension insurance fund in China’s Zhejiang province, based on available data from 2001 through 2014. Using a time series ARIMA forecasting model and a comprehensive prediction model, in conjunction with theories from economics, statistics and sociology, we tried to establish the implicit pension debt (IPD for Zhejiang and determine the pension payment feasibility for the next 15 years. We use our findings to explain the current problems with the pension system in Zhejiang and offer suggestions for improvement.

  7. Catastrophic risk : Social influences on insurance decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, Michal; Trautmann, Stefan; van de Kuilen, Gijs

    We study behavioral patterns of insurance demand for low-probability large-loss events (catastrophic losses). Individual patterns of belief formation and risk attitude that were suggested in the behavioral decisions literature emerge robustly in the current set of insurance choices. However, social

  8. Savings needed to fund health insurance and health care expenses in retirement: findings from a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, Paul; Salisbury, Dallas; VanDerhei, Jack

    2008-05-01

    MODELING RETIREE HEALTH COSTS: This Issue Brief examines the uncertainty of health care expenses in retirement by using a Monte Carlo simulation model to estimate the amount of savings needed to cover health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket health care expenses. This type of simulation is able to account for the uncertainty related to individual mortality and rates of return, and computes the present value of the savings needed to cover health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket expenses in retirement. These observations were used to determine asset targets for having adequate savings to cover retiree health costs 50, 75, and 90 percent of the time. NOT ENOUGH SAVINGS: Many individuals will need more money than the amounts reported in this Issue Brief because this analysis does not factor in the savings needed to cover long-term care expenses, nor does it take into account the fact that many individuals retire prior to becoming eligible for Medicare. However, some workers will need to save less than what is reported if they keep working in retirement and receive health benefits as active workers. WHO HAS RETIREE HEALTH BENEFITS BEYOND MEDICARE?: About 12 percent of private-sector employers report offering any Medicare supplemental health insurance. This increases to about 40 percent among large employers. Overall, nearly 22 percent of retirees age 65 and older had retiree health benefits in 2005 to supplement Medicare coverage. As recently as 2006, 53 percent of retirees age 65 and older were covered by Medicare Part D, 24 percent had outpatient prescription drug coverage through an employment-based plan. Only 10 percent had no prescription drug coverage. INDIVIDUALLY PURCHASED MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS, 2008: Among those who purchase Medigap and Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage at age 65 in 2008, men would need between $79,000 and $159,000 with median prescription drug expenses (50th percentile and 90th percentiles, respectively), and between $156

  9. Influence of health, lifestyle, working conditions, and sociodemography on early retirement among nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karina; Ekholm, Ola; Hundrup, Yrsa A

    2007-01-01

    by Statistics Denmark. The follow-up period was from 1993 to 2002. RESULTS: Nurses who had poor self-rated health were more likely to join PEW compared with nurses who considered their health as good (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41). Low job influence, high workload, and physical job demands only marginally...... increased the probability of retiring. Nurses who have relatively low gross incomes had an increased probability of entering PEW compared with nurses with relatively high gross incomes (HR 1.60, CI 1.43-1.79). Having a spouse increased the probability of joining PEW, especially having a spouse who had...... retired or was unemployed. CONCLUSIONS: The retirement age among nurses is influenced by a number of sociodemographic, work-related, and health-related factors. Poor health, low income, living outside the Copenhagen area, being married, having a spouse who is outside the labor force, and working...

  10. How do retirement dynamics influence mental well-being in later life? A 10-year panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Ellen; Henkens, Kène

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies have consistently shown the negative impact of involuntary retirement on mental well-being. However, few studies have thus far investigated the degree to which post-retirement work affects late-life outcomes. The present study improves our understanding of the impact of retirement on the self-efficacy and life satisfaction among older adults by focusing on the combined impact of retirement voluntariness and participation in post-retirement work. By using panel data on retirement behavior in the Netherlands, we estimate fixed effects and multilevel models to explain (intra-)individual changes in self-efficacy and life satisfaction over a 10-year period in which most participants made the transition to retirement. The results indicate that involuntary retirement is associated with decreases in both self-efficacy and life satisfaction in later life. Whereas involuntary retirees who participate in bridge jobs show no changes in life satisfaction, those involuntary retirees without bridge jobs experience a decline in life satisfaction. In addition, we found enhanced levels of life satisfaction for voluntary retirees in bridge employment. The association with self-efficacy was less pronounced. These results suggest that the characteristics of the retirement process influence changes in mental well-being in later life. Specifically, bridge employment alleviates the negative consequences of involuntary retirement and even seems to enhance post-retirement well-being for voluntary retirees.

  11. Reimagining the self at late-career transitions: how identity threat influences academic physicians' retirement considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyura, Betty; Bohnen, John; Wasylenki, Don; Jarvis, Anna; Giblon, Barney; Hyland, Robert; Silver, Ivan; Leslie, Karen

    2015-06-01

    There is scant empirical work exploring academic physicians' psychosocial adjustment during late-career transitions or on the factors that influence their retirement decisions. The authors examine these issues through the lens of sociopsychological identity theory, specifically examining how identity threat influences academic physicians' decisions about retirement. Participants were academic physicians at a Canadian medical school and were recruited via e-mail requests for clinical faculty interested in discussing late-career and retirement planning issues. Participants included 15 males and 6 females (N = 21; mean age = 63, standard deviation = 7.54), representing eight specialties (clinical and surgical). Data were collected in October and November 2012 via facilitated focus groups, which were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and anonymized, then analyzed using thematic analysis. Four primary themes were identified: centrality of occupational identity, experiences of identity threat, experiences of aging in an indifferent system, and coping with late-career transitions. Identity threats were manifested in apprehensions about self-esteem after retirement, practice continuity, and clinical competence, as well as in a loss of meaning and belonging. These identity challenges influenced decisions on whether to retire. Organizational and system support was perceived as wanting. Coping strategies included reimagining and revaluing various aspects of the self through assimilating new activities and reprioritizing others. Identity-related struggles are a significant feature of academic physicians' considerations about late-career transitions. Understanding these challenges, their antecedents, and their consequences can prepare faculty, and their institutions, to better manage late-career transitions. Individual- and institution-level implications are discussed.

  12. A survey on critical factors influencing agricultural insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Valipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural business is a very high-risk job and an increase demand for agricultural products from one side and steady increase in production cost and weather changes, on the other side, have motivated many to use insurance for agricultural products. Insurance plays an important role in influencing crop production and insured satisfaction or farmers. The purpose of this research is to find critical components in agricultural insurance. Based on an exploration of the literature review and interviews, the proposed study of this paper extracts 24 variables and using factor analysis, we select the most important factors, which are grouped in seven categories. The implementation of our factor analysis has revealed uncertainty, moderator, market equilibrium, risky environment, empowering factor, education, training, structural hazards and natural ecosystems as the most important factors influencing agricultural industry.

  13. The Influence of Financial Literacy, Risk Aversion and Expectations on Retirement Planning and Portfolio Allocation in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Shahnaz Mahdzan

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available The two objectives of this paper are to examine the effect of financial literacy, risk aversion and expectations on retirement planning; and, to investigate the effect of these antecedents on the retire- ment portfolio allocation. Data was collected via a self-administered questionnaire from a sample of 270 working individuals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Logistic and ordered probit regressions were employed to analyse the first and second objective, respectively. The results from the logistic regression indicate that future expectations significantly influence the probability of planning for retirement. Meanwhile, individu- als with higher financial literacy and lower risk aversion are more likely to hold risky assets in their retirement portfolios. Subsequently, two-sample t-test and one-way ANOVA tests were conducted to further examine the differences in financial literacy, risk aversion and expectations, across demographic sub-groups. The study contributes to the literature by holistically incorporating the behavioural aspects that affect retirement planning and by exploring an uncharted issue of retirement planning—namely, the retirement portfolio allocation.

  14. An exploration study to detect important factors influencing insurance firms

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Soleimani; Fattaneh Alizadeh Meshkani; Abdullah Naami

    2013-01-01

    The recent trend on competition among insurance firms has increased motivation to look for important factors influencing this industry. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to find important factors shaping this industry. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and, using principal component analysis, detects important factors on the success of this industry. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 0.849, and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin and Bartlett's Test are calculated as ...

  15. An exploration study to detect important factors influencing insurance firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Soleimani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent trend on competition among insurance firms has increased motivation to look for important factors influencing this industry. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to find important factors shaping this industry. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and, using principal component analysis, detects important factors on the success of this industry. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 0.849, and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin and Bartlett's Test are calculated as 0.873 and 12744 with (Sig. =0.000, respectively. The study has detected four important factors including quality of service casualties, sales improvement and advertisement, quality of issuance of insurance policies and quality of work force.

  16. Disability testing and retirement

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Helmuth; Lozachmeur, Jean-Marie; Pestieau, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    This Paper studies the design of retirement and disability policies. It illustrates the often observed exit from the labour force of healthy workers through disability insurance schemes. Two types of individuals, disabled and leisure-prone ones, have the same disutility for labour and cannot be distinguished. They are not, however, counted in the same way in social welfare. Benefits depend on retirement age and on the (reported) health status. We determine first- and second-best optimal benef...

  17. The influence of marital status and spousal employment on retirement behavior in Germany and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radl, Jonas; Himmelreicher, Ralf K

    2015-05-01

    This article analyzes the impact of marital status and spousal employment on the timing of retirement in Germany and Spain. Retirement behavior is examined by means of event-history models, with a competing risks framework being used to distinguish between voluntary and involuntary work-exit transitions. To take account of the role of social policies, we adopt a comparative approach. Data are drawn from a 2006 special retirement module implemented analogously in national labor force surveys. The results show that spousal labor market participation plays a large role in work-exit transitions, even when retirement is involuntary. This finding questions the widespread belief that coretirement is exclusively due to preference for joint retirement shared among spouses. Moreover, widows and widowers tend to retire prematurely in Germany, whereas no such effect could be found in Spain. This finding is explained by reference to specific economic incentives arising from national pension legislation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Influencers of Life Insurance Investments: Empirical Evidence from Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Mitra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the impact of economic, demographic and cultural factors on life insurance consumption in 28 European countries. The period of study is post financial crisis from 2009-2014, and the study considers many of the emerging Eastern European economies where there have been significant insurance sector reforms recently. Europe is the world’s largest insurance market with 35% of the overall insurance premium contribution, but ranks third in insurance per capita, hence Europe is an interesting region in which to study insurance demand. The study observed four economic parameters: GDP per capita, gross savings, competitiveness of the nation, and inflation, as significant impacts on the insurance consumption in the region. Two demographic factors, population and education, and two cultural factors, individualism and long term orientation, appear to impact insurance consumption in the selected countries.

  19. Influence of biomedical sciences on National Health Insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health insurance becomes a viable alternative for financing health care amidst the high cost of health care. This study, conducted in 1997, uses a valuation method to assess the willingness of individuals from the working sector in Accra, Ghana, to join and pay premium for a proposed National Health Insurance Scheme ...

  20. Reserves and cash flows under stochastic retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt; Nielsen, Jeppe Woetmann

    2016-01-01

    Uncertain time of retirement and uncertain structure of retirement benefits are risk factors for life insurance companies. Nevertheless, classical life insurance models assume these are deterministic. In this paper, we include the risk from stochastic time of retirement and stochastic benefit...... structure in a classical finite-state Markov model for a life insurance contract. We include discontinuities in the distribution of the retirement time. First, we derive formulas for appropriate scaling of the benefits according to the time of retirement and discuss the link between the scaling...... and the guarantees provided. Stochastic retirement creates a need to rethink the construction of disability products for high ages and ways to handle this are discussed. We show how to calculate market reserves and how to use modified transition probabilities to calculate expected cash flows without significantly...

  1. Health insurance without provider influence: the limits of cost containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, L G; Greenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    In our previous paper, we showed that market forces can play a significant role in controlling health care costs and that a considerable amount of cost containment effort was pursued by third-party insurers in Oregon in the 1930s and 1940s. Although physicians were able to thwart this cost-control effort, a 1986 Supreme Court decision, FTC v. Indiana Federation of Dentists, found that a boycott of insurers by dentists violated Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act. Further investigation of recent developments, including the recent Wickline v. California decision, indicates that the primary barriers to cost containment today are not obstructive tactics by providers or provider-controlled health insurance plans. Rather, the primary barriers are increases in the development and diffusion of new technology and society's apparent preference for paying for new tests and procedures regardless of economic efficiency.

  2. SURGICAL RETIREMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . 3. Drag LL, et al. Cognitive functioning, retirement status, and age: results from the Cognitive Changes and Retirement among. Senior Surgeons study. J Am Coll Surg. 2010;211(3):303-7. 4. Wang DS, Winfield HN. Survey of urological laparoscopic practice patterns in the Midwest.

  3. Factors that influence the selection and utilization of children’s medical insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The researchers analyzed how different regions in the USA, family structure, ethnicity, and family income levels influenced the selection and utilization of medical care programs and services by American children. To prevent any possible bias in the analysis and to produce reliable results, an endogenous switching model was utilized in the study. The researchers found no statistically significant differences in the number of doctor visits and hospital stays between children with insurance and children without insurance. However, significant differences were determined regarding family structure, family income, geographic regions, and ethnicity. Children from single-parent families with insurance coverage (private, Medicaid, or SCHIP had statistically higher rates of doctor visits and hospital stays than children from two-parent families with insurance coverage. Family income, region, and ethnicity variables all had significant impacts on the type of health insurance coverage that was reported for children.

  4. Life Insurance Take-Up Rate Influencing Factors Comparison between Malaysia and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Kardinar Wijayanti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study will investigate the factors that influence take-up rates within the Malaysian Life Insurance industry to discover potential opportunities and limitations. For comparative purposes, the study is modelled on Power (2013 who examined four factors affecting customer satisfaction in life insurance in Japan (product, price, customer services and procedures and documentation. This study is exploratory in nature using both secondary research and primary data from questionnaires. The main finding was “Product offerings” being the most significant variation, both an opportunity and limitation, due to the relative maturity, experience and changing trends within the insurance market of Japan, conversely growth, infancy and different dynamics in Malaysia.

  5. Inflation's Impact on Faculty Retirement Annuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Nancy S.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion is confined to the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (TIAA) and College Retirement Equities Fund (CREF) and how they have remained effective with the rise of inflation. (Author/BP)

  6. [The influence of Nintendo-Wii® bowling upon residents of retirement homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittelsberger, R; Krug, S; Tittlbach, S; Bös, K

    2013-07-01

    The few studies dealing with the positive effects of health and well-being of older people are only one-sided. The aim of the study therefore was to analyze the effects of Nintendo-Wii® bowling on daily function, state of dementia, quality of life, cognition and motor skills in retirement home inhabitants. The study was performed with 27 study participants (13 women, 14 men) between the ages of 49 and 95 years (mean = 71, SD = 14). They were randomly assigned to a control group (KG) and an intervention group (IG). Between pre- and posttest, the IG played 60 min/twice a week Nintendo-Wii® Bowling over 6 weeks. The improvement of IG was significant in the analysis of variance concerning strength (arm curls: F df = 2 = 7.199; p = 0,013; η(2) = 0,231) and showed a significant trend concerning coordination (tracking lines: F df = 2 = 3.99; p = 0,058; η(2) = 0,154) compared with KG. The area of rapidity (catching bars: F df = 2 = 28.511; p = 0,008; η(2) = 0,279) showed a significant decline in the IG compared with the KG. However, closer examination shows that the short time of intervention and the wide age range could have affected the results. Thus, further studies should take these critical aspects into consideration.

  7. The Influence of Leverage and Diversification to Financial Performance of General Insurance Companiesn in Indonesia 2010-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Nuryatno, Muhammad; Yulianti

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to find out the influence of leverage and diversification to financial performance of general insurance companies in Indonesia. This research uses secondary data from Indonesian general insurance companies’s financial report  within  year 2010 to 2014. The population of this research  is general insurance companies in Indonesia which listed as member of The General Insurance assosiation of Indonesia. The number of samples that used in this research are 10 g...

  8. Factors Influencing Support for National Health Insurance among Patients Attending Specialist Clinics in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almualm, Yasmin; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Aljunid, Syed; Alsagoff, Syed Sagoff

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the level of support towards the proposed National Health Insurance scheme among Malaysian patients attending specialist clinics at the National University of Malaysia Medical centre and its influencing factors. The cross sectional study was carried out from July-October 2012. 260 patients were selected using multistage sampling method. 71.2% of respondents supported the proposed National Health insurance scheme. 61.4% of respondents are willing to pay up to RM240 per year to join the National Health Insurance and 76.6% of respondents are of the view that enrolment in NHI should be made compulsory. Knowledge had a positive influence on respondent's support towards National Health Insurance. National Health Insurance when implemented in Malaysia can be used to raise funds for health care financing, increase access to health services and achieve the desired health status. More efforts should be taken to promote the scheme and educate the public in order to achieve higher support towards the proposed National Health Insurance. The cost to enroll in NHI as well as services to be included under the scheme should be duly considered. PMID:23985101

  9. Preparation for retirement seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    (Health insurance and wealth and succession planning) During the preparation for retirement seminar in November 2009, the sessions on health insurance in Switzerland and in France unfortunately had to be postponed. Participants in the seminar also expressed interest in an information session on “How to manage your wealth and organize your succession”. The sessions on health insurance will be held on 16 March 2010 and those on managing wealth and succession on 18 March 2010. Programme for Tuesday 16 March 2010 (TH Theory Conference Room, Building 4/3-006): 09:00 Health insurance in Switzerland by Mr. Sandro Breitenstein, Service de l'Assurance Maladie du Canton de Genève 10:00 Coffee break 10:20 Health insurance in France by Mr. Dominique Curtiaud, Caisse Primaire d'Assurance Maladie de l'Ain Programme for Thursday 18 March 2010 (TH Theory Conference Room, Building 4/3-006): 09:00 How to manage your wealth and organize your succession in Switzerland by Mr. Jean-Marc W...

  10. How do retirement dynamics influence mental well-being in later life? A 10-year panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, E.; Henkens, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Empirical studies have consistently shown the negative impact of involuntary retirement on mental well-being. However, few studies have thus far investigated the degree to which post-retirement work affects late-life outcomes. The present study improves our understanding of the impact of

  11. What influence Customer Patronage of Insurance Policies: An Empirical Assessment of Socio-Economic and Demographic Determinants of Insurance Patronage in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Fofie, Gloria A.

    2016-01-01

    The study attempts to explore and assess the social, economic and demographic factors that are likely to influence the patronage of insurance in Ghana. Employing a cross-sectional and convenient sampling method, 200 respondents were selected to answer semi-structured questionnaires. Using a Probit econometric regression model for analysis, the results indicate these socio-economic and demographic determinants are positively and significantly related to insurance demand, except that of religio...

  12. Power Plant Retirements: Trends and Possible Drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Andrew D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiser, Ryan H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Seel, Joachim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-11-29

    This paper synthesizes available data on historical and planned power plant retirements. Specifically, we present data on historical generation capacity additions and retirements over time, and the types of plants recently retired and planned for retirement. We then present data on the age of plants that have recently retired or that have plans to retire. We also review the characteristics of plants that recently retired or plan to retire vs. those that continue to operate, focusing on plant size, age, heat rate, and SO2 emissions. Finally, we show the level of recent thermal plant retirements on a regional basis and correlate those data with a subset of possible factors that may be contributing to retirement decisions. This basic data synthesis cannot be used to precisely estimate the relative magnitude of retirement drivers. Nor do we explore every possible driver for retirement decisions. Moreover, future retirement decisions may be influenced by different factors than those that have affected past decisions. Nonetheless, it is clear that recently retired plants are relatively old, and that plants with stated planned retirement dates are—on average—no younger. We observe that retired plants are smaller, older, less efficient, and more polluting than operating plants. Based on simple correlation graphics, the strongest predictors of regional retirement differences appear to include SO2 emissions rates (for coal), planning reserve margins (for all thermal units), variations in load growth or contraction (for all thermal units), and the age of older thermal plans (for all thermal units). Additional apparent predictors of regional retirements include the ratio of coal to gas prices and delivered natural gas prices. Other factors appear to have played lesser roles, including the penetration variable renewable energy (VRE), recent non-VRE capacity additions, and whether the region hosts an ISO/RTO.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF LEVERAGE AND DIVERSIFICATION TO FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANIESN IN INDONESIA 2010-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulianti ,

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to find out the influence of leverage and diversification to financial performance of general insurance companies in Indonesia. This research uses secondary data from Indonesian general insurance companies’s financial report  within  year 2010 to 2014. The population of this research  is general insurance companies in Indonesia which listed as member of The General Insurance assosiation of Indonesia. The number of samples that used in this research are 10 general insurance companies which were selected based on purposive sampling method.This research used pooled regression models and hypothesis testing for each independent variable on dependent. The Result of this research shows that leverage and diversification significantly affect positively to general insurance company’s financial performance in Indonesia. Keywords : leverage, diversification, financial performance, insurance companies, and ROE.

  14. Examining the influence of health insurance literacy and perception on the people preference to purchase private voluntary health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Tanuj; Das, Gurudas; Gupta, Hemendra

    2018-01-01

    Most studies have associated "un-affordability" as a plausible cause for the lower take-up of private voluntary health insurance plans. However, others refuted this claim on the pretext that when people can afford "inpatient-care" from pocket then insurance premium cost is far less than those payments. Thus, economic factors remain insufficient in clearly explaining the reason for poor private voluntary health insurance take-up. An attempt is being made by shifting the focus towards non-economic factors and understanding the role of perception and health insurance literacy in transforming people preferences to invest in private voluntary health insurance plans. The study findings will conspicuously support decision-makers in developing strategy to increase the private voluntary health insurance take-up.

  15. THE LONG REACH OF EDUCATION: EARLY RETIREMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venti, Steven; Wise, David A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to draw attention to the long lasting effect of education on economic outcomes. We use the relationship between education and two routes to early retirement - the receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) and the early claiming of Social Security retirement benefits - to illustrate the long-lasting influence of education. We find that for both men and women with less than a high school degree the median DI participation rate is 6.6 times the participation rate for those with a college degree or more. Similarly, men and women with less than a high school education are over 25 percentage points more likely to claim Social Security benefits early than those with a college degree or more. We focus on four critical "pathways" through which education may indirectly influence early retirement - health, employment, earnings, and the accumulation of assets. We find that for women health is the dominant pathway through which education influences DI participation. For men, the health, earnings, and wealth pathways are of roughly equal magnitude. For both men and women the principal channel through which education influences early Social Security claiming decisions is the earnings pathway. We also consider the direct effect of education that does not operate through these pathways. The direct effect of education is much greater for early claiming of Social Security benefits than for DI participation, accounting for 72 percent of the effect of education for men and 67 percent for women. For women the direct effect of education on DI participation is not statistically significant, suggesting that the total effect may be through the four pathways.

  16. Congressional Statistics: Disability Insurance for December 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — While Social Security is best known for providing retirement benefits, the program also provides Disability Insurance (DI) protection to workers and their families...

  17. INFLUENCE OF RETIREMENT AND WORK STRESS ON HEADACHE PREVALENCE: A LONGITUDINAL MODELLING STUDY FROM THE GAZEL COHORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjösten, Noora; Nabi, Hermann; Westerlund, Hugo; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Dartigues, Jean-François; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie; Oksanen, Tuula; Salo, Paula; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    Aims To examine trajectories of headache in relation to retirement and to clarify the role of work stress and stress-prone personality. Methods Headache prevalence during seven years before and after retirement was measured by annual questionnaires from GAZEL cohort comprising French national gas and electricity company employees (N=12,913). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for headache during pre- peri- and post-retirement were calculated. The role of effect modifiers (work stress, type A or hostile personality) was tested by multiplicative interactions and synergy indices. Results 11%-13% reduction in headache prevalence was found during pre- and post-retirement, whereas decline was much steeper (46%) during the retirement transition. In absolute terms, the decline was greater among persons with high work stress or stress-prone personality than among other participants. Conclusions Retirement is associated with a decrease in headache prevalence, particularly among persons with high amount of work stress or proneness to overreact to stress. PMID:21220374

  18. Influence of retirement and work stress on headache prevalence: a longitudinal modelling study from the GAZEL Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjösten, Noora; Nabi, Hermann; Westerlund, Hugo; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Dartigues, Jean-François; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie; Oksanen, Tuula; Salo, Paula; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine trajectories of headache in relation to retirement and to clarify the role of work stress and stress-prone personality. Headache prevalence during the 7 years before and after retirement was measured by annual questionnaires from GAZEL cohort comprising French national gas and electricity company employees (n = 12,913). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for headache during pre- peri- and post-retirement were calculated. The role of effect modifiers (work stress, type A or hostile personality) was tested by multiplicative interactions and synergy indices. An 11-13% reduction in headache prevalence was found during pre- and post-retirement, whereas decline was much steeper (46%) during the retirement transition. In absolute terms, the decline was greater among persons with high work stress or stress-prone personality than among other participants. Retirement is associated with a decrease in headache prevalence, particularly among persons with a high amount of work stress or proneness to over-react to stress.

  19. It's time to retire. Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dychtwald, Ken; Erickson, Tamara; Morison, Bob

    2004-03-01

    Companies have been so focused on down-sizing to contain costs that they've largely neglected a looming threat to their competitiveness: a severe shortage of talented workers. The general population is aging and with it, the labor pool. People are living longer, healthier lives, and the birthrate is at a historical low. During the next 15 years, 80% of the native-born workforce growth in North America--and even more in much of Western Europe--is going to be in the over-50 age cohort. When these mature workers begin to retire, there won't be nearly enough young people entering the workforce to compensate. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a shortfall of 10 million workers in the United States in 2010, and in countries where the birthrate is well below the population replacement level (particularly in Western Europe), the shortage will hit sooner, be more severe, and remain chronic. The problem won't just be a lack of bodies. Skills, knowledge, experience, and relationships walk out the door every time somebody retires--and they take time and money to replace. And while the brain drain is beginning now, the problem is going to become much more acute in the next decade or so, when baby boomers--more than one-quarter of all Americans, amounting to 76 million people--start hitting their mid sixties. Based on the results of their yearlong research project, the authors of this article offer recommendations for gaining the loyalty of older workers and creating a more flexible approach to retirement that allows people to continue contributing well into their sixties and seventies. Companies can no longer afford to think of retirement as a onetime event, permanently dividing work life from leisure.

  20. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance, lease rentals, joint facility rents, other rents, depreciation, joint facility, repairs billed to others... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other...

  1. 12 CFR 745.9-2 - Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retirement and other employee benefit plan... Coverage § 745.9-2 Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts. (a) Pass-through share insurance. Any shares of an employee benefit plan in an insured credit union shall be insured on a “pass-through...

  2. 12 CFR 330.14 - Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retirement and other employee benefit plan... STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY DEPOSIT INSURANCE COVERAGE § 330.14 Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts. (a) “Pass-through” insurance. Any deposits of an employee benefit plan in an insured depository...

  3. Optimal Time to Enter a Retirement Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the financial planning problem of a retiree wishing to enter a retirement village at a future uncertain date. The date of entry is determined by the retiree’s utility and bequest maximisation problem within the context of uncertain future health states. In addition, the retiree must choose optimal consumption, investment, bequest and purchase of insurance products prior to their full annuitisation on entry to the retirement village. A hyperbolic absolute risk-aversion (HARA utility function is used to allow necessary consumption for basic living and medical costs. The retirement village will typically require an initial deposit upon entry. This threshold wealth requirement leads to exercising the replication of an American put option at the uncertain stopping time. From our numerical results, active insurance and annuity markets are shown to be a critical aspect in retirement planning.

  4. Multivariate Density Modeling for Retirement Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Rook, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Prior to the financial crisis mortgage securitization models increased in sophistication as did products built to insure against losses. Layers of complexity formed upon a foundation that could not support it and as the foundation crumbled the housing market followed. That foundation was the Gaussian copula which failed to correctly model failure-time correlations of derivative securities in duress. In retirement, surveys suggest the greatest fear is running out of money and as retirement dec...

  5. 5 CFR 831.613 - Election of insurable interest annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Election of insurable interest annuity... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Survivor Annuities Elections at the Time of Retirement § 831.613 Election of insurable interest annuity. (a) At the time of retirement, an employee or Member in...

  6. An empirical investigation on factors influencing on insurance issued by export guarantee funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to find important factors influencing on insurance issued by export guarantee funds. The study uses factor analysis to detect important factors based on a questionnaire in Likert scale. The study has determined four factors including risk management, customer oriented, quality management and trade management. The first factor is associated with risk management and it includes four sub-factors. The factors include being responsive, reliability, service quality and customer detection and reliability plays the most important factor. The second factor is associated with being customer oriented where the factor includes four components including cost recognition, access, marketing knowledge and the level of management training. The third factor is associated with quality management, which includes four variables including responsiveness, reliability, quality of services and customer recognition. Finally, the last factor is associated with trade management, which includes three variables including trade risk, insurance premium and currency.

  7. Influence of the prudential supervision over the capitalization of the Romanian insurance market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Elly NAGHI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In a decade when all activities are globalized, including insurance, the recent focus of the supervisory authorities became the leveling of the legal framework concerning the solvency requirements of the companies acting on the market (as a consequence of the 2008 crisis, much more acute in USA than in Europe, where Basel Agreement decreased the fall of the banking sector. The present paper analyses the way in which the main solvency regimes applied at international level influence the equity of the insurance companies, especially the increase in the solvency capital required by the supervisors, taking into consideration the risk profile of the company. Moreover, the paper provides a blueprint of the methods to ensure the financial stability of the national industry, in order to respond adequately to systemic and systematic risks.

  8. Are managers open to involvement in employee retirement? The influence of manager psycho-social characteristics, decision-making environment and older employee situational factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, E.M.M.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Stephenson, J.

    2018-01-01

    The changing retirement landscape calls on employers to develop practices that respond to individuals’ retirement needs. Line managers are a key stakeholder in managing retirement and this study focuses on how they respond to employee retirement scenarios. This empirical work examines manager

  9. Influence of awareness on the usage of motor third party insurance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a case study of Kampala district. ... informants (insurers, insurance regulators as well as enforcers – traffic police officers); and carried out desk review of motor third party insurance ... enormous negative economic impact on individuals, fam-.

  10. Retirement routes and economic incentives to retire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin

    We estimate the effect of benefit rates on individuals’ retirement behaviour. Compared to most other studies in the field, the characterising feature of this paper is to use a cross-country panel data set of individuals (the European Community Household Panel, ECHP) to estimate economic effects...... across countries. A descriptive part of the paper makes clear that retirement via a period of unemployment prior to retirement programmes is quantitatively very important. We find econometric evidence that benefit rates affect retirement and the magnitude of this effect is relatively low if retirement...

  11. A quantitative study on factors influencing enrolment of dairy farmers in a community health insurance scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greef, Tineke de Groot-de; Monareng, Lydia V; Roos, Janetta H

    2016-12-09

    Access to affordable and effective health care is a challenge in low- and middle- income countries. Out-of-pocket expenditure for health care is a major cause of impoverishment. One way to facilitate access and overcome catastrophic expenditure is through a health insurance mechanism, whereby risks are shared and financial inputs pooled by way of contributions. This study examined factors that influenced the enrolment status of dairy farmers in Western Kenya to a community health insurance (CHI) scheme. Quantitative, cross-sectional research was used to describe factors influencing the enrolment in the CHI scheme. Quota and convenience sampling was used, recruiting a sample of 135 farmers who supply milk to a dairy cooperation. Data were collected using a structured interview schedule and analysed using Stata SE, Data Analysis and Statistical Software, Version 12. Factors influencing non-enrolment were identified as affordability (40%; n = 47), unfamiliarity with the management of the scheme (37%; n = 44) and a lack of understanding about the scheme (41%; n = 48). An exploratory factor analysis was used to reduce the variables to two factors: information provision and understanding community health insurance (CHI). Logistic regression identified factors associated with enrolment in the Tanykina Community Healthcare Plan (TCHP). Supplies of less than six litres of milk per day (OR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.06-0.84) and information provision (OR: 8.77; 95% CI: 2.25-34.16) were significantly associated with enrolment in the TCHP. Nearly 30% (29.6%; n = 40) of the respondents remarked that TCHP is expensive and 17% (n = 23) asked for more education on CHI and TCHP in an open-ended question. Recommendations related to marketing strategies, financial approach, information provision and further research were outlined to be made to the management of the TCHP as well as to those involved in public health.

  12. Influence of health-insurance access and hospital retention policies on childhood cancer treatment in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, S; Njuguna, F; van de Ven, P M; Olbara, G; Kemps, L J P A; Musimbi, J; Strother, R M; Aluoch, L M; Skiles, J; Buziba, N G; Sitaresmi, M N; Vreeman, R C; Kaspers, G J L

    2014-05-01

    Kenyan national policies for public hospitals dictate that patients are retained on hospital wards until their hospital bills are paid, but this payment process differs for patients with or without access to National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF) at diagnosis. Whether these differences impact treatment outcomes has not been described. Our study explores whether childhood cancer treatment outcomes in Kenya are influenced by health-insurance status and hospital retention policies. This study combined retrospective review of medical records with an illustrative case report. We identified children diagnosed with malignancies at a large Kenyan academic hospital between 2007 and 2009, their treatment outcomes, and health-insurance status at diagnosis. Between 2007 and 2009, 222 children were diagnosed with malignancies. Among 180 patients with documented treatment outcome, 54% abandoned treatment, 22% had treatment-related death, 4% progressive/relapsed disease, and 19% event-free survival. Health-insurance status at diagnosis was recorded in 148 children: 23% had NHIF and 77% had no NHIF. For children whose families had NHIF compared with those who did not, the relative risk for treatment abandonment relative to event-free survival was significantly smaller (relative-risk ratio = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.12-0.81, P = 0.016). The case report illustrates difficulties that Kenyan families might face when their child is diagnosed with cancer, has no NHIF, and is retained in hospital. Children with NHIF at diagnosis had significantly lower chance of abandoning treatment and higher chance of survival. Childhood cancer treatment outcomes could be improved by interventions that prevent treatment abandonment and improve access to NHIF. Hospital retention of patients over unpaid medical bills must stop. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The relation between self-determination and retirement satisfaction among active retired individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Yannick; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the motivational forces leading retired individuals to engage in post-retirement activities and how they could be related to satisfaction with retirement. Using the self-determination framework, the purpose of the present exploratory study was to examine the nature of active retirees' motivation and its impact on satisfaction with life in retirement. The Global Motivation Scale and measures of satisfaction with retirement were administered to 150 active retired individuals engaged in organized post-retirement activities in a University-based organization. Results revealed that these individuals were mainly characterized by higher levels of intrinsic motivation for knowledge, stimulation and accomplishment, rather than extrinsic dimensions. Regression analysis further demonstrated that intrinsic motivation for both accomplishment and stimulation were positively related to satisfaction with retirement, over and above the significant contribution of time since retirement, anticipated satisfaction with retirement, and subjective health. This exploratory study highlights the motivational mechanisms through which post-retirement behaviors could positively influence satisfaction with life in retirement among active retirees.

  14. Factors That Influence Enrolment and Retention in Ghana’ National Health Insurance Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millicent Kotoh, Agnes; Aryeetey, Genevieve Cecilia; der Geest, Sjaak Van

    2018-01-01

    Background: The government of Ghana introduced the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in 2004 with the goal of achieving universal coverage within 5 years. Evidence, however, shows that expanding NHIS coverage and especially retaining members have remained a challenge. A multilevel perspective was employed as a conceptual framework and methodological tool to examine why enrolment and retention in the NHIS remains low. Methods: A household survey was conducted after 20 months educational and promotional activities aimed at improving enrolment and retention rates in 15 communities in the Central and Eastern Regions (ERs) of Ghana. Observation, indepth interviews and informal conversations were used to collect qualitative data. Forty key informants (community members, health providers and district health insurance schemes’ [DHISs] staff) purposely selected from two casestudy communities in the Central Region (CR) were interviewed. Several community members, health providers and DHISs’ staff were also engaged in informal conversations in the other five communities in the region. Also, four staff of the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ghana Health Service (GHS) and National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) were engaged in in-depth interviews. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse quantitative data. Qualitative data was analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: The results show that factors that influence enrolment and retention in the NHIS are multi-dimensional and cut across all stakeholders. People enrolled and renewed their membership because of NHIS’ benefits and health providers’ positive behaviour. Barriers to enrolment and retention included: poverty, traditional risk-sharing arrangements influence people to enrol or renew their membership only when they need healthcare, dissatisfaction about health providers’ behaviour and service delivery challenges. Conclusion: Given the multi-dimensional nature of barriers to enrolment and retention

  15. Analyzing the Influence of Ethical Sales Behavior on Customers Loyalty through Customer Satisfaction and Trust in Insurance Company

    OpenAIRE

    Razieh Pezhman; Mohammad Hossein Moshref Javadi; Arash Shahin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analysis of a model for investigation the influences of ethical sales behavior on customer loyalty in insurance industry with a case study in Parsian Insurance Company in Iran. The theoretical topics collected by means of library and Internet and the data was obtained from questionnaire. To analyze the data, the structural equation modeling embedded in the AMOS software was applied. The results of analyzing data reveal that the presented model is an appropriate...

  16. Social security and retirement decision: A positive and normative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Helmuth; Lozachmeur, Jean-Marie; Pestieau, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Social insurance for the elderly is judged responsible for the widely observed trend towards early retirement. In a world of laissez-faire or in a first-best setting, there would be no such trend. However, when first-best instruments are not available, because health and productivity are not observable, the optimal social insurance policy may imply a distortion on the retirement decision. The main point we make is that while there is no doubt that retirement systems induce an excessive bias t...

  17. RETIREMENT EDUCATION AND ADULTHOOD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the positive impact of retirement education on the future lives of the adult workers who are .... relationships, assume personal and civic responsibilities, care ... devastating phenomenon and a route to poverty. The retired ...

  18. How e-business influences on time customer delivery: An empirical investigation on insurance industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, e-business has revolutionized insurance industry and it has become as one of the most important techniques to reach global market. This paper presents an empirical investigation to find important factors influencing on time delivery to customers. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire consists of 28 items in Likert scale, which was reduced to 24 and using principle component analysis, the study finds different important factors. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 0.94. In addition, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy and Approx. Chi-Square are 0.882 and 2462, respectively. The study determines four important factors including dynamic organization, environment opportunities, flexible structure and customer relationship management.

  19. Factors That Influence Enrolment and Retention in Ghana' National Health Insurance Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoh, Agnes Millicent; Aryeetey, Genevieve Cecilia; Van der Geest, Sjaak

    2017-10-17

    The government of Ghana introduced the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in 2004 with the goal of achieving universal coverage within 5 years. Evidence, however, shows that expanding NHIS coverage and especially retaining members have remained a challenge. A multilevel perspective was employed as a conceptual framework and methodological tool to examine why enrolment and retention in the NHIS remains low. A household survey was conducted after 20 months educational and promotional activities aimed at improving enrolment and retention rates in 15 communities in the Central and Eastern Regions (ERs) of Ghana. Observation, indepth interviews and informal conversations were used to collect qualitative data. Forty key informants (community members, health providers and district health insurance schemes' [DHISs] staff) purposely selected from two casestudy communities in the Central Region (CR) were interviewed. Several community members, health providers and DHISs' staff were also engaged in informal conversations in the other five communities in the region. Also, four staff of the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ghana Health Service (GHS) and National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) were engaged in in-depth interviews. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse quantitative data. Qualitative data was analysed using thematic content analysis. The results show that factors that influence enrolment and retention in the NHIS are multi-dimensional and cut across all stakeholders. People enrolled and renewed their membership because of NHIS' benefits and health providers' positive behaviour. Barriers to enrolment and retention included: poverty, traditional risk-sharing arrangements influence people to enrol or renew their membership only when they need healthcare, dissatisfaction about health providers' behaviour and service delivery challenges. Given the multi-dimensional nature of barriers to enrolment and retention, we suggest that the NHIA should engage DHISs, health

  20. [Factors Influencing Participation in Financial Incentive Programmes of Health Insurance Funds. Results of the Study 'German Health Update'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, S; von der Lippe, E; Starker, A; Hoebel, J; Franke, A

    2015-11-01

    The statutory health insurance can offer their insured incentive programmes that will motivate for healthy behaviour through a financial or material reward. This study will show results about what factors influence financial incentive programme participation (BPT) including all sorts of statutory health insurance funds and taking into account gender differences. For the cross-sectional analysis, data were used from 15,858 participants in the study 'Germany Health Update' (GEDA) from 2009, who were insured in the statutory health insurance. The selection of potential influencing variables for a BPT is based on the "Behavioural Model for Health Service Use" of Andersen. Accordingly, various factors were included in logistic regression models, which were calculated separately by gender: predisposing factors (age, education, social support, and health awareness), enabling factors (income, statutory health insurance fund, and family physician), and need factors (smoking, fruit and vegetable consumption, sports, body mass index, and general health status). In consideration of all factors, for both sexes, BPT is associated with age, health awareness, education, use of a family physician, smoking, and sports activities. In addition, income, body mass index, and diet are significant in women and social support and kind of statutory health insurance fund in men. It is found that predisposing, enabling and need factors are relevant. Financial incentive programmes reach population groups with greatest need less than those groups who already have a health-conscious behaviour, who receive a reward for this. In longitudinal studies, further research on financial incentive programmes should investigate the existence of deadweight effects and whether incentive programmes can contribute to the reduction of the inequity in health. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Maternal factors influencing late entry into prenatal care: a stratified analysis by race or ethnicity and insurance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Rebecca J; Altman, Molly R; Oltman, Scott P; Ryckman, Kelli K; Chambers, Christina D; Rand, Larry; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L

    2018-04-09

    Examine factors influencing late (> sixth month of gestation) entry into prenatal care by race/ethnicity and insurance payer. The study population was drawn from singleton live births in California from 2007-2012 in the birth cohort file maintained by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, which includes linked birth certificate and mother and infant hospital discharge records. The sample was restricted to infants delivered between 20 and 44 weeks gestation. Logistic regression was used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for factors influencing late entry into prenatal care. Maternal age, education, smoking, drug or alcohol abuse/dependence, mental illness, participation in the Women, Infants and Children's program and rural residence were evaluated for women entering prenatal care > sixth month of gestation compared with women entering prenatal care entry for each race or ethnicity and insurance payer. The sample included 2 963 888 women. The percent of women with late entry into prenatal care was consistently higher among women with public versus private insurance. Less than 1% of white non-Hispanic and Asian women with private insurance entered prenatal care late versus more than 4% of white non-Hispanic and black women with public insurance. After stratifying by race or ethnicity and insurance status, women less than 18 years of age were more likely to enter prenatal care late, with young Asian women with private insurance at the highest risk (15.6%; adjusted RR 7.4, 95% CI 5.3-10.5). Among all women with private insurance, > 12-year education or age > 34 years at term reduced the likelihood of late prenatal care entry (adjusted RRs 0.5-0.7). Drugs and alcohol abuse/dependence and residing in a rural county were associated with increased risk of late prenatal care across all subgroups (adjusted RRs 1.3-3.8). Participation in the Women, Infants and Children's program was associated with decreased

  2. How Can Adult Children Influence Parents’ Long-Term Care Insurance Purchase Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voils, Corrine I.; Coe, Norma B.; Konetzka, R. Tamara; Boles, Jillian; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of the Study: Long-term care (LTC) poses a significant strain on public health insurance financing. In response, there is policy interest in bolstering the private long-term care insurance (LTCI) market. Although families are central to LTC provision, their role in LTCI demand remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to obtain in-depth information concerning: (a) How do older parents evaluate the need for LTCI, (b) what role do adult children play? and (c) How do families communicate about parents’ LTC preferences and plans, including LTCI purchase? Design and Methods: We conducted focus groups with older parents and adult children in diverse markets. Two groups were conducted with older parents who had purchased LTCI and two with parents who had not purchased LTCI. Four groups were conducted with adult children, mixed as to whether their parents had purchased LTCI. Probes were informed by published reasons for purchasing or not purchasing LTCI. We analyzed transcriptions using directed content analysis and constant comparative method. Results: Older parents valued autonomy for themselves and their children. Older parent purchasers regarded LTCI as supporting this value while nonpurchasers perceived limitations. Adult children described unstated expectations that they would care for their parents. Though discussions between parents and children about LTCI were rare, successful influence occurred when children appealed to shared values, specifically avoiding burden and remaining home. Implications: Messages that emphasize autonomy over LTC decisions and interventions that start the LTC conversation among families, with attention to shared values, could increase private LTCI uptake. PMID:25209446

  3. How Can Adult Children Influence Parents' Long-Term Care Insurance Purchase Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Nina R; Voils, Corrine I; Coe, Norma B; Konetzka, R Tamara; Boles, Jillian; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2017-04-01

    Long-term care (LTC) poses a significant strain on public health insurance financing. In response, there is policy interest in bolstering the private long-term care insurance (LTCI) market. Although families are central to LTC provision, their role in LTCI demand remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to obtain in-depth information concerning: (a) How do older parents evaluate the need for LTCI, (b) what role do adult children play? and (c) How do families communicate about parents' LTC preferences and plans, including LTCI purchase? We conducted focus groups with older parents and adult children in diverse markets. Two groups were conducted with older parents who had purchased LTCI and two with parents who had not purchased LTCI. Four groups were conducted with adult children, mixed as to whether their parents had purchased LTCI. Probes were informed by published reasons for purchasing or not purchasing LTCI. We analyzed transcriptions using directed content analysis and constant comparative method. Older parents valued autonomy for themselves and their children. Older parent purchasers regarded LTCI as supporting this value while nonpurchasers perceived limitations. Adult children described unstated expectations that they would care for their parents. Though discussions between parents and children about LTCI were rare, successful influence occurred when children appealed to shared values, specifically avoiding burden and remaining home. Messages that emphasize autonomy over LTC decisions and interventions that start the LTC conversation among families, with attention to shared values, could increase private LTCI uptake. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Retirement expectations and satisfaction with retirement provisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bresser, Jochem; van Soest, Arthur

    This paper investigates the relationship between subjective expectations regarding the replacement rate of income at retirement and several measures of pension satisfaction. We use panel data on Dutch employees, analyzed with fixed effects models, allowing for correlation between unobserved

  5. The influence of gender and product design on farmers' preferences for weather-indexed crop insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Sonia; Krupnik, Timothy J; Rossi, Frederick; Khanam, Fahmida

    2016-05-01

    Theoretically, weather-index insurance is an effective risk reduction option for small-scale farmers in low income countries. Renewed policy and donor emphasis on bridging gender gaps in development also emphasizes the potential social safety net benefits that weather-index insurance could bring to women farmers who are disproportionately vulnerable to climate change risk and have low adaptive capacity. To date, no quantitative studies have experimentally explored weather-index insurance preferences through a gender lens, and little information exists regarding gender-specific preferences for (and constraints to) smallholder investment in agricultural weather-index insurance. This study responds to this gap, and advances the understanding of preference heterogeneity for weather-index insurance by analysing data collected from 433 male and female farmers living on a climate change vulnerable coastal island in Bangladesh, where an increasing number of farmers are adopting maize as a potentially remunerative, but high-risk cash crop. We implemented a choice experiment designed to investigate farmers' valuations for, and trade-offs among, the key attributes of a hypothetical maize crop weather-index insurance program that offered different options for bundling insurance with financial saving mechanisms. Our results reveal significant insurance aversion among female farmers, irrespective of the attributes of the insurance scheme. Heterogeneity in insurance choices could however not be explained by differences in men's and women's risk and time preferences, or agency in making agriculturally related decisions. Rather, gendered differences in farmers' level of trust in insurance institutions and financial literacy were the key factors driving the heterogeneous preferences observed between men and women. Efforts to fulfill gender equity mandates in climate-smart agricultural development programs that rely on weather-index insurance as a risk-abatement tool are therefore

  6. Predictors of disability retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, N; Lynch, J; Kaplan, G A; Cohen, R D; Goldberg, D E; Salonen, J T

    1997-12-01

    Disability retirement may increase as the work force ages, but there is little information on factors associated with retirement because of disability. This is the first prospective population-based study of predictors of disability retirement including information on workplace, socioeconomic, behavioral, and health-related factors. The subjects were 1038 Finnish men who were enrolled in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, who were 42, 48, 54, or 60 years of age at the beginning of the study, and who participated in a 4-year follow-up medical examination. Various job characteristics predicted disability retirement. Heavy work, work in uncomfortable positions, long workhours, noise at work, physical job strain, musculoskeletal strain, repetitive or continuous muscle strain, mental job strain, and job dissatisfaction were all significantly associated with the incidence of disability retirement. The ability to communicate with fellow workers and social support from supervisors tended to reduce the risk of disability retirement. The relationships persisted after control for socioeconomic factors, prevalent disease, and health behavior, which were also associated with disability retirement. The strong associations found between workplace factors and the incidence of disability retirement link the problem of disability retirement to the problem of poor work conditions.

  7. Lassoing the Determinants of Retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Kock, Anders Bredahl; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    2016-01-01

    This article uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998. Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socioeconomic, financial, and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case ...... that this is the case for core variables such as age, income, wealth, and general health. We also point out the most important differences between these groups and explain why these might be present.......This article uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998. Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socioeconomic, financial, and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case...

  8. Lassoing the Determinants of Retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Kock, Anders Bredahl; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    This paper uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998.Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socio-economic, financially and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case t...... such as age, income, wealth and general health. We also point out themost important differences between these groups and explain why these might be present.......This paper uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998.Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socio-economic, financially and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case...

  9. Multigroup Path Analysis of the Influence of Healthcare Quality, by Different Health Insurance Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong-Rock; Holcomb, Derek; Ballard, Michael; Schwartz, Laurel

    Winds of change have been blowing in the U.S. healthcare system since passage of the Affordable Care Act. Examining differences between individuals covered by different types of insurance is essential if healthcare executives are to develop new strategies in response to the emerging health insurance market. In this study, we used multigroup path analysis models to examine the moderating effects of health insurance on direct and indirect associations with general health status, satisfaction with received care, financial burden, and perceived value of the healthcare system. Data were obtained from the 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and analyzed according to the types of insurance: private, public, and military. With the satisfactory fit of the model (χ = 2,532.644, df = 96, p spending.

  10. Psychosocial work environment and retirement age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Jensen, Per H.; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retention of senior employees is a challenge for most developed countries. We aimed to identify psychosocial work environment factors of importance for the retention of older employees by evaluating the association between the psychosocial work environment and voluntary early retirement i...... at the labor market. However, we found no evidence that low demands or good relations between colleagues could influence older employees’ decision on early retirement....

  11. Preparing for asset retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Randall W; Reinstein, Alan

    2003-04-01

    Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 143 requires organizations to recognize a liability for an asset retirement obligation when it is incurred--even if that occurs far in advance of the asset's planned retirement. For example, organizations must recognize future costs associated with medical equipment disposal that carries hazardous material legal obligations.

  12. Early Retirement Payoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.; Lovenheim, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    As public budgets have grown tighter over the past decade, states and school districts have sought ways to control the growth of spending. One increasingly common strategy employed to rein in costs is to offer experienced teachers with high salaries financial incentives to retire early. Although early retirement incentive (ERI) programs have been…

  13. Essays on partial retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarci, T.

    2012-01-01

    The five essays in this dissertation address a range of topics in the micro-economic literature on partial retirement. The focus is on the labor market behavior of older age groups. The essays examine the economic and non-economic determinants of partial retirement behavior, the effect of partial

  14. Married Women's Retirement Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Pozzebon; Olivia S. Mitchell

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we examine the economic and family determinants of married women's retirement behavior. A model of wives' retirement decisions is developed and tested empirically using data on working married women. Estimated response parameters are compared to those obtained previously for male workers. Our findings are directly relevant to policy questions regarding pension and Social Security reform.

  15. Demand for voluntary basic medical insurance in urban China: panel evidence from the Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Yan, Xiao

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigates the key factors associated with the demand for Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI), which was established in 2007 and aims to cover all Chinese urban residents. Two waves of longitudinal household survey data are used, and a three-level random-intercept logit model is used for the analysis. Two different sets of explanatory variables were identified for adults and children, separately. Results suggest for both the adult and the child samples that income, health status, age and health risk behaviours are key influencing factors for basic medical insurance demand. The household head's characteristics are also significantly related to other household members' medical insurance demands. Specifically, household heads who are more educated or retired are more likely to purchase medical insurance for their children. These findings suggest that an expansion of the special subsidy to the poor or, probably more important, a risk-adjusted benefit package may be needed for voluntary basic medical insurance in China. In addition, adverse selection consistently exists and is a major challenge for the sustainability of medical insurance financing. To expand insurance coverage for children, especially those under school age, special efforts (possibly through health education or health promotion) should be focused on the household head, particularly those engaging in risky health behaviours.

  16. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    We investigate the effect of an acute health shock on retirement among elderly male workers in Denmark, 1991-1999, and in particular whether various welfare state programs and institutions impinge on the retirement effect. The results show that an acute health event increases the retirement chances...... significant. For the most part, the retirement effect following a health shock seems to be immune to the availability of a multitude of government programs for older workers in Denmark....... benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is not strongly...

  17. PREPARATION FOR RETIREMENT - AVS SEMINAR

    CERN Multimedia

    Social Service

    2001-01-01

    The 500 or so participants in the fifth Preparation for Retirement seminar held at the end of March were unfortunately deprived of the planned session on the AVS due to the unavailability of the Director of the Caisse Cantonale Genevoise de Compensation (CCGC). We have since had formal confirmation that because of an extra workload due to important changes in the Swiss tax and social legislation and the implementation this summer of the maternity insurance in Geneva, the CCGC has suspended its participation in preparation for retirement seminars in the international organisations for the time being. Conscious of the necessity of offering a session dedicated to the AVS, it is with pleasure that we can inform you that one of our legal advisers, Mr Lorenz Stampfli, has accepted to lead this session. In order to allow for adequate preparation we have reserved the following date: Wednesday 26 September from 14.00 to 16.00 in the Main Amphitheatre The session will be open to all people already registered and any o...

  18. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  19. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  20. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement - testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  1. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement : testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Geuskens, G.A.; Ybema, J.F.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  2. 'All those things together made me retire': qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; de Wind, Astrid; Westerman, Marjan J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; van der Beek, Allard J; Geuskens, Goedele A

    2013-05-28

    Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60-64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement ('push factors'), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement ('pull factors') included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and psychosocial job characteristics on the one hand, and

  3. Retirement Planning: Young Professionals in Private Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zazili Ainol Sarin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the factors influencing retirement planning among young professionals in private sector. There are three factors identified in this research which includes financial literacy, job satisfaction and savings behavior. Data used for this study are primary and secondary data such as from journal articles, periodicals and textbooks. A questionnaire is distributed and administered to extract data from the respondents consist of executives, non-executives and managers around Klang Valley, aged between 20 - 34 years old. The data is analyzed using frequency analysis, reliability test and Pearson correlation in order to obtain a clear findings and results. The findings show that financial literacy, job satisfaction and savings behavior has a positive association towards retirement planning. Furthermore, it is shown that financial literacy and saving behavior have a significant relationship with retirement planning. It is hope that this study will inform and encourage the young professionals to save and invest for the retirement.

  4. Retirement Choice 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION...retirement choice in 2016. We start by describing the $30,000 bonus as an early, partial cash -out of the servicemember’s retirement pension. This...30,000 cash -out will be “paid back” later in the form of reduced retirement checks. By providing information on how much this cash -out will cost in

  5. Retirement of Massimo Tarenghi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, C.

    2013-09-01

    Massimo Tarenghi, chronologically MPG/ESO project scientist, NTT project manager, VLT programme manager and first Director, ALMA Director and ESO Representative in Chile, has retired after 35 years at ESO. A brief summary of his achievements is presented.

  6. Retirement Information Center Blog

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A place for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to share information about retirement benefits for new, prospective, and current Federal employees, as well...

  7. Second Careers in Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kellye

    1992-01-01

    Describes career changes and retirement choices made by outgoing "career" superintendents. Choices ranged from teaching and consulting to administering philanthropic organizations and launching a charter-boat business. (MLH)

  8. Celebrating Stephen Robertson's retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Tait, J.; MacFarlane, A; Belkin, N.

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Robertson retired from the Microsoft Research Lab in Cambridge during the summer of 2013 after a long career as one of the most influential, well-liked and eminent researchers in Information Retrieval throughout the world.

  9. Factors influencing the decision to drop out of health insurance enrolment among urban slum dwellers in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atinga, Roger A; Abiiro, Gilbert Abotisem; Kuganab-Lem, Robert Bella

    2015-03-01

    To identify the factors influencing dropout from Ghana's health insurance scheme among populations living in slum communities. Cross-sectional data were collected from residents of 22 slums in the Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Cluster and systematic random sampling techniques were used to select and interview 600 individuals who had dropped out from the scheme 6 months prior to the study. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression models were computed to account for sample characteristics and reasons associated with the decision to dropout. The proportion of dropouts in the sample increased from the range of 6.8% in 2008 to 34.8% in 2012. Non-affordability of premium was the predominant reason followed by rare illness episodes, limited benefits of the scheme and poor service quality. Low-income earners and those with low education were significantly more likely to report premium non-affordability. Rare illness was a common reason among younger respondents, informal sector workers and respondents with higher education. All subgroups of age, education, occupation and income reported nominal benefits of the scheme as a reason for dropout. Interventions targeted at removing bottlenecks to health insurance enrolment are salient to maximising the size of the insurance pool. Strengthening service quality and extending the premium exemption to cover low-income families in slum communities is a valuable strategy to achieve universal health coverage. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Influence of insurance and marital status on outcomes of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintel, Andrew E; Jamy, Omer; Martin, Mike G

    2015-06-01

    Although outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are worse when treated according to adult rather than pediatric protocols, one criticism is that this may be due to the emancipation of young adults. Using case listing session of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 (1973-2010), we examined outcomes for AYA with ALL defined similar to Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 10,403 criteria (age 18-30) predicated on marital and insurance status as surrogates for emancipation (limiting analysis to 2007-2010). Analyses were conducted with SEER*Stat 8.1.2, Microsoft Excel 2007, and GraphPad Prism 6. Comparisons were made by the Fisher exact test and log rank test (Mantel-Cox); all P values were 2-sided. Although age (24 and younger vs. 25 and older) was predictive of median overall survival (OS) (not reached vs. 33; P = .0029) (3-year OS 66% vs. 49%), social factors were not. Three-year OS for insured versus uninsured patients was 61% versus 50%, and median OS was not reached versus 30 months (P = .2334). Three-year OS for single versus married patients was 62% versus 55%, with median OS not reached for both groups (P = .1084). Insurance status and marriage did not influence outcomes for AYA with ALL, suggesting that intrinsic differences in disease and disease-specific therapies are more important than social issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 5 CFR 842.605 - Election of insurable interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Election of insurable interest rate. 842... Election of insurable interest rate. (a) At the time of retirement, an employee or Member in good health and who is applying for a non-disability annuity may elect an insurable interest rate. An election...

  12. How Do Board Characteristics Influence Business Performance? Evidence from Non-life Insurance Firms in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Sandada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to contribute to the corporate governance literature by establishing the relationship between board characteristics and corporate performance within the nonlife insurance firms in Zimbabwe. The study sought to provide some insights on corporate governance since the phenomenon is relatively an emerging discipline in Zimbabwe. The paper sought to complement other corporate governance studies that were conducted in other environments by producing evidence on the phenomenon from a developing country context. A quantitative research approach was adopted and respondents were selected through a stratified random sampling. The results of the study confirm that board characteristics (board composition, diversity, and size exhibit a statistically significant positive predictive relationship with the performance of non-life insurance firms measured by gross premium written and customer retention. However, CEO/Chairman duality showed a negative relationship with business performance. Non-life insurance companies need to be cognizant of board characteristics in order to improve their performance. Moreover , the findings in this research has practical relevance for the selection process of directors as it highlights the importance of having a sizeable number of board members as well as an appropriate mix of competences and qualifications on the board. Although corporate governance is has been extensively researched, there is limited study in this area from a developing country like Zimbabwe with relatively less developed capital markets. It would be wrong to assume that the findings found in other countries can apply here because the conditions are different.

  13. Do single women value early retirement more than single men?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danø, Anne Møller; Ejrnæs, Mette; Husted, Leif

    2005-01-01

    and health are important determinants of the retirement decision. Furthermore, we find substantial gender differences in the retirement pattern. Healthy single women value retirement more than healthy single men and are willing to reduce their disposable income to 74% of their previous income while men......The focus of this paper is to analyse why a large fraction of single elderly people choose to retire early. A structural model directly based on the individual decision of labour supply is estimated on a sample of singles, where singles are defined as those who are living alone. We find that income...... are willing to reduce the income to 81%. Men's retirement decision is mainly influenced by income and health, whereas women's retirement decision is also affected by education and unemployment experience...

  14. Facing up to Post-Retirement Medical Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John H.

    2008-01-01

    In the late 1990s, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation made grants to study people's attitudes toward retirement and to determine what factors influenced their decisions to retire. Although faculty were not talking to college administrators or human-resources departments about health care, the researchers found to their surprise that when they…

  15. Perceptions of Retirement Affect Career Commitment: The Mediating Role of Retirement System Satisfaction for Two Teacher Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin L.; Conley, Sharon; You, Sukkyung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated a sample of California elementary, intermediate, and high school employed teachers (N = 247) to assess the effects of retirement perceptions on career commitment among teachers who are in different age groupings. Using path analysis, the influence of five retirement perceptions variables was examined: concerns about…

  16. What causes EBRI retirement readiness ratings to vary: results from the 2014 Retirement Security Projection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2014-02-01

    RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY IMPROVED SLIGHTLY IN 2013: Due to the increase in financial market and housing values during 2013, the probability that Baby Boomers and Generation Xers would NOT run short of money in retirement increases between 0.5 and 1.6 percentage points, based on the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) Retirement Readiness Ratings (RRRs). ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION IN AN EMPLOYER-SPONSORED DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN REMAINS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS FOR RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY: RRR values double for Gen Xers in the lowest-income quartile when comparing those with 20 or more years of future eligibility with those with no years of future eligibility, while those in the middle income quartiles experience increases in RRR values by 27.1-30.3 percentage points. FUTURE SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE FOR THE RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY OF SOME HOUSEHOLDS, ESPECIALLY GEN XERS IN THE LOWEST-INCOME QUARTILE: If Social Security benefits are subject to proportionate decreases beginning in 2033 (according to the values in Figure 8), the RRR values for those households will drop by more than 50 percent: from 20.9 percent to 10.3 percent. LONGEVITY RISK AND STOCHASTIC HEALTH CARE RISK ARE ASSOCIATED WITH HUGE VARIATIONS IN RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY: For both of these factors, a comparison between the most "risky" quartile with the least risky quartile shows a spread of approximately 30 percentage points for the lowest income range, approximately 25 to 40 percentage points for the highest income range, and even larger spreads for those in the middle income ranges. A GREAT DEAL OF THE VARIABILITY IN RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY COULD BE MITIGATED BY APPROPRIATE RISK-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES AT OR NEAR RETIREMENT AGE: For example, the annuitization of a portion of the defined contribution and IRA balances may substantially increase the probability of not running short of money in retirement. Moreover, a well-functioning market in long

  17. Manfred Ziebell Retires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstadt, D.

    2002-12-01

    On December 1st, 2002, after thirty- seven years of service, first in Chile and then in Garching, Ms. Christa Euler will leave ESO to enjoy a welldeserved retirement. Among the current staff, she is probably the only person who started her career at ESO just four years after the Organization was founded.

  18. Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Following the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 2 December 2008, please note that the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, i.e. until 31 March 2010. Further information is available on : https://hr-services.web.cern.ch/hr-services/services-Ben/prp/prp.asp HR Department, tel. 73903

  19. Mental retirement and schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Martinello, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    , which affect cognitive functioning at old ages, they are invalid as instruments without controlling for schooling. We show by means of simulation and a replication study that unless the model incorporates schooling, the estimated effect of retirement is negatively biased. This explains a large part...... of the “mental retirement” effects which have recently been found...

  20. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical

  1. Athletic identity and psychiatric symptoms following retirement from varsity sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Zarina A; Haney, Colleen J; Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2017-11-01

    Despite evidence identifying adjustment difficulties among retiring athletes, research investigating factors that contribute to post-retirement complications is limited. Athletic identity may be an important determinant of adverse adaptation to sport retirement. The purpose of this study was to address the influence of athletic identity on post-retirement depression and anxiety symptoms among varsity athletes. An anonymous, online survey regarding athletic identity and psychiatric symptoms was completed by 72 self-identified varsity athletes during their final season of competition and 3 months after retiring from sport. After controlling for the effects of pre-retirement anxiety symptoms, endorsement of an athletic identity significantly predicted anxiety symptoms in the post-retirement period. A similar, but non-significant, pattern was observed for depressive symptoms. The findings of this study suggest that athletes' degree of athletic identity may be a risk factor for the emergence of psychiatric distress in the months following their retirement from sport. Identity-focused screening or intervention during athletes' sport careers could potentially mitigate some of the psychological difficulties associated with sport retirement.

  2. Ideas for Improving Retirement Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Anna M

    Employers can and should take steps to support retirement and financial wellness. This article provides a framework for retirement wellness informed by research conducted or supported by the Society of Actuaries. Research insights about Americans' finances, planning, decisions, money management, debt, retiree income shocks and other areas point to ways employers can provide retirement wellness support as a vital part of an overall benefit program. The author suggests several key considerations employers should pay attention to in order to improve retirement wellness.

  3. The Influence of Israel Health Insurance Law on the Negev Bedouin Population — A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Morad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extension of universal health service insurance to national populations is a relatively new phenomenon. Since 1995, the Israeli National Health Insurance Law (NHIL has provided universal health services to every resident, but the effect of this law on health and health services among minorities has not been examined sufficiently. The goals of this study were to track some of the first changes engendered by the NHIL among the Negev Bedouin Arabs to examine the effects of universal health care services. Methods included analysis of historical and health policy documents, three field appraisals of health care services (1994, 1995, 1999, a region-wide interview survey of Negev Bedouins (1997, and key informant interviews. For the interview survey, a sample of 515 households was chosen from different Bedouin localities representing major sedentarization stages. Results showed that prior to the NHIL, a substantial proportion of the Negev Bedouins were uninsured with limited, locally available health service. Since 1995, health services, particularly primary care clinics and health manpower, have dramatically expanded. The initial expansion appears to have been a marketing ploy, but real improvements have occurred. There was a high level of health service utilization among the Bedouins in the Negev, especially private medical services, hospitals, and night ambulatory medical services. The NHIL brought change to the structure of health services in Israel, namely the institution of a national health system based on proportional allocation of resources (based on size and age and open competition in the provision of quality health care. The expansion of the pool of potential members engendered by the new universal coverage had profound effects on the Health Funds' attitudes towards Negev Bedouins. In addition, real consumer choice was introduced for the first time. Although all the health care needs of this rapidly growing population have yet to be met

  4. Korean immigrants don't buy health insurance: The influences of culture on self-employed Korean immigrants focusing on structure and functions of social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunsung; Jeong, Chung Hyeon

    2017-10-01

    Culture has been pinpointed as a culprit of disparities in health insurance coverage between Korean immigrants and other ethnic groups. This study explored specific mechanisms by which culture influences a decision to buy health insurance among self-employed Korean immigrants living in ethnic enclaves by focusing on the structure and functions of social networks. Between March and June 2015, we recruited 24 Korean immigrant adults (aged 18 or older) who identified as self-employed and being uninsured for substantial periods before 2014 in Southern California. Interviews were conducted in Korean, and Korean transcripts were translated into English by two bilingual interpreters. Using constant comparative analysis, we explored why participants didn't purchase health insurance after migrating to the United States and how their social networks influenced their decisions whether to purchase health insurance. Results indicate Korean immigrants sought health information from dense and homogeneous social networks whose members are mostly Korean immigrants embedded in similar social contexts. Social learning was frequently observed when people sought health care while uninsured. However, respondents often noted social ties do not provide helpful information about benefits, costs, and ways to use health insurance. "Koreans don't buy health insurance" was a dominant social norm reported by most respondents. Findings indicate that social learning and normative influence occur inside social networks and these mechanisms seemingly prevent purchasing of health insurance. In addition to the individual mandate in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more targeted approaches that consider the structure and functions of social networks could improve the public health of Korean immigrants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Starting Retirement on a Sound Footing

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The fifth pre-retirement seminar has been a great success. The various sessions covered questions relating to rules and regulations, as well as financial and health issues, health insurance, residence permits and the psychological aspects of retirement. You will no doubt have noticed that the car parks near the Main Building were particularly full last week. In fact it was almost impossible to find a parking spot. A prestigious speaker? A sensational lecture series? Nothing of the sort. It was all due to the pre-retirement seminar, the fifth of its kind since 1993, which never fails to be a success. 'We sent out a thousand invitations to CERN staff aged 55 and above and received 500 positive replies' says William Blair, who has been organising the seminars for the Human Resources (HR) Division for the last eight years in collaboration with the CERN Pensioners Association and the Staff Association. The Main Auditorium was not big enough to accommodate everyone and the discussions also had to be retransmitted l...

  6. Entrepreneurial Moral Hazard in Income Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Mette; Hochguertel, Stefan

    We study risk behavior of Danish self-employed entrepreneurs, whose income risk may be driven by both exogenous factors and effort choice (moral hazard). Partial insurance is available through voluntary unemployment insurance (UI). Additional incentives to sign insurance contracts stem from a UI......-embedded, government-subsidized early retirement (ER) program, giving benefits that are unrelated to business risk. Indeed, we argue that the self-employeds' incentives to insure themselves stem from the ER plan rather than from the UI cover. We show how to use a policy reform to identify moral hazard in observed...

  7. Affluence and Private Health Insurance Influence Treatment and Survival in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Comber

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate inequalities in survival for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, distinguishing between direct and indirect effects of patient, social and process-of-care factors.All cases of NHL diagnosed in Ireland in 2004-2008 were included. Variables describing patient, cancer, stage and process of care were included in a discrete-time model of survival using Structural Equation Modelling software.Emergency admissions were more common in patients with co-morbid conditions or with more aggressive cancers, and less frequent for patients from more affluent areas. Aggressive morphology, female sex, emergency admission, increasing age, comorbidity, treatment in a high caseload hospital and late stage were associated with increased hazard of mortality. Private patients had a reduced hazard of mortality, mediated by systemic therapy, admission to high caseload hospitals and fewer emergency admissions.The higher rate of emergency presentation, and consequent poorer survival, of uninsured patients, suggests they face barriers to early presentation. Social, educational and cultural factors may also discourage disadvantaged patients from consulting with early symptoms of NHL. Non-insured patients, who present later and have more emergency admissions would benefit from better access to diagnostic services. Older patients remain disadvantaged by sub-optimal treatment, treatment in non-specialist centres and emergency admission.

  8. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the main auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via ...

  9. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place in the afternoons of 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Ind...

  10. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance ...

  11. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register ...

  12. 5 CFR 842.106 - Elections of retirement coverage under the District of Columbia Financial Responsibility and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... employee has elected to participate in a retirement, health or life insurance program offered by the... timely election and the employee thereafter acted with due diligence in making the election. (d) Effect...

  13. 5 CFR 831.204 - Elections of retirement coverage under the District of Columbia Financial Responsibility and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... retirement, health or life insurance program offered by the District of Columbia. (2) Exception. A former... timely election and the employee thereafter acted with due diligence in making the election. (e) Effect...

  14. The influence of health-promoting lifestyles on the quality of life of retired workers in a medium-sized city of Northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-chen; Tao, Fang-biao; Ueda, Atsushi; Wei, Chang-nian; Fang, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the actual state of retired workers' lifestyles and quality of life (QOL) in a medium-sized city of Northeastern China and to assess the relationship between these according to differences between gender groups. The Chinese version of the Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP-II), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), and demographic variables were used to measure 343 (aged 50-79 years) retired workers' lifestyles and QOL. The results were analyzed using the t test, one-way analysis of variance, correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis. Among the six lifestyle subscales of HPLP-II, the highest mean score was for Interpersonal Relations (IR) and the lowest was for Health Responsibility (HR), which has not been reported previously. The youngest group (50-60 years) had higher scores for lifestyles and QOL than the other age groups. When the results were analyzed based on financial situation, the lowest income group (below ¥2000) had the poorest scores. Analysis according to gender group revealed different tendencies for the scores of lifestyle and QOL, as well as in the multiple regression analysis between variables. Our results suggest that an effective approach to maintain a desirable lifestyle and QOL for retired workers at the regional level would be to introduce daily activities to improve HR and to maintain and enhance social support for the low-income populations. Further research is needed to understand the complex causal pathways between regional health and welfare factors, health behavior, and QOL.

  15. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Human Resources is organising a preparation for retirement seminar which will take place on the four successive afternoons of 2 to 5 October 2007. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of one’s working life and the start of a new period of life. This period of transition and change is experienced differently from one individual to another. In any case, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above as well as those who have retired during the year have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of th...

  16. Expanding Canada Pension Plan Retirement Benefits: Assessing Big CPP Proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. Kesselman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Current and growing deficiencies in many workers’ ability to maintain their accustomed living standards in retirement have evoked varied proposals for reform of Canada’s retirement income system. This study focuses on proposals for expanding the retirement benefits of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP, and undertakes comparative analysis with proposals for reforms affecting workplace pensions and individual savings. It begins by reviewing key policy questions for the retirement income system and describing essential features of several proposals for CPP benefit expansion. It then uses these “Big CPP” proposals as a basis to assess the design issues for expanding CPP benefits and the implications for other components of the retirement income system. The paper assesses each of the major private and public savings vehicles based on multifaceted criteria for a well-performing retirement income system; a mandatory public scheme with defined benefits ranks most highly on almost all criteria other than individual flexibility. Additional behavioural and institutional factors also support the use of mandatory public pensions: myopia in savings, individual investment behaviour, scale economies and costs of fund management, adverse selection and annuitization costs, the Samaritan’s Dilemma, and labour market incentives. The study provides an overview analysis of key design issues for the expansion of CPP retirement benefits. Major issues include the desirable scale of expansion for both the percentage of insurable earnings and the insurable earnings ceiling; mandatory versus voluntary coverage and options; the allocation of investment return risk; and the phasing-in of higher premiums and benefits. The study then assesses the implications of CPP expansion for other components of the retirement income system: Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement, workplace pensions, tax provisions for savings, and individual savings. A Big CPP fits

  17. Retirement as Meaningful: Positive Retirement Stereotypes Associated with Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Reuben; Allore, Heather G.; Monin, Joan K.; Levy, Becca R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the association between retirement and health have produced mixed results. This may be due to previous studies treating retirement as merely a change in job status rather than a transition associated with stereotypes or societal beliefs (e.g., retirement is a time of mental decline or retirement is a time of growth). To examine whether these stereotypes are associated with health, we studied retirement stereotypes and survival over a 23-year period among 1,011 older adults. As predicted by stereotype embodiment theory, it was found that positive stereotypes about physical health during retirement showed a survival advantage of 4.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.88, p = .022) and positive stereotypes about mental health during retirement tended to show a survival advantage of 2.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.87, p = .034). Models adjusted for relevant covariates such as age, gender, race, employment status, functional health, and self-rated health. These results suggest that retirement preparation could benefit from considering retirement stereotypes. PMID:27346893

  18. Report of the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-29

    experience unique stresses associated with parental deployments and frequent relocations that can adversely affect academic performance. A military...publicpolicy.wharton.upenn.edu/live/news/317-an-affordable-and-equitable-retirement-system-for. See also David B. Newman , Mitigating the Inequity of...insurance plans in the style of FEHBP would greatly expand choice in health care and consequently provide beneficiaries demonstrated value, as

  19. Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health insurance helps protect you from high medical care costs. It is a contract between you and your ... Many people in the United States get a health insurance policy through their employers. In most cases, the ...

  20. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a Preparation for Retirement Seminar, which will take place on 18 and 21 October 2011 in the afternoon in the Main Auditorium and on 19 October and 15 and 16 November 2011 in the afternoon in the Council Chamber. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned, you are ...

  1. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a Preparation for Retirement Seminar, which will take place on 18 and 21 October 2011 in the afternoon in the Main Auditorium and on 19 October and 15 and 16 November 2011 in the afternoon in the Council Chamber. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned, you are r...

  2. The XWHO directory retires

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    On 11 May a new web-based phonebook will take over from the 16-year old XWHO directory. It will provide access to basic contact information for people and services at CERN. A user-friendly interface will allow you to look for people and services using criteria such as first or last name, organisational unit and phone number. All requests submitted to the retired XWHO directory will be redirected to the new phonebook.   The new CERN Phonebook's user interface. CERN’s first electronic phonebook was created in 1995. The XWHO directory was first presented in July that year in a CERN Computer Newsletter (CNL) article entitled “Migrating the access to central directory services” by Miguel Marquina and Bernd Pollermann. Since then, it has been used by thousands of people at CERN and around the world looking for contact details of other members of the Organization. The XWHO directory is now retiring and is to be replaced by the new web-based CERN Phonebook. For several month...

  3. PRE-RETIREMENT PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Special Meeting concerning the TAXATION OF PENSIONS IN FRANCE Following the pre-retirement seminar held at CERN in March 2001, the Human Resources Division and the CERN Pensioners Association (GAC) are organising a special information session on the Taxation of CERN pensions in France The speaker will be S. Agarrat, a barrister specialising in tax law (practising in Lyon) and the meeting will take the form of a general presentation of the subject, followed by a question-and-answer session. This meeting is intended for CERN pensioners residing in France, as well as for staff due to retire from the Organization in 2001/2002. Registration is not necessary. The meeting will take place on Wednesday, 28 November 2001, from 4.30 p.m. to 6.30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium N.B.: Questions concerning the taxation rules applicable to salaries paid by CERN, in particular questions relating to the CRDS tax, will not be dealt with during this meeting.

  4. Preparation for retirement seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

      The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Indico. &a...

  5. Insurance crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses the effects of financing and technology advances on the availability of insurance for independent power producers operating gas turbines. Combined cycle units which require new materials and processes make it difficult to assess risk. Insurers are denying coverage, or raising prices and deductibles. Many lenders, however, are requiring insurance prior to financing. Some solutions proposed include information sharing by industry participants and insurers and increased risk acceptance by plant owners/operators

  6. Probabilistic Insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.; Thaler, R.H.; Tversky, A.

    1997-01-01

    Probabilistic insurance is an insurance policy involving a small probability that the consumer will not be reimbursed. Survey data suggest that people dislike probabilistic insurance and demand more than a 20% reduction in premium to compensate for a 1% default risk. These observations cannot be

  7. Probabilistic Insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Wakker (Peter); R.H. Thaler (Richard); A. Tversky (Amos)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractProbabilistic insurance is an insurance policy involving a small probability that the consumer will not be reimbursed. Survey data suggest that people dislike probabilistic insurance and demand more than a 20% reduction in the premium to compensate for a 1% default risk. While these

  8. Do Individual Accounts Postpone Retirement: Evidence from Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Estelle James; Alejandra Cox Edwards

    2005-01-01

    Postponing retirement will become increasingly important as a means to increase the labor force, its output and old age security, as populations age. Recent research has focused on incentives stemming from the social security system that influence the worker’s decision to retire. Defined benefit systems (both public and private) often contain penalties for postponing access to pensions or continuing to work while receiving a pension. In contrast, the tight link between contributions and accum...

  9. 78 FR 33911 - Phased Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... to implement phased retirement, a new human resources tool that allows full-time employees to work a..., 582, 831, et al. Phased Retirement; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 108 / Wednesday, June 5, 2013 / Proposed Rules#0;#0; [[Page 33912

  10. Retirement Patterns and Income Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasang, Anette Eva

    2012-01-01

    How do social policies shape life courses, and which consequences do different life course patterns hold for individuals? This article engages the example of retirement in Germany and Britain to analyze life course patterns and their consequences for income inequality. Sequence analysis is used to measure retirement trajectories. The liberal…

  11. Consequences of Retirement: An Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Gerald P.

    Studies on retirement reporting that, compared to people not retired, recent retirees exhibited less income, more physical and mental illness, lower self-esteem, and less life satisfaction have been challenged and new findings have been revealed by longitudinal studies using data from large samples. It appears that perhaps the way individuals…

  12. Marketing in life insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njegomir Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Insurance industry has traditionally been oriented on sale of its products i.e. at the stage which from the aspect of marketing theory can be characterized as sales phase, phase which proceeds the marketing orientation. However, faced with numerous challenges of modern business environment such as globalization, deregulation and sophisticated information technology insurance companies must change their way of doing business. Competition is becoming fierce as insurance companies are faced with competition not only from insurance industry but also from other competitors, such as banks, that are in position to offer product substitutes for life insurance products. In this new environment information about customers and their education are becoming critical factors. Insurance companies must know their customers what influences their demand for life insurance, what is the amount of their income, what is inflation rate, their expenditures on other goods i.e. opportunity costs, etc. Those are factors that force insurance companies to concentrate more on present and potential buyers and their needs and force them to give their best to satisfy those needs in a way that will produce delighted customers.

  13. The impact of retirement on health: quasi-experimental methods using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Elizabeth Mokyr; Cullen, Mark R

    2016-02-19

    Is retirement good or bad for health? Disentangling causality is difficult. Much of the previous quasi-experimental research on the effect of health on retirement used self-reported health and relied upon discontinuities in public retirement incentives across Europe. The current study investigated the effect of retirement on health by exploiting discontinuities in private retirement incentives to test the effect of retirement on health using a quasi-experimental study design. Secondary data (1997-2009) on a cohort of male manufacturing workers in a United States setting. Health status was determined using claims data from private insurance and Medicare. Analyses used employer-based administrative and claims data and claim data from Medicare. Widely used selection on observables models overstate the negative impact of retirement due to the endogeneity of the decision to retire. In addition, health status as measured by administrative claims data provide some advantages over the more commonly used survey items. Using an instrument and administrative health records, we find null to positive effects from retirement on all fronts, with a possible exception of increased risk for diabetes. This study provides evidence that retirement is not detrimental and may be beneficial to health for a sample of manufacturing workers. In addition, it supports previous research indicating that quasi-experimental methodologies are necessary to evaluate the relationship between retirement and health, as any selection on observable model will overstate the negative relationship of retirement on health. Further, it provides a model for how such research could be implemented in countries like the United States that do not have a strong public pension program. Finally, it demonstrates that such research need-not rely upon survey data, which has certain shortcomings and is not always available for homogenous samples.

  14. 20 CFR 255.9 - Individual enrolled under supplementary medical insurance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... supplementary medical insurance premiums will be applied toward payment of such premiums, and the balance of the... medical insurance plan. 255.9 Section 255.9 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS... supplementary medical insurance plan. Where recovery of the overpayment is by setoff as provided for in § 255.6...

  15. Changes in physical activity during the retirement transition: a theory-based, qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Suzanne; O'Brien, Nicola; White, Martin; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2015-02-21

    There are considerable inter-individual differences in the direction and degree of change in physical activity (PA) levels during the retirement transition. There is currently a limited theoretical understanding of how these differences can be explained. This study aimed to explore and compare perceptions about how theory-based factors influence PA change during the transition from employment to retirement among individuals approaching retirement and recently retired. Theory-based, one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 28 adults (15 retired) within 24 months of retirement. Participants were sampled to reflect a diverse range of socio-economic and occupational backgrounds. The interview was based on the 12 domains within the Theory Domain Framework and designed to elicit anticipated or experienced retirement-related changes in PA behaviour and perceived determinants. Interview transcripts were analysed using Framework analysis to explore intra- and inter-individual perceptions of how PA changes after retirement and the factors which may influence this change. The majority of participants perceived retirement to be related to an increase in PA levels. Four themes emerged from the data regarding factors perceived to influence changes in PA behaviour after retirement: (1) resources for PA; (2) structure of daily life in retirement; (3) opportunities for PA; and (4) transitional PA phases after retirement. Retirement is associated with a number of inter-related changes and opportunities which can have a positive or negative impact on PA behaviour. The influence of these factors does not appear to be static and may change over time. A number of different transitional phases may be experienced after leaving work and each phase may have a differential impact on PA behaviour. The findings of this qualitative study contribute to the theoretical understanding of PA change during the retirement transition. Each post-retirement PA

  16. Nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The yearbook contains among others the figures of the nuclear insurance line. According to these these the DKVG (German nuclear power plant insurance association) has 102 member insurance companies all registered in the Federal Republic of Germany. By using reinsurance capacities of the other pools at present property insurance amounts to 1.5 billion DM and liability insurance to 200 million DM. In 1991 the damage charges on account of DKV amounted to 3.1 (1990 : 4.3) million DM. From these 0.6 million DM are apportioned to payments and 2.5 million DM to reserves. One large damage would cost a maximum gross sum of 2.2 billion DM property and liability insurance; on account of DKVG 750 million DM. (orig./HSCH) [de

  17. Probabilistic insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Wakker, P.P.; Thaler, R.H.; Tversky, A.

    1997-01-01

    textabstractProbabilistic insurance is an insurance policy involving a small probability that the consumer will not be reimbursed. Survey data suggest that people dislike probabilistic insurance and demand more than a 20% reduction in the premium to compensate for a 1% default risk. While these preferences are intuitively appealing they are difficult to reconcile with expected utility theory. Under highly plausible assumptions about the utility function, willingness to pay for probabilistic i...

  18. Trusted counsellor retires

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    His astute counsel, knowing smile and distinguished eloquence will be missed by many. With a pang of regret, the man himself admits that 'CERN was like a drug for me'. Last week, Jean-Daniel Mandica retired, after 40 years of loyal service. He was the trusted counsellor of every Director of the Administration and Director-General for eighteen years, from 1986 to 2003. Head of the planning unit for the Directorate and the Administration from 1986 to 1996, he was then named Head of the Directorate Services Unit in 1996, a position he held until the end of 2003. Throughout that time, he conducted key tasks for the Organization, such as restructuring the Administration and carrying out audits. His role in the creation of Microcosm and his commitment to CERN's participation in the Universal Exposition at Seville in 1992 contributed in no small part to the spread of the Laboratory's fame. Jean-Daniel Mandica's incomparable knowledge of the Administration, sense of diplomacy and great ability to listen made him a v...

  19. Preparing for retirement - new seminars

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2015-01-01

    We would like to take the opportunity to inform you about a new programme related to retirement, organised by the Human Resources Department. Retirement marks the end of a career and the start of a new chapter in life.  In all cases, being well-informed and prepared is necessary to cope successfully with this transition. The programme has been developed for staff members and consists of two seminars: Leaving CERN (half day seminar): short presentations by internal speakers, focusing on what options CERN offers at the end of your career: organised once per year, next session scheduled on 24 November 2015, in the afternoon, enrolment and more information on Indico.   Preparation for retirement (2-day seminar): interactive workshop (in small groups) delivered by external experts, focusing on how to prepare psychologically as well as practically to cope with all the changes retirement brings: organised regularly in 2016, in English or ...

  20. Senior Law Faculty Attitudes toward Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, David S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the retirement plans and personal characteristics of 273 senior law school faculty, focusing on health status, income, job satisfaction, and preferred age of retirement. The study suggests that early retirement incentives and a "senior faculty" alternative to full retirement are positive institutional options. (DB)

  1. An empirical investigation on factors influencing customer loyalty and their relationships with quality of services: A case study of insurance firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostam Pourrahidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to study the effect of various factors influencing customer loyalty and quality of services on customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. The proposed study is implemented in one of Iranian insurance firms by choosing a sample of 171 randomly selected customers of this insurance firm. We use SERVQUAL standard questionnaire to measure customer satisfaction. The study examines three hypotheses associated with the proposed study using one-way t-student as well as path analysis, and the results have confirmed all three hypotheses. The study also uses Freedman test to rank the most important factors and detects that value was the most important issue followed by trust, customer satisfaction, empathy, value and resistance to change.

  2. School Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964

    The importance of insurance in the school budget is the theme of this comprehensive bulletin on the practices and policies for Texas school districts. Also considered is the development of desirable school board policies in purchasing insurance and operating the program. Areas of discussion are: risks to be covered, amount of coverage, values,…

  3. Forest insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis T. Williams

    1949-01-01

    Standing timber is one of the few important kinds of property that are not generally covered by insurance. Studies made by the Forest Service and other agencies have indicated that the risks involved in the insurance of timber are not unduly great, provided they can be properly distributed. Such studies, however, have thus far failed to induce any notable development...

  4. Miles, speed, and technology: Traffic safety under oligopolistic insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dementieva, M.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2016-01-01

    We study road safety when insurance companies have market power, and can influence drivers' behavior via insurance premiums. We obtain first- and second-best premiums for different insurance market structures. The insurance program consists of an insurance premium, and marginal dependencies of that

  5. The Influences of Health Insurance and Access to Information on Prostate Cancer Screening among Men in Dominican Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangmennaang, J.; Luginaah, I.

    2016-01-01

    Although research demonstrates the public health burden of prostate cancer among men in the Caribbean, relatively little is known about the factors that underlie the low levels of testing for the disease among this population. Study Design. A cross-sectional study of prostate cancer testing behaviours among men aged 40-60 years in Dominican Republic using the Demographic and Health Survey (2013). Methods. We use hierarchical binary logit regression models and average treatment effects combined with propensity score matching to explore the determinants of prostate screening as well as the average effect of health insurance coverage on screening. The use of hierarchical binary logit regression enabled us to control for the effect of unobserved heterogeneity at the cluster level that may affect prostate cancer testing behaviours. Results. Screening varied significantly with health insurance coverage, knowledge of cholesterol level, education, and wealth. Insured men were more likely to test for prostate cancer (OR=1.65, P=0.01) compared to the uninsured. Conclusions. The expansion and restructuring of Dominican Republic universal health insurance scheme to ensure equity in access may improve health access that would potentially impact positively on prostate cancer screening among men.

  6. Using Simulation to Assess the Influence of Race and Insurer on Shared Decision-making in Periviable Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Brownsyne Tucker; McKenzie, Fatima; Fadel, William F.; Matthias, Marianne S.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Barnato, Amber E.; Frankel, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sociodemographic differences have been observed in the treatment of extremely premature (periviable) neonates, but the source of this variation is not well understood. We assessed the feasibility of using simulation to test the effect of maternal race and insurance status on shared decision-making (SDM) in periviable counseling. Methods We conducted a 2 × 2 factorial simulation experiment in which obstetricians and neonatologists counseled two consecutive standardized patients (SPs) diagnosed with ruptured membranes at 23 weeks, counterbalancing race (black/white) and insurance status using random permutation. We assessed verisimilitude of the simulation in semi-structured debriefing interviews. We coded physician communication related to resuscitation, mode of delivery, and steroid decisions using a 9-point SDM coding framework; then compared communication scores by SP race and insurer using ANOVA. Results Sixteen obstetricians and 15 neonatologists participated; 71% were women, 84% married, and 75% parents; 91% of physicians rated the simulation as highly realistic. Overall, SDM scores were relatively high, with means ranging from 6.4–7.9 (out of 9). There was a statistically significant interaction between race and insurer for SDM related to steroid use and mode of delivery (peffects on periviable counseling. SDM may occur differentially based on patients’ sociodemographic characteristics and deserves further study. PMID:25188489

  7. The Reallocation of Compensation in Response to Health Insurance Premium Increases

    OpenAIRE

    Dana P. Goldman; Neeraj Sood; Arleen Leibowitz

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines how compensation packages change when health insurance premiums rise. We use data on employee choices within a single large firm with a flexible benefits plan; an increasingly common arrangement among medium and large firms. In these companies, employees explicitly choose how to allocate compensation between cash and various benefits such as retirement, medical insurance, life insurance, and dental benefits. We find that a $1 increase in the price of health insurance leads...

  8. INSURANCE INTERMEDIARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Stoican

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The actual Civil code regulates for the first time in the Romanian legislation the intermediation contract, until its entering into force existing multiple situations that lent themselves to this legal operation, but did not benefit of such particular legal rules. Yet, the case law has shown that the situations that arise in the activity of the legal or natural persons are much more complex, this leading, in time, to the reglementation of such particular rules. Such a case is that found in the matter of insurance contracts, the position of the insurance intermediaries being regulated especially by Law no. 32/2000, according to which they represent the natural or legal persons authorized in the conditions of the above mentioned legal document, that perform intermediation activities in the insurance field, in exchange of a remuneration, as well as the intermediaries from the EU member states that perform such an activity on the Romanian territory, in accordance with the freedom in performing services. Therefore, the present paper aims to analyze the conclusion of such insurance contracts and to underline the particular position of the insurance brokers, having the following structure: 1 Introduction; 2 The reglementation of the intermediation contract/brokerage agreement in the Romanian Law; 3 The importance of the intermediaries in the insurance contracts; 4 The conclusion of the insurance contracts; 5 Conclusions.

  9. The Relationship Between Demographic Characteristics and Retirement Satisfaction in Elderly Retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Kianpour Ghahfarokhi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between demographic characteristics and retirement satisfaction in elderly members of registered retirement Education Center in Ahwaz. Methods & Materials: This study was descriptive-correlative. The sample of study includes ninety-six retirees referring to retirement center of Ahvaz Using Convenience of haphazard sampling in year 1388. Participants were requested to fill in Retirement Descriptive Index as well as a demographic questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistic, Simple correlation and regression repeatedly analysis (by SPSS 16 versions. Results: There are significant positive correlation between health, employment, financial status, usefulness feeling, spouse employment with retirement satisfaction and negative correlation between retirement age and spouse retirement with retirement satisfaction. Conclusion: This study reveals that health, re-employment after retirement, having a good financial status and usefulness feeling increase retirement satisfaction. But retirement age and retirement satisfaction‌ decrease it.

  10. Remuneration of limited partners with regard to the base for retirement pension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Otavová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The papes deals with possible forms of the remuneration of limited partner. There are defined differences between types of his incomes (remuneration such as dividend, remuneration and wage, in relation to czech tax law. With the aid of calculation was determined their combination, both in light of maximum his after-payment-tax income with the inclusion of payments of social and medical insurence, and with respect to computing base for his future retirement pension. The comparison of the forms of the remuneration of limited partner was performed by using the model situations. Mo­dels were configured to represent the possible ways of the remuneration of the partner and also with regard to the social and health insurance. These models highlight the advantages of the different options in terms of the tax burden, partner’s net income and the pension paid in the future. Evalutes haw the forms and amount of incomes influence the amount of the old-age pension. Those models were the basis for the determining the optimum combination of the payment of the profit sharing and the wage of the Partner.

  11. THE ROLE OF REINSURANCE IN INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VĂDUVA MARIA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insurance companies carry out risk spreading through the co-insurance and reinsurance mechanism, consisting of the participation of more companies in the provision of high-value assets. Reinsurance is a form of insurance whereby an insurance organization can transfer to another reinsurer, partly or fully, its payment obligations arising from the insurance contracts that it has concluded. In the reinsurance ratios, the insurance companies appear in a double position - giving other insurance companies some of the risks assumed under direct insurance, being reinsured, but receiving different risks to reinsurance, acquiring the quality of reinsurers. Reinsurance intends to satisfy some multiple needs of the direct insurer and can provide means to counteract the risks associated with the fluctuations in compensation costs, the reinsurer will contribute to the payment of compensations on behalf of the reinsurer. Life insurance has characteristics that influence reinsurance: the average life of the insurance, the insurance is concluded for a fixed amount insured, the capital accumulation. In life reinsurance, almost all reinsurance arrangements are proportional agreements, and the largest share have the "surplus" agreements. Reinsurance plays an important role because it fulfills the following functions: it confers capacity, creates stability, helps to consolidate financial strength. The adjustment of the client portfolio in terms of the changes of reinsurance agreement, required by the reinsurer, can only be done by concluding the insurance contracts. In life insurance, reinsurance contracts contain provisions that meet the need of the insurer to have long-term protection.

  12. Common attributes in retired professional cricketers that may enhance or hinder quality of life after retirement: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Bishop, Felicity; Peirce, Nicholas; Jones, Mary E; Arden, Nigel K

    2017-07-26

    Retired professional cricketers shared unique experiences and may possess specific psychological attributes with potential to influence quality of life (QOL). Additionally, pain and osteoarthritis can be common in retired athletes which may negatively impact QOL. However, QOL in retired athletes is poorly understood. This study explores the following questions from the personal perspective of retired cricketers: How do retired cricketers perceive and experience musculoskeletal pain and function in daily life? Are there any psychological attributes that might enhance or hinder retired cricketers' QOL? A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were subject to inductive, thematic analysis. A data-driven, iterative approach to data coding was employed. All participants had lived and played professional cricket in the UK and were living in the UK or abroad at the time of interview. Eighteen male participants, aged a mean 57±11 (range 34-77) years had played professional cricket for a mean 12±7 seasons and had been retired from professional cricket on average 23±9 years. Fifteen participants reported pain or joint difficulties and all but one was satisfied with their QOL. Most retired cricketers reflected on experiences during their cricket career that may be associated with the psychological attributes that these individuals shared, including resilience and a positive attitude. Additional attributes included a high sense of body awareness, an ability to self-manage pain and adapt lifestyle choices to accommodate physical limitations. Participants felt fortunate and proud to have played professional cricket, which may have further contributed to the high QOL in this group of retired cricketers. Most retired cricketers in this study were living with pain or joint difficulties. Despite this, all but one was satisfied or very satisfied with their QOL. This may be partly explained by the positive psychological attributes that these retired cricketers

  13. Insurance against climate change and flood risk: Insurability and decision processes of insurers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hung-Chih; Hung, Jia-Yi

    2016-04-01

    1. Background Major portions of the Asia-Pacific region is facing escalating exposure and vulnerability to climate change and flood-related extremes. This highlights an arduous challenge for public agencies to improve existing risk management strategies. Conventionally, governmental funding was majorly responsible and accountable for disaster loss compensation in the developing countries in Asia, such as Taiwan. This is often criticized as an ineffective and inefficient measure of dealing with flood risk. Flood insurance is one option within the toolkit of risk-sharing arrangement and adaptation strategy to flood risk. However, there are numerous potential barriers for insurance companies to cover flood damage, which would cause the flood risk is regarded as uninsurable. This study thus aims to examine attitudes within the insurers about the viability of flood insurance, the decision-making processes of pricing flood insurance and their determinants, as well as to examine potential solutions to encourage flood insurance. 2. Methods and data Using expected-utility theory, an insurance agent-based decision-making model was developed to examine the insurers' attitudes towards the insurability of flood risk, and to scrutinize the factors that influence their decisions on flood insurance premium-setting. This model particularly focuses on how insurers price insurance when they face either uncertainty or ambiguity about the probability and loss of a particular flood event occurring. This study considers the factors that are expected to affect insures' decisions on underwriting and pricing insurance are their risk perception, attitudes towards flood insurance, governmental measures (e.g., land-use planning, building codes, risk communication), expected probabilities and losses of devastating flooding events, as well as insurance companies' attributes. To elicit insurers' utilities about premium-setting for insurance coverage, the 'certainty equivalent,' 'probability

  14. The Role of the Spouse in Early Retirement Decisions for Older Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene

    This paper investigates the determinants of older workers’ early retirement behavior in Denmark. Instead of considering dual retirement we recognize the importance of the spouse in the early retirement decision by assessing the effect of a rich number of spousal variables. Given the grouped nature...... of the data we set up a semi-parametric single risk grouped duration proportional hazard model accounting for right censoring and allows for time-varying covariates, a nonparametric baseline and unobserved heterogeneity. We find that spousal characteristics do influence the retirement decision and significant...

  15. Filmography to reflect on retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Ángeles AGUILERA VELASCO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A documentary compilation of films about retirement was made. The data of films, in language or subtitles in Spanish, that had an argument related to retirement or that their protagonists evidenced experiences of the retirement were included. The documentary compilation was made through the stages of search and analysis. 54 films were found and organized into nine categories. The oldest film was from 1924 and the most recent of 2017. 61.11% of films were made as of 2010. In five films (9.25% the protagonists wanted to commit suicide when leaving work. Euthanasia (5.55% was performed in three films (5.55%. The problem of retirement in women was found only in four films (7.49%. In 18 films (33.33% the male protagonists went through widowhood. Twenty-one countries participated in productions, the United States produced 21 films (38.88%. It provides a very extensive collection of valuable films that convey great lessons, allow us to reflect and raise awareness of this stage of life. It is recommended to socialize the films through socio-educational interventions and investigations, as well as to begin to inquire scientifically about the relationship between suicide and euthanasia in retirement.

  16. 75 FR 34571 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules Relating to Status as a Grandfathered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules Relating to Status as a Grandfathered Health Plan... of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan under the Employee Retirement...

  17. 75 FR 43109 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and Appeals and... the Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human... health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan under the Employee Retirement...

  18. Insurance dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Lutz, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    Special technical terms used in the world of insurance can hardly be found in general dictionaries. This is a gap which the 'Insurance dictionary' now presented is designed to fill. In view of its supplementary function, the number of terms covered is limited to 1200. To make this dictionary especially convenient for ready reference, only the most commonly used translations are given for each key word in any of the four languages. This dictionary is subdivided into four parts, each containing the translation of the selected terms in the three other languages. To further facilitate the use of the booklet, paper of different colours was used for the printing of the German, English, French and Greek sections. The present volume was developed from a Swedish insurance dictionary (Fickordbok Foersaekring), published in 1967, which - with Swedish as the key language- offers English, French and German translations of the basic insurance terms. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Lack of insurance and parity influence choice between long-acting reversible contraception and sterilization in women postpregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Maureen K; Rodriguez, Maria I; Edelman, Alison B

    2012-07-01

    Disparities in postpregnancy contraception utilization exist, with low-income women disproportionately undergoing sterilization. We assessed the impact of increased intrauterine device (IUD) availability on rates of female sterilization. Hospital billing records were used to identify women with an IUD placement or sterilization within 1 year of a pregnancy at a university hospital between Oct 2005 and Jun 2007. Demographic data were compared between women receiving either an IUD or sterilization. There were 365 sterilizations and 223 IUD placements during the study period. IUD placements doubled over the study period from 6% to 12% of all deliveries, while sterilizations remained stable at 11% (pwomen with either public or private insurance who had financial access to both sterilization (n=253) and IUD (n=223). Women receiving sterilization were slightly older (mean age 31 years versus 30 years, p=.03), of higher parity (median three versus two, pwomen who received IUD. Approximately 45% of women delivering in Oregon in 2007 were publicly insured (2010 Maternal and Child Health Update: States Make Progress Towards Improving Systems of Care. National Governor's Association, Table 6. Available at http://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/MCHUPDATE2010.PDF, accessed Nov 2011). After adjusting for age, parity and type of delivery, women choosing sterilization were more likely to have public insurance than women choosing IUD (odds ratio 8.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7-14.9, pWomen choosing sterilization are more likely to have public insurance than women choosing IUD and may represent a continued trend toward nonreversible contraception among women of lower socioeconomic status despite available long-acting reversible methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of Health Insurance Coverage among People Aged 45 and over in China: Who Buys Public, Private and Multiple Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinzi; Hou, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Donglan

    2016-01-01

    Background China is reforming and restructuring its health insurance system to achieve the goal of universal coverage. This study aims to understand the determinants of public, private and multiple insurance coverage among people of retirement-age in China. Methods We used data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey 2011 and 2013, a nationally representative survey of Chinese people aged 45 and over. Multinomial logit regression was performed to identify the determinants of public, private and multiple health insurance coverage. We also conducted logit regression to examine the association between public insurance coverage and demand for private insurance. Results In 2013, 94.5% of this population had at least one type of public insurance, and 12.2% purchased private insurance. In general, we found that rural residents were less likely to be uninsured (Relative Risk Ratio (RRR) = 0.40, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.34–0.47) and were less likely to buy private insurance (RRR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.16–0.31). But rural-to-urban migrants were more likely to be uninsured (RRR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.24–1.57). Public health insurance coverage may crowd out private insurance market (Odds Ratio = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.48–0.63), particularly among enrollees of Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance. There exists a huge socioeconomic disparity in both public and private insurance coverage. Conclusion The migrants, the poor and the vulnerable remained in the edge of the system. The growing private insurance market did not provide sufficient financial protection and did not cover the people with the greatest need. To achieve universal coverage and reduce socioeconomic disparity, China should integrate the urban and rural public insurance schemes across regions and remove the barriers for the middle-income and low-income to access private insurance. PMID:27564320

  1. Hobbies of Retired People in the People's Republic of China: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun-Chen

    1990-01-01

    Described and analyzed hobbies of over 500 individuals in the People's Republic of China. Results indicated there were significant differences between the hobbies of retired and younger people; reading was the hobby most preferred; and gender, age, education, and previous occupation were factors that most influenced the retired person's choice of…

  2. Old European Couples' Retirement Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario; Ranzani, Marco

    is married, and amongst these 24 percent has a working wife. This results from dramatic changes in the labor force behaviour of both older men and older women after World War II. These trends signal a need of investigating retirement choices at a household level. Using an absolutely new international micro...... data (SHARE, Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe - Release 2), we adopt a duration analysis approach and estimate both single and competing risks models by allowing for a exible speci cation with and without unobserved heterogeneity. Our findings show that joint retirement is signi cantly...... correlated with education, age, and health status, together with partner's employment status, partner's education and partner's health status. We also perform a sensitivity analysis in order to check whether the results on the correlation of health status are robust to two alternative measures of health...

  3. Optimal Taxation and Social Insurance in a Lifetime Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovenberg, A. Lans; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    Advances in information technology have improved the administrative feasibility of redistribution based on lifetime earnings recorded at the time of retirement. We study optimal lifetime income taxation and social insurance in an economy in which redistributive taxation and social insurance serve......-transfer system does not provide full disability insurance. By offering imperfect insurance and structuring disability benefits so as to enable workers to insure against disability by working harder, social insurance is designed to offset the distortionary impact of the redistributive labor income tax on labor...... to insure (ex ante) against skill heterogeneity as well as disability risk. Optimal disability benefits rise with previous earnings so that public transfers depend not only on current earnings but also on earnings in the past. Hence, lifetime taxation rather than annual taxation is optimal. The optimal tax...

  4. Achieving a Financially Secure Retirement: A Retirement Community Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Francis Henry

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of recent events, especially the Great Recession of 2007-2009, affecting the economy, resulting in job losses, personal financial distress, and gloomy perceptions of their future well-being, many Americans are concerned about their financial quality of life in retirement. The media is replete with a plethora of advertisements for…

  5. Disability Insurance Benefits and Labor Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Gruber

    2000-01-01

    Disability Insurance (DI) is a public program that provides income support to persons unable to continue work due to disability. The difficulty of defining disability, however, has raised the possibility that this program may be subsidizing the early retirement of workers who are not truly disabled. A critical input for assessing the optimal size of the DI program is therefore the elasticity of labor force participation with respect to benefits generosity. Unfortunately, this parameter has be...

  6. Simon van der Meer retires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    CERN's big Auditorium was packed on Friday 23 November for a 'Simon van der Meer Feest' to mark the formal retirement of the gifted Dutch accelerator physicist who has made so many valuable contributions to his field and to CERN's success

  7. Financial planning considerations at retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, R J

    1998-03-01

    The process of retirement planning is a difficult one for a physician. The Planning process should address the areas of Investment Planning, Estate Planning, and Risk Management. This article examines each of these dimensions with special emphasis on Modern Portfolio Theory as the basis for investment planning.

  8. LATER RETIREMENT? PATTERNS, PREFERENCES, POLICIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kohli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pension systems are a major part of the political economy of current societies – much beyond providing old-age income security. The well-known demographics of population aging as well as globalization today challenge their financial viability. Later retirement seems to be a good way to meet these challenges. However, it is not only unpopular but also inequitable in terms of differential longevity. The paper first discusses these problems, with a particular focus on the social stratification of mortality. It then analyzes the preferences towards retirement age at several levels:  in terms of attitudes towards public spending on pensions or towards the state’s responsibility in this matter, of support for pension policy alternatives, and of preferred individual age of retirement. Results show that large majorities across all age groups are in favour of more government spending on pensions. There is a substantial amount of ‘involuntary retirement’, meaning that people would have preferred to work longer than they actually did, as well as a somewhat lower amount of ‘involuntary work’, but the preferred ages are everywhere below 65, and in some countries still below 60. Finally, the paper examines the policies of raising the retirement age adopted during the last two decades. What has especially been lacking in these policies is a consideration of socially differentiated longevity.

  9. Retirement Planning the Easy Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl D.

    1996-01-01

    Options available to college faculty for planning their retirement benefits are described, including defined benefit plans, defined contribution plans, and methods for customizing a pension plan. Data for 1993 on American households owning interest-earning assets (passbook savings, money market deposit accounts, certificates of deposit, checking…

  10. Early and Late Retirement Exits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The current study proposes that personal need fulfillment (relatedness, generativity, identity, growth, and finances) predicts early and late retirement intentions. The personal needs of 160 full-time older employees were measured by personal goals, job satisfactions, job characteristics, and intrinsic motivation. Results suggest that the personal…

  11. Retired RNs: perceptions of volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca-Bates, Katherine C; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done to explore the perceptions of volunteering among retired registered nurses (RNs) in Kansas. Participants were volunteers in formal nursing roles or were using their nursing knowledge and experience in non-nursing roles, such as church work. Regardless of the type of volunteer position, retired RNs reported that they use what they have learned as nurses when they volunteer. Volunteering benefits include enhanced self-worth, intellectual stimulation, reduced social isolation, and opportunities to help others. Increased paperwork, new technology, difficulty finding nursing-specific volunteer opportunities, resistance from health care organizations, and a lack of respect for what these nurses know are challenges and barriers to volunteering. Retired RNs have accumulated years of clinical nursing experience and can be helpful to employed nurses. Health care organizations should launch targeted efforts to recruit and utilize retired RN volunteers. Health care professionals who care for older adults should recommend volunteering as a healthful endeavor. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Shelved: The Retired Librarian's Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Jane D.

    Free-lance librarianship is discussed, and retired librarians are urged to start their own information service as a business. Because computer based storage and retrieval systems are not socially, politically, or economically integrated, and one library cannot hold all information, new needs are emerging for information services. For example, a…

  13. Sustainable Retirement: A Look At Consumer Desires

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Jon D. Stanford; Michael Drew; Bill Stanhope

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the findings of the research project, 'Retirement Savings: Drivers and Desires', commissioned by the Investment and Financial Services Association Ltd (IFSA) in 2001. The paper investigates retirement savings decision-making and retirement income product stream choice. This paper presents a quantitative analysis of questionnaire data relating to decision-making and product stream choice and discusses these issues in the context of established research findings about retire...

  14. Optimizing retirement funds : an institutional perspective

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Comm. Pension funds have risen to great prominence in the last two decades because they provide a service that fits the needs of individuals. The community at large are rapidly accepting and demanding facilities for proper retirement planning. Employees contribute towards retirement funds and their contributions are tax deductible while taxable to the employee upon retirement, generally at a lower rate. The employer, who has instituted the retirement fund, owes the fund because the emplo...

  15. The Role of Financial Education in Retirement Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ntalianis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Governments in many countries are facing the challenge of providing sufficient retirement incomes for apopulation that is ageing as a result of lower mortality and fertility rates. An ageing population placesconsiderable financial stress on government budgets as spending on welfare increases, further compoundedby a proportional reduction in working-age taxpayers. Exposure to financial education programs canpositively influence the retirement planning and savings behaviour of individuals. Research indicates thatseminars, written communications and website information are effective methods in communicating financialeducation. In this study an investigation is conducted into the views of retirement fund members regardingelements of financial education resources made available to them through their retirement fund. Four aspectsare investigated, that is, whether there are differences with respect to members’ views between the genders,older and younger members, levels of qualification, and size of superannuation balances. Empirical evidencesuggests that gender and age are important factors with females and younger people less likely to utiliseeducational information and more at risk of not accumulating sufficient funds for retirement.

  16. A Worry-Free Retirement in Korea: Effectiveness of Retirement Coaching Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyejin; Suh, Wookyung; Lee, Jiyoung; Jang, Younju; Kim, Minjung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated a retirement coaching educational program using the mixed method research design. A structured survey was distributed to 48 financial planners who had undergone 50-hour retirement education including retirement coaching. The coaching was conducted in two sessions in 2015. Results revealed that first, the retirement coaching…

  17. [Physical activity during the transition period between occupation and retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, H; Brehm, W; Tittlbach, S

    2010-10-01

    During the transition period between occupation and retirement, different mental challenges may arise as a consequence of the numerous changes and necessary reorientation to the following phase of life. Personal well-being is a precondition to cope with these challenges. Interviews with physically active people in the transition period between occupation and retirement, concerning the importance of physical activity in coping with mental challenges, were conducted. Physical activity is meant to affect well-being and the physical condition in a positive way. In addition, it should foster social contacts and make it easier to manage everyday life. Moreover, it is a measure of personal success during advanced age. Because of its influence on various physical, mental, and social aspects, physical activity can help a person to cope with mental challenges in the transition period between occupation and retirement.

  18. Nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The German Nuclear Power Plant Insurance (DKVG) Association was able to increase its net capacity in property insurance to 637 million marks in 1993 (1992: 589 million). The reinsurance capacity of the other pools included, the total amount covered now amounts to 2 billion marks in property incurance and 200 million marks in liability incurance. As in the year before the pool can reckon with a stable gross premium yield around 175 million marks. The revival of the US dollar has played a decisive role in this development. In 1993 in the domestic market, the DKVG offered policies for 22 types of property risk and 43 types to third-party risk, operating with a gross target premium of 65 million marks and 16 million marks, respectively. The DKVG also participated in 540 foreign insurance contracts. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. Narrow Framing and Long-Term Care Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Gottlieb; Olivia S. Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model of narrow framing in insurance and test it using data from a new module we designed and fielded in the Health and Retirement Study. We show that respondents subject to narrow framing are substantially less likely to buy long-term care insurance than average. This effect is distinct from, and much larger than, the effects of risk aversion or adverse selection, and it offers a new explanation for why people underinsure their later-life care needs.

  20. Personal Values: Psychological Determinants of Retirement Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, William F.

    With the trend toward early retirement and the fact that people are living to an older average age, more years of an individual's life will be spent in retirement. To examine personal values as psychological determinants of the retirement preparation process, 206 classified university employees, between the ages of 50 and 65 years of age,…

  1. TIAA-CREF Retirement Options and Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastable, C. W.; Brady, Gerald P.

    1979-01-01

    The various retirement income options available to TIAA-CREF participants and federal taxes on each option are explained. The importance of early planning for retirement income is stressed and it is suggested that assessment of future financial needs will indicate the most appropriate settlement mode for retirement. (SF)

  2. Retirement and Learning: A Longitudinal Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Maureen

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses retirement as a learning process, where learning, be it formal or informal, enables retirees to adjust to the transition from work to retirement. Such discussion is important given the fact that the world population is aging and that more people are retiring in the next few decades. Moreover, people are experiencing an…

  3. Inflation Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Zvi Bodie

    1989-01-01

    A contract to insure $1 against inflation is equivalent to a European call option on the consumer price index. When there is no deductible this call option is equivalent to a forward contract on the CPI. Its price is the difference between the prices of a zero coupon real bond and a zero coupon nominal bond, both free of default risk. Provided that the risk-free real rate of interest is positive, the price of such an inflation insurance policy first rises and then falls with time to maturity....

  4. Is poor mental health a risk factor for retirement? Findings from a longitudinal population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sarah C; Butterworth, Peter; Rodgers, Bryan

    2012-05-01

    Poor mental health may influence people's decisions about, and ability to, keep working into later adulthood. The identification of factors that drive retirement provides valuable information for policymakers attempting to mitigate the effects of population ageing. This study examined whether mental health predicts subsequent retirement in a general population sample, and whether this association varied with the timing of retirement. Longitudinal data from 2,803 people aged 45-75 years were drawn from five waves of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey. Discrete-time survival analyses were used to estimate the association between mental health and retirement. Mental health was measured using the Mental Health Index (MHI-5). The relative influences of other health, social, financial, and work-related predictors of retirement were considered to determine the unique contribution of mental health to retirement behaviour. Poor mental health was associated with higher rates of retirement in men (hazard rate ratio, HRR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.29), and workforce exit more generally in women (HRR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.22). These associations varied with the timing of retirement and were driven by early retirees specifically. Physical functioning, income, social activity, job conditions (including job stress for women and job control for men), and aspects of job satisfaction also predicted subsequent retirement. Poor mental and physical health predict workforce departure in mid-to-late adulthood, particularly early retirement. Strategies to accommodate health conditions in the workplace may reduce rates of early retirement and encourage people to remain at work into later adulthood.

  5. Determinants of Private Long-Term Care Insurance Purchase in Response to the Partnership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haizhen; Prince, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    To assess three possible determinants of individuals' response in their private insurance purchases to the availability of the Partnership for Long-Term Care (PLTC) insurance program: bequest motives, financial literacy, and program awareness. The health and retirement study (HRS) merged with data on states' implementation of the PLTC program. Individual-level decision on private long-term care insurance is regressed on whether the PLTC program is being implemented for a given state-year, asset dummies, policy determinant variable, two-way and three-way interactions of these variables, and other controls, using fixed effects panel regression. Analysis used a sample between 50 and 69 years of age from 2002 to 2010, resulting in 12,695 unique individuals with a total of 39,151 observations. We find mild evidence that intent to bequest influences individual purchase of insurance. We also find that program awareness is necessary for response, while financial literacy notably increases responsiveness. Increasing response to the PLTC program among the middle class (the stated target group) requires increased efforts to create awareness of the program's existence and increased education about the program's benefits, and more generally, about long-term care risks and needs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Self-regulation and retirement: how regulatory focus affects pre-retirement anxiety and affect

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary retirement research endeavours to identify the complex antecedents and consequences of retirement decisions and retirement planning. However, few research studies have examined how retirement decisions and planning behaviours have been implemented, nor has there been any significant research investigating the impact of the complex interactions that occur between individual traits and matching or non-matching strategic preferences on retirement outcomes. This research progra...

  7. 77 FR 42909 - Presumption of Insurable Interest for Same-Sex Domestic Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... do not fall within the presumptive classes. The commenter suggested that OPM has merely replaced one... beneficiary's date of birth. * * * * * PART 842--FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM--BASIC ANNUITY 0 3. The.... 842.605 Election of insurable interest rate. * * * * * (e) An insurable interest rate may be elected...

  8. 5 CFR 3201.103 - Prohibition on acquisition, ownership, or control of securities of FDIC-insured depository...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... described in paragraph (a) of this section if: (i) The security was acquired by inheritance, gift, stock...-insured depository institution as custodian or trustee of accounts containing tax-deferred retirement...

  9. A Health Production Model with Endogenous Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galama, Titus; Kapteyn, Arie; Fonseca, Raquel; Michaud, Pierre-Carl

    2012-01-01

    We formulate a stylized structural model of health, wealth accumulation and retirement decisions building on the human capital framework of health and derive analytic solutions for the time paths of consumption, health, health investment, savings and retirement. We argue that the literature has been unnecessarily restrictive in assuming that health is always at the “optimal” health level. Exploring the properties of corner solutions we find that advances in population health decrease the retirement age, while at the same time individuals retire when their health has deteriorated. This potentially explains why retirees point to deteriorating health as an important reason for early retirement, while retirement ages have continued to fall in the developed world, despite continued improvements in population health and mortality. In our model, workers with higher human capital invest more in health and because they stay healthier retire later than those with lower human capital whose health deteriorates faster. PMID:22888062

  10. Leaving the labour market: the impact of exit routes from employment to retirement on health and wellbeing in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halleröd, Björn; Örestig, Johan; Stattin, Mikael

    2013-03-01

    The study analyses whether and to what degree specific routes into retirement affect older people, i.e. the relationship between heterogeneous exit patterns and post-retirement health and wellbeing. We used longitudinal data from two points in time; data related to t 0 were collected in 1993, 1994, 1995 and 1996 and data related to t 1 were collected in 2002 and 2003 ( N  = 589). We focused on older people (55+ at t 1 ) who were employed at t 0 and retired at t 1 . We used confirmative factor analysis to identify identical measures of health and wellbeing at both t 0 and t 1 . Hence, we were able to control for pre-retirement health and wellbeing when evaluating the effects of different exit routes. These routes were defined as dependence on incomes from sickness benefit, disability pension, part-time pension, unemployment insurance and active labour market programmes. Our initial structural equation model showed a clear relation between exit routes and post-retirement wellbeing. People who prior to retirement were pushed into social benefit programmes related to health and unemployment were significantly worse off as retirees, especially those with health-related benefits. However, these relationships disappeared once pre-retirement wellbeing was added to the model. Our main conclusion is that post-retirement wellbeing first and foremost is a consequence of accumulation of advantages and disadvantages during the life course. Both labour market exit routes and post-retirement wellbeing can be seen as outcomes of this process. There are no independent effects of the retirement process. Judging from our findings, there is no reason to believe that involvement in social security programmes allowing early retirement on health grounds has any additional negative consequences for health and wellbeing.

  11. Wealth, income, and health before and after retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Siegfried; Spreckelsen, Ove; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    It was supposed that associations of wealth and health might be higher after retirement than in the economically active periods of life, but no comparisons were available. Most studies on wealth were based on net worth, a measure combining several elements of wealth into an index. We examined associations between different elements of wealth and health by comparing retired women and men with economically active ones. Data were drawn from the German Socio-Economic Panel, a nationwide longitudinal survey project. Two waves (2002 and 2007) included indicators of wealth in addition to household income and education. Wealth was not depicted by an index. Instead, debts, property of life insurances, home ownership and assets were considered separately with their associations with self-rated health. Two data sets were used to examine whether the results were occasional, or whether they can be replicated. Associations of income and education emerged in respondents in their active periods of life. In most cases indicators of wealth were associated with subjective health. In retired respondents home ownership was the only indicator yielding consistent associations with health, but their sizes turned out as rather moderate. Contrary to expectation, the associations of wealth and health were inconsistent in the retired study population. These results were obtained in a country with national pension schemes, and it has to be examined whether the findings can be generalised to other countries. The inconsistent findings of indicators of wealth are calling the utility of net worth into question. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Crop insurance: Risks and models of insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of crop protection is very important because of a variety of risks that could cause difficult consequences. One type of risk protection is insurance. The author in the paper states various models of insurance in some EU countries and the systems of subsidizing of insurance premiums by state. The author also gives a picture of crop insurance in the U.S., noting that in this country pays great attention to this matter. As for crop insurance in Serbia, it is not at a high level. The main problem with crop insurance is not only the risks but also the way of protection through insurance. The basic question that arises not only in the EU is the question is who will insure and protect crops. There are three possibilities: insurance companies under state control, insurance companies that are public-private partnerships or private insurance companies on a purely commercial basis.

  13. SIMULATION OF THE INSURANCE COMPANY’S MARKETING STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Klepikova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted the development of marketing strategy of the insurance company with using of mathematical modeling of structures. The algorithm was developed for calculating the coefficient of “probability of insurance policy acquisition” which accumulates the influence of factors related to the feature of providing insurance services and financial activities of the insurance company.

  14. HEALTH INSURANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Division HR

    2000-01-01

    Change of name for AUSTRIA As of October 1, the AUSTRIA Assurances S.A. company will change its name to: UNIQA Assurances S.A. It inherits the same name as its parent Austrian company, which adopted it towards the end of 1999. This change has no effect on the contract which binds it to CERN for the administration of our Health Insurance Scheme. New insurance cards will be sent to you by UNIQA and the printed forms and envelopes will gradually be updated with the new name. Postal and phone addresses remain unaffected by the change. You should address your postal mail to: UNIQA Assurances rue des Eaux Vives 94 case postale 6402 1211 Genève 6 You may telephone your usual contact persons at the same numbers as before and send e-mails to the UNIQA office at CERN at: UNIQA.Assurances@cern.ch

  15. Export insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These notes are intended as a general guide for the use of members of the Canadian Nuclear Association who are, or may become, involved in supplying goods or services or contracting/ erecting as part of a contract to supply a nuclear facility to an overseas country. They give information to the type of insurances needed and available, the parties normally responsible for providing the coverages, the intent and operation of the various policies, general methods of charging premiums, and main exclusions

  16. HEALTH INSURANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The CERN-AUSTRIA Agreement, which implemented CERN's health insurance scheme, expired on 31 December 1999.In accordance with CERN's rules, a call for tenders for the management of the health insurance scheme was issued and the contract was once again awarded to AUSTRIA. In June 1999, the Finance Committee thus authorised the Management to conclude a new contract with AUSTRIA, which came into force on 1st January 2000.Continuity is thus assured on favourable conditions and the transition from one contract to the other will entail no substantial changes in the system for those insured at CERN except for a few minor and purely formal amendmentsWHAT REMAINS UNCHANGEDThe list of benefits, i.e. the 'cover' provided by the system, is not changed;Neither is the reimbursement procedure.AUSTRIA's office at CERN and its opening hours as well as its city headquarters remain the same. The envelopes containing requests for reimbursement have had to be sent (since the end of 1998) to :Rue des Eaux-Vives 94Case postale 64021...

  17. Analysis of Life Insurance Premium in Regard to Net Income as an Influencing Factor– the Case of the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olja Munitlak Ivanović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In current business conditions, insurance market in the Republic of Serbia notes positive but relatively slow growing trend. During the last few years, life insurance market in Serbia has an upward trend, however, it still significantly falls back in comparison to developed European countries. Insufficient development of life insurance sector is in direct relation to insufficient economic development, weak financial market, high unemployment rate and poor implementation of economic reforms. Additionally there is a problem due to the lack of both quality and quantity of education with insufficient basic knowledge of potentials that this type of insurance offers. The aim of this paper is to present the projection of life insurance premium on the basis of linear trend parameters and correlation degree between average net income and the amount of life insurance premium and to emphasize the necessity of intense development of life insurance market. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  18. Retirement and Cognition: A Life Course View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denier, Nicole; Clouston, Sean A P; Richards, Marcus; Hofer, Scott M

    2017-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between retirement and cognitive aging. We build on previous research by exploring how different specifications of retirement that reflect diverse pathways out of the labor market, including reason for leaving the pre-retirement job and duration spent in retirement, impact three domains of cognitive functioning. We further assess how early-life factors, including adolescent cognition, and mid-life work experiences, condition these relationships. To do so, we draw on longitudinal data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study , a cohort study of Wisconsin high school graduates collected prospectively starting in 1957 until most recently in 2011 when individuals were aged 71. Results indicate that retirement, on average, is associated with improved abstract reasoning, but not with verbal memory or verbal fluency. Yet, when accounting for the reason individuals left their pre-retirement job, those who had retired for health reasons had both lower verbal memory and verbal fluency scores and those who had retired voluntarily or for family reasons had improved abstract memory scores. Together, the results suggest that retirement has an inconsistent effect on cognitive aging across cognitive domains and that the conditions surrounding the retirement decision are important to understanding cognitive functioning at older ages.

  19. Optimal Taxation and Social Insurance in a Lifetime Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovenberg, A. Lans; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    Advances in information technology have improved the administrative feasibility of redistribution based on lifetime earnings recorded at the time of retirement. We study optimal lifetime income taxation and social insurance in an economy in which redistributive taxation and social insurance serve...... to insure (ex ante) against skill heterogeneity as well as disability risk. Optimal disability benefits rise with previous earnings so that public transfers depend not only on current earnings but also on earnings in the past. Hence, lifetime taxation rather than annual taxation is optimal. The optimal tax...

  20. Social Security and the Retirement and Savings Behavior of Low Income Households1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Klaauw, Wilbert; Wolpin, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop and estimate a model of retirement and savings incorporating limited borrowing, stochastic wage offers, health status and survival, social security benefits, Medicare and employer provided health insurance coverage, and intentional bequests. The model is estimated on sample of relatively poor households from the first three waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), for whom we would expect social security income to be of particular importance. The estimated model is used to simulate the responses to changes in social security rules, including changes in benefit levels, in the payroll tax, in the social security earnings tax and in early and normal retirement ages. Welfare and budget consequences are estimated. PMID:21566719

  1. THE ROLE OF THE WORLD INSURANCE MARKET INFRASTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Sholoiko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to define a role and significance of elements of the world insurance market infrastructure. Tasks of the study are the next: to consider the dynamics of development of the world insurance market from 2012 to 2016; to define groups of elements of the world insurance market infrastructure; to characterize elements of the world insurance market infrastructure. Methodology. These tasks are done because of using such methods as: grouping of elements of the world insurance market infrastructure; a collection of information about elements of the world insurance market infrastructure; generalization to define role and significance of elements of the world insurance market infrastructure. Results. World insurance premiums were increasing and decreasing from 2012 to 2016 and did not exceed 6.3% of Gross Domestic Product. Lots of factors influence global insurance premium volume as an indicator of the development of world insurance market. One of them is an activity of the elements of the world insurance market infrastructure. It is necessary to divide them into some groups: A International insurance associations (associations of organizations connected with insurance but members of such associations do not provide insurance services – International Association of Insurance Supervisors, International Association of Insurance Fraud Agencies, Global Federation of Insurance Associations, International Insurance Foundation; B International associations of insurers (includes associations of insurers and other organizations in a certain area of insurance – International Association of Deposit Insurers, International Union of Credit and Investment Insurers, International Association of Agricultural Production Insurers, International Group of P&I Clubs, International Union of Aerospace Insurers, International Union of Marine Insurance, International Association of Engineering Insurers; C International associations of insurance experts

  2. 20 CFR 404.1088 - Retirement payment to retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Self-Employment..., in figuring your net earnings from self-employment you must exclude payments made to you on a... excluded in determining net earnings from self-employment (if any) for that taxable year. ...

  3. Work-Family Conflict and Retirement Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Raymo, James M.; Sweeney, Megan M

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates relationships between perceived levels of work-family conflict and retirement preferences. Methods: Using the large sample of 52-54 year-old respondents to the 1992 Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we estimate multinomial logistic regression models of preferences for partial and full retirement within the next ten years. We examine the association between preferences for retirement and perceived work-family conflict...

  4. Physician assistants and their intent to retire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Jennifer; Hooker, Roderick S; Brunisholz, Kim

    2013-07-01

    To determine predictors of physician assistants (PAs) to retire or to permanently leave clinical practice. The intent was to create a measure of retention and attrition for purposes of forecasting PA supply. All PAs 55 years or older who were nationally certified in 2011 were surveyed. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures utilizing means, standard deviations, range, and proportions for all survey questions. Univariable analysis using χ² test for the categorical variables determined gender differences in participants' intent to retire. A studentized t test analysis for continuous variables was used to compare differences across genders. The estimated time interval until retirement was calculated using reported values from participants and then subtracting their projected retirement age from current age. The same calculation was used for estimating PA career length from date of graduation to retirement. For all analyses, a P value surveyed online; 4767 responded (38%). The mean age was 60 years and the years in clinical practice was 25. When asked to predict a retirement date or age, the mean duration of working beyond age 55 years was 12 years (range 5 to 21). Most respondents reported being confident they were on track to retire with an adequate income. The significant differences that emerged were that men were more confident than women in preparing to retire, having enough money for medical expenses, and being able to live comfortably in retirement. Men more than women stated that, if forced to retire, they were more confident in the preparation to do so. PAs 55 years and older report they are likely to delay retirement from practice until age 67 years, on average. Women were less confident than men in retirement preparation. This age prediction expands career projections and refines forecasting models for the profession. Correlations based on expectation-action chain of events should be developed by periodically measuring how often intent and

  5. FINANCIAL STABILITY OF INSURANCE AND ITS SOURCES OF SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pikus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes theoretical aspects of determination of financial stability of insurance companies of Ukraine. It was found the main factors that influence the financial stability of insurance companies. Influencing factors are classified into internal and external and the effects of these factors on insurers' activities are presented. The main criteria of financial stability of insurance companies were deeply analysed and the most significant were chosen: sufficient amount of equity capital, the optimal tariff policy, balanced insurance portfolio, secure and effective reinsurance program, sufficient amount of insurance reserves for future payments, optimal investment management of insurance reserves and high solvency of an insurance company. Basic directions of provision and maintenance of financial stability of insurance companies in post-crisis period were presented. The main problems of provision and maintenance of financial stability of insurance companies were outlined and recommendations for its strengthening were provided.

  6. An Historical Analysis and Comparison of the Military Retirement System and the Federal Employee Retirement system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breth, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    The most significant change to private sector as well as civil service employee retirement systems over the past 15 years has been the transition from defined benefit to defined contribution retirement plans...

  7. Work-family conflict and retirement preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymo, James M; Sweeney, Megan M

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates relationships between retirement preferences and perceived levels of work-family conflict. Using the large sample of 52-54-year-old respondents to the 1992 Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we estimated multinomial logistic regression models of preferences for partial and full retirement within the next 10 years. We examined the association between retirement preferences and perceived work-family conflict, evaluated the extent to which work-family conflict was a mediating mechanism between stressful work and family circumstances and preferences to retire, and explored potential gender differences in the association between work-family conflict and preferring retirement. Work-family conflict was positively related to preferences for both full and partial retirement. Yet work-family conflict did not appear to mediate relationships between stressful work and family environments and retirement preferences, nor did significant gender differences emerge in this association. Our analyses provide the first direct evidence of the role played by work-family conflict in the early stages of the retirement process, although we were not able to identify the sources of conflict underlying this relationship. Identifying the sources of this conflict and the psychological mechanisms linking work-family conflict to retirement preferences is an important task for future researchers.

  8. Satisfaction with early retirement: making choices in the auto industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, M A; Quadagno, J

    1995-07-01

    In recent decades, the expanded availability of early retirement incentive plans has allowed an increasing number of workers to retire at an age younger than normally allowed by their pension plans. On the surface, these retirement incentives appear to offer older workers more flexibility in deciding when to retire. However, the offer of early retirement incentives frequently occurs when employers are attempting to reduce employment; therefore, the opportunity for early retirement may be counterbalanced by downsizing goals that place older workers' continued employment in jeopardy. Early retirement incentive programs are thereby characterized by an unusual combination of inducement and coercion. In this study, we examined how the structure of the early retirement program shapes the way older male auto workers evaluate their retirement transitions. We conclude that the structure of the early retirement program, the timing of the retirement decision, and job security are important in framing the retirement transition and in distinguishing levels of satisfaction with the retirement experience.

  9. Motives for early retirement of self-employed GPs in the Netherlands: a comparison of two time periods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuningen, M. van; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Velden, L.F.J. van der

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high cost of training and the relatively long period of training for physicians make it beneficial to stimulate physicians to retire later. Therefore, a better understanding of the link between the factors influencing the decision to retire and actual turnover would benefit policies

  10. [Physician's professional retirement. Family dynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Gas, Héctor G

    2011-01-01

    Human beings have a natural resistance to think about their old age, both personally and professionally. Governments have targeted efforts to successfully prolong the life of the population, situation which already is a social and economic problem. “Old is a person with physical, intellectual and emotional limitations, who has a reduced autonomy and welfare, as a result of the years lived”. Not everyone ages at the same age; it will depend on health, habits, physical and intellectual activity, nutritional status, vices and attitude towards life. A physician may decide not to continue exercising medicine due to: health problems, because they do not want to, because they do not feel competent, because of the risk of having to deal with a complaint or a lawsuit, to have a new life project, or because they have no patients. The options available for a doctor at the time of retirement will depend on his/her age, health status, stage of the aging process: autonomy, dependency or old age; his/her physical and mental condition, professional development, economic situation and family environment. A doctor may remain independent, join another family or seek shelter in a retirement home.

  11. Retirement patterns and bridge jobs in the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J F

    1999-02-01

    contribution plans, which do not contain the age-specific retirement incentives that many defined benefit plans do. The composition of jobs has shifted from manufacturing to service occupations. Americans are living longer and healthier lives, and many look forward to years to productive activity after age 65. These structural changes have been accompanied by an important cyclical factor: the strength of the American economy over the past decade. This has increased the demand for all types of labor, including older workers. Evidence suggests that there is more than this cyclical factor at work, however, and that new attitudes about work late in life are developing. Labor supply decisions late in life are correlated in expected ways with the individual's health (measured in several ways), age, and pension and health insurance status. Retirement patterns in America are much richer and more varied than the stereotypical one-step view of retirement suggests. Public policy is changing in ways that make continued work late in life more likely. If employers are willing to provide flexible job opportunities to meet the needs of these potential employees, then society can tap a growing pool of older, experienced, and willing workers for years to come.

  12. The influences of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on women's choice of prenatal care facility: Investigation of differences between rural and non-rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chi-Liang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI, implemented in 1995, substantially increased the number of health care facilities that can deliver free prenatal care. Because of the increase in such facilities, it is usually assumed that women would have more choices regarding prenatal care facilities and thus experience reduction in travel cost. Nevertheless, there has been no research exploring these issues in the literature. This study compares how Taiwan's NHI program may have influenced choice of prenatal care facility and perception regarding convenience in transportation for obtaining such care for women in rural and non-rural areas in Taiwan. Methods Based on data collected by a national survey conducted by Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes (NHRI in 2000, we tried to compare how women chose prenatal care facility before and after Taiwan's National Health Insurance program was implemented. Basing our analysis on how women answered questionnaire items regarding "the type of major health care facility used and convenience of transportation to and from prenatal care facility," we investigated whether there were disparities in how women in rural and non-rural areas chose prenatal care facilities and felt about the transportation, and whether the NHI had different influences for the two groups of women. Results After NHI, women in rural areas were more likely than before to choose large hospitals for prenatal care services. For women in rural areas, the relative probability of choosing large hospitals to choosing non-hospital settings in 1998–1999 was about 6.54 times of that in 1990–1992. In contrast, no such change was found in women in non-rural areas. For a woman in a non-rural area, she was significantly more likely to perceive the transportation to and from prenatal care facilities to be very convenient between 1998 and 1999 than in the period between 1990 and 1992. No such improvement was found for women in

  13. CHIS – Renewal of health insurance cards and opening hours of UNIQA offices

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The production of health insurance cards valid from 1 January 2008 was interrupted in November due to a technical problem. Production has now resumed for those who have not yet received one. The insurance cards are being sent either to your professional address at CERN (if you’re an active member) or to your home address (if you are retired). Due to the closure of the Lab on Friday 21 December and to the workload of the postal services at the end of the year, these cards might not reach you until the beginning of January 2008. Thank you in advance for your patience. UNIQA informs us that in future the address on the insurance card will show only the name of the town and country of your residence. These data are indicated for information only and have no influence on the services offered by the health care provider. We also wish to inform you that the offices of UNIQA at CERN will be closed during the Christmas closure of the Lab. During that period, the Geneva offices of...

  14. Retirement planning among South African professional soccer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An inevitable reality that all athletes have to face is retirement from competition and this experience can lead an acute sense of loss in the athlete. Professional soccer players are no exception. While retirement traditionally occurs for most non-athletes after a long working career that allows them to plan and anticipate the ...

  15. Financial literacy and preparation for retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prast, Henriette; van Soest, Arthur

    To meet the challenges of an ageing population, eligibility ages for state pensions have increased, early retirement arrangements have been abolished, and a substantial part of the risk and responsibility for an adequate standard of living after retirement has been shifted from the government,

  16. Retirement Plan Lawsuits: Preparing for the Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morahan, John; Turner, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Currently, higher education is being roiled by class-action lawsuits filed against high-profile institutions, including MIT, Yale and New York University, over management of their retirement plans. As the lawyers are deployed and the billable hours accrue, it is timely to examine how those who have responsibility for retirement plan…

  17. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  18. Goal Expectations as Predictors of Retirement Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The current study explored the contribution of personal goals to retirement decisions. A SMARTER methodology (to assess multiattribute utility) and taxonomy of human goals were used to investigate the relationship between older workers' personal goals and their retirement intentions. Two hundred and fifty-one employees of a large university,…

  19. Subjective Well-Being Around Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abolhassani, Marzieh; Alessie, Rob

    This paper studies the effect of both retirement and unemployment on life satisfaction, using subjective satisfaction indicators from the German Socio-Economic Panel. Moreover, we analyze how accurate individuals anticipate changes in satisfaction around retirement, as well as the correlation

  20. 22 CFR 20.4 - Retirement benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 20.4 Section 20.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN FORMER SPOUSES § 20.4 Retirement benefits. (a) Type of benefits. (1) A former spouse who meets the qualification requirements of § 20.3 is entitled to...

  1. 20 CFR 633.306 - Retirement benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement benefits. 633.306 Section 633.306 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.306 Retirement benefits. No funds...

  2. Retirement Counseling: Preparing for the "Golden Years."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuehlsdorff, Harry W.; Baldwin, Cynthia

    Preparing for retirement can sometimes be problematic since it means that one is aging and moving into another life cycle change. This paper will review some factors to consider in making the transition a more positive experience. The impact of retirement on older citizens is frequently neglected in the counseling arena. In the current youth…

  3. The influence of length of relationship, gender and age on the relationship intention of short-term insurance clients: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derik Steyn

    2011-09-01

    insurance industry completed self-administered questionnaires. Findings indicate that, for a group of high relationship-intention clients of a short-term insurance organisation, no practically significant discrimination exists on any of the relationship-intention constructs for clients’ length of relationship, gender or age.

  4. Planning for Retirement with a Tax-Sheltered Mutual Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Edward J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Greater attention has been focused on the role that employer-sponsored retirement plans and individual savings must play in ensuring retirement income security. Alternative tax retirement planning opportunities currently available to college personnel are explored. (MLW)

  5. TRENDS IN RETIREMENT SAVING: EVIDENCE FROM AN ONLINE SURVEY OF ROMANIAN HOUSEHOLDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GURAN (TEODORESCU ILEANA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the population aging and the demographic crisis throughout Europe and the developed world, the public pension systems will become increasingly strained as the proportion of pensioners to the working population will continue to increase. Empirical evidence shows that individuals fail to save enough for retirement to compensate for the less than optimal level of public pensions, and thus are facing the risk of a decrease in the standard of living in their post-retirement years. This larger context makes the study of retirement saving behavior an important matter. The objective of this paper is to document current trends in retirement saving behavior from the data collected through an online survey of Romanian households. The survey was distributed as an online questionnaire that collected 1285 of responses. The survey’s objective was to document households’ financial situation, as well as other psychological and social factors that might explain saving behavior. The analysis of the survey results indicates that there is a gap between intentions and actions when it comes to retirement saving. This gap and the resulting suboptimal retirement saving rates are explained in behavioral economics literature by anomalies in the inter-temporal choices of individuals, subject to self-control issues. We will see to what extent this gap is due to self-control issues and to what extent it is explained by the current financial situation of individuals. We will also conclude about possible retirement saving behavior influencing factors and motives.

  6. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Insured Banks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Summary of Deposits (SOD) is the annual survey of branch office deposits for all FDIC-insured institutions including insured U.S. branches of foreign banks. Data...

  7. Immunization and Hedging of Post Retirement Income Annuity Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyu Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing post retirement benefits requires access to appropriate investment instruments to manage the interest rate and longevity risks. Post retirement benefits are increasingly taken as a form of income benefit, either as a pension or an annuity. Pension funds and life insurers offer annuities generating long term liabilities linked to longevity. Risk management of life annuity portfolios for interest rate risks is well developed but the incorporation of longevity risk has received limited attention. We develop an immunization approach and a delta-gamma based hedging approach to manage the risks of adverse portfolio surplus using stochastic models for mortality and interest rates. We compare and assess the immunization and hedge effectiveness of fixed-income coupon bonds, annuity bonds, as well as longevity bonds, using simulations of the portfolio surplus for an annuity portfolio and a range of risk measures including value-at-risk. We show how fixed-income annuity bonds can more effectively match cash flows and provide additional hedge effectiveness over coupon bonds. Longevity bonds, including deferred longevity bonds, reduce risk significantly compared to coupon and annuity bonds, reflecting the long duration of the typical life annuity and the exposure to longevity risk. Longevity bonds are shown to be effective in immunizing surplus over short and long horizons. Delta gamma hedging is generally only effective over short horizons. The results of the paper have implications for how providers of post retirement income benefit streams can manage risks in demanding conditions where innovation in investment markets can support new products and increase the product range.

  8. Teaching retirement financial literacy in an undergraduate gerontology classroom: broadening the concept of the tripod or three-legged stool of retirement income utilizing active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hallie E; Brown, Pamela Pitman

    2015-01-01

    The three-legged stool concept is widely used in gerontological and geriatric education as an explanation on how one should fiscally approach his or her retirement. Financial managers, planners, retirees, business owners, even the Social Security Administration uses this metaphor of fiscal soundness in retirement planning. Gerontologists are moving away from the "tripod of retirement income" and "three-legged stool" term, as more often market work is needed for financial security. This activity focuses on the tripod or three-legged stool concepts of retirement planning using active learning, allowing the students to work collaboratively in a group, reflect upon the activity, and most importantly have fun. The game also allows for an expansion of the tripod concepts into the four pillars of economic security, broaching the use of personal assets and the possible need for longer employment. Game scenarios also emphasize macro- and microlevel forces, such as race, gender, health status, education, or marital status, which can influence timing of retirement or the level of retirement income available. The authors include instructions on how to set up the learning experience including worksheets, as well as reflection questions posed throughout the process.

  9. Unemployment Insurance Query (UIQ)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Unemployment Insurance Query (UIQ) provides State Unemployment Insurance agencies real-time online access to SSA data. This includes SSN verification and Title...

  10. Motivational profiles of retired cosmonauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedfeld, Peter; Johnson, Phyllis J.; Gushin, Vadim; Brcic, Jelena

    2018-05-01

    Motivational patterns have been shown to be related to outcomes such as occupational success and satisfaction, innovation, aggressiveness, cooperation, and conformity. They are likely to be important in adaptation to the demands of flying in a space crew. Autobiographical interviews with 20 retired long-duration male cosmonauts were scored for references to three core motives: the needs for Achievement, Power, and Affiliation. Overall, the cosmonauts mentioned need for Affiliation most often, followed by need for Achievement, with need for Power the least frequently mentioned. However, need for Power increased between reminiscences of one's pre-flight career to those concerning the in-flight and post-flight periods. Imagery related to both other needs decreased. Cosmonauts who had spent less than a year in space mentioned need for Achievement significantly more frequently than those who had spent more than a year. Other space-experience and demographic variables, and changes across pairs of career phases, were not significant. The high scores for need for Affiliation indicate the importance of selecting compatible teams and fostering friendship and cooperation during training and deployment. A relatively flat hierarchical organization would be harmonious with low Power motivation; but the increase during missions indicates a desire for autonomy. After retirement from spaceflight, former space crews should be afforded opportunities for leadership and decision-making to satisfy continuing need for Power. Comparison is made to the same measures applied to a sample of ISS crewmembers, and to the ISS vs. veteran data for 8 cosmonauts who were included in both sets of data.

  11. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement--testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement Model. This study aims to investigate whether data support the model and how it could be improved. Employees aged 58-62 years (N=1862), who participated in the first three waves of the Dutch Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM) were included. Determinants were assessed at baseline, central explanatory variables after one year, and early retirement after two years. Structural equation modeling was applied. Testing the Early Retirement Model resulted in a model with good fit. Health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors were related to the ability, motivation and/or opportunity to work (significant β range: 0.05-0.31). Lower work ability (β=-0.13) and less opportunity to work (attitude colleagues and supervisor about working until age 65: β=-0.24) predicted early retirement, whereas the motivation to work (work engagement) did not. The model could be improved by adding direct effects of three determinants on early retirement, ie, support of colleagues and supervisor (β=0.14), positive attitude of the partner with respect to early retirement (β=0.15), and not having a partner (β=-0.13). The Early Retirement Model was largely supported by the data but could be improved. The prolongation of working life might be promoted by work-related interventions focusing on health, work ability, the social work climate, social norms on prolonged careers, and the learning environment.

  12. Mitigating the Inequity of the Military Retirement System by Changing the Rules Governing Individual Retirement Accounts for Service Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, David

    1997-01-01

    .... It reviews the structure of Individual Retirement Accounts and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, which governs private-sector retirement plans and their treatment by the Internal Revenue Code...

  13. NEW VECTORS OF THE MOTOR INSURANCE DEVELOPMENT IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Prikazyuk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The essence and features of different forms of motor insurance are studied. As investigated, the motor insurance is one of the most popular types of insurance in many countries, and continues its further quality development. It is stated that the following new vectors of development has been recently observed in developed countries: Internet sales are getting significantly prevalent along with the traditional channels of insurance distribution; insurers’ websites provide a wide range of online features in motor insurance; innovations in motor insurance based on the use of telematics, particularly the usage-based insurance, are widely spread. Basic types of motor insurance, which represent the domestic market, are analyzed. It was found that the share of motor insurance in the insurance market of Ukraine is significant. As established, the proportion of net premiums of motor insurance is decreasing, because its development is significantly influenced by economic factors. Measures, applied by insurance companies in the domestic market of motor insurance to attract new customers and retain the existing ones, are defined. In particular, insurers are trying to develop the implementation of insurance services online, and use possibilities offered by mobile technologies. It was found that the domestic market of motor insurance is characterized by a high level of fraud, that is why some innovative measures in the domestic and international motor insurance agreements are taken to decrease it, such as the introduction of mandatory registration of insurance agents, who have the right to perform mediatory activity in compulsory civil liability insurance of owners of motor vehicles (CCLIOMV, and procedures for contracting the international insurance “Green Card” agreements with simultaneous entering the information on concluded agreement into a unified centralized database of Motor (transport insurance bureau of Ukraine using the “Green Card online

  14. The determinants of early retirement in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, David; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade, Switzerland has experienced a large increase in the number of individuals going into early retirement. This paper examines the determinants of such early retirement using data from the newly implemented social-security module of the 2002 Swiss Labor Force Survey. In the sixteen-month period from January 2001 to April 2002, more than 36,000 older individuals, representing 8% of all workers within nine years of legal retirement age, became early retirees. One of the most imp...

  15. Are Your Employees Retirement-Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorchheiner, Alan H; Zaleta, Cynthia O

    2016-01-01

    Much of the discussion on the decumulation phase of retirement savings has focused on the lack of any lifetime annuities. But there is a whole range of options sponsors can employ to facilitate the generation of retirement income and bolster financial wellness. As U.S. employers show no sign of substantially increasing spending on compensation or benefits, it is imperative that human resources professionals help employees--particularly the retiring baby boomers--to maximize what they have saved. This article presents five first-step ideas toward achieving that goal.

  16. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women's Health Policy Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Published: Oct 31, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn ... that many women continue to face. Sources of Health Insurance Coverage Employer-Sponsored Insurance: Approximately 57.9 million ...

  17. Alternative health insurance schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Hansen, Bodil O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple model of health insurance with asymmetric information, where we compare two alternative ways of organizing the insurance market. Either as a competitive insurance market, where some risks remain uninsured, or as a compulsory scheme, where however, the level...... competitive insurance; this situation turns out to be at least as good as either of the alternatives...

  18. Health Insurance Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Health Insurance Basics What's ... thought advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  19. INSURANCE AND THE CORPORATE COST OF CAPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Wieczorek-Kosmala

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to provide some support to the thesis that insurance may reduce the cost of capital in a company by influencing both the cost of capital components and the need for rising capital. The problem is here perceived from two perspectives – the classical concept related to the weighted average cost of capital (WACC and a novel concept related to the risk-based capital structure model with the total average cost of capital (TACC. The paper explains the idea of insurance as a retrospective (post-loss risk financing tool and the risk transfer mechanism upon it. As the risk financing tool insurance reduces the need for the balance-sheet capital in a company and thus the financial distress costs. Also, insurance may reduce the level of operating risk and thus influences the required returns of the capital providers. These observations allow emphasising the impact of insurance on the WACC. However, according to the novel concept of the risk-based capital structure, insurance (as a risk financing tool represents an off-balance sheet capital component. As a consequence, it extends the volume of total capital. The presented conceptual model, based on the TACC concept, indicates that large volume of insurance (the insurance sum and its relatively low cost (the insurance premium gives the possibility to the significant reduction of the cost of capital on average. The concluding remarks discuss some dilemmas over the utility of the TACC concept.

  20. The Effects of Health Shocks on Employment and Health Insurance: The Role of Employer-Provided Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J.; Neumark, David; Motika, Meryl

    2012-01-01

    Background Employment-contingent health insurance (ECHI) has been criticized for tying insurance to continued employment. Our research sheds light on two central issues regarding employment-contingent health insurance: whether such insurance “locks” people who experience a health shock into remaining at work; and whether it puts people at risk for insurance loss upon the onset of illness, because health shocks pose challenges to continued employment. Objective To determine how men’s dependence on their own employer for health insurance affects labor supply responses and health insurance coverage following a health shock. Data Sources We use the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) surveys from 1996 through 2008 to observe employment and health insurance status at interviews two years apart, and whether a health shock occurred in the intervening period between the interviews. Study Selection All employed married men with health insurance either through their own employer or their spouse’s employer, interviewed in at least two consecutive HRS waves with non-missing data on employment, insurance, health, demographic, and other variables, and under age 64 at the second interview. We limited the sample to men who were initially healthy. Data Extraction Our analytical sample consisted of 1,582 men of whom 1,379 had ECHI at the first interview, while 203 were covered by their spouse’s employer. Hospitalization affected 209 men with ECHI and 36 men with spouse insurance. A new disease diagnosis was reported by 103 men with ECHI and 22 men with other insurance. There were 171 men with ECHI and 25 men with spouse employer insurance who had a self-reported health decline. Data Synthesis Labor supply response differences associated with ECHI – with men with health shocks and ECHI more likely to continue working – appear to be driven by specific types of health shocks associated with future higher health care costs but not with immediate increases in morbidity that

  1. Impacts of Pre-Retirement Guidance and Family Involvement on Retirement Adjustment of Retirees in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Olatomide

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study examined retirement adjustment of teacher-retirees in Osun State, and explored the interaction effects of pre-retirement guidance and family in-volvement on retirement adjustment. Exposit-facto design was used. The population comprised retirees from public, civil and private establishments from which 122 teacher-retirees were selected using a multi-stage sampling technique. An instrument: Family Involvement, Pre-retirement Guidance and Retirement Adjustment Questionnaire was used for data collection. Three research questions and three hypotheses guided the study. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results revealed that retirees in Osun State are not optimally adjusted, and positive significant interaction effect was found between family involvement and pre-retirement guidance on retirees adjustment, among others. Appropriate policy implications are outlined.

  2. Nudging toward a stable retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroncke, Charles

    2018-01-01

    The classical economics perspective is that public policy should be used to allow, not hinder, economic freedom. In some cases it may be possible for government to gently nudge individuals to change their behavior without hindering freedom. One example is a change from the default on pension program enrollment forms from "not contribute" to "contribute." This is generally viewed as a good nudge that gets people to do what the majority of people view as generally the correct behavior. However, a choice to contribute to a pension fund is not always in the individual's best interest - thus, it is a nudge, not a mandate. To maintain personal liberty, individuals should be fully informed about the consequences of their choice and the motives of the political authority. Saving for retirement is a complex issue, and pension contribution decisions are often made with little foresight or information. Pension contribution nudges may not always be freedom preserving because of complexity and unintended consequences. The benefits, risks, and limitations of default contribution pension nudges are discussed.

  3. "Mental retirement?" Trajectories of work engagement preceding retirement among older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Leijten, Fenna Rm; Hoekstra, Trynke; Geuskens, Goedele A; Burdorf, Alex; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Before actual retirement, employees may already distance themselves from work, which could be referred to as "mental retirement". However, trajectories of work motivation, ie, work engagement, have not been studied yet. The present study aimed to (i) identify different trajectories of work engagement among older workers approaching the retirement age, and (ii) examine their associations with actual retirement. Methods In total 3171 employees aged 55-62 years, who participated in the Dutch Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation were included in this study. Participants completed questionnaires in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Latent class growth mixture modeling was performed to identify groups of employees with similar three-year trajectories in work engagement. Logistic regression analyses were performed to study whether trajectory membership was associated with retirement. Results Of the 3171 employees, 16.2% made a transition from work to (early) retirement (N=513). Four trajectories of work engagement were identified: steady high (76.3%), steady low (12.7%), decreasing (6.2%), and increasing (4.8%). A steady low work engagement trajectory was associated with retirement [odds ratio (OR) 1.46], compared to a steady high work engagement trajectory. Although not statistically significant, an increasing work engagement trajectory seemed to be associated with retirement as well (OR 1.60). Conclusions This study did not support the concept of mental retirement before actual retirement, ie, a decrease in work engagement among those facing retirement. However, as one in eight employees did experience steady low work engagement in the years before retirement, interventions promoting work motivation are recommended to support the employability of these employees.

  4. The Emergence of Flood Insurance in Canada: Navigating Institutional Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistlethwaite, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Flood insurance has remained unavailable in Canada based on an assessment that it lacks economic viability. In response to Canada's costliest flood event to date in 2013, the Canadian insurance industry has started to develop a framework to expand existing property insurance to cover flood damage. Research on flood insurance has overlooked why and how insurance systems transition to expand insurance coverage without evidence of economic viability. This article will address this gap through a case study on the emergence of flood insurance in Canada, and the approach to its expansion. Between 2013 and 2016, insurance industry officials representing over 60% of premiums collected in Canada were interviewed. These interviews revealed that flood insurance is being expanded in response to institutional pressure, specifically external stakeholder expectations that the insurance industry will adopt a stronger role in managing flood risk through coverage of flood damage. Further evidence of this finding is explored by assessing the emergence of a unique flood insurance model that involves a risk-adjusted and optional product along with an expansion of government policy supporting flood risk mitigation. This approach attempts to balance industry concerns about economic viability with institutional pressure to reduce flood risk through insurance. This analysis builds on existing research by providing the first scholarly analysis of flood insurance in Canada, important "empirical" teeth to existing conceptual analysis on the availability of flood insurance, and the influence of institutional factors on risk analysis within the insurance sector. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  6. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 9 November 2015 and approval by the Director-General, please note that:   the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2016 until 31 March 2017;   the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2016 until 31 December 2016. Further information is available from the following sites: - https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/progressive-retirement-programme-prp - https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/part-time-work-pre-retirement-measure-ptp Human Resources Department Tel.: 79257 / 73903

  7. Optimizing the aging, retirement, and pensions dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Bertocchi, Marida; Ziemba, William T.

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward guide focused on life cycle investing-namely aging, retirement, and pensions Life cycle investing and the implications of aging, retirement, and pensions continues to grow in importance. With people living longer, the relative and absolute number of retirees is growing while the number of workers contributing to pension funds is declining. This reliable resource develops a detailed economic analysis-at the micro (individual) and macro (economy wide) levels-which addresses issues regarding the economics of an aging population. Topics touched upon include retirement and the associated health care funding of the aged as well as social security and the asset classes that are considered asset-liability choices over time. The probability of achieving adequate return patterns from various investment strategies and asset classes is reviewed Shares rich insights on the aging, retirement, and pensions dilemma An assessment of the resources the real economy will be able to commit to non-workers is prov...

  8. The retirement prospects of divorced women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrica, Barbara A; Smith, Karen E

    2012-01-01

    For decades, policymakers have discussed how to remedy the high poverty rates of older widows. Yet older divorced women are more likely to be poor than older widows, and historical divorce and remarriage trends suggest that in the future a larger share of retired women will be divorced. This article uses the Social Security Administration's Modeling Income in the Near Term (version 6) to project the retirement resources and wellbeing of divorced women. We find that Social Security benefits and retirement incomes are projected to increase for divorced women and that their poverty rates are projected to decline, due in large part to women's increasing lifetime earnings. However, not all divorced women will be equally well off economic well-being in retirement varies by Social Security benefit type.

  9. Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We use a representative survey covering 1,500 households to document the level of financial literacy in Switzerland and to examine how financial literacy is related to retirement planning. We measure financial literacy with standardized questions that capture knowledge about three basic financial concepts: Compound interest, inflation, and risk diversification. We measure retirement planning by the incidence of a voluntary retirement savings account. Our results show that financial literacy in Switzerland is high by international standards--a result which is compatible with the high ranking of Switzerland on the PISA mathematical scales. Financial literacy is lower among low-income, less-educated, and immigrant, non-native-speaking households as well as among women. We find that financial literacy is strongly correlated with voluntary retirement saving. Our results also show that financial literacy is correlated with financial market participation and mortgage borrowing.

  10. 77 FR 66149 - Retirement of FASTforward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ...;Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each #0;week. #0; #0; #0; #0;#0... difficult. In February 2009, the USPS TM announced its intention to retire the FASTforward system by the end...

  11. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS): Monthly Contributions for 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    For 2016, the contribution rate for active and retired CHIS members will be 4.86%. The amounts of the fixed contributions for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and other associates), as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including a CERN pension), are thus as follows:   1. Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is 1218 CHF per month. This fixed contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and other associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount, 609 CHF, is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and other associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 487 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and temporary basis. 2. Supplementary contributions The supplementary contribution for the spouse or registered partner of a staff member, fellow or pensioner is now as follows, according to the spouse’s month...

  13. Organizations, managers, and the employment of older workers after retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Population aging and the resulting retirement-related policy reforms are leading to higher rates of labor market participation among older workers and later retirement ages. In addition, working beyond traditional retirement ages, thereby combining employment with retirement, is also increasingly

  14. 5 CFR 838.911 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) To satisfy the requirements of § 838.804(b)(1), a court order must contain language identifying...) and (b)(2) of this section, language referring to benefits under another retirement system, such as military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits and Central Intelligence Agency retirement...

  15. 5 CFR 838.611 - Identifying the retirement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... order must contain language identifying the retirement system to be affected. For example, “CSRS,” “FERS... in paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section, language referring to benefits under another retirement system, such as military retired pay, Foreign Service retirement benefits or Central Intelligence...

  16. 5 CFR 831.1207 - Withdrawal of disability retirement applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... type. (d) OPM also considers a disability retirement application to be withdrawn when the agency... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal of disability retirement...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Disability Retirement § 831.1207 Withdrawal of...

  17. 38 CFR 3.754 - Emergency officers' retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...' retirement pay. 3.754 Section 3.754 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... officers' retirement pay. A retired emergency officer of World War I has basic eligibility to retirement pay by the Department of Veterans Affairs under Pub. L. 87-875 (sec. 11(b), Pub. L. 85-857) from date...

  18. Blended Retirement System Impact on Gender Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    compensation in their decisions on how long to remain in the service, but financial compensation is not the most important factor. In order to continue...their Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) retirement account to provide members departing the service prior to 20 year retirement eligibility with some portable...employment and promotion/ advancement opportunities. Thus, the BRS will have a neutral effect on gender 4 retention. In order to continue to close

  19. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    served after December 31, 2014. 9 Department of Defense, Valuation of the Military Retirement System, September 30, 2006, DOD Office of the Actuary...provision twice; first in 2014 (P.L. 113-82 §10001; formerly known as South Utah Valley Electric Conveyance Act) to apply only to servicemembers...Actuary, Valuation of the Military Retirement System, September 30, 2014, rev. June 2016. DOD budget authority and outlays in each fiscal year that

  20. Preparation à la retraite - Preparing for retirement

    CERN Multimedia

    WHO/OMS Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Retirement implies an important change from a working environment to a new lifestyle. Every individual copes with this transition in his own way. In this video, registered already a few years ago, Dr. Sartorius from WHO addresses some of his colleagues close to retirement and explains what situations they can expect to encounter. We make this video available to CERN personnel to stimulate their own thinking on the subject.

  1. Retirement planning: conceptualisation, challenges and policy options

    OpenAIRE

    Adenutsi, Deodat E.

    2009-01-01

    The central objective of this paper is to explain the concept and relevance of retirement planning within a vibrant Christian organisation such as the Assemblies of God’s Church. In particular, an attempt is made to expose participants to the theoretical relevance and application of the benefits of retirement planning to the church as an employer, and the pastors as employees of the church. Accordingly, issues related to the role of the church and beneficiary pastors and other full-time worke...

  2. Toward Efficient Military Retirement Accrual Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors. Support RAND Make a tax -deductible charitable contribution at www.rand.org/giving...mandated accrual account - ing to fund the military retirement benefit liability and specified the use of the aggregate entry-age normal accounting ...tary retirees; military retirement was a pay-as-you-go (PAYGO) system. The shift to accrual accounting sought to meet the objective of recog- nizing

  3. Life Insurance and Annuity Demand under Hyperbolic Discounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqi Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyse and construct a lifetime utility maximisation model with hyperbolic discounting. Within the model, a number of assumptions are made: complete markets, actuarially fair life insurance/annuity is available, and investors have time-dependent preferences. Time dependent preferences are in contrast to the usual case of constant preferences (exponential discounting. We find: (1 investors (realistically demand more life insurance after retirement (in contrast to the standard model, which showed strong demand for life annuities, and annuities are rarely purchased; (2 optimal consumption paths exhibit a humped shape (which is usually only found in incomplete markets under the assumptions of the standard model.

  4. [Occupational health services as the insurance product and insurance economic instruments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    One of the most controversial issues in restructuring the Polish health insurance system is the implementation of private voluntary insurance and creation within it a new insurance product known as occupational health services (OHS). In this article some opportunities and dilemmas likely to be faced by providers and employers/employees, when contracting with insurance institutions, are considered as a contribution to the discussion on private insurance in Poland. The basic question is how private insurance institutions could influence the promotion of different preventive activities at the company level by motivating both OHS providers and employers. The descriptive qualitative method has been applied in the analysis of legal acts, scientific publications selected according to keywords (Pubmed), documents and expert evaluations and research project results. Taking into account the experiences of European countries, described in publications, international experts' opinions and results of research projects the solution proposed in Poland could be possible under the following several prerequisites: inclusion of a full scope of occupational health services into the insurance product, constant supervision of occupational medicine professionals, monitoring of the health care quality and the relations between private insurers and OHS provider and implementation of the economic incentives scheme to ensure an adequate position of OHS providers on the market. The proposed reconstruction of the health insurance system, comprising undoubtedly positive elements, may entail some threats in the area of health, organization and economy. Private voluntary health insurance implementation requires precisely defined solutions concerning the scope of insurance product, motivation scheme and information system.

  5. Long-term care insurance matures as a benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elaine; Leach, Tom

    2002-12-01

    Forty-eight percent of U.S. businesses now offer long-term care insurance (LTCI) coverage, an increase of 15% since 1998. As more organizations realize the added value of LTCI in the employee benefit package, they have also found that motivation to buy varies with employee financial standing, gender and age, and that targeted employee education as part of retirement planning is essential.

  6. ‘All those things together made me retire’: qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. Methods A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60–64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). Results For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement (‘push factors’), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement (‘pull factors’) included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. Conclusion To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and

  7. Insurance of nuclear risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.

    1976-01-01

    Insurance for large nuclear installations covers mainly four types of risk: third party liability which in accordance with the nuclear conventions, is borne by a nuclear operator following an incident occurring in his installation or during transport of nuclear substances; material damage to the installation itself, which precisely is not covered by third party liability insurance; machinery breakdown, i.e. accidental damage or interruption of operation. Only the first category must be insured. In view of the magnitude of the risk, nuclear insurance resorts to co-insurance and reinsurance techniques which results in a special organisation of the nuclear insurance market, based on national nuclear insurance pools and on the Standing Committee on Atomic Risk of the European Insurance Committee. Conferences of the chairmen of nuclear insurance pools are convened regularly at a worldwide level. (NEA) [fr

  8. BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS IN INSURANCE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroe Andreea

    2013-07-01

    In this paper there are showed and debated some situation in which psychological effects like loss aversion, reference point, status-quo and framming effects can influence the deccision of the consumer and are not consistent with the standard economic model.In addition to this aspects, Cumulative Prspect Theory enhance the fact that decision makers overestimate low peobabilities and underestimate high probabilities,thus buying inadequate insurance in many situation.in thiss sense, in order to support this idea I tried to make a qualitative presentation of the model used on the insurance market using Prelec function which is the function related with the Cumulative Prospect Theory which can be used in the insurance context.The weak points of the theory of expected utility are explained through this new perspectives and nevertheless aspects like insensivity to bad news concerning incomes,elasticity of price,displacements of status-quo and default,disposition effect and equity premium are taken into consideration.As example,I chose a Kunreuther experiment about insurance decision in with is underlyined the fact that for moderate risk people buy insurance with premiums that exceed the expected loss.There are demands for low deductibles in the the markets for extended guarantees and insurances for mobile phones where was observed that the insurance underwriting rate increases with the probability of loss keeping the expected loss constant.It is better to mention that the theory and the model that are presented here comes as complementary to the economic standard theory not as a substitute.

  9. Effect of retirement on eating out and weight change: an analysis of gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sukyung; Popkin, Barry M; Domino, Marisa E; Stearns, Sally C

    2007-04-01

    The objectives were to understand how the retirement decisions of older Americans influence household food consumption patterns by gender and, in turn, to examine the impact of the change in food consumption on weight. This study used five waves of the Health and Retirement Study (1992 to 2002; n=28,117). Participants were 50 to 71 years old during the study period. We used longitudinal regression analyses controlling for health events, spousal factors, socioeconomic factors, and individual fixed effects over time. Retirement of the individual and of his/her spouse reduced the individual's monthly spending on eating out by $10 and $7 on average, respectively, but did not change household spending on food at home. The wife's, but not the husband's, retirement decreased the spouse's spending on eating out by $13/mo. Spending on eating out was a significant but weak (0.003BMI/$) predictor of weight gain. The decrease in spending on eating out after retirement, particularly women's, suggests that people eat out less when they have more time for food preparation at home. However, increases in other risks of weight gain with retirement, such as physical inactivity, could counteract the effects of eating out less.

  10. Retaining older workers: the effect of phased retirement on delaying early retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsmund Hermansen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phased retirement involves reducing working time in the final years before retirement. The aim of phased retirement is to extend working careers and retain older workers who would otherwise opt for full early retirement. This article investigates the effect of offering phased retirement on early-retirement behaviour in Norway.Method: The data used in the analysis covers the period between 2000 and 2010 and comprises all employees between 61 and 62 years of age (N= 18 174 who were employed in any of the 442 companies that participated in a 2010 survey carried out by the Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research and Respons Analyse AS, a Norwegian research firm. I use a difference-in-differences approach and logistic regression, which enables the measurement of changes in the individual relative risk of retiring full-time on the contractual pension (AFP, avtalefestet pensjon, contractual early-retirement pension, before and after the introduction of phased retirement as a retention measure.Results: The results show that working in a company that offers reduced working hours for older workers does not have an effect on the relative risk of a 61- or 62-year-old withdrawing a full contractual pension in the next two years of their employment. This result is evident both before and after controlling for a range of known individual risk factors, as well as after controlling for company characteristics.Discussion: In the search for suitable measures for retaining older workers, offering phased retirement may still be part of the answer. Though my analysis does not support the idea that more flexible working hours is a decisive factor for those who choose to opt for full early retirement, a possible next step could be to investigate the impact of offering flexible working hours on the employment duration of those who do remain in employment.

  11. Extending the Scope of Services in the Insurance Industry

    OpenAIRE

    von Watzdorf, Stephan; Gebauer, Heiko; Staake, Thorsten; Fleisch, Elgar

    2011-01-01

    The study at hand explores the influence of value-added services offered in addition to a motor insurance product on the customer's preference structure. It addresses the need of insurance companies to extend their core business with different types of supplementary services. A choice-based conjoint analysis is conducted which considers the price for the insurance product, the insurance franchise, the non-claims bonus as well as post-accident services and value-added services. Based on the re...

  12. Toward Better Access to Health Insurance Coverage for U.S. Retirees in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Warner David C.; Jahnke Lauren R.

    2001-01-01

    Many retirees from the United States of America have limited health insurance coverage while living in Mexico. Medicare and Medicaid benefits are not portable to other countries and Medigap (private insurance that supplements Medicare) is very limited. This causes economic and medical hardships and serves as a barrier to retirement to Mexico. Increasing numbers of U.S. retirees will be interested in moving to Mexico in the future because of the climate, the culture, and the lower cost of livi...

  13. ECONOMIC AND MANAGERIAL APPROACH OF HEALTH INSURANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Dragomir

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an analysis in the domain of the social insurances for health care. It emphasizesthe necessity and the opportunity of creating in Romania a medical service market based on the competingsystem. In Romania, the social insurances for health care are at their very beginning. The development of thedomain of the private insurances for health care is prevented even by its legislation, due to the lack of anormative act that may regulate the management of the private insurances for health care. The establishment ofthe legislation related to the optional insurances for health care might lead to some activity norms for thecompanies which carry out optional insurances for health care. The change of the legislation is made in order tocreate normative and financial opportunities for the development of the optional medical insurances. Thischange, as part of the social protection of people, will positively influence the development of the medicalinsurance system. The extension of the segment of the optional insurances into the medical insurance segmentincreases the health protection budget with the value of the financial sources which do not belong to thebudgetary funds.

  14. Mental retirement? Trajectories of work engagement preceding retirement among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Leijten, F.R.M.; Hoekstra, T.; Geuskens, G.A.; Burdorf, L.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Before actual retirement, employees may already distance themselves from work, which could be referred to as "mental retirement". However, trajectories of work motivation, ie, work engagement, have not been studied yet. The present study aimed to (i) identify different trajectories of

  15. Women and Retirement: The Effect of Multiple Careers on Retirement Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connidis, Ingrid

    1982-01-01

    The concept of career set is employed as the basis for a framework designed to analyze the impact of women's involvement in multiple careers on their adjustment to retirement. The author concludes that the familial careers engaged in by married, working women have a mediative effect on their transition to retirement. (Author/CT)

  16. Chinese nuclear insurance and Chinese nuclear insurance pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Zhiqi

    2000-01-01

    Chinese Nuclear Insurance Started with Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station, PICC issued the insurance policy. Nuclear insurance cooperation between Chinese and international pool's organizations was set up in 1989. In 1996, the Chinese Nuclear Insurance Pool was prepared. The Chinese Nuclear Insurance Pool was approved by The Chinese Insurance Regulatory Committee in May of 1999. The principal aim is to centralize maximum the insurance capacity for nuclear insurance from local individual insurers and to strengthen the reinsurance relations with international insurance pools so as to provide the high quality insurance service for Chinese nuclear industry. The Member Company of Chinese Nuclear Pool and its roles are introduced in this article

  17. Disability Income Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Hayhoe, Celia Ray; Smith, Mike, CPF

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of disability income insurance is to partially replace your income if you are unable to work because of sickness or an accident. This guide reviews the types of disability insurance, important terms and concepts and employer provided benefits.

  18. Understanding health insurance plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000879.htm Understanding health insurance plans To use the sharing features on this ... plan for you and your family. Types of Health Insurance Plans Depending on how you get your health ...

  19. Tax reform options: promoting retirement security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2011-11-01

    TAX PROPOSALS: Currently, the combination of worker and employer contributions in a defined contribution plan is capped by the federal tax code at the lesser of $49,000 per year or 100 percent of a worker's compensation (participants over age 50 can make additional "catch-up" contributions). As part of the effort to lower the federal deficit and reduce federal "tax expenditures," two major reform proposals have surfaced that would change current tax policy toward retirement savings: A plan that would end the existing tax deductions for 401(k) contributions and replace them with a flat-rate refundable credit that serves as a matching contribution into a retirement savings account. The so-called "20/20 cap," included by the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform in their December 2010 report, "The Moment of Truth," which would limit the sum of employer and worker annual contributions to the lower of $20,000 or 20 percent of income, the so-called "20/20 cap." IMPACT OF PERMANENTLY MODIFYING THE EXCLUSION OF EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLANS FROM TAXABLE INCOME: If the current exclusion of worker contributions for retirement savings plans were ended in 2012 and the total match remains constant, the average reductions in 401(k) accounts at Social Security normal retirement age would range from a low of 11.2 percent for workers currently ages 26-35 in the highest-income groups, to a high of 24.2 percent for workers in that age range in the lowest-income group. IMPACT OF "20/20 CAP": Earlier EBRI analysis of enacting the 20/20 cap starting in 2012 showed it would, as expected, most affect those with high income. However, EBRI also found the cap would cause a significant reduction in retirement savings by the lowest-income workers as well, and younger cohorts would experience larger reductions given their increased exposure to the proposal. IMPORTANCE OF EMPLOYER-SPONSORED RETIREMENT PLANS AND AUTO-ENROLLMENT: A key factor in future

  20. Influence of Distance to Hospital and Insurance Status on the Rates of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy, a National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Erin P; Unkart, Jonathan T; Bryant, Alex; Murphy, James; Blair, Sarah L

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the impact of travel distance and insurance status on contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rates in breast cancer. We queried the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for women >18 years of age with a nonmetastatic primary breast cancer of ductal, lobular, or mixed histology. Patient- and facility-specific CPM rates were calculated based on insurance, race, and distance to treatment center. Standard univariable and multivariable regression analysis was performed. Overall, the CPM rate was 6.5% for the 864,105 patients identified. Most patients traveled CPM. However, distance to the treatment center and insurance type had a greater absolute impact on rates of CPM for Black and Hispanic patients. Absolute CPM rate increases for patients >100 miles from a treatment center compared with those CPM rates. Increased travel distance is independently associated with increased rates of CPM for all patients and increased facility-specific rates of CPM. Black and Hispanic patients were found to be more vulnerable to the impact of travel distance and insurance status on rates of CPM.

  1. Pension Insurance Data Tables

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — Find out about retirement trends in PBGC's data tables. The tables include statistics on the people and pensions that PBGC protects, including how many Americans are...

  2. 24 CFR 266.602 - Mortgage insurance premium: Insured advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgage insurance premium: Insured... Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 266.602 Mortgage insurance premium: Insured.... On each anniversary of the initial closing, the HFA shall pay an interim mortgage insurance premium...

  3. The need for an organized approach for Government Medical Insurance Programs in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F

    2005-01-01

    The Commonwealth of Virginia has a disorganized approach to enrolling their retired faculty in Medicare Supplement Insurance Programs. An organized approach to establishing Medicare Supplemental Insurance for retired University faculty should include the following administrative changes to correct this potential health-care crisis for retired state faculty members. First, the ombudsman for human resources for the state universities must receive educational programs that prepare the retired faculty members over the age of 65 to select the corporate insurance policy from Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield Insurance Company. Included in this educational program should be a review of the Advantage 65 Member Handbook. Second, they must point out to the faculty member that they are receiving a CORPORATE insurance policy rather than an individual insurance policy from Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield Insurance Company. They must provide the telephone numbers of the Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield offices in Roanoke, Virginia. Concomitantly, they must send the name and address of the faculty member to the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Human Resource Management. They should inform the faculty member that the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Human Resource Management will be sending them newsletters that outline any changes in the corporate insurance policy that they coordinate with the Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield Insurance Company. The Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Human Resource Management must take on some new responsibilities in their efforts to coordinate health-care coverage of the retired faculty over the age of 65. First, they must have a computer registry of all corporate health-care policies of the individual faculty members to ensure that newsletters are being sent to them. Ideally, this agency should have a computerized system that allows it to send out its newsletter update by email to those retired faculty members who have computers. They should

  4. Farmers Insures Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifeld, Lorri

    2012-01-01

    Farmers Insurance claims the No. 2 spot on the Training Top 125 with a forward-thinking training strategy linked to its primary mission: FarmersFuture 2020. It's not surprising an insurance company would have an insurance policy for the future. But Farmers takes that strategy one step further, setting its sights on 2020 with a far-reaching plan to…

  5. Flexible work schedules, older workers, and retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, J K; Brenner, A M

    2000-01-01

    Older workers in the United States indicate that they would prefer flexible work arrangements rather than abrupt retirement, yet management has done very little to make this possible. A review of two bodies of literature from the late 1980s is presented: social science writings including sociological, gerontological, and economic literature, and business and management literature. There is a clash between the way jobs are traditionally scheduled and the needs of growing numbers of older workers. Workers continue to be subject to obstacles to phased retirement due to the structuring of health care and pension benefits, downsizing, organizational inflexibility, and "corporate culture." Thus, general views among social scientists regarding the desirability of flexible schedules toward retirement will not produce real changes unless management becomes committed to such changes and they are securely embedded in company policies.

  6. Ageing, government budgets, retirement, and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    changes of taxes, government spending components and the retirement age in politico-economic equilibrium. Growth is driven by capital accumulation and productivity increases fueled by public investment. The closed-form solutions of the model predict taxation and the retirement age in OECD economies...... to increase in response to demographic ageing and per-capita growth to accelerate. If the retirement age were held constant, the growth rate in politico-economic equilibrium would essentially remain unchanged, due to a surge of social security transfers and crowding out of public investment.......We analyze the short and long run effects of demographic ageing - increased longevity and reduced fertility - on per-capita growth. The OLG model captures direct effects, working through adjustments in the savings rate, labor supply, and capital deepening, and indirect effects, working through...

  7. Investment Strategy and Efficiency of Investment Activity of European Insurers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhabynets Olga Yo.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article studies investment strategy and efficiency of investment activity of European insurance companies. In particular, it analyses the share of investments of insurance companies of Europe in GDP, investment portfolio of European insurers and its structure, contribution of insurance companies – leaders of investment activity – into the European investment portfolio. It studies influence of the financial crisis upon investment strategy of European insurers and analyses efficiency of investment activity of European insurers in risk insurance and life insurance. The article proves that investment business models of insurance companies are capable of resisting crisis phenomena more efficiently than other financial institutions. It marks out that measures of insurance companies that are directed at increase of profitability of investments require from them both significant expenditures on creation of the system of investment risk management and open access to different categories of financial assets and markets, which influences the general risk level, taken upon by an insurance company. The author draws a conclusion that, taking into account recent developments, European insurers should focus on equity and investment risk management, finding new possibilities for their (investments growth and also adaptation of new systems and operations for solution of these important tasks.

  8. Risks and nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debaets, M.; Springett, G.D.; Luotonen, K.; Virole, J.

    1988-01-01

    When analysing the nuclear insurance market, three elements must be taken into account: the nuclear operator's liability is regulated by national laws and/or international Conventions, such operators pay large premiums to insure their nuclear installations against property damage and finally, the nuclear insurance market is made up of pools and is mainly a monopoly. This report describes the different types of insurance coverage, the system governing nuclear third party liability under the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention and several national laws in that field. The last part of the report deals with liability and insurance aspects of international transport of nuclear materials [fr

  9. No more lock-step retirement: Boomers' shifting meanings of work and retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojola, Erik; Moen, Phyllis

    2016-01-01

    Standard pathways for work and retirement are being transformed as the large Boomer cohort moves through typical retirement ages during a moment of economic, social and political change. People are delaying retirement and moving into and out of paid work as the standard lock-step retirement becomes less dominant. However, little research has explored how and why Boomers are taking on these diverse pathways in their later careers. Accordingly, we conduct in-depth interviews with working and retired white-collar Boomers, exploring how they are working and the meanings and motivations for their decisions and plans in their later careers. We find that there is no single dominant pattern for retirement, but rather a diverse mix of pathways shaped by occupational identities, finances, health and perceptions of retirement. Boomers express a desire to have control over their time and to find meaning and purpose in either paid or unpaid activities. However, life course transitions, normative cultural scripts, and gender and class locations as well as workplace and social policies constrain their decisions and plans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrative Relationship Between Retirement Syndromes Components With General Health Symptoms Among Retired Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Golparvar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This research was administered with the aim of studying the relationship between retirement syndrome components with general health symptoms in retired adults in Esfahan city. Methods & Materials: This research carried out in descriptive and correlational method. Research statistical population was the retired adults in Esfahan city, among them, 461 persons for participating to research were selected using stratified random sampling, and then retirement syndrome questionnaire (helplessness and failure, older and idleness, trying and new direction and conflict and confusion and general health questionnaire (somatization, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, and depression administered to them. Results: 1 Three components have predictive power for prediction of somatization, consisted of: helplessness and failure, older and idleness, trying and new directions, 2 for prediction of anxiety and insomnia, helplessness and failure, trying and new direction, older and idleness have significant predictive power, 3 For prediction of social dysfunction, helplessness and failure, and trying and new directions have significant predictive power, 4 For prediction of depression also, helplessness and failure and trying and new directions have significant predictive power. Conclusion: The finding of this research revealed that, helplessness and failure along with trying and new direction are the two components which must be considered in retired adults. Therefore, it is essential for this two dimensions established counseling centers related to retirement centers for helping retired adults.

  11. Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie R. Agnew

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Financial literacy and numeracy are closely tied. Furthermore, financial literacy has been shown to relate to important financial behaviors. This study examines the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning using a measure that includes questions requiring numeracy. We implement a customized survey to a representative sample of 1,024 Australians. Overall, we find aggregate levels of financial literacy similar to comparable countries with the young, least educated, those not employed, and those not in the labor force most at risk. Our financial literacy measure is positively related to retirement planning in our sample.

  12. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 27 November 2014 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2015 until 31 March 2016; the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2015 until 31 December 2015. Further information is available at the following sites: https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/node/447 https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/node/484 Human Resources Department Tel. 79257 / 73903

  13. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 5 December 2013 and approval by the Director-General, please note that:   the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2014 until 31 March 2015; the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2014 until 31 December 2014. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp_fr.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp_fr.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 79257/ 73903

  14. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Department

    2011-01-01

    Following recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2011 until 31 March 2012; and the Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2011 until 31 December 2011. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp.asp Tel. 73903

  15. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 2 December 2011 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2012 until 31 March 2013; and the Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2012 until 31 December 2012. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp.asp Tel.  73903 Human Resources Department

  16. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 4 December 2012 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2013 until 31 March 2014; and the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2013 until 31 December 2013.   Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp_fr.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp_fr.asp   Human Resources Department Tel. 73903

  17. MARKET INSURANCE AND RISKS IN THIS FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia Catrina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The insurance market can be considered a market where all sorts of anomalies can be encountered or a current acquisition for a situation considered to be certain or relative future, depending on the type of insurance. For the most part, assurance is based on a premise, a hypothesis that is generally based on several factors of influence. Generally, the most important factors in making such a decision are generated by the human-sensitive factor or the economicprotective. Therefore, by joining the insurance market and purchasing any kind of insurance, we must also take into account the risks that arise from these products. Generally, most people perceive these insurance policies in different areas as a future guarantee without considering additional elements that can highlight risk elements that may alter the expected outcome of the acquirer. An important element to mitigate these risks would be the implementation and use of internal control over the supply chain, control that would make a difference between an activity under normal, predictable and legal conditions and a random activity with many elements of risk that can cause major damage to those involved, and to the insurer and the insured. Through this paper, the author aimed to highlight the importance of internal control in insurance companies, as well as the consequences of the lack of internal control within these societies

  18. Economic and Managerial Approach of Health Insurances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela BOBOC

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an analysis in the domain of the social insurances for health care. It emphasizes the necessity and the opportunity ofcreating in Romania a medical service market based on the competing system. In Romania, the social insurances for health care are at their verybeginning. The development of the domain of the private insurances for health care is prevented even by its legislation, due to the lack of a normativeact that may regulate the management of the private insurances for health care. The establishment of the legislation related to the optional insurancesfor health care might lead to some activity norms for the companies which carry out optional insurances for health care. The change of the legislationis made in order to create normative and financial opportunities for the development of the optional medical insurances. This change, as part of thesocial protection of people, will positively influence the development of the medical insurance system. The extension of the segment of the optionalinsurances into the medical insurance segment increases the health protection budget with the value of the financial sources which do not belong tothe budgetary funds.

  19. Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Retire Tool When Deciding Between High 36 Retirement and Blended TSP Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget , Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave...VALUE OF THE TSP ...........16 D. ELEMENTS OF RETIRE TOOL ANALYSIS .....................................18 1. Cash Flow Analysis...23 3. Cash Flow Comparison ...............................................................24 4. Volatility Analysis

  20. Public Insurance and Equality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Néron, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Heath (among other political theorists) considers that the principle of efficiency provides a better normative explanation and justification of public insurance than the egalitarian account. According to this view, the fact that the state is involved in the provision of specific insurance (primarily......Public insurance is commonly assimilated with redistributive tools mobilized by the welfare state in the pursuit of an egalitarian ideal. This view contains some truth, since the result of insurance, at a given moment, is the redistribution of resources from the lucky to unlucky. However, Joseph...... surrounding public insurance as a redistributive tool, advancing the idea that public insurance may be a relational egalitarian tool. It then presents a number of relational arguments in favor of the involvement of the state in the provision of specific forms of insurance, arguments that have been overlooked...

  1. Health as a predictor of early retirement before and after introduction of a flexible statutory pension age in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Leinonen, Taina; Laaksonen, Mikko; Chandola, Tarani; Martikainen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known of how pension reforms affect the retirement decisions of people with different health statuses, although this is crucial for the understanding of the broader societal impact of pension policies and for future policy development. We assessed how the Finnish statutory pension age reform introduced in 2005 influenced the role of health as a predictor of retirement. Methods: We used register-based data and cox regression analysis to examine the association of health (...

  2. “Personal network” and retirement: Is retirement bad for friendship and good for family relationships?

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Laferrere

    2014-01-01

    What shapes the size of a personal network of family and friends? We concentrates here on the effect of retirement from the work force. Retirement provides time to develop personal relationships; but it deprives from a potential supply of colleague friends. We draw evidence from a new question on the number of confidants in the 4th wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The survey allows to take into account many potential determinants of personal relations. A first re...

  3. The influence of exercise intervention upon quality of life and activity of daily living in elderly people who use nursing care insurance services

    OpenAIRE

    竹内, 亮

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the importance of enhancing quality of life (QOL) and activity of daily living (ADL) in elderly people, and to examine methods of exercise intervention for QOL and ADL outcomes in elderly people who use nursing care insurance services. Chapter 2 clarifies the relationship between QOL, ADL, and changes in the level of independence in elderly residents. Higher QOL outcomes (sense of well-being, satisfaction with social support, independence, and beh...

  4. Athletic identity and self-esteem among active and retired Paralympic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Urquiza, Adriana; Ferreira, José Pedro; Van Biesen, Debbie

    2018-04-17

    Athletic identity (AI) has been suggested as a variable that can have an impact on the psychological health of the athletes upon retirement. The aim of this study was to provide more insight on the transition out of elite sport by assessing and comparing the extent of AI and self-esteem in an active group (AG) and a retired group (RG) of Paralympic athletes. Perceived stress and depressive symptoms were additionally assessed in the AG and RG, respectively. A non-probability sampling method was used to recruit active and retired Paralympic athletes (AG, n = 43; RG, n = 41, where 35 retired voluntarily and 6 retired involuntarily) with visual or physical impairments, from Dutch-, English-, Portuguese- and Spanish-speaking countries. Participants completed an electronic survey with questionnaires to assess the study variables mentioned above. Descriptive analysis, comparisons (Mann-Whitney U test and t-test) and Spearman's correlation coefficient were performed for the statistical analysis. Scores of AI were significantly lower in the RG (44.6 ± 9.6) compared to the AG (49.4 ± 8.9); t(82) = 2.36, p = .021, d = 0.51. No differences in self-esteem were found between RG and AG; however, within the RG, athletes who involuntarily retired (21 ± 7.1) had significantly lower self-esteem scores than those who retired voluntarily (25.2 ± 4.2); t(39) = 2.04, p = .049, d = 0.73. In conclusion, free choice upon retirement can positively influence the athletes' self-esteem, whereas a strong AI may negatively influence the retirement process, as it was positively correlated with depressive symptoms (ρ = .409, p = .008). These findings can have practical implications for sport psychologists to better support their athletes.

  5. Organizational and Occupational Identification: Relations to Teacher Satisfaction and Intention to Early Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Murat; Hamarat, Bahattin; Colak, Ertugrul; Duran, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the effects of two work related identification (occupational and organizational) of school teachers on intention to early retirement (withdrawal) and satisfaction with the occupation and satisfaction with the school. It also seeks the influence of perceived external prestige on withdrawal and satisfaction.…

  6. Using Proactivity, Time Discounting, and the Theory of Planned Behavior to Identify Predictors of Retirement Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Barbara; Loe, David; Hesketh, Beryl

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and tested a model to identify the predictors of retirement planning based on an extension of the theory of planned behavior ([TPB], Ajzen, 1991) that included individual differences in proactivity and time discounting. The results showed that personal attitudes, sense of control, social influence, and stable traits have a…

  7. Leaving Quietly? A Quantitative Study of Retirement Rituals and How They Affect Life Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaard, L.

    2017-01-01

    This study quantitatively explores the understudied topic of retirement rituals, what factors influence them, and how the experience of such rites of passage may affect postretirement satisfaction with life (SWL). Various regression techniques are applied to 2 waves of Dutch panel data gathered

  8. A flexible benefits tax credit for health insurance and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheredge, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    This essay outlines a concept for a "flexible benefits" tax credit for expanding health insurance coverage and other purposes such as retirement savings plans (with potential withdrawals for higher education, first-home ownership, and catastrophic medical expenses). Two examples are presented. The advantages of a flexible benefits tax credit are considered in terms of efficient use of the budget surplus to help meet the varied (and changing) needs of American families, to eliminate major national gaps in health insurance and pension coverage, and to advance other objectives. If the budget surplus is used wisely, political decisionmakers could achieve health insurance coverage for most uninsured workers and children and assure a future with real economic security for American families.

  9. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Contributions – Changes for 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2012, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.41%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity increase accordingly : Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1094 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (547 CHF) is applied to apprentices as well as to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 438 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and tempo...

  10. Family Health Histories and Their Impact on Retirement Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Cathleen D; Mayer, Robert N; Smith, Ken R

    2015-08-01

    Retirement confidence is a key social barometer. In this article, we examine how personal and parental health histories relate to working-age adults' feelings of optimism or pessimism about their overall retirement prospects. This study links survey data on retirement planning with information on respondents' own health histories and those of their parents. The multivariate models control for the respondents' socio-demographic and economic characteristics along with past retirement planning activities when estimating the relationships between family health histories and retirement confidence. Retirement confidence is inversely related to parental history of cancer and cardiovascular disease but not to personal health history. In contrast, retirement confidence is positively associated with both parents being deceased. As members of the public become increasingly aware of how genetics and other family factors affect intergenerational transmission of chronic diseases, it is likely that the link between family health histories and retirement confidence will intensify. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The Importance of Resilience for Well-Being in Retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pimentel Nalin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the elderly population has prompted research on retirement. This study investigated the importance of resilience, economic satisfaction, the length of retirement, and planning to well-being during retirement of 270 participants. The majority of this sample were men (64%, and the mean age was 65 years (SD = 5.7. The participants were retired members of 10 public and private organizations in Rio de Janeiro. Factor analysis and hierarchical regression were performed. The results showed that determined resilience (mastery, adaptability, confidence and perseverance and socioeconomic satisfaction were the main predictors of well-being in retirement and explained 28% of this model. The findings suggest that well-being in retirement is closely related to socioeconomic satisfaction and determined resilience. Additional research should address the importance of resilience for the well-being of retirees who are or not members of retirement associations. Resilience attitudes should be promoted in Retirement Education Programs.

  12. Retirement plan participation and features and standard of living of Americans 55 or older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Craig

    2002-08-01

    ,196. Nearly 80 percent of those age 55 or older reported that their standard of living is about the same or better now than it was when they were in their early 50s. The incidence of both pension income and health insurance from a former employer had a significant impact on retirees' ability to maintain their standard of living. In addition, those who spent their entire most recent lump-sum distribution were more likely to have a much worse standard of living in retirement than those who rolled over their entire most recent distribution.

  13. THE MODEL OF INTERACTION BETWEEN INSURANCE INTERMEDIARIES AND INSURANCE COMPANIES IN THE ASSURANCE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INSURANCE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Kudriavska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is the investigation of the model of interaction between insurance intermediaries and insurance companies in the assurance of sustainable development of the insurance market. The methodology is based on the new studies and books. It is underlined the importance of potency and effectiveness of this model, its influence on the insurance market stability. It is analysed the European experience and specific of Ukrainian insurance market. The main ways for improving its model and ways of its practical realization are characterized. Results. The problems that exist in the broker market in general are connected with an ineffective state policy. In particular, we can say about the absence of many laws, acts, resolutions, which explain what a broker have to do in case of different problems with insurance companies, another brokers and clients. At the same time, the problem of distrust to national brokers exists. It provokes a decline of the demand for their services and so on. However, it is possible to solve these problems. Practical implications. For this, it is necessary to do some acts. The first one is to implement resolutions that regulate relationships between insurance brokers and insurance companies, clearly regulate the model of its interaction. This model affects the stability of the insurance market in general. The second is to find methods of solving problems of the increase in insurance culture of the population (for example, by the way of advertisement. The third one is to solve problems connected with the appearance of foreign brokers in the insurance market of Ukraine. Actually, the Ukrainian market of insurance brokers is not developed enough. That is why it needs big changes and reforms. Value/originality. Among alternatives of the strategic development of insurance, the method of quick liberalization and gradual development is distinguished. According to the liberal way, it is possible to transfer to the

  14. Gates to retirement and gender differences: Macroeconomic conditions, job satisfaction, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrad, Hila; Mcnamara, Tay K

    2017-08-04

    The different pathways out of the labor force have been the focus of many recent studies, yet not enough scholarly attention has been paid to the effect of country-level, individual, and job characteristics and their potentially different influence across genders. The current article examines the relationships between retirement decisions and macroeconomic conditions, personal characteristics, and job satisfaction, while focusing on gender differences. Data came from 16,337 respondents in 13 European countries that participated in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We find that the relative importance of macroeconomic conditions and job satisfaction differs by gender.

  15. Financial Planning for Retirement: A Psychosocial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Lunceford, Gregg; Boyatzis, Richard E.

    2018-01-01

    Retirement is a time of life that has grown ever longer in the developed world, and the number of pensioners has increased accordingly, questioning the strength of Social Security systems and the social safety net in general. Financial Planning for Retirement (FRP) consists of the series of activities involved in the accumulation of wealth to cover needs in the post-retirement stage of life. The negative short-, mid-, and long-term consequences of inadequate Financial Planning for Retirement do not only affect individuals, but also their extended families, homes, eventually producing an unwanted impact on the entire society. The Capacity-Willingness-Opportunity Model has been proposed to understand FPR, combined with Intentional Change Theory, a framework for understanding the process, antecedents and consequences of FPR. From this perspective, we propose this promising model, but there are a large number of variables that have not been included that offer novel ways to deepen our understanding of FPR. A focus on each dimension of the model, the role of age and psychosocial variables associated with demographic indicators such as gender, health status, and migration, allow us to provide a proposal of scientific advancement of FPR. PMID:29416519

  16. Retirees' Social Identity and Satisfaction with Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinov, Estelle; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the structure of retirees' social identity and its impact on satisfaction with retirement. From social identity theory formulations, we assumed that (1) retiree-identity was comprised of three distinct components (cognitive, evaluative, and affective), and (2) only the affective component would play a role…

  17. Basic Features of Effective Retirement Planning. | Akinade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It states that as one moves near retirement, one should calculate his or her net worth, invest in human capital, slow down strenuous activities and start a familiar business and learn to manage it. It suggests some sources of money to start some income generating ventures .It encourages employees to plan to build functional ...

  18. Financial Planning for Retirement: A Psychosocial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Topa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Retirement is a time of life that has grown ever longer in the developed world, and the number of pensioners has increased accordingly, questioning the strength of Social Security systems and the social safety net in general. Financial Planning for Retirement (FRP consists of the series of activities involved in the accumulation of wealth to cover needs in the post-retirement stage of life. The negative short-, mid-, and long-term consequences of inadequate Financial Planning for Retirement do not only affect individuals, but also their extended families, homes, eventually producing an unwanted impact on the entire society. The Capacity-Willingness-Opportunity Model has been proposed to understand FPR, combined with Intentional Change Theory, a framework for understanding the process, antecedents and consequences of FPR. From this perspective, we propose this promising model, but there are a large number of variables that have not been included that offer novel ways to deepen our understanding of FPR. A focus on each dimension of the model, the role of age and psychosocial variables associated with demographic indicators such as gender, health status, and migration, allow us to provide a proposal of scientific advancement of FPR.

  19. Training access, reciprocity, and expected retirement age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montizaan, R.M.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether employers can induce employees to postpone retirement by offering access to training courses that maintain job proficiency. We use unique, matched employer-employee surveys for the Dutch public sector, which include detailed information on a wide range of HR practices

  20. Financial Planning for Retirement: A Psychosocial Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Lunceford, Gregg; Boyatzis, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    Retirement is a time of life that has grown ever longer in the developed world, and the number of pensioners has increased accordingly, questioning the strength of Social Security systems and the social safety net in general. Financial Planning for Retirement (FRP) consists of the series of activities involved in the accumulation of wealth to cover needs in the post-retirement stage of life. The negative short-, mid-, and long-term consequences of inadequate Financial Planning for Retirement do not only affect individuals, but also their extended families, homes, eventually producing an unwanted impact on the entire society. The Capacity-Willingness-Opportunity Model has been proposed to understand FPR, combined with Intentional Change Theory, a framework for understanding the process, antecedents and consequences of FPR. From this perspective, we propose this promising model, but there are a large number of variables that have not been included that offer novel ways to deepen our understanding of FPR. A focus on each dimension of the model, the role of age and psychosocial variables associated with demographic indicators such as gender, health status, and migration, allow us to provide a proposal of scientific advancement of FPR.

  1. 75 FR 81456 - Hybrid Retirement Plans; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... accumulated benefit under the plan is expressed in terms of only one safe-harbor formula measure and no... expressed in terms of any measure other than that same safe- harbor formula measure. Thus, for example, if a... expressed under the terms of the plan as a life annuity payable at normal retirement age (or current age, if...

  2. Activities in Retirement: Individual Experience of Silver Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Maxin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of demographic change is a longer average remaining lifetime after retirement. Many people, however, remain able and willing to continue work after reaching the statutory retirement age. Given the predicted shortage of skilled workers in the future, post-retirement activities have the potential to contribute to both organisations and society. This article elaborates the prerequisites for productivity in retirement age and the changed nature of retirement at present.It also quantifies the extent to which activities are continued at retirement age. Paid employment still occurs beyond the applicable retirement age, whereby with increasing age, self-employed persons and assistant family members make up the lion’s share of the statistics. An empirical study shows the concrete situation of active retirees and the prerequisites for post-retirement activities. At the explorative level, individual experiences of the transition into retirement, the reasons for and the framework of post-retirement activities, motivational factors in job design, and physical and intellectual demands before and after retirement are characterised. The qualitative data indicate that retirement entails changes towards more flexible structures in everyday life. Decisive reasons for taking up post-retirement activities are the desire to help, pass on knowledge or remain active; personal development and contact with others; and gaining appreciation and recognition. Flexible job design and freedom to make decisions constitute major elements in shaping post-retirement working activities. Offering autonomy, skill variety, and task significance is important for the design of post-retirement activities. The paper closes with identifying relevant research fields and the concrete need to take action at individual,  organisational, and societal levels. All in all, the transition from working life to retirement should be made flexible enough to do greater justice to the

  3. Liquidity in Retirement Savings Systems: An International Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Beshears, John Leonard; Choi, James J.; Hurwitz, Joshua Bayard; Laibson, David I.; Madrian, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    What is the socially optimal level of liquidity in a retirement savings system? Liquid retirement savings are desirable because liquidity enables agents to flexibly respond to pre-retirement events that raise the marginal utility of consumption. On the other hand, pre-retirement liquidity is undesirable when it leads to under-saving arising from, for example, planning mistakes or self-control problems. This paper compares the liquidity that six developed economies have built into their employ...

  4. What Triggers Early Retirement. Results from Swiss Pension Funds

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Bütler; Olivia Huguenin; Federica Teppa

    2004-01-01

    Early retirement is predominantly considered as the result of incentives set by social security and the tax system. But people seem to retire early even in the absence of such distortions as the Swiss example demonstrates. We look for determinants of early retirement, in particular the role of lifetime income and family status, using individual data from a selection of Swiss pension funds. Our findings suggest that affordability is a key determinant in retirement decisions: More affluent men,...

  5. Why older workers work beyond the retirement age: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewdas, Ranu; de Wind, Astrid; van der Zwaan, Lennart G L; van der Borg, Wieke E; Steenbeek, Romy; van der Beek, Allard J; Boot, Cécile R L

    2017-08-22

    The aims of the present study were to: 1) gain insight into reasons for working beyond the statutory retirement age from older workers' perspectives, and 2) explore how the domains of the research framework Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM) can be applied to working beyond retirement age. A qualitative research design included individual interviews (n = 15) and three focus groups (n = 18 participants) conducted with older workers aged 65 years and older continuing in a paid job or self-employment. Interview participants were recruited from an existing STREAM cohort study. Focus group participants were recruited from companies and employment agencies. The data were subjected to thematic analysis. The most important motives for working beyond retirement age were maintaining daily routines and financial benefit. Good health and flexible work arrangements were mentioned as important preconditions. The themes emerging from the categorization of the motives and preconditions corresponded to the domains of health, work characteristics, skills and knowledge, and social and financial factors from the STREAM research framework. However, our analysis revealed one additional theme-purpose in life. This study offers important new insights into the various preconditions and motives that influence working beyond retirement age. In addition, the five domains of the STREAM research framework, including the additional domain of 'purpose in life', seem to be applicable to working beyond retirement age. This knowledge contributes to the development of work-related interventions that enhance older workers' motivation to prolong their working lives.

  6. Associations between BMI Change and Cardiometabolic Risk in Retired Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Defreese, J D; Marshall, Stephen W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2018-04-01

    Elevated rates of cardiometabolic diseases have been observed in former American football players. The current study sought to determine whether change in body mass index (ΔBMI) after retirement influences the prevalence of CHD, diabetes, or high blood pressure (HBP) in former professional football players. Retired professional football players (n = 3729) were sent a survey with questions regarding health status, playing history, and demographic information. Self-reported BMI at the time of retirement was subtracted from current self-reported BMI to calculate ΔBMI. Prevalence of CHD, diabetes, and HBP were determined by asking participants if they had ever been diagnosed by a health care professional. Binomial regression with a Poisson residual and robust variance estimation was used to compute crude prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each outcome. Adjusted PR values were calculated by adjusting for BMI at the time of retirement, age, years of football experience, race, exercise habits, alcohol use, steroid history, smoking history, and playing position. Complete data were available for 2062 respondents. Prevalence of CHD increased 25%-31% for each five-point increase in ΔBMI after retirement (crude PR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.03-1.52, P = 0.026; adjusted PR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.11-1.55, P = 0.001). Diabetes prevalence increased 69%-88% for each five-point ΔBMI increase (crude = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.45-2.44, P football players.

  7. THE IMPACT OF COOPERATION BETWEEN INSURERS AND BANKS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INSURANCE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Prikazyuk

    2017-11-01

    marketing research. Value/originality. Despite the numerous works on this subject, such an issue like the impact of insurers and banks cooperation on the insurance system development remain insufficiently studied. The article highlights the impact of the banking system on insurance as from the perspective of their interaction and the factors of direct and indirect influence of banking activities on the insurance system.

  8. Effects of three types of retirement preparation program : A qualitative study of civil servants in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leandro-Franca, Cristineide; Van Solinge, Hanna; Henkens, Kene; Murta, Sheila Giardini

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of retirement planning programs are relatively scarce. Retirement preparation and planning programs may assist individuals to smooth the transition to retirement and subsequent adjustment. This qualitative study examines the effects of three retirement preparation

  9. Socioeconomic, psychological and demographic determinants of Australian baby boomers' financial planning for retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, Jack; O'Loughlin, Kate; Kendig, Hal

    2012-09-01

    Research from around the Western World has shown that psychological, socioeconomic and demographic factors can influence levels of financial planning. This study aims to determine how these factors interrelate to predict planning outcomes. Data from the Ageing Baby Boomers in Australia Study were used to examine the effects of multiple factors on financial planning for 709 employed Australians nearing retirement. The results showed that higher income, future time perspective (FTP) and financial knowledge independently predicted levels of retirement planning. The effects of FTP and financial knowledge on financial planning were consistent across levels of socioeconomic status. While similar issues in financial planning appeared across socioeconomic status, a 'one size fits all' approach to retirement policy may not be effective. Instead, policy should be targeted towards the diverse needs of different groups. Raising public awareness of FTP and financial knowledge may provide a useful starting point. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2012 ACOTA.

  10. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Monthly Contributions – Changes for 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2015, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.86%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including the CERN pension) increase accordingly : 1. Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1208 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (604 CHF) is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 483 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insur...

  11. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2004-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 8 November 2004, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2005 until 31 March 2006; of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure with effect from 1 January 2005 until 31 December 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  12. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 25 January 2006, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2006 until 31 March 2007; of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2006, i.e. until 31 December 2006. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  13. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Upon the proposal of the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 25 November 2002, the Director-General has approved the extension for one year of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2003, and of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for requested effective dates commencing not later than 1 January 2004. Human Resources Division Tel. 72808/74128

  14. 76 FR 41993 - Customs and Border Protection Officer Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... mandatory retirement age); (2) early optional retirement eligibility; (3) enhanced annuity provisions (to... barred from reemployment in any position except a primary position after age 60. Service by a reemployed... Act provides early retirement and enhanced annuity benefits for customs and border protection officers...

  15. Retirement Education and Adulthood | David | Global Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that gender does not constitute a barrier in the adult lives in retirement. The study concluded that retirement education is a panacea for positive crisis-free retirement life. It was recommended that counselors should emphasize the need for retirees to understand the factors capable of causing stress and broken homes.

  16. 26 CFR 1.408-3 - Individual retirement annuities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual retirement annuities. 1.408-3 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-3 Individual retirement annuities. (a) In general. An individual retirement annuity is an annuity contract or endowment contract...

  17. Retirement planning by Dutch farmers: rationality or randomness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Veen, van der H.B.; Meulen, van der H.A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose

    – In self‐directed retirement plans, farmers are responsible for selecting the types of risky investments toward which the funds in their retirement plan are allocated. Furthermore, farmers do not necessarily purchase sufficient annuities with their savings upon retirement. There is

  18. The Information Seeking and Use Behaviors of Retired Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the information seeking and use behaviors of a group of US retired or near-retirement investors from everyday life information seeking and serious leisure perspectives. Although primarily qualitative, it also collects and analyzes quantitative data to describe retired investors' information preferences and use.…

  19. Information Sources and Retirement Savings of Working Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsua, Chungwen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how retirement planning information search was related to retirement savings of working women. By controlling for sociodemographic variables, the study further explored factors associated with individual information sources for retirement planning. An online survey was developed to collect data from a national population,…

  20. Beyond Health and Wealth: Predictors of Women's Retirement Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christine A.; Balaswamy, Shantha

    2009-01-01

    Despite empirical support for the positive effects of health and wealth on retirement satisfaction, alternative variables also play a key role in helping to shape women's assessment of retirement. In the present study, we explore personal and psychosocial predictors of women's retirement satisfaction while controlling for financial security and…

  1. 7 CFR 1773.41 - Extraordinary retirement losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extraordinary retirement losses. 1773.41 Section 1773... Documentation § 1773.41 Extraordinary retirement losses. The CPA's workpapers must contain an analysis of retirement losses, including any required approval by a regulatory commission with jurisdiction in the matter...

  2. Retirement Financial Planning and the RN: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2015-10-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  3. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation to...

  4. Mitigating the Inequity of the Military Retirement System by Changing the Rules Governing Individual Retirement Accounts for Service Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, David

    1997-01-01

    .... It demonstrates that the inequity of the military retirement system is compounded by the fact that although the system does not comply with the minimum standards required of private-sector retirement...

  5. Does postponing minimum retirement age improve healthy behaviours before retirement? Evidence from middle-aged Italian workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoni, Marco; Brunello, Giorgio; Mazzarella, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    By increasing the residual working horizon of employed individuals, pension reforms that raise minimum retirement age are likely to affect the returns to investments in healthpromoting behaviours before retirement, with consequences for individual health. Using the exogenous variation in minimum

  6. A Longitudinal Study of Work After Retirement: Examining Predictors of Bridge Employment, Continued Career Employment, and Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Misty M; Beehr, Terry A; Lepisto, Lawrence R

    2016-09-01

    Older employees are increasingly accepting bridge employment, which occurs when older workers take employment for pay after they retire from their main career. This study examined predictors of workers' decisions to engage in bridge employment versus full retirement and career employment. A national sample of 482 older people in the United States was surveyed regarding various work-related and nonwork related predictors of retirement decisions, and their retirement status was measured 5 years later. In bivariate analyses, both work-related variables (career goal achievement and experienced pressure to retire) and nonwork-related variables (psychological distress and traditional gender role orientation) predicted taking bridge employment, but in multinomial logistic regression, only nonwork variables had unique effects. Few predictors differentiated the bridge employed and fully retired groups. Nonwork variables were salient in making the decision to retire, and bridge employment may be conceptually more similar to full retirement than to career employment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, E.M.M.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Flynn, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination

  8. Reluctance to Retire: A Qualitative Study on Work Identity, Intergenerational Conflict, and Retirement in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Michelle Pannor; Williams, Sarah A

    2018-03-19

    Some professions foster expectations that individuals cultivate their work identity above all other aspects of life. This can be problematic when individuals are confronted with the expectation that they will readily terminate this identity in later-career stages as institutions seek to cycle in new generations. This study examines the relationship between work identity and retirement by examining multiple generations of academic physicians. This study used a multimethod qualitative design that included document analysis, participant observation, focus groups, and in-depth interviews with academic physicians from one of the oldest departments of medicine in North America. This study illustrates how participants were predisposed and then groomed through institutional efforts to embrace a career trajectory that emphasized work above all else and fostered negative sensibilities about retirement. Participants across multiple generations described a lack of work-life balance and a prioritization of their careers above nonwork commitments. Assertions that less experienced physicians were not as dedicated to medicine and implicit assumptions that later-career physicians should retire emerged as key concerns. Strong work identity and tensions between different generations may confound concerns about retirement in ways that complicate institutional succession planning and that demonstrate how traditional understandings of retirement are out of date. Findings support the need to creatively reconsider the ways we examine relations between work identity, age, and retirement in ways that account for the recent extensions in the working lives of professionals.

  9. Work or retirement: Exploration of the experiences of Iranian retired nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Khoshknab, Masood Fallahi

    2015-01-01

    According to recent studies, the level of international interest in bridge employment, as return to work after retirement, has been growing. This study aimed to explore the experiences of retired nurses in Iran with regard to making a decision about whether or not to seek bridge employment. A qualitative study using a content analysis approach was conducted in an urban area of Iran. Semi-structured interviews were held with 20 Iranian male and female retired nurses chosen using purposive sampling. During the data analysis, two main themes were identified as the participants' thoughts supporting the decision of seeking bridge employment. The first theme was entitled motivational factors with categories of ``serving the society,'' ``maintaining and promoting health,'' ``tendency toward flexible work,'' and ``maintaining the role and activity.'' The second theme was entitled forcing factors with categories of ``ardent desire to work (pluralistic ignorance)'' and ``financial need.' ' While some Iranian retired nurses were not motivated to seek work for health reasons, most preferred to return to work after retirement. They were motivated to seek bridge employment out of a desire to serve the society, to promote their own physical and mental health, to continue to use their expertise and maintain the worker role, and because of financial needs and perceived societal expectations. Nurses seeking employment later in life tended to look for job flexibility and less stressful work. Therefore, the management of bridge employment by healthcare system authorities can be useful in making use of the invaluable experiences of retired nurses.

  10. Nuclear insurance fire risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, E.G.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear facilities operate under the constant risk that radioactive materials could be accidentally released off-site and cause injuries to people or damages to the property of others. Management of this nuclear risk, therefore, is very important to nuclear operators, financial stakeholders and the general public. Operators of these facilities normally retain a portion of this risk and transfer the remainder to others through an insurance mechanism. Since the nuclear loss exposure could be very high, insurers usually assess their risk first-hand by sending insurance engineers to conduct a nuclear insurance inspection. Because a serious fire can greatly increase the probability of an off-site release of radiation, fire safety should be included in the nuclear insurance inspection. This paper reviews essential elements of a facility's fire safety program as a key factor in underwriting nuclear third-party liability insurance. (author)

  11. Nonlife Insurance Pricing:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooneh, Amir H.

    We consider the insurance company as a physical system which is immersed in its environment (the financial market). The insurer company interacts with the market by exchanging the money through the payments for loss claims and receiving the premium. Here, in the equilibrium state, we obtain the premium by using the canonical ensemble theory, and compare it with the Esscher principle, the well-known formula in actuary for premium calculation. We simulate the case of car insurance for quantitative comparison.

  12. Catastrophic risks and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprimoz, J.

    1988-01-01

    This short communication deals with compensation for nuclear damage and compensation for environmental pollution through industrial activities and compress both systems and their insurance coverage [fr

  13. Prescriptions and Insurance Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Healthcare Management, Insurance & Bills, Your Health ResourcesTags: brand name, co-pay, drug, formulary, generic, isurance, medicine, ...

  14. Uninsured vs. insured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Z. J.; Lin, Chyongchiou J; Chang, Chung-Chou H

    2003-01-01

    analyzed. Approximately 74 percent of uninsured Americans are nonelderly Americans. Among the nonelderly Americans, about 17 percent are uninsured. Our findings show that insurance status varies significantly by region, age, race, gender, marital status, income, education, employment status, and health......This study identified the underlying demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with insurance status among nonelderly Americans (age 19-64), as well as compared health care utilization between insured and uninsured. Data from the Community Tracking Study 1996-1997 Household Survey were...... status. Also, the insured nonelderly Americans were found to have better access to health care than the uninsured nonelderly....

  15. Retirement and mental health: does social participation mitigate the association? A fixed-effects longitudinal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Shiba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical evidence investigating heterogeneous impact of retirement on mental health depending on social backgrounds is lacking, especially among older adults. Methods We examined the impact of changes in working status on changes in mental health using Japanese community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years participating in the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study between 2010 and 2013 (N = 62,438. Between-waves changes in working status (“Kept working”, “Retired”, “Started work”, or “Continuously retired” were used to predict changes in depressive symptoms measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale. First-difference regression models were stratified by gender, controlling for changes in time-varying confounding actors including equivalised household income, marital status, instrumental activities of daily living, incidence of serious illnesses and family caregiving. We then examined the interactions between changes in working status and occupational class, changes in marital status, and post-retirement social participation. Results Participants who transitioned to retirement reported significantly increased depressive symptoms (β = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.21–0.45 for men, and β = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.13–0.45 for women compared to those who kept working. Men who were continuously retired reported increased depressive symptoms (β = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.05–0.20, whereas males who started work reported decreased depressive symptoms (β = −0.20, 95% CI: -0.38–-0.02. Men from lower occupational class (compared to men from higher class reported more increase in depressive symptoms when continuously retired (β = −0.16, 95% CI: -0.25–-0.08. Those reporting recreational social participation after retirement appeared to be less influenced by transition to retirement. Conclusions Retirement may increase depressive symptoms among Japanese older adults, particularly men from lower occupational class backgrounds

  16. The insurance of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is given of the development of nuclear insurance. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: the need for nuclear insurance, nuclear insurance pools, international co-operation, nuclear installations which may be insured, international conventions relating to the liability of operators of nuclear installations, classes of nuclear insurance, nuclear reactor hazards and their assessment, future developments. (U.K.)

  17. Does Raising the Early Retirement Age Increase Employment of Older Workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubli, Stefan; Zweimüller, Josef

    2013-12-01

    Two pension reforms in Austria increased the early retirement age (ERA) from 60 to 62 for men and from 55 to 58.25 for women. We find that raising the ERA increased employment by 9.75 percentage points among affected men and by 11 percentage points among affected women. The reforms had large spillover effects on the unemployment insurance program but negligible effects on disability insurance claims. Specifically, unemployment increased by 12.5 percentage points among men and by 11.8 percentage points among women. The employment response was largest among high-wage and healthy workers, while low-wage and less healthy workers either continued to retire early via disability benefits or bridged the gap to the ERA via unemployment benefits. Taking spillover effects and additional tax revenues into account, we find that for a typical birth-year cohort a one year increase in the ERA resulted in a reduction of net government expenditures of 107 million euros for men and of 122 million euros for women.

  18. Health insurance and health services utilization in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, C; Nolan, B

    2001-03-01

    The numbers buying private health insurance in Ireland have continued to grow, despite a broadening in entitlement to public care. About 40% of the population now have insurance, although everyone has entitlement to public hospital care. In this paper, we examine in detail the growth in insurance coverage and the factors underlying the demand for insurance. Attitudinal responses reveal the importance of perceptions about waiting times for public care, as well as some concerns about the quality of that care. Individual characteristics, such as education, age, gender, marital status, family composition and income all influence the probability of purchasing private insurance. We also examine the relationship between insurance and utilization of hospital in-patient services. The positive effect of private insurance appears less than that of entitlement to full free health care from the state, although the latter is means-tested, and may partly represent health status. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Earthquake insurance pricing: a risk-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeng-Hsiang

    2018-04-01

    Flat earthquake premiums are 'uniformly' set for a variety of buildings in many countries, neglecting the fact that the risk of damage to buildings by earthquakes is based on a wide range of factors. How these factors influence the insurance premiums is worth being studied further. Proposed herein is a risk-based approach to estimate the earthquake insurance rates of buildings. Examples of application of the approach to buildings located in Taipei city of Taiwan were examined. Then, the earthquake insurance rates for the buildings investigated were calculated and tabulated. To fulfil insurance rating, the buildings were classified into 15 model building types according to their construction materials and building height. Seismic design levels were also considered in insurance rating in response to the effect of seismic zone and construction years of buildings. This paper may be of interest to insurers, actuaries, and private and public sectors of insurance. © 2018 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2018.

  20. The Effect of Dental Insurance on the Use of Dental Care For Older Adults: A Partial Identification Analysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Brent; Moeller, John; Manski, Richard J.; Pepper, John

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of dental insurance on the use of dental services using a potential outcomes identification framework designed to handle uncertainty created by unknown counterfactuals – that is, the endogenous selection problem – as well as uncertainty about the reliability of self-reported insurance status. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we estimate that utilization rates of adults older than 50 would increase from 75% to around 80% under universal dental coverage. PMID:24890257

  1. Trump and the GOP agenda: implications for retirement policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madland, David; Rowell, Alex

    2018-04-11

    Policymakers need to act to protect Americans' retirement security. A significant portion of Americans are at risk of not being able to maintain their standard of living in retirement and research suggests that this percentage is likely to grow. This commentary provides background on the current state of American retirement, highlights recent efforts to reform retirement policy, and predicts what to expect under President Donald Trump. Retirement has not been a major focus of national policymakers in recent years. Early actions during the Trump administration to undo Obama administration policies may make it more difficult for individuals to save for retirement. While it is impossible to predict the future with any certainty, long standing trends and recent political developments suggest that major action will not be taken during the Trump presidency to boost retirement security.

  2. Retirement intentions of dentists in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Sue

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian dental workforce is ageing and current shortages have been predicted to worsen with the retirement of the growing contingent of older dentists. However, these predictions have been based on retirement trends of previous generations and little is known about the retirement intentions of today's older dentists. Methods The Dentist Retirement Intentions Survey was mailed to 768 NSW Australian Dental Association members aged over 50 and achieved a response rate of 20%. T-tests, ANOVAs and multivariate regression were used to analyse the data. Results On average, participants intend to retire at the age of 66, although they would prefer to do so earlier (p Conclusions The current generation of older dentists intends to retire later than their predecessors. Most wish to remain involved in dentistry in some capacity following retirement, and may assist in overcoming workforce shortages, either by practising part time or training dental students.

  3. Insuring against Health Shocks: Health Insurance and Household Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence on the role of public health insurance in mitigating adverse outcomes associated with health shocks. Exploiting the rollout of a universal health insurance program in rural China, I find that total household income and consumption are fully insured against health shocks even without access to health insurance. Household labor supply is an important insurance mechanism against health shocks. Access to health insurance helps households to maintain investme...

  4. Reform Proposals for Replenishing Retirement Savings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack M. Mintz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2008-2009 economic crisis dealt a serious blow to Canadians’ retirement savings. While markets have since partially recovered, the ratio of Canadians’ household net-worth relative to disposable income still remains below where it was in 2007. So much wealth that workers had accumulated to prepare for retirement has been wiped away, while the years since 2008 that might have otherwise been spent compounding retirement savings have been spent, instead, on trying to recover losses in a low-interest-rate environment that has limited returns. With large waves of older workers approaching retirement age, and these future retirees projected to live longer than previous cohorts, Canada now faces the very realistic scenario that a significant number of people will reach retirement age without the funds they will need to provide a comfortable post-working-life income. Canadian policy-makers may not have the ability to restore that destroyed wealth. And with most governments already struggling to resolve serious deficits, the situation is not likely to be ameliorated with anything that requires additional spending, or that could reduce tax revenues. But there are policy reforms available that can help at least in better preparing the coming waves of retirees for a financially secure retirement. The reforms need not be far-reaching to have a meaningful impact. And they need not be costly, either. They can include a modest expansion of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP to allow larger contributions — shared by employers and employees, or covered entirely by employees — that would, in turn, allow retiring workers to draw a larger maximum pension, rather than having to rely on the guaranteed income supplement (GIS. CPP contributions could also be made deductible from taxable income, like RRSP investments, to encourage workers to maximize contributions. To minimize an increase in payroll taxes, the eligibility age for CPP benefits could be increased to

  5. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    It was the risk of contamination of ships from the Pacific atmospheric atomic bomb tests in the 1940's that seems first to have set insurers thinking that a limited amount of cover would be a practical possibility if not a commercially-attractive proposition. One Chapter of this book traces the early, hesitant steps towards the evolution of ''nuclear insurance'', as it is usually called; a term of convenience rather than exactitude because it seems to suggest an entirely new branch of insurance with a status of its own like that of Marine, Life or Motor insurance. Insurance in the field of nuclear energy is more correctly regarded as the application of the usual, well-established forms of cover to unusual kinds of industrial plant, materials and liabilities, characterised by the peculiar dangers of radioactivity which have no parallel among the common hazards of industry and commerce. It had, and still has, the feature that individual insurance underwriters are none too keen to look upon nuclear risks as a potential source of good business and profit. Only by joining together in Syndicates or Pools have the members of the national insurance markets been able to make proper provision for nuclear risks; only by close international collaboration among the national Pools have the insurers of the world been able to assemble adequate capacity - though still, even after thirty years, not sufficient to provide complete coverage for a large nuclear installation. (author)

  6. Social health insurance

    CERN Document Server

    International Labour Office. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    This manual provides an overview of social health insurance schemes and looks at the development of health care policies and feasibility issues. It also examines the design of health insurance schemes, health care benefits, financing and costs and considers the operational and strategic information requirements.

  7. Insurance industry guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This is an insurance industry guide for the independent power industry. The directory includes the insurance company's name, address, telephone and FAX numbers and a description of the company's area of expertise, products and services, and limitations. The directory is international in scope. Some of the companies specialize in independent power projects

  8. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    be made. However, others have argued that past modifications intended to save money have had a deleterious effect on military recruiting and...Savings Plan (TSP) coupled with government matching and early vesting. It will also reduce the defined benefit multiplier for calculating the retirement...In addition, some have argued that past modifications to the system intended to save money have had a deleterious effect on military recruiting and

  9. Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Johan Almenberg; Jenny Säve-Söderbergh

    2011-01-01

    We examine the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning in a representative sample of Swedish adults. We find significant differences in financial literacy between planners and non-planners. Financial literacy levels are also lower among older people, women and those with low education or earnings. When we control for demographic variables we do not find an association between a narrow measure of financial literacy and planning, but with a broader measure the associatio...

  10. Failure analysis of retired steam generator tubings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, J. S.; Hwang, S. S. and others

    2005-04-15

    Degradation of steam generator leads to forced outage and extension of outage, which causes increase in repair cost, cost of purchasing replacement power and radiation exposure of workers. Steam generator tube rupture incident occurred in Uljin 4 in 2002, which made public sensitive to nuclear power plant. To keep nuclear energy as a main energy source, integrity of steam generator should be demonstrated. Quantitative relationship between ECT(eddy current test) signal and crack size is needed in assesment of integrity of steam generator in pressurized water reactor. However, it is not fully established for application in industry. Retired steam generator of Kori 1 has many kinds of crack such as circumferential and axial primary water stress corrosion crack and outer diameter stress corrosion crack(ODSCC). So, it can be used in qualifying and improving ECT technology and in condition monitoring assesment for crack detected in ISI(in service inspection). In addition, examination of pulled tube of Kori 1 retired steam generator will give information about effectiveness of non welded sleeving technology which was employed to repair defect tubes and remedial action which was applied to mitigate ODSCC. In this project, hardware such as semi hot lab. for pulled tube examination and modification transportation cask for pulled tube and software such as procedure of transportation of radioactive steam generator tube and non-destructive and destructive examination of pulled tube were established. Non-destructive and destructive examination of pulled tubes from Kori 1 retired steam generator were performed in semi hot lab. Remedial actions applied to Kori 1 retired steam generator, PWSCC trend and bulk water chemistry and crevice chemistry in Kori 1 were evaluated. Electrochemical decontamination technology for pulled tube was developed to reduce radiation exposure and enhance effectiveness of pulled tube examination. Multiparameter algorithm developed at ANL, USA was

  11. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-06

    contributions . Many of the MCRMC recommendations were adopted by Congress in the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2016 (P.L. 114-92) and amended by... contribution plan that would require the services to contribute up to 5% of annual base pay into a retirement account for each servicemember. The...TSP). Under the blended system, the services would begin monthly contributions of 1% of basic pay automatically into the servicemember’s TSP account

  12. Modelling home equity conversion loans with life insurance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baškot Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Home equity represents a reserve that can be used for providing additional money for its owners during their retirement. Life insurance models can be successfully applied to model home equity conversion loans. The home equity conversion loan is a financial product that provides a certain flexibility by using home equity as a resource for a quality life during retirement. Home equity conversion loans do not have a predetermined maturity date, as do conventional loans. But, like every loan, it must be repaid. One potential advantage of using a home equity conversion loan during tough financial times instead of some types of need-based assistance is that eligibility is straightforward. Home equity conversion loans can be useful tools in the process of pension system reform.

  13. Main Determinants of Supplementary Health Insurance Demand: (Case of Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Soraya Nouraei; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Mahdavi, Ghadir; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the majority of developing countries, the volume of medical insurance services, provided by social insurance organizations is inadequate. Thus, supplementary medical insurance is proposed as a means to address inadequacy of medical insurance. Accordingly, in this article, we attempted to provide the context for expansion of this important branch of insurance through identification of essential factors affecting demand for supplementary medical insurance. Method: In this study, two methods were used to identify essential factors affecting choice of supplementary medical insurance including Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Bayesian logit. To this end, Excel® software was used to refine data and R® software for estimation. The present study was conducted during 2012, covering all provinces in Iran. Sample size included 18,541 urban households, selected by Statistical Center of Iran using 3-stage cluster sampling approach. In this study, all data required were collected from the Statistical Center of Iran. Results: In 2012, an overall 8.04% of the Iranian population benefited from supplementary medical insurance. Demand for supplementary insurance is a concave function of age of the household head, and peaks in middle-age when savings and income are highest. The present study results showed greater likelihood of demand for supplementary medical insurance in households with better economic status, higher educated heads, female heads, and smaller households with greater expected medical expenses, and household income is the most important factor affecting demand for supplementary medical insurance. Conclusion: Since demand for supplementary medical insurance is hugely influenced by households’ economic status, policy-makers in the health sector should devise measures to improve households’ economic or financial access to supplementary insurance services, by identifying households in the lower economic deciles, and increasing their

  14. Physical workload and thoughts of retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkiö-Mäkelä, Merja; Hirvonen, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Finnish employees' opinions on continuing work until retirement pension and after the age of 63, and to find out if physical workload is related to these opinions. Altogether 39% of men and 40% of women had never had thoughts of early retirement, and 59% claimed (both men and women) that they would consider working beyond the age of 63. Own health (20%); financial gain such as salary and better pension (19%); meaningful, interesting and challenging work (15%); flexible working hours or part-time work (13%); lighter work load (13%); good work community (8%); and good work environment (6%) were stated as factors affecting the decision to continue working after the age of 63. Employees whose work involved low physical workload had less thoughts of early retirement and had considered continuing work after the age of 63 more often than those whose work involved high physical loads. Own health in particular was stated as a reason to consider continuing work by employees whose work was physically demanding.

  15. China's Insurance Regulatory Reform, Corporate Governance Behavior and Insurers' Governance Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huicong; Zhang, Hongliang; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Qiu, Aichao

    2017-10-17

    External regulation is an important mechanism to improve corporate behavior in emerging markets. China's insurance governance regulation, which began to supervise and guide insurance corporate governance behavior in 2006, has experienced a complex process of reform. This study tested our hypotheses with a sample of 85 firms during 2010-2011, which was obtained by providing a questionnaire to all of China's shareholding insurance companies. The empirical study results generally show that China's insurance governance effectiveness has significantly improved through strict regulation. Insurance corporate governance can improve business acumen and risk-control ability, but no significant evidence was found to prove its influence on profitability, as a result of focusing less attention on governance than on management. State ownership is associated with higher corporate governance effectiveness than non-state ownership. Listed companies tend to outperform non-listed firms, and life insurance corporate governance is more effective than that of property insurers. This study not only contributes to the comprehensive understanding of corporate governance effectiveness but also to the literature by highlighting the effect of corporate governance regulation in China's insurance industry and other emerging economies of the financial sector.

  16. Unemployment Insurance and Inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Birthe; Waisman, Gisela

    This paper examines the impact of higher unemployment insurance on the fraction of the work force paying into an unemployment insurance fond, wage differences and therefore inquality and education letting worker initial wealth being important for the decisions and implied values. As usually higher...... educated workers receive a lower fraction of their wages as unemployment insurance, we consider how the impact on labour market performance and wage differences and thereby inequality differ dependent on whether educated or uneducated workers receive higher benefits. The model can help shed light...... on the the puzzle why only some workers, for given educational level, pay into an unemployment insurance fond, the lower wealth mobility than income mobility as well as the relative compressed wage structure in countries with generous social assistance as well as unemployment insurance for low income workers...

  17. Health insurance for "frontaliers"

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The French government has decided that, with effect from 1 June 2014, persons resident in France but working in Switzerland (hereinafter referred to as “frontaliers”) will no longer be entitled to opt for private French health insurance provision as their sole and principal health insurance.   The right of choice, which was granted by the Bilateral Agreement on the Free Movement of Persons between Switzerland and the European Union and which came into force on 1 June 2002, exempts “frontaliers” from the obligation to become a member of Switzerland’s compulsory health insurance scheme (LAMal) if they can prove that they have equivalent coverage in France, provided by either the French social security system (CMU) or a private French insurance provider. As the latter option of private health insurance as an alternative to membership of LAMal will be revoked under the new French legislation that will come into force on 1 June 2014, current “...

  18. Terrorism Risk Insurance: An Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webel, Baird

    2005-01-01

    .... Addressing this problem, Congress enacted the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2002 (TRIA) to create a temporary program to share future insured terrorism losses with the property-casualty insurance industry and policyholders...

  19. Disposition of Insurance Allotment Payments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Shelton

    2001-01-01

    .... The request was prompted by action taken by the Florida Department of Insurance against two life insurance companies that had received large numbers of insurance allotments from Service members...

  20. Effect of Health Insurance on Demand for Outpatient Medical Care in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ahavugimana

    objective of this paper is to examine factors influencing outpatient care demand in ..... Endogeneity of health insurance arises because the decision to purchase health ... insurance plan, or by purchasing privately a generous coverage. Existing ...

  1. Is employer-based health insurance a barrier to entrepreneurship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, Robert W; Kapur, Kanika; Gates, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The focus on employer-provided health insurance in the United States may restrict business creation. We address the limited research on the topic of "entrepreneurship lock" by using recent panel data from matched Current Population Surveys. We use difference-in-difference models to estimate the interaction between having a spouse with employer-based health insurance and potential demand for health care. We find evidence of a larger negative effect of health insurance demand on business creation for those without spousal coverage than for those with spousal coverage. We also take a new approach in the literature to examine the question of whether employer-based health insurance discourages business creation by exploiting the discontinuity created at age 65 through the qualification for Medicare. Using a novel procedure of identifying age in months from matched monthly CPS data, we compare the probability of business ownership among male workers in the months just before turning age 65 and in the months just after turning age 65. We find that business ownership rates increase from just under age 65 to just over age 65, whereas we find no change in business ownership rates from just before to just after for other ages 55-75. We also do not find evidence from the previous literature and additional estimates that other confounding factors such as retirement, partial retirement, social security and pension eligibility are responsible for the increase in business ownership in the month individuals turn 65. Our estimates provide some evidence that "entrepreneurship lock" exists, which raises concerns that the bundling of health insurance and employment may create an inefficient level of business creation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Insurance: Accounting, Regulation, Actuarial Science

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Tosetti; Thomas Behar; Michel Fromenteau; Stéphane Ménart

    2001-01-01

    We shall be examining the following topics: (i) basic frameworks for accounting and for statutory insurance rules; and (ii) actuarial principles of insurance; for both life and nonlife (i.e. casualty and property) insurance.Section 1 introduces insurance terminology, regarding what an operation must include in order to be an insurance operation (the legal, statistical, financial or economic aspects), and introduces the accounting and regulation frameworks and the two actuarial models of insur...

  3. Risk Management in Insurance Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xufeng

    2006-01-01

    Insurance is the uncertain business in uncertain society. Today, insures face more complex and difficult risks. Efficient risk management mechanisms are essential for the insurers. The paper is set out initially to explore UK insurance companies risk management and risk disclosure by examining companies annual report after all the listed insurance companies are required to disclose risk information in their annual report, which seeks to reflect the recent development in UK insurance companies...

  4. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Eleanor M. M.; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Flynn, Matt

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorporating moderating and mediating variables into retirement models is needed. Drawing on comparative models of attitude to retirement, we hypothesized a direct relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age for workers with a high household income and an indirect relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for workers with a low or mean household income. We collected data from a sample of 590 United Kingdom workers aged 50+. Using conditional process analysis, we found that the underlying mechanisms in our research model differ according to socio-economic status. We found no direct effect between job satisfaction and intended retirement age. However, an indirect effect was observed between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for both low- and mean-household income individuals. Specifically, the relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude differed according to socio-economic group: for high-household income older workers, there was no relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. However, for low- and mean-household income older workers, we observed a negative relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. Otherwise stated, increases in job satisfaction for mean and low household income workers are likely to make the prospect of retirement less attractive. Therefore, we argue that utmost care must be taken around the conditions under which lower income employees will continue their work when getting older in order to protect their sustainable employability. PMID:28620329

  5. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor M. M. Davies

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorporating moderating and mediating variables into retirement models is needed. Drawing on comparative models of attitude to retirement, we hypothesized a direct relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age for workers with a high household income and an indirect relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for workers with a low or mean household income. We collected data from a sample of 590 United Kingdom workers aged 50+. Using conditional process analysis, we found that the underlying mechanisms in our research model differ according to socio-economic status. We found no direct effect between job satisfaction and intended retirement age. However, an indirect effect was observed between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for both low- and mean-household income individuals. Specifically, the relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude differed according to socio-economic group: for high-household income older workers, there was no relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. However, for low- and mean-household income older workers, we observed a negative relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. Otherwise stated, increases in job satisfaction for mean and low household income workers are likely to make the prospect of retirement less attractive. Therefore, we argue that utmost care must be taken around the conditions under which lower income employees will continue their work when getting older in order to protect their sustainable employability.

  6. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers' Level of Household Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Eleanor M M; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Flynn, Matt

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorporating moderating and mediating variables into retirement models is needed. Drawing on comparative models of attitude to retirement, we hypothesized a direct relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age for workers with a high household income and an indirect relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for workers with a low or mean household income. We collected data from a sample of 590 United Kingdom workers aged 50+. Using conditional process analysis, we found that the underlying mechanisms in our research model differ according to socio-economic status. We found no direct effect between job satisfaction and intended retirement age. However, an indirect effect was observed between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for both low- and mean-household income individuals. Specifically, the relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude differed according to socio-economic group: for high-household income older workers, there was no relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. However, for low- and mean-household income older workers, we observed a negative relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. Otherwise stated, increases in job satisfaction for mean and low household income workers are likely to make the prospect of retirement less attractive. Therefore, we argue that utmost care must be taken around the conditions under which lower income employees will continue their work when getting older in order to protect their sustainable employability.

  7. Retirement Syndrome Among Babol City Retirees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Sum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Retirement impacts different dimensions of life such as physical, psychological, social, economic, and spiritual aspects. Since identification of the factors promoting or demoting health situation of retirees is important; this study aimed to determine the level of retirement syndrome in Babol retirees. Methods & Materials: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 205 retirees aged over 50 years. Data were gathered by a questionnaire consisting of 2 sections; Demographic characteristics and retirement syndromes. Retirement syndrome questionnaire consisted of 40 questions in 5-point scale (“never” to “always” in 4 dimensions of “helplessness and failure”, “older and idleness”, “trying and new directions”, and “conflict and confusion”. Data were analyzed by SPSS. The Pearson and Spearman tests were used to evaluate the within group variables. To analyze the data, the correlation coefficient test, t-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA were performed. The significant level for all tests was set at 0.05. Results: About 53% of the participants were male and 47% female with an average (SD age 61.13(5.87 years. Means(SD scores of “helplessness and failure”, “older and idleness”, “trying and new directions”, and “conflict and confusion” were 2.08(0.52, 3.73(0.51, 3.47(0.65 and 2.49(0.56, respectively. There were a direct significant association between “feeling helplessness” and “conflict and confusion” (P<0.0001 and a reverse relationship between “older and idleness” and “trying and new directions” (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Findings of this research showed that retirees of Babol County partly suffer from retirement syndrome. Therefore, paying attention to them and promotion of the retirees’ situation seems necessary.

  8. Baby boom generation at the retirement onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojilković Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden increase in the number of live births after the Second World War due to an increase in fertility rates has led to the formation of cohorts with specific characteristics or baby boom generation. This generation is unique in the history of the demographic phenomenon that has affected and affects the functioning of many segments of society. The aim of this paper is to assess structure of baby boomers who are few years away from retirement, using demographic data. Impact of baby boomer age structure of current and future retirees is described with a graphical display of current and projected age pyramid of baby boomers. Demographic pattern that women live longer than men is evident in the projected pyramid. In addition, the number of baby boomers will lead to a "younger" old population. The imbalance in the number of men and women pensioners, as well as older cohorts of women and female baby boomers was analyzed. As a result, an increasing trend of women's age pensioners who are members of the baby boom generation was clearly observed, which is opposite to the older cohort of women who often were family pensioners. Different circumstances and conditions in which female boomers lived and worked will form a new "pension model" because they will gain their benefits as well as men, for the first time in significant number, unlike their mothers, which gained the right to retire after they become widows. Number of women age pensioners is getting greater comparing to men, as the result of changes in the economic activities of women in the last half of the 20th century. When baby boomers retire and exit the working population, this will create a vacuum, because the numerically smaller generations will enter working population, while the sudden and very shortly, the number of population older than 60 or 65 will increase, most of them will likely to acquire the right to a pension. It is undeniable that baby boomers had impact on demographic structure

  9. Lifetime distributional effects of Social Security retirement benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen; Toder, Eric; Iams, Howard

    This article presents three measures of the distribution of actual and projected net benefits (benefits minus payroll taxes) from Social Security's Old-Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) for people born between 1931 and 1960. The results are based on simulations with the Social Security Administration's Model of Income in the Near Term (MINT), which projects retirement income through 2020. The base sample for MINT is the U.S. Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation panels for 1990 to 1993, matched with Social Security administrative records. The study population is grouped into 5-year birth cohorts and then ranked by economic status in three ways. First, the population is divided into five groups on the basis of individual lifetime covered earnings, and their lifetime present values of OASI benefits received and payroll taxes paid are calculated. By this measure, OASI provides much higher benefits to the lowest quintile of earners than to other groups, but it becomes less redistributive toward lower earners in more recent birth cohorts. Second, people are ranked by shared lifetime covered earnings, and the values of shared benefits received and payroll taxes paid are computed. Individuals are assumed to split covered earnings, benefits, and payroll taxes with their spouses in the years they are married. By the shared covered earnings measure, OASI is still much more favorable to persons in the lower income quintiles, although to a lesser degree than when people are ranked by individual covered earnings. OASI becomes more progressive among recent cohorts, even as net lifetime benefits decline for the entire population. Finally, individuals are ranked on the basis of their shared permanent income from age 62, when they become eligible for early retirement benefits, until death. Their annual Social Security benefits are compared with the benefits they would have received if they had saved their payroll taxes in individual accounts and used the

  10. Health insurance basic actuarial models

    CERN Document Server

    Pitacco, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    Health Insurance aims at filling a gap in actuarial literature, attempting to solve the frequent misunderstanding in regards to both the purpose and the contents of health insurance products (and ‘protection products’, more generally) on the one hand, and the relevant actuarial structures on the other. In order to cover the basic principles regarding health insurance techniques, the first few chapters in this book are mainly devoted to the need for health insurance and a description of insurance products in this area (sickness insurance, accident insurance, critical illness covers, income protection, long-term care insurance, health-related benefits as riders to life insurance policies). An introduction to general actuarial and risk-management issues follows. Basic actuarial models are presented for sickness insurance and income protection (i.e. disability annuities). Several numerical examples help the reader understand the main features of pricing and reserving in the health insurance area. A short int...

  11. Motives for early retirement of self-employed GPs in the Netherlands: a comparison of two time periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Greuningen Malou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high cost of training and the relatively long period of training for physicians make it beneficial to stimulate physicians to retire later. Therefore, a better understanding of the link between the factors influencing the decision to retire and actual turnover would benefit policies designed to encourage later retirement. This study focuses on actual GP turnover and the determining factors for this in the Netherlands. The period 2003–2007 saw fewer GPs retiring from general practice than the period 1998–2002. In addition, GPs’ retirement age was higher in 2003–2007. For these two periods, we analysed work perception, objective workload and reasons for leaving, and related these with the probability that GPs would leave general practice at an early age. Methods In 2003, a first retrospective survey was sent to 520 self-employed GPs who had retired between 1998 and 2002. In 2008, the same survey was sent to 405 GPs who had retired between 2003 and 2007. The response rates were 60% and 54%, respectively. Analyses were done to compare work perception, objective workload, external factors and personal reasons for retiring. Results For both male and female GPs, work perception was different in the periods under scrutiny: both groups reported greater job satisfaction and a lower degree of emotional exhaustion in the later period, although there was no notable difference in subjective workload. The objective workload was lower in the second period. Moreover, most external factors and personal reasons that may contribute to the decision to retire were reported as less important in the second period. There was a stronger decrease in the probability that female GPs leave general practice within one year than for male GPs. This underscores the gender differences and the need for disaggregated data collection. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the decrease in the probability of GPs leaving general practice

  12. Insurability of Terrorism Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbruecker, D.

    2006-01-01

    Until 2001 losses caused by terrorist attacks have been covered under fire policies worldwide with two exceptions: Spain and UK where major and multiple losses caused by ETA and IRA had led to specific insurance solutions. The September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Centre have changed the world in many aspects. This includes the insurance industry, which was compelled to exclude terrorism from coverage and to offer special solutions for extra premium. Nuclear power plants have been repeatedly called targets for terrorists as their destruction could cause a large catastrophe and more victims than the September 2001 attacks. How does the insurance industry respond? (author)

  13. Travel: a long-range goal of retired women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Sara; Pierfelice, Loretta

    2003-09-01

    The authors surveyed retired persons (predominately women) with regard to their immediate, intermediate, and long-range activities following retirement. As predicted, leisure travel emerged as a frequent long-range goal for persons retired more than 5 years. The travel activity preferences of long-retired older women present challenges and opportunities to both researchers and marketers. Length of trips and frequency of trips have been predicted from regression models, with trip length in particular being well predicted by the problem of daily life hassles. A theoretical model of continued post-retirement travel is presented as a variant of Solomon's opponent process theory of affect (R. L. Solomon, 1980). The authors suggest that to the degree that places traveled to are varied and different, older people may remain stimulated and continue to enjoy retirement.

  14. Insuring against health shocks: Health insurance and household choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence on the role of public health insurance in mitigating adverse outcomes associated with health shocks. Exploiting the rollout of a universal health insurance program in rural China, I find that total household income and consumption are fully insured against health shocks even without access to health insurance. Household labor supply is an important insurance mechanism against health shocks. Access to health insurance helps households to maintain investment in children's human capital during negative health shocks, which suggests that one benefit of health insurance could arise from reducing the use of costly smoothing mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimum amount of an insurance sum in life insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Balkovec

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Personal insurance represents one of the sources of personal social security as a category of personal property. How to get a proper life insurance is a frequently asked question. When insuring material objects (car, house..., the problem is usually not in the amount of the taken insurance. With life insurance (abstract goods, problems as such occur. In this paper, we wish to present a model that, according to the financial situation and the anticipated future, makes it possible to calculate the optimum insurance sum in life insurance.

  16. Retirement savings and decision errors: lessons from behavioral economics

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Armour; Mary C. Daly

    2008-01-01

    Long gone are the days when most American workers could rely on their employers to manage their retirement savings. Today, most people handle their retirement portfolios themselves, gaining the right and responsibility to determine their own best strategies. Research on retirement planning suggests, however, that many fall short of consensus targets for optimal savings and investment. While part of the shortfall is explained by information gaps and income constraints, research in behavioral e...

  17. The conscientious retiree: The relationship between conscientiousness, retirement, and volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Mike, Anissa; Jackson, Joshua J.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between conscientiousness, work status, and volunteering utilizing two large samples, the St. Louis Personality and Aging Network (SPAN) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It was hypothesized that conscientious adults who were retired would be more likely to volunteer because, after retirement, they gain a substantial amount of free time, while losing an outlet for their industrious and achievement-striving tendencies. Cross-sectional and lo...

  18. Comparing Military Retirement to the California Highway Patrol Pension Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    retirement authority across all branches of service (USD(P&R), 2011). After World War II, the Navy faced the same overpopulation of the officer ranks...early retirement list were granted their request based upon seniority (USD(P&R), 2011). 2. 1900–1937 Overpopulation of the Navy’s senior officer ranks...remained an issue up until World War I. Consequently, the policy of early retirement, created by the act of March 3, 1899, remained in place until

  19. Impact of Economic Crisis on Credit Insurance Market in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina VÎRLANUTA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bank Insurance phenomenon can not be attributed primarily or banks or insurance institutions. Near the two sectors was due to mutations occurring in supply and demand for financial services. Convergence bankers and insurers are determined by common platform for each country of local influence by supervisors and reforms at the central level. Credit insurance has emerged as a necessity stemming from the fact that most trade agreements concluded in circumstances in which payment is partially or completely after delivery of the goods or services covered by the agreement, so the payment delayed or selling on credit.

  20. Group life insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration wishes to inform staff members and fellows having taken out optional life insurance under the group contract signed by CERN that the following changes to the rules and regulations entered into force on 1 January 2013:   The maximum age for an active member has been extended from 65 to 67 years. The beneficiary clause now allows insured persons to designate one or more persons of their choice to be their beneficiary(-ies), either at the time of taking out the insurance or at a later date, in which case the membership/modification form must be updated accordingly. Beneficiaries must be clearly identified (name, first name, date of birth, address).   The membership/modification form is available on the FP website: http://fp.web.cern.ch/helvetia-life-insurance For further information, please contact: Valentina Clavel (Tel. 73904) Peggy Pithioud (Tel. 72736)

  1. Vaccines as Epidemic Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Mark V

    2017-10-27

    This paper explores the relationship between the research for and development of vaccines against global pandemics and insurance. It shows that development in advance of pandemics of a portfolio of effective and government-approved vaccines does have some insurance properties: it requires incurring costs that are certain (the costs of discovering, developing, and testing vaccines) in return for protection against large losses (if a pandemic treatable with one of the vaccines occurs) but also with the possibility of no benefit (from a vaccine against a disease that never reaches the pandemic stage). It then argues that insurance against the latter event might usefully be offered to organizations developing vaccines, and explores the benefits of insurance payments to or on behalf of countries who suffer from unpredictable pandemics. These ideas are then related to recent government, industry, and philanthropic efforts to develop better policies to make vaccines against pandemics available on a timely basis.

  2. Vaccines as Epidemic Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark V. Pauly

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between the research for and development of vaccines against global pandemics and insurance. It shows that development in advance of pandemics of a portfolio of effective and government-approved vaccines does have some insurance properties: it requires incurring costs that are certain (the costs of discovering, developing, and testing vaccines in return for protection against large losses (if a pandemic treatable with one of the vaccines occurs but also with the possibility of no benefit (from a vaccine against a disease that never reaches the pandemic stage. It then argues that insurance against the latter event might usefully be offered to organizations developing vaccines, and explores the benefits of insurance payments to or on behalf of countries who suffer from unpredictable pandemics. These ideas are then related to recent government, industry, and philanthropic efforts to develop better policies to make vaccines against pandemics available on a timely basis.

  3. M. Nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear insurance and some of the features associated with it, such as the International Conventions and the operation of Atomic Risk Pools, are discussed both in general and with specific reference to the USA, Canada and the United Kingdom

  4. Building and Contents Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, William C.

    Insurance coverage of school buildings and contents is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain, and increases of 50 percent or more in the premium are not uncommon. Methods of reducing premium increases are outlined in this speech. (MLF)

  5. HUD Insured Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Office of Healthcare Programs (OHP), previously known as the Office of Insured Health Care Facilities, is located within the Office of Housing and administers...

  6. Deductibles in health insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriyadis, I.; Öney, Ü. N.

    2009-11-01

    This study is an extension to a simulation study that has been developed to determine ruin probabilities in health insurance. The study concentrates on inpatient and outpatient benefits for customers of varying age bands. Loss distributions are modelled through the Allianz tool pack for different classes of insureds. Premiums at different levels of deductibles are derived in the simulation and ruin probabilities are computed assuming a linear loading on the premium. The increase in the probability of ruin at high levels of the deductible clearly shows the insufficiency of proportional loading in deductible premiums. The PH-transform pricing rule developed by Wang is analyzed as an alternative pricing rule. A simple case, where an insured is assumed to be an exponential utility decision maker while the insurer's pricing rule is a PH-transform is also treated.

  7. Prevention in insurance markets

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Cécile FAGART; Bidénam KAMBIA-CHOPIN

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers a competitive insurance market under moral hazard and adverse selection, in which preventive efforts and self-protection costs are unobservable by insurance companies. Under reasonable assumptions, the conclusions of Rothschild and Stiglitz (1976) are preserved in our context even if it involves moral hazard. The riskier agents in equilibrium, who would also be the riskier agents under perfect information, receive their moral hazard contract. For other agents, adverse sel...

  8. Health insurance take-up by the near-elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmueller, Thomas C; Ohri, Sabina

    2006-12-01

    To examine the effect of price on the demand for health insurance by early retirees between the ages of 55 and 64. Administrative health plan enrollment data from a medium-sized U.S. employer. The analysis takes advantage of a natural experiment created by the firm's health insurance contribution policy. The amount the firm contributes toward retiree health insurance coverage depends on when a person retired and her years of service at that date. As a result of this policy, there is considerable variation in out-of-pocket premiums faced by individuals in the data. This variation is independent of the nonprice attributes of the health insurance plans offered and is plausibly exogenous to individual characteristics that are likely to affect the demand for insurance. A probit model is used to estimate the decision to take-up employer-sponsored health insurance by early retirees between the ages of 55 and 64. Demand for insurance is measured as a function of out-of-pocket premiums and a set of individual characteristics. We find that price has a small but statistically significant effect on the decision to take up coverage. Estimated price elasticities range from -0.10 to -0.16, depending on the sample. The implied elasticities are comparable with results found in previous studies using very different data. Our estimates indicate that policy proposals for a Medicare buy-in or a nongroup tax credit will have a modest impact on take-up rates of near-elderly retirees.

  9. Retirement intentions of general practitioners aged 45-65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Thomas D; Arnold-Reed, Diane E; Hince, Dana A; Wood, Ian K; Moorhead, Robert G

    2009-07-20

    To ascertain the retirement intentions of a cohort of Australian general practitioners. Postal questionnaire survey of members of four Divisions of General Practice in Western Australia, sent out November 2007 - January 2008. A sample of 178 GPs aged 45-65 years. Intention to work in general practice until retirement; reasons for retiring before age 65 years; factors that might encourage working beyond chosen retirement age; and perceived obstacles to working in general practice. 63% of GPs intended to work to at least age 65 years, with men more likely to retire early. Of 63 GPs intending to retire early, 46% gave pressure of work, exhaustion and burnout as reasons for early retirement. Better remuneration, better staffing levels and more general support were incentives to continue working for 46% of the 64 GPs who responded to the question about incentives, and more flexible working hours, part-time work and reduced workload for 41%. Of 169 participants, 65% gave increasing bureaucracy, poor job satisfaction and disillusionment with the medical system or Medicare as obstacles to working in general practice in Australia, whereas workforce shortage, increasing patient demands and diminishing lifestyle through overwork were obstacles named by 48%. Many GPs are planning to retire early, reflecting an emerging trend among professionals and society generally. Declining job satisfaction, falling workforce numbers, excessive workload and increasing bureaucracy were recurrent concerns of older WA GPs considering premature retirement.

  10. Does retirement reduce the risk of myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kasper; Rugulies, Reiner; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested that retirement may have beneficial effects on health outcomes. In this study we examined whether the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) was reduced following retirement in a Danish population sample. METHODS: Participants were 617 511 Danish workers, born...... of 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.16) when comparing retirees with active workers of the same age. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that retirement reduces risk of MI. On the contrary, we find that retirement is associated with a modestly increased risk of MI....

  11. An application of Fuzzy DEMATEL electronic life-insurance development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Vali Tabatabaei

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available For years, e-commerce has generated competitive advantage for many industries especially in insurance industry where people could apply for any sort of insurance, very easily. In fact, insurance industry has become one of the most important sectors in the world. E-commerce, on the other hand, has absorbed various people in insurance industry to develop economic growth. However, applying e-commerce for insurance firms may encounter serious obstacles and it is important to know them properly and setup appropriate actions to remove them. In this paper, we present a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM technique based on DEMATEL with an adaptation of fuzzy logic to find important factors impacting implementation of e-commerce for life insurance industry. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire and distributes it among some insurance experts and then we analyze them using fuzzy DEMATEL technique. Findings indicate that “lack of designing death table based on the existing statistics of population death in Iran”, “lack of variety in protections of life insurance in proportionate to society individual’s requirements by means of low level income of society individuals” and “lack of extensive advertisements for developing the culture of life insurance in country” are the most important factors influencing insurance industry for enhancing e-business.

  12. All those things together made me retire : Qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; Wind, A. de; Westerman, M.J.; Ybema, J.F.; Beek, A.J. van der; Geuskens, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early

  13. 'All those things together made me retire': qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; de Wind, A.; Westerman, M.J.; Ybema, J.F.; van der Beek, A.J.; Geuskens, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early

  14. 78 FR 47018 - Civil Service Retirement System and Federal Employees' Retirement System; Opportunity for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... System; Opportunity for Annuitants to Elect Survivor Annuity Benefits for Same-Sex Spouses AGENCY: Office... survivor annuities for their spouses under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) and Federal Employees... survivor annuities for their spouses based on their recognized marital status. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  15. Consumer in insurance law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čorkalo Milena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the notion of consumer in the European Union law, and, in particular, the notion of consumer in insurance law. The author highligts the differences between the notion of consumer is in aquis communautaire and in insurance law, discussing whether the consumer can be defined in both field in the same way, concerning that insurance services differ a lot from other kind of services. Having regarded unequal position of contracting parties and information and technical disadvantages of a weaker party, author pleads for broad definition of consumer in insurance law. In Serbian law, the consumer is not defined in consistent way. That applies on Serbian insurance law as well. Therefore, the necessity of precise and broad definition of consumes is underlined, in order to delimit the circle of subject who are in need for protection. The author holds that the issue of determination of the circle of persons entitled to extended protection as consumers is of vital importance for further development of insurance market in Serbia.

  16. Risk Management in the banking and insurance sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Mala

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is becoming an integral part of every organization, especially for the banking and Insurance sector because of their high-risk business. Both sectors try to manage the risks of their clients and their own risks. But, challenges in the banking and insurance industry are frequently influenced by the liquidity rations and the amount and quality of capital as ground requirements for risk management. The risk exposure in recent times is becoming more complex, more dynamic and diverse. Hence, we need to understand the risks which can be taken and the risks which should be avoided. In the other side insurance policies are long term, enabling insurers to stabilize the financial system and oft en insurance is the final transfer of risk. In this paper we will analyze an overview of risk management in the banking and insurance sector.

  17. Paris and Vienna nuclear liability conventions: challenges for insurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    2004-01-01

    Insurers have actively contributed to the negotiations on the revision of the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy. In the course of these negotiations they have pointed out that some of the proposals for revision may have consequences for insurers and could prove incapable of finding insurance support. This paper aims at explaining the revision related points, which could cause problems in respect of insurability. Furthermore, the writer takes the liberty to expand its scope to more generally include developments, which have the potential to influence the availability of insurance capacity. Therefore, also the insurance implications of terrorist acts combined with share market developments of recent years will be dealt with.(author)

  18. The Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission’s Blended Retirement Plan: Implications for Marine Corps Force Management Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    through retirement, we estimate the annual take-home income (i.e., income after taxes ) available to each Marine under the BRS and compare it with take...Marine Corps Manpower Team Resource Analysis Division i Abstract This report examines the impact of the new military blended...retirement system (BRS) on various U.S. Marine Corps force management objectives (FMOs). We estimated the effect of the retirement system changes on active

  19. Baby boomers nearing retirement: the healthiest generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Neil E; Lang, Iain A; Henley, William; Melzer, David

    2010-02-01

    The baby-boom generation is entering retirement. Having experienced unprecedented prosperity and improved medical technology, they should be the healthiest generation ever. We compared prevalence of disease and risk factors at ages 50-61 years in baby boomers with the preceding generation and attributed differences to period or cohort effects. Data were from the Health Survey for England (HSE) from 1994 to 2007 (n = 48,563). Logistic regression models compared health status between birth cohorts. Age-period-cohort models identified cohort and period effects separately. Compared to the wartime generation, the baby-boomer group was heavier (3.02 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.42-3.63; p Baby boomers reported fewer heart attacks (OR = 0.61; CI, 0.47-0.79; p baby boomers are moving toward retirement with improved cardiovascular health. However, the baby-boomer cohort has a higher prevalence of mental illness diagnoses and shows no improvement in self-rated health compared to the wartime birth cohort. There remains substantial scope to reduce health risks and future disability.

  20. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Monthly Contributions – Changes for 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2014, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.7%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including the CERN pension) will increase accordingly: Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1161 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (580 CHF) is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 464 CHF is applied to children maintaining their ins...

  1. Are Integrated Plan Providers Associated With Lower Premiums on the Health Insurance Marketplaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Forgia, Ambar; Maeda, Jared Lane K; Banthin, Jessica S

    2018-04-01

    As the health insurance industry becomes more consolidated, hospitals and health systems have started to enter the insurance business. Insurers are also rapidly acquiring providers. Although these "vertically" integrated plan providers are small players in the insurance market, they are becoming more numerous. The health insurance marketplaces (HIMs) offer a unique setting to study integrated plan providers relative to other insurer types because the HIMs were designed to promote competition. In this descriptive study, the authors compared the premiums of the lowest priced silver plans of integrated plan providers with other insurer types on the 2015 and 2016 HIMs. Integrated plan providers were associated with modestly lower premiums relative to most other insurer types. This study provides early insights into premium competition on the HIMs. Examining integrated plan providers as a separate insurer type has important policy implications because they are a growing segment of the marketplaces and their pricing behavior may influence future premium trends.

  2. Why older workers work beyond the retirement age: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranu Sewdas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of the present study were to: 1 gain insight into reasons for working beyond the statutory retirement age from older workers’ perspectives, and 2 explore how the domains of the research framework Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM can be applied to working beyond retirement age. Methods A qualitative research design included individual interviews (n = 15 and three focus groups (n = 18 participants conducted with older workers aged 65 years and older continuing in a paid job or self-employment. Interview participants were recruited from an existing STREAM cohort study. Focus group participants were recruited from companies and employment agencies. The data were subjected to thematic analysis. Results The most important motives for working beyond retirement age were maintaining daily routines and financial benefit. Good health and flexible work arrangements were mentioned as important preconditions. The themes emerging from the categorization of the motives and preconditions corresponded to the domains of health, work characteristics, skills and knowledge, and social and financial factors from the STREAM research framework. However, our analysis revealed one additional theme—purpose in life. Conclusion This study offers important new insights into the various preconditions and motives that influence working beyond retirement age. In addition, the five domains of the STREAM research framework, including the additional domain of ‘purpose in life’, seem to be applicable to working beyond retirement age. This knowledge contributes to the development of work-related interventions that enhance older workers’ motivation to prolong their working lives.

  3. Continuing connections: the experiences of retired and senior working nurse mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Glenda; Mohan, Shantala; Jackson, Debra; Vickers, Margaret H; Wilkes, Lesley

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the benefits and challenges of a mentoring programme through which retired and senior nurses continued to support and nurture nurses and midwives currently working in the health system. Nursing has an ageing workforce and faces significant loss of expertise because of retirements. Previously, mentoring programmes have been instituted in a range of nursing contexts and they have been a retention strategy for older nurses and midwives. Mentors and their mentees worked together towards mutually agreed on professional and personal goals. They were asked to meet or speak together a minimum of twice per month for at least six months. As part of a collective case study, 15 mentoring dyads were established. Participants and mentors took part in qualitative, semi-structured interviews about their perceptions and experiences of the mentoring programme. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed thematically. Mentors reported the mentoring experience to be rewarding experience that enabled them to re-connect with nursing-related activities and brought new challenges in retirement. They perceived the mentees were visibly helped by their support and influence. The mentors studied reinforced a positive self-concept as nurses and midwives in their mentees and assisted their development. Retired nurses and midwives in particular may have several characteristics that make them effective mentors. Potential benefits are demonstrated for nurses and midwives vulnerable to workplace adversity, especially those new to Australia who may have limited professional and social networks. For health organisations, mentoring programmes may be an innovative method of retention that engages both mid-career nurses and midwives and those recently retired. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. RISK CORRIDORS AND REINSURANCE IN HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACES: Insurance for Insurers

    OpenAIRE

    LAYTON, TIMOTHY J.; MCGUIRE, THOMAS G.; SINAIKO, ANNA D.

    2016-01-01

    In order to encourage entry and lower prices, most regulated markets for health insurance include policies that seek to reduce the uncertainty faced by insurers. In addition to risk adjustment of premiums paid to plans, the Health Insurance Marketplaces established by the Affordable Care Act implement reinsurance and risk corridors. Reinsurance limits insurer costs associated with specific individuals, while risk corridors protect against aggregate losses. Both tighten the insurer's distribut...

  5. Factors predicting health services use among older people in China: An analysis of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cathy Honge; Kendig, Hal; He, Xiaojun

    2016-02-18

    Rapid population ageing in China is increasing the numbers of older people who are likely to require health services in response to higher levels of poor perceived health and chronic diseases. Understanding factors influencing health services use at late life will help to plan for increasing needs for health care, reducing inequalities in health services use and releasing severe pressures on a highly variable health care system that has constrained public resources and increasing reliance on health insurance and user payments. Drawing on the nationally representative China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study 2013 data, we apply the Andersen healthcare utilization conceptual model to binary logistic regression multivariate analyses to examine the joint predictors of physical examinations, outpatient and inpatient care among the middle-aged and elderly in China. The multivariate analyses find that both physical examinations and inpatient care rates increase significantly by age when health deteriorates. Females are less likely to use inpatient care. Significant socio-economic variations exist in healthcare utilization. Older people with higher education, communist party membership, urban residence, non-agricultural household registration, better financial situation are more likely to have physical examinations or inpatient care. Factors influencing all three types of health care utilization are household expenditure, losing a partner, having multiple chronic diseases or perceiving poor health. With activities of daily living limitations or pain increases the probability of seeing a doctor while with functional loss increases the rates of having physical examinations, but being the ethnic minorities, no social health insurance, with depression, fair or poor memory could be a barrier to having physical examinations or seeing a doctor, which might delay the early diagnose of severe health problems among these groups. Not drinking, not smoking and regular physical

  6. Would national health insurance itnprove equity and efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ence of social health insurance, and some Asian countries have more recently .... Mexico, special funds subsidised by the government and social security, were ..... show how powerful interest groups can influence the direction of health care ...

  7. ENDOWMENT LIFE INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljko Sain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper that treats the actuarial model of insurance in case of survival or early death is to show the actuarial methods and methodology for creating a model and an appropriate number of sub-models of the most popular form of life insurance in the world. The paper applies the scientific methodology of the deductive character based on scientific, theoretical knowledge and practical realities. Following the basic theoretical model’s determinants, which are at the beginning of the paper, the basic difference between models further in this paper was carried out according to the character of the premium to be paid. Finally, the financial repercussions of some models are presented at examples in insurance companies. The result of this paper is to show the spectrum of possible forms of capital endowment insurance which can be, without major problems, depending on the financial policy of the company, applied in actual practice. The conclusion of this paper shows the theoretical and the practical reality of this model, life insurance, and its quantitative and qualitative guidelines.

  8. 75 FR 60643 - Customs and Border Protection Officer Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... maximum entry age (to permit a career to be completed by mandatory retirement age); (2) Early optional... barred from reemployment in any position except a primary position after age 60. Service by a reemployed... the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2008. The Act provides early retirement and...

  9. Application of a greedy algorithm to military aircraft fleet retirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newcamp, J.M.; Verhagen, W.J.C.; Udluft, H.; Curran, Ricky

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a retirement analysis model for aircraft fleets. By employing a greedy algorithm, the presented solution is capable of identifying individually weak assets in a fleet of aircraft with inhomogeneous historical utilization. The model forecasts future retirement scenarios

  10. 12 CFR 615.5280 - Retirement in event of default.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retirement in event of default. 615.5280... Dividends § 615.5280 Retirement in event of default. (a) When the debt of a holder of eligible borrower... association or agricultural credit association is in default, such institution may, but shall not be required...

  11. Setting the Record Straight: Retirement Security for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The landscape of public education retirement plans is in an upheaval. A variety of economic, demographic, and political factors make it increasingly difficult for defined-benefit pension plans alone to provide educators with an adequate retirement. As a result, for the nearly seven million educators in America's public primary and secondary…

  12. The impact of behavioural economics and finance on retirement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These choices may also pose a threat to a member's financial wellbeing in retirement. Behavioural economics and finance helps to explain the choices made by these stakeholders in the retirement industry. The authors explain this concept in the context of industry stakeholders and the unique South African economic and ...

  13. Ecstasy of Emptiness? Reflections of a Retired School Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzara, Judith R.

    2001-01-01

    A retired elementary principal who was actively tied to her community for decades explains how to put a positive spin on retirement. New retirees should treasure their gifts and talents, develop new ones, take advantage of travel opportunities, mentor a new principal, and/or go back to college. (MLH)

  14. Gaining weight through retirement? Results from the SHARE survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godard, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper estimates the causal impact of retirement on the Body Mass Index (BMI) of adults aged 50-69 years old, on the probability of being either overweight or obese and on the probability of being obese. Based on the 2004, 2006 and 2010-2011 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement

  15. Financial Planning for Retirement: An Imperative for Baby Boomer Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Kilpatrick, Beverly B.

    1998-01-01

    Many women fail to plan for retirement due to economic constraints, interrupted career paths, lower earnings, gender bias, gender-role socialization, self-esteem, role definition, locus of control, or risk tolerance. Retirement education must address women's specific issues regarding financial planning. (SK)

  16. Does retirement reduce the risk of mental disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kasper; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Madsen, Ida E.H.

    2015-01-01

    by reduced prevalence of hospital treatment for depression and antidepressant purchase. METHODS: Participants were 245 082 Danish workers who retired between 2000 and 2006. Information on retirement, hospital treatment and antidepressant purchases were obtained from Danish national registers. The yearly...

  17. The Counsellor's Role In Pre-Retirement Education In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many Nigerian workers are scared at the mention of the word retirement. This is because of the unpleasant experiences of the past retirees in terms of the delay and difficulties encountered in getting their retirement benefits – gratuity and pension. Unfortunately, some retirees have died out of frustration and in abject poverty ...

  18. Reality Investing | Alaska Division of Retirement and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content State of Alaska myAlaska My Government Resident Business in Alaska Visiting Comp All Other Programs Features Empower Retirement Account Info Online myRnB Member Services Seminars Benefits > Reality Investing Online Counselor Scheduler Empower Retirement Account Info Online myRnB

  19. Maintaining work-related personal ties following retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozijnsen, M.R.; Stevens, N.L.; van Tilburg, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the consequences of retirement for the continuation of work-related personal ties. The hypothesis is that their inclusion in personal networks after retirement has become more likely because these relationships have become less role based in today's social-cultural context. Data

  20. 26 CFR 1.405-3 - Taxation of retirement bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of retirement bonds. 1.405-3 Section 1.405-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.405-3 Taxation of retirement...

  1. Life after College: Retirement Security for Higher Ed Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, James; McGill, Robin; Brodeur, Philip; Hall, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between employer and employee has changed significantly over the past 40 years. One of the greatest changes in this relationship is in the nature of employee retirement. While pension reform at public and private colleges has helped ensure institutional financial viability, retirement security for employees has declined. With the…

  2. Mandatory or Flexible: Whither Retirement Age Policy? | Ibiwoye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to flexible retirement. It also found that flexible policy will have a positive welfare effect as many employees can then take care of their extended span of dependants for a longer period and employee productivity will also be improved. Key words: Retirement, Mandatory, Flexible, Pension Plan, Extended Family System.

  3. A Policy Analysis of Public School Retirement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tara; Teeter, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this policy analysis was to examine the Missouri Public School Retirement System (PSRS). The team investigated the under-funding of PSRS, relating to sustainability and the feasibility of the system's use of one lever, contribution rate, to stabilize the retirement system, and to meet actuary needs and governmental requirements. The…

  4. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-8 - Retirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... value or over the fair market value at the time of such retirement if greater, but only if— (i) The... such productive use without disposition as, for example, by being placed in a supplies or scrap account... timing of the retirement, the estimated useful life used in computing depreciation, and whether the asset...

  5. Early retirement and non-employment after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Kuosma, E; Taskila, T

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether workplace support, sociodemographic factors and co-morbidity are associated with early retirement or non-employment due to other reasons among breast cancer survivors. We also compared quality of life and chronic symptoms (pain, fatigue, anxiety and depression) among...... employed, retired and other non-employed breast cancer survivors....

  6. Liability to pay retirement benefits when contributions were not paid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article addresses the conduct of employers who are associated with retirement funds, who have failed to pay their employees' contributions into such retirement funds. In particular, the article responds to the critique levelled at the approach adopted by both our courts and the office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator ...

  7. So now what? Effects of retirement on civic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaard, L.; Henkens, K.; Kalmijn, M.

    2014-01-01

    Retirement is an event that often brings about great changes in a person's personal and social life. For many people, work is not only a way to fill time and earn money, but also important for their identity and meaning in life. After retirement, these benefits of work are lost, and it is expected

  8. So now what? Effects of retirement on civic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaard, L.; Henkens, K.; Kalmijn, M.

    2014-01-01

    Retirement is an event that often brings about great changes in a person’s personal and social life. For many people, work is not only a way to fill time and earn money, but also important for their identity and meaning in life. After retirement, these benefits of work are lost, and it is expected

  9. Pathways to Retirement and Mortality Risk in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalwij, Adriaan; Alessie, Rob; Knoef, Marike

    The success of policies aimed at keeping older workers in employment until the statutory retirement age in part depends on the health of these workers. For this reason we examine to what extent pathways to statutory retirement other than employment are associated with adverse health conditions as

  10. Serbian insurance market: Select issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obadović Mirjana M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Every day insurance companies face a number of risks arising from the insurance industry itself, as well as risks arising from insurance company operations. In this constant fight against risks insurance companies use different models and methods that help them better understand, have a more comprehensive view of, and develop greater tolerance towards risks, in order to reduce their exposure to these risks. The model presented in this paper has been developed for implementation in insurance risk management directly related to insurance company risk, i.e. it is a model that can reliably determine the manner and intensity with which deviations in the initial insurance risk assessment affect insurance company operations, in the form of changes in operational risks and consequently in insurance companies’ business strategies. Additionally we present the implementation of the model in the Serbian market for the period 2005-2010.

  11. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi SS Toor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008 focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  12. Retirement and mental health: analysis of the Australian national survey of mental health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Peter; Gill, Sarah C; Rodgers, Bryan; Anstey, Kaarin J; Villamil, Elena; Melzer, David

    2006-03-01

    Nation-wide research on mental health problems amongst men and women during the transition from employment to retirement is limited. This study sought to explore the relationship between retirement and mental health across older adulthood, whilst considering age and known risk factors for mental disorders. Data were from the 1997 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being, a cross-sectional survey of 10,641 Australian adults. The prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders was analysed in the sub-sample of men (n = 1928) and women (n = 2261) aged 45-74 years. Mental health was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Instrument. Additional measures were used to assess respondents' physical health, demographic and personal characteristics. The prevalence of common mental disorders diminished across increasing age groups of men and women. Women aged 55-59, 65-69, and 70-74 had significantly lower rates of mental disorders than those aged 45-49. In contrast, only men aged 65-69 and 70-74 demonstrated significantly lower prevalence compared with men aged 45-49. Amongst younger men, retirees were significantly more likely to have a common mental disorder relative to men still in the labour force; however, this was not the case for retired men of, or nearing, the traditional retirement age of 65. Men and women with poor physical health were also more likely to have a diagnosable mental disorder. The findings of this study indicate that, for men, the relationship between retirement and mental health varies with age. The poorer mental health of men who retire early is not explained by usual risk factors. Given current policy changes in many countries to curtail early retirement, these findings highlight the need to consider mental health, and its influencing factors, when encouraging continued employment amongst older adults.

  13. CURRENT CHANGES ON INSURANCE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Giorgiana MANGRA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The offer of insurance products is about the requirements and needs of the consumer who must always have information regarding: the type of insurance risk covered and the excluded risks, the sum insured, the payment of premiums and their duration. The accurate information of customer requires, from the commencement of contract and throughout its duration, that he or she is aware of the obligations throughout the contractual period. Most of the Romanians are turning their attention to one of the insurance companies found in the top 10 in 2016, supervised by F.S.A. (Financial Supervision Authority, preferring to have a policy of mandatory household and goods insurance, auto liability or life insurance, but are also interested in travel health insurance when going abroad, private health insurance or private pension insurance. Romanians' reluctance regarding the conclusion of an insurance comes from their distrust in insurance companies (see the situations of companies like Astra Insurance, Carpatica Insurance etc., their personal financial situation and the fear that they will not receive protection if the risk is covered but the insured sum is insufficient

  14. The Health Effects of US Unemployment Insurance Policy: Does Income from Unemployment Benefits Prevent Cardiovascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Stefan; Glymour, Maria; Avendano, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggest that unemployment predicts increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but whether unemployment insurance programs mitigate this risk has not been assessed. Exploiting US state variations in unemployment insurance benefit programs, we tested the hypothesis that more generous benefits reduce CVD risk. Methods Cohort data came from 16,108 participants in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) aged 50–65 at baseline interviewed from 1992 to 2010. Data on first and recurrent CVD diagnosis assessed through biennial interviews were linked to the generosity of unemployment benefit programmes in each state and year. Using state fixed-effect models, we assessed whether state changes in the generosity of unemployment benefits predicted CVD risk. Results States with higher unemployment benefits had lower incidence of CVD, so that a 1% increase in benefits was associated with 18% lower odds of CVD (OR:0.82, 95%-CI:0.71–0.94). This association remained after introducing US census regional division fixed effects, but disappeared after introducing state fixed effects (OR:1.02, 95%-CI:0.79–1.31).This was consistent with the fact that unemployment was not associated with CVD risk in state-fixed effect models. Conclusion Although states with more generous unemployment benefits had lower CVD incidence, this appeared to be due to confounding by state-level characteristics. Possible explanations are the lack of short-term effects of unemployment on CVD risk. Future studies should assess whether benefits at earlier stages of the life-course influence long-term risk of CVD. PMID:25025281

  15. Retirement Age: Preferences of Employees Representing Various Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Mendryk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prolonging professional activity constitutes one of the possible solutions for alleviating negative consequences of demographic changes/population ageing. Devising effective tools motivating employees to remain professionally active must take into account preferences associated with retirement age. The following constitute the objectives of the present paper: 1 identification of preferences in the retirement age for various age groups; 2 indication of potential consequences behind particular preferences; 3 formulation of guidelines for human resources management in organizations. In order to achieve these objectives, the results of the study encompassing 2076 respondents, specialists employed in various departments of Polish innovative companies, were analysed. On average, for each evaluated age group, the preferred retirement age was much lower than the statutory retirement age in Poland (65 years . In case of women in 45+ age groups, the average retirement age was observed to be higher than 60 years (the new statutory threshold.

  16. The value of adaptive regret management in retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Jamie C; Wrosch, Carsten; Pushkar, Dolores; Li, Karen Z H

    2013-01-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study examined the associations between regret management, everyday activities, and retirement satisfaction among recent retirees. We hypothesized that the regulation of a severe life regret can facilitate activity engagement and retirement satisfaction, but only if retirees manage their regrets adaptively by either increasing effort and commitment when possessing favorable opportunities or disengaging when opportunity is unfavorable. Cross-sectional analyses demonstrated that the highest baseline levels of activity (e.g., volunteering, traveling) and retirement satisfaction were observed among participants who perceived favorable opportunities for addressing their life regrets and had high levels of engagement. Longitudinal analyses showed that this pattern was also associated with increases in activity engagement. In contrast, disengagement protected individuals with unfavorable opportunity from 3-year declines in retirement satisfaction. These findings indicate that adaptive regulation of regrets can both contribute to gains and prevent losses in the early stages of retirement, which may have lasting consequences on retirees' quality of life.

  17. The link between active aging and retirement age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Robert PAŞNICU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to shed light on the policies and consequences of the current retirement age in Romania. The retirement age has been repeatedly incremented in Romania in the last couple of years in order to try to compensate for the fact that the country has a low general employment rate, only 30% of the population, while having 20% of the total population aged 65+. By using an econometric model we will first prove the existence of an optimal retirement age that might vary for each and every one of us, after which we will explore different possibilities of exploiting this information in order to improve the current retirement programs. Mainly, we will look at the possible solution of eliminating the mandatory retirement age in certain work sectors through a comparison analysis.

  18. The conscientious retiree: The relationship between conscientiousness, retirement, and volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Anissa; Jackson, Joshua J.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between conscientiousness, work status, and volunteering utilizing two large samples, the St. Louis Personality and Aging Network (SPAN) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It was hypothesized that conscientious adults who were retired would be more likely to volunteer because, after retirement, they gain a substantial amount of free time, while losing an outlet for their industrious and achievement-striving tendencies. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses revealed that conscientious, retired individuals were more likely to volunteer than conscientious, working individuals. Further analyses revealed that facets of conscientiousness provide differential information from the general trait. These findings indicate that volunteering during retirement fills an important niche for high-striving, conscientious individuals. PMID:25843985

  19. RETIREMENT AS AN EFFECT OF EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Turek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Employers are the key actors in defining conditions for retirement, as well as the conditions for retaining employees; their role, however, is still not well recognised and expressed in theoretical frameworks. In order to better understand individual retirement and to design successful ageing policies we should consider the behaviour and attitudes of employers.The article presents the organisational perspective on retirement and contributes to a theoretical consideration of the role of employers and work environments in the retirement process. It discusses the classic economic approaches, including the deferred payment model, and in referring to sociology of economy and management sciences it presents the employer’s perspective in relations with older workers. The main goal of the article is to consider the retirement process as an effect of employer-employee relations.

  20. Why do Women in Spain Retire Later than Men? [ENG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Radl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between gender and retirement in Spain is paradoxical. The female employment rate between the ages of 55 and 64 is slightly more than half that of the male rate, whilst the average retirement age amongst women is much higher. Using event-history analysis techniques, this paper analyses whether this puzzling gender difference is due to compositional or selection effects. Data comes from a special retirement module within the 2006 Spanish Labour Force Survey (Encuesta de Población Activa, EPA.It applies a novel methodological framework, contrasting the results from a naïve survival analysis with those from a duration- selection model. The results suggest that women retire later than men above all because, from a fi nancial point of view, they cannot afford to retire any earlier.

  1. Patterns in income source expectations for retirement among preretirees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Elizabeth A; Bokemeier, Janet

    2014-07-01

    Financial planning for retirement is a lifelong process constrained by financial literacy, resources, and competing demands for resources across the life course. Further, social structure shapes the availability of options for funding retirement. The social and economic frameworks surrounding retirement planning are changing, and policy makers and researchers question whether retirement expectations have adapted. To explore this question, this research used k-means cluster analysis of a 2010 survey data set to identify natural groupings of Michigan adult preretirees based on their expectations of income sources for retirement. The cluster analysis identified six distinct groups that hold very different expectations. Most had expectations that are not consistent with projected changes in social structure and resource availability and those that did were more likely to occupy traditionally privileged statuses including being White, male, and married. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Impact of Long-Term Care on Retirement Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Retirement wellness is the result of retiring at an appropriate age, saving enough and managing risks appropriately. One of the major risks that often is not addressed effectively is the long-term care (LTC) risk, i.e., the risk of needing help due to physical or cognitive limitations. In 2014, the Society of Actuaries issued a call for papers on the link between LTC and retirement security. This article will discuss the topic of LTC and retirement security broadly, drawing from several of the papers. Some of the topics include the impact of LTC on the individual, family members and caregivers; modeling results showing the impact of LTC on assets needed for a secure retirement; alternative methods of financing LTC; the link between housing decisions and LTC; and some ideas for the future.

  3. The conscientious retiree: The relationship between conscientiousness, retirement, and volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Anissa; Jackson, Joshua J; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined the relationship between conscientiousness, work status, and volunteering utilizing two large samples, the St. Louis Personality and Aging Network (SPAN) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It was hypothesized that conscientious adults who were retired would be more likely to volunteer because, after retirement, they gain a substantial amount of free time, while losing an outlet for their industrious and achievement-striving tendencies. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses revealed that conscientious, retired individuals were more likely to volunteer than conscientious, working individuals. Further analyses revealed that facets of conscientiousness provide differential information from the general trait. These findings indicate that volunteering during retirement fills an important niche for high-striving, conscientious individuals.

  4. Mental health and retirement savings: Confounding issues with compounding interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Vicki L; Fertig, Angela R

    2018-02-01

    The questionable ability of the U.S. pension system to provide for the growing elderly population combined with the rising number of people affected by depression and other mental health issues magnifies the need to understand how these household characteristics affect retirement. Mental health problems have a large and significant negative effect on retirement savings. Specifically, psychological distress is associated with decreasing the probability of holding retirement accounts by as much as 24 percentage points and decreasing retirement savings as a share of financial assets by as much as 67 percentage points. The magnitude of these effects underscores the importance of employer management policy and government regulation of these accounts to help ensure households have adequate retirement savings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A life course perspective on working beyond retirement-results from a longitudinal study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Pas S. van der; Beek, A.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a societal need that workers prolong their working lives. By adopting a life course perspective, this study aimed to investigate the influence of work motives and motivation, health, job characteristics, skills, and financial and social situation on working beyond retirement, and

  6. Motives for early retirement of self-employed GPs in the Netherlands: a comparative study of two periods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuningen, M. van; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Velden, L.F.J. van der

    2011-01-01

    Background: Workforce planning for general practitioners needs to be informed by data on retirement intentions of GPs and factors that influence them. Several studies have investigated the association of explanatory factors with intentions to leave practice and actual leaving (e.g. in the UK, USA,

  7. Insurance against nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Virtually any type of nuclear risk is insurable in principle, providing, of course, that the necessary standards of safety and control are met. Some of the risks are of a relatively minor character and no more hazardous than a simple conventional risk. But insurers would not consider as a minor risk anything which involves the use of nuclear fuel or other nuclear materials which are in a critical state or capable of releasing dangerous levels of radioactivity. These would include nuclear reactors or, indeed, any type of assembly which can not be regarded as subcritical. Most insurers would also regard installations involved in the manufacturing, processing and enriching of nuclear fuel, and certainly those concerned with the reprocessing of irradiated fuel and plutonium extraction, as major risks. (HP) [de

  8. Hierarchical Markov Model in Life Insurance and Social Benefit Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwook Jang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We explored the effect of the jump-diffusion process on a social benefit scheme consisting of life insurance, unemployment/disability benefits, and retirement benefits. To do so, we used a four-state Markov chain with multiple decrements. Assuming independent state-wise intensities taking the form of a jump-diffusion process and deterministic interest rates, we evaluated the prospective reserves for this scheme in which the individual is employed at inception. We then numerically demonstrated the state of the reserves for the scheme under jump-diffusion and non-jump-diffusion settings. By decomposing the reserve equation into five components, our numerical illustration indicated that an extension of the retirement age has a spillover effect that would increase government expenses for other social insurance programs. We also conducted sensitivity analyses and examined the total-reserves components by changing the relevant parameters of the transition intensities, which are the average jump-size parameter, average jump frequency, and diffusion parameters of the chosen states, with figures provided. Our computation revealed that the total reserve is most sensitive to changes in average jump frequency.

  9. CERN Health Insurance Scheme - changes on 1 January 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Changes decided by the Council on 16 December 2010 Following the five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council has taken certain decisions which affect both active and retired staff. In order to restore the financial equilibrium of the CHIS, the level of contributions will increase progressively over the next five years. In 2011, the contributions of both active and retired members increase from 4.02% to 4.27%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntary insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with an income from a professional activity increase accordingly. The amounts of the daily allowance for Long-Term Care have been increased by 20% as of 1 January 2011. The CHIS Rules have been amended according to the above decisions. They entered into force on 1 January 2011 and are available on the CHIS site. Tel. 74125 Members of the personnel shall be deemed to ...

  10. Proposed Modification of the Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    After discussion at TREF on 29 October 2003, the Management proposes in this document a modification affecting one of the general principles of the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP), decided by the Council in December 1996 and introduced in April 1997. This modification would authorise the Director-General, in exceptional cases, as indicated in section 3 below, and, with the staff member's consent, to cancel his or her participation in the PRP and to reinstate the staff member in his or her original contractual situation. No modifications to the Staff Rules and Regulations are required. The proposal set out in section 3 of the present document is submitted by the Management, after consultation of the Governing Board of the Pension Fund, for recommendation by the Finance Committee to the Council and for approval by the Council, to enter into force as of 1 January 2004.

  11. Are Retirement Villages Promoting Active Aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Annie; Lee, Andy H; Jancey, Jonine; Kerr, Deborah; Howat, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated physical activity (PA) facilities of retirement villages (RVs) and neighborhood PA barriers identified by RV residents in Perth, Australia. An environmental audit of PA facilities was undertaken on 50 RV with 50+ independent living units, using the Audit of Physical Activity Resources for Seniors. Telephone interviews with 200 RV residents were conducted to identify neighborhood barriers to walking, and to obtain information on utilization of facilities and attendance of PA programs. Larger size RV appeared to provide significantly more PA facilities and programs. Utilization of PA facilities and program attendance were low (≈ 50%) and not associated with the RV environment (size, age, and facilities). Neighborhood barriers to walking were unsafe streets and hills. RV offers an attractive residential option with facilities that support active aging, but it is important to understand the barriers and enablers to use such facilities and attend programs offered.

  12. Impact of Insurance Coverage on Outcomes in Primary Breast Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L. Koenig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Private insurance is associated with better outcomes in multiple common cancers. We hypothesized that insurance status would significantly impact outcomes in primary breast sarcoma (PBS due to the additional challenges of diagnosing and coordinating specialized care for a rare cancer. Using the National Cancer Database, we identified adult females diagnosed with PBS between 2004 and 2013. The influence of insurance status on overall survival (OS was evaluated using the Kaplan–Meier estimator with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models. Among a cohort of 607 patients, 67 (11.0% had Medicaid, 217 (35.7% had Medicare, and 323 (53.2% had private insurance. Compared to privately insured patients, Medicaid patients were more likely to present with larger tumors and have their first surgical procedure further after diagnosis. Treatment was similar between patients with comparable disease stage. In multivariate analysis, Medicaid (hazard ratio (HR, 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.62–3.77; p<0.001 and Medicare (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10–2.57; p=0.017 were independently associated with worse OS. Medicaid insurance coverage negatively impacted survival compared to private insurance more in breast sarcoma than in breast carcinoma (interaction p<0.001. In conclusion, patients with Medicaid insurance present with later stage disease and have worse overall survival than privately insured patients with PBS. Worse outcomes for Medicaid patients are exacerbated in this rare cancer.

  13. Nuclear insurance and indemnity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovan, D.

    1976-01-01

    A brief account is given of insurance protection in the nuclear industry, and the legislation involved. Aspects discussed are: third part liability and the role of government in setting the maximum amount of compensation; the development and concept of channelling the liability exclusively to the operator; the development of nuclear insurance facilities in Europe and the USA; and the emergence in Europe of international agreements on third party liability for protection of neighbouring countries in the event of a major accident. The development of liability law in the USA from the time of the Price Anderson Act of 1957 through subsequent legislation is described. (U.K.)

  14. American nuclear insurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear liability insurance covers liability for damages directly caused by the nuclear energy hazard. This coverage includes offsite bodily injury and property damage sustained by members of the general public, and bodily injury to onsite third party personnel. Recent nuclear liability claims allege bodily injury and property damage resulting from releases or radioactive materials to the environmental and occupational radiation worker exposures. Routine reactor operations involving radioactive waste have the potential to result in such claims. The nuclear insurance Pools believe that one way such claims can be minimized is through the implementation of an effective radioactive waste management program

  15. Lectures on insurance models

    CERN Document Server

    Ramasubramanian, S

    2009-01-01

    Insurance has become a necessary aspect of modern society. The mathematical basis of insurance modeling is best expressed in terms of continuous time stochastic processes. This introductory text on actuarial risk theory deals with the Cramer-Lundberg model and the renewal risk model. Their basic structure and properties, including the renewal theorems as well as the corresponding ruin problems, are studied. There is a detailed discussion of heavy tailed distributions, which have become increasingly relevant. The Lundberg risk process with investment in risky asset is also considered. This book will be useful to practitioners in the field and to graduate students interested in this important branch of applied probability.

  16. Does postponing minimum retirement age improve healthy behaviours before retirement? Evidence from middle-aged Italian workers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoni, Marco; Brunello, Giorgio; Mazzarella, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    By increasing the residual working horizon of employed individuals, pension reforms that raise minimum retirement age are likely to affect the returns to investments in health-promoting behaviours before retirement, with consequences for individual health. Using the exogenous variation in minimum

  17. Counseling as an Insured Benefit: Perspectives from the Insurance Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Wallace C.

    1974-01-01

    Article discusses the feasibility of marriage counseling as an insurance benefit in the future. It is suggested that the physician be used as a marriage counselor in that insurance companies will pay for medical services. (EK)

  18. How Do Management Fees Affect Retirement Wealth under Mexico's Personal Retirement Accounts System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Emma; Hurd, Michael D; Rohwedder, Susann

    2014-12-01

    In 1997, Mexico transformed its pay-as-you-go social security system to a fully funded system with personal retirement accounts, including management fees. This article examines changes in retirement wealth resulting from this new system. It shows that management fees have drained a significant proportion of individuals' retirement wealth and have increased the number of persons claiming a government-subsidized minimum pension, particularly from the time the system was introduced in 1997 until adjustment to management fees in 2008. Since 2008, retirement wealth accumulation has been similar to that of the previous system. En 1997, México transformó su sistema de pensiones basado en cotizaciones individuales a uno de ahorro para el retiro que incluyen cuotas por la administración de las cuentas. El presente estudio examina los cambios en el monto de las pensiones como resultado de la introducción del nuevo sistema. Los resultados muestran que las cuotas de administración han drenado una proporción significativa del ahorro para el retiro de los individuos por lo que ha aumentado el número de personas que solicita la pensión mínima garantizada subsidiada por el gobierno desde que se introdujo el sistema en 1997 hasta que se hicieron ajustes en las cuotas de administración de los fondos de pensiones en 2008. A partir de 2008, la acumulación del ahorro para el retiro ha sido similar que la del sistema anterior.

  19. Risk Adjusted Valuation of the Current Military Retirement and the CY2018 Retirement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Department of Defense Authorization Act increases basic pay further in order to close the gap with civilian wages (P.L. 96-342). • 1993—The National...separates calculations based on gender (Office of the Actuary, 2015a). Following the life expectancy chart for the assumed retirement ages and using...a weighted average of the gender demographics of the enlisted and officer population within DOD yields the following (OSD, 2104): • Enlisted

  20. Dental practitioners and ill health retirement: a qualitative investigation into the causes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K B; Burke, F J T; Brown, J; Macdonald, E B; Morris, A J; White, D A; Murray, K

    2010-09-11

    Data published in 1999 from the Government Actuary on the National Health Service Pension Scheme (1989-1994) have indicated that the frequency of ill health premature retirement (IHR) was four times more prevalent among dentists at age 42 years compared with doctors.Objective The aim of this project was to determine the factors that contributed to IHR in dental practitioners, and the effects of IHR on their lives. Semi-structured interviews were carried out during 2007. A topic list was developed, piloted and used to guide the interviewer. A purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the respondents from an insurance company database. A framework approach to data analysis was utilised. Twenty-three respondents were interviewed, 19 male and 4 female, aged between 39-59 years. Depression, stress and anxiety were reported by respondents to be major causes of their retirement, followed by musculoskeletal disease and premature disability caused by trauma. This is illustrated by the following: '...just went straight into general practice but with some regrets. Practice was so depressing' (GDS/NHS); 'I withdraw, I don't engage ... I found it more and more difficult and one morning... I collapsed in tears at the practice' (GDS/NHS). Dentists reported both negative and positive comments in relation to support received from their health insurance company. The main causes of IHR were depression, musculoskeletal disease and specific skin conditions. Respondents expressed concern regarding the level of support available to dentists in distress. Respondents to this study found that continuing to work had a positive impact on their health.