WorldWideScience

Sample records for instructor training approaches

  1. Instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    A SAT-based Instructor Training Course was developed and implemented at NVTC. The duration of the initial course is 3 weeks and 2 weeks for annual refresher course. NVTC has had much experience with this Instructor Training Course generating the following lessons-learned: SAT implementation needs to be supported by plant management; age of instructors; developments of training materials and conducting training at the same time; knowledge and use of the PC; English language skills; social transitioning from the NPP to the TC; motivation; workplace environment and conditions

  2. A Gold Standards Approach to Training Instructors to Evaluate Crew Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David P.; Dismukes, R. Key

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Qualification Program requires that airlines evaluate crew performance in Line Oriented Simulation. For this evaluation to be meaningful, instructors must observe relevant crew behaviors and evaluate those behaviors consistently and accurately against standards established by the airline. The airline industry has largely settled on an approach in which instructors evaluate crew performance on a series of event sets, using standardized grade sheets on which behaviors specific to event set are listed. Typically, new instructors are given a class in which they learn to use the grade sheets and practice evaluating crew performance observed on videotapes. These classes emphasize reliability, providing detailed instruction and practice in scoring so that all instructors within a given class will give similar scores to similar performance. This approach has value but also has important limitations; (1) ratings within one class of new instructors may differ from those of other classes; (2) ratings may not be driven primarily by the specific behaviors on which the company wanted the crews to be scored; and (3) ratings may not be calibrated to company standards for level of performance skill required. In this paper we provide a method to extend the existing method of training instructors to address these three limitations. We call this method the "gold standards" approach because it uses ratings from the company's most experienced instructors as the basis for training rater accuracy. This approach ties the training to the specific behaviors on which the experienced instructors based their ratings.

  3. Training of OJT instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggin, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    OJT (on-the-job) instructor training needs to include several important elements. They need to provide OJT instructors with the policies and procedures for conducting and documenting the training; they need to acquaint them with performance objectives and train them to measure performance against these objectives; but most of all they need to teach them how to demonstrate a manipulative skill at the level of the objective, for this is the most likely single teaching method that the OJT instructor will use. This teaching skill consists of several discrete elements, all of which can be taught and learned. Finally, the OJT instructor needs to know how to create a job performance measure to assess the achievement of the learners. This paper describes such a training program

  4. Simulator training effectiveness: instructor training and qualifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholand, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power plant simulators have become the most important tool in training nuclear power plant operators. Yet, as these machines continue to become even more sophisticated, highly trained and experienced instructors with unique skills and insights are still essential in order to achieve effective and meaningful training. The making of a qualified simulator instructor involves training and techniques that exceed the traditional programs required of a Senior Reactor Operator (SRO). This paper discusses (i) the training necessary to produce a competent simulator instructor; and (ii) the continuing task of maintaining his or her proficiency. (author)

  5. SAT for instructor training. An experience in implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioujakov, A.Yu.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the main approaches for Instructor Training are presented been verified and approved by practice within Russian NPP Training organisations during last 5 years. The instructor selection, recruitment and followed training activities are an essential strategy plan for any NPP training organisation if the latter wants to provide effective training of NPP personnel. The strategy how to reach and maintain the competencies of instructors (or trainers) is explained; key points of instructor training programmes, both initial and continuing, are also discussed. The approaches concerned Instructor Training Programs being in compliance with the best of the Russian and international practice are defined and presented; these approaches in the field of instructor training. Initial and continuous training parts of whole program are discussed including specific modules/parts and principles to be used. Some examples extracted from verified and implemented training courses are presented and discussed. (author)

  6. Military Instructor Training in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    RNSETT 51 supervision at a training establishment; they finally return to the school for a further two weeks of consolidation. The embryo Instructor...seriously the ideal concept of individualization, severe problems could arise over the question of who controls the destinies of learners. Institutions

  7. Development of instructors for nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    In 1996 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook, which provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared to provide further details concerning the development of instructors for NPP personnel training. The quality of nuclear power plant personnel training is strongly dependent on the availability of competent instructors. Instructors must have a comprehensive practical as well as theoretical understanding of all aspects of the subjects being taught and the relationship of the subject to nuclear plant operation. Instructors should have the appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) in their assigned areas of responsibility. They should thoroughly understand all aspects of the contents of the training programmes and the relationship between these contents and overall plant operation. This means that they should be technically competent and show credibility with the trainees and other plant personnel. In addition, the instructors should be familiar with the basics of adult learning and a systematic approach to training, and should have adequate instructional and assessment skills. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on various aspects of instructor selection, development and deployment, by quoting actual examples from different countries. It highlights the importance of having an appropriate training policy, especially considering the various organisational arrangements that exist in different utilities/countries. This should result in: plant performance improvement, improved human performance, meeting goals and objectives of the business (quality, safety, productivity), and improving training programs. This publication is available in two formats - as a conventional printed

  8. 14 CFR 91.1095 - Initial and transition training and checking: Flight instructors (aircraft), flight instructors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instructor certificate— (i) The fundamental principles of the teaching-learning process; (ii) Teaching... Management § 91.1095 Initial and transition training and checking: Flight instructors (aircraft), flight...

  9. Athletic Training Clinical Instructors as Situational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Linda Platt

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present Situational Leadership as a model that can be implemented by clinical instructors during clinical education. Effective leadership occurs when the leadership style is matched with the observed followers' characteristics. Effective leaders anticipate and assess change and adapt quickly and grow with the change, all while leading followers to do the same. As athletic training students' levels of readiness change, clinical instructors also need to transform their leadership styles and strategies to match the students' ever-changing observed needs in different situations. DATA SOURCES: CINAHL (1982-2002), MEDLINE (1990-2001), SPORT Discus (1949-2002), ERIC (1966-2002), and Internet Web sites were searched. Search terms included leadership, situational leadership, clinical instructors and leadership, teachers as leaders, and clinical education. DATA SYNTHESIS: Situational Leadership is presented as a leadership model to be used by clinical instructors while teaching and supervising athletic training students in the clinical setting. This model can be implemented to improve the clinical-education process. Situational leaders, eg, clinical instructors, must have the flexibility and range of skills to vary their leadership styles to match the challenges that occur while teaching athletic training students. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: This leadership style causes the leader to carry a substantial responsibility to lead while giving power away. Communication is one of the most important leadership skills to develop to become an effective leader. It is imperative for the future of the profession that certified athletic trainers continue to develop effective leadership skills to address the changing times in education and expectations of the athletic training profession.

  10. Selection and training of instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chang-Kook

    1996-01-01

    Korea, a poor natural resources country, has to choose to construct nuclear power plants. In order to construct nuclear power plant on time and to operate it safely, capable manpower is needed. KNTC is the organization to supply such manpower requirement. Furthermore, nuclear safety is the most sensitive area among the general public. To improve the safety of nuclear power plants, training of the operator is the one of the best way to achieve it. The performance of Korean nuclear power plants is somewhat good. Average capacity factor of operating NPPs was over 85% for the last three years. One of the reasons Korea achieves such high performance of nuclear power plant is good training system of KEPCO. 2 figs, 5 tabs

  11. An Instructor's Diagnostic Aid for Feedback in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Dee H.; Uliano, Kevin C.

    1988-01-01

    Instructor's Diagnostic Aid for Feedback in Training (IDAFT) is a computer-assisted method based on error analysis, domains of learning, and events of instruction. Its use with Navy team instructors is currently being explored. (JOW)

  12. Guide to good practices for training and qualification of instructors. DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this guide is to provide contractor training organizations with information that can be used to verify the adquacy and/or modify existing instructor training programs, or to develop new training programs. It contains good practices for the training and qualification of technical instructors and instructional technologists at DOE reactor and non-reactor nuclear facilities. It addresses the content of initial and continuing instructor training programs, evaluation of instructor training programs, and maintenance of instructor training records.

  13. Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is Comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, L. D.; Løfgren, Bo; Jessen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study.......Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study....

  14. Interpersonal Skills Training: Online versus Instructor-Led Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Erika R.; Fritsch, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    Compares instructional methods used in interpersonal skills training courses delivered online to the methods used in similar courses delivered in a traditional instructor-led classroom. Discusses implications for performance improvement professionals who are responsible for selecting and designing interpersonal skills training interventions.…

  15. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  16. Training of instructors on nuclear safety in Asian Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, Yuko; Shitomi, Hajimu; Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Technology and Education Center

    2002-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)is conducting the international cooperation's of training of the foreign instructors and sending the Japanese teacher to the countries of Indonesia, Thailand (both from 1996) and Vietnam (2000). The training is performed in the JAERI for the future instructors of the concerned country for the period of essentially 2 months and is mainly on nuclear safety principles and safety handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Until 2001, 22 instructors from those countries have been trained in 142 courses. The sent Japanese teacher together with the trained instructor conduct the education of mainly radiation protection and measurement for personnel in ETC of BATAN (Education and Training Center, Indonesia atomic energy agency), radiation protection and atomic energy technology/application in OAEP (Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand) and the same subjects as BATAN in VAEC (Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission). Instruments for radiation measurement are essentially from Japan. This JAERI international cooperation will be open to other Asian countries. (K.H.)

  17. Training of instructors on nuclear safety in Asian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Yuko; Shitomi, Hajimu; Saeki, Masakatsu

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)is conducting the international cooperation's of training of the foreign instructors and sending the Japanese teacher to the countries of Indonesia, Thailand (both from 1996) and Vietnam (2000). The training is performed in the JAERI for the future instructors of the concerned country for the period of essentially 2 months and is mainly on nuclear safety principles and safety handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Until 2001, 22 instructors from those countries have been trained in 142 courses. The sent Japanese teacher together with the trained instructor conduct the education of mainly radiation protection and measurement for personnel in ETC of BATAN (Education and Training Center, Indonesia atomic energy agency), radiation protection and atomic energy technology/application in OAEP (Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand) and the same subjects as BATAN in VAEC (Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission). Instruments for radiation measurement are essentially from Japan. This JAERI international cooperation will be open to other Asian countries. (K.H.)

  18. Instructional skills training - the Westinghouse program to insure competence of nuclear training instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear training engineer as well as being competent technically must be able to teach effectively. Westinghouse have developed a course for training instructors which aims to improve their teaching skills. The course, which has both theoretical and practical content covers the role of the instructor, the learning process, communications, test construction and analysis and stress identification and analysis. (U.K.)

  19. Teaching the Literature Review: A Practical Approach for College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisco, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Instructors across the disciplines require their students to write literature reviews. Although numerous sources describe the literature review process, instructors and students face difficulty when approaching the structure of a literature review. This paper presents a straightforward, efficient approach for teaching students how to write a…

  20. Instructor qualification for radiation safety training at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Prior to 1993, Health Physics Training (HPT) was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) health physics group. The job requirements specified a Masters Degree and experience. In fact, the majority of Health Physicists in the group were certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Under those circumstances, it was assumed that individuals in the group were technically qualified and the HPT instructor qualification stated that. In late 1993, the Health Physics Group at the LLNL was restructured and the training function was assigned to the training group. Additional requirements for training were mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE), which would necessitate increasing the existing training staff. With the need to hire, and the policy of reassignment of employees during downsizing, it was imperative that formal qualification standards be developed for technical knowledge. Qualification standards were in place for instructional capability. In drafting the new training qualifications for instructors, the requirements of a Certified Health Physicists had to be modified due to supply and demand. Additionally, for many of the performance-based training courses, registration by the National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists is more desirable. Flexibility in qualification requirements has been incorporated to meet the reality of ongoing training and the compensation for desirable skills of individuals who may not meet all the criteria. The qualification requirements for an instructor rely on entry-level requirements and emphasis on goals (preferred) and continuing development of technical and instructional capabilities

  1. Instructor training at the Swedish Nuclear Power Training and Safety Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, P.-E.

    1988-01-01

    In spite of the fact that full-scope simulators are very powerful training tools, the transfer of knowledge and skills to the trainees during simulator training is completely dependent on the instructors' technical competence and their ability to transfer it to the trainees by efficient use of these training tools. Accordingly, the instructor candidates must pass a technical training programme equivalent to that for shift supervisors and have at least a few months of experience in each operator position at a nuclear power plant. To be authorized, the instructors must also pass a teacher training programme consisting of four 2 week instructor courses. To stay authorized the instructors must pass an annual retraining programme consisting of at least two weeks of technical refresher and one week teacher retraining. The retraining programme also includes at least three weeks of operational practice at a nuclear power plant. (author)

  2. Welding. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This instructor's guide accompanies the self-paced student training modules on welding, three of which are available separately as CE 032 889-891. Introductory materials include a description of the components of the pre-apprenticeship project, a discussion of the teacher's role in conducting the course, and scope and contents of the four phases…

  3. Advanced CRM training for instructors and evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, William R.

    1991-01-01

    It is seen that if the maximum operational benefit of crew resource management (CRM) is to be achieved, the evaluator group is the principal key and specialized training that is ongoing is necessary for this group. The training must be customized to fit the needs of a particular organization, and the training must address key topical issues that influence organizational dynamics. Attention is given to the use of video and full length scripted NASA research LOFTS, behavioral markers and debriefing skills, the importance of policy and written CRM standards, and line oriented simulations debriefing performance indicators.

  4. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...... individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines...... for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  5. Electronics lab instructors' approaches to troubleshooting instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing participants' instructional practices, we characterize their perceptions about the role of troubleshooting in electronics, the importance of the ability to troubleshoot more generally, and what it means for students to be competent troubleshooters. One major finding of this work is that, while almost all instructors in our study said that troubleshooting is an important learning outcome for students in electronics lab courses, only half of instructors said they directly assessed students' ability to troubleshoot. Based on our findings, we argue that there is a need for research-based instructional materials that attend to both cognitive and noncognitive aspects of troubleshooting proficiency. We also identify several areas for future investigation related to troubleshooting instruction in electronics lab courses.

  6. An Automatic Course Scheduling Approach Using Instructors' Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Faris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available University Courses Timetabling problem has been extensively researched in the last decade. Therefore, numerous approaches were proposed to solve UCT problem. This paper proposes a new approach to process a sequence of meetings between instructors, rooms, and students in predefined periods of time with satisfying a set of constraints divided in variety of types. In addition, this paper proposes new representation for courses timetabling and conflict-free for each time slot by mining instructor preferences from previous schedules to avoid undesirable times for instructors. Experiments on different real data showed the approach achieved increased satisfaction degree for each instructor and gives feasible schedule with satisfying all hard constraints in construction operation. The generated schedules have high satisfaction degrees comparing with schedules created manually. The research conducts experiments on collected data gathered from the computer science department and other related departments in Jordan University of Science and Technology- Jordan.

  7. University-industry consortium: maximizing the use of limited resources for instructor training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, R.E.; Williams, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    This proposed development effort would accomplish three major objectives, as follows: 1. To identify and verify, through job analysis, the critical professional tasks that must be performed by electric utility instructors. 2. To adapt and revise existing instructor training modules to make them self-contained and highly specific to the professional knowledge and skills needed by electric utility instructors. 3. To develop new instructor training modules, if needed, to meet utility instructor training needs that are not addressed by any existing materials. It is anticipated that approximately twenty (20) modules will be needed to address all of the critical instructor tasks identified during the job analysis phase. The National Center for Research in Vocational Education proposes that it would be very cost-effective and time-efficient to cooperatively undertake the development of the needed instructor training modules with a consortium of about to ten interested electric utility companies

  8. Simulation-based crisis resource management training for pediatric critical care medicine: a review for instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Donoghue, Aaron; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Eppich, Walter

    2012-03-01

    To review the essential elements of crisis resource management and provide a resource for instructors by describing how to use simulation-based training to teach crisis resource management principles in pediatric acute care contexts. A MEDLINE-based literature source. OUTLINE OF REVIEW: This review is divided into three main sections: Background, Principles of Crisis Resource Management, and Tools and Resources. The background section provides the brief history and definition of crisis resource management. The next section describes all the essential elements of crisis resource management, including leadership and followership, communication, teamwork, resource use, and situational awareness. This is followed by a review of evidence supporting the use of simulation-based crisis resource management training in health care. The last section provides the resources necessary to develop crisis resource management training using a simulation-based approach. This includes a description of how to design pediatric simulation scenarios, how to effectively debrief, and a list of potential assessment tools that instructors can use to evaluate crisis resource management performance during simulation-based training. Crisis resource management principles form the foundation for efficient team functioning and subsequent error reduction in high-stakes environments such as acute care pediatrics. Effective instructor training is required for those programs wishing to teach these principles using simulation-based learning. Dissemination and integration of these principles into pediatric critical care practice has the potential for a tremendous impact on patient safety and outcomes.

  9. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new "blended learning" course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on April 1st, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while ...

  10. 14 CFR 142.53 - Training center instructor training and testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instruction in at least— (i) The fundamental principles of the learning process; (ii) Elements of effective... training device controls and systems; (ii) Proper operation of environmental and fault panels; (iii... covering aircraft subsystems and operating rules applicable to the training courses that the instructor is...

  11. Teaching the Literature Review: A Practical Approach for College Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Cisco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Instructors across the disciplines require their students to write literature reviews. Although numerous sources describe the literature review process, instructors and students face difficulty when approaching the structure of a literature review. This paper presents a straightforward, efficient approach for teaching students how to write a literature review. Developed over the course of three years at a university writing center, this lesson received substantial support from students across the disciplines. This paper reflects on one group of students’ experiences while writing literature reviews in a political science course, showing that students demonstrated a sense of confidence and direction after the lesson. University professors, writing center staff, and content-discipline instructors in higher education classrooms can alleviate their students’ anxiety about literature reviews by using this lesson in their classrooms.

  12. Conversion of Provider EMR Training from Instructor-Led Training to eLearning at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Karen; Williams, Michele; Aldrich, Alison; Bogacz, Adrienne; Denier, Sighle; McAlearney, Ann S

    2017-07-26

    This case study overviews the conversion of provider training of the electronic medical record (EMR) from an instructor-led training (ILT) program to eLearning at an Academic Medical Center (AMC). This conversion provided us with both a useful training tool and the opportunity to maximize efficiency within both our training and optimization team and organization. eLearning Development Principles were created and served as a guide to assist us with designing an eLearning curriculum using a five step process. The result was a new training approach that allowed learners to complete training at their own pace, and even test out of sections based on demonstrated competency. The information we have leads us to believe that a substantial return on our investment can be obtained from the conversion with positive impacts that have served as the foundation for the future of end user EMR training at our AMC.

  13. Simulation Training: Evaluating the Instructor's Contribution to a Wizard of Oz Simulator in Obstetrics and Gynecology Ultrasound Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aric; Tepper, Ronnie; Shtub, Avraham

    2017-04-21

    Workplaces today demand graduates who are prepared with field-specific knowledge, advanced social skills, problem-solving skills, and integration capabilities. Meeting these goals with didactic learning (DL) is becoming increasingly difficult. Enhanced training methods that would better prepare tomorrow's graduates must be more engaging and game-like, such as feedback based e-learning or simulation-based training, while saving time. Empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of advanced learning methods is lacking. Objective quantitative research comparing advanced training methods with DL is sparse. This quantitative study assessed the effectiveness of a computerized interactive simulator coupled with an instructor who monitored students' progress and provided Web-based immediate feedback. A low-cost, globally accessible, telemedicine simulator, developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel-was used. A previous study in the field of interventional cardiology, evaluating the efficacy of the simulator to enhanced learning via knowledge exams, presented promising results of average scores varying from 94% after training and 54% before training (n=20) with Padvantage (P=.01) was found in favor of the WOZ training approach. Content type and training audience were not significant. This study evaluated the contribution of an integrated teaching environment using a computerized interactive simulator, with an instructor providing immediate Web-based immediate feedback to trainees. Involvement of an instructor in the simulation-based training process provided better learning outcomes that varied training content and trainee populations did not affect the overall learning gains. ©Aric Katz, Ronnie Tepper, Avraham Shtub. Originally published in JMIR Medical Education (http://mededu.jmir.org), 21.04.2017.

  14. Role Strain in Collegiate Athletic Training Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jolene M; Weidner, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    Context: Certified athletic trainers who serve as Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) in the collegiate setting are balancing various roles (eg, patient care and related administrative tasks, clinical education). Whether this balancing act is associated with role strain in athletic trainers has not been examined. Objective: To examine the degree of, and contributing factors (eg, socialization experiences, professional and employment demographics, job congruency) to, role strain in collegiate ACIs. Design: Cross-sectional survey design. Setting: Geographically stratified random sample of ACIs affiliated with accredited athletic training education programs at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, II, and III institutions. Patients or Other Participants: 118 collegiate ACIs (47 head athletic trainers, 45 assistant athletic trainers, 26 graduate assistant athletic trainers). Main Outcome Measure(s): The Athletic Training ACI Role Strain Inventory, which measures total degree of role strain, 7 subscales of role strain, socialization experiences, professional and employment characteristics, and congruency in job responsibilities. Results: A total of 49% (n  =  58) of the participants experienced a moderate to high degree of role strain. Role Overload was the highest contributing subscale to total role strain. No differences were noted between total role strain and role occupant groups, NCAA division, or sex. Graduate assistant athletic trainers experienced a greater degree of role incompetence than head athletic trainers did (P  =  .001). Division II ACIs reported a greater degree of inter-role conflict than those in Division I (P  =  .02). Female ACIs reported a greater degree of role incompetence than male ACIs (P  =  .01). Those ACIs who stated that the ACI training provided by their institution did not adequately prepare them for the role as an ACI experienced greater role strain (P < .001). Conclusions: The ACIs in the

  15. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004 - Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on 7 September, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office XP' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the app...

  16. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004 - Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on September 7, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office XP' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the ...

  17. 14 CFR 61.41 - Flight training received from flight instructors not certificated by the FAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the FAA. (a) A person may credit flight training toward the requirements of a pilot certificate or... flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to...

  18. 14 CFR 142.47 - Training center instructor eligibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and speak and understand in the English language; (3) If instructing in an aircraft in flight, is... and procedures. (iii) The fundamental principles of the learning process. (iv) Instructor duties...

  19. Comparison of instructor-led automated external defibrillation training and three alternative DVD-based training methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Wiebe; Turner, Nigel M.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Self-directed BLS-training, using a personal training manikin with video has been shown to be as effective as instructor-led training. This has not previously been investigated for AED-training. Materials and methods: This prospective, randomized study with a non-inferiority design

  20. Hanford general employee training: Computer-based training instructor's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The Computer-Based Training portion of the Hanford General Employee Training course is designed to be used in a classroom setting with a live instructor. Future references to this course'' refer only to the computer-based portion of the whole. This course covers the basic Safety, Security, and Quality issues that pertain to all employees of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The topics that are covered were taken from the recommendations and requirements for General Employee Training as set forth by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in INPO 87-004, Guidelines for General Employee Training, applicable US Department of Energy orders, and Westinghouse Hanford Company procedures and policy. Besides presenting fundamental concepts, this course also contains information on resources that are available to assist students. It does this using Interactive Videodisk technology, which combines computer-generated text and graphics with audio and video provided by a videodisk player.

  1. The effects of training group exercise class instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, N; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Quested, E; Hancox, J

    2017-09-01

    Drawing from self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2002), we developed and tested an intervention to train fitness instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style when interacting with exercisers. This was a parallel group, two-arm quasi-experimental design. Participants in the intervention arm were 29 indoor cycling instructors (n = 10 for the control arm) and 246 class members (n = 75 for the control arm). The intervention consisted of face-to-face workshops, education/information video clips, group discussions and activities, brainstorming, individual planning, and practical tasks in the cycling studio. Instructors and exercisers responded to validated questionnaires about instructors' use of motivational strategies and other motivation-related variables before the first workshop and at the end of the third and final workshop (4 months later). Time × arm interactions revealed no significant effects, possibly due to the large attrition of instructors and exercisers in the control arm. Within-group analyses in the intervention arm showed that exercisers' perceptions of instructor motivationally adaptive strategies, psychological need satisfaction, and intentions to remain in the class increased over time. Similarly, instructors in the intervention arm reported being less controlling and experiencing more need satisfaction over time. These results offer initial promising evidence for the positive impact of the training. © 2016 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Developing and maintaining instructor capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, W.P.; Smith, G.

    1985-01-01

    The New York Power Authority, after surveying available courses, decided to develop an in-house instructor training program. Following the principles of the Systems Approach to Training the course embodied the results of a job analysis resulting in a program containing instruction in Educational Philosophy, the Systems Approach to Training, Methods and Media, and Testing. The course content is covered through classroom instruction, on-the-job training, instructor evaluations, and assignments. Instructors completing the program continue to maintain skills with inservice training

  3. 76 FR 35103 - Training and Qualification Requirements for Check Airmen and Flight Instructors; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... which initial and transition flight training must include an in-flight element. Technical Amendment This.... 28471; Amendment Nos. 121-355 and 135-125] RIN 2120-AF08 Training and Qualification Requirements for Check Airmen and Flight Instructors; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...

  4. Using a Design-Based Research Study to Identify Principles for Training Instructors to Teach Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Julie; Anderson, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Within the overall framework of design-based research, this paper reports on a study that focused on evaluating an online training course for online instructors. This intervention was designed as a possible solution to the problem facing some higher education institutions of how to provide quality, accessible training for mostly part-time…

  5. Comparison of an interactive CD-based and traditional instructor-led Basic Life Support skills training for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardegan, Karen J; Schofield, Margot J; Murphy, Gregory C

    2015-08-01

    Basic Life Support (BLS) is a life-saving and fundamental skill in resuscitation. However, studies have reported limitations in BLS training outcomes for both health professional and lay populations, and noted the resource and time-intensive nature of traditional training approaches. This exploratory study evaluated the effectiveness of an interactive CD-based BLS training programme that included unsupervised manikin practice compared with a traditional instructor-led BLS training programme involving demonstration and supervised practice. A quasi-experimental post-test with follow-up design was used. The sample was comprised of two cohorts: Novice second-year undergraduate Nursing students (n=187) and Practising Nurses (n=107) in their first year of hospital employment. BLS skill outcomes were assessed at one week and again at eight weeks post training. No statistically significant differences were found between the CD and traditional instructor-led BLS training methods in BLS skills of Novice and Practising Nurses at one week and eight weeks post training. However, there was a decrement in skill between one week and eight weeks post-training across both groups and an overall low level of competence. The failure to find a difference between the CD-based BLS programme with unsupervised manikin practice and a resource-intensive traditional instructor-led BLS training programme may indicate equivalence of the programmes or, even study design limitations. It is concerning that competence displayed by trainees from both groups was less than optimal and suggests the need for renewed efforts to develop and evaluate BLS training programmes which can achieve high rates of competence with acceptable skill retention over time. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experiences of instructors delivering the Mental Health First Aid training programme: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J

    2010-09-01

    Mental health literacy among the public is often poor, and although people frequently encounter others experiencing mental distress in their workplace, families and communities, they may be ill-equipped to provide appropriate support. 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA), a 12-h mental health promotion programme seeks to address this, training people in the knowledge and skills needed to engage with someone experiencing mental health problems. Research relating to the MHFA programme has centred on course attendees, with a paucity of research surrounding the delivery of basic mental health training programmes. Understanding experiences of instructors delivering such programmes is key to the success of future delivery. This study sought to identify the views and experiences of instructors delivering the MHFA programme in Wales. Fourteen MHFA instructors participated in semi-structured audio-recorded interviews, with the transcripts analysed to identify key themes. This paper explores two of the identified themes namely prerequisite skills and support required by instructors. The study highlighted that because of the ensuing emotional labour experienced by instructors, universal mental health training programmes must put in place a clear infrastructure to train, support and monitor those delivering them, for programme roll-out to be effective.

  7. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook ? A new "blended learning" course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training course for Microsoft Applications. The next sessions will take place on the 19 and 26 February (Thursday mornings), with 8 participants at most. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants...

  8. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook ? A new "blended learning" course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on February 26, Thursday morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while ...

  9. How Iranian Instructors Teach L2 Pragmatics in Their Classroom Practices? A Mixed-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthasamy, Paramasivam; Farashaiyan, Atieh

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the teaching approaches and techniques that Iranian instructors utilize for teaching L2 pragmatics in their classroom practices. 238 Iranian instructors participated in this study. The data for this study were accumulated through questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. In terms of the instructional approaches, both the…

  10. Tailored instructor feedback leads to more effective virtual-reality laparoscopic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschold, M; Huber, T; Zeißig, S R; Lang, H; Kneist, Werner

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic novices begin at different performance levels, and studies on tailored training concepts are warranted. The effect of verbal instructor feedback has been investigated with varying results, and its effectiveness in virtual-reality laparoscopic (VRL) simulations still is unclear. This study aimed to determine whether laparoscopic novices with lower initial performance statuses may profit from training with intensive instructor feedback. A prospective, single-blinded study was performed within a week-long curricular course. In this study, 20 medical students performed a complex bimanual maneuver on a VRL simulator. There was a division in performance levels, with a high-performer group (HPG) that received a better median score and a low-performer group (LPG). During the training phase, only the initial LPG received standardized instructor feedback in a one-to-one setting. The final assessment of skills for both groups involved performing the task without feedback at the end of the course. The HPG and LPG showed significantly different initial performance levels according global and categorized (time, economics, error) scores (p training concept with instructor feedback limited to the LPG. The tailored training was effective and economic for the laparoscopic novices and their teachers.

  11. Training New Instructors to Implement Discrete Trial Teaching Strategies with Children with Autism in a Community-Based Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Andrew; Downs, Robyn Conley

    2013-01-01

    The effects of training and supervision on instructor knowledge and performance of discrete trial teaching (DTT) within three domains (DTT Technical Skills; Work Session Preparation/Conclusion; and Student Engagement/Management) were examined in this study. Eight undergraduate student instructors received an 8-[hour] training in DTT and support…

  12. An Investigation of First-Year Engineering Student and Instructor Perspectives of Learning Analytics Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David B.; Brozina, Cory; Novoselich, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how first-year engineering undergraduates and their instructors describe the potential for learning analytics approaches to contribute to student success. Results of qualitative data collection in a first-year engineering course indicated that both students and instructors\temphasized a preference for learning analytics…

  13. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  14. Adult Basic Skills Instructor Training and Experiential Learning Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Competency-based training workshops based on Kolb's experiential learning theory were held for North Carolina adult basic education teachers; 251 attended 1-day sessions and 91 a week-long summer institute. Topics included interpersonal communication, reading, numeracy, language arts, math, assessment, and program evaluation. (SK)

  15. The Effects of Instructor Differences Upon Student Progress in Naval Aviation Training. Medical Research Progress No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Wayne L.; Shannon, Richard H.

    The investigation attempted to determine: whether instructor differences could be measured quantitatively; if such differences affected the grades which they assigned; if such differences affected the student's progress through the flight training program. Using an unstructured rating form, it was found that reliable instructor differences could…

  16. CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on September 7, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/ where you can find the detailed course contents under the "Microsoft Office XP" catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participa...

  17. CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on September 7, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office XP' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the app...

  18. CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on September 7, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the "Microsoft Office XP" catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the partici...

  19. CERN Technical Training 2004 - Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on September 7, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office XP' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the ap...

  20. CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A new blended learning course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on September 7, morning. Course sessions will be self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office XP suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office XP' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the ...

  1. CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A 'blended learning' course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on November 9, morning. Course sessions are self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the appropriate WBT...

  2. CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Would you need to enhance your skills in Microsoft Office applications or Outlook? A 'blended learning' course, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, is now offered by Technical Training: the Instructor-led CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) Course for Microsoft Applications. The next session will take place on November 9, morning. Course sessions are self-paced and self-directed, with participants being in control of their learning, while having direct access to an instructor when in class. Topics include the Microsoft Office suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access) and Outlook, at introductory, intermediate and advanced levels. Visit the 2004 CERN WBTechT Portal, http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/, where you can find the detailed course contents under the 'Microsoft Office' catalogue. Previous experience in web-based training is not required, as each session will start with an introduction to E-learning, and registration of the participants into the appropriate WBT...

  3. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  4. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  5. Outlines of JAEA's instructor training program and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Yabuuchi, Yukiko; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Sawada, Makoto; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Sawai, Tomotsugu; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of JAEA has conducted nuclear human resource development for more than 50 years since its establishment in 1958. NuHRDeC conducts international nuclear human resource development, so called “Instructor Training Program (ITP)”, which is a training scheme launched in 1996 in order to support Asian countries seeking peaceful use of nuclear energy. The ITP consists of 1) Instructor Training Course (ITC) in Japan, 2) Follow-up Training Course (FTC) in own countries organized by instructors trained at ITC in Japan, and 3) Nuclear Technology Seminar for bringing up nuclear trainers and leaders in Asian countries. The purpose of ITP is to develop a self-sustainable training system in Asian countries, which disseminates the knowledge and technology in their countries. After completing ITC trainings at NuHRDeC, the trainees are obliged to set up FTC in each country. They create own 1 or 2 weeks course curricula and allocate local lecturers including themselves. Two or three Japanese experts join the FTC to give technical advices and support to local lecturers. The present specialized fields of ITC are 1) Reactor engineering such as reactor physics, thermal engineering and reactor safety, 2) Environmental radioactivity monitoring, and 3) Nuclear emergency preparedness. The main feature of ITC is that the curricula places emphasis on the practical exercise with well-equipped training facilities, experimental laboratories utilizing the simulators of research reactor, and the expertise of lecturers mostly from JAEA. As of FY2014, ITC is applied to 8 countries; Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Philippines and Mongolia. The total number of participants at ITC since 1996 is approximately 300 and the participation of FTC has been increased significantly year after year with more than 3,000 in total. This result indicates that the ITP system has been effectively contributed to fostering local

  6. Students' Perceptions about Online Teaching Effectiveness: A Bottom-Up Approach for Identifying Online Instructors' Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rey, Pilar; Barbera, Elena; Fernández-Navarro, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The topic of online instructors' roles has been of interest to the educational community since the late twentieth century. In previous studies, the identification of online instructors' roles was done using a top-down (deductive) approach. This study applied a bottom-up (inductive) procedure to examine not only the roles of online instructors from…

  7. The Significance of Emotional Intelligence on Entrepreneurial Behavior of Instructors (Case study: Iran Technical and vocational Training Organization (TVTO’s Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Karimi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurial characteristics, in fact, are the entrepreneur’s behavioral outputs in different conditions. The behavior, which can be increasingly changed during the times, is a function of acquired and inherent factors. Emotional intelligence as a set of teachable and acquisitive behaviors, can affect the entrepreneurs’ behavioral characteristics. This paper tried to study the relationship between emotional intelligence and entrepreneurial behavioral characteristics among the Iran Technical and vocational Training Organization (TVTO’s Instructors. The statistical sample population in this research is 105 instructors from all over the Iran. Two standardized questionnaires including; Measurement Instrument of Personality characteristics of Iranian’s Entrepreneurs and “Bar- On” Test for assessing the Emotional Intelligence has been used for data collection after testing their validity and reliability. Results from data analysis using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques showed that there is a significant positive relationship between entrepreneurial characteristics and emotional intelligence among Iran TVTO’s instructors.

  8. Technical Training: CERN Technical Training 2004: Instructor-led WBTechT Course for Microsoft Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The Instructor-led CERN WBTechT course for Microsoft Applications is a new type of course offered in the framework of the Technical Training Programme, combining instructor-led and computer-based multimedia training, also known as "blended learning". The next sessions will take place on the 12, 19, and 26 February (Thursday mornings), and subsequent sessions will be organised following demand. Based on the new ElementK 2004 CERN WBTechT catalogue, courses will be self-paced and self-d...

  9. Factors influencing effective learning in instructional skill training for vocational instructors : learning for change : a case of Training Institute for Technical Instruction (TITI), Bhaktapur, Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neupane, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on Instructional Skills (IS) training module which was imparted by Training Institute for Technical Instruction (TITI) Nepal to improve the performance of vocational instructors. Instructional skill training is a three months training course split in to three modules; each

  10. The Effect of Academics' Dress and Gender on Student Perceptions of Instructor Approachability and Likeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Amber M.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to discover student perceptions of academics' dress and gender and their impact on perceived instructor approachability and likeability. Three categories of dress were examined: casual, business casual and professional. The results of this study suggest students at career-arts institutions perceive female teachers as less…

  11. Are the attitudes of exercise instructors who work with older adults influenced by training and personal characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Helen; Skelton, Dawn A; Campbell, Malcolm; Todd, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between attitudes and characteristics of instructors and uptake and adherence of older people to exercise classes. This article explores these issues. The authors surveyed 731 UK exercise instructors with specialist older adult exercise qualifications. A questionnaire investigated instructors' characteristics and attitudes toward older adults' participation in exercise. For mostly seated classes, EXTEND qualification (B = 0.36, p = .005) had a positive effect on instructors' attitudes. Later Life Training qualification (B = -2.80, p = .003), clinical background (B = -3.99, p = .005), and delivering classes in National Health Services (B = -3.12, p attitudes. For mostly standing classes, experience (B = 0.20, p = .003) and delivering in leisure centers (B = 0.46, p = .032) had a positive and clinical background (B = -1.78, p = .018) had a negative effect on instructors' attitudes. Most instructors have positive attitudes, but training and work context can influence attitudes toward older people's participation in exercise classes both positively and negatively.

  12. NEW APPROACHES: Toppling trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Malcolm

    1998-03-01

    This article explains a novel way of approaching centripetal force: theory is used to predict an orbital period at which a toy train will topple from a circular track. The demonstration has proved useful in A-level, GNVQ and undergraduate Physics and Engineering schemes.

  13. Approach to team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, J.L.; Roe, M.L.; Gaddy, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The US commercial nuclear power industry has recognized the importance of team skills in control room operation. The desire to combine training of team interaction skills, like communications, with technical knowledge of reactor operations requires a unique approach to training. An NRC-sponsored study identified a five-phase approach to team skills training designed to be consistent with the systems approach to training currently endorsed by the NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification. This paper describes an approach to team skills training with emphasis on the nuclear power plant control room crew. An approach to team skills training

  14. A randomized trial of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for medical students: voice advisory mannequin compared to guidance provided by an instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Nieves; Rodríguez-Díez, María-Cristina; Nagore, David; Fernández, Secundino; Ferrer, Marta; Beunza, Juan-Jose

    2013-08-01

    Current European Resuscitation Guidelines 2010 recommend the use of prompt/feedback devices when training for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We aimed to assess the quality of CPR training among second-year medical students with a voice advisory mannequin (VAM) compared to guidance provided by an instructor. Forty-three students received a theoretical reminder about CPR followed by a 2-minute pretest on CPR (compressions/ventilations cycle) with Resusci Anne SkillReporter (Laerdal Medical). They were then randomized into a control group (n = 22), trained by an instructor for 4 minutes per student, and an intervention group (n = 21) trained individually with VAM CPR mannequin for 4 minutes. After training, the students performed a 2-minute posttest, with the same method as the pretest. Participants in the intervention group (VAM) performed more correct hand position (73% vs. 37%; P = 0.014) and tended to display better compression rate (124 min vs. 135 min; P = 0.089). In a stratified analyses by sex we found that only among women trained with VAM was there a significant improvement in compression depth before and after training (36 mm vs. 46 mm, P = 0.018) and in the percentage of insufficient compressions before and after training (56% vs. 15%; P = 0.021). In comparison to the traditional training method involving an instructor, training medical students in CPR with VAM improves the quality of chest compressions in hand position and in compression rate applied to mannequins. Only among women was VAM shown to be superior in compression depth training. This technology reduces costs in 14% in our setup and might potentially release instructors' time for other activities.

  15. Student and Instructor-Centered Approaches to Teaching Precalculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tara C.; Lu', Hùng

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a two-semester-long study of the effects of student-centered instruction on Precalculus courses. We also describe our teaching approaches centering around students, which include a mixture of lectures, student presentations, group work, discussion, and guided investigations. Students were taught with either the…

  16. A comparison of pediatric basic life support self-led and instructor-led training among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Lone D; Løfgren, Bo; Jessen, Casper L; Petersen, Christina B; Wolff, Anne; Nielsen, Henrik V; Krarup, Niels H V

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric cardiac arrest carries a poor prognosis. Basic life support improves survival. Studies on pediatric basic life support (PBLS) training are sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of self-training in PBLS. We conducted a prospective controlled trial enrolling nurses from pediatric and maternity wards (n=29 in each group). Self-training, including a manikin and access to a web-based video on PBLS, was compared with a 2-h instructor-led course. Two weeks after training, all participants were tested in a mock scenario of pediatric cardiac arrest. Fifteen parameters equivalent to the steps in the PBLS algorithm - for example, effective ventilations, effective chest compressions, calling for help, and correct sequence of actions, were evaluated and rated dichotomously (1=approved or 0=not approved). No difference was observed in the baseline demographics between the self-training group and the instructor-led group. The participants in the self-training group accessed the website 2±1.5 times (mean±SD) and spent 41±25 min on the site. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the overall average score (10.5 in the self-training group vs. 10.0 in the instructor-led group, P=0.51) or in any of the 15 parameters. After the study, all participants felt that they had improved their skills and felt capable of performing PBLS. Self-training is not statistically different to instructor-led training in teaching PBLS. Self-evaluated confidence improved, but showed no difference between groups. PBLS may be disseminated through self-training.

  17. Delivering a basic mental health training programme: views and experiences of Mental Health First Aid instructors in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J

    2011-10-01

    Originating in Australia, 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA) is a way of providing support to someone who is experiencing a mental health problem before professional help is obtained. Positive evaluations have shown that it both increases confidence while decreasing stigmatizing attitudes. However, the evidence base surrounding the delivery of basic mental health programmes remains underdeveloped. This descriptive qualitative study explored the views and experiences of 14 MHFA instructors from across Wales through semi-structured interviews, as a means to identify the experience of course delivery from their perspective. Data were collected between January and April 2009. The study found individuals benefited from being an MHFA instructor through increased confidence and self-development. However, instructors encountered logistical difficulties in course delivery and noted that as attendees related to the course material, they wished to discuss their own mental health problems during the course. This created considerable challenges for instructors, who noted both positive and negative impacts on themselves, and on their expectations of the role of becoming MHFA instructors. In conclusion, basic mental health training courses must build a clear infrastructure, ongoing quality assurance processes and reliable support structures to train, support and monitor those delivering them. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  18. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module II. Human Systems and Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on human systems and patient assessment is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Four units are presented: (1) medical terminology, which covers some common prefixes and suffixes and the use of the medical dictionary; (2) an overview of the…

  19. E-Learning Approach in Teacher Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seda YUCEL

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing interest in e-learning in teacher training at universities during the last ten years. With the developing technology, educational methods have differed as well as many other processes. Firstly, a definition on e-learning as a new approach should be given. E-learning could shortly be defined as a web-based educational system on platform with Internet, Intranet or computer access. The concept of e-learning has two main subtitles as synchronized (where a group of students and an instructor actualize an online conference meeting in a computer environment an asynchronized (where individuals actualize self-training in computer environments. Students have access to the course contents whenever they want and communicate with their peers or teachers via communication tools such as e-mail and forums. In order the distance learning system to succeed in e-learning, the program should be planned as both synchronized and asynchronized.

  20. The Military Instructor's Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøstedt, Peter; Grønlund, Thomas

    The Military Instructor's handbook was written for the basic professional training of instructors in the danish defence. The book describes the work of instructors and their areas of responsibility, and it offers guidance and direction on how to plan, conduct and evaluate learning activities...

  1. An operator self-training system based upon the emulation of instructor skill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuenkov, M.; Marsiletti, M.

    1999-01-01

    In the early 90's a project started in Ansaldo for developing the Training Compact Simulation Technology. One of the objectives was to substitute the human instructor with an Expert System based on the Emulation of Instructor Skill (EIS). EIS stems from software architecture and an ad hoc language (ABIS) developed at Institute of Control Sciences (ICS) of Moscow. The expert system relies upon Artificial Intelligence technology and qualitative logic modelling of controlled plant physics. Its task is to explain the physical effects of controlled plant behaviour and control system response and comment on them as well as estimation of operator's actions in standard and nonstandard situations. Insight into process physics is obtained through consulting the expert system into which the qualitative process model is built-in, thus enabling expert explanation of fine physical effects such as: identification of disturbance and control system actions. The main features of EIS are: (a) checking the correct memorisation of the plant procedures, (b) testing his own reactions when facing abnormal and/or unexpected situations, (c) improving his own engineering sensitivity, (d) getting on-line answers to specific questions, such as: what are the reasons of the current status of Plant (Operator control actions, control system actions, disturbances imposed by the Instructor, transient behaviour of parameters); what events are the result of the action performed by the Operator (step by step); what events can result from a given Operator action (prediction); correspondence of the Operator actions to the steps of the performed procedures; in abnormal situations, judgement about operator actions (positive or negative, with respect to the goal of plant stabilisation or disturbances elimination). A demonstrative application was developed for Sampierdarena 40 MW Cogeneration Plant. The plant model running under the simulator was built-up by means of the LEGO code. The LEGO code is a modular

  2. The impact of transition training on adapting to Technically Advanced Aircraft at regional airlines: Perceptions of pilots and instructor pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Renzo, John Carl, Jr.

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesis about pilot and instructor pilot perceptions of how effectively pilots learn and use new technology, found in Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA), given initial type of instrumentation training. New aviation technologies such as Glass Cockpits in technically advanced aircraft are complex and can be difficult to learn and use. The research questions focused on the type of initial instrumentation training to determine the differences among pilots trained using various types of instrumentation ranging from aircraft equipped with traditional analog instrumentation to aircraft equipped with glass cockpits. A convenience sample of Pilots in Training (PT) and Instructor Pilots (IP) was selected from a regional airline. The research design used a mixed methodology. Pilots in training completed a thirty-two question quantitative questionnaire and instructor pilots completed a five question qualitative questionnaire. Findings and conclusions. This investigation failed to disprove the null hypothesis. The type of instrumentation training has no significant effect on newly trained regional airline pilot perceived ability to adapt to advanced technology cockpits. Therefore, no evidence exists from this investigation to support the early introduction and training of TAA. While the results of this investigation were surprising, they are nonetheless, instructive. Even though it would seem that there would be a relationship between exposure to and use of technically advanced instrumentation, apparently there was no perceived relationship for this group of airline transport pilots. However, a point of interest is that these pilots were almost evenly divided in their opinion of whether or not their previous training had prepared them for transition to TAA. The majority also believed that the type of initial instrumentation training received does make a difference when transitioning to TAA. Pilots believed

  3. Andragogical Content Knowledge as a Key Component in the Training of the Instructors of Nonformal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Sri

    2015-01-01

    Currently, professionals and academics of non-formal education in Indonesia have began to question the competences of the non-formal education instructors. Non-formal education is a profession that requires knowledge (subject-content area), skill (ability to deliver content in regard to the needs of society) and programme content (the content…

  4. Income Tax Law: U.S. Armed Forces Training: Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal Revenue Service (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    The instructor's guide provides eight detailed lesson plans for instructing military personnel in the preparation of their U.S. Income Tax Returns. The plans cover the following subjects: requirements for filing returns of income and declaration of estimated tax; exemptions; gross income; exclusions and deductions to arrive at adjusted gross…

  5. Effect of Instructor Feedback on Skills Retention After Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    . Participants were surgical novices (medical students). All participants (n = 99) initially practiced a laparoscopic salpingectomy on the LapSim virtual reality simulator to proficiency. The intervention group could request instructor feedback, whereas the control group could not. After 6 months...

  6. Peripheral venous catheter insertion simulation training: A randomized controlled trial comparing performance after instructor-led teaching versus peer-assisted learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelloux, Sophie; Grégoire, Arnaud; Kirmizigul, Patrice; Maillot, Sandrine; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Llorca, Guy; Boet, Sylvain; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Peripheral venous catheter insertion is a procedural skill that every medical student should master. Training is often limited to a small number of students and is poorly evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of peer-assisted learning in comparison to instructor-led teaching for peripheral venous catheter insertion training. Students were randomized to the control group attending a traditional instructor-led training session (slideshow and demonstration by an anesthetist instructor, followed by training on a procedural simulator) or to the test group attending a peer-assisted training session (slideshow and demonstration video-recorded by the same instructor, followed by training on a procedural simulator). The primary endpoint was the performance of peripheral venous catheter insertion, assessed on procedural simulator one week later by blinded experts using a standardized 20-item grid. Students self-evaluated their confidence levels using a numeric 10-point scale. Eighty-six students were included, 73 of whom attended the assessment session. The median performance score was 12/20 [8-15] in the instructor-led teaching group versus 13/20 [11-15] in the peer-assisted learning group (P=0.430). Confidence levels improved significantly after the assessment session and were significantly higher in the peer-assisted learning group (7.6/10 [7.0-8.0] versus 7.0/10 [5.0-8.0], P=0.026). Peer-assisted learning is effective for peripheral venous catheter insertion training and can be as effective as instructor-led teaching. Given the large number of students to train, this finding is important for optimizing the cost-effectiveness of peripheral venous catheter insertion training. Copyright © 2017 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Measuring the Effectiveness of Information Security Training: A Comparative Analysis of Computer-Based Training and Instructor-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Financial institutions are increasingly finding difficulty defending against information security risks and threats, as they are often the number one target for information thieves. An effective information security training and awareness program can be a critical component of protecting an organization's information assets. Many financial…

  8. THE APPROACHING TRAIN DETECTION ALGORITHM

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Bibikov

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with detection algorithm for rail vibroacoustic waves caused by approaching train on the background of increased noise. The urgency of algorithm development for train detection in view of increased rail noise, when railway lines are close to roads or road intersections is justified. The algorithm is based on the method of weak signals detection in a noisy environment. The information statistics ultimate expression is adjusted. We present the results of algorithm research and t...

  9. Alternative systematic approaches to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    This handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and contractors. The handbook was prepared primarily for DOE nuclear facilities, but the information can be effectively used by any other type of facility. DOE nuclear, DOE non-nuclear, commercial nuclear reactor, fuel fabrication, chemical processing, or other types of facilities may also apply the principles of this approach and find it useful and applicable to local needs. The handbook provides DOE and contractor operating organizations with concepts and guidance regarding the use of alternative techniques to implement a systematic approach to training (SAT). The techniques described in this handbook are endorsed by DOE and use of the guidance in this handbook is appropriate for establishment of technical training programs at DOE nuclear facilities. The use of guidance on selection and implementation of appropriate training approaches after consideration of job complexity, the consequences of error based on risk/hazard potential, and available training media should result in effective and efficient training programs. The information presented in this handbook can be used to grade the level of effort and formality used in developing training programs.

  10. Training for instructor in radiation protection courses in the medical diagnosis with X-Rays in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Aguilar, J.; Rodriguez Aranda, F.; Dominguez Anaya, E.

    2003-01-01

    The General Regulation of Radiological Security establishes in its article 159 that the occupationally exposed professionals will have to count on the authorization of the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safety (CNSNS) with respect to their training. The Mexican official norm NOM-157-SSA1-1996: Protection and radiological safety in the medical diagnosis with X-rays, indicates that the personnel must receive and accept the information, instructions and training related to the protection and radiological safety, in order to accomplish their work according to the requirements and obligations established in the outstanding procedures. Therefore it was designed an initial training course of instructors in the field of the radiological protection to train occupationally exposed professionals who work in the medical diagnosis establishments with X-rays. The didactic material was elaborated considering a period of training of 10 working days, 8.0 daily hours considering theoretical topics, as well as 11 practical. It is used a conventional radiology equipment, a ionization chamber of brand INOVISIOB model 451 P-DE-SI for increasing the radiation levels, and equipment Radical model 9015 with two ionization chambers of 150 cc and 150 cc respectively, as well as a calibrated plates game of aluminium type 110 and a phantom of acrylic as disperser. To date 73 persons have been trained, from which only 37% approved the initial training course. It has been seen that it is necessary to count on a previous training in the filed of the radiological protection to better profit from this training, since if students do not have good bases it is not possible for them to learn all the content in only 80 hours. To date it has been trained to 73 persons, of alone those which 37.0% approved the initial. (Author)

  11. Astronaut training in view of the future: A Columbus payload instructor perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Manuela; Bosca, Riccardo; Müllerschkowski, Uwe

    2010-02-01

    In early 2008 the Columbus module was successfully attached to the ISS. Columbus is the main European contribution to the on-board scientific activity, and is the result of the interdisciplinary effort of European professionals involved from the concept to the utilisation of the laboratory. Astronauts from different Space Agencies have been trained to operate the scientific payloads aboard Columbus, in order to return fundamental data to the scientific community. The aim of this paper is to describe the current activity of the Columbus Payload Training Team (as part of the European Astronaut Centre of ESA) and from this experience derive lessons learned for the future training development, in view of long-term missions. The general structure of the training is described. The Columbus Payload Training Team activity is outlined and the process of the lesson development (Instructional System Design) is briefly described. Finally the features of the training process that can become critical in future scenario are highlighted.

  12. Determining Best Practices for Training Instructors to Teach in the Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Marie Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have indicated that the number of online courses will continue to grow in the coming years, resulting in an increased need for online course facilitators. Often these facilitators have transitioned without receiving adequate training. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the training requirements and future faculty…

  13. Heuristic approach to train rescheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Snežana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the defined network topology and the timetable assigned beforehand, the paper considers a train rescheduling in respond to disturbances that have occurred. Assuming that the train trips are jobs, which require the elements of infrastructure - resources, it was done by the mapping of the initial problem into a special case of job shop scheduling problem. In order to solve the given problem, a constraint programming approach has been used. A support to fast finding "enough good" schedules is offered by original separation, bound and search heuristic algorithms. In addition, to improve the time performance, instead of the actual objective function with a large domain, a surrogate objective function is used with a smaller domain, if there is such. .

  14. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). 121.412 Section 121.412 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Training Program § 121.412 Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 121.414: (1) A flight instructor (airplane) is a...

  15. Approach to training the trainer at the Bell System Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housley, E.A.; Stevenson, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The major activity of the Bell System Training Center is to develop and deliver technical training. Experts in various technical areas are selected as course developers or instructors, usually on rotational assignments. Through a series of workshops, described in this paper, combined with coaching, use of job aids and working with more experienced peers, they become competent developers or instructors. There may be similarities between the mission of the Bell System Training Center and other contexts where criticality of job performance and technical subject matter are training characteristics

  16. Mining Predictors of Success in Air Force Flight Training Regiments via Semantic Analysis of Instructor Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    the flight-training course. 14. SUBJECT TERMS text mining , feedback analysis, semantic network, binary classification 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 105 16...A. TEXT MINING ..........................................................................................5 B. SEMANTIC WORD NETWORK...13 Figure 2. Text Mining Pre-Processing Techniques. Source: Vijayarani (2015). ............20 Figure 3. From text

  17. Musculoskeletal Pain in High-G Aircraft Training Programs: A Survey of Student and Instructor Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    progress through training. The Japan study reviewed literature [3-8] and found high-G neck injuries to include the rare compression fractures , herniated... fractures at C7 and C5, widening of the C6-7 interspinous ligament, herniated disc at C5-6 and C6-7, myofascial pain syndrome, and fracture of the C7...Medicine and Rehabilitation , Osteopathic, Chiropractic, Aerospace Medicine Primary, Residency in Aerospace Medicine, and the SUPT, as well as the

  18. Use of the learning conversation improves instructor confidence in life support training: An open randomised controlled cross-over trial comparing teaching feedback mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Lydia J L; Jones, Christopher M; Hulme, Jonathan; Owen, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Feedback is vital for the effective delivery of skills-based education. We sought to compare the sandwich technique and learning conversation structured methods of feedback delivery in competency-based basic life support (BLS) training. Open randomised crossover study undertaken between October 2014 and March 2015 at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. Six-hundred and forty healthcare students undertaking a European Resuscitation Council (ERC) BLS course were enrolled, each of whom was randomised to receive teaching using either the sandwich technique or the learning conversation. Fifty-eight instructors were randomised to initially teach using either the learning conversation or sandwich technique, prior to crossing-over and teaching with the alternative technique after a pre-defined time period. Outcome measures included skill acquisition as measured by an end-of-course competency assessment, instructors' perception of teaching with each feedback technique and candidates' perception of the feedback they were provided with. Scores assigned to use of the learning conversation by instructors were significantly more favourable than for the sandwich technique across all but two assessed domains relating to instructor perception of the feedback technique, including all skills-based domains. No difference was seen in either assessment pass rates (80.9% sandwich technique vs. 77.2% learning conversation; OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.85-1.84; p=0.29) or any domain relating to candidates' perception of their teaching technique. This is the first direct comparison of two feedback techniques in clinical medical education using both quantitative and qualitative methodology. The learning conversation is preferred by instructors providing competency-based life support training and is perceived to favour skills acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comprehensive Approach Training Toolkit: Training Needs Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    general. t necessarily lea to act). Very litt Yoruba . entations liarization (FAM ology Integratio es. Content is p given cultural g nd pertinent lan...and focus-g training the C cially other g ncrease its th ng with CA c cation and re e cultural aw needs to con ; and g) traini g schedules a s are...milita tifs, de cultur olton, Febbra t, 2013; Thom es FC dans l’ la formation borer une boî alisée chez n ons se sont d ir compte dan é à clarifier l

  20. Consultative Instructor Supervision and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Organizations vary greatly in how they monitor training instructors. The methods used in monitoring vary greatly. This article presents a systematic process for improving instructor skills that result in better teaching and better learning, which results in better-prepared employees for the workforce. The consultative supervision and evaluation…

  1. “Booster” training: Evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A.; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S.; Lengetti, Evelyn L.; Berg, Robert A.; Helfaer, Mark A.; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside “booster” cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Design Prospective, randomized trial. Setting General pediatric wards at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Subjects Sixty-nine Basic Life Support–certified hospital-based providers. Intervention CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Measurements and Main Results Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min−1 and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests. PMID:20625336

  2. "Booster" training: evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S; Lengetti, Evelyn L; Berg, Robert A; Helfaer, Mark A; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside "booster" cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Prospective, randomized trial. General pediatric wards at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Sixty-nine Basic Life Support-certified hospital-based providers. CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min(-1) and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests.

  3. Training Package Implementation: Innovative and Flexible Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Dave; Blom, Kaaren

    The implementation of training packages (TPs) in Australian workplaces was examined through case studies of the use of TPs in nontraditional trade areas by six innovative registered training organizations (RTOs) across Australia. The study focused on the extent to which new and flexible approaches to learning, training delivery, and assessment…

  4. Instructor Support Feature Guidelines. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    starts his final approach, the display formats change to provide graphic depictions of glideslope, lineup and airspeed parameters, and indications of...and evaluate several facets of student performance simultaneously . It may also provide objective, standardized performance measurement of the student’s...procedures monitoring feature shall provide the instructor cation with a method of monitoring the sequential mission training activities of a student. The

  5. The Business Approach to Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa; Green, Adrian

    This self-study book concentrates on enabling trainers to talk and think in a business-related way, use business concepts and terminology, and translate training and development ideas into a business setting. Each part contains activities to enable users to study their training and development function and organization and consider how to use the…

  6. Training Program Handbook: A systematic approach to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This DOE handbook describes a systematic method for establishing and maintaining training programs that meet the requirements and expectations of DOE Orders 5480.18B and 5480.20. The systematic approach to training includes 5 phases: Analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  7. A “Fundamentals” Train-the-Trainer Approach to Building Pediatric Critical Care Expertise in the Developing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri S. Crow

    2018-04-01

    rated as median (IQR: (a relevance of PFCCS content to clinical work, 5 (4–5; (b effectiveness of lecture delivery, 4 (3–4; and (c value of skill stations for clinical practice, 5 (4–5. Additionally, the mean (±SD responses were 4.6 (±0.5, 3.7 (±0.6, and 4.5 (±0.6, respectively. Training local PFCCS instructors within an international environment is an effective method for establishing a uniform, reproducible, and sustainable approach to educating health-care providers in the fundamentals of pediatric critical care. Future collaborations will evaluate the clinical impact of PFCCS throughout the Georgian health-care system.

  8. A systematic approach to training: A training needs assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Margaret H.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to determine the gap between the actual performance and the necessary performance of employees for the effective and efficient accomplishment of an organization's mission and goals, an organization-wide Training Needs Assessment must be conducted. The purpose of this work was to conduct a training needs analysis and prepare a NASA Langley Catalog of On-Site Training programs. The work included developing a Training Needs Assessment Survey, implementing the survey, analyzing and researching the training needs, identifying the courses to meet the needs, and preparing and designing an On-Site Training Catalog. This needs analysis attempted to identify performance weaknesses and deficits; seek out and provide opportunities for improved performance; anticipate and avoid future problems; enhance and create new strengths. The end product is a user-friendly catalog of on-site training available. The results include: top-down approach to needs assessment; improved communication with training coordinators; 98 percent return rate of the Training Needs Assessment survey; complete, newly designed, user-friendly catalog; 167 catalog descriptions advertised; 82 new courses advertised; training logo; and request for the training application form.

  9. Inspector training for VIFM equipment - An integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Q.S. Bob; Keeffe, R.; Ellacott, T.; Desson, K.; Herber, N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The VXI Integrated Fuel Monitor (VIFM) was developed by the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP) as a generic radiation monitor for safeguards applications. The VIFM equipment features a modular design, where a single cabinet can house several instruments such as bundle counters, core discharge monitors, Yes/No monitors, and other devices. VIFM can also be used in a stand-alone, transportable mode, with a detector connected to a single VIFM module linked to a laptop computer. VIFM equipment is currently in use at CANDU nuclear generating stations in several countries. Because each facility may have a different combination of detectors, the training program has been designed to reflect the modular nature of VIFM. Introductory material is generic and applies to any facility. More advanced material is carefully compartmentalized to allow IAEA Inspectors to concentrate their efforts in areas that concern them. Advanced material is available in a just-in-time reference format that simplifies rapid access to detailed information. A number of training resources have been developed, including multimedia and video material on CD-ROMs. This material has been designed to operate on a laptop computer, allowing inspectors to review and refresh their knowledge at any time - for example, during inspection trips. Although each of these resources is useful in its own right, the CSSP is developing an integrated approach to inspector training that combines all of these elements in a new way calculated to produce better training results than in the past. This new training approach features a two-day workshop preceded by a period of CD-ROM-based self-paced study. After the workshop, participants are able to make use of printed and CD-ROM-based reference materials for just-in-time 'refreshers'. Each step in this integrated approach to training will be described in the presentation. Briefly, the steps are as follows. A multimedia computer-based training package is made

  10. Approaches to training in companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnoler Patrizia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The need to address generational change and the challenges of a global market in terms of maintaining productivity require small and medium enterprises, mainly of an artisanal nature, to rethink training. The challenges mainly concern production capacity, which is increasingly problematic given that demand does not allow for long-term schedules and enhancement of human resources. There are many tensions and just as many needs for improvement, and training is therefore the space in which to collect and rework in order to restore a new perspective of sustainable and quality change.

  11. Inductive Reasoning: A Training Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, Karl Josef; Phye, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have examined inductive reasoning to identify different cognitive processes when participants deal with inductive problems. This article presents a prescriptive theory of inductive reasoning that identifies cognitive processing using a procedural strategy for making comparisons. It is hypothesized that training in the use of the…

  12. Evaluation of POE and instructor-led problem-solving approaches integrated into force and motion lecture classes using a model analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakkapao, S; Pengpan, T; Srikeaw, S; Prasitpong, S

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the use of the predict–observe–explain (POE) approach integrated into large lecture classes on forces and motion. It is compared to the instructor-led problem-solving method using model analysis. The samples are science (SC, N = 420) and engineering (EN, N = 434) freshmen, from Prince of Songkla University, Thailand. Research findings from the force and motion conceptual evaluation indicate that the multimedia-supported POE method promotes students’ learning better than the problem-solving method, in particular for the velocity and acceleration concepts. There is a small shift of the students’ model states after the problem-solving instruction. Moreover, by using model analysis instructors are able to investigate students’ misconceptions and evaluate teaching methods. It benefits instructors in organizing subsequent instructional materials. (paper)

  13. A Systematic Approach to Terminal Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, John

    1980-01-01

    Describes the systematic approach used by the training department of the Canada Trust Company to develop a training program for operators of the new terminals for the online banking system to which the bank was converting, the Canadian On-Line Financial Information System (COFIS). (JD)

  14. Institutionalizing the Ecohealth Approach : Training and Awards ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program will comprise three elements: a region-wide training and awards ... of the Ecohealth approach within INSP's graduate program; and a co-financing strategy to ... New funding opportunity for gender equality and climate change.

  15. Designing an Instrument to Identify Instructor Characteristics and Student Reactions in U.S. Marine Corps Vocational Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    vocations including: micro-miniature electronics repair, airfield operations, family resource center office manager , U.S. Marine Corps recruiter, CT...39 Saberliner jet-aircraft plane captain, technical formal school instructor, and curriculum course manager . He retired as a Master Sergeant of...as an adjunct professor, septic tank builder and drain field installer, short order cook and waiter , graphic artist, yacht engine repair and dock

  16. Promoviendo un Futuro Saludable: Manual de Entrenamiento para Educadores de Salud e Instructores que Trabajan con Jovenes Promotores de Salud, Jovenes Consejeros o Educadores y Voluntarios (Promoting a Healthy Future: Training Manual for Health Educators and Instructors Who Work with Young Health Promoters, Young Counselors or Educators and Volunteers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Carmen; Cuchi, Paloma

    This manual is designed to help the Latino community in its work of incorporating young people into disease prevention efforts and health education. It provides basic information on 12 health themes along with suggestions and resource materials for the instructor. The young people trained through this manual may work in a number of education and…

  17. Faces of Change. Visual Evidence: An Instructional Approach. Instructor's Notes: Film/Essay Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Norman N.

    Designed for use with the multidisciplinary film project, "Faces of Change, Five Rural Societies in Transition" for the college social studies curriculum, this manual contains an overview of the material and its underlying philosophy and suggests teaching strategies. The first section discusses the overall approach, the use of films in…

  18. Teaching Writing within the Disciplines: A Viable Approach for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This case study of an adjunct-model English for Academic Purposes (EAP) writing course linked to a policy-analysis course describes an effective approach for putting "specificity" into practice in EAP curriculum design. The rationale for interdisciplinary collaboration, the positive learning outcomes from the EAP writing course, the…

  19. Crash Injury Management: Emergency Medical Services for Traffic Law Enforcement Officers. Instructor's Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    To assist in the continuing efforts to improve the safety of the motorist on the nation's highways and roads, this instructor's guide provides a standardized approach for providing training in emergency medical care for first responders to traffic accidents. The objective of the course is to provide training in all aspects of emergency medical…

  20. E-Learning Approach in Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Seda A.

    2006-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in e-learning in teacher training at universities during the last ten years. With the developing technology, educational methods have differed as well as many other processes. Firstly, a definition on e-learning as a new approach should be given. E-learning could shortly be defined as a web-based educational…

  1. Improving Supervision of Part-Time Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eney, Patricia R.; Davidson, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of colleges and universities turning to part-time instructors to teach courses at their institutions, developmental education professionals are faced with the task of finding appropriate ways to train, serve, and evaluate these instructors. Unfortunately, there is little published information on how to accomplish these…

  2. Christian Universities and Colleges: The Need to Train Instructors to Teach the Bible as Literature in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The author examines the national growth of Bible literacy courses in America's public schools and examines what steps Christian universities and colleges can take to help meet the demand for teachers for these courses. The author asserts that several sources of training are currently available, but declares that they will be unable to train a…

  3. Qualification of contractor/consultant instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    Following a brief discussion of the role of consultant instructors in Public Service Electric and Gas Company's training organization, the qualification process is presented. Consultant instructors are provided with information regarding supervision of the trainees and the instructional process and procedures required. Each individual must have his or her instructional capability, supervisory skills and technical competence verified and documented prior to conducting training independently. Concluding comments describe the overall satisfactory experience with this program

  4. Instructor development program at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irizarry, C.A.; Jones, J.W.; Knief, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) Training Department has prepared and conducted Instructor Development Programs which have upgraded the capabilities of its instructors and provided more uniformity among its diverse efforts. The week-long course was prepared in-house by a staff that combined college teaching experience in both education and technical subjects with strong background in industrial training. Through the first two offerings of the course, twenty-five individuals have participated and eight have served on the course staff

  5. NEW APPROACHES TO TEACHER PHILOLOGIST TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Igorevna Postnikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the theory of teacher training in the field of Humanities and Pedagogy and the problem of devising academic syllabus for the Bachelor’s Degree in Philology and its compliance to present day requirements.Goa. Devising theoretical grounding to the course content in the academic discipline applying the principle of cross-subject communications, pragmatism and integral approach.Methods. Study of literature, modelling general and specific hypothesis, forecasting the results and processes at various stages of research, study of international documents, genera-lization and synthesis, simulation method.Results. The study presents theoretical grounding to the courses content ‘Language and Literature as Factors in Developing Tolerance’ and ‘Psychology of Interpersonal Relations in the Language Environment’ of the academic module ‘Communication in Modern Multicultural Environment’ within the syllabus ‘Pedagogical Education (philologists’. The study presents new approach to practical training of a language teacher in the context of cross-subject communications and integrated and practical approaches.Scope of application: higher professional education

  6. Upgrading NPP personnel. Competence and training through the systematic approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner Markhof, F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the reasons for acceptance of SAT (Systematic Approach to Training) as the best international practice in respect to training of NPP personnel and the differences in comparison to traditional approaches to training. The identification and evaluation of the new training needs, resources and other requirements for implementing SAT are discussed as well as new approaches and existing training capabilities and involvement of Regulatory body in training of NPP personnel. The IAEA Guidebook on NPP Personnel Training (TRS-380) was used a a basis for discussion of the mentioned topics with the emphasis on achieving the best possible training programmes for NPP personnel

  7. E-Learning Approach in Teacher Training

    OpenAIRE

    YUCEL, A. Seda

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in e-learning in teacher training at universities during the last ten years. With the developing technology, educational methods have differed as well as many other processes. Firstly, a definition on e-learning as a new approach should be given. E-learning could shortly be defined as a web-based educational system on platform with Internet, Intranet or computer access. The concept of e-learning has two main subtitles as synchronized (where a group of stu...

  8. Facilitating the Research Paper Process: A Guide for the Social Science Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Suzanne L.

    This paper describes the approach used successfully at California State University, Dominguez Hills, to instruct college students in the research paper writing process. To achieve the results, the instructor followed a specific set of steps during a class meeting set aside for this specialized training. This paper details each step in the…

  9. Use of a Real-Time Training Software (Laerdal QCPR®) Compared to Instructor-Based Feedback for High-Quality Chest Compressions Acquisition in Secondary School Students: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortegiani, Andrea; Russotto, Vincenzo; Montalto, Francesca; Iozzo, Pasquale; Meschis, Roberta; Pugliesi, Marinella; Mariano, Dario; Benenati, Vincenzo; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Gregoretti, Cesare; Giarratano, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    High-quality chest compressions are pivotal to improve survival from cardiac arrest. Basic life support training of school students is an international priority. The aim of this trial was to assess the effectiveness of a real-time training software (Laerdal QCPR®) compared to a standard instructor-based feedback for chest compressions acquisition in secondary school students. After an interactive frontal lesson about basic life support and high quality chest compressions, 144 students were randomized to two types of chest compressions training: 1) using Laerdal QCPR® (QCPR group- 72 students) for real-time feedback during chest compressions with the guide of an instructor who considered software data for students' correction 2) based on standard instructor-based feedback (SF group- 72 students). Both groups had a minimum of a 2-minute chest compressions training session. Students were required to reach a minimum technical skill level before the evaluation. We evaluated all students at 7 days from the training with a 2-minute chest compressions session. The primary outcome was the compression score, which is an overall measure of chest compressions quality calculated by the software expressed as percentage. 125 students were present at the evaluation session (60 from QCPR group and 65 from SF group). Students in QCPR group had a significantly higher compression score (median 90%, IQR 81.9-96.0) compared to SF group (median 67%, IQR 27.7-87.5), p = 0.0003. Students in QCPR group performed significantly higher percentage of fully released chest compressions (71% [IQR 24.5-99.0] vs 24% [IQR 2.5-88.2]; p = 0.005) and better chest compression rate (117.5/min [IQR 106-123.5] vs 125/min [115-135.2]; p = 0.001). In secondary school students, a training for chest compressions based on a real-time feedback software (Laerdal QCPR®) guided by an instructor is superior to instructor-based feedback training in terms of chest compression technical skill acquisition. Australian

  10. Impact of a Multifaceted and Clinically Integrated Training Program in Evidence-Based Practice on Knowledge, Skills, Beliefs and Behaviour among Clinical Instructors in Physiotherapy: A Non-Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nina Rydland; Bradley, Peter; Espehaug, Birgitte; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen; Lygren, Hildegunn; Frisk, Bente; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapists practicing at clinical placement sites assigned the role as clinical instructors (CIs), are responsible for supervising physiotherapy students. For CIs to role model evidence-based practice (EBP) they need EBP competence. The aim of this study was to assess the short and long term impact of a six-month multifaceted and clinically integrated training program in EBP on the knowledge, skills, beliefs and behaviour of CIs supervising physiotherapy students. We invited 37 CIs to participate in this non-randomized controlled study. Three self-administered questionnaires were used pre- and post-intervention, and at six-month follow-up: 1) The Adapted Fresno test (AFT), 2) the EBP Belief Scale and 3) the EBP Implementation Scale. The analysis approach was linear regression modeling using Generalized Estimating Equations. In total, 29 CIs agreed to participate in the study: 14 were invited to participate in the intervention group and 15 were invited to participate in the control group. One in the intervention group and five in the control group were lost to follow-up. At follow-up, the group difference was statistically significant for the AFT (mean difference = 37, 95% CI (15.9 -58.1), p students.

  11. New EDF approach to the mentification of NPP personnel training needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazet, Jean-Christophe

    2003-01-01

    The EDF ambition today is to be among the best electricity producers in the world. To do so, we have to take more responsibilities, to motivate and to give our employees a better level of competence, and to make them more involved in the culture and the success of our company. In order to reach these objectives a deeper analysis of the NPP training needs must be completed. Our answer, named 'Local Competencies Development System' (LCDS) consists in implementing a large decentralisation of the competencies management, done by the EDF Production Department in conjunction with the EDF Training Department. It takes place in a logical approach bound up with the historical development of our nuclear program. In addition to this LCDS a new organization of training centers instructors, in dedicated training teams, has been implemented in order to co-ordinate the different actions directly with the NPP. The purpose of this presentation is to take into account the LCDS on the operation personnel training side, a similar organization has been implemented for the maintenance side

  12. Proficiency-based laparoscopic and endoscopic training with virtual reality simulators: a comparison of proctored and independent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher W; Vandromme, Marianne J; Tyra, Sharon L; Hawn, Mary T

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators for laparoscopy and endoscopy may be valuable tools for resident education. However, the cost of such training in terms of trainee and instructor time may vary depending upon whether an independent or proctored approach is employed. We performed a randomized controlled trial to compare independent and proctored methods of proficiency-based VR simulator training. Medical students were randomized to independent or proctored training groups. Groups were compared with respect to the number of training hours and task repetitions required to achieve expert level proficiency on laparoscopic and endoscopic simulators. Cox regression modeling was used to compare time to proficiency between groups, with adjustment for appropriate covariates. Thirty-six medical students (18 independent, 18 proctored) were enrolled. Achievement of overall simulator proficiency required a median of 11 hours of training (range, 6-21 hours). Laparoscopic and endoscopic proficiency were achieved after a median of 11 (range, 6-32) and 10 (range, 5-27) task repetitions, respectively. The number of repetitions required to achieve proficiency was similar between groups. After adjustment for covariates, trainees in the independent group achieved simulator proficiency with significantly fewer hours of training (hazard ratio, 2.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-6.85; p = 0.048). Our study quantifies the cost, in instructor and trainee hours, of proficiency-based laparoscopic and endoscopic VR simulator training, and suggests that proctored instruction does not offer any advantages to trainees. The independent approach may be preferable for surgical residency programs desiring to implement VR simulator training.

  13. Impact of a Multifaceted and Clinically Integrated Training Program in Evidence-Based Practice on Knowledge, Skills, Beliefs and Behaviour among Clinical Instructors in Physiotherapy: A Non-Randomized Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Rydland Olsen

    Full Text Available Physiotherapists practicing at clinical placement sites assigned the role as clinical instructors (CIs, are responsible for supervising physiotherapy students. For CIs to role model evidence-based practice (EBP they need EBP competence. The aim of this study was to assess the short and long term impact of a six-month multifaceted and clinically integrated training program in EBP on the knowledge, skills, beliefs and behaviour of CIs supervising physiotherapy students.We invited 37 CIs to participate in this non-randomized controlled study. Three self-administered questionnaires were used pre- and post-intervention, and at six-month follow-up: 1 The Adapted Fresno test (AFT, 2 the EBP Belief Scale and 3 the EBP Implementation Scale. The analysis approach was linear regression modeling using Generalized Estimating Equations.In total, 29 CIs agreed to participate in the study: 14 were invited to participate in the intervention group and 15 were invited to participate in the control group. One in the intervention group and five in the control group were lost to follow-up. At follow-up, the group difference was statistically significant for the AFT (mean difference = 37, 95% CI (15.9 -58.1, p < 0.001 and the EBP Beliefs scale (mean difference = 8.1, 95% CI (3.1 -13.2, p = 0.002, but not for the EBP Implementation scale (mean difference = 1.8. 95% CI (-4.5-8.1, p = 0.574. Comparing measurements over time, we found a statistically significant increase in mean scores related to all outcome measures for the intervention group only.A multifaceted and clinically integrated training program in EBP was successful in improving EBP knowledge, skills and beliefs among CIs. Future studies need to ensure long-term EBP behaviour change, in addition to assessing CIs' abilities to apply EBP knowledge and skills when supervising students.

  14. Evaluation of a newly developed media-supported 4-step approach for basic life support training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopka Saša

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The quality of external chest compressions (ECC is of primary importance within basic life support (BLS. Recent guidelines delineate the so-called 4“-step approach” for teaching practical skills within resuscitation training guided by a certified instructor. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a “media-supported 4-step approach” for BLS training leads to equal practical performance compared to the standard 4-step approach. Materials and methods After baseline testing, 220 laypersons were either trained using the widely accepted method for resuscitation training (4-step approach or using a newly created “media-supported 4-step approach”, both of equal duration. In this approach, steps 1 and 2 were ensured via a standardised self-produced podcast, which included all of the information regarding the BLS algorithm and resuscitation skills. Participants were tested on manikins in the same mock cardiac arrest single-rescuer scenario prior to intervention, after one week and after six months with respect to ECC-performance, and participants were surveyed about the approach. Results Participants (age 23 ± 11, 69% female reached comparable practical ECC performances in both groups, with no statistical difference. Even after six months, there was no difference detected in the quality of the initial assessment algorithm or delay concerning initiation of CPR. Overall, at least 99% of the intervention group (n = 99; mean 1.5 ± 0.8; 6-point Likert scale: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree agreed that the video provided an adequate introduction to BLS skills. Conclusions The “media-supported 4-step approach” leads to comparable practical ECC-performance compared to standard teaching, even with respect to retention of skills. Therefore, this approach could be useful in special educational settings where, for example, instructors’ resources are sparse or large-group sessions

  15. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    % vs 49%; P = 0.004). Men used less time (in minutes) than women (P = 0.037), but no sex difference was observed for repetitions (P = 0.20). Participants in the intervention group had higher self-perception regarding surgical skills after the trial (P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS:: Instructor feedback...... increases the efficiency when training a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator; time and repetitions used to achieve a predefined proficiency level were significantly reduced in the group that received instructor feedback compared with the control group. Trial registration number: NCT......OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the impact of instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback when training a complex operational task on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. BACKGROUND:: Simulators are now widely accepted as a training tool, but there is insufficient knowledge about how much...

  16. Systematic Approach to Research Training: Benefits for Counseling Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Teri A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Synthesizes developments concerning research training in graduate counselor education and presents a systematic approach for training master's and doctoral students in mental health counseling to assimilate, use, and perform research. Suggests diversity of research training strategies for implementation in counselor preparation programs.…

  17. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde

    2012-01-01

    of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational...

  18. Radiation protection training programmes Spanish approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboli, M. Marco; Suarez, M. Rodriguez; Cabrera, S. Falcon

    2002-01-01

    Radiation Protection Programmes are being considered the best way to promote safety culture and to spread and propagate European basic safety standards. It is widely accepted that training is an important tool to upgrade competence for radiation exposed workers. The Spanish Radiation Protection Education and Training Programmes provide a solid and integrated educational model, which takes into account the variety of applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international tendencies. The needs for a specialised training on Radiation Protection (RP) for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. National initial training programmes are well established since 1972. Individual certifications, based on personal licences are required for exposed workers. The Spanish regulation also includes continuous and on the job RP training. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving. CIEMAT plays an important role in RP Spanish training, improving and modifying the previous RP courses and developing new programmes in order to complete the RP training levels. To achieve Radiation Protection objectives, new technological media for educational methods and material are taking into account. Nevertheless, Spanish RP education and training model has to be improved in some aspects. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the situation and the future needs to be considered in order to complete the RP training processes

  19. Bias modification training can alter approach bias and chocolate consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Sophie E; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that bias modification training has potential to reduce cognitive biases for attractive targets and affect health behaviours. The present study investigated whether cognitive bias modification training could be applied to reduce approach bias for chocolate and affect subsequent chocolate consumption. A sample of 120 women (18-27 years) were randomly assigned to an approach-chocolate condition or avoid-chocolate condition, in which they were trained to approach or avoid pictorial chocolate stimuli, respectively. Training had the predicted effect on approach bias, such that participants trained to approach chocolate demonstrated an increased approach bias to chocolate stimuli whereas participants trained to avoid such stimuli showed a reduced bias. Further, participants trained to avoid chocolate ate significantly less of a chocolate muffin in a subsequent taste test than participants trained to approach chocolate. Theoretically, results provide support for the dual process model's conceptualisation of consumption as being driven by implicit processes such as approach bias. In practice, approach bias modification may be a useful component of interventions designed to curb the consumption of unhealthy foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Definition of curriculum and approach: study of a training course for teachers of non-formal education in NGOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivis Perez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a research aimed to analyze the approach and the definition of guiding curriculum of teacher training for work in the non-formal education in non-governmental organizations(NGOs. We opted for a qualitative approach and case study of Teacher Training Course for NGOs, developed by Ong São Paulo-SP. The research instruments were: analysis of documents of the course, interviews with trainers and coordinator and literature review. In this course, curriculum is defined as a path to be followed by students and instructors and the coordinator of the subjects studied. We adopted the so-called Integrated Curriculum, in which teaching occurs by the study of problem situations and integrators of learning projects. At the end, we suggest improving the course and following that information, it is hoped, one will support the production of further comparative research.

  1. Enfermeiro instrutor no processo de treinamento admissional do enfermeiro em unidade de terapia intensiva Enfermero instructor en el proceso de entrenamiento de admisión del enfermero en una unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Nurse instructor in the process of admission training of nurses in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Marília Bucchi

    2011-01-01

    autonomía de acción, siendo el papel del instructor transmitir esos valores a los ingresantes.OBJECTIVE: To define and analyze the profile of the nurse-instructor training for nurses on admission to the ICU. METHODS: The study was developed from the perspective of action research, adopting the technique of focus group dialogue and the use of electronic data collection. The sample included 29 nurses: 11 in the focus group sessions and 18 in the electronic interchange. RESULTS: Among the responsibilities of the instructor, defined by the group, the updated scientific and technical knowledge were highlighted, along with ethics and the ability to teach; the instructor was identified as having a key role in the process of admission training. CONCLUSIONS: The research has promoted reflection by the group and the researchers on the issues involved in education and about the identity of the group characterized by the charitable role and autonomy of action, and the role of the instructor to transmit these values to new nurses.

  2. ADHD in Preschool: Approaches and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Squires, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Due to the prevalence of ADHD, there is a need for early intervention at the preschool level to improve children's chance of academic success in later years. Yet few preschool teachers are trained to meet the challenges children with ADHD present. This paper gives a rationale and curriculum for teacher training in ADHD, with an emphasis on Social…

  3. Innovative Approaches in the Training of Lexicographers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What kind of in-service training should the trainee lexicographer undergo if he or she ... In answer to the question which qualities a good definer should have, Landau ... valuable practical training, but I know of none that offer such opportunities.

  4. An Instructional Systems Approach or FAA Student Centered Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Academy has been using a systems approach as part of its training program since 1969. This booklet describes the general characteristics of an instructional system and explains the steps the FAA goes through in implementing the approach. These steps are: 1) recognize a need for training, 2) specify the…

  5. A description of teaching methods using an on-site instructor versus a distant site instructor to train laryngoscopy to medical students in Hanoi, Vietnam, from Omaha, Nebraska, by video communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeger, Wesley G; Branecki, Chad E; Nguyen, Thang T; Hall, Todd; Boedeker, Ben; Boedeker, David; Wadman, Michael C

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrated a method to train medical students at Hanoi Medical School in airway management from Omaha, Nebraska, using tele-mentoring techniques. Correct placement of the endotracheal tube was documented by tele-broncoscopy following intubation. This technology may increase medical training capabilities in remote or developing areas of the world. Medical care delivery could be performed using this technology by tele-mentoring a lesser trained medical provider at a distant site enabling them to accomplish complex medical tasks.

  6. Conceptualizing movement by expert Bobath instructors in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan-Graham, Julie; Patterson, Kara; Zabjek, Karl; Cott, Cheryl A

    2017-12-01

    Movement, a core aspect of physiotherapy practice, and integral to the clinical reasoning process has undergone limited theoretical development. Instead, research has focused on intervention effectiveness embedded within the positivist paradigm. The purpose of this study was to explore how expert neurorehabilitation therapists conceptualize movement as part of their clinical reasoning. A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach consisting of stimulated recall using video-recorded treatment sessions and in-depth interviews was used. Theoretical sampling was used to recruit members of the International Bobath Instructors Training Association (IBITA) who are recognized experts in neurorehabilitation. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was progressive, iterative, and inductive. Twenty-two IBITA instructors from 7 different countries volunteered to participate. They ranged in clinical experience from 12 to 40 years and instructor experience from 1 to 35 years. The conceptualization of movement by the IBITA instructors involves the following elements: (1) movement comprises the whole person and the whole body, not just individual body segments; (2) active alignment of body segments is integral to movement performance; and (3) efficient movement requires the relative integration of postural control/stability and selective movement/mobility. The IBITA instructors conceptualize movement from a person-centred perspective. The integration of postural control and selective movement, with alignment and variability as key components, forms the foundation of their understanding of movement. Further investigation into the role of postural control in movement recovery post central nervous system lesion is required. Likewise, the dimensions of movement critical to the conceptualization of movement are not well understood from the perspective of the physiotherapist or persons with neurological impairments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Systematic training model for teaching, development and training of instructors in inguinal hernia treatment using the Lichtenstein technique. Hernia campaign 2014 & 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarini-Mendes, Carlos José; Pacheco, Adhemar Monteiro; Destro, Bárbara Bozzoli; Tamaro, Caroline; Nogueira, Fábio Antonio Del Picchia DE Araújo; Chen, David; Reinpold, Wolfgang; Bruscagin, Vitor; Roll, Sergio; Silva, Rodrigo Altenfelder

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the method of training and continuing education of 18 surgeons in 2014, and 28 surgeons in 2015, in the Holy Homes of Ribeirao Preto, Araraquara, Franca and San Carlos of São Paulo, in the performance of Lichtenstein inguinal herniorrhaphy, tutored by the Faculty of Medical Sciences of the São Paulo Holy Home and the organization HERNIA HELP - "Hernia Repair for the Underserved". the training was tutored and systematized through an active methodology of teaching and learning, aiming to offer competence, skills and attitudes, measured by a previously validated Qualification Form, qualifying leaders in trainees' improvement. in 2014 the outcomes were: the difficulty of the case, direction, incision, dissection, mesh preparation, mesh cutting, mesh setting, closing, instruments, respect to tissues, flow, time and motion, and performance, all presented change in the general rating (p=0.000002); there was greater confidence in the execution of the procedure in 80% of trainees, considered "very valuable" in 93.3% of the interventions. In 2015, 28 surgeons were trained by ten surgeons previously qualified in 2014. The nerve identification rate, a relevant time the Lichtenstein technique, was 95.5% for the Iliohypogastric, 98.5% for the ilioinguinal and 89.4% for the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve. the applied teaching method is possible, reproducible, reliable and valid. The joint efforts offer enormous opportunity of directed education, reaching underserved populations, revealing the great teacher-student social responsibility. avaliar resultados do método de treinamento e educação continuada de 18 cirurgiões, em 2014, e 28 cirurgiões, em 2015, nas Santas Casas de Ribeirão Preto, Araraquara, Franca e São Carlos do Estado de São Paulo, na realização da Herniorrafia Inguinal à Lichtenstein, tutorados pela Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo e pela organização HERNIA HELP - "Hernia Repair for the Underserved

  8. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  9. Housekeeping. An Approach to Housekeeping Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This booklet examines the training required by staff employed in housekeeping departments in the hotel and catering industry. It details specifications of particular tasks--baths/cloakrooms; service pantries and utility rooms; beds; furniture/fittings; floors/walls and ceilings; carpets/upholstery/soft furnishings; linen handling; linen room work;…

  10. Effective Pedagogical Practices for Online Teaching: Perception of Experienced Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Craig J.; Card, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    Institutions have focused on providing faculty with technological training to enhance their online teaching, but many online instructors would like to learn more effective pedagogical practices. This phenomenological study determines what experienced, award-winning South Dakota e-learning instructors perceive to be effective pedagogical practices.…

  11. Emotional Development: Fostering the Child's Identity. Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    "Emotional Development: Fostering the Child's Identity" is a manual for use in training families providing service to foster children. Consisting of information to be covered in eight class sessions and numerous appendices providing supplementary material, this instructor's manual contains instructor's materials and participants' course content.…

  12. Living with a systematic approach to training. A personal experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    The Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) plays an important role in the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It can often be seen as the answer to all training needs but it can sometimes fall victim to its own rigidity and inertia. This paper outlines the personal experiences and conceptual models of a former Human Resources Manager with responsibility for both pre operational and operational training. (author)

  13. Simulator training and licensing examination for nuclear power station operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pingsheng

    2007-01-01

    For the recruitment, training and position qualification of the simulator instructors and feedback of training effect, the management approaches are formulated in 'The System for Simulator Training and Licensing Examination of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station Operators'. The concrete requirements on the professional knowledge, work experience and foreign language ability of a simulator instructor are put forward. The process of instructor training is designed. The training items include the trainer training, pedagogy training, time management training, operation activities training during outage of unit, 'shadow' training and on-the-jot training on simulator courses. Job rotation is realized between simulator instructor and licensing personnel on site. New simulator instructor must pass the qualification identification. After a duration of 2 years, re-qualification has to be carried out. On the basis of the operator training method introduced from EDF (electricite De France), some new courses are developed and the improvement on the initial training, retaining courses, the technical support and the experience feedback by using the simulator is done also. (authors)

  14. A Simulation-Based Approach to Training Operational Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Cultural knowledge and skills are critically important for military operations, emergency response, or any job that involves interaction with a culturally diverse population. However, it is not obvious what cultural knowledge and skills need to be trained, and how to integrate that training with the other training that trainees must undergo. Cultural training needs to be broad enough to encompass both regional (culture-specific) and cross-cultural (culture-general) competencies, yet be focused enough to result in targeted improvements in on-the-job performance. This paper describes a comprehensive instructional development methodology and training technology framework that focuses cultural training on operational needs. It supports knowledge acquisition, skill acquisition, and skill transfer. It supports both training and assessment, and integrates with other aspects of operational skills training. Two training systems will be used to illustrate this approach: the Virtual Cultural Awareness Trainer (VCAT) and the Tactical Dari language and culture training system. The paper also discusses new and emerging capabilities that are integrating cultural competence training more strongly with other aspects of training and mission rehearsal.

  15. Common modelling approaches for training simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    Training simulators for nuclear power plant operating staff have gained increasing importance over the last twenty years. One of the recommendations of the 1983 IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Nuclear Power Plant Training Simulators in Helsinki was to organize a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on some aspects of training simulators. The goal statement was: ''To establish and maintain a common approach to modelling for nuclear training simulators based on defined training requirements''. Before adapting this goal statement, the participants considered many alternatives for defining the common aspects of training simulator models, such as the programming language used, the nature of the simulator computer system, the size of the simulation computers, the scope of simulation. The participants agreed that it was the training requirements that defined the need for a simulator, the scope of models and hence the type of computer complex that was required, the criteria for fidelity and verification, and was therefore the most appropriate basis for the commonality of modelling approaches. It should be noted that the Co-ordinated Research Programme was restricted, for a variety of reasons, to consider only a few aspects of training simulators. This report reflects these limitations, and covers only the topics considered within the scope of the programme. The information in this document is intended as an aid for operating organizations to identify possible modelling approaches for training simulators for nuclear power plants. 33 refs

  16. A Comparison of HPT and Traditional Training Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretz, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the comparative use of training from human performance technology (HPT) and traditional training perspectives, based on taxonomy. Concludes that the primary difference is a holistic systems performance improvement approach by eliminating barriers with HPT versus reaction or response to a set of business objectives in traditional…

  17. Strategic planning approach to nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Detroit Edison Company's Nuclear Training group used an organizational planning process that yielded significant results in 1984. At the heart of the process was a concept called the Driving Force which served as the basis for the development of goals, objectives, and action plants. A key ingredient of the success of the planning process was the total, voluntary participation by all members of the organization

  18. Learning from the application of the systematic approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Yoder, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the objectives, lessons learned, key accomplishments and related activities of the application of the systematic approach to training initiated by DOE in Russia and Ukraine in 1992 focused on single facility in each country

  19. Systematic approach to training. Experiences from the training activities of regulatory body personnel in STUK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.

    1998-04-01

    The report describes the experiences obtained of a training programme for nuclear power plant inspectors arranged in the 90's by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK). In the implementation of the programme, a systematic method was used to analyse the training needs, to plan, develop and implement the training programme as well as to assess the programme's implementation and results. The method used, 'SAT Ae Systematic Approach to Training', is presented in 'Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook', IAEA Technical Report Series No. 380, which is a publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is recommended that this method be applied in the planning and implementation of nuclear power plant personnel training. The application of the method as a tool for developing the qualifications of nuclear power plant inspectors shows that the method is well suited for use in Finland. Until the 90's, STUK had no systematic approach to training activities. Some training was arranged internally, but training in most respects meant participation in external training events and international seminars. A more systematic approach was adopted in the early 90's. The main goal was to define basic competence profiles for inspectors working in different fields and to provide an internal basic training programme not available externally. The development of the training activities called for a profound renewal of the training function to ensure a systematic approach and high quality. The experiences gained in STUK are useful in co-operation with Eastern and Central European regulatory bodies; they can be utilized when the qualifications of personnel who carry out inspections are developed. This will extensively contribute to the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  20. Systematic approach to training. Experiences from the training activities of regulatory body personnel in STUK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, I.

    1998-04-01

    The report describes the experiences obtained of a training programme for nuclear power plant inspectors arranged in the 90`s by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK). In the implementation of the programme, a systematic method was used to analyse the training needs, to plan, develop and implement the training programme as well as to assess the programme`s implementation and results. The method used, `SAT Ae Systematic Approach to Training`, is presented in `Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook`, IAEA Technical Report Series No. 380, which is a publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is recommended that this method be applied in the planning and implementation of nuclear power plant personnel training. The application of the method as a tool for developing the qualifications of nuclear power plant inspectors shows that the method is well suited for use in Finland. Until the 90`s, STUK had no systematic approach to training activities. Some training was arranged internally, but training in most respects meant participation in external training events and international seminars. A more systematic approach was adopted in the early 90`s. The main goal was to define basic competence profiles for inspectors working in different fields and to provide an internal basic training programme not available externally. The development of the training activities called for a profound renewal of the training function to ensure a systematic approach and high quality. The experiences gained in STUK are useful in co-operation with Eastern and Central European regulatory bodies; they can be utilized when the qualifications of personnel who carry out inspections are developed. This will extensively contribute to the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.). 2 refs.

  1. ACTIVITY APPROACH IN THE ORGANIZATION OF TRAINING OF TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sidenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of research in the field of pedagogy. The author develops a model of teacher’s training course that focuses on self-determination of participants with respect to teachers’ personal sense of participation in training courses; organization of system-activity approach to professional development; subject-subject approach to skills development. The novelty is the development of a mechanism of transformation of the teachers’ motivation of avoiding failure into motivation to succeed.

  2. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  3. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE GUIDE IS TO GIVE MAXIMUM ASSISTANCE TO INSTRUCTORS IN PLANNING THE TRAINING OF LICENSED INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHERS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY THE ENGINEERING EXTENSION SERVICE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS. THE 21 UNITS INCLUDE (1) INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS, (2) NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS, (3)…

  4. 77 FR 61721 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ...-26661; Amdt. No. 61-129A] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification... revise the training, qualification, certification, and operating requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. A portion of the codified text was inadvertently deleted...

  5. TRX Suspension Training: A New Functional Training Approach for Older Adults - Development, Training Control and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaedtke, Angus; Morat, Tobias

    Because of its proximity to daily activities functional training becomes more important for older adults. Sling training, a form of functional training, was primarily developed for therapy and rehabilitation. Due to its effects (core muscle activation, strength and balance improvements), sling training may be relevant for older adults. However, to our knowledge no recent sling training program for healthy older adults included a detailed training control which is indeed an essential component in designing and implementing this type of training to reach positive effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a TRX Suspension Training for healthy older adults (TRX-OldAge) and to evaluate its feasibility. Eleven participants finished the 12 week intervention study. All participants trained in the TRX-OldAge whole-body workout which consists of seven exercises including 3-4 progressively advancing stages of difficulty for every exercise. At each stage, intensity could be increased through changes in position. Feasibility data was evaluated in terms of training compliance and a self-developed questionnaire for rating TRX-OldAge. The training compliance was 85 %. After study period, 91 % of the participants were motivated to continue with the program. The training intensity, duration and frequency were rated as optimal. All participants noted positive effects whereas strength gains were the most. On the basis of the detailed information about training control, TRX-OldAge can be individually adapted for each older adult appropriate to its precondition, demands and preference.

  6. A "Fundamentals" Train-the-Trainer Approach to Building Pediatric Critical Care Expertise in the Developing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Sheri S; Ballinger, Beth A; Rivera, Mariela; Tsibadze, David; Gakhokidze, Nino; Zavrashvili, Nino; Ritter, Matthew J; Arteaga, Grace M

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric Fundamental Critical Care Support (PFCCS) is an educational tool for training non-intensivists, nurses, and critical care practitioners in diverse health-care settings to deal with the acute deterioration of pediatric patients. Our objective was to evaluate the PFCCS course as a tool for developing a uniform, reproducible, and sustainable model for educating local health-care workers in the optimal management of critically ill children in the Republic of Georgia. Over a period of 18 months and four visits to the country, we worked with Georgian pediatric critical care leadership to complete the following tasks: (1) survey health-care needs within the Republic of Georgia, (2) present representative PFCCS lectures and simulation scenarios to evaluate interest and obtain "buy-in" from key stakeholders throughout the Georgian educational infrastructure, and (3) identify PFCCS instructor candidates. Georgian PFCCS instructor training included the following steps: (1) US PFCCS consultant and content experts presented PFCCS course to Georgian instructor candidates. (2) Simulation learning principles were taught and basic equipment was acquired. (3) Instructor candidates presented PFCCS to Georgian learners, mentored by PFCCS course consultants. Objective evaluation and debriefing with instructor candidates concluded each visit. Between training visits Georgian instructors translated PFCCS slides to the Georgian language. Six candidates were identified and completed PFCCS instructor training. These Georgian instructors independently presented the PFCCS course to 15 Georgian medical students. Student test scores improved significantly from pretest results ( n  = 14) (pretest: 38.7 ± 7 vs. posttest 62.7 ± 6, p  fundamentals of pediatric critical care. Future collaborations will evaluate the clinical impact of PFCCS throughout the Georgian health-care system.

  7. Training simulated patients: evaluation of a training approach using self-assessment and peer/tutor feedback to improve performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Juriah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most medical schools use simulated patients (SPs for teaching. In this context the authenticity of role play and quality of feedback provided by SPs is of paramount importance. The available literature on SP training mostly addresses instructor led training where the SPs are given direction on their roles. This study focuses on the use of peer and self evaluation as a tool to train SPs. Methods SPs at the medical school participated in a staff development and training programme which included a self-assessment of their performance while observing video-tapes of their role play using a structured guide and b peer group assessment of their performance under tutor guidance. The pre and post training performance in relation to authenticity of role play and quality of feedback was blindly assessed by students and tutors using a validated instrument and the scores were compared. A focus group discussion and a questionnaire assessed acceptability of the training programme by the SPs. Results The post-training performance assessment scores were significantly higher (p Conclusion Use of structured self-reflective and peer-interactive, practice based methods of SP training is recommended to improve SP performance. More studies on these methods of training may further refine SP training and lead to improvement of SP performance which in turn may positively impact medical education.

  8. Script Templates: A Practical Approach to Script Training in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Rosalind C.; Cherney, Leora R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Script training for aphasia involves repeated practice of relevant phrases and sentences that, when mastered, can potentially be used in other communicative situations. Although an increasingly popular approach, script development can be time-consuming. We provide a detailed summary of the evidence supporting this approach. We then…

  9. Implementing an Holistic Approach in Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Donna-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Although the phrase "holistic approach" is increasingly used in reference to vocational education and training (VET) in Australia, there appears to be a paucity of literature which extensively conceptualises or details its practical application. Existing references to an "holistic approach" appear indicative of an integrated…

  10. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  11. Implementation of systematic training approach in Kozloduy Training Centre - Current situation. Presentation of Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosturkov, L.

    1993-01-01

    To identify the needs in implementation of the systematic training approach, a relation between the number of trainees, duration of the training and the type of training should be made. In other hand, as it was stated in the TWG-T(93) Status Report, in order to be better identified outstanding training needs, the existing capabilities and other related projects should be taken into account. This report is pointed to give more details for the current situation in Bulgaria and to clarify the needs of international assistance. 3 refs, 3 tabs

  12. Conduct of operations training - An innovative approach to team building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.; Kurth, W.; Broccolo, A.

    1987-01-01

    The conduct of nuclear power plant operations is a key parameter for station management and regulators alike. Indeed, the basic methods and demeanor in which operating crews approach overall plant operations is perhaps the principal factor leading to safe and efficient operations. Hence, Commonwealth Edison's Zion Station has initiated an innovative and positive training program designed to increase operator awareness of conducting station operations in an attentive, diligent, and conscientious manner. This Conduct of Operations Training Program is a collaborative joint effort between Commonwealth Edison and the Westinghouse Nuclear Training Center. In particular, the key managers of Zion's operating department brainstormed various philosophies and strategies with senior training staff members of the Westinghouse Nuclear Training Center. The outcome of these sessions has formed the skeleton of an intensified, one-day Conduct of Operations course. Several unique aspects of this innovative course are described

  13. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 141 - Ground Instructor Certification Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... planning; and (6) Classroom training techniques. (c) Ground training for a basic ground instructor..., required under this part, for the following ratings: (a) Ground Instructor—Basic. (b) Ground Instructor...) Ground training must include the following aeronautical knowledge areas: (1) Learning process; (2...

  14. Training simulated patients: evaluation of a training approach using self-assessment and peer/tutor feedback to improve performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Jennifer; Perera, Joachim; Abdullah, Juriah; Lee, Nagarajah

    2009-06-29

    Most medical schools use simulated patients (SPs) for teaching. In this context the authenticity of role play and quality of feedback provided by SPs is of paramount importance. The available literature on SP training mostly addresses instructor led training where the SPs are given direction on their roles. This study focuses on the use of peer and self evaluation as a tool to train SPs. SPs at the medical school participated in a staff development and training programme which included a) self-assessment of their performance while observing video-tapes of their role play using a structured guide and b) peer group assessment of their performance under tutor guidance. The pre and post training performance in relation to authenticity of role play and quality of feedback was blindly assessed by students and tutors using a validated instrument and the scores were compared. A focus group discussion and a questionnaire assessed acceptability of the training programme by the SPs. The post-training performance assessment scores were significantly higher (p performance. More studies on these methods of training may further refine SP training and lead to improvement of SP performance which in turn may positively impact medical education.

  15. Critical safety parameters: The logical approach to refresher training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Pilkington, W.; Turner, S.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plant managers must ensure that control room staff are able to perform effectively. This is of particular importance through the longer term after initial authorization. Traditionally refresher training has been based on delivery of fragmented training packages typically derived from the initial authorization training programs. Various approaches have been taken to provide a more integrated refresher training program. However, methods such as job and task analysis and subject matter expert derived training have tended to develop without a focused clear overall training objective. The primary objective of all control room staff training is to ensure a proper and safe response to all plant transients. At the Point Lepreau Nuclear Plant, this has defined the Critical Safety Parameter based refresher training program. The overall objective of the Critical Safety Parameter training program is to ensure that control room staff can monitor and control a discrete set of plant parameters. Maintenance of the selected parameters within defined boundaries assures adequate cooling of the fuel and containment of radioactivity. Control room staff need to be able to reliably respond correctly to plant transients under potentially high stress conditions,. utilizing the essential knowledge and skills to deal with such transients. The inference is that the knowledge and skills must be limited to that which can be reliably recalled. This paper describes how the Point Lepreau Nuclear Plant has developed a refresher training program on the basis of a limited number of Critical Safety Parameters. Through this approach, it has been possible to define the essential set of knowledge and skills which ensures a correct response to plant transients

  16. Training in ionizing radiation metrology: a systematic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.G.P.; Sales, E.; Wieland, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the systematic approach to training applied to the determination of backscattering factor of the mammography radiation qualities implemented at LNMRI/IRD/CNEN. The strategy for training includes the procedures described at the IAEA Safety Reports Series 201, i.e. analysis, design, implementation and evaluation with feedback . The training included theoretical and practical classes on dosimetry tools, interaction of radiation with matter, radiation protection, laboratory rules, and measurements and uncertainty analysis. At the end the trainee presents a seminar to show the competency acquired and to improve the scientific communication skills. (author)

  17. Identifying motivators and barriers to student completion of instructor evaluations: A multi-faceted, collaborative approach from four colleges of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, James W; Backo, Jennifer Lynn; Sobota, Kristen Finley; Metzger, Anne H; Ulbrich, Timothy

    To identify motivators and barriers to pharmacy student completion of instructor evaluations, and to develop potential strategies to improve the evaluation process. Completed at four Ohio Colleges of Pharmacy, Phase I consisted of a student/faculty survey and Phase II consisted of joint student/faculty focus groups to discuss Phase I data and to problem solve. In Phase I, the top three student-identified and faculty-perceived motivators to completion of evaluations were to (1) make the course better, (2) earn bonus points, and (3) improve the instructor's teaching. The top three student-identified barriers to completion of evaluations were having to (1) evaluate multiple instructors, (2) complete several evaluations around the same time, and (3) complete lengthy evaluations. Phase II focus groups identified a number of potential ways to enhance the motivators and reduce barriers, including but not limited to making sure faculty convey to students that the feedback they provide is useful and to provide examples of how student feedback has been used to improve their teaching/the course. Students and faculty identified motivators and barriers to completing instructor evaluations and were willing to work together to improve the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. COMPETENCE APPROACH TO TRAINING OF EXPERTS IN RADIATION HYGIENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Baltrukova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of attitude to labor in the society, in professional communities and among people is necessary for further development of society and national economy. This goal may be achieved if the system of professional training is modified: switched to competence approach which should include training of experts, including those in radiation hygiene, with a set of general cultural and professional competences. The system of future experts training should be based on traditions of domestic and international education; it should use modern forms of active and interactive education (computer simulations, business games and role-playing, analysis of concrete situations, portfolio, psychological and other trainings, remote education, etc. It should consider actuality of knowledge and skills and develop independence and responsibility that will enable the young expert to be competitive at the modern labor market and to meet employers’ expectations. Under the new federal educational standard on radiation hygiene accepted in 2014 at present primary specialization in radiation hygiene takes place in internship. At training of experts the new standard provides great use of on-the-job training, independent work, scientific and practical work. Employers should play an important role in training of experts.

  19. Competency profile of Fitness Instructor

    OpenAIRE

    Peterová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Title: COMPETENCY PROFILE OF FITNESS INSTRUCTOR Objectives: The aim of this work is to find out competencies of fitness instructor and make a competency profile, containing competencies, which are important for excellent fitness instructor. Methods: I applied the method of interview and the method of research in my thesis. The interview was used to make a list of competencies of fitness instructor. The research was applied in the final part of making competency profile, for an attestation of ...

  20. Marketing Research. Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration, Washington, DC.

    Prepared for the Administrative Management Course Program, this instructor's manual was developed to serve small-business management needs. The sections of the manual are as follows: (1) Lesson Plan--an outline of material covered, which may be used as a teaching guide, presented in two columns: the presentation, and a step-by-step indication of…

  1. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  2. Touching for attention: How flight instructors support a pilot wearing a view-limiting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard; Tuccio, William A.

    2018-01-01

    We use video recordings from pilot training flights to show how instructors support attention of a student wearing ‘foggles’, a view-limiting device designed to train pilots to fly by reference only to the cockpit flight instruments. The instructors touch cockpit displays with a pointing finger...... demonstrates a technique for controlling descent. The data examples are taken from a corpus of almost 100 hours of video recordings of actual in-flight instruction. We consider how our analyses can inform flight instructor training and improve instructor effectiveness, for example by revealing possible...

  3. Increasing the effectiveness of instrumentation and control training programs using integrated training settings and a systematic approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, J.F.; Rakos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of plant maintenance-related tasks assigned to instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) technicians can be broken down into physical skills required to do the task; resident knowledge of how to do the task; effect of maintenance on plant operating conditions; interactions with other plant organizations such as operations, radiation protection, and quality control; and knowledge of consequences of miss-action. A technician who has learned about the task in formal classroom presentations has not had the advantage of integrating that knowledge with the requisite physical and communication skills; hence, the first time these distinct and vital parts of the task equation are put together is on the job, during initial task performance. On-the-job training provides for the integration of skills and knowledge; however, this form of training is limited by plant conditions, availability of supporting players, and training experience levels of the personnel conducting the exercise. For licensed operations personnel, most nuclear utilities use formal classroom and a full-scope control room simulator to achieve the integration of skills and knowledge in a controlled training environment. TU Electric has taken that same approach into maintenance areas by including identical plant equipment in a laboratory setting for the large portion of training received by maintenance personnel at its Comanche Peak steam electric station. The policy of determining training needs and defining the scope of training by using the systematic approach to training has been highly effective and provided training at a reasonable cost (approximately $18.00/student contact hour)

  4. An Evaluation of Manpower Training Needs in the Hotel-Restaurant Industry on Kauai, 1968, with Recommendations on Programs, Sources of Students, Instructors, and Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Robert W.

    This report, requested and funded by a committee of community leaders, investigates the recruiting, training and employment of cooks, waitresses, maids, and small business managers needed on the island of Kauai through the year 1973. Projected increases in tourism and hotel construction indicate substantial need for well trained personnel. Courses…

  5. Preliminary Measures of Instructor Learning in Teaching Junctional Tourniquet Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, John F; Aden, James K; Shackelford, Stacy; Dubick, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of instructor learning on student performance in use of junctional tourniquets. From a convenience sample of data available after another study, we used a manikin for assessment of control of bleeding from a right groin gunshot wound. Blood loss was measured by the instructor while training users. The data set represented a group of 30 persons taught one at a time. The first measure was a plot of mean blood loss volumes for the sequential users. The second measure was a plot of the cumulative sum (CUSUM) of mean blood loss (BL) volumes for users. Mean blood loss trended down as the instructor gained experience with each newly instructed user. User performance continually improved as the instructor gained more experience with teaching. No plateau effect was observed within the 30 users. The CUSUM plot illustrated a turning point or cusp at the seventh user. The prior portion of the plot (users 1-7) had the greatest improvement; performance did not improve as much thereafter. The improvement after the seventh user was the only change detected in the instructor's trend of performance. The instructor's teaching experience appeared to directly affect user performance; in a model of junctional hemorrhage, the volume of blood loss from the manikin during junctional tourniquet placement was a useful metric of instructor learning. The CUSUM technique detected a small but meaningful change in trend where the instructor learning curve was greatest while working with the first seven users. 2016.

  6. Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In support of United States Government (USG) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear security programs, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been developed and implemented as the basis for a performance-based methodology for the design and evaluation of physical protection systems against a design basis threat (DBT) for theft and sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Integrated systems must include technology, people, and the man-machine interface. A critical aspect of the human element is training on the systems-approach for all the stakeholders in nuclear security. Current training courses and workshops have been very beneficial but are still rather limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international classes - the international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials, and the design basis threat methodology workshop. SNL is also completing the development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. They are vital area identification methodology focused on nuclear power plants to aid in their protection against radiological sabotage, insider threat analysis methodology and protection schemes, and security foundations for competent authority and facility operator stakeholders who are not security professionals. In the long term, we envision a comprehensive nuclear security curriculum that spans policy and technology, regulators and operators, introductory and expert levels, classroom and laboratory/field, and local and offsite training options. This training curriculum will be developed in concert with a nuclear security series of guidance documents that is expected to be forthcoming from the IAEA. It is important to note that while appropriate implementation of systems based on such training and documentation can improve the risk reduction, such a

  7. Task-based neurofeedback training: A novel approach toward training executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S M Hadi; Pritchard-Berman, Mika; Sosa, Natasha; Ceja, Angelica; Kesler, Shelli R

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive training is an emergent approach to improve cognitive functions in various neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. However, current training programs can be relatively lengthy, making adherence potentially difficult for patients with cognitive difficulties. Previous studies suggest that providing individuals with real-time feedback about the level of brain activity (neurofeedback) can potentially help them learn to control the activation of specific brain regions. In the present study, we developed a novel task-based neurofeedback training paradigm that benefits from the effects of neurofeedback in parallel with computerized training. We focused on executive function training given its core involvement in various developmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was employed for providing neurofeedback by measuring changes in oxygenated hemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex. Of the twenty healthy adult participants, ten received real neurofeedback (NFB) on prefrontal activity during cognitive training, and ten were presented with sham feedback (SHAM). Compared with SHAM, the NFB group showed significantly improved executive function performance including measures of working memory after four sessions of training (100min total). The NFB group also showed significantly reduced training-related brain activity in the executive function network including right middle frontal and inferior frontal regions compared with SHAM. Our data suggest that providing neurofeedback along with cognitive training can enhance executive function after a relatively short period of training. Similar designs could potentially be used for patient populations with known neuropathology, potentially helping them to boost/recover the activity in the affected brain regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phronesis: practical wisdom the role of professional practice knowledge in the clinical reasoning of Bobath instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan-Graham, Julie; Cott, Cheryl

    2017-10-01

    Clinical reasoning is an essential aspect of clinical practice, however is largely ignored in the current rehabilitation sciences evidence base. Literature related to clinical reasoning and clinical expertise has evolved concurrently although rehabilitation reasoning frameworks remain relatively generic. The purpose of this study was to explicate the clinical reasoning process of Bobath instructors of a widely used neuro-rehabilitation approach, the Bobath concept. A qualitative interpretive description approach consisting of stimulated recall using video-recorded treatment sessions and in-depth interviews. Purposive sampling was used to recruit members of the International Bobath Instructors Training Association (IBITA). Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim providing the raw data. Data analysis was progressive, iterative, and inductive. Twenty-two IBITA instructors from 7 different countries participated. Ranging in clinical experience from 12 to 40 years, and instructor experience from 1 to 35 years. Three themes were developed, (a) a Bobath clinical framework, (b) person-centered, and (c) a Bobath reasoning approach, highlighting the role of practical wisdom, phronesis in the clinical reasoning process. In particular the role of visuospatial-kinesthetic perception, an element of technical expertise, was illuminated as an integral aspect of clinical reasoning in this expert group. This study provides an interpretive understanding of the clinical reasoning process used by IBITA instructors illustrating an inactive embodied view of clinical reasoning, specifically the role of phronesis, requiring further investigation in nonexpert Bobath therapists, as well as in novice and experienced therapists in other specialty areas. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. An augmented reality home-training system based on the mirror training and imagery approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan, Jörg; Diers, Martin; Fuchs, Xaver; Bach, Felix; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Foell, Jens; Kamping, Sandra; Rance, Mariela; Maaß, Heiko; Flor, Herta

    2014-09-01

    Mirror training and movement imagery have been demonstrated to be effective in treating several clinical conditions, such as phantom limb pain, stroke-induced hemiparesis, and complex regional pain syndrome. This article presents an augmented reality home-training system based on the mirror and imagery treatment approaches for hand training. A head-mounted display equipped with cameras captures one hand held in front of the body, mirrors this hand, and displays it in real time in a set of four different training tasks: (1) flexing fingers in a predefined sequence, (2) moving the hand into a posture fitting into a silhouette template, (3) driving a "Snake" video game with the index finger, and (4) grasping and moving a virtual ball. The system records task performance and transfers these data to a central server via the Internet, allowing monitoring of training progress. We evaluated the system by having 7 healthy participants train with it over the course of ten sessions of 15-min duration. No technical problems emerged during this time. Performance indicators showed that the system achieves a good balance between relatively easy and more challenging tasks and that participants improved significantly over the training sessions. This suggests that the system is well suited to maintain motivation in patients, especially when it is used for a prolonged period of time.

  10. CrossFit® Instructor Demographics and Practice Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R; Suric, Vladimir; Daniels, Alan H; Gil, Joseph A; Eberson, Craig P

    2016-11-17

    CrossFit ® is an increasingly popular exercise modality that uses high intensity power training. The literature to date regarding CrossFit ® has focused on its benefits to VO2 Max, body composition and the motivational variables of participants of CrossFit ® . A computerized survey was distributed to CrossFit ® instructors using Survey Monkey ® (Palo Alto, CA, USA). One hundred and ninety-three CrossFit ® instructors responded to the survey. Of these 86.6% (155/179) reported being a certified CrossFit ® instructor with 26.7% (48/180) having a bachelor's degree in an exercise-related field. Instructors with a CrossFit ® certification have less bachelor's (P=0.04) or master's (P=0.0001) degrees compared to those without a CrossFit ® certification, more utilization of Olympic weightlifting (P=0.03), one-on-one teaching (P=0.0001), 1-RM max on snatch (P=0.004), 1-RM on clean and jerk or hang clean (P=0.0003), kettlebell use (P=0.0001) and one-on-one training (P=0.0001). Instructors report differences in their education and differences in use of weightlifting platforms and various types of footwear. Non-certified instructors differ from CrossFit ® certified instructors in regards to teaching of Olympic weightlifting and exercise programming.

  11. CrossFit® instructor demographics and practice trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Waryasz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available CrossFit® is an increasingly popular exercise modality that uses high intensity power training. The literature to date regarding CrossFit® has focused on its benefits to VO2 Max, body composition and the motivational variables of participants of CrossFit®. A computerized survey was distributed to CrossFit® instructors using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA. One hundred and ninety-three CrossFit® instructors responded to the survey. Of these 86.6% (155/179 reported being a certified CrossFit® instructor with 26.7% (48/180 having a bachelor’s degree in an exercise-related field. Instructors with a CrossFit® certification have less bachelor’s (P=0.04 or master’s (P=0.0001 degrees compared to those without a CrossFit® certification, more utilization of Olympic weightlifting (P=0.03, one-on-one teaching (P=0.0001, 1-RM max on snatch (P=0.004, 1- RM on clean and jerk or hang clean (P=0.0003, kettlebell use (P=0.0001 and one-on-one training (P=0.0001. Instructors report differences in their education and differences in use of weightlifting platforms and various types of footwear. Non-certified instructors differ from CrossFit® certified instructors in regards to teaching of Olympic weightlifting and exercise programming.

  12. Why should nuclear power plant management support the systematic approach to training?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Yoder, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation shows the role of management in training of NPP personnel especially in training for technology transfer and training for transfer of the training capabilities. Systematic approach to training should be used to achieve standard among different industries; consistent, effective and efficient training

  13. The pulling power of chocolate: Effects of approach-avoidance training on approach bias and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Hugh; Kavanagh, David J; MacLeod, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Previous research has shown that action tendencies to approach alcohol may be modified using computerized Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT), and that this impacted on subsequent consumption. A recent paper in this journal (Becker, Jostman, Wiers, & Holland, 2015) failed to show significant training effects for food in three studies: Nor did it find effects on subsequent consumption. However, avoidance training to high calorie foods was tested against a control rather than Approach training. The present study used a more comparable paradigm to the alcohol studies. It randomly assigned 90 participants to 'approach' or 'avoid' chocolate images on the AAT, and then asked them to taste and rate chocolates. A significant interaction of condition and time showed that training to avoid chocolate resulted in faster avoidance responses to chocolate images, compared with training to approach it. Consistent with Becker et al.'s Study 3, no effect was found on amounts of chocolate consumed, although a newly published study in this journal (Schumacher, Kemps, & Tiggemann, 2016) did do so. The collective evidence does not as yet provide solid basis for the application of AAT training to reduction of problematic food consumption, although clinical trials have yet to be conducted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The graded approach to SAT: A cost effective use of the systematic approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.; Bruno, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) has become the internationally accepted standard for the identification, organization, development and delivery of performance - based training. The SAT methodology has been defined and endorsed by the National Academy for Nuclear Training (NANT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Through the routine use of the SAT process organizations, including non-nuclear industries, have been provided with a consistent methodology to determine the level of knowledge and skills that are required to successfully perform job related tasks. However, due to the complexity of each NPP job position and those in other highly technical organizations an enormous volume of data is required to develop, deliver and maintain a performance - based training program. This burden most often falls on the Training Department and requires proficient information management to ensure that all aspects of job performance are incorporated into position specific training programs. Traditionally the SAT process has been a costly and labor- intensive endeavor that many organizations are beginning to challenge as 'too expensive'. Organizations in the US are spending 60+ billion dollars annually on training and the number is growing rapidly. These organizations are also demanding that training: Develop shorter timeframes for learning; Bring physically disconnected employees together in a virtual learning environment; Optimize training by leveraging technology; Be diverse enough to support employee careers; More clearly demonstrate training's ROI; Accommodate cultural diversity and learning differences. (author)

  15. Gait quality is improved by locomotor training in individuals with SCI regardless of training approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooijen, C.F.J.; ter Hoeve, N.; Field-Fote, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: While various body weight supported locomotor training (BWSLT) approaches are reported in the literature for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), none have evaluated outcomes in terms of gait quality. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in measures of gait quality

  16. Salutogenetic approach to professional training of future teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionova O.M.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: disclosure of a nature and characteristics of the Movement for the renewal of adult education (New Adult Learning Movement - NALM as salutogenetic approach to the training of future teachers. Results: to analyze the nature and characteristics of salutogenetic approach to training of future teachers, which is based on anthroposophical methodological foundations and practically realized in the world as Movement for the renewal of adult education. Described the theoretical basis and direction of training (academic training, learning experiences, inner spiritual development, that allow to activate the internal intention of the person, arouse will of students to learn throughout life and contributes to the healthy development of the whole structure of the individual. Conclusions: were reported health saving forms and methods of education of future teachers: the organization of health-improving educational space, development of integrated programs (integration of educational elements - lectures, discussions, group work, project work, art classes, social exercises, etc., the rhythmic organization of educational process taking into account the human biorhythms, work with the biography of a man, pedagogical diagnostics and etc.

  17. Innovative approach to training radiation safety regulatory professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilley, Debbie Bray

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The supply of human resources required to adequately manage a radiation safety regulatory program has diminished in the last five years. Competing professional opportunities and a reduction in the number of health physics secondary schools have made it necessary to look at alternative methods of training. There are limited educational programs in the US that prepare our professionals for careers in the Radiation Regulatory Programs. The state of Florida's radiation control program embraced a new methodology using a combination of didactic and work experience using qualification journals, subject matter experts, and formalized training to develop a qualified pool of employees to perform the regulatory functions and emergency response requirements of a state radiation control program. This program uses a task-based approach to identify training needs and draws upon current staff to develop and implement the training. This has led to a task-oriented staff capable of responding to basic regulatory and emergency response activities within one year of employment. Florida's program lends itself to other states or countries with limited resources that have experienced staff attrition due to retirement or competing employment opportunities. Information on establishing a 'task-based' pool of employees that can perform basic regulatory functions and emergency response after one year of employment will be described. Initial task analysis of core functions and methodology is used to determine the appropriate training methodology for these functions. Instructions will be provided on the methodology used to 'mentor' new employees and then incorporate the new employees into the established core functions and be a useful employee at the completion of the first year of employment. New training philosophy and regime may be useful in assisting in the development of programs in countries and states with limited resources for training radiation protection personnel. (author)

  18. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Winkel, Per; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Ringsted, Charlotte; Gluud, Christian; Grantcharov, Teodor; Ottesen, Bent; Sorensen, Jette Led

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the impact of instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback when training a complex operational task on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. : Simulators are now widely accepted as a training tool, but there is insufficient knowledge about how much feedback is necessary, which is useful for sustainable implementation. A randomized trial complying with CONSORT Statement. All participants had to reach a predefined proficiency level for a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator. The intervention group received standardized instructor feedback a maximum of 3 times. The control group did not receive instructor feedback. Participants were senior medical students without prior laparoscopic experience (n = 99). Outcome measures were time, repetitions, and performance score to reach a predefined proficiency level. Furthermore, influence of sex and perception of own surgical skills were examined. Time (in minutes) and repetitions were reduced in the intervention group (162 vs 342 minutes; P less time (in minutes) than women (P = 0.037), but no sex difference was observed for repetitions (P = 0.20). Participants in the intervention group had higher self-perception regarding surgical skills after the trial (P = 0.011). Instructor feedback increases the efficiency when training a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator; time and repetitions used to achieve a predefined proficiency level were significantly reduced in the group that received instructor feedback compared with the control group. NCT01497782.

  19. WWER-1000 simulator instructor service in NV TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebitsky, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    In July 1996 a full-scope simulator developed by the joint efforts of ATOMTECHENERGO, VNII AES (Russia) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (Japan) was put into service Novovoronezh Training Centre (NV TC). this paper describes the Instructor Station equipment and its capabilities for training process monitoring and simulation. (author)

  20. Cooking and Nutrition Basics. An Instructors Guide for Teaching Cooking Skills and Basic Nutrition to the Chronically Mentally Ill Who Are Being Trained for Independent Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barngrover, Lavone

    Designed for those with teaching skills as well as those without and for those with backgrounds in nutrition and those without, this handbook provides information on how to organize and conduct nutrition education and cooking training for the chronically mentally ill. The first section describes the pilot program which developed the handbook,…

  1. Teach beyond Your Reach: An Instructor's Guide to Developing and Running Successful Distance Learning Classes, Workshops, Training Sessions, and More. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidorf, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Distance education is enabling individuals to earn college and graduate degrees, professional certificates, and a wide range of skills and credentials. In addition to the expanding role of distance learning in higher education, all types of organizations now offer web-based training courses to employees, clients, and other associates. In this…

  2. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  3. Medical students and physical education students as CPR instructors: an appropriate solution to the CPR-instructor shortage in secondary schools?

    OpenAIRE

    Cuijpers, P. J. P. M.; Bookelman, G.; Kicken, W.; de Vries, W.; Gorgels, A. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in secondary schools will increase the number of potential CPR providers. However, currently too few certified instructors are available for this purpose. Training medical students and physical education student teachers to become CPR instructors could decrease this shortage. Aim Examine whether medical students and physical education student teachers can provide CPR training for secondary school pupils as well as (i.?e., non...

  4. Domain Adaptation for Opinion Classification: A Self-Training Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu, Ning

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Domain transfer is a widely recognized problem for machine learning algorithms because models built upon one data domain generally do not perform well in another data domain. This is especially a challenge for tasks such as opinion classification, which often has to deal with insufficient quantities of labeled data. This study investigates the feasibility of self-training in dealing with the domain transfer problem in opinion classification via leveraging labeled data in non-target data domain(s and unlabeled data in the target-domain. Specifically, self-training is evaluated for effectiveness in sparse data situations and feasibility for domain adaptation in opinion classification. Three types of Web content are tested: edited news articles, semi-structured movie reviews, and the informal and unstructured content of the blogosphere. Findings of this study suggest that, when there are limited labeled data, self-training is a promising approach for opinion classification, although the contributions vary across data domains. Significant improvement was demonstrated for the most challenging data domain-the blogosphere-when a domain transfer-based self-training strategy was implemented.

  5. Shakeout: A New Approach to Regularized Deep Neural Network Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Guoliang; Li, Jun; Tao, Dacheng

    2018-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the success of deep neural networks in dealing with a plenty of practical problems. Dropout has played an essential role in many successful deep neural networks, by inducing regularization in the model training. In this paper, we present a new regularized training approach: Shakeout. Instead of randomly discarding units as Dropout does at the training stage, Shakeout randomly chooses to enhance or reverse each unit's contribution to the next layer. This minor modification of Dropout has the statistical trait: the regularizer induced by Shakeout adaptively combines , and regularization terms. Our classification experiments with representative deep architectures on image datasets MNIST, CIFAR-10 and ImageNet show that Shakeout deals with over-fitting effectively and outperforms Dropout. We empirically demonstrate that Shakeout leads to sparser weights under both unsupervised and supervised settings. Shakeout also leads to the grouping effect of the input units in a layer. Considering the weights in reflecting the importance of connections, Shakeout is superior to Dropout, which is valuable for the deep model compression. Moreover, we demonstrate that Shakeout can effectively reduce the instability of the training process of the deep architecture.

  6. Building national capacity for research mentor training: an evidence-based approach to training the trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published Entering Mentoring curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this evidence-based training at their home institutions, we developed an extensive, interactive, multifaceted train-the-trainer workshop. The specific goals of these workshops are to 1) increase facilitator knowledge of an RMT curriculum, 2) increase facilitator confidence in implementing the curriculum, 3) provide a safe environment to practice facilitation of curricular activities, and 4) review implementation strategies and evaluation tools. Data indicate that our approach results in high satisfaction and significant confidence gains among attendees. Of the 195 diverse attendees trained in our workshops since Fall 2010, 44% report implementation at 39 different institutions, collectively training more than 500 mentors. Further, mentors who participated in the RMT sessions led by our trained facilitators report high facilitator effectiveness in guiding discussion. Implications and challenges to building the national capacity needed for improved research mentoring relationships are discussed. © 2015 C. Pfund, K. C. Spencer, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Doris E.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the US Government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Programmes, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been implemented as the basis for a performance methodology for the design and evaluation of Physical Protection Systems against a Design Basis Threat (DBT) for theft or sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Since integrated systems must include people as well as technology and the man-machine interface, a critical aspect of the human element is to train all stakeholders in nuclear security on the systems approach. Current training courses have been beneficial but are still limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international courses and is completing development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. In the long-term, SNL envisions establishing a comprehensive nuclear security training curriculum that will be developed along with a series of forthcoming IAEA Nuclear Security Series guidance documents.

  8. Maggot Instructor: Semi-Automated Analysis of Learning and Memory in Drosophila Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urte Tomasiunaite

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, Drosophila has been widely used as a suitable model organism to study the fundamental processes of associative olfactory learning and memory. More recently, this condition also became true for the Drosophila larva, which has become a focus for learning and memory studies based on a number of technical advances in the field of anatomical, molecular, and neuronal analyses. The ongoing efforts should be mentioned to reconstruct the complete connectome of the larval brain featuring a total of about 10,000 neurons and the development of neurogenic tools that allow individual manipulation of each neuron. By contrast, standardized behavioral assays that are commonly used to analyze learning and memory in Drosophila larvae exhibit no such technical development. Most commonly, a simple assay with Petri dishes and odor containers is used; in this method, the animals must be manually transferred in several steps. The behavioral approach is therefore labor-intensive and limits the capacity to conduct large-scale genetic screenings in small laboratories. To circumvent these limitations, we introduce a training device called the Maggot Instructor. This device allows automatic training up to 10 groups of larvae in parallel. To achieve such goal, we used fully automated, computer-controlled optogenetic activation of single olfactory neurons in combination with the application of electric shocks. We showed that Drosophila larvae trained with the Maggot Instructor establish an odor-specific memory, which is independent of handling and non-associative effects. The Maggot Instructor will allow to investigate the large collections of genetically modified larvae in a short period and with minimal human resources. Therefore, the Maggot Instructor should be able to help extensive behavioral experiments in Drosophila larvae to keep up with the current technical advancements. In the longer term, this condition will lead to a better understanding of

  9. Application of systematic approach to training at TVO Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piirto, A.; Latva, T.-M.; Yli-Antola, K.

    2002-01-01

    Systematic Approach to Training has been used at TVO as the basic principle directing training activity especially in the training of operating personnel. This paper presents how training in general has been planned to be developed. Special attention has been paid on the more systematic realization of the training program of maintenance personnel

  10. A training approach for the transition of repeatable collaboration processes to practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.; De Vreede, G.J.; Pietron, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a training approach to support the deployment of collaboration process support according to the Collaboration Engineering approach. In Collaboration Engineering, practitioners in an organization are trained to facilitate a specific collaborative work practice on a recurring

  11. Systematic approach to training for competence building in radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asiamah, S.D.; Schandorf, C.; Darko, E.O.

    2003-01-01

    Competence building involves four main attributes, namely, knowledge, skills, operating experience and attitude to radiation safety. These multi-attribute requirements demand a systematic approach to education and training of regulatory staff, licensees/registrants and service providers to ensure commensurate competence in performance of responsibilities and duties to specified standards. In order to address issues of competencies required in radiation safety a national programme for qualification and certification has been initiated for regulatory staff, operators, radiation safety officers and qualified experts. Since the inception of this programme in 1993, 40 training events have been organized involving 423 individuals. This programme is at various levels of implementation due to financial and human resource constraints. A department for Human Resource Development and Research was established in 2000 to enhance and ensure the sustainability of the effectiveness of capacity building in radiation safety. (author)

  12. FUTURE TEACHERS TRAINING TO INNOVATIVE PEDAGOGICAL ACTIVITY: CONTEXT APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko L.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The innovative processes in education arose in different historical periods and determined its development. The analysis of theoretical and experimental studies showed that now the teachers have difficulty in developing and implementing innovative technologies, choosing the most appropriate pedagogical methods and assets. The widespread innovations lead to changes in future teachers’ training to the professional activity. The leading objective of higher pedagogical education is to train teacher who has the developed personal and professional skills, able to perform innovative teaching activity. The achievement of this strategic objective requires the organization of targeted training of future teachers to innovative pedagogical activity in terms of higher education system, promoting their professional and personal growth, the formation of innovative capacity and innovative culture. In this regard, there is a need to find approaches to education that are focused on the future content of professional activity. In our opinion, these requirements fully meet the contextual approach that provides consistent, continuous and systematic formation of future teachers’ readiness to innovative pedagogical activity. The this article we analyzed the features of the training of future teachers to innovative pedagogical activity; identified the possibilities of contextual education application in pedagogical institutions; considered the survey results of the beginning teachers of secondary and vocational schools; defined a number of innovative forms, methods and technologies for implementing the contextual education system thet allow combining educational, quasi professional and educational-professional activity, such as: design and usage of electronic educational resources, electronic teaching methods; engaging students into self-educational activity by means of Web services; fulfillment of individual and group projects based on Web and Blog-quests in which

  13. On application of the systematic approach to training in Qinshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Riqing

    1997-01-01

    The author describes the feature of systematic approach to training and introduces the situation about using the approach for training operation and maintenance personnel in Qinshan NPP. The final part of paper shows that there are still some problems worthy of serious consideration in application of the systematic approach to training in nuclear power plant

  14. Repurposing traditional instructor-led lectures for continuing education: rewarding instructors as authors and maximizing return on investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushinek, Avi; Rushinek, Sara; Lippincott, Christine; Ambrosia, Todd

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the repurposing of classroom video surveillance and on-screen archives (RCVSOSA) model, which is an innovative, technology-enabled approach to continuing education in nursing. The RCVSOSA model leverages network Internet-protocol, high-definition surveillance cameras to record videos of classroom lectures that can be automatically uploaded to the Internet or converted to DVD, either in their entirety or as content-specific modules, with the production work embedded in the technology. The proposed model supports health care continuing education through the use of online assessments for focused education modules, access to archived online recordings and DVD training courses, voice-to-text transcripts, and possibly continuing education modules that may be translated into multiple languages. Potential benefits of this model include increased access to educational modules for students, instant authorship, and financial compensation for instructors and their respective organizations.

  15. Approach to team skills training of nuclear power plant control room crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.T.; Gaddy, C.D.; Turney, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    An investigation of current team skills training practices and research was conducted by General Physics Corporation for the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The methodology used included a review of relevant team skills training literature and a workshop to collect inputs from team training practitioners and researchers from the public and private sectors. The workshop was attended by representatives from nuclear utility training organizations, the commercial airline industry, federal agencies, and defense training and research commands. The literature reviews and workshop results provided the input for a suggested approach to team skills training that can be integrated into existing training programs for control room operating crews. The approach includes five phases: (1) team skills objectives development, (2) basic team skills training, (3) team task training, (4) team skills evaluation, and (5) team training program evaluation. Supporting background information and a user-oriented description of the approach to team skills training are provided. 47 refs

  16. Statistics Anxiety and Instructor Immediacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between instructor immediacy and statistics anxiety. It was predicted that students receiving immediacy would report lower levels of statistics anxiety. Using a pretest-posttest-control group design, immediacy was measured using the Instructor Immediacy scale. Statistics anxiety was…

  17. Machine Accounting. An Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, E. Noah, Ed.

    Designed to prepare students to operate the types of accounting machines used in many medium-sized businesses, this instructor's guide presents a full-year high school course in machine accounting covering 120 hours of instruction. An introduction for the instructor suggests how to adapt the guide to present a 60-hour module which would be…

  18. Training digital divide seniors to use a telehealth system: a remote training approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Albert M; Kaufman, David R; Starren, Justin

    2006-01-01

    As the use of health information technologies continues to proliferate amongst seniors, many of whom lack computer experience, there is a need to develop effective training approaches to foster basic competencies. This paper describes the REmote Patient Education in a Telemedicine Environment (REPETE) system, a component of the IDEATel telemedicine architecture. The REPETE architecture supports simultaneous visual and audio teaching modes over low bandwidth connections. This paper presents an in-depth qualitative analysis of two patients being trained to use the IDEATel patient web portal. The results indicate that this method of instruction was useful in facilitating patients' use of the web application. However, the observations suggest that there is learning curve for the trainer to use the resources effectively to establish common ground and foster competencies in the patient.

  19. A Multimedia Approach to ODL for Agricultural Training in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Grunfeld

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Open distance learning (ODL has long been an important option for formal and non-formal education (NFE in most developed and developing countries, but less so in post-conflict countries, including Cambodia. However, in Cambodia there is now greater awareness that ODL can complement traditional face-to-face educational approaches, particularly as there is a shortage of teachers in the country. Thus, understanding how ODL can achieve learning and other objectives has important implications for both formal education and NFE. If it can be found to be effective, ODL has the potential of reaching a large number of people at comparatively lower average costs. This paper reports on a project where the same content was taught to farmers in Cambodia via traditional face-to-face and via ODL and compares outcomes between the different training methods. Exploring the extent to which farmers had adopted new farm practices taught in the course, our results indicate that the outcomes did not vary considerably between those trained using the different approaches.

  20. [Evaluation of the instruction and the instructors by the students during a clinical training period in a gynecology and obstetrics unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploteau, S; Winer, N; Barrier, J; Rogez, J-M; Philippe, H-J

    2007-12-01

    The evaluation of an educational system is part of the essential process to get high-quality teaching. We wanted to assess the teaching and the teachers in a gynaecological unit with a view to improve the education of the trainees within a dynamic educational system. It is a prospective study which took place in the gynecology-obstetric unit of the University of Nantes. Thanks to a questionnaire called "Evaluation of the teaching during a gynecologic-obstetric training course", we evaluated the feelings of 21 medical students about their two-month training course. This questionnaire of 27 items is divided in several parts. The first one is about the quality of the teaching, the second about planification, the third about the quality of the learning resources, and the fourth is about the educational quality of each teacher (interaction teacher-student). The fifth one evaluates the perception of this work experience by the student, notably his clinical activity and his personal implication in the unity. There are also some open questions which point out the positive aspects of the teaching but also its failings and the parts that must be improved. We give here the details of the different stages of this assessment from the questionnaire up to the results, mentioning their limits considering the conceptual orientations and the methodological orientations chosen. Analysis of the data was done determining the percentage of agreement and disagreement to a statement of the questionnaire. All the students find the teachings interesting and stimulating, objectives were gone through thoroughly. Courses were well organised. Their integration in the medical team was good. They feel responsible especially when they are on call (88.3%). On the other hand, for a quarter of them, educational supports are not adapted, teaching documents are not clear and adapted to the National Test. Half of them (45%) are not satisfied by the numerical campus which does not facilitate

  1. Training for the Future? A Case Study of Emerging Education, Training and Development Practitioners in the South African Clothing Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Cooper, Linda; McMillan, Janice

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates how training instructors in the South African clothing industry were prepared for their roles as Education, Training and Development Practitioners (ETDPs) by a university adult education programme. The key focus is on how these emerging ETDPs experienced their changing roles, identities and approaches to teaching and the…

  2. College Students’ Perceptions of Professor/Instructor Bullying: Questionnaire Development and Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Marisa E.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study developed and examined the psychometric properties of a newly formed measure designed to assess professor/instructor bullying, as well as teacher bullying occurring prior to college. Additionally, prevalence of instructor bullying and characteristics related to victims of instructor bullying were examined. Participants Participants were 337 college students recruited in 2012 from a northeastern university. Methods An online questionnaire was administered to college students. A split-half, cross-validation approach was employed for measurement development. Results The measure demonstrated strong criterion validity and internal consistency. Approximately half of students reported witnessing professor/instructor bullying and 18% reported being bullied by a professor/instructor. Report of teacher bullying occurring prior to college was related to professor/instructor bullying in college, and sex was a moderating variable. Conclusion College students perceive instructor bullying as occurring but may not know how to properly address it. Prevention efforts should be made by university administrators, faculty and staff. PMID:26151235

  3. College Students' Perceptions of Professor/Instructor Bullying: Questionnaire Development and Psychometric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Marisa E; Weyandt, Lisa L; Rossi, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    This study developed and examined the psychometric properties of a newly formed measure designed to assess professor/instructor bullying, as well as teacher bullying occurring prior to college. Additionally, prevalence of instructor bullying and characteristics related to victims of instructor bullying were examined. Participants were 337 college students recruited in 2012 from a northeastern university. An online questionnaire was administered to college students. A split-half, cross-validation approach was employed for measurement development. The measure demonstrated strong criterion validity and internal consistency. Approximately half of students reported witnessing professor/instructor bullying and 18% reported being bullied by a professor/instructor. Report of teacher bullying occurring prior to college was related to professor/instructor bullying in college, and sex was a moderating variable. College students perceive instructor bullying as occurring but may not know how to properly address it. Prevention efforts should be made by university administrators, faculty, and staff.

  4. Training Second-Career Teachers: A Different Student Profile, A Different Training Approach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies Baeten

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Second-career teachers are career changers who leave their current jobs to become teachers. This study conducts a narrative literature review which explores the student profiles of these teachers, asking how they differ from school leavers entering teacher education. The literature review also explores the characteristics of training approaches that are most suitable for second-career teachers based on their general student profile. Results show that second-career teachers are older, have strong intrinsic motivation, possess a wide range of knowledge and skills, have a self-directed and application-oriented approach to learning and teaching, and appreciate peer support. They benefit from teacher education programs that are flexible and include a preparatory period, that transfer their expertise into the teaching profession, provide opportunities for self-directed learning and peer support, integrate coursework and field experience, offer a significant amount of field experience and provide intensive mentoring support.

  5. 49 CFR 214.329 - Train approach warning provided by watchmen/lookouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Protection § 214.329 Train approach warning provided by watchmen/lookouts. Roadway workers in a roadway work group who foul any track outside of working limits shall be given warning of approaching trains by one... shall clearly signify to all recipients of the warning that a train or other on-track equipment is...

  6. A MOOC approach for training researchers in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Murugesan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on an online course in research writing offered in a massive open online course (MOOC format for developing country researchers. The concepts of cognitive presence, teacher presence, and social presence informed the design of the course, with a philosophy of strong social interaction supported by guest facilitators. The course was developed with low-bandwidth elements and hosted on a Moodle site. It was offered twice as a MOOC and 2830 learners from more than 90 countries, mainly in the developing world, took part. The average completion rate was 53%. Female learners and learners who were active in the forums were more likely to complete the course. Our MOOC approach may be a useful model for continuing professional development training in the developing world.

  7. A New Pedagogical Design for Geo-Informatics Courses Using an E-Training Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Ahmed Sharaf; ElNahry, Alaa H.; Elsayed, Adel; Ibrahim, Rania Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    The current study seeks to introduce a new pedagogical design for geo-informatics courses using an e-training support system. Laurillard's conversational approach based on conceptual representation for both instructor and learner was used to form the framework. As the current study specifically interested in training as a special form for…

  8. Influence of learning styles on the practical performance after the four-step basic life support training approach - An observational cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Schröder

    Full Text Available Learning and training basic life support (BLS-especially external chest compressions (ECC within the BLS-algorithm-are essential resuscitation training for laypersons as well as for health care professionals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of learning styles on the performance of BLS and to identify whether all types of learners are sufficiently addressed by Peyton's four-step approach for BLS training.A study group of first-year medical students (n = 334 without previous medical knowledge was categorized according to learning styles using the German Lernstilinventar questionnaire based on Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory. Students' BLS performances were assessed before and after a four-step BLS training approach lasting 4 hours. Standardized BLS training was provided by an educational staff consisting of European Resuscitation Council-certified advanced life support providers and instructors. Pre- and post-intervention BLS performance was evaluated using a single-rescuer-scenario and standardized questionnaires (6-point-Likert-scales: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree. The recorded points of measurement were the time to start, depth, and frequency of ECC.The study population was categorized according to learning styles: diverging (5%, n = 16, assimilating (36%, n = 121, converging (41%, n = 138, and accommodating (18%, n = 59. Independent of learning styles, both male and female participants showed significant improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR performance. Based on the Kolb learning styles, no significant differences between the four groups were observed in compression depth, frequency, time to start CPR, or the checklist-based assessment within the baseline assessment. A significant sex effect on the difference between pre- and post-interventional assessment points was observed for mean compression depth and mean compression frequency.The findings of this work show that the four-step-approach

  9. Influence of learning styles on the practical performance after the four-step basic life support training approach - An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Hanna; Henke, Alexandra; Stieger, Lina; Beckers, Stefan; Biermann, Henning; Rossaint, Rolf; Sopka, Saša

    2017-01-01

    Learning and training basic life support (BLS)-especially external chest compressions (ECC) within the BLS-algorithm-are essential resuscitation training for laypersons as well as for health care professionals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of learning styles on the performance of BLS and to identify whether all types of learners are sufficiently addressed by Peyton's four-step approach for BLS training. A study group of first-year medical students (n = 334) without previous medical knowledge was categorized according to learning styles using the German Lernstilinventar questionnaire based on Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory. Students' BLS performances were assessed before and after a four-step BLS training approach lasting 4 hours. Standardized BLS training was provided by an educational staff consisting of European Resuscitation Council-certified advanced life support providers and instructors. Pre- and post-intervention BLS performance was evaluated using a single-rescuer-scenario and standardized questionnaires (6-point-Likert-scales: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree). The recorded points of measurement were the time to start, depth, and frequency of ECC. The study population was categorized according to learning styles: diverging (5%, n = 16), assimilating (36%, n = 121), converging (41%, n = 138), and accommodating (18%, n = 59). Independent of learning styles, both male and female participants showed significant improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. Based on the Kolb learning styles, no significant differences between the four groups were observed in compression depth, frequency, time to start CPR, or the checklist-based assessment within the baseline assessment. A significant sex effect on the difference between pre- and post-interventional assessment points was observed for mean compression depth and mean compression frequency. The findings of this work show that the four-step-approach for

  10. Influence of learning styles on the practical performance after the four-step basic life support training approach – An observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Alexandra; Stieger, Lina; Beckers, Stefan; Biermann, Henning; Rossaint, Rolf; Sopka, Saša

    2017-01-01

    Background Learning and training basic life support (BLS)—especially external chest compressions (ECC) within the BLS-algorithm—are essential resuscitation training for laypersons as well as for health care professionals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of learning styles on the performance of BLS and to identify whether all types of learners are sufficiently addressed by Peyton’s four-step approach for BLS training. Methods A study group of first-year medical students (n = 334) without previous medical knowledge was categorized according to learning styles using the German Lernstilinventar questionnaire based on Kolb’s Learning Styles Inventory. Students’ BLS performances were assessed before and after a four-step BLS training approach lasting 4 hours. Standardized BLS training was provided by an educational staff consisting of European Resuscitation Council-certified advanced life support providers and instructors. Pre- and post-intervention BLS performance was evaluated using a single-rescuer-scenario and standardized questionnaires (6-point-Likert-scales: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree). The recorded points of measurement were the time to start, depth, and frequency of ECC. Results The study population was categorized according to learning styles: diverging (5%, n = 16), assimilating (36%, n = 121), converging (41%, n = 138), and accommodating (18%, n = 59). Independent of learning styles, both male and female participants showed significant improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. Based on the Kolb learning styles, no significant differences between the four groups were observed in compression depth, frequency, time to start CPR, or the checklist-based assessment within the baseline assessment. A significant sex effect on the difference between pre- and post-interventional assessment points was observed for mean compression depth and mean compression frequency. Conclusions The findings

  11. Developing the Mental Health Workforce: Review and Application of Training Approaches from Multiple Disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Kerns, Suzanne E. U.; Bruns, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Strategies specifically designed to facilitate the training of mental health practitioners in evidence-based practices (EBPs) have lagged behind the development of the interventions themselves. The current paper draws from an interdisciplinary literature (including medical training, adult education, and teacher training) to identify useful training and support approaches as well as important conceptual frameworks that may be applied to training in mental health. Theory and research findings a...

  12. A decision-algorithm defining the rehabilitation approach: 'Facial oral tract therapy'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine S; Jakobsen, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    was developed by a research occupational therapist and an F.O.T.T. senior instructor. We used an inductive approach combining existing knowledge from: F.O.T.T. instructors, therapists trained in using the F.O.T.T. approach, and existing literature. A group of F.O.T.T. instructors and the originator...... and eating; oral hygiene; breathing, voice, and speech articulation; facial expression, giving guidance on interventions. The algorithm outlines all important components in the treatment that the therapist should decide to use or not to use in the intervention. The algorithm is supported by a manual...

  13. CrossFit® instructor demographics and practice trends

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory R. Waryasz; Vladimir Suric; Alan H. Daniels; Joseph A. Gil; Craig P. Eberson

    2016-01-01

    CrossFit® is an increasingly popular exercise modality that uses high intensity power training. The literature to date regarding CrossFit® has focused on its benefits to VO2 Max, body composition and the motivational variables of participants of CrossFit®. A computerized survey was distributed to CrossFit® instructors using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA). One hundred and ninety-three CrossFit® instructors responded to the survey. Of these 86.6% (155/179) reported being a certified CrossF...

  14. The effects of verbal information and approach-avoidance training on children's fear-related responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J; Lisk, Stephen C; Mikita, Nina; Mitchell, Sophie; Huijding, Jorg; Rinck, Mike; Field, Andy P

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the effects of verbal information and approach-avoidance training on fear-related cognitive and behavioural responses about novel animals. One hundred and sixty children (7-11 years) were randomly allocated to receive: a) positive verbal information about one novel animal and threat information about a second novel animal (verbal information condition); b) approach-avoidance training in which they repeatedly pushed away (avoid) or pulled closer (approach) pictures of the animals (approach-avoidance training), c) a combined condition in which verbal information was given prior to approach-avoidance training (verbal information + approach-avoidance training) and d) a combined condition in which approach-avoidance training was given prior to verbal information (approach-avoidance training + verbal information). Threat and positive information significantly increased and decreased fear beliefs and avoidance behaviour respectively. Approach-avoidance training was successful in training the desired behavioural responses but had limited effects on fear-related responses. Verbal information and both combined conditions resulted in significantly larger effects than approach-avoidance training. We found no evidence for an additive effect of these pathways. This study used a non-clinical sample and focused on novel animals rather than animals about which children already had experience or established fears. The study also compared positive information/approach with threat information/avoid training, limiting specific conclusions regarding the independent effects of these conditions. The present study finds little evidence in support of a possible causal role for behavioural response training in the aetiology of childhood fear. However, the provision of verbal information appears to be an important pathway involved in the aetiology of childhood fear. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond the Biology: A Systematic Investigation of Noncontent Instructor Talk in an Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Shannon B.; Reggi, Amanda L.; Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Burrus, Laura W.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors create classroom environments that have the potential to impact learning by affecting student motivation, resistance, and self-efficacy. However, despite the critical importance of the learning environment in increasing conceptual understanding, little research has investigated what instructors say and do to create learning environments in college biology classrooms. We systematically investigated the language used by instructors that does not directly relate to course content and defined the construct of Instructor Talk. Transcripts were generated from a semester-long, cotaught introductory biology course (n = 270 students). Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach to identify emergent categories of Instructor Talk. The five emergent categories from analysis of more than 600 quotes were, in order of prevalence, 1) Building the Instructor/Student Relationship, 2) Establishing Classroom Culture, 3) Explaining Pedagogical Choices, 4) Sharing Personal Experiences, and 5) Unmasking Science. Instances of Instructor Talk were present in every class session analyzed and ranged from six to 68 quotes per session. The Instructor Talk framework is a novel research variable that could yield insights into instructor effectiveness, origins of student resistance, and methods for overcoming stereotype threat. Additionally, it holds promise in professional development settings to assist instructors in reflecting on the learning environments they create. PMID:26582237

  16. Competence-based approaches to professional training and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhov, S.B.; Shcheglov, V.A.; Savenkov, A.M.; Puzanova, O.V.

    2010-01-01

    The authors say that the personnel training system for the nuclear industry must represent a successive transition from one activity to another: from purely training activities to professional training activities to purely professional activities. Components of knowledge management include storage, transfer and efficiency of knowledge use. The competence of a specialist is determined by a combination of cognitive, functional and value and ethics components. In order to assure that the internship program is clearly structured, it must be comprised of a set of training modules. The examples of probation training modules for scientific and design organizations are given. Problems of assessing the quality of training of young specialists and building general professional competence are also discussed [ru

  17. Task to Training Matrix Design for Decommissioning Engineer on the basis of Systematic Approach to Training Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jeong Keun [KHNP, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In nuclear history, before Chernobyl Accident, Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident was the severest accident. For this reason, to resolve the disclosed or potential possibilities of nuclear accident, more than one hundred countermeasures were proposed by United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Among various recommendations by USNRC, one suggestion was related to training aspect. It was Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) and this event was the initiation of SAT methodology in the world. In Korea, upcoming June 2017, Kori Unit-1 NPP is scheduled to be shut down and it will experience NPP decommissioning for the first time. Present study aims to establish concrete training foundation for NPP decommissioning engineers based on Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology, in particular, Task to Training Matrix (TTM). The objective of this paper is to organize TTM on the basis of SAT for NPP decommissioning engineer. For this reason, eighteen tasks are yielded through Job and Task Analysis (JTA) process. After that, for the settlement of Task to Training Matrix (TTM), various data are determined such as element, condition, standard, knowledge and skill, learning objective and training setting. When it comes to training in nuclear industry, SAT methodology has been the unwavering principle in Korea since NPPs export to UAE.

  18. An Alternative Approach to Preservice Police Training: Combining Training and Education Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Many states offer police and corrections officer certification through state approved police basic training, either after hire (in-service) or before hire (preservice). Only large agencies conduct their own basic training academies after being hired. The trend is to save money through preservice training offered by colleges. This especially…

  19. Establishing and maintaining instructional skills through initial and continuing training: A common sense approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, J.A.; Hall, J.D.; Betz, T.L.; Stoupe, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Using this common sense approach to determining initial and continuing training for instructional staff members helped XYZ facility to develop a training program that will meet the specific needs of its staff. From the results of the analysis, XYZ can now provide the right training at the right time. THe competency-to-training matrix will assist XYZ in accomplishing this training. This matrix also groups the competencies into the five phases associated with the Systematic Approach to Training methodology. From this common sense approach, XYZ facility has a report detailing many solutions that go beyond training. Awareness of problems, causes, and solutions are the keys to successful facility management. Sharing these issues with the right facility personnel, XYZ will be able to meet and/or exceed the changing expectations placed on them due to ''downsizing'', ''rightsizing'', or ''reengineering''

  20. Conflicting demands in prison education and the need for context-specific, specialist training for prison educators: an account of the work of the Initial Teacher Training project for teachers and instructors in London prisons and offender learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanes, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prison Education is regulated by legislative and institutional requirements as are other kinds of Learning and Skill provision, but it is also fundamentally affected by the custodial requirements of the British Legal system. This, together with the relative isolation that teaching staff face within an organisational culture which is peculiar to each prison, produces a learning culture that is very different from that of general Further Education. This paper discusses initial findings of the LONCETT Prison Education Research Project (2008, which aims to identify the specific professional training needs of prison educators in London. Findings from five of the eight prisons in London highlighted two main pedagogic issues that emerged as key aspects of prison education practice which require both specialist training input and further research: the fragmentation which characterises the learner experience; and the emotional stress produced in this environment, which impacts both upon prisoner-learners and teaching staff.

  1. Developing the Mental Health Workforce: Review and Application of Training Approaches from Multiple Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Kerns, Suzanne E. U.; Bruns, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Strategies specifically designed to facilitate the training of mental health practitioners in evidence-based practices (EBPs) have lagged behind the development of the interventions themselves. The current paper draws from an interdisciplinary literature (including medical training, adult education, and teacher training) to identify useful training and support approaches as well as important conceptual frameworks that may be applied to training in mental health. Theory and research findings are reviewed, which highlight the importance of continued consultation/ support following training workshops, congruence between the training content and practitioner experience, and focus on motivational issues. In addition, six individual approaches are presented with careful attention to their empirical foundations and potential applications. Common techniques are highlighted and applications and future directions for mental health workforce training and research are discussed. PMID:21190075

  2. Comparison of Two Music Training Approaches on Music and Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christina D; Galvin, John J; Maat, Bert; Başkent, Deniz; Free, Rolien H

    2018-01-01

    In normal-hearing (NH) adults, long-term music training may benefit music and speech perception, even when listening to spectro-temporally degraded signals as experienced by cochlear implant (CI) users. In this study, we compared two different music training approaches in CI users and their effects on speech and music perception, as it remains unclear which approach to music training might be best. The approaches differed in terms of music exercises and social interaction. For the pitch/timbre group, melodic contour identification (MCI) training was performed using computer software. For the music therapy group, training involved face-to-face group exercises (rhythm perception, musical speech perception, music perception, singing, vocal emotion identification, and music improvisation). For the control group, training involved group nonmusic activities (e.g., writing, cooking, and woodworking). Training consisted of weekly 2-hr sessions over a 6-week period. Speech intelligibility in quiet and noise, vocal emotion identification, MCI, and quality of life (QoL) were measured before and after training. The different training approaches appeared to offer different benefits for music and speech perception. Training effects were observed within-domain (better MCI performance for the pitch/timbre group), with little cross-domain transfer of music training (emotion identification significantly improved for the music therapy group). While training had no significant effect on QoL, the music therapy group reported better perceptual skills across training sessions. These results suggest that more extensive and intensive training approaches that combine pitch training with the social aspects of music therapy may further benefit CI users.

  3. NRC approach to evaluating training effectiveness in accordance with the policy statement on training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persensky, J.J.; Blumer, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The activity of the past two years has provided an opportunity for the NRC to examine and realign the way in which it views the training process. In the process, it has provided the industry with an incentive to emphasize training as an opportunity for enlightened self-regulation. As a result, the NRC and industry perspectives on training have, for all intents and purposes, merged into a single performance orientation. This cooperation should provide the needed momentum towards improvements in training effectiveness. It is the NRC's goal to monitor this momentum and to encourage progress toward the ideal of systematic, performance-based training for all essential personnel in the nuclear industry

  4. Approach to training the operators of WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pironkov, L.; Minakova, R.

    2002-01-01

    The paper has three parts. (1) Personnel Training and Qualifications (2) Description of Kozloduy NPP Training and Qualification System (TQS) built in the last 7 years and its interfaces with the Certification System and (3) Application of the TQS for the Senior Reactor Operator (SRO). (author)

  5. Development Strategies for Online Volunteer Training Modules: A Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robideau, Kari; Vogel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Volunteers are central to the delivery of 4-H programs, and providing quality, relevant training is key to volunteer success. Online, asynchronous modules are an enhancement to a training delivery menu for adult volunteers, providing consistent, accessible options traditionally delivered primarily face to face. This article describes how Minnesota…

  6. Balancing Training Techniques for Flight Controller Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Training of ground control teams has been a difficult task in space operations. There are several intangible skills that must be learned to become the steely eyed men and women of mission control who respond to spacecraft failures that can lead to loss of vehicle or crew if handled improperly. And as difficult as training is, it can also be costly. Every day, month or year an operator is in training, is a day that not only they are being trained without direct benefit to the organization, but potentially an instructor or mentor is also being paid for hours spent assisting them. Therefore, optimization of the training flow is highly desired. Recently the Expedition Division (DI) at Johnson Space Flight Center has recreated their training flows for the purpose of both moving to an operator/specialist/instructor hierarchy and to address past inefficiencies in the training flow. This paper will discuss the types of training DI is utilizing in their new flows, and the balance that has been struck between the ideal learning environments and realistic constraints. Specifically, the past training flow for the ISS Attitude Determination and Control Officer will be presented, including drawbacks that were encountered. Then the new training flow will be discussed and how a new approach utilizes more training methods and teaching techniques. We will look at how DI has integrated classes, workshops, checkouts, module reviews, scenarios, OJT, paper sims, Mini Sims, and finally Integrated Sims to balance the cost and timing of training a new flight controller.

  7. Face-to-Face or Distance Training: Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs to Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Naomi; Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Two approaches to training for small/medium-sized enterprises were compared: a British distance learning program and an Irish program offering face-to-face training for micro-enterprises. Both used constructivist, collaborative, and reflective methods. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach were identified. (SK)

  8. How Well Can We Learn With Standard BCI Training Approaches? A Pilot Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeunet , Camille; Cellard , Alison; Subramanian , Sriram; Hachet , Martin; N'Kaoua , Bernard; Lotte , Fabien

    2014-01-01

    International audience; While being very promising, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) remain barely used outside laboratories because they are not reliable enough. It has been suggested that current training approaches may be partly responsible for the poor reliability of BCIs as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology and are thus inadequate. To determine to which extent such BCI training approaches (i.e., feedback and training tasks) are suitable to learn a skill, we used them in ...

  9. Modernizing the Professional Capabilities of Driving Instructors and Traffic Safety Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarov Ivan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effective traffic safety training is a long process; it starts from very young age and continues throughout life. This is not only a process of acquiring knowledge and skills, but also a matter of social importance. Pedagogical forms of education depend on the position of a man in society, respectively, on abilities to percept the environment. The recent investigations of traffic accidents show, that the young drivers generally have poorer than average self-reflection skills. It is therefore important to foster self-reflection skills and attitudes from an early age, especially in matters that relate to road and driving safety. All of staff that have career in traffic safety training (mainly instructors for driving and traffic safety teachers in Europe have their responsibility for decreasing the traffic accidents and incidents by polishing their skills. They work under variety conditions, specific National Lows and Regulations, but the features of their target groups are one and the same. In order to meet the new challenges put by EU Commission they need to have common vision about traffic safety training in Europe, to know what traffic safety means for different age groups, to know what is the best practice of their colleagues, including curricula, methods, training materials, and to be aware their work is very important for traffic safety. Aim of this paper is to present an approach for non-formal instructors for driving and traffic safety teachers training for modernizing their professional capabilities with students form 0 to 30 years old. The investigations and main results are based on the theoretical investigation for hierarchical level of behavior, made by Hatakka for instructors for driving training. The students are divided in four age groups: pre-school children (0-6 years, schoolchildren (7-12 years, teenagers (13-17 years and young adults (18-30 years. For each age group a curriculum is developed according to common EU rules and

  10. Modeling the Effects of Stress: An Approach to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    Stress is an integral element of the operational conditions experienced by combat medics. The effects of stress can compromise the performance of combat medics who must reach and treat their comrades under often threatening circumstances. Examples of these effects include tunnel vision, loss of motor control, and diminished hearing, which can result in an inability to perceive further danger, satisfactorily treat the casualty, and communicate with others. While many training programs strive to recreate this stress to aid in the experiential learning process, stress inducement may not always be feasible or desired. In addition, live simulations are not always a practical, convenient, and repeatable method of training. Instead, presenting situational training on a personal computer is proposed as an effective training platform in which the effects of stress can be addressed in a different way. We explore the cognitive and motor effects of stress, as well as the benefits of training for mitigating these effects in real life. While many training applications focus on inducing stress in order to "condition" the stress response, the author explores the possibilities of modeling stress to produce a similar effect. Can presenting modeled effects of stress help prepare or inoculate soldiers for stressful situations in which they must perform at a high level? This paper investigates feasibility of modeling stress and describes the preliminary design considerations of a combat medic training system that utilizes this method of battlefield preparation.

  11. STS-31 crewmembers review checklist with instructor on JSC's FB-SMS middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Bruce McCandless II (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden (right) discuss procedures with a training instructor on the middeck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The three are pointing to a checklist during this training simulation in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  12. Training Approach-Avoidance of Smiling Faces Affects Emotional Vulnerability in Socially Anxious Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eRinck

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research revealed an automatic behavioral bias in high socially anxious individuals (HSAs: Although their explicit evaluations of smiling faces are positive, they show automatic avoidance of these faces. This is reflected by faster pushing than pulling of smiling faces in an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT; Heuer, Rinck, & Becker, 2007. The current study addressed the causal role of this avoidance bias for social anxiety. To this end, we used the AAT to train HSAs, either to approach smiling faces or to avoid them. We examined whether such an AAT training could change HSAs’ automatic avoidance tendencies, and if yes, whether AAT effects would generalize to a new approach task with new facial stimuli, and to mood and anxiety in a social threat situation (a video-recorded self-presentation. We found that HSAs trained to approach smiling faces did indeed approach female faces faster after the training than HSAs trained to avoid smiling faces. Moreover, approach-faces training reduced emotional vulnerability: It led to more positive mood and lower anxiety after the self-presentation than avoid-faces training. These results suggest that automatic approach-avoidance tendencies have a causal role in social anxiety, and that they can be modified by a simple computerized training. This may open new avenues in the therapy of social phobia.

  13. Training approach-avoidance of smiling faces affects emotional vulnerability in socially anxious individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinck, Mike; Telli, Sibel; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Woud, Marcella L.; Kerstholt, Merel; te Velthuis, Sarai; Wittkowski, Matthias; Becker, Eni S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research revealed an automatic behavioral bias in high socially anxious individuals (HSAs): although their explicit evaluations of smiling faces are positive, they show automatic avoidance of these faces. This is reflected by faster pushing than pulling of smiling faces in an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT; Heuer et al., 2007). The current study addressed the causal role of this avoidance bias for social anxiety. To this end, we used the AAT to train HSAs, either to approach smiling faces or to avoid them. We examined whether such an AAT training could change HSAs' automatic avoidance tendencies, and if yes, whether AAT effects would generalize to a new approach task with new facial stimuli, and to mood and anxiety in a social threat situation (a video-recorded self-presentation). We found that HSAs trained to approach smiling faces did indeed approach female faces faster after the training than HSAs trained to avoid smiling faces. Moreover, approach-faces training reduced emotional vulnerability: it led to more positive mood and lower anxiety after the self-presentation than avoid-faces training. These results suggest that automatic approach-avoidance tendencies have a causal role in social anxiety, and that they can be modified by a simple computerized training. This may open new avenues in the therapy of social phobia. PMID:23970862

  14. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part II: Approved Clinical Instructor and Student Perceptions of and Influences on Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context: Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) are expected to provide feedback to athletic training students (ATSs) during clinical education experiences. Researchers in other fields have found that clinical instructors and students often have different perceptions of actual and ideal feedback and that several factors may influence the feedback exchanges between instructors and students. However, understanding of these issues in athletic training education is minimal. Objective: To investigate the current characteristics and perceptions of and the influences on feedback exchanges between ATSs and ACIs. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: One entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: Four ACIs and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis: Individual, semistructured interviews were conducted with participants and integrated with field notes and observations for analysis. We used the constant comparative approach to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results: Participants described that feedback plays an important role in clinical education and has several purposes related to improving performance. The ACIs and ATSs also discussed several preferred characteristics of feedback. Participants identified 4 main influences on their feedback exchanges, including the ACI, the ATS, personalities, and the learning environment. Conclusions: The ACIs and ATSs had similar perceptions of ideal feedback in addition to the actual feedback that was provided during their clinical education experiences. Most of the preferences for feedback were aligned with recommendations in the literature, suggesting that existing research findings are applicable to athletic training clinical education. Several factors influenced the

  15. A multivariate approach to heavy flavour tagging with cascade training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J; Liu, Y

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of artificial neural networks and boosted decision trees, with and without cascade training, for tagging b-jets in a collider experiment. It is shown, using a Monte Carlo simulation of WH→lνq q-bar events, that for a b-tagging efficiency of 50%, the light jet rejection power given by boosted decision trees without cascade training is about 55% higher than that given by artificial neural networks. The cascade training technique can improve the performance of boosted decision trees and artificial neural networks at this b-tagging efficiency level by about 35% and 80% respectively. We conclude that the cascade trained boosted decision trees method is the most promising technique for tagging heavy flavours at collider experiments

  16. The Culure Assimilator: An Approach to Cross-Cultural Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Evaluates the cultural assimilator, a kind of training manual to help members of one culture understand and adjust to another culture. Describes those constructed for the Arab countries, Iran, Thailand, Central America, and Greece. (MB)

  17. Systems Approach to Japanese Language Teacher Training Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Nuibe, Yoshinori

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to present a conceptual framework for systematizing the Japanese-language teacher training curriculum. Firstly, I discussed what an outstanding Japanese language teacher is like. Secondly, I focussed on teacher development. Thirdly, I proposed the principles of constructing a systematic curriculum. Lastly, I insisted that a new curriculum for human dynamics in Japanese be introduced and established in the Japanese language teacher training course.

  18. LMS Use and Instructor Performance: The Role of Task-Technology Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Tanya; Klobas, Jane; Renzi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of learning management systems (LMS) has changed the way in which instructors work. This paper uses Goodhue and Thompson's (1995) technology-to-performance chain (TPC) to explore the roles of task-technology fit (TTF) and level of LMS use in the performance impacts of LMS for instructors. A mixed method approach was used: an…

  19. Training at Electricite de France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1985-01-01

    With 41 nuclear power units operating and another 21 units under construction, France is serious about improving personnel training for the 3000 new employees each year. Electricite de France (EdF) takes a paternalistic approach to personnel training and to recruitment and advancement from within the organization. Courses in the training program range from one day to one year in length, and may take place either on or off the site. The author describes the training centers and schedule, but emphasizes the training is an ongoing process. Most instructors come from operating power stations. The courses use simulators to train operators in the use of fault analysis during an emergency. Computer-aided teaching systems are also widely used. 1 figure

  20. Pervasive Sound Sensing: A Weakly Supervised Training Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel; Caulfield, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Modern smartphones present an ideal device for pervasive sensing of human behavior. Microphones have the potential to reveal key information about a person's behavior. However, they have been utilized to a significantly lesser extent than other smartphone sensors in the context of human behavior sensing. We postulate that, in order for microphones to be useful in behavior sensing applications, the analysis techniques must be flexible and allow easy modification of the types of sounds to be sensed. A simplification of the training data collection process could allow a more flexible sound classification framework. We hypothesize that detailed training, a prerequisite for the majority of sound sensing techniques, is not necessary and that a significantly less detailed and time consuming data collection process can be carried out, allowing even a nonexpert to conduct the collection, labeling, and training process. To test this hypothesis, we implement a diverse density-based multiple instance learning framework, to identify a target sound, and a bag trimming algorithm, which, using the target sound, automatically segments weakly labeled sound clips to construct an accurate training set. Experiments reveal that our hypothesis is a valid one and results show that classifiers, trained using the automatically segmented training sets, were able to accurately classify unseen sound samples with accuracies comparable to supervised classifiers, achieving an average F -measure of 0.969 and 0.87 for two weakly supervised datasets.

  1. Changing Instructor's Roles in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Zane L.

    2008-01-01

    Berge's Instructor's Roles Model categorized the instructor's roles as pedagogical, social, managerial, and technical. Developed more than a decade ago, this model described changing roles for instructors as they transitioned from in-person classrooms to teaching online. Today, as virtual worlds emerge and are being used as educational platforms,…

  2. How does teaching clinical skills influence instructors' professional behaviour?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamani N

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: "Introduction to Clinical Medicine" in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services is an initiative in which general practitioners work as instructors and have the opportunity to experience teaching in addition to clinical practice. Since teaching, affects both teacher and students, this study aims to assess the influence of teaching clinical skills on the instructors' psychological, social and professional behaviour. Methods: This was performed as a qualitative study. The research population consisted of instructors of “Introduction to Clinical Medicine” who were all general practitioners and acted as facilitator in small groups working on physical examination and case discussion. The data collecting tool was a semi-structured interview which was recorded on the tape. Then, the interviews were transcribed and confirmed by interviewees at the end. 10 instructors were interviewed. The data were analysed according to Colaizzi model. Results: After coding the data to 38 main subjects, they were classified into three main categories including professional, psychological and social effects. The influence of teaching on professional performance included performing a thorough and correct physical examination, taking a detailed and correct history, increasing decision making ability and increasing professional knowledge. Some of the psychological effects were increasing selfconfidence, job satisfaction and morale. The social effects of teaching were increasing social contacts, having a relationship with an academic environment and having a respectful job. Conclusion: Considering the positive effects of teaching on instructors, teaching clinical skills by general practitioners can increase general practitioners knowledge and clinical skills and improve their morale. It is recommended to train general practitioners both for teaching skills and clinical skills and consider this, as an opportunity for physicians’ continuing

  3. TRAINING OF E-LEARNING MANAGERS: COMPETENCY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the competencies necessary for the successful professional activity of e-learning managers. The content of the professional qualification "e-learning manager" is revealed. The model of competency system of the e-learning manager is offered. The model, which defines the content, forms, methods and means of training, tools and indicators for assessing the results of training e-learning managers by levels, is substantiated. Examples of competency tasks for forming of professional competencies in innovative teaching methods and technologies, Web 2.0 services, e-learning expertise, e-environment design, IT infrastructure management, and the development of Soft skills are presented. It is proposed to solve the problem of training specialists who will be able not only to use ICT in educational activities, but also to master the competencies of e-learning management.

  4. Enhancing the Classroom Experience: Instructor Use of Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeff; Hill, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Instructors continually search for innovative approaches to interact with and engage students in the classroom. The tablet offers a potential innovation for this purpose. Tablet devices from Apple, Microsoft, and other hardware vendors have overcome many of the challenges of the past (e.g. cost and limited applications) to become useful tools for…

  5. Instructor Attitudes toward Students: Job Satisfaction and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.

    2008-01-01

    The relational teaching approach suggests that instructors should develop positive relationships with students, with benefits including greater job satisfaction. One way to build positive relationships with students involves exhibiting immediacy behaviors. The author examined relationships among professors' attitudes toward students, immediacy…

  6. Distance learning approach to train health sciences students at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The University of Nairobi (UoN) College of Health Sciences (CHS) established Partnership for Innovative Medical Education in Kenya (PRIME-K) programmeme to enhance health outcomes in Kenya through extending the reach of medical training outside Nairobi to help health sciences students enhance their ...

  7. Using Emotional Intelligence in Training Crisis Managers: The Pandora Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Lachian; Bacon, Liz; Cortellessa, Gabriella; Cesta, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Multi-agency crisis management represents one of the most complex of real-world situations, requiring rapid negotiation and decision-making under extreme pressure. However, the training offered to strategic planners, called Gold Commanders, does not place them under any such pressure. It takes the form of paper-based, table-top exercises, or…

  8. Beyond Assertiveness Training: A Problem-Solving Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nancy A.

    1979-01-01

    Assertiveness training models show shortcomings in those situations where assertiveness results in stalemates or conflicts, or both. Deadlocks may occur when antagonists demonstrate appropriate assertive behavior. Conflict management using problem-solving skills allows individuals to learn appropriate methods of dealing with conflictual or…

  9. Routing Trains Through Railway Junctions: A New Set Packing Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusby, Richard; Larsen, Jesper; Ryan, David

    how the problem can be formulated as a set packing model. To exploit the structure of the problem we present a solution procedure which entails solving the dual of this formulation through the dynamic addition of violated cuts (primal variables). A discussion of the variable (train path) generation...

  10. Training Needs Analysis: Weaknesses in the Conventional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, Michael James; Lovel, Murray Jack

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the training and development needs of administrative support staff is not aided by conventional performance appraisal, which measures summary or comparative effectiveness. Meaningful diagnostic evaluation integrates three levels of analysis (organization, task, and individual), using behavioral expectation scales. (SK)

  11. Analysis of Video-Based Training Approaches and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Serge

    2018-01-01

    The use of videos to analyze teaching practices or initial teacher training is aimed at helping build professional skills by establishing more explicit links between university education and internships and practical work in the schools. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the English-speaking community with French research via a study…

  12. Teacher Training in Family Involvement: An Interpersonal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Mick; Wallinga, Charlotte

    2000-01-01

    Discusses ways to develop family-school-community involvement, based on an early childhood teacher training course in family involvement. Discusses strategies for using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs to facilitate family involvement interactions, and using student teachers' experiences for structuring reflective thought about family involvement…

  13. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in Washington state public high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Sheri; Quan, Linda

    2003-03-01

    To determine the best approaches for increasing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training opportunities for public high school students, we conducted a statewide survey of all 310 public high schools in Washington State. The findings describe CPR student training currently provided by high schools, barriers to providing, and strategies to increase CPR training of high school students. The response rate was 89% (276 schools) from a combination of mail and telephone surveys; 35% (n=97) reported that they did not provide any CPR student training. Of the 132 schools that provided CPR student training, 23% trained less than 10% of their students, and 39% trained more than 90% of their students. The majority of public high schools, 70%, did not have any teacher trained to teach CPR or had only one teacher with such training. Yet 80% of schools felt that CPR training is best provided in school settings. Schools perceived the greatest benefit of CPR training as providing students with the skill to save a life (43%). The most frequently identified barriers were logistical: limited time to teach the curriculum (24%), lack of funds (16%), and instructor scheduling difficulties (17%). Less than 5% of respondents voiced any opposition to CPR training, and that opposition was for logistical reasons. To increase CPR training, the single best strategies suggested were: increase funding, provide time in the curriculum, have more certified instructors, and make CPR student training a requirement.

  15. Andragogical Approach to the Quality and Effectiveness of Vocational Adults Training (A Retrospective Study [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Katansky

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the basic results of a study dealing with the problem of quality and effectiveness of vocational training of adults in Bulgaria. Why is it retrospective? Because the subject of study is previous author’s andragogical investigations on the vocational qualification system, adults learners, training process and principals. The author uses the andragogigal methodology and results in order to develop a new approach to the problem and original definitions of vocational training quality and effectiveness.

  16. Instructor station of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fanghui

    1996-01-01

    The instructor station of Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit is based on SGI graphic workstation. The operation system is real time UNIX, and the development of man-machine interface, mainly depends on standard X window system, special for X TOOLKITS and MOTIF. The instructor station has been designed to increase training effectiveness and provide the most flexible environment possible to enhance its usefulness. Based on experiences in the development of the instructor station, many new features have been added including I/O panel diagrams, simulation diagrams, graphic operation of malfunction, remote function and I/O overrides etc

  17. Effects of Instructor Attractiveness on Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Richard; Millar, Murray; Walsh, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    Although a considerable body of research has examined the impact of student attractiveness on instructors, little attention has been given to the influence of instructor attractiveness on students. This study tested the hypothesis that persons would perform significantly better on a learning task when they perceived their instructor to be high in physical attractiveness. To test the hypothesis, participants listened to an audio lecture while viewing a photograph of instructor. The photograph depicted either a physically attractive instructor or a less attractive instructor. Following the lecture, participants completed a forced choice recognition task covering material from the lecture. Consistent with the predictions; attractive instructors were associated with more learning. Finally, we replicated previous findings demonstrating the role attractiveness plays in person perception.

  18. Training and learning robotic surgery, time for a more structured approach: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, H. W. R.; Wolswijk, R.; Zweemer, R. P.; Schijven, M. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery is growing rapidly and there is an increasing need for a structured approach to train future robotic surgeons. Objectives To review the literature on training and learning strategies for robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Search strategy A

  19. Continuous Training and Wages: An Empirical Analysis Using a Comparison-Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlitz, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Using German linked employer-employee data, this paper investigates the short-term impact of on-the-job training on wages. The applied estimation approach was first introduced by Leuven and Oosterbeek (2008). Wages of employees who intended to participate in training but did not do so because of a random event are compared to wages of training…

  20. Two Methods of Interpersonal Skills Training; Conceptual- versus Response-Oriented Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohart, Arthur C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Training people in warmth, empathy, and genuineness might fulfill a specific helping role and increase their general social comfort for others. By using conceptual and response-oriented approaches, authors show that training individuals to be effective counselors also helped them be more interpersonally effective. (Author/BEF)

  1. Perceptual Training Methods Compared: The Relative Efficacy of Different Approaches to Enhancing Sport-Specific Anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Bruce; Schorer, Jorg; Jackson, Robin C.; Hagemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The comparative efficacy of different perceptual training approaches for the improvement of anticipation was examined using a goalkeeping task from European handball that required the rapid prediction of shot direction. Novice participants (N = 60) were assigned equally to four different training groups and two different control groups (a placebo…

  2. An Evaluation System for Training Programs: A Case Study Using a Four-Phase Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingham, Tony; Richley, Bonnie; Rezania, Davar

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: With the increased importance of training in organizations, creating important and meaningful programs are critical to an organization and its members. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a four-phase systematic approach to designing and evaluating training programs that promotes collaboration between organizational leaders, trainers,…

  3. The Learning Transfer Approach To Estimating the Benefits of Training: Empirical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Paul; Hannigan, Kevin; Crowe, Deirdre

    2001-01-01

    The Learning Transfer Systems Inventory provides a systematic approach for predicting training effectiveness through needs assessment, organizational analysis to determine issues affecting training outcomes, and assessment of needed resources. Data from 158 management trainers demonstrated its effectiveness in assessing how well an organization…

  4. A data fusion approach for track monitoring from multiple in-service trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, George; Chen, Siheng; Garrett, James H.; Kovačević, Jelena; Noh, Hae Young; Bielak, Jacobo

    2017-10-01

    We present a data fusion approach for enabling data-driven rail-infrastructure monitoring from multiple in-service trains. A number of researchers have proposed using vibration data collected from in-service trains as a low-cost method to monitor track geometry. The majority of this work has focused on developing novel features to extract information about the tracks from data produced by individual sensors on individual trains. We extend this work by presenting a technique to combine extracted features from multiple passes over the tracks from multiple sensors aboard multiple vehicles. There are a number of challenges in combining multiple data sources, like different relative position coordinates depending on the location of the sensor within the train. Furthermore, as the number of sensors increases, the likelihood that some will malfunction also increases. We use a two-step approach that first minimizes position offset errors through data alignment, then fuses the data with a novel adaptive Kalman filter that weights data according to its estimated reliability. We show the efficacy of this approach both through simulations and on a data-set collected from two instrumented trains operating over a one-year period. Combining data from numerous in-service trains allows for more continuous and more reliable data-driven monitoring than analyzing data from any one train alone; as the number of instrumented trains increases, the proposed fusion approach could facilitate track monitoring of entire rail-networks.

  5. A 3D visualization approach for process training in office environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aysolmaz, Banu; Brown, Ross; Bruza, Peter; Reijers, Hajo A.

    2016-01-01

    Process participants need to learn how to perform in the context of their business processes. Process training is challenging due to cognitive difficulties in relating process model elements to real world concepts. In this paper we present a 3D VirtualWorld (VW) process training approach for office

  6. Approaches to, and perceived benefits of, training in the secondary wood industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew S. Bumgardner; Urs Buehlmann; Albert T. Schuler; Brooke Baldwin Wisdom; Brooke Baldwin Wisdom

    2005-01-01

    Practitioners and researchers alike have noted that a well-trained workforce is an important component of the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers in the global economy. This study compares four secondary wood industry sectors on their approaches to, and perceived benefits of, training production employees. The study was based on an Internet survey in the autumn of...

  7. Comparison of Two Music Training Approaches on Music and Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuller, Christina D; Galvin, John J; Maat, Bert; Başkent, Deniz; Free, Rolien H

    2018-01-01

    In normal-hearing (NH) adults, long-term music training may benefit music and speech perception, even when listening to spectro-temporally degraded signals as experienced by cochlear implant (CI) users. In this study, we compared two different music training approaches in CI users and their effects

  8. Innovative Approach to the Organization of Future Social Workers' Practical Training: Foreign Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Vira; Slozanska, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Innovative approaches to practical training of future social workers in higher educational establishments have been defined. Peculiarities of foreign experience of social workers' practical training in higher educational establishments have been analyzed. Experience of organizing practice for bachelor students studying at "Social Work"…

  9. Systematic Approach to Training for System Engineers in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Jeong-keun

    2015-01-01

    In my paper, comprehensive preparations, tangible applications, and final establishments of training for system engineers are described using practical materials in KHNP. The purpose of this paper is to formulate SAT based training in KHNP, especially for system engineers. Hence, to achieve this goal, over one year study was performed considering voluminous materials and working experiences. Through the process, SAT based training package for system engineers was finished, in the end. In terms of training in NPPs, SAT methodology is the unwavering trend in South Korea since NPPs export to UAE. Therefore, materialization of SAT based training for system engineers from the origin of SAT to the finalization of SAT should not be overlooked. A variety of accident preventive approaches have been adopted since the first commercial NPP operation in Calder Hall, United Kingdom. Among diverse event preventive ways, training has played an important role for the improvement of NPPs reliability and safety. This is reason why nuclear industry in every country has established and maintained own training institutes and methods. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) recommended many betterment plans to US nuclear industry for the elevation of NPPs safety. In the suggested considerations, systematic approach to training, so called SAT appeared in the world. Basically, SAT is composed of five stages, what is called ADDIE. Hence, through ADDIE process, holistic and trustworthy training could be realized in the actual NPPs operation and maintenance. For this reason, SAT is the representative training methodology in the US nuclear business

  10. Systematic Approach to Training for System Engineers in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jeong-keun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In my paper, comprehensive preparations, tangible applications, and final establishments of training for system engineers are described using practical materials in KHNP. The purpose of this paper is to formulate SAT based training in KHNP, especially for system engineers. Hence, to achieve this goal, over one year study was performed considering voluminous materials and working experiences. Through the process, SAT based training package for system engineers was finished, in the end. In terms of training in NPPs, SAT methodology is the unwavering trend in South Korea since NPPs export to UAE. Therefore, materialization of SAT based training for system engineers from the origin of SAT to the finalization of SAT should not be overlooked. A variety of accident preventive approaches have been adopted since the first commercial NPP operation in Calder Hall, United Kingdom. Among diverse event preventive ways, training has played an important role for the improvement of NPPs reliability and safety. This is reason why nuclear industry in every country has established and maintained own training institutes and methods. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) recommended many betterment plans to US nuclear industry for the elevation of NPPs safety. In the suggested considerations, systematic approach to training, so called SAT appeared in the world. Basically, SAT is composed of five stages, what is called ADDIE. Hence, through ADDIE process, holistic and trustworthy training could be realized in the actual NPPs operation and maintenance. For this reason, SAT is the representative training methodology in the US nuclear business.

  11. Sail training: an innovative approach to graduate nurse preceptor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Pam; Young, Melisa

    2007-01-01

    A 1-day sail-training program that aims to increase graduate nurse preceptor skills was evaluated. Preliminary results suggest that this experiential learning is an effective way to develop graduate nurse preceptors. Awareness of graduate nurses' needs has been heightened, and skills in clinical teaching have been developed. It is indicated from the limited results that the outcomes are sustained over time, but further evaluation is needed.

  12. EMuRgency - New approaches for resuscitation support and training in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Skorning, Max; Haberstroh, Max; Gorgels, Ton; Klerkx, Joris; Vergnion, Michel; Van Poucke, Sven; Lenssen, Niklas; Biermann, Henning; Schuffelen, Petra; Pijls, Ruud; Ternier, Stefaan; De Vries, Fred; Van der Baaren, John; Parra, Gonzalo; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Kalz, M., Skorning, M., Haberstroh, M., Gorgels, T., Klerkx, J., Vergnion, M., ...Specht, M. (2012). EMuRgency – New approaches for resuscitation support and training in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine. Resuscitation, 83 (S1). e37.

  13. Instructor's guide : - synchronized skating school

    OpenAIRE

    Mokkila, Eveliina

    2011-01-01

    The starting point to the Instructor’s guide for synchronized skating school was the situation that Turun Riennon Taitoluistelu figure skating club constantly struggles to get enough skaters to the Beginner team in synchronized skating. The guidebook was written to guide the skating school instructors towards providing more synchronized skating teaching in their lessons. As a result from introducing synchronized skating more in the skating school, it is expected to have more children conti...

  14. Cognitive Effects of Mindfulness Training: Results of a Pilot Study Based on a Theory Driven Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wimmer, Lena; Bellingrath, Silja; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reports a pilot study which tested cognitive effects of mindfulness practice in a theory-driven approach. Thirty-four fifth graders received either a mindfulness training which was based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction approach (experimental group), a concentration training (active control group), or no treatment (passive control group). Based on the operational definition of mindfulness by Bishop et al. (2004), effects on sustained attention, cognitive flexibility...

  15. The Systematic Approach to Training: Analysis and Evaluation in the Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ticevic, S.; Weichselbraun, A.; Pickett, S.; Crete, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    In applying a systematic approach to training (SAT), identifying the learning needs is the first step - a learning needs analysis allows the organization to identify the competencies required to perform a particular job. A systematic approach can provide a clear structure for training and education programme development as well as the necessary evaluation and feedback so that the organization can adjust the development accordingly and deliver the optimal learning experience. In this presentation we will describes two key elements of a SAT used in the Safeguards Training Section in the Department of Safeguards: Analysis and Evaluation. Analysis is the first part of a SAT needed to define competencies for Safeguards staff in order to improve training development within the Department. We describe the training needs analysis used to capture and articulate the various competencies required for safeguards implementation based upon an analysis of tasks and activities carried out by staff members in the Department. Firstly, we highlight the different qualitative methods used to gather information from staff and the process of evaluating and organizing this information into a structured framework. Secondly, we describe how this framework provides the necessary reference to specify learning objectives, evaluate training effectiveness, review and revise training offerings, and select appropriate training paths based on identified needs. In addition, as part of the SAT, evaluation is performed to identify the usefulness of course outcomes and improvements for future offerings based on lessons learned, to ensure that appropriate knowledge and skills are being taught and to demonstrate the value of training by meeting the organization's needs. We present how the Kirkpatrick four-level evaluation model has been implemented by Safeguards Training Section in order to evaluate course effectiveness after the training has been completed, and discuss how the current evaluation

  16. METHODICAL APPROACH TO DEFINING INFRASTRUCTURE COMPONENT OF THE COSTS FOR THE PARTICULAR PASSENGER TRAIN TRAFFIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Barash

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the scientific paper a methodical approach concerning determining the infrastructure component of the costs for traffic of the particular passenger train should be developed. It takes into account the individual characteristics of the particular train traffic. Methodology. To achieve the research purposes was used a method which is based on apportionment of expenses for the traffic of a particular passenger train taking into account the factors affecting the magnitude of costs. This methodology allows allocating properly infrastructure costs for a particular train and, consequently, to determine the accurate profitability of each train. Findings. All expenditures relating to passenger traffic of a long distance were allocated from first cost of passenger and freight traffic. These costs are divided into four components. Three groups of expenses were allocated in infrastructure component, which are calculated according to the certain principle taking into account the individual characteristics of the particular train traffic. Originality. The allocation method of all passenger transportation costs of all Ukrzaliznytsia departments for a particular passenger train was improved. It is based on principles of general indicators formation of each department costs, which correspond to the main influential factors of operating trains. The methodical approach to determining the cost of infrastructure component is improved, which takes into account the effect of the speed and weight of a passenger train on the wear of the railway track superstructure and contact network. All this allows allocating to reasonably the costs of particular passenger train traffic and to determine its profitability. Practical value. Implementing these methods allows calculating the real, economically justified costs of a particular train that will correctly determine the profitability of a particular passenger train and on this basis it allows to make management

  17. ENEN's approaches and initiatives for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safieh, Joseph; De Regge, Peter; Kusumi, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), established in 2003 through the EU Fifth Framework Programme (FP) project, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the ENEN Association, a legal nonprofit-making body pursuing an instructive and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear fields by higher education and training. This objective is realized through the cooperation between EU universities involved in education and research in nuclear disciplines, nuclear research centers and the nuclear industry. As of May 2009, the ENEN has 47 members in 17 EU countries. Since 2007 the ENEN Association has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with partners beyond Europe for further cooperation, such as South Africa, Russian Federation and Japan. The ENEN has good collaboration with national networks and international organizations, like Belgian Nuclear Education Network (BNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The ENEN has provided support to its Members for the organization of and participation to selected E and T courses in nuclear fields. Based on the mutual recognition of those courses, the ENEN developed a reference curriculum in nuclear engineering, consisting of a core package of courses and optional substitute courses in nuclear disciplines, to be realized as the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE). From the experience gained through the EMSNE, a European Master of Science in Nuclear Disciplines will be delivered in the near future, extending ENEN's certification to other disciplines such as radiation protection and waste management and disposal. The ENEN-II Coordination Action consolidated and expanded the achievements of the ENEN and the NEPTUNO projects attained by the ENEN in respectively the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes. The objective of the ENEN-II project was to develop the ENEN Association in a sustainable way in the areas

  18. Transportation security personnel training manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This volume is the instructor's manual for the training of SNM guards. Covered are: self-defense, arrest authority, civil liability, report writing, stress, tactics, and situational training scenarios

  19. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  20. Ecosystem Approaches to Human Health Graduate Training Awards ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC's Ecosystem Approaches to Human Health (Ecohealth) program initiative ... Each grant will consist of CA $15 000 for field research and up to CA $4 000 for ... Nutrition, health policy, and ethics in the age of public-private partnerships.

  1. Higher specialty training in genitourinary medicine: A curriculum competencies-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mitesh; Davies, Olubanke; Menon-Johansson, Anatole; Sethi, Gulshan Cindy

    2018-01-01

    Specialty trainees in genitourinary medicine (GUM) are required to attain competencies described in the GUM higher specialty training curriculum by the end of their training, but learning opportunities available may conflict with service delivery needs. In response to poor feedback on trainee satisfaction surveys, a four-year modular training programme was developed to achieve a curriculum competencies-based approach to training. We evaluated the clinical opportunities of the new programme to determine: (1) Whether opportunity cost of training to service delivery is justifiable; (2) Which competencies are inadequately addressed by direct clinical opportunities alone and (3) Trainee satisfaction. Local faculty and trainees assessed the 'usefulness' of the new modular programme to meet each curriculum competence. The annual General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey assessed trainee satisfaction. The clinical opportunities provided by the modular training programme were sufficiently useful for attaining many competencies. Trainee satisfaction as captured by the GMC survey improved from two reds pre- to nine greens post-intervention on a background of rising clinical activity in the department. The curriculum competencies-based approach to training offers an objective way to balance training with service provision and led to an improvement in GMC survey satisfaction.

  2. Analyzing Hollywood’s Animations Movies with Training Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bashir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the most influential and popular media production in the world in terms of the impact on education and training of children and adolescents, is animation movies especially those that are made in Hollywood. Since these 3D Animation movies have been created, these kind of products have been changed considerably and concepts of them have promoted significantly. Due to this, in this research, using qualitative content analysis, the content of these types of animations have been studied. In this study, six animation movies "Ice Age", "Kung Fu Panda", "Frozen", "Brave", "Ratatouille" and "Everyone’s Hero," are analyzed and in the end Codes and then themes of each of them are extracted. Finally, themes categorized into concepts that result in extracted 26 concepts which training effects of these concepts have been studied in three levels. Some of more important of main concepts in findings are relativity of values, desacralizing, emphasizing on the importance of family, the necessity of believing in something that needs to be done, and so on. Eventually impacts of different levels’ concepts have been studied and compared from positive and negative impacts and then theoretical and practical aspects.

  3. Linking Educational Institutions with Police Officer Training Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Wood

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Community partnerships that are formed through Community Oriented Policing help to assist law enforcement officers with academy education and post academy education. The training offered in the academy and the post academy Field Training Officer Program traditionally places little to no emphasis on critical thinking, professional self-regulation, communication skills or problem-based learning. In the last several years a new approach has been spawned. The Police Training Officer Program (PTO is an innovative form of education that focuses on problem based learning for post academy graduates. The PTO Program emphasizes adult education, problem solving, emotional intelligence, and conflict resolution. This education is necessary to assist officers in de-escalation strategies within their communities and can lend to the reduction of civil disturbances. However, currently, relatively few agencies are offering this education to their post academy graduates and none are offering it to their academy recruits due, in part, to a lack of qualified instructors. PTO instructors must be proficient and fully trained in problem based learning techniques. Through Community Oriented Policing, law enforcement agencies can address this instructor shortage by partnering with university educational institutions to secure instructors who are competent in andragogy, critical thinking, and problem-based learning.

  4. Declarative terrain modeling for military training games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Kraker, J.K.. de; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain

  5. Meeting Training Needs for Maquila Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Jim

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the maquila project and some of the problems encountered by community colleges in providing training, such as finding qualified bilingual instructors and dealing with transportation complexities. (JOW)

  6. A New Approach for Education and Training of Medical Physicists in Cuba: From University to Clinical Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso-Laguardia, R.; Rivero Blanco, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: According to the international recommendations of IAEA and the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the education and training of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMP) should include three main academic and professional elements: a university level education, a postgraduate education specific in medical physics (MP) and a supervised clinical training. In Cuba, most of the medical physicists working in radiation oncology (RO) or nuclear medicine (NM) services have graduated from nuclear related programmes of the High Institute on Applied Technologies and Sciences (InSTEC), who further perform a postgraduate study in medical physics (MP), at the level of a so-called Diploma course or a Master in Sciences. Nevertheless, the third level of education, namely the supervised clinical training has not yet been established, due to the lack of official recognition of the profession of MP by the health authorities. A new approach for comprehensive training of CQMP is presented, where, by maintaining the three elements of education, the process is optimized so that a medical physicist is prepared with the highest level of theoretical and clinical training, in agreement with the current demand of the advanced technologies put in service in Cuban hospitals. (author

  7. Practical approach in training (on-the-job) for workers in nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianna, Vilson Bedim; Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da

    2005-01-01

    This work approaches the 'on-the-job training' - a method of practical training - used in nuclear industries for workers who handle radioactive nuclides. The required training must, in accordance with the ISO 9000 standard, be geared to meet the needs of the organization, including the minimization of errors in operation with radionuclides, which involves various aspects (standard, social, environmental, personal and process safety etc.). Therefore, the training process must have the commitment of everybody and have a logical and documented sequence, where both the individual and the needs of the company are raised and analyzed. The clear identification of the radiological risks associated to the hands-on training is critical to the safety of who is being trained and should be part of the training content. However, the greatest challenge is a mechanism allowing to transform the hands-on training in practical learning. The role of training in the modern nuclear industry should not be restricted to provide conditions for better training or development of the employee, but also motivate the continuous improvement of the company and of the productive process

  8. General practitioners' approach to malingering in basic military training centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokcu, Alper Tunga; Kurt, E

    2017-04-01

    Malingering can be defined as the abuse of the right to benefit from the health services. In this study, the frequency of the malingering cases in Basic Military Training Centres (BMTCs) and the behaviours and the attitudes of the military physicians towards the recruits who are suspected malingerers were described. A total of 17 general practitioners in nine different BMTCs in different regions of Turkey constitute the universe of this descriptive study. In the questionnaire, there were a total of 30 questions about the descriptive characteristics of the participants and their attitudes and behaviours towards malingering. Informed consent form and a questionnaire were applied through the intranet via participants' emails. In the study, 15 physicians were reached with a response rate of 88.2%. All of the physicians suspected malingering in some of the soldiers who were examined. A total of 80% of the physicians (n=12) suspected malingering in at least 10% of the patients they examined. Only 13.3% of the physicians (n=2) had officially diagnosed a case of malingering in the last training period. All of the participants stated that they did not report the official decision for every soldier suspected of malingering. Instead of reporting official decision for malingering, the military physicians apply alternative procedures for suspected malingerers. In countries where the military service is compulsory, prevalence of malingering is estimated to be higher (approximately 5-25%). The problem of malingering is often underestimated due to the fact it is usually overlooked. Malingering remains a problem for the entire military healthcare system, due to the difficulties in exact diagnosis. Therefore, it can be useful to take some practical administrative measures for the soldiers who are prone to malingering, in order to discourage the behaviour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  9. An Approach to Ethical Practice in Management and Trainer Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rita

    1992-01-01

    Concern with ethics has given rise to two educational approaches, one derived from philosophical principles of social ethics, the other based on case studies of practical issues. A combination of these is necessary to ensure situational applicability and to avoid moral relativism and expediency. (SK)

  10. Examination of Pre-Service Teacher's Training through Tutoring Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiao-ping; Guerra, Myriam Jimena

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service teacher preparation in the United States is becoming progressively more challenging with respect to the demands on teachers. This study examined the impact of tutoring approach on pre-service teachers? skills to work with English language learners through a qualitative research design. Content analysis was used at the thematic level on…

  11. A Multimedia Approach to ODL for Agricultural Training in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, Helena; Ng, Maria Lee Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Open distance learning (ODL) has long been an important option for formal and non-formal education (NFE) in most developed and developing countries, but less so in post-conflict countries, including Cambodia. However, in Cambodia there is now greater awareness that ODL can complement traditional face-to-face educational approaches, particularly as…

  12. Structured-Exercise-Program (SEP): An Effective Training Approach to Key Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miazi, Mosharaf H.; Hossain, Taleb; Tiroyakgosi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Structured exercise program is an effective approach to technology dependent resource limited healthcare area for professional training. The result of a recently conducted data analysis revealed this. The aim of the study is to know the effectiveness of the applied approach that was designed to observe the level of adherence to newly adopted…

  13. Assessing Changes in Job Behavior Due to Training: A Guide to the Participant Action Plan Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides a brief introduction to the Participant Action Plan Approach (PAPA) and a user's handbook. Part I outlines five steps of PAPA which determine how job behavior is changed by training course or program participation. Part II, the manual, is arranged by the five steps of the PAPA approach. Planning for PAPA discusses making…

  14. Skills Training for School Leavers: Some Alternative Approaches. Current Issues Brief No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Doug

    In the face of escalating youth unemployment, some new approaches are needed for training out-of-school youth in Australia. The current system of apprenticeship has become outmoded because many of the skilled trades that the system prepares young people for will soon be non-existent. One approach to this problem has been implementation of…

  15. "GARDEN OF CHILDHOOD" as an Innovative Approach to Training and Education of Children at Preschool Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, Larisa; Shkolyar, Luidmila; Savenkova, Luibov

    2016-01-01

    The authors reveal an innovative approach to training and education of preschool children. This approach is called "GARDEN OF CHILDHOOD". It is based on the idea that the development of the preschool child's personality should be joyous and free "cultural self-creation" in terms of the collective co-creation, where adults and…

  16. Practical Skills Training in Agricultural Education--A Comparison between Traditional and Blended Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Donna; Wims, Padraig; Pettit, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article the use of blended learning multimedia materials as an education tool was compared with the traditional approach for skills training. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study was conducted in Ireland using a pre-test, post-test experimental design. All students were instructed on how to complete two skills using either a…

  17. E-learning on the job : training taking a more virtual approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, R.

    2008-07-15

    A growing number of companies are using web-based e-learning systems to train employees. The activities of 3 E-learning companies were described in this article, notably dominKnow Learning Systems, NGRAIN Corporation and Blatant Media. One of the greatest challenges facing the oilsands industry is to build a skilled labour force to operate massive upgraders. The benefit of the e-learning approach is that consistent information can be delivered to learners, with no variation in information. The training takes on many forms, either through online simulations or simply placing a manual online. In addition to saving time, e-learning familiarizes workers with specific pieces of equipment that would be much too expensive to purchase. Three-dimensional equipment simulations are also made available for training purposes. This article presented an online e-learning approach that has been used effectively for safety training and corporate governance. E-learning simplified the process compared to actual classroom training. It allowed staff to combine training time with regular work schedules. The online e-learning approach was shown to save companies many of hours in training time. 2 figs.

  18. A systematic approach to the training in the nuclear power industry: The need for standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The five elements of a open-quotes Systematic Approach to Trainingclose quotes (SAT) are analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. These elements are also present in the effective application of basic process control. The fundamental negative feedback process control loop is therefore an excellent model for a successful, systematic approach to training in the nuclear power industry. Just as standards are required in today's manufacturing and service industries, eg ISO 9000, so too are control standards needed in the training industry and in particular in the training of nuclear power plant staff. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) produced its TECDOC 525 on open-quotes Training to Establish and Maintain the Qualification and Competence of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnelclose quotes in 1989 and the American Nuclear Society published its open-quotes Selection, Qualification, and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants, an American National Standardclose quotes in 1993. It is important that community colleges, training vendors and organizations such as the Instrument Society of America (ISA), who may be supplying basic or prerequisite training to the nuclear power industry, become aware of these and other standards relating to training in the nuclear power industry

  19. NRC's object-oriented simulator instructor station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.I.; Griffin, J.P.

    1995-06-01

    As part of a comprehensive simulator upgrade program, the simulator computer systems associated with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) nuclear power plant simulators were replaced. Because the original instructor stations for two of the simulators were dependent on the original computer equipment, it was necessary to develop and implement new instructor stations. This report describes the Macintosh-based Instructor Stations developed by NRC engineers for the General Electric (GE) and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) simulators

  20. Approaches to Education and Training for Kenya's Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalambuka, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    1. Review of status and development of E and T for the nuclear power program in Kenya; 2. Review of challenges in nuclear E and T, and the initiatives being undertaken to mitigate them: • Recommendations for strategic action; 3. State of nuclear skills in the context of key drivers of the global revival in nuclear energy; 4. Point of view: Education in Applied Nuclear and Radiation physics at Nairobi: • Its growth has helped identify the gaps, and relevant practical approaches for realizing the broad spectrum of technical capacity to conduct a national NPP; 5. Proposed approach to support the E and T infrastructure necessary to allow the country to plan, construct, operate, regulate, and safely and securely handle nuclear facilities sustainably; 6. Specified E and T initiatives in the context of the national industrial development strategy and nuclear energy policy and funding for the complete life cycle and technology localization. (author)

  1. Competencies in Community Instructors who Provide Service to the Indigenous Peoples of the State of Chiapas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Georgina Gómez Zermeño

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the results of an exploratory-descriptive study on intercultural competencies in community instructors of the National Council for Educational Development (CONAFE providing service in the Modality of Educational Attention to the Indigenous Population (MAEPI in the region of San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas. It describes the historical background of Indian education in Mexico, and the contributions to community education, and develops concepts regarding intercultural education and intercultural competencies. The research methodology adopted a mixed method based on a non-experimental, trans-sectional and naturalistic ethnographic design of convergent triangulation. The conclusions outline the need to strengthen teacher training so as to build an educational model that would fully incorporate the intercultural approach.

  2. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... of CPR skills may be beneficial to ensure high-quality learning outcome.Author Disclosures: C. Hansen: None. S.E. Rasmussen: None. M.A. Nebsbjerg: None. M. Stærk: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  3. Approach bias modification training and consumption: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoschke, Naomi; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence have suggested that biased cognitive processing is an important contributor to unhealthy behaviour. Approach bias modification is a novel intervention in which approach biases for appetitive cues are modified. The current review of the literature aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of modifying approach bias for harmful consumption behaviours, including alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and unhealthy eating. Relevant publications were identified through a search of four electronic databases (PsycINFO, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and Scopus) that were conducted between October and December 2015. Eligibility criteria included the use of a human adult sample, at least one session of avoidance training, and an outcome measure related to the behaviour of interest. The fifteen identified publications (comprising 18 individual studies) were coded on a number of characteristics, including consumption behaviour, participants, task, training and control conditions, number of training sessions and trials, outcome measure, and results. The results generally showed positive effects of approach-avoidance training, including reduced consumption behaviour in the laboratory, lower relapse rates, and improvements in self-reported measures of behaviour. Importantly, all studies (with one exception) that reported favourable consumption outcomes also demonstrated successful reduction of the approach bias for appetitive cues. Thus, the current review concluded that approach bias modification is effective for reducing both approach bias and unhealthy consumption behaviour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Instructor Credibility across Disciplines: Identifying Students' Differentiated Expectations of Instructor Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermiller, Carl; Ruppert, Bryan; Atwood, April

    2012-01-01

    Business communication instructors can face a unique set of challenges to maintain their credibility with students. Communication plays an important role in the instructor-student relationship, and students judge instructors' ability to teach communication based on their ability to practice what they teach. The authors' empirical study shows that…

  5. An analysis of the introduction and efficacy of a novel training programme for ERC basic life support assessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Christopher J; Jones, Christopher M; Harvey, Philip; Hulme, Jonathan; Owen, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Existing ERC BLS/AED accreditation procedures allow BLS instructors to assess the capability of BLS/AED providers, without undergoing additional training as an assessor. The reliability of instructor-based assessment has been questioned. This study sought to determine the efficacy of a simple training programme for BLS/AED instructors aimed at standardising assessment decisions. An Assessment Training Programme (ATP) which provides additional, assessment-focused tuition for BLS instructors was introduced. Eighteen ERC accredited instructors participated in the study. Nine received standard ERC training (instructors); nine received additional training through the ATP (assessors). The assessment of 73 students' BLS/AED capabilities was carried out by an assessor, ERC instructor and ERC instructor trainer concurrently. Participants independently completed an ERC assessment form. Decisions for instructors and assessors were compared to the instructor trainers' decisions; those not agreeing were deemed to be incorrect. Instructors (49.3%) had lower raw pass rates than assessors (67.1%) and instructor trainers (64.4%). There was a significant difference in overall decisions between instructors and instructor trainers (p=0.035), and instructors and assessors (p=0.015). There was no difference between assessors and instructor trainers (p=0.824). Instructors were more prone to incorrectly failing candidates than assessors (sensitivities of 80.5% and 63.8% respectively, p=0.077). AED-capability decisions were significantly different from instructor trainers in both the instructor (p=0.007) and assessor groups (p=0.031). BLS instructors incorrectly fail candidates for reasons that should not normally constitute a true assessment failure. The ATP is an effective intervention to reduce false-failure rates and improve compliance with an experienced instructor trainer's decision. Consideration should be made to integrate such programmes into current BLS instructor accreditation

  6. Performance-based training: from job and task analysis to training materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.T.; Spinney, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Historically, the smoke filled room approach has been used to revise training programs: instructors would sit down and design a program based on existing training materials and any federal requirements that applied. This failure to reflect a systematic definition of required job functions, responsibilities and performance standards in training programs has resulted in generic program deficiencies: they do not provide complete training of required skills and knowledge. Recognition of this need for change, coupled with a decrease in experienced industry personnel inputs and long training pipelines, has heightened the need for efficient performance-based training programs which are derived from and referenced to job performance criteria. This paper presents the process for developing performance-based training materials based on job and task analysis products

  7. Cooperative approach to training for radiological emergency preparedness and response in Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bus, John; Popp, Andrew; Holland, Brian; Murray, Allan

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the collaborative and systematic approach to training for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response and the outcomes of this work with ANSTO's Southeast Asian counterparts, particularly in the Philippines. The standards and criteria being applied are discussed, along with the methods, design and conduct of workshops, table-top and field exercises. The following elements of this training will be presented: (a) identifying the priority areas for training through needs analysis;(b) strengthening individual profesional expertise through a structured approach to training; and (c) enhancing individual Agency and National nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response arrangements and capabilities. Whilst the work is motivated by nuclear security concerns, the implications for effective and sustainable emergency response to any nuclear or radiological incidents are noted. (author)

  8. Analysis phase of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    The IAEA and many Member States have recognized the benefits of a systematic approach when training nuclear power plant personnel. The Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) fully described in the IAEA publications, is recommended as the best practice for attaining and maintaining the competence and qualification of NPP personnel. Typically, SAT is organised into distinct phases of Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation, and relies on Feedback as a process for continuous improvement This document is addressed to nuclear power operating organisations facing the challenge of developing training programs for their own personnel. The intention was to provide Member States with examples of the Analysis phase to form foundation of SAT-based training programs. This document is also available in CD form

  9. The Neurorehabilitation Training Toolkit (NTT: A Novel Worldwide Accessible Motor Training Approach for At-Home Rehabilitation after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Bermúdez i Badia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available After stroke, enduring rehabilitation is required for maximum recovery, and ideally throughout life to prevent functional deterioration. Hence we developed a new concept for at-home low-cost motor rehabilitation, the NTT, an Internet-based interactive system for upper-limb rehabilitation. In this paper we present the NTT design concepts, its implementation and a proof of concept study with 10 healthy participants. The NTT brings together concepts of optimal learning, engagement, and storytelling to deliver a personalized training to its users. In this study we evaluate the feasibility of NTT as a tool capable of automatically assessing and adapting to its user. This is achieved by means of a psychometric study where we show that the NTT is able to assess movement kinematics—movement smoothness, range of motion, arm displacement and arm coordination—in healthy users. Subsequently, a modeling approach is presented to understand how the measured movement kinematics relate to training parameters, and how these can be modified to adapt the training to meet the needs of patients. Finally, an adaptive algorithm for the personalization of training considering motivational and performance aspects is proposed. In the next phase we will deploy and evaluate the NTT with stroke patients at their homes.

  10. Experimental Study Comparing a Traditional Approach to Performance Appraisal Training to a Whole-Brain Training Method at C.B. Fleet Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Sally; Sherrier, Tom; Wooters, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a new approach to performance appraisal training. Motivated by split-brain theory and existing studies of cognitive information processing and performance appraisals, this exploratory study examined the effects of a whole-brain approach to training managers for implementing performance…

  11. Graduate Education and Simulation Training for CBRNE Disasters Using a Multimodal Approach to Learning. Part 2: Education and Training from the Perspectives of Educators and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    quantify learning effectiveness and retention rates by comparing didactic lectures, reading, audiovisual presentations, demonstrations, discussion...Graduate Education and Simulation Training   for CBRNE Disasters Using a Multimodal  Approach to  Learning   Part 2: Education and Training from the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Graduate Education and Simulation Training for CBRNE Disasters Using a Multimodal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Approach to Learning

  12. IMPROVING THE POSITIONING ACCURACY OF TRAIN ON THE APPROACH SECTION TO THE RAILWAY CROSSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Havryliuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the paper it is necessary to analyze possibility of improving the positioning accuracy of train on the approach section to crossing for traffic safety control at railway crossings. Methodology. Researches were performed using developed mathematical model, describing dependence of the input impedance of the coded and audio frequency track circuits on a train coordinate at various values of ballast isolation resistances and for all usable frequencies. Findings. The paper presents the developed mathematical model, describing dependence of the input impedance of the coded and audio-frequency track circuits on the train coordinate at various values of ballast isolation resistances and for all frequencies used in track circuits. The relative error determination of train coordinate by input impedance caused by variation of the ballast isolation resistance for the coded track circuits was investigated. The values of relative error determination of train coordinate can achieve up to 40-50 % and these facts do not allow using this method directly for coded track circuits. For short audio frequency track circuits on frequencies of continuous cab signaling (25, 50 Hz the relative error does not exceed acceptable values, this allow using the examined method for determination of train location on the approach section to railway crossing. Originality. The developed mathematical model allowed determination of the error dependence of train coordinate by using input impedance of the track circuit for coded and audio-frequency track circuits at various frequencies of the signal current and at different ballast isolation resistances. Practical value. The authors proposethe method for train location determination on approach section to the crossing, equipped with audio-frequency track circuits, which is a combination of discrete and continuous monitoring of the train location.

  13. Beyond the Biology: A Systematic Investigation of Noncontent Instructor Talk in an Introductory Biology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Shannon B; Reggi, Amanda L; Schinske, Jeffrey N; Burrus, Laura W; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    Instructors create classroom environments that have the potential to impact learning by affecting student motivation, resistance, and self-efficacy. However, despite the critical importance of the learning environment in increasing conceptual understanding, little research has investigated what instructors say and do to create learning environments in college biology classrooms. We systematically investigated the language used by instructors that does not directly relate to course content and defined the construct of Instructor Talk. Transcripts were generated from a semester-long, cotaught introductory biology course (n = 270 students). Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach to identify emergent categories of Instructor Talk. The five emergent categories from analysis of more than 600 quotes were, in order of prevalence, 1) Building the Instructor/Student Relationship, 2) Establishing Classroom Culture, 3) Explaining Pedagogical Choices, 4) Sharing Personal Experiences, and 5) Unmasking Science. Instances of Instructor Talk were present in every class session analyzed and ranged from six to 68 quotes per session. The Instructor Talk framework is a novel research variable that could yield insights into instructor effectiveness, origins of student resistance, and methods for overcoming stereotype threat. Additionally, it holds promise in professional development settings to assist instructors in reflecting on the learning environments they create. © 2015 S. B. Seidel et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. The feasibility of a train-the-trainer approach to end of life care training in care homes: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Andrea; Goodman, Claire; Smeeton, Nigel; Handley, Melanie; Amador, Sarah; Davies, Sue

    2016-01-22

    there is organisational stability, peer to peer approaches to skills training in end of life care can, with expert facilitation, cascade and sustain learning in care homes.

  15. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oestergaard Jeanett

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. Methods/Design The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. Discussion The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. Trial Registration NCT01497782

  16. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Winkel, Per; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Ringsted, Charlotte; Gluud, Christian; Grantcharov, Teodor; Ottesen, Bent; Soerensen, Jette Led

    2012-02-28

    Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. NCT01497782.

  17. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. Methods/Design The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. Discussion The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. Trial Registration NCT01497782 PMID:22373062

  18. B-1 Systems Approach to Training. Volume 3. Appendix B. Bibliography and Data Collection Trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    the Fourth Annual Symposium on Psychology in the Air Force, 1974, ~ •—- ~ - --- - Creelman , J.A., Evaluation of Approach Training Procedures...of Engineering Psychology , American Psychologist, 1972, 27 (7), 615-622. Adams, J.A., and Hufford, I.E., Effects of Programmed Perceptual Training on...Control, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 7-9, 1970. Aldrich, T.B., Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Psychology in the Air Force (2nd

  19. B-1 Systems Approach to Training. Simulation Technology Assessment Report (STAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    Psychology in the Air Force, 1974. Creelman , J.A., Evaluation of Approach Training Procedures, U.S. Naval School of Aviation Med., Proj. No. NM001-109-107...training. 3.2 PHYSICAL VERSUS PSYCHOLOGICAL SIMULATION In the previous section, the term "physical simulation" was used to represent the case where... psychology that there is no "step function" threshold. Rather, detection capability plotted against phys- ical parameter strength results in an ogival

  20. A quality approach for conducting training needs assessments in the Ministry of Health, State of Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, S; al-Darazi, F

    2000-01-01

    In health care organizations around the world, Training Needs Assessments (TNAs) have generally followed a professions-based approach. For example, the training needs of doctors, nurses, each allied health profession, and distinct support staff have been analyzed separately--individualized TNAs conducted for each speciality and functional area. Although a professions-based TNA model can provide useful information to human resource development (HRD) professionals, there are two major drawbacks: (1) it is possible that important training needs might be overlooked because of lack of information sharing among professions and (2) such an approach does not encourage an interdisciplinary, team orientation to service provision. This paper proposes an improved method of conceptualizing TNAs, using an approach that builds on the quality management literature (TQM, CQI, etc.) which stresses the importance of customer- and service-orientations to organizing and measuring organizational and individual performance.

  1. Comparing interactive videodisc training effectiveness to traditional training methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenworthy, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    Videodisc skills training programs developed by Industrial Training Corporation are being used and evaluated by major industrial facilities. In one such study, interactive videodisc training programs were compared to videotape and instructor-based training to determine the effectiveness of videodisc in terms of performance, training time and trainee attitudes. Results showed that when initial training was done using the interactive videodisc system, trainee performance was superior to the performance of trainees using videotape, and approximately equal to the performance of those trained by an instructor. When each method was used in follow-up training, interactive videodisc was definitely the most effective. Results also indicate that training time can be reduced using interactive videodisc. Attitudes of both trainees and instructors toward the interactive videodisc training were positive

  2. IITET and shadow TT: an innovative approach to training at the point of need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andrew; Lopez, Favio; Dirkse, James; Anderson, Darran; Berglie, Stephen; May, Christopher; Harkrider, Susan

    2014-06-01

    The Image Intensification and Thermal Equipment Training (IITET) project is a joint effort between Night Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate (NVESD) Modeling and Simulation Division (MSD) and the Army Research Institute (ARI) Fort Benning Research Unit. The IITET effort develops a reusable and extensible training architecture that supports the Army Learning Model and trains Manned-Unmanned Teaming (MUM-T) concepts to Shadow Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) payload operators. The training challenge of MUM-T during aviation operations is that UAS payload operators traditionally learn few of the scout-reconnaissance skills and coordination appropriate to MUM-T at the schoolhouse. The IITET effort leveraged the simulation experience and capabilities at NVESD and ARI's research to develop a novel payload operator training approach consistent with the Army Learning Model. Based on the training and system requirements, the team researched and identified candidate capabilities in several distinct technology areas. The training capability will support a variety of training missions as well as a full campaign. Data from these missions will be captured in a fully integrated AAR capability, which will provide objective feedback to the user in near-real-time. IITET will be delivered via a combination of browser and video streaming technologies, eliminating the requirement for a client download and reducing user computer system requirements. The result is a novel UAS Payload Operator training capability, nested within an architecture capable of supporting a wide variety of training needs for air and ground tactical platforms and sensors, and potentially several other areas requiring vignette-based serious games training.

  3. Students and Instructors Opinions about Piano Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the opinions of the students and piano instructors in the Turkish Education Faculties' Fine Arts Instruction Departments' music instruction programs about piano instruction. The study data were collected using a questionnaire administered to the piano instructors and the students who took lessons from them. The study results…

  4. Evaluation of training programs and entry-level qualifications for nuclear-power-plant control-room personnel based on the systems approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Selby, D.L.; Hanley, M.J.; Mercer, R.T.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes results of research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to initiate the use of the Systems Approach to Training in the evaluation of training programs and entry level qualifications for nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. Variables (performance shaping factors) of potential importance to personnel selection and training are identified, and research to more rigorously define an operationally useful taxonomy of those variables is recommended. A high-level model of the Systems Approach to Training for use in the nuclear industry, which could serve as a model for NRC evaluation of industry programs, is presented. The model is consistent with current publically stated NRC policy, with the approach being followed by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and with current training technology. Checklists to be used by NRC evaluators to assess training programs for NPP control-room personnel are proposed which are based on this model

  5. Evaluation of training programs and entry-level qualifications for nuclear-power-plant control-room personnel based on the systems approach to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P M; Selby, D L; Hanley, M J; Mercer, R T

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes results of research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to initiate the use of the Systems Approach to Training in the evaluation of training programs and entry level qualifications for nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. Variables (performance shaping factors) of potential importance to personnel selection and training are identified, and research to more rigorously define an operationally useful taxonomy of those variables is recommended. A high-level model of the Systems Approach to Training for use in the nuclear industry, which could serve as a model for NRC evaluation of industry programs, is presented. The model is consistent with current publically stated NRC policy, with the approach being followed by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and with current training technology. Checklists to be used by NRC evaluators to assess training programs for NPP control-room personnel are proposed which are based on this model.

  6. Training organizational supervisors to detect and prevent cyber insider threats: two approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dee H. Andrews

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyber insider threat is intentional theft from, or sabotage of, a cyber system by someone within the organization. This article explores the use of advanced cognitive and instructional principles to accelerate learning in organizational supervisors to mitigate the cyber threat. It examines the potential advantage of using serious games to engage supervisors. It also posits two systematic instructional approaches for this training challenge – optimal path modelling and a competency-based approach. The paper concludes by discussing challenges of evaluating training for seldom occurring real world phenomena, like detecting a cyber-insider threat.

  7. Developing a Scientific Virtue-Based Approach to Science Ethics Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Robert T; O'Rourke, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Responsible conduct of research training typically includes only a subset of the issues that ought to be included in science ethics and sometimes makes ethics appear to be a set of externally imposed rules rather than something intrinsic to scientific practice. A new approach to science ethics training based upon Pennock's notion of the scientific virtues may help avoid such problems. This paper motivates and describes three implementations-theory-centered, exemplar-centered, and concept-centered-that we have developed in courses and workshops to introduce students to this scientific virtue-based approach.

  8. Memorable Exemplification in Undergraduate Biology: Instructor Strategies and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Bretzlaff, Tiffany; Brown, Adam O.

    2018-03-01

    The present study examines the exemplification practices of a university biology instructor during a semester-long course. Attention is given specifically to how the instructor approaches memorable exemplification—classroom episodes identified by students as a source of memorable learning experiences. A mixed-method research approach is adopted wherein descriptive statistics is combined with qualitative multimodal analysis of video recordings and survey data. Our findings show that memorable experiencing of examples may depend on a multiplicity of factors, including whether students can relate to the example, how unique and extreme the example is, how much detail is provided, whether the example is enacted rather than told, and whether the example makes students feel sad, surprised, shocked, and/or amused. It is argued that, rather than simply assuming that all examples are equally effective, careful consideration needs be given to how exemplification can serve as an important source of memorable science learning experiences.

  9. An Information-Theoretic Approach for Indirect Train Traffic Monitoring Using Building Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an indirect train traffic monitoring method to detect and infer real-time train events based on the vibration response of a nearby building. Monitoring and characterizing traffic events are important for cities to improve the efficiency of transportation systems (e.g., train passing, heavy trucks, and traffic. Most prior work falls into two categories: (1 methods that require intensive labor to manually record events or (2 systems that require deployment of dedicated sensors. These approaches are difficult and costly to execute and maintain. In addition, most prior work uses dedicated sensors designed for a single purpose, resulting in deployment of multiple sensor systems. This further increases costs. Meanwhile, with the increasing demands of structural health monitoring, many vibration sensors are being deployed in commercial buildings. Traffic events create ground vibration that propagates to nearby building structures inducing noisy vibration responses. We present an information-theoretic method for train event monitoring using commonly existing vibration sensors deployed for building health monitoring. The key idea is to represent the wave propagation in a building induced by train traffic as information conveyed in noisy measurement signals. Our technique first uses wavelet analysis to detect train events. Then, by analyzing information exchange patterns of building vibration signals, we infer the category of the events (i.e., southbound or northbound train. Our algorithm is evaluated with an 11-story building where trains pass by frequently. The results show that the method can robustly achieve a train event detection accuracy of up to a 93% true positive rate and an 80% true negative rate. For direction categorization, compared with the traditional signal processing method, our information-theoretic approach reduces categorization error from 32.1 to 12.1%, which is a 2.5× improvement.

  10. Liability exposure for surgical robotics instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu L; Kilic, Gokhan; Phelps, John Y

    2012-01-01

    Surgical robotics instructors provide an essential service in improving the competency of novice gynecologic surgeons learning robotic surgery and advancing surgical skills on behalf of patients. However, despite best intentions, robotics instructors and the gynecologists who use their services expose themselves to liability. The fear of litigation in the event of a surgical complication may reduce the availability and utility of robotics instructors. A better understanding of the principles of duty of care and the physician-patient relationship, and their potential applicability in a court of law likely will help to dismantle some concerns and uncertainties about liability. This commentary is not meant to discourage current and future surgical instructors but to raise awareness of liability issues among robotics instructors and their students and to recommend certain preventive measures to curb potential liability risks. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Is there a place for a holistic approach in surgical training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayoglu, Timucin; Buchholz, Noor; Atayoglu, Ayten Guner; Caliskan, Mujgan

    2014-03-01

    The holistic approach in medicine is a framework that considers and treats all aspects of a patient's needs, as it relates to their health. The goal of such an approach is to prevent illness, and to maximise the well-being of individuals and families. Holistic medicine is also referred to as integrative, which has been interpreted by some professionals as the combination of evidence-based medicine and complementary medicine. The speciality of Family Medicine (FM) is often referred to as General Practice (GP), a terminology which emphasises the holistic nature of that discipline. Furthermore, GP/FM professional bodies in some countries have incorporated the holistic and integrative approach into curricula and guidelines for doctors in training, which reflects its acceptance as a component of medical training. However, despite this validation, and despite research showing the effectiveness of such strategies in enhancing the outcomes of surgery, a holistic framework or integrative approach has not been equally integrated into speciality training for would-be surgeons. We argue that it would be advisable to include holistic approaches into surgical training and help surgeons to recognise their role in the continuum of care.

  12. Odor Perception by Dogs: Evaluating Two Training Approaches for Odor Learning of Sniffer Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Tenhagen, Carola; Johnen, Dorothea; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Becker, Roland; Schallschmidt, Kristin; Nehls, Irene

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a standardized experimental set-up with various combinations of herbs as odor sources was designed. Two training approaches for sniffer dogs were compared; first, training with a pure reference odor, and second, training with a variety of odor mixtures with the target odor as a common denominator. The ability of the dogs to identify the target odor in a new context was tested. Six different herbs (basil, St. John's wort, dandelion, marjoram, parsley, ribwort) were chosen to produce reference materials in various mixtures with (positive) and without (negative) chamomile as the target odor source. The dogs were trained to show 1 of 2 different behaviors, 1 for the positive, and 1 for the negative sample as a yes/no task. Tests were double blind with one sample presented at a time. In both training approaches, dogs were able to detect chamomile as the target odor in any presented mixture with an average sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 84%. Dogs trained with odor mixture containing the target odor had more correct indications in the transfer task. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Transforming Warrant Officer Career College Instructor Assessment for the Army Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Career College (WOCC) to reflect the Army Learning Model (ALM)’s emphasis on adult pedagogical approaches. An instructor guide was also developed to...and digital communications, building of effective relationships through interpersonal tact, influence, and communication. • Critical thinking and...students to learn. Foster respect and rapport in the instructor-student relationship and the student-student relationship . Encourage student

  14. Mentoring SFRM: A New Approach to International Space Station Flight Control Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Therese; Barshi, Immanuel; Schmidt, Lacey

    2009-01-01

    The Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) of the Johnson Space Center is responsible for providing continuous operations support for the International Space Station (ISS). Operations support requires flight controllers who are skilled in team performance as well as the technical operations of the ISS. Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM), a NASA adapted variant of Crew Resource Management (CRM), is the competency model used in the MOD. ISS flight controller certification has evolved to include a balanced focus on development of SFRM and technical expertise. The latest challenge the MOD faces is how to certify an ISS flight controller (Operator) to a basic level of effectiveness in 1 year. SFRM training uses a twopronged approach to expediting operator certification: 1) imbed SFRM skills training into all Operator technical training and 2) use senior flight controllers as mentors. This paper focuses on how the MOD uses senior flight controllers as mentors to train SFRM skills.

  15. Effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a metacomponential approach for outpatients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kenneth N K; Howie, Dorothy R

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a metacomponential approach with 33 outpatients with moderate acquired brain injury, in the Hong Kong context. We compared an experimental training intervention with this explicit problem-solving approach, which taught metacomponential strategies, with a conventional cognitive training approach that did not have this explicit metacognitive training. We found significant advantages for the experimental group on the Metacomponential Interview measure in association with the explicit metacomponential training, but transfer to the real-life problem-solving measures was not evidenced in statistically significant findings. Small sample size, limited time of intervention, and some limitations with these tools may have been contributing factors to these results. The training program was demonstrated to have a significantly greater effect than the conventional training approach on metacomponential functioning and the component of problem representation. However, these benefits were not transferable to real-life situations.

  16. Cognitive Effects of Mindfulness Training: Results of a Pilot Study Based on a Theory Driven Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Lena; Bellingrath, Silja; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reports a pilot study which tested cognitive effects of mindfulness practice in a theory-driven approach. Thirty-four fifth graders received either a mindfulness training which was based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction approach (experimental group), a concentration training (active control group), or no treatment (passive control group). Based on the operational definition of mindfulness by Bishop et al. (2004), effects on sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition, and data-driven as opposed to schema-based information processing were predicted. These abilities were assessed in a pre-post design by means of a vigilance test, a reversible figures test, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, a Stroop test, a visual search task, and a recognition task of prototypical faces. Results suggest that the mindfulness training specifically improved cognitive inhibition and data-driven information processing.

  17. Cognitive effects of mindfulness training: Results of a pilot study based on a theory driven approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Wimmer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports a pilot study which tested cognitive effects of mindfulness practice in a theory-driven approach. Thirty-four fifth graders received either a mindfulness training which was based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction approach (experimental group, a concentration training (active control group or no treatment (passive control group. Based on the operational definition of mindfulness by Bishop et al. (2004, effects on sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition and data-driven as opposed to schema-based information processing were predicted. These abilities were assessed in a pre-post design by means of a vigilance test, a reversible figures test, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, a Stroop test, a visual search task, and a recognition task of prototypical faces. Results suggest that the mindfulness training specifically improved cognitive inhibition and data-driven information processing.

  18. Approach-Avoidance Training Effects Are Moderated by Awareness of Stimulus-Action Contingencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dessel, Pieter; De Houwer, Jan; Gast, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Prior research suggests that repeatedly approaching or avoiding a stimulus changes the liking of that stimulus. In two experiments, we investigated the relationship between, on one hand, effects of approach-avoidance (AA) training on implicit and explicit evaluations of novel faces and, on the other hand, contingency awareness as indexed by participants' memory for the relation between stimulus and action. We observed stronger effects for faces that were classified as contingency aware and found no evidence that AA training caused changes in stimulus evaluations in the absence of contingency awareness. These findings challenge the standard view that AA training effects are (exclusively) the product of implicit learning processes, such as the automatic formation of associations in memory. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  19. Application of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Training in the Physical Sciences and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T.; Waples, Ethan P.; Sevier, Sydney T.; Godfrey, Elaine S.; Mumford, Michael D.; Hougen, Dean F.

    2008-06-01

    Integrity is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of research organizations in terms of producing high quality research and educating the new generation of scientists. A number of responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs have been developed to address this growing organizational concern. However, in spite of a significant body of research in ethics training, it is still unknown which approach has the highest potential to enhance researchers' integrity. One of the approaches showing some promise in improving researchers' integrity has focused on the development of ethical decision-making skills. The current effort proposes a novel curriculum that focuses on broad metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day social and professional practices that have ethical implications for the physical sciences and engineering. This sensemaking training has been implemented in a professional sample of scientists conducting research in electrical engineering, atmospheric and computer sciences at a large multi-cultural, multi-disciplinary, and multi-university research center. A pre-post design was used to assess training effectiveness using scenario-based ethical decision-making measures. The training resulted in enhanced ethical decision-making of researchers in relation to four ethical conduct areas, namely data management, study conduct, professional practices, and business practices. In addition, sensemaking training led to researchers' preference for decisions involving the application of the broad metacognitive reasoning strategies. Individual trainee and training characteristics were used to explain the study findings. Broad implications of the findings for ethics training development, implementation, and evaluation in the sciences are discussed.

  20. Mentoring SFRM: A New Approach to International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Therese; Barshi, Immanuel; Schmidt, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    The Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) of the Johnson Space Center is responsible for providing continuous operations support for the International Space Station (ISS). Operations support requires flight controllers who are skilled in team performance as well as the technical operations of the ISS. Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM), a NASA adapted variant of Crew Resource Management (CRM), is the competency model used in the MOD. ISS flight controller certification has evolved to include a balanced focus on development of SFRM and technical expertise. The latest challenge the MOD faces is how to certify an ISS flight controller (operator) to a basic level of effectiveness in 1 year. SFRM training uses a two-pronged approach to expediting operator certification: 1) imbed SFRM skills training into all operator technical training and 2) use senior flight controllers as mentors. This paper focuses on how the MOD uses senior flight controllers as mentors to train SFRM skills. Methods: A mentor works with an operator throughout the training flow. Inserted into the training flow are guided-discussion sessions and on-the-job observation opportunities focusing on specific SFRM skills, including: situational leadership, conflict management, stress management, cross-cultural awareness, self care and team care while on-console, communication, workload management, and situation awareness. The mentor and operator discuss the science and art behind the skills, cultural effects on skills applications, recognition of good and bad skills applications, recognition of how skills application changes subtly in different situations, and individual goals and techniques for improving skills. Discussion: This mentoring program provides an additional means of transferring SFRM knowledge compared to traditional CRM training programs. Our future endeavors in training SFRM skills (as well as other organization s) may benefit from adding team performance skills mentoring. This paper

  1. Lessons from Providing Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Two-year colleges and Tribal colleges are important centers for workforce education and training. A professional development program funded by the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education Program, 2007-2011 and 2012-2015, is providing the resources needed by instructors at those colleges to develop courses and programs in remote sensing. The highly successful program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" will complete its currently funded work in May 2015. 76 instructors of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) from all over the country will have been served. Each of them will have spent 18 months on the project, participating in two Summer Institutes at NASA and USGS and in monthly webinars on science and technology of remote sensing. iGETT-RS participants have created their own exercises and "concept modules" for the classroom, and many have created new courses and new programs across the country. As the external evaluator for iGETT-RS expressed it, the impact on project participants can "only be described as transformational." Viewers of this presentation will learn about the iGETT-RS project design and approach; successes, failures and lessons learned by the staff; and how to access the workshop materials and participant-authored classroom resources. Viewers will also learn about the Geospatial Technology Competency Model at the US Department of Labor, and about specifications for the Remote Sensing Model Course recently developed by the National Geospatial Technology Center to provide invaluable frameworks for faculty, students, administrators and employers.

  2. The effects of verbal information and approach-avoidance training on children's fear-related responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J.; Lisk, Stephen C.; Mikita, Nina; Mitchell, Sophie; Huijding, Jorg; Rinck, Mike; Field, Andy P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study examined the effects of verbal information and approach-avoidance training on fear-related cognitive and behavioural responses about novel animals. Methods One hundred and sixty children (7–11 years) were randomly allocated to receive: a) positive verbal information about one novel animal and threat information about a second novel animal (verbal information condition); b) approach-avoidance training in which they repeatedly pushed away (avoid) or pulled closer (approach) pictures of the animals (approach-avoidance training), c) a combined condition in which verbal information was given prior to approach-avoidance training (verbal information + approach-avoidance training) and d) a combined condition in which approach-avoidance training was given prior to verbal information (approach-avoidance training + verbal information). Results Threat and positive information significantly increased and decreased fear beliefs and avoidance behaviour respectively. Approach-avoidance training was successful in training the desired behavioural responses but had limited effects on fear-related responses. Verbal information and both combined conditions resulted in significantly larger effects than approach-avoidance training. We found no evidence for an additive effect of these pathways. Limitations This study used a non-clinical sample and focused on novel animals rather than animals about which children already had experience or established fears. The study also compared positive information/approach with threat information/avoid training, limiting specific conclusions regarding the independent effects of these conditions. Conclusions The present study finds little evidence in support of a possible causal role for behavioural response training in the aetiology of childhood fear. However, the provision of verbal information appears to be an important pathway involved in the aetiology of childhood fear. PMID:25698069

  3. Challenges and Approaches in River Delta Planning - Annexes to report on training workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten, J.H.M.; Douven, W.; Long Phi, H.; Fida Abdullah Khan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Programme, participants and all powerpoint presentations of the Delta Alliance Training Workshop: Challenges and approaches in river delta planning, sharing experiences from SE Asian Deltas and the Rhine-Meuse Delta. 22-26 October 2012, WACC, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  4. Training and Developing an Age Diverse Workforce in SMEs: The Need for a Strategic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Graham; Hutchings, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of strategic human resource development (HRD) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with specific reference to key issues around training, development and education as well as an emerging issue of significance, age diversity management. Design/Methodology/Approach: The approach…

  5. A Structural Equation Modelling Approach for Massive Blended Synchronous Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kalpana; Narayanan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a structural equation modelling (SEM) approach for blended synchronous teacher training workshop. It examines the relationship among various factors that influence the Satisfaction (SAT) of participating teachers. Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire from about 500 engineering college teachers. These teachers…

  6. Self-directed learning skills in air-traffic control training; An eye-tracking approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meeuwen, Ludo; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Bock, Jeano; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Van Meeuwen, L. W., Brand-Gruwel, S., De Bock, J. J. P. R., Kirschner, P. A., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010, September). Self-directed Learning Skills in Air-traffic Control Training; An Eye-tracking Approach. Paper presented at the European Association for Aviation Psychology, Budapest.

  7. Show Me the Way: Future Faculty Prefer Directive Feedback When Trying Active Learning Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jessica D.; Battle, David C.; Gormally, Cara L.; Brickman, Peggy

    2017-01-01

    Early training opportunities for future faculty, namely graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, can better prepare them to use active learning approaches. We know that instructional feedback supports sustained change and motivates instructors to improve teaching practices. Here, we incorporate feedback as a key component of a pedagogical…

  8. Heart Rate Variability (HRV biofeedback: A new training approach for operator’s performance enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auditya Purwandini Sutarto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The widespread implementation of advanced and complex systems requires predominantly operators’ cognitive functions and less importance of human manual control. On the other hand, most operators perform their cognitive functions below their peak cognitive capacity level due to fatigue, stress, and boredom. Thus, there is a need to improve their cognitive functions during work. The goal of this paper is to present a psychophysiology training approach derived from cardiovascular response named heart rate variability (HRV biofeedback. Description of resonant frequency biofeedback - a specific HRV training protocol - is discussed as well as its supported researches for the performance enhancement. HRV biofeedback training works by teaching people to recognize their involuntary HRV and to control patterns of this physiological response. The training is directed to increase HRV amplitude that promotes autonomic nervous system balance. This balance is associated with improved physiological functioning as well as psychological benefits. Most individuals can learn HRV biofeedback training easily which involves slowing the breathing rate (around six breaths/min to each individual’s resonant frequency at which the amplitude of HRV is maximized. Maximal control over HRV can be obtained in most people after approximately four sessions of training. Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of HRV biofeedback to the improvement of some cognitive functions in both simulated and real industrial operators.

  9. A uniform approach for on-site training and qualification of health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates show that in the U.S. approx. 75% of the health physics technicians received their training through courses offered by their employer. The quality and the extent of this training vary considerably among nuclear facilities. This paper describes a uniform approach for on-site training and qualification of health physics technicians applicable to all nuclear facilities. The program consists of four levels of qualification: Health Physics Technician Trainee, Technician I, Technician II and Senior Technician. The training is divided into modules that are composed of formal lectures, practical factors, experience, and a comprehensive examination. The minimum time required from hiring of inexperienced trainees to qualification as Senior Technicians is approx. 24 months. A qualification guide lists each step a technician must complete in the training program and provides documentation which facilitates audits by internal and external groups. Although items in the program would differ between facilities, the program provides specific titles for technicians, based on their training and experience, which would be applicable throughout the nuclear industry. (author)

  10. A systematic approach to human performance improvement in nuclear power plants: Training solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation: A Guidebook. This publication provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for all NPP personnel. The IAEA International Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared that provided further details concerning the training of NPP personnel on non-technical or soft skills. This report has been prepared in response to that recommendation. In the past, much of the focus of formal NPP training and development programmes was on the technical skills of NPP personnel, particularly those of control room operators. The environment in which NPPs operate is continually changing, placing new demands on NPP personnel to work more efficiently and effectively while continuing to maintain the high levels of safety required of NPPs. In this report, an integrated approach that considers training along with other ways to achieve desired levels of human performance is suggested

  11. A systematic approach to human performance improvement in nuclear power plants: Training solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation: A Guidebook. This publication provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for all NPP personnel. The IAEA International Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared that provided further details concerning the training of NPP personnel on non-technical or soft skills. This report has been prepared in response to that recommendation. In the past, much of the focus of formal NPP training and development programmes was on the technical skills of NPP personnel, particularly those of control room operators. The environment in which NPPs operate is continually changing, placing new demands on NPP personnel to work more efficiently and effectively while continuing to maintain the high levels of safety required of NPPs. In this report, an integrated approach that considers training along with other ways to achieve desired levels of human performance is suggested.

  12. New approach to training in citizen security from the social link university–community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edicta Gregoria González-Leal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article bases the need for a new conception in the training approaches in the training institutions of citizen security professionals, due to the present changes in the 21st century at the state, regional and local level, where the protagonism of the same lies In responding to the new challenges, trends and challenges present in society. It also analyzes the significance of the university's social connection with the communities, so that the praxis of the students goes beyond the understanding of the problems to the search for possible alternatives for their solution, with the consequent social transformations that this bring along.

  13. The effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol action tendency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Sharbanee

    Full Text Available Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training's efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1 whether the training's effect is mediated by a change in action tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2 whether the training's effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC. Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74 completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT. Participants' WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related action tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT, before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in action tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying action tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  14. The First Aid Training Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ian

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of first aid training provisions in the United Kingdom with respect to the outdoor industry, what to look for in a first aid training provider, an experiential model of first aid training, and the current National Governing Body requirements for first aid training for various types of coaches and instructors. (TD)

  15. [Approaches to medical training among physicians who teach; analysis of two different educational strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loría-Castellanos, Jorge; Rivera-lbarra, Doris Beatriz; Márquez-Avila, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Compare the outreach of a promotional educational strategy that focuses on active participation and compare it with a more traditional approach to medical training. A quasi-experimental design was approved by the research committee. We compared the outreach of two different approaches to medical training. We administered a validated instrument that included 72 items that analyze statements used to measure educational tasks in the form of duplets through 3 indicators. A group that included seven physicians that were actively participating in teaching activities was stratified according to teaching approaches. One of the approaches was a traditional one and the other included a promotional strategy aimed at increasing participation. All participants signed informed consent before answering the research instruments. Statistical analysis was done using non-parametric tests. Mann-Whitney results did not show differences among the group in the preliminary analysis. A second analysis with the same test after the interventions found significant differences (p d" 0.018) in favor of those subjects that had participated in the promotional approach mainly in the indicator measuring "consequence". The Wilcoxon test showed that all participants in the promotional approach increased significantly (pd" 0.018) in 3 main indicators as compared with the control group. A promotional strategy aimed at increasing physician participation constitutes a more profitable approach when compared with traditional teaching methods.

  16. An exploration of implications for the development of Pilates instructor system through identification of instructors? difficulties

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at exploring ideas for the development of Pilates instructor qualification system by identifying a range of difficulties Pilates instructors are experiencing. Open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data before they were analyzed with inductive content analysis method. In consideration of the difficulties Pilates instructors experience during three qualification stages (before-during-after qualification education), three key categ...

  17. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ...-2006-26661; Amendment No., 141-14] RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School..., certification, and operating requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools...: Background On August 21, 2009, the FAA published the ``Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School...

  18. The Pedagogical Readiness of Instructors towards Achieving Integration of ICT's in TVET Institutions in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Tirus Muya; Ogalo, James; Mwai, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    This paper points to the necessity to conduct research on the pedagogical readiness of instructors towards achieving integration of ICT's in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions in Kenya. Research on the integration of ICTs in teaching and learning in TVET institution in Kenya have been done to improve the learning…

  19. Project LINC: Supporting Lecturers and Adjunct Instructors in Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sally S.; Edwards, Wade

    2012-01-01

    Foreign language learning can pose a barrier to some students with disabilities. This practice brief describes a collaborative process used on one campus to provide professional development for foreign language instructors. Training opportunities were intentionally focused on the needs of adjunct and temporary lecturers in providing inclusive…

  20. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  1. World of Work--Education and Jobs. Kit No. WW-705. Instructor's Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mamie Rose; Killingsworth, Linda

    This instructor's manual contains activities for teaching students about the benefits derived from completing high school, sources of training for occupations, and information on finding job openings and on working part-time and full-time. It is designed for use in five periods in classes in prevocational education in South Carolina. The guide…

  2. World of Work--Choosing a Career. Kit No. WW-704. Instructor's Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mamie Rose; Killingsworth, Linda

    This instructor's manual contains activities for teaching students about occupational categories, job requirements versus personal characteristics, the steps to take in making an occupational choice, and the vocational training programs offered by area vocational centers. It is designed for use in six to eight periods in classes in prevocational…

  3. Bridging content and EFL: a one-day ESP workshop for flight instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This workshop allows an ESP provider with limited specialized knowledge in the field of aviation to train English-speaking flight instructors in basic EFL communication strategies. While the present workshop is based on a Canadian model of flight instruction, it can be easily adapted to other jurisdictions

  4. Carpentry, Culinary Arts Instructor Guide and Curriculums. Bilingual Vocational Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Roxanne T.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational English as a second language (VESL) instructors in teaching courses in carpentry and the culinary arts to residents of Navajo reservations. The first section outlines the rationale and content of the two training programs as well as the basic VESL objectives that they seek to address. The next section, a…

  5. Perceived Instructor Affective Support in Relation to Academic Emotions and Motivation in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiz, Gonul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the associations among perceived instructor affective support, academic enjoyment, academic hopelessness, behavioural engagement and academic help seeking in college classrooms. A self-report survey was administered to 277 college students enrolled in a teacher training department of a major…

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ethical Leadership: Perceptions of Instructors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    academic leaders and instructors in the Western Cluster universities of Ethiopia. To this end, qualitative .... methods should be in place to ensure ..... dedication to the satisfaction of the interests of ... customers and take corrective measures.

  7. Intercultural exchange: an approach to training from a Franco-Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The current challenges of cultural diversity necessitate effective methods for training professionals in health, as well as other sectors, to work with the phenomenon of culture. This paper presents an overview of a semiotic-based approach to training in this regard. Recent publications by Anti Randviir in semiotics on the textual nature of cultural phenomena and by Annabel Levesque on the healthcare issues of Western, French-speaking Canadians provide the methodological frame and basic cultural reference for the overview. The anthropological definition of culture as a 'semiotic', or universe of meaning, offers interdisciplinary common ground for designing practical approaches to cultural analysis, intercultural communication and creativity training. This definition is consistent with convergent findings and research practice in social and cognitive psychology, administrative science, philosophy, ethnography, linguistics and semiotics. Cultural performances such as narrative constitute an effective methodological tool for interdisciplinary data gathering and for analysis of all kinds of cultures: organizational, family, ethnic, regional, transborder, etc. When combined with a functionalist and systemic approach to the study of culture, semiotic approaches to narrative analysis provide useful principles for decoding cultural modes of communication and for designing meaningful change based on cultural specificity.

  8. Autogenic Training as a behavioural approach to insomnia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Ann; Lorenc, Ava; Robinson, Nicola

    2012-04-01

    Insomnia is commonly associated with chronic health problems. Behavioural and cognitive factors often perpetuate a vicious cycle of anxiety and sleep disturbance, leading to long-term insomnia. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence currently recommends behavioural approaches before prescribing hypnotics. Behavioural approaches aim to treat underlying causes, but are not widely available. Research usually includes patients diagnosed with insomnia rather than secondary, co-morbid sleep- related problems. To examine the effectiveness of autogenic training (AT) as a non-drug approach to sleep-related problems associated with chronic ill health. Prospective pre- and post-treatment cohort study. AT centre, Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. All patients referred for AT from April 2007 to April 2008 were invited to participate. Participants received standard 8-week training, with no specific focus on sleep. Sleep questionnaires were administered at four time points, 'Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile' (MYMOP) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, before and after treatment. Results before and after treatment were compared. Camden and Islington Community Local Research and Ethics Committee approved the study. The AT course was completed by 153 participants, of whom 73% were identified as having a sleep-related problem. Improvements in sleep patterns included: sleep onset latency (P = 0.049), falling asleep quicker after night waking (P training. AT may provide an approach to insomnia that could be incorporated into primary care.

  9. The Inflatable Mini Anne® Manikin May be Used as an Inexpensive Alternative to a Standard Life-size Resuscitation Manikin During Instructor-led BLS/AED Training - A Randomized Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Camilla; Cordsen, Anna-Sophie N; Hoe, Masja B

    2017-01-01

    -led BLS/AED training. All participants underwent an end-of-course test on an AMBU® Man-manikin (AMBU). The primary endpoint: performing all steps of the European Resuscitation Council BLS/AED algorithm correctly (passing the test). Secondary endpoints: CPR quality parameters and manikin preference...

  10. Resource approach in providing health-saving process of future teachers training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykytiuk S.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of realization of resource approach are exposed in organization of pedagogical education. There were defined the ways of providing health-saving teacher training, namely: assessment criteria of adjustment of social order and personal professional development needs, means of implementing the tasks of pedagogical education concept according to the resource approach. The methods of maintainance and strengthening of health of future teachers are specified in the process of professional preparation. It is marked that resource approach unites requirement to the competence of teacher, provides the account of age-dependent features of organism of student and periods of becoming of personality of student and teacher. Resource approach is given by possibility to take into account the specific of labour and level of knowledge, abilities and skills of every student. Resource approach harmonizes the actual aspects of complex of the modern scientific going near education of students and professional preparation of future teachers.

  11. Instructor and student knowledge of study strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehead, Kayla; Rhodes, Matthew G; DeLozier, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Students' self-reported study skills and beliefs are often inconsistent with empirically supported (ES) study strategies. However, little is known regarding instructors' beliefs about study skills and if such beliefs differ from those of students. In the current study, we surveyed college students' and instructors' knowledge of study strategies and had both groups evaluate the efficacy of learning strategies described in six learning scenarios. Results from the survey indicated that students frequently reported engaging in methods of studying that were not optimal for learning. Instructors' responses to the survey indicated that they endorsed a number of effective study skills but also held several beliefs inconsistent with research in learning and memory (e.g., learning styles). Further, results from the learning scenarios measure indicated that instructors were moderately more likely than students to endorse ES learning strategies. Collectively, these data suggest that instructors exhibited better knowledge of effective study skills than students, although the difference was small. We discuss several notable findings and argue for the improvement of both students' and instructors' study skill knowledge.

  12. Improving Teach Astronomy: A Survey of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Matthew; Riabokin, Malanka; Impey, Chris David

    2018-01-01

    Teach Astronomy is a website that provides educational resources for introductory astronomy. The motivation behind constructing this site was to provide quality online educational tools for use as a primary or supplementary instructional resource for teachers and students. The website provides an online textbook, glossary, podcasts and video summaries of concepts. As the popularity of online courses steadily increases, so does the demand for robust online educational resources. In order to cater to our users, our team conducted a survey of the instructors that use Teach Astronomy site for feedback for use in updating and streamlining the website content. The survey collected feedback regarding functionality of each of the website tools, in which courses the site was being used, and the motivation of the instructors use of our site. The overwhelming majority of responses indicate that instructors use the website as a class textbook in introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors, and instructors also generally tended to agree that the site content was comprehensive and lucid. One interesting result of the survey is to cluster topics in a way that is consistent with different levels of instruction (i.e. grouping middle-school level content and university level content distinctly). Our team will use this feedback to improve the Teach Astronomy website and maintain it as a high-quality, free online resource. We will also continue to gather feedback from instructors to ensure that the Teach Astronomy website stays current and remains a valuable online resource for instructors around the country.

  13. A Systematic Approach to Identify Sources of Abnormal Interior Noise for a High-Speed Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic approach to identify sources of abnormal interior noise occurring in a high-speed train is presented and applied in this paper to resolve a particular noise issue. This approach is developed based on a number of previous dealings with similar noise problems. The particular noise issue occurs in a Chinese high-speed train. It is measured that there is a difference of 7 dB(A in overall Sound Pressure Level (SPL between two nominally identical VIP cabins at 250 km/h. The systematic approach is applied to identify the root cause of the 7 dB(A difference. Well planned measurements are performed in both the VIP cabins. Sound pressure contributions, either in terms of frequency band or in terms of facing area, are analyzed. Order analysis is also carried out. Based on these analyses, it is found that the problematic frequency is the sleeper passing frequency of the train, and an area on the roof contributes the most. In order to determine what causes that area to be the main contributor without disassembling the structure of the roof, measured noise and vibration data for different train speeds are further analyzed. It is then reasoned that roof is the main contributor caused by sound pressure behind the panel. Up to this point, panels of the roof are removed, revealing that a hole of 300 cm2 for running cables is presented behind the red area without proper sound insulation. This study can provide a basis for abnormal interior noise analysis and control of high-speed trains.

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Cognitive Training Game for Older People: A Design-based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Hsin; Lin, Weijane; Yueh, Hsiu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    In the research field of cognitive aging, games have gained attention as training interventions to remediate age-related deficits. Cognitive training games on computer, video and mobile platforms have shown ample and positive support. However, the generalized effects are not agreed upon unanimously, and the game tasks are usually simple and decontextualized due to the limitations of measurements. This study adopted a qualitative approach of design-based research (DBR) to systematically review and pragmatically examine the regime, presentation and feedback design of a cognitive training game for older adults. An overview of the literature of cognitive aging and training games was conducted to form the theoretical conjectures of the design, and an iterative cycle and process were employed to develop a mobile game for older adults who are homebound or receiving care in a nursing home. Stakeholders, i.e., elderly users and institutional administrators, were invited to participate in the design process. Using two cycles of design and evaluation, a working prototype of an iPad-based app that accounted for the needs of elderly adults in terms of form, appearance and working function was developed and tested in the actual contexts of the participants' homes and an assisted living facility. The results showed that the cognitive training game developed in this study was accepted by the participants, and a high degree of satisfaction was noted. Moreover, the elements of the interface, including its size, layout and control flow, were tested and found to be suitable for use. This study contributes to the literature by providing design suggestions for such games, including the designs of the cognitive training structure, interface, interaction, instructions and feedback, based on empirical evidence collected in natural settings. This study further suggests that the effectiveness of cognitive training in mobile games be evaluated through field and physical testing on a larger

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Cognitive Training Game for Older People: A Design-based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Hsin; Lin, Weijane; Yueh, Hsiu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    In the research field of cognitive aging, games have gained attention as training interventions to remediate age-related deficits. Cognitive training games on computer, video and mobile platforms have shown ample and positive support. However, the generalized effects are not agreed upon unanimously, and the game tasks are usually simple and decontextualized due to the limitations of measurements. This study adopted a qualitative approach of design-based research (DBR) to systematically review and pragmatically examine the regime, presentation and feedback design of a cognitive training game for older adults. An overview of the literature of cognitive aging and training games was conducted to form the theoretical conjectures of the design, and an iterative cycle and process were employed to develop a mobile game for older adults who are homebound or receiving care in a nursing home. Stakeholders, i.e., elderly users and institutional administrators, were invited to participate in the design process. Using two cycles of design and evaluation, a working prototype of an iPad-based app that accounted for the needs of elderly adults in terms of form, appearance and working function was developed and tested in the actual contexts of the participants' homes and an assisted living facility. The results showed that the cognitive training game developed in this study was accepted by the participants, and a high degree of satisfaction was noted. Moreover, the elements of the interface, including its size, layout and control flow, were tested and found to be suitable for use. This study contributes to the literature by providing design suggestions for such games, including the designs of the cognitive training structure, interface, interaction, instructions and feedback, based on empirical evidence collected in natural settings. This study further suggests that the effectiveness of cognitive training in mobile games be evaluated through field and physical testing on a larger

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Cognitive Training Game for Older People: A Design-based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsin Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the research field of cognitive aging, games have gained attention as training interventions to remediate age-related deficits. Cognitive training games on computer, video and mobile platforms have shown ample and positive support. However, the generalized effects are not agreed upon unanimously, and the game tasks are usually simple and decontextualized due to the limitations of measurements. This study adopted a qualitative approach of design-based research (DBR to systematically review and pragmatically examine the regime, presentation and feedback design of a cognitive training game for older adults. An overview of the literature of cognitive aging and training games was conducted to form the theoretical conjectures of the design, and an iterative cycle and process were employed to develop a mobile game for older adults who are homebound or receiving care in a nursing home. Stakeholders, i.e., elderly users and institutional administrators, were invited to participate in the design process. Using two cycles of design and evaluation, a working prototype of an iPad-based app that accounted for the needs of elderly adults in terms of form, appearance and working function was developed and tested in the actual contexts of the participants' homes and an assisted living facility. The results showed that the cognitive training game developed in this study was accepted by the participants, and a high degree of satisfaction was noted. Moreover, the elements of the interface, including its size, layout and control flow, were tested and found to be suitable for use. This study contributes to the literature by providing design suggestions for such games, including the designs of the cognitive training structure, interface, interaction, instructions and feedback, based on empirical evidence collected in natural settings. This study further suggests that the effectiveness of cognitive training in mobile games be evaluated through field and physical

  17. Experience in the use of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    One of the essential requirements for safe and reliable nuclear power plant operation and maintenance is the availability of competent personnel, and thus systematic approach to training (SAT) is recognized world-wide. Many countries have applied and implemented the use of SAT in their training systems as demonstrated by the results of the IAEA World Survey on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training. This report complements two IAEA publications, the Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel and its Evaluation (Technical Reports Series No. 380) and the IAEA World Survey of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training (IAEA-TECDOC-1063). It provides a detailed overview and analysis of the experience gained worldwide on the introduction and application of SAT, including the reasons why SAT was introduced and lessons learned. The technical document will be of use for nuclear power plant managers and supervisors and all those responsible for training of personnel. The report was initiated by the International Working Group at a Technical Committee Meeting. Experiences gained from the application of SAT in the following Member States are included: Armenia, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Mexico, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovenia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States of America

  18. Experience in the use of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear power plant personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    One of the essential requirements for safe and reliable nuclear power plant operation and maintenance is the availability of competent personnel, and thus systematic approach to training (SAT) is recognized world-wide. Many countries have applied and implemented the use of SAT in their training systems as demonstrated by the results of the IAEA World Survey on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training. This report complements two IAEA publications, the Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel and its Evaluation (Technical Reports Series No. 380) and the IAEA World Survey of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training (IAEA-TECDOC-1063). It provides a detailed overview and analysis of the experience gained worldwide on the introduction and application of SAT, including the reasons why SAT was introduced and lessons learned. The technical document will be of use for nuclear power plant managers and supervisors and all those responsible for training of personnel. The report was initiated by the International Working Group at a Technical Committee Meeting. Experiences gained from the application of SAT in the following Member States are included: Armenia, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Mexico, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovenia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States of America. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Simulation and training of ultrasound supported anaesthesia: a low-cost approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, T.; Lamontain, M.; Hilpert, J.; Schilling, F.; Tolxdorff, T.

    2010-03-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging technology during techniques of peripheral nerve blockade offers several clinical benefits. Here we report on a new method to educate residents in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The daily challenge for the anesthesiologists is the 3D angle-depending handling of the stimulation needle and the ultrasound probe while watching the 2D ultrasound image on the monitor. Purpose: Our approach describes how a computer-aided simulation and training set for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia could be built based on wireless low-cost devices and an interactive simulation of a 2D ultrasound image. For training purposes the injection needle and the ultrasound probe are replaced by wireless Bluetooth-connected 3D tracking devices, which are embedded in WII-mote controllers (Nintendo-Brand). In correlation to the tracked 3D positions of the needle and transducer models the visibility and position of the needle should be simulated in the 2D generated ultrasound image. Conclusion: In future, this tracking and visualization software module could be integrated in a more complex training set, where complex injection paths could be trained based on a 3D segmented model and the training results could be part of a curricular e-learning module.

  20. Climate change: what competencies and which medical education and training approaches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Erica J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much research has been devoted to identifying healthcare needs in a climate-changing world. However, while there are now global and national policy statements about the importance of health workforce development for climate change, little has been published about what competencies might be demanded of practitioners in a climate-changing world. In such a context, this debate and discussion paper aims to explore the nature of key competencies and related opportunities for teaching climate change in medical education and training. Particular emphasis is made on preparation for practice in rural and remote regions likely to be greatly affected by climate change. Discussion The paper describes what kinds of competencies for climate change might be included in medical education and training. It explores which curricula, teaching, learning and assessment approaches might be involved. Rather than arguing for major changes to medical education and training, this paper explores well established precedents to offer practical suggestions for where a particular kind of literacy--eco-medical literacy--and related competencies could be naturally integrated into existing elements of medical education and training. Summary The health effects of climate change have, generally, not yet been integrated into medical education and training systems. However, the necessary competencies could be taught by building on existing models, best practice and innovative traditions in medicine. Even in crowded curricula, climate change offers an opportunity to reinforce and extend understandings of how interactions between people and place affect health.

  1. Instructor-Created Activities to Engage Undergraduate Nursing Research Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda L; Reuille, Kristina M

    2018-03-01

    In flipped or blended classrooms, instruction intentionally shifts to a student-centered model for a problem-based learning approach, where class time explores topics in greater depth, creating meaningful learning opportunities. This article describes instructor-created activities focused on research processes linked to evidence-based practice that engage undergraduate nursing research students. In the classroom, these activities include individual and team work to foster critical thinking and stimulate student discussion of topic material. Six activities for small and large student groups are related to quantitative, qualitative, and both research processes, as well as applying research evidence to practice. Positive student outcomes included quantitative success on assignments and robust student topic discussions, along with instructor-noted overall group engagement and interest. Using these activities can result in class time for the construction of meaning, rather than primarily information transmission. Instructors may adopt these activities to involve and stimulate students' critical thinking about research and evidence-based practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):174-177.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. An Event-Based Approach to Design a Teamwork Training Scenario and Assessment Tool in Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngan; Watson, William D; Dominguez, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Simulation is a technique recommended for teaching and measuring teamwork, but few published methodologies are available on how best to design simulation for teamwork training in surgery and health care in general. The purpose of this article is to describe a general methodology, called event-based approach to training (EBAT), to guide the design of simulation for teamwork training and discuss its application to surgery. The EBAT methodology draws on the science of training by systematically introducing training exercise events that are linked to training requirements (i.e., competencies being trained and learning objectives) and performance assessment. The EBAT process involves: Of the 4 teamwork competencies endorsed by the Agency for Healthcare Research Quality and Department of Defense, "communication" was chosen to be the focus of our training efforts. A total of 5 learning objectives were defined based on 5 validated teamwork and communication techniques. Diagnostic laparoscopy was chosen as the clinical context to frame the training scenario, and 29 KSAs were defined based on review of published literature on patient safety and input from subject matter experts. Critical events included those that correspond to a specific phase in the normal flow of a surgical procedure as well as clinical events that may occur when performing the operation. Similar to the targeted KSAs, targeted responses to the critical events were developed based on existing literature and gathering input from content experts. Finally, a 29-item EBAT-derived checklist was created to assess communication performance. Like any instructional tool, simulation is only effective if it is designed and implemented appropriately. It is recognized that the effectiveness of simulation depends on whether (1) it is built upon a theoretical framework, (2) it uses preplanned structured exercises or events to allow learners the opportunity to exhibit the targeted KSAs, (3) it assesses performance, and (4

  3. Teaching Students, Not Standards: Threshold Crossings for Students and Instructors Alike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Burgess

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is an opportunity for IL instructors to ask themselves whether their current approaches to instruction are meeting the higher goals of IL education. Instructors might re-examine their pedagogical approaches by considering their own knowledge practices and dispositions in teaching IL. How might we best create a space in which the desired student knowledge practices and dispositions flourish? How can we approach IL education as fellow students – ones who just happen to be at a different point on the same path of lifelong learning?

  4. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) biofeedback: A new training approach for operator’s performance enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Auditya Purwandini Sutarto; Muhammad Nubli Abdul Wahab; Nora Mat Zin

    2010-01-01

    The widespread implementation of advanced and complex systems requires predominantly operators’ cognitive functions and less importance of human manual control. On the other hand, most operators perform their cognitive functions below their peak cognitive capacity level due to fatigue, stress, and boredom. Thus, there is a need to improve their cognitive functions during work. The goal of this paper is to present a psychophysiology training approach derived from cardiovascular response ...

  5. INTERVENTIONS IN HUMAN RESOURCE TRAINING FOR COMPETENCIES WITHIN THE INTELLIGENT ORGANIZATIONS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    César A. Valecillos

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study on interventions for human talent training programs for competency within the Intelligent Organizations focus. The theoretical foundation is supported by Organizational Development and approaches from Senge (1994 ) , Lewin ( 1946 ) , Leboyer (2000) and Obeso (2003 ) . The methodology is embedded in the qualitative - interpretive paradigm and action research. Results showed programs focused on Senge's learning disciplines to to promote change and c...

  6. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 24. Equipment Repair Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    REIdRT , i- FIFRMN ORG 6Po,. NUMBER ...... ,s / . . .. . CONTRACT Oil GRANT NUMNIER e _ ___ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ 9 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...Courses." In this he called for "vigorous and imaginative effort," and an approach "characterized by an organized training program with precise goals and...FOR NON-STANDARD USAGE 30 IFABRICATE WROUGHT METAL FRAMEWORK 31 IDRAW ARCHITECHTURAL FLOOR PLAN FOR CLINIC 32 IBUILD MULTIPLE-PATIENT CARDIAC

  7. Voice problems of group fitness instructors: diagnosis, treatment, perceived and experienced attitudes and expectations of the industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F

    2013-11-01

    To determine the anatomical and physiological nature of voice problems and their treatment in those group fitness instructors (GFIs) who have sought a medical diagnosis; the impact of voice disorders on quality of life and their contribution to activity limitations and participation restrictions; and the perceived attitudes and level of support from the industry at large in response to instructor's voice disorders and need for treatment. Prospective self-completion questionnaire design. Thirty-eight individuals (3 males and 35 females) currently active in the Australian fitness industry who had been diagnosed with a voice disorder completed an online self-completion questionnaire administered via SurveyMonkey. Laryngeal pathology included vocal fold nodules (N = 24), vocal fold cysts (N = 2), vocal fold hemorrhage (N = 1), and recurrent chronic laryngitis (N = 3). Eight individuals reported vocal strain and muscle tension dysphonia without concurrent vocal fold pathology. Treatment methods were variable, with 73.68% (N = 28) receiving voice therapy alone, 7.89% (N = 3) having voice therapy in combination with surgery, and 10.53% (N = 4) having voice therapy in conjunction with medication. Three individuals (7.89%) received no treatment for their voice disorder. During treatment, 82% of the cohort altered their teaching practices. Half of the cohort reported that their voice problems led to social withdrawal, decreased job satisfaction, and emotional distress. Greater than 65% also reported being dissatisfied with the level of industry and coworker support during the period of voice recovery. This study identifies that GFIs are susceptible to a number of voice disorders that impact their social and professional lives, and there is a need for more proactive training and advice on voice care for instructors, as well as those in management positions within the industry to address mixed approaches and opinions regarding the importance of voice care. Copyright © 2013

  8. A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing for simulated crises in perioperative medicine in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Alam, Fahad; Hoch, Jeffrey; Boet, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation training is effective for learning crisis resource management (CRM) skills, but cost is a major barrier to implementing high-fidelity simulation training into the curriculum. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of self-debriefing and traditional instructor debriefing in CRM training programs and to calculate the minimum willingness-to-pay (WTP) value when one debriefing type becomes more cost-effective than the other. This study used previous data from a randomized controlled trial involving 50 anesthesiology residents in Canada. Each participant managed a pretest crisis scenario. Participants who were randomized to self-debrief used the video of their pretest scenario with no instructor present during their debriefing. Participants from the control group were debriefed by a trained instructor using the video of their pretest scenario. Participants individually managed a post-test simulated crisis scenario. We compared the cost and effectiveness of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing using net benefit regression. The cost-effectiveness estimate was reported as the incremental net benefit and the uncertainty was presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Self-debriefing costs less than instructor debriefing. As the WTP increased, the probability that self-debriefing would be cost-effective decreased. With a WTP ≤Can$200, the self-debriefing program was cost-effective. However, when effectiveness was priced higher than cost-savings and with a WTP >Can$300, instructor debriefing was the preferred alternative. With a lower WTP (≤Can$200), self-debriefing was cost-effective in CRM simulation training when compared to instructor debriefing. This study provides evidence regarding cost-effectiveness that will inform decision-makers and clinical educators in their decision-making process, and may help to optimize resource allocation in education.

  9. A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing for simulated crises in perioperative medicine in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanrudee Isaranuwatchai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose High-fidelity simulation training is effective for learning crisis resource management (CRM skills, but cost is a major barrier to implementing high-fidelity simulation training into the curriculum. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of self-debriefing and traditional instructor debriefing in CRM training programs and to calculate the minimum willingness-to-pay (WTP value when one debriefing type becomes more cost-effective than the other. Methods This study used previous data from a randomized controlled trial involving 50 anesthesiology residents in Canada. Each participant managed a pretest crisis scenario. Participants who were randomized to self-debrief used the video of their pretest scenario with no instructor present during their debriefing. Participants from the control group were debriefed by a trained instructor using the video of their pretest scenario. Participants individually managed a post-test simulated crisis scenario. We compared the cost and effectiveness of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing using net benefit regression. The cost-effectiveness estimate was reported as the incremental net benefit and the uncertainty was presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Results Self-debriefing costs less than instructor debriefing. As the WTP increased, the probability that self-debriefing would be cost-effective decreased. With a WTP ≤Can$200, the self-debriefing program was cost-effective. However, when effectiveness was priced higher than cost-savings and with a WTP >Can$300, instructor debriefing was the preferred alternative. Conclusion With a lower WTP (≤Can$200, self-debriefing was cost-effective in CRM simulation training when compared to instructor debriefing. This study provides evidence regarding cost-effectiveness that will inform decision-makers and clinical educators in their decision-making process, and may help to optimize resource allocation in education.

  10. The roles of the instructors in an ESP-task based language teaching course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Vásquez, José Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The graduate program in Teaching English at the University of Costa Rica offers yearly English courses to satisfy the language learning needs at different departments, research centers, or similar institutions. The objective of this article was to analyze the extent to which a group of student teachers fulfilled the roles of the instructors in the Task Based Language Teaching method used in the graduate program. The study used a mixed-methods approach and the subjects were three instructors during their teaching practicum. The roles of the instructors were assessed by the practicum supervisors, fellow students in the practicum, the students in the course, and the instructors themselves through rubrics, observation sheets, surveys, and teaching journals. The results from the different instruments using different scales pointed to the instructors fulfilling the roles of sequencing tasks and motivating the learners a majority of the times. The roles of preparing the learners for tasks and raising consciousness were fulfilled to a lesser extent, which indicated that the instructors needed to work further on these areas. The study concluded with recommendations for improving the roles that revealed weaknesses, notably aimed to provide a manageable numbers of vocabulary items and grammar structures in the pretask, as well as to provide prompt feedback, and to elicit students’ knowledge for the development of lessons.

  11. Explicating Filipino student nurses' preferences of clinical instructors' attributes: A conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Elisa Monette R; de Guzman, Allan B

    2017-08-01

    The role of clinical instructor in student nurses' preparation for the professional nursing practice cannot be underestimated. The extent to which such role is achieved depends highly on the instructors' ability to realize the desired qualities expected of them. While a number of empirical studies have qualitatively explored the attributes of an effective clinical instructor, no attempt has ventured yet on the power of experimental vignettes for conjoint analysis in explicating the preferences of a select group of Filipino student nurses relative to their clinical instructors' attributes. Junior and senior nursing students (n=227), recruited from one of the comprehensive universities in the Philippines, were asked to sort out orthogonal cards generated by Sawtooth Software. As shown, the full-profile conjoint analysis was considerably fit for this study: Pearson's R=0.988, (prelationship and caring behavior (33.17%). In regard to the clinical teaching capability, a clinical instructor who parallels clinical teaching skills with the students' understanding and experience (0.089) was the highest part-worth. As for the interpersonal relationship and caring behavior, the highest part-worth was a clinical instructor who respects a student nurse as an individual and cares about him/her as a person (0.114). Findings of this study can be a basis for clinical instructors as to which qualities to cultivate best to facilitate a first-rate clinical nursing instruction. Likewise, the results of this study can inform current practices of clinical instructors by making them aware of how they can nurture a pedagogical approach consistent with the student nurses' preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Instructor Misbehavior and Forgiveness: An Examination of Student Communicative Outcomes in the Aftermath of Instructor Misbehavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallade, Jessalyn I.; Malachowski, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Using Attribution Theory as a theoretical framework, this study explored the role of forgiveness in impacting student nonverbal responsiveness, out-of-class communication (OCC), and perceptions of cognitive and affective learning following instructor misbehavior. Additionally, the role of instructor nonverbal immediacy was examined. Participants…

  13. Enhancing Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in Nigeria for Sustainable Development: Competency-Based Training (CBT) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, K. R. E.; Michael, Ofonmbuk Isaac

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine the concept of Competency-Based Training (CBT) as a veritable mode of delivery of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and at the same time highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of implementing competency-base training. The characteristics, principles and benefits of CBT were also x-rayed.…

  14. Issues in Cross Cultural Training: Educating the Imagination with Cross Cultural Approaches to Literacy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Nina

    An instructor's teaching practices have been influenced by Edward T. Hall's theory in "Beyond Culture," which begins with the notion that "what is known least well and is therefore in the poorest position to be studied is what is closest to oneself," the "unconscious patterns that control us." This wisdom has been…

  15. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  16. Simulation Training: Evaluating the Instructor’s Contribution to a Wizard of Oz Simulator in Obstetrics and Gynecology Ultrasound Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Ronnie

    2017-01-01

    Background Workplaces today demand graduates who are prepared with field-specific knowledge, advanced social skills, problem-solving skills, and integration capabilities. Meeting these goals with didactic learning (DL) is becoming increasingly difficult. Enhanced training methods that would better prepare tomorrow’s graduates must be more engaging and game-like, such as feedback based e-learning or simulation-based training, while saving time. Empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of advanced learning methods is lacking. Objective quantitative research comparing advanced training methods with DL is sparse. Objectives This quantitative study assessed the effectiveness of a computerized interactive simulator coupled with an instructor who monitored students’ progress and provided Web-based immediate feedback. Methods A low-cost, globally accessible, telemedicine simulator, developed at the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel—was used. A previous study in the field of interventional cardiology, evaluating the efficacy of the simulator to enhanced learning via knowledge exams, presented promising results of average scores varying from 94% after training and 54% before training (n=20) with Pe-learning in the field of Ob-Gyn. Results from objective knowledge tests were analyzed using hypothesis testing and model fitting. Results A significant advantage (P=.01) was found in favor of the WOZ training approach. Content type and training audience were not significant. Conclusions This study evaluated the contribution of an integrated teaching environment using a computerized interactive simulator, with an instructor providing immediate Web-based immediate feedback to trainees. Involvement of an instructor in the simulation-based training process provided better learning outcomes that varied training content and trainee populations did not affect the overall learning gains. PMID:28432039

  17. CULTOROLOGICAL APPROACH TO TRAINING OF THE FUTURE MANAGERS OF TOURISM IN PRECARPATHIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Chorna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the «culturological approach» to the professional training of future managers of tourism in Precarpathia. As the Precarpathian region attracts thousands of tourists year-round the demand of training qualified specialists in the sphere of tourism and hospitality is constantly growing. Nowadays the question of a successful and perspectives career in tourism results in training a new standard professional, a specialist of many-sided knowledge,with the ability to fulfil tasks concerning thinking over, making and realizing management decisions. In order to develop tourist  Carpathian region, the Precarpathian National University named after V.Stefanyk educates future experts in such specialities as "Tourism" and "Hospitality Industry". Involving youth in social cultural values and ideals, education contributes to maintaining social order and by providing realization of new technologies, scientific rethinking of existing knowledge education promotes social changes, society development, i.e. education operates as an agent of moral regulation facilitating social integration. Different interpretations of the concept «culture» were studied. The conclusion that culture is a multiaspect and multifunctional notion was made. Cultorological approach in education provides effectiveness of the process of putting culture as a social phenomenon into action. The fact of culturological direction extending of the whole educational process in the university interrelating to its components (common-cultural, professional and functional is of great importance. Cultorological approach introduction to the process of training of the future tourism experts that is aimed at the developing of civil society values and an independent creative personality is a premise of modernization of higher education in Ukraine.

  18. Poor Demonstration and Knowledge of AED Electrode Placement by Certified and Experienced BLS/AED Instructors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Mathilde; Vammen, Lauge; Hansen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    to demonstrate correct use of an AED remains to be investigated.Aim: To determine BLS instructors’ competence in using an AED.Methods: Certified BLS instructors were asked to operate a training AED (Lifepak ® CR-T Plus, PhysioControl, default audiotape duration of 67 sec from start to time of shock......Introduction: Use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) improves survival. Incorrect AED electrode placement may affect defibrillation success and survival. During courses in basic life support (BLS), instructors teach laypeople how to use an AED. However, BLS instructors’ ability......) on a resuscitation manikin with arms (AMBU ® Man, AMBU) as they would do in a teaching situation but without any explanations. The demonstration by the instructor was video recorded. After shock delivery the AED electrode position was assessed i.e. the distance from the center of the electrode to the recommended...

  19. Personalized instructor responses to guided student reflections: Analysis of two instructors' perspectives and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Daniel L.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.

    2017-11-01

    One way to foster a supportive culture in physics departments is for instructors to provide students with personal attention regarding their academic difficulties. To this end, we have developed the Guided Reflection Form (GRF), an online tool that facilitates student reflections and personalized instructor responses. In the present work, we report on the experiences and practices of two instructors who used the GRF in an introductory physics lab course. Our analysis draws on two sources of data: (i) post-semester interviews with both instructors and (ii) the instructors' written responses to 134 student reflections. Interviews focused on the instructors' perceptions about the goals and framing of the GRF activity, and characteristics of good or bad feedback. Their GRF responses were analyzed for the presence of up to six types of statement: encouraging statements, normalizing statements, empathizing statements, strategy suggestions, resource suggestions, and feedback to the student on the structure of students' reflections. We find that both instructors used all six response types, in alignment with their perceptions of what counts as good feedback. In addition, although each instructor had their own unique feedback style, both instructors' feedback practices were compatible with two principles for effective feedback: praise should focus on effort, express confidence in students' abilities, and be sincere; and process-level feedback should be specific and strategy-oriented. This exploratory qualitative investigation demonstrates that the GRF can serve as a mechanism for instructors to pay personal attention to their students. In addition, it opens the door to future work about the impact of the GRF on student-teacher interactions.

  20. Learning on the Fly: Exploring the Informal Learning Process of Aviation Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Michael Grant; Ellinger, Andrea D.; Watkins, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the process of informal learning of aviation instructors. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative instrumental case study design was used for this study. In-depth, multiple semi-structured interviews and document review were the primary approaches to data collection and the data were analyzed using constant…

  1. Deep and Surface Processing of Instructor's Feedback in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Ge, Xun; Law, Victor

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of deep and surface approaches to learning in online students' responses to instructor's qualitative feedback given to a multi-stage, ill-structured design project. Further, the study examined the relationships between approaches to learning and two learner characteristics: epistemic beliefs (EB) and…

  2. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  3. Radiation protection training award - an innovative approach of testing radiation protection skills in catastrophe management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, T.

    2003-01-01

    own emergency planning. ARCS Bronze award consists of 4 practical exercises followed by a theoretical test. The praxis requirements include the detection and identification of a radioactive source, application of a low level gamma monitor, principles of personnel monitoring, control of external hazard as well as taking environmental samples. Theoretical testing ranges from the nature of radioactivity and radiation units to the legislation related to radiological protection. Evaluation is given in an objective numeric grading. The Silver award includes the treatment of nuclear emergencies such as the detonation of a nuclear weapon, an accident in a radionuclid/ isotop lab or an accident in a nuclear plant. The candidates have also to present their skills in handling an transportation accident, arranging immediate catastrophe management. The candidates' background ranged from security force members to academics. The problem of harmonized training standards is, especially since the September 11 th attacks, a worldwide need. Security forces have to show their practical knowledge and secure their theoretical background to eventually update their skills. The protection of the general population can only be ensured by a homogenous training as well as perfect collaboration of the security units. Therefore an intensive training of the security guards performed by specialists must be guaranteed. ARCS radiation protection awards can be seen as the motivational background to this approach. Also the social component must not be neglected since the period of training at ARCS offers a perfect environment for interdisciplinary discussion. Safety culture and training experiences in the field of radiation protection in Austria depend an such an information system and ARCS has shown experience in that field for decades. Innovative approaches in training and sharing information as well as experience are seen as important tools to maintain safety culture. Harmonization and national

  4. Training Inference Making Skills Using a Situation Model Approach Improves Reading Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisanne eBos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to enhance third and fourth graders’ text comprehension at the situation model level. Therefore, we tested a reading strategy training developed to target inference making skills, which are widely considered to be pivotal to situation model construction. The training was grounded in contemporary literature on situation model-based inference making and addressed the source (text-based versus knowledge-based, type (necessary versus unnecessary for (re-establishing coherence, and depth of an inference (making single lexical inferences versus combining multiple lexical inferences, as well as the type of searching strategy (forward versus backward. Results indicated that, compared to a control group (n = 51, children who followed the experimental training (n = 67 improved their inference making skills supportive to situation model construction. Importantly, our training also resulted in increased levels of general reading comprehension and motivation. In sum, this study showed that a ‘level of text representation’-approach can provide a useful framework to teach inference making skills to third and fourth graders.

  5. CoSpa: A Co-training Approach for Spam Review Identification with Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spam reviews are increasingly appearing on the Internet to promote sales or defame competitors by misleading consumers with deceptive opinions. This paper proposes a co-training approach called CoSpa (Co-training for Spam review identification to identify spam reviews by two views: one is the lexical terms derived from the textual content of the reviews and the other is the PCFG (Probabilistic Context-Free Grammars rules derived from a deep syntax analysis of the reviews. Using SVM (Support Vector Machine as the base classifier, we develop two strategies, CoSpa-C and CoSpa-U, embedded within the CoSpa approach. The CoSpa-C strategy selects unlabeled reviews classified with the largest confidence to augment the training dataset to retrain the classifier. The CoSpa-U strategy randomly selects unlabeled reviews with a uniform distribution of confidence. Experiments on the spam dataset and the deception dataset demonstrate that both the proposed CoSpa algorithms outperform the traditional SVM with lexical terms and PCFG rules in spam review identification. Moreover, the CoSpa-U strategy outperforms the CoSpa-C strategy when we use the absolute value of decision function of SVM as the confidence.

  6. A unified approach to validation, reliability, and education study design for surgical technical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Robert M; Hananel, David; Lawrenz, Frances

    2010-02-01

    To present modern educational psychology theory and apply these concepts to validity and reliability of surgical skills training and assessment. In a series of cross-disciplinary meetings, we applied a unified approach of behavioral science principles and theory to medical technical skills education given the recent advances in the theories in the field of behavioral psychology and statistics. While validation of the individual simulation tools is important, it is only one piece of a multimodal curriculum that in and of itself deserves examination and study. We propose concurrent validation throughout the design of simulation-based curriculum rather than once it is complete. We embrace the concept that validity and curriculum development are interdependent, ongoing processes that are never truly complete. Individual predictive, construct, content, and face validity aspects should not be considered separately but as interdependent and complementary toward an end application. Such an approach could help guide our acceptance and appropriate application of these exciting new training and assessment tools for technical skills training in medicine.

  7. An integrated approach to endoscopic instrument tracking for augmented reality applications in surgical simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Constantinos; Lahanas, Vasileios; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2013-12-01

    Despite the popular use of virtual and physical reality simulators in laparoscopic training, the educational potential of augmented reality (AR) has not received much attention. A major challenge is the robust tracking and three-dimensional (3D) pose estimation of the endoscopic instrument, which are essential for achieving interaction with the virtual world and for realistic rendering when the virtual scene is occluded by the instrument. In this paper we propose a method that addresses these issues, based solely on visual information obtained from the endoscopic camera. Two different tracking algorithms are combined for estimating the 3D pose of the surgical instrument with respect to the camera. The first tracker creates an adaptive model of a colour strip attached to the distal part of the tool (close to the tip). The second algorithm tracks the endoscopic shaft, using a combined Hough-Kalman approach. The 3D pose is estimated with perspective geometry, using appropriate measurements extracted by the two trackers. The method has been validated on several complex image sequences for its tracking efficiency, pose estimation accuracy and applicability in AR-based training. Using a standard endoscopic camera, the absolute average error of the tip position was 2.5 mm for working distances commonly found in laparoscopic training. The average error of the instrument's angle with respect to the camera plane was approximately 2°. The results are also supplemented by video segments of laparoscopic training tasks performed in a physical and an AR environment. The experiments yielded promising results regarding the potential of applying AR technologies for laparoscopic skills training, based on a computer vision framework. The issue of occlusion handling was adequately addressed. The estimated trajectory of the instruments may also be used for surgical gesture interpretation and assessment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Self-regulatory Behaviors and Approaches to Learning of Arts Students: A Comparison Between Professional Training and English Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-Chen; Chen, Chia-Cheng

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the self-regulatory behaviors of arts students, namely memory strategy, goal-setting, self-evaluation, seeking assistance, environmental structuring, learning responsibility, and planning and organizing. We also explored approaches to learning, including deep approach (DA) and surface approach (SA), in a comparison between students' professional training and English learning. The participants consisted of 344 arts majors. The Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire and the Revised Learning Process Questionnaire were adopted to examine students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. The results show that a positive and significant correlation was found in students' self-regulatory behaviors between professional training and English learning. The results indicated that increases in using self-regulatory behaviors in professional training were associated with increases in applying self-regulatory behaviors in learning English. Seeking assistance, self-evaluation, and planning and organizing were significant predictors for learning English. In addition, arts students used the deep approach more often than the surface approach in both their professional training and English learning. A positive correlation was found in DA, whereas a negative correlation was shown in SA between students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. Students with high self-regulation adopted a deep approach, and they applied the surface approach less in professional training and English learning. In addition, a SEM model confirmed that DA had a positive influence; however, SA had a negative influence on self-regulatory behaviors.

  9. Experiences in the use of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear power plant personnel training. Working material. Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    This document complements two previous IAEA documents: the Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation (IAEA-TRS 380) and the IAEA World Survey of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training. It provides a detailed overview and analysis of the experience gained world-wide on the introduction and use of SAT, including the reasons why SAT was introduced and important lessons learned. The Technical Document will be especially useful for nuclear power plant management and supervisors, all those responsible for the training of nuclear power plant personnel, and those in regulatory bodies whose duties relate to nuclear power plant personnel training and qualification. 41 refs, figs, tabs

  10. Experiences in the use of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear power plant personnel training. Working material. Final draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This document complements two previous IAEA documents: the Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation (IAEA-TRS 380) and the IAEA World Survey of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training. It provides a detailed overview and analysis of the experience gained world-wide on the introduction and use of SAT, including the reasons why SAT was introduced and important lessons learned. The Technical Document will be especially useful for nuclear power plant management and supervisors, all those responsible for the training of nuclear power plant personnel, and those in regulatory bodies whose duties relate to nuclear power plant personnel training and qualification. 41 refs, figs, tabs.

  11. Train-to-Ground communications of a Train Control and Monitoring Systems: A simulation platform modelling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouaziz, Maha; Yan, Ying; Kassab, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    wireless technologies, e.g. Wi-Fi and LTE. Different T2G scenarios are defined in order to evaluate the performances of the Mobile Communication Gateway (managing train communications) and Quality of Services (QoS) offered to TCMS applications in the context of various environments (regular train lines......Under the SAFE4RAIL project, we are developing a simulation platform based on a discrete-events network simulator. This platform models the Train-to-Ground (T2G) link in the framework of a system-level simulation of Train Control Management System (TCMS). The modelled T2G link is based on existing...

  12. Natural training tools of informatics in conditions of embodied and mental approach realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A. Barkhatova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern processes of globalization and informatization of human activity cause the necessity of change of the educational paradigm in the field of information training of a person, focused on the formation of the strong fundamental knowledge and abilities, which are necessary for person’s information activities and self-education during all life.In connection with these requirements, it is necessary to pay attention to new approaches in education, based on achievements of cognitive science and modern pedagogic. One of such approaches is embodied and mental approach. The paper is devoted to the description of a way of realization of embodied and mental approach in training of informatics through application of the natural tools, providing the fullest and deep understanding of the educational material, and development of cognitive abilities of students.In the paper the theoretical analysis of psychology-pedagogical and methodical literature on a research subject is carried out, results are generalized, natural tools are modeled and results of their partial approbation are described. Achievement of necessary quality of education is offered due to the use of modern techniques, focused on the development of cognitive abilities and improvement of quality of the knowledge. In the conditions of information education, the combination of embodied and mental approaches will allow to acquaint students with the essence of the studied subject due to activation of motor area of the memory and the kinesthetic and visual perception channels. The instrument of realization of this idea is offered to use natural tools in informatics, what is actualized by age features of cognitive abilities of students and individual requirements to ways of perception and mastering of the material, matched according to the level of their knowledge.The research results describe the models of natural tools, developed by students and lecturers of the basic Department of Informatics

  13. IAEA world survey on nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Training of personnel is acknowledged to be essential for safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The preparation of this TECDOC was recommended by the IAEA International Working group on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and Qualification and represents a unique compilation of information including all aspects of NPP personnel training from 23 Member States and 129 training organizations. The basic aims of this survey are: to provide a worldwide overview of all aspects of NPP personnel training; to foster both national and international cooperation between organizations involved in nuclear training; to provide the means of exchange of experiences and practices in systematic approach to training (SAT). The survey provides information for each corresponding country on the: national system and organization of training; job positions for which SAT is used; training programmes for key operations, maintenance, instructor and other jobs; role of management and the regulatory body; training facilities; recommended training practices; availability of training personnel from organizations outside the country; and contact points. The three main parts of the publication are the summary, the analysis of training programmes for each job position and the analysis of training resources, and the country reports

  14. INTERVENTIONS IN HUMAN RESOURCE TRAINING FOR COMPETENCIES WITHIN THE INTELLIGENT ORGANIZATIONS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Valecillos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results of a study on interventions for human talent training programs for competency within the Intelligent Organizations focus. The theoretical foundation is supported by Organizational Development and approaches from Senge (1994 , Lewin ( 1946 , Leboyer (2000 and Obeso (2003 . The methodology is embedded in the qualitative - interpretive paradigm and action research. Results showed programs focused on Senge's learning disciplines to to promote change and competence skills that help staff to cope with the challenges and opportunities facing modern business towards organizational intelligence.

  15. Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. E.; Cruz, C.

    2014-11-01

    The ingredients for the highly successful, ongoing educator professional development program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" came into place in 2006 when representatives of public and private organizations convened a two-day workshop at the National Science Foundation (NSF) to explore issues around integrating remote sensing with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) instruction at two-year (community and Tribal) colleges. The results of that 2006 workshop informed the shape of a grant proposal, and two phases of iGETT-RS were funded by NSF's Advanced Technological Education Program (NSF DUE #0703185, 2007-2011, and NSF DUE #1205069, 2012-2015). 76 GIS instructors from all over the country have been served. Each of them has spent 18 months on the project, participating in monthly webinars and two Summer Institutes, and creating their own integrated geospatial exercises for the classroom. The project will be completed in June 2015. As the external evaluator for iGETT expressed it, the impact on participating instructors "can only be described as transformative." This paper describes how iGETT came about, how it was designed and implemented, how it affected participants and their programs, and what has been learned by the project staff about delivering professional development in geospatial technologies for workforce preparedness.

  16. CRM Assessment: Determining the Generalization of Rater Calibration Training. Summary of Research Report: Gold Standards Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David P.

    2002-01-01

    The extent to which pilot instructors are trained to assess crew resource management (CRM) skills accurately during Line-Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) and Line Operational Evaluation (LOE) scenarios is critical. Pilot instructors must make accurate performance ratings to ensure that proper feedback is provided to flight crews and appropriate decisions are made regarding certification to fly the line. Furthermore, the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) requires that instructors be trained explicitly to evaluate both technical and CRM performance (i.e., rater training) and also requires that proficiency and standardization of instructors be verified periodically. To address the critical need for effective pilot instructor training, the American Institutes for Research (AIR) reviewed the relevant research on rater training and, based on "best practices" from this research, developed a new strategy for training pilot instructors to assess crew performance. In addition, we explored new statistical techniques for assessing the effectiveness of pilot instructor training. The results of our research are briefly summarized below. This summary is followed by abstracts of articles and book chapters published under this grant.

  17. The impact of university provided nurse electronic medical record training on health care organizations: an exploratory simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Anderson, James G; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W; Malovec, Shannon; Espejo, Angela; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Training providers appropriately, particularly early in their caregiving careers, is an important aspect of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation. Considerable time and resources are needed to bring the newly hired providers 'up to speed' with the actual use practices of the organization. Similarly, universities lose valuable clinical training hours when students are required to spend those hours learning organization-specific EMR systems in order to participate in care during clinical rotations. Although there are multiple real-world barriers to university/health care organization training partnerships, the investment these entities share in training care providers, specifically nurses, to use and understand EMR technology encourages a question: What would be the cumulative effect of integrating a mutually agreed upon EMR system training program in to nursing classroom training on downstream hospital costs in terms of hours of direct caregiving lost, and benefits in terms of number of overall EMR trained nurses hired? In order to inform the development of a large scale study, we employed a dynamic systems modeling approach to simulate the theoretical relationships between key model variables and determine the possible effect of integrating EMR training into nursing classrooms on hospital outcomes. The analysis indicated that integrating EMR training into the nursing classroom curriculum results in more available time for nurse bedside care. Also, the simulation suggests that efficiency of clinical training can be potentially improved by centralizing EMR training within the nursing curriculum.

  18. MONITORING FIDELITY IN THE ADOLESCENT COMMUNITY REINFORCEMENT APPROACH (A-CRA): THE TRAINING PROCESS FOR A-CRA RATERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Barnes, Brandi; Godley, Susan H

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring evidence-based treatments are delivered with a high degree of fidelity is an important aspect of transporting these practices to community-based treatment providers. Just as training is critical for clinicians who plan to deliver the Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA), a process of training and vetting individuals who assess sessions for fidelity also is critical. This article describes the training process for session raters who assess fidelity of A-CRA during the clinician training and certification process. A-CRA is currently being implemented in 32 independent community-based agencies as part of a large initiative funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

  19. Sustainable transportation : technology, engineering, and science - summer camp instructor's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This document reproduces the instructors guide for a ten day transportation engineering summer camp that was held at the University of Idaho in July 2013. The instructors guide is split into three units: Unit 1: Vehicle Technology, Unit 2: Traf...

  20. Accommodating Oversize and Overweight Loads : Instructor and Student Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This instructor and student guide is designed to guide the instructor in conveying information at the district level concerning Research Project 0-6404 Accommodating Oversize and Overweight Loads. The specific information focuses on the Bryan D...

  1. 14 CFR 61.193 - Flight instructor privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... than Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.193 Flight instructor privileges. A person who...; (e) An aircraft rating; (f) An instrument rating; (g) A flight review, operating privilege, or...

  2. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Santos Coelho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2 Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3 Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4 Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise.

  3. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment approach, training, and technical assistance for DOE contractors. FY 1995 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, S.

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy and its contractors are faced with environmental concerns and large waste management costs. Federal legislation and DOE Orders require sites to develop waste minimization/pollution prevention programs. In response to these requirements, the Kansas City Plant developed a pollution prevention tool called a pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA). Pilot assessments resulted in the development of a graded approach to reduce the amount of effort required for activities that utilized nonhazardous and/or low-volume waste streams. The project`s objectives in FY95 were to validate DOE`s PPOA Graded Approach methodology, provide PPOA training and technical assistance to interested DOE personnel and DOE contractors, enhance the methodology with energy analysis and tools for environmental restoration activities, implement a DOE-wide PPOA database, and provide support to DOE EM-334 in the completion of a report which estimates the future potential for pollution prevention and waste minimization in the DOE complex.

  4. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment approach, training, and technical assistance for DOE contractors. FY 1995 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pemberton, S.

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy and its contractors are faced with environmental concerns and large waste management costs. Federal legislation and DOE Orders require sites to develop waste minimization/pollution prevention programs. In response to these requirements, the Kansas City Plant developed a pollution prevention tool called a pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA). Pilot assessments resulted in the development of a graded approach to reduce the amount of effort required for activities that utilized nonhazardous and/or low-volume waste streams. The project's objectives in FY95 were to validate DOE's PPOA Graded Approach methodology, provide PPOA training and technical assistance to interested DOE personnel and DOE contractors, enhance the methodology with energy analysis and tools for environmental restoration activities, implement a DOE-wide PPOA database, and provide support to DOE EM-334 in the completion of a report which estimates the future potential for pollution prevention and waste minimization in the DOE complex

  5. Train Stop Scheduling in a High-Speed Rail Network by Utilizing a Two-Stage Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiling Fu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the most commonly used methods of scheduling train stops are practical experience and various “one-step” optimal models. These methods face problems of direct transferability and computational complexity when considering a large-scale high-speed rail (HSR network such as the one in China. This paper introduces a two-stage approach for train stop scheduling with a goal of efficiently organizing passenger traffic into a rational train stop pattern combination while retaining features of regularity, connectivity, and rapidity (RCR. Based on a three-level station classification definition, a mixed integer programming model and a train operating tactics descriptive model along with the computing algorithm are developed and presented for the two stages. A real-world numerical example is presented using the Chinese HSR network as the setting. The performance of the train stop schedule and the applicability of the proposed approach are evaluated from the perspective of maintaining RCR.

  6. Políticas de inclusão digital no Brasil: a experiência da formação dos monitores dos telecentros GESAC | Digital inclusion policies in Brazil: the experience of training instructors for "telecenters"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayonara Leal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Este trabalho tem como objetivo avaliar a formação dos monitores de pontos GESAC dentro dos propósitos do projeto de inclusão digital do Ministério das Comunicações, com ênfase na dimensão sócio-cognitiva da formação durante o período do treinamento, assim como os impactos desse programa instrucional nas comunidades locais atendidas pelos telecentros do GESAC. Serão analisadas as bases para a consolidação de uma política de Ciência e Tecnologia, que inclua o cidadão na chamada sociedade informacional, a partir não somente do acesso aos recursos materiais, mas também à formação para estimular a capacidade cognitiva do cidadão usuário do ponto GESAC em lidar com novas ferramentas e linguagens próprias às TIC. As técnicas utilizadas são: análise documental, questionários, entrevistas semi-estruturadas e grupos focais. Palavras-chave TIC; inclusão digital; política pública; pontos Gesac Abstract The main objective of this study was to evaluate the formation process of monitors in the GESAC’s points – the Digital Inclusion Project integrated to the Policy for Science and Technology developed by Ministry of Communications in Brazil. This research emphasized a socio-cognitive dimension in both the training period as well as the evaluation of this instructional program’s impact on the local community. Focus groups were coordinated by us in the local community attended by GESAC's “telecentros". Qualitative data was collected through documental analysis, questionnaries and semi-structured interviews as well. Building a Science & Technology Public Policy in Brazil demands not only promoting access to the material resources but also stimulating citizen participation among GESAC's point users. Including them in the "informational society" means enabling them to understand and handle proper ICT tools and languages. Keywords ICTs; digital inclusion, public policy, Gesac´s points

  7. Instructor Active Empathic Listening and Classroom Incivility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Harry

    2018-01-01

    Instructor listening skill is an understudied area in instructional communication research. This study looks at teachers' active empathic listening behavior association with student incivility. Scholars recognize student incivility as a growing problem and have called for research that identifies classroom behaviors that can affect classroom…

  8. Establish Best Practices for Supervision of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    active participants in the feedback process, allowing them to voice their opinions and collaboratively set goals ( Norris , 1991). In the foreign...language instructional context, instructors may desire to participate in the feedback process ( Norris , 1991). Accordingly, effective instructional...13%) and Russian (11%) were the most commonly reported language offerings, followed by Chinese (9%), French (9%), Portuguese (9%), and Spanish (9

  9. Oral Hygiene. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on oral hygiene. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, additional resources (student handouts), student performance checklists for both…

  10. The Cost of Becoming an Outdoor Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashel, Chris

    This article describes instructor criteria in three outdoor organizations: Outward Bound (OB), the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), and the Wilderness Education Association (WEA). Common requirements for outdoor leadership programs are outdoor experience and skills, advanced first aid, CPR, and a minimum age requirement. Traditionally…

  11. Mathematics: Foundations for Business. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfe, Manfred W.; Bianci-Rossi, Larry

    This is the instructor's guide to a text designed for the contemporary business student who frequently questions the need for studying mathematics. The text material is presented in a "building-block" fashion, with skills learned in earlier chapters organized to provide a smooth transition into more difficult topics. This guide consists…

  12. Sales Simulation Games: Student and Instructor Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuk, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    This study combines the perspective of students (n = 137) and sales instructors (n = 248). It compares how well selling and sales management simulation games, case discussions, and traditional lectures are perceived to conform to the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. The study further compares each method's performance…

  13. Instructor's Guide for Human Development Student Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This instructor's guide is designed for use with an accompanying set of 61 student learning modules on human development. Included among the topics covered in the individual modules are the following: consumer and homemaking education (health and nutrition, personal appearance and grooming, puberty, menstruation, the human reproductive system,…

  14. Motivating Instructors through Innovative Technology and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nicole L.; Barth, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the UWM CETL online and blended faculty development team share innovative technological and pedagogical strategies that they currently utilize to motivate and assist instructors in developing courses for the online or blended environments, and they discuss the lessons learned from incorporating active learning, open content, bring your…

  15. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  16. Online Instructors: Andragogical or Pedagogical Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor C. X.; Kania-Gosche, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the andragogical and pedagogical teaching philosophies of online instructors at the California State University, Long Beach in the Spring Semester of 2010. Drawing from reflective adult education theory, this article proposes a new model for this reflective adult education theory. It is either the helping relationship…

  17. Flipping a Calculus Class: One Instructor's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes one instructor's experiences during a year of flipping four calculus classes. The first exploration attempts to understand student expectations of a math class and their preference towards a flipped classroom. The second examines success of students from a flipped classroom, and the last investigates relationships with student…

  18. Ten Traits of Highly Effective Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanouette, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Bill Gates Foundation has spent as much as a third-world country's income on the following conclusion: one of the primary reasons why students struggle in class and often leave school altogether is instructor ineffectiveness. This may be a slightly painful thing to hear, but, as the saying goes, the truth sometimes hurts. Additionally, the…

  19. Listening Skills. Instructor/Lesson Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Carol; And Others

    This instructor/lesson guide provides instructional materials for a 4-hour course in listening skills in the workplace. Stated objectives are to help students to become more effective listeners, to assist students in obtaining an understanding of how effective they are as listeners, and to assist students in identifying bad listening habits. Two…

  20. Fostering Improved Anatomy and Physiology Instructor Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology…

  1. Grooming. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on grooming. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, an additional resources list, and student completion cards to issue to students as an…

  2. Beat the Instructor: An Introductory Forecasting Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent R.; Eliasson, Janice B.

    2013-01-01

    This teaching brief describes a 30-minute game where student groups compete in-class in an introductory time-series forecasting exercise. The students are challenged to "beat the instructor" who competes using forecasting techniques that will be subsequently taught. All forecasts are graphed prior to revealing the randomly generated…

  3. Electronic Mail and the Writing Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawisher, Gail E.; Moran, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the growing importance of electronic mail among academicians. Offers a rhetoric and a pedagogy that include electronic mail in their fields of vision. Argues that writing instructors should continue to do research into the issues inherent in electronic mail. (HB)

  4. 14 CFR 61.419 - How do I obtain privileges to provide training in an additional category or class of light-sport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... training in an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.419 Section 61.419 Aeronautics and...: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.419 How do I obtain privileges to provide training in an additional category or class of light-sport...

  5. A training approach to improve stepping automaticity while dual-tasking in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiak, Taylor; Watts, Alexander; Meyer, Nicole; Pereira, Fernando V.; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Deficits in motor movement automaticity in Parkinson's disease (PD), especially during multitasking, are early and consistent hallmarks of cognitive function decline, which increases fall risk and reduces quality of life. This study aimed to test the feasibility and potential efficacy of a wearable sensor-enabled technological platform designed for an in-home music-contingent stepping-in-place (SIP) training program to improve step automaticity during dual-tasking (DT). Methods: This was a 4-week prospective intervention pilot study. The intervention uses a sensor system and algorithm that runs off the iPod Touch which calculates step height (SH) in real-time. These measurements were then used to trigger auditory (treatment group, music; control group, radio podcast) playback in real-time through wireless headphones upon maintenance of repeated large amplitude stepping. With small steps or shuffling, auditory playback stops, thus allowing participants to use anticipatory motor control to regain positive feedback. Eleven participants were recruited from an ongoing trial (Trial Number: ISRCTN06023392). Fear of falling (FES-I), general cognitive functioning (MoCA), self-reported freezing of gait (FOG-Q), and DT step automaticity were evaluated. Results: While we found no significant effect of training on FES-I, MoCA, or FOG-Q, we did observe a significant group (music vs podcast) by training interaction in DT step automaticity (Ptraining to increase motor automaticity for people living with PD. The training approach described here can be implemented at home to meet the growing demand for self-management of symptoms by patients. PMID:28151878

  6. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions. PMID:27856550

  7. A unified approach to linking experimental, statistical and computational analysis of spike train data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Meng

    Full Text Available A fundamental issue in neuroscience is how to identify the multiple biophysical mechanisms through which neurons generate observed patterns of spiking activity. In previous work, we proposed a method for linking observed patterns of spiking activity to specific biophysical mechanisms based on a state space modeling framework and a sequential Monte Carlo, or particle filter, estimation algorithm. We have shown, in simulation, that this approach is able to identify a space of simple biophysical models that were consistent with observed spiking data (and included the model that generated the data, but have yet to demonstrate the application of the method to identify realistic currents from real spike train data. Here, we apply the particle filter to spiking data recorded from rat layer V cortical neurons, and correctly identify the dynamics of an slow, intrinsic current. The underlying intrinsic current is successfully identified in four distinct neurons, even though the cells exhibit two distinct classes of spiking activity: regular spiking and bursting. This approach--linking statistical, computational, and experimental neuroscience--provides an effective technique to constrain detailed biophysical models to specific mechanisms consistent with observed spike train data.

  8. Training symmetry of weight distribution after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study comparing task-related reach, Bobath and feedback training approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, M H; Winzeler-Mercay, U; Radwan, S; Lee, L

    2002-09-01

    To determine (1) the most effective of three treatment approaches to retrain seated weight distribution long-term after stroke and (2) whether improvements could be generalized to weight distribution in standing. Inpatient rehabilitation unit. Forty asymmetrical acute stroke subjects were randomly allocated to one of four groups in this pilot study. Changes in weight distribution were compared between the 10 subjects of each of three treatment groups (task-specific reach, Bobath, or Balance Performance Monitor [BPM] feedback training) and a no specific treatment control group. One week of measurement only was followed by two weeks of daily training sessions with the treatment to which the subject was randomly allocated. Measurements were performed using the BPM daily before treatment sessions, two weeks after cessation of treatment and 12 weeks post study. Weight distribution was calculated in terms of mean balance (percentage of total body weight) or the mean of 300 balance points over a 30-s data run. In the short term, the Bobath approach was the most effective treatment for retraining sitting symmetry after stroke (p = 0.004). Training with the BPM and no training were also significant (p = 0.038 and p = 0.035 respectively) and task-specific reach training failed to reach significance (p = 0.26). At 12 weeks post study 83% of the BPM training group, 38% of the task-specific reach group, 29% of the Bobath group and 0% of the untrained group were found to be distributing their weight to both sides. Some generalization of symmetry training in sitting to standing was noted in the BPM training group which appeared to persist long term. Results should be treated with caution due to the small group sizes. However, these preliminary findings suggest that it might be possible to restore postural symmetry in sitting in the early stages of rehabilitation with therapy that focuses on creating an awareness of body position.

  9. Instructor Reputation: An Expectancy Relationship Involving Student Ratings and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Raymond P.

    1979-01-01

    Instructor expressiveness and lecture content were combined with instructor reputation in a 2 X 2 X 2 factorial design to assess interaction effects. Results indicated that reputation interacted with expressiveness but not content, in which students rated positive, high-expressive instructors more favorably than negative, high-expressive…

  10. A Study of Work Engagement among Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gemmy S.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how community college instructors perceive their level of work engagement. Businesses have studied work engagement, but the empirical literature on work engagement of community college instructors has been limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent the type of faculty member (full-time instructor versus…

  11. A Fine Balance: Instructor Self-Disclosure in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Brian M.; Mishna, Faye

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of the instructor's self-disclosure within a classroom. Theoretically, the paper offers a broad relational framework from which we discuss dynamics regarding the instructor's inevitable use of self-disclosure and its impact on the student-instructor relationship and the learning process. Further, we survey the…

  12. Presence and Positioning as Components of Online Instructor Persona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Vanessa Paz

    2007-01-01

    Instructor persona in online discussion may set the tone for a variety of course outcomes. Instructors establish persona via both presence (amount of instructor posts) and position (interaction relative to those in the student role). In this paper, three online classes were studied using positioning theory as a grounding framework to elicit ways…

  13. Instituting Learning-By-Doing Practices in Training Programs for Technical Writers, Usability Testers, and Translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Isohella, Suvi; Mara, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - This workshop focuses on how to implement and grow highly successful and realistic learning-by-doing approaches to teaching and training professional communicators by connecting students from across the globe and across academic language programs. Workshop participants learn the method...... that instructors from the Trans-Atlantic & Pacific Project use when they form students enrolled in technical writing, usability testing, and translation courses into multilingual cross-cultural virtual teams....

  14. Making a Math Teaching Aids of Junior High School Based on Scientific Approach Through an Integrated and Sustainable Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiastuti, E.; Mashuri

    2017-04-01

    Not all of teachers of Mathematics in Junior High School (JHS) can design and create teaching aids. Moreover, if teaching aids should be designed so that it can be used in learning through scientific approaches. The problem: How to conduct an integrated and sustainable training that the math teacher of JHS, especially in Semarang can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach? The purpose of this study to find a way of integrated and continuous training so that the math teacher of JHS can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach. This article was based on research with a qualitative approach. Through trials activities of resulting of training model, Focus Group Discussions (FGD), interviews, and triangulation of the results of the research were: (1) Produced a training model of integrated and sustainable that the mathematics teacher of JHS can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach. (2) In training, there was the provision of material and workshop (3) There was a mentoring in the classroom. (4) Sustainability of the consultation. Our advice: (1) the trainer should be clever, (2) the training can be held at the holidays, while the assistance during the holiday season was over.

  15. Development of a competencies profile for the inspector of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities using the systematic approach to training(SAT) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sung Mok; Kim, Byung Sun; Kim, Yang Hee; Kim, Wang Kyun; Myung, Chang Yeon; Min, Kung Han

    2005-12-01

    The information of the basis for the training program development is needed to ensure whether the training regulation and the training program is appropriate. These objective information should be developed through the systematic approach to training (SAT). But, KINS does not have the training program development system and the basic information system yet. Through this project, we have established the education and training program development system that is applied by the Developing A Curriculum (DACUM) method

  16. Developing an understanding of research-based nursing pedagogy among clinical instructors: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakari, Nazik M A; Hamadi, Hanadi Y; Salem, Olfat

    2014-11-01

    Effective instruction is imperative to the learning process of clinical nursing instructors. Faculty members are required to provide high-quality teaching and training by using new ways of teaching pedagogical methods to clinical instructors, which have transformed pedagogies from an exclusive clinical model to a holistic model. The purpose of this study was to explore clinical instructors' use of planning, implementation, feedback loops, and reflection frameworks to apply research-based teaching and to examine the pedagogy used during field experience. Data for the qualitative study were obtained from twenty purposefully sampled clinical teachers (n=20) via lists of questioned instructional practices and discussions, semi-structured interviews, observational notes, field notes, and written reflections. Data were analyzed by using a triangulation method to ensure trustworthiness, credibility, and reliability. Three main themes emerged regarding the use of research-based teaching strategies: the need for learning about research-based pedagogy, support mechanisms to implement innovative teaching strategies, and transitioning from nursing student to nursing clinical instructors. It has been well documented that the nursing profession faces a serious shortage of nursing faculty, impacting the quality of clinical teaching. Developing clinical instructor programs to give students opportunities to select instructor pathways, focusing on knowledge promoting critical thinking and life-long professional development, is essential. Nursing colleges must collaborate by using a partnership model to achieve competency in planning, implementation, feedback loops, and reflection. Applying research-based clinical teaching requires the development of programs that integrate low-fidelity simulation and assisted instruction through the use of computers in Nursing Colleges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Training effectiveness vs. cost effectiveness: The next millennium challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of the new millennium and energy deregulation, organizations will be challenged to be cost competitive and profitable. Deregulation in the US energy industry will force utilities and, more specifically, commercial nuclear power production to unprecedented cost control measures. It will also renew the fires of debate about costs vs. safety. With personnel costs being the single largest expenditure for most organizations management will be faced with constant dilemmas of competition for scarce resources. Salaries, benefits and training costs will be under greater scrutiny. Training resources and programs will face increased pressure to be job related, based on conservative requirements and more cost effective than in the past. For nearly two decades the US National Academy for Nuclear Training (NANT) has developed and used industry-wide accreditation and evaluation standards based on the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). This process assures that existing and emerging technical training is constantly reviewed and evaluated against standardized criteria to assure job relatedness and enhanced job performance. The process also requires management to approve, actively participate in and support the training of NPP personnel. Instructors must be highly skilled and well trained in the SAT process and various instructional strategies. The SAT process is grounded in five interlocking keystone steps; Analysis - Design - Development - Implementation - Evaluation (ADDIE). Evaluation of training is often said to be the most crucial and most difficult step. Here is where an organization determines if the training is effective and meeting the legitimate needs of all of the stakeholders. This QA/QC aspect of training must be an ongoing process involving management, instructors and the students. It is only through the discipline of an SAT based evaluation process that an organization can truly determine if the training is efficient, effective, cost effective and

  18. Gender Integration in Basic Training: The Services Are Using a Variety of Approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...) the extent to which the services have gender integrated basic training and (2) the performance of men and women in gender integrated basic training compared with that of men and women whose training is segregated...

  19. A view on ''On-the-Job Training'' in the central and eastern European countries, Russia and Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffrennes, M.

    1996-01-01

    The G-24 Training Working Group visited the Central and Eastern European Countries (CEESs), Russia and Ukraine in the course of 1993/94, in order to define priorities for further financial support by the Donor Countries. As a result, it appeared that Nuclear Training needed strong improvements since it is mainly based on OJT (On the Job Training), not SAT (Systematic Approach to Training) oriented and relying essentially on the line supervisor of the trainee. Recommendations were provided to support a SAT based approach development and to provide adequate equipment. In view of the importance of OJT in the training courses, and that probably for some more years, a specific effort should be made in better defining the goals and objectives of the OJT and its coherent integration in the overall training system. In addition, the OJT ''instructors'' have to be trained in the specific teaching skills required to successfully run OJT. (author). 3 figs

  20. Experiential Learning Approach for Training Pre-Service Teachers in Environmental Science Using Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, D. C.; Nair, U. S.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of complex environmental problems, it is desirable to enhance public awareness of environmental issues. In response to this challenge, environmental education is an integral part of curriculum at all levels of education, including teacher education. However, it is often criticized for being reductionist and empirical and thus not optimal for training next generation of students who are expected to formulate solutions to complex, interdisciplinary environmental issues. Experiential learning is better suited for such training. It create a connection between the learner and the content by involving the students in reflection on their experiences. It is very appropriate in teacher education where students carry their own unique experiences into the learning environment. This study will report on the use of mobile application, based on the Open Data Kit (ODK), along with the Google Earth Engine (GEE) to implement experiential learning approach for teacher education in Kerala, India. The specific topic considered is land use and land cover change due to human activity. The approach will involve students using Android mobile application to collect a sample of geo-locations for different land cover types. This data will be used to classify satellite imagery and understand how their neighborhoods have changed over the years. The present study will also report on evaluation of effectiveness of the developed Mobile Application as a tool for experiential learning of Environmental Education. The study uses an experimental method with mixed methods-one group Pretest-Posttest design. The sample for the study consists of 300 Pre-service teachers of Kerala, India. The data collected is analyzed using paired t tests. Qualitative feedback about the Mobile Application through focus group interviews is also collected. Implementation of the experiential learning algorithm and analysis of data collected for evaluation of the learning approach will also be presented.

  1. Trainer Instruction for the Aircrew Coordination Exportable Training Package

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pawlik, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    ...) to field the Aircrew Coordination Exportable Training Package. USARIARDA and Dynamics Research Corporation prepared and conducted a 12-day, modified Aircrew Coordination Instructor Course and provided post-training consultation to the cadre...

  2. MITT writer and MITT writer advanced development: Developing authoring and training systems for complex technical domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederholt, Bradley J.; Browning, Elica J.; Norton, Jeffrey E.; Johnson, William B.

    1991-01-01

    MITT Writer is a software system for developing computer based training for complex technical domains. A training system produced by MITT Writer allows a student to learn and practice troubleshooting and diagnostic skills. The MITT (Microcomputer Intelligence for Technical Training) architecture is a reasonable approach to simulation based diagnostic training. MITT delivers training on available computing equipment, delivers challenging training and simulation scenarios, and has economical development and maintenance costs. A 15 month effort was undertaken in which the MITT Writer system was developed. A workshop was also conducted to train instructors in how to use MITT Writer. Earlier versions were used to develop an Intelligent Tutoring System for troubleshooting the Minuteman Missile Message Processing System.

  3. A Flipped Classroom Approach to Improving the Quality of Delirium Care Using an Interprofessional Train-the-Trainer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; James, Sandra-Li; Sinyi, Rebecca; Carroll, Aideen; Laidlaw, Jennifer; Yanofsky, Richard; Sheehan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Given the prevalence and morbidity associated with delirium, there is a need for effective and efficient institutional approaches to delirium training in health care settings. Novel education methods, specifically the "flipped classroom" (FC) and "train-the-trainer" (TTT), have the potential to address these delirium training gaps. This study evaluates the effect of a TTT FC interprofessional delirium training program on participants' perceived ability to manage delirium, delirium knowledge, and clinicians' delirium assessment behaviors. FC Delirium TTT sessions were implemented in a large four-hospital network and consisted of presession online work and a 3-hour in-session component. The 156 TTT interprofessional participants who attended the sessions (ie, trainers) were expected to then deliver delirium training to their patient care units. Delirium care self-efficacy and knowledge test scores were measured before, after, and 6 months after the training session. Clinician delirium assessment rates were measured by chart audits before and 3 months after trainer's implementation of delirium training sessions. Delirium knowledge test scores (7.8 ± 1.6 versus 9.7 ± 1.2, P approach can improve participants' perceived delirium care skills and confidence, and delirium knowledge up to 6 months after the session. This approach provides a model for implementing hospitalwide delirium education that can change delirium assessment behavior while minimizing time and personnel requirements.

  4. Training and qualification of nuclear power plant operators (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Training center using the simulators, instructor training, training upgrade, deployment of digital control panel and review of training were described with overseas practice. Recently, nuclear power plant on-site simulators were also used for respective operator training. Operator teamwork training, training team performance upgrade, reflection of operating experiences in nuclear power plant accidents, development of training support equipments and management of training records were needed to review and upgrade training and qualification programs. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Engineering and training simulators: A combined approach for nuclear plant construction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnois, Olivier; Gain, Pascal; Bartak, Jan; Gathmann, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Simulation technologies have always been widely used on nuclear applications, but with a clear division between engineering application, using highly validated code run in batch mode, and training purpose where real time computation is a mandatory requirement. Thanks to the flexibility of modern simulation technology and the increased performance of computers, it becomes now possible to develop Nuclear Power plant simulators that can be used both for engineering and training purposes. In the last years, the revival of nuclear industry raised a number of new construction or plant finishing projects in which the application of this combined approach would result in decisive improvement on plant construction lead times, better project control and cost optimizations. The simulator development is to be executed in a step-wise approach, scheduled in parallel with the plant design and construction phases. During a first step, the simulator will model the plant nuclear island systems plus the corresponding instrumentation and control, specific malfunctions and local commands. It can then be used for engineering activities defining and validating the plant operating strategies in case of incidents or accidents. The Simulator executive Station and Operator Station will be in prototype version with an interface imagery enabling monitoring and control of the simulator. Availability of such simulation platform leads to a significant increase in efficiency of the engineering works, the possibility to validate basic design hypotheses and detect defects and conflicts early. The second phase will consist in the fully detailed simulation of Main Control Room plant supervision and control MMI, taking into account I and C control loops detailed design improvement, while having sufficient fidelity in order to be suitable for the future operator training. Its use will enable the engineering units not only to specify and validate normal, incident and accident detailed plant

  6. Promoting human subjects training for place-based communities and cultural groups in environmental research: curriculum approaches for graduate student/faculty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Dianne

    2015-02-01

    A collaborative team of environmental sociologists, community psychologists, religious studies scholars, environmental studies/science researchers and engineers has been working together to design and implement new training in research ethics, culture and community-based approaches for place-based communities and cultural groups. The training is designed for short and semester-long graduate courses at several universities in the northeastern US. The team received a 3 year grant from the US National Science Foundation's Ethics Education in Science and Engineering in 2010. This manuscript details the curriculum topics developed that incorporate ethical principles, particularly for group protections/benefits within the field practices of environmental/engineering researchers.

  7. Implementation of digital safety related I and C systems at nuclear power plants. A systematic approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedig, Peter; Schoenfelder, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In the past, refurbishment or modernization projects at nuclear power plants (NPP) dealing with the AREVA product for safety related digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, i.e. TELEPERM registered XS (TXS), regularly led to the development and implementation of different project specific training courses. They mostly dealt with a basic introduction to TELEPERM registered XS, as well as project specific engineering of TELEPERM registered XS and maintenance of the TELEPERM registered XS system supplied with the project. However, it gradually emerged that diverse training needs of different personnel involved in refurbishment or modernization projects as well as in new build projects had to be considered in more detail. Additionally, each target group, e.g. project managers, project engineers, technical engineers, commissioning engineers, operating and maintenance personnel, will have to work with TELEPERM registered XS at different phases within a project. Consequently, it became necessary to take into account the diverse training and project needs. According to the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) process as developed and promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a job and task analysis was performed. After identification of related training needs and redesigning as well as modification or development of appropriate training material, a comprehensive, standardized TELEPERM registered XS training offer is now available at the AREVA Reactor Training Center. This training offer can be easily adapted to project or customer specific requirements. (orig.)

  8. Development and implementation of a clinical pathway approach to simulation-based training for foregut surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Kiyoyuki W; Buchholz, Joseph; LaMarra, Denise; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary demands on resident education call for integration of simulation. We designed and implemented a simulation-based curriculum for Post Graduate Year 1 surgery residents to teach technical and nontechnical skills within a clinical pathway approach for a foregut surgery patient, from outpatient visit through surgery and postoperative follow-up. The 3-day curriculum for groups of 6 residents comprises a combination of standardized patient encounters, didactic sessions, and hands-on training. The curriculum is underpinned by a summative simulation "pathway" repeated on days 1 and 3. The "pathway" is a series of simulated preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative encounters in following up a single patient through a disease process. The resident sees a standardized patient in the clinic presenting with distal gastric cancer and then enters an operating room to perform a gastrojejunostomy on a porcine tissue model. Finally, the resident engages in a simulated postoperative visit. All encounters are rated by faculty members and the residents themselves, using standardized assessment forms endorsed by the American Board of Surgery. A total of 18 first-year residents underwent this curriculum. Faculty ratings of overall operative performance significantly improved following the 3-day module. Ratings of preoperative and postoperative performance were not significantly changed in 3 days. Resident self-ratings significantly improved for all encounters assessed, as did reported confidence in meeting the defined learning objectives. Conventional surgical simulation training focuses on technical skills in isolation. Our novel "pathway" curriculum targets an important gap in training methodologies by placing both technical and nontechnical skills in their clinical context as part of managing a surgical patient. Results indicate consistent improvements in assessments of performance as well as confidence and support its continued usage to educate surgery residents

  9. Creating Entrustable Professional Activities to Assess Internal Medicine Residents in Training: A Mixed-Methods Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David R; Park, Yoon Soo; Smith, Christopher A; Karpinski, Jolanta; Coke, William; Tekian, Ara

    2018-05-15

    Competency-based medical education has not advanced residency training as much as many observers expected. Some medical educators now advocate reorienting competency-based approaches to focus on a resident's ability to do authentic clinical work. To develop descriptions of clinical work for which internal medicine residents must gain proficiency to deliver meaningful patient care (for example, "Admit and manage a medical inpatient with a new acute problem"). A modified Delphi process involving clinical experts followed by a conference of educational experts. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. In phase 1 of the project, members of the Specialty Committee for Internal Medicine participated in a modified Delphi process to identify activities in internal medicine that represent the scope of the specialty. In phase 2 of the project, 5 experts who were scholars and leaders in competency-based medical education reviewed the results. Phase 1 identified important activities, revised descriptions to improve accuracy and avoid overlap, and assigned activities to stages of training. Phase 2 compared proposed activity descriptions with published guidelines for their development and application in medical education. The project identified 29 activities that qualify as entrustable professional activities. The project also produced a detailed description of each activity and guidelines for using them to assess residents. These activities reflect the practice patterns of the developers and may not fully represent internal medicine practice in Canada. Identification of these activities is expected to facilitate modification of training and assessment programs for medical residents so that programs focus less on isolated skills and more on integrated tasks. Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization Endowed Scholarship and Education Fund and Queen's University Department of Medicine Innovation Fund.

  10. Device 2F112 (F-14A WST (Weapon System Trainers)) Instructor Console Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    irdividuals adequately trained in the use of a particular trainer. ’S G. L. RICARD Scientific Officer 9., - 5 * NAVTRAEQUIPCEN 81-M-1121-1 TABLE OF...through verbal comunication with the instructors at the console. Several problems exist in the use of the flyout mismatch page. a. The automatic display...Washington, DC 20350 Washington, DC 20301 Chief of Naval Operations Commanding Officer OP-596C Air Force Office of Scientific Washington, DC 20350

  11. Preparing mental health professionals for new directions in mental health practice: Evaluating the sensory approaches e-learning training package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela; Yeates, Harriet; Greaves, Amanda; Taylor, Michelle; Slattery, Maddy; Charters, Michelle; Hill, Melissa

    2018-02-01

    The application of sensory modulation approaches in mental health settings is growing in recognition internationally. However, a number of barriers have been identified as limiting the implementation of the approach, including workplace culture and a lack of accessible and effective sensory approaches training. The aim of this project was to investigate the efficacy of providing this training through a custom-designed e-learning package. Participants in the present study were predominately nurses and occupational therapists working in mental health settings in Queensland, Australia. Data were collected from 121 participants using an online survey. Significant improvements were found between pre- and post-training in participants' real and perceived levels of knowledge, their perceived levels of confidence, and their attitudes towards using sensory modulation approaches in mental health settings. The findings of the study suggest that the custom-designed sensory approaches e-learning package is an effective, accessible, acceptable, and usable method to train health professionals in sensory modulation approaches. As this study is the first to analyse the efficacy of an e-learning sensory approaches package, the results are considered preliminary, and further investigation is required. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Engagement in Training as a Mechanism to Understanding Fidelity of Implementation of the Responsive Classroom Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, Shannon B; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Abry, Tashia; Larsen, Ross A; Patton, Christine L

    2015-11-01

    Fidelity of implementation of classroom interventions varies greatly, a reality that is concerning because higher fidelity of implementation relates to greater effectiveness of the intervention. We analyzed 126 fourth and fifth grade teachers from the treatment group of a randomized controlled trial of the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach. Prior to training in the intervention, we assessed factors that had the potential to represent a teacher's readiness to implement with fidelity. These included teachers' observed emotional support, teacher-rated use of intervention practices, teacher-rated self-efficacy, teacher-rated collective responsibility, education level, and years of experience, and they were not directly related to observed fidelity of implementation 2 years later. Further analyses indicated, however, that RC trainers' ratings of teachers' engagement in the initial weeklong RC training mediated the relation between initial observed emotional support and later observed fidelity of implementation. We discuss these findings as a way to advance understanding of teachers' readiness to implement new interventions with fidelity.

  13. The Regional-Matrix Approach to the Training of Highly Qualified Personnel for the Sustainable Development of the Mining Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernov, Evgeny; Nehoda, Evgenia

    2017-11-01

    The state, regional and industry approaches to the problem of personnel training for building an innovative knowledge economy at all levels that ensures sustainable development of the region are analyzed in the article using the cases of the Kemerovo region and the coal industry. A new regional-matrix approach to the training of highly qualified personnel is proposed, which allows to link the training systems with the regional economic matrix "natural resources - cognitive resources" developed by the author. A special feature of the new approach is the consideration of objective conditions and contradictions of regional systems of personnel training, which have formed as part of economic systems of regions differ-entiated in the matrix. The methodology of the research is based on the statement about the interconnectivity of general and local knowledge, from which the understanding of the need for a combination of regional, indus-try and state approaches to personnel training is derived. A new form of representing such a combination is the proposed approach, which is based on matrix analysis. The results of the research can be implemented in the practice of modernization of professional education of workers in the coal industry of the natural resources extractive region.

  14. How Organisations Are Using Blended E-Learning to Deliver More Flexible Approaches to Trade Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Victor James; Johnston, Margaret Alison; Poulsen, Alison Louise

    2015-01-01

    Training organisations are being asked to respond to the growing levels of diversity around the contexts for training and to examine a wider range of training solutions than in the past. This research investigates how training organisations in Australia are using blended forms of e-learning to provide more responsive, flexible and innovative…

  15. Exploring the experiences of novice clinical instructors in physical therapy clinical education: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, B H; Bridges, P H; Phillips, T A; Drill, A N; Gaydosik, C D; Krishnan, A; Yandziak, H J

    2014-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of novice physical therapy clinical instructors (CIs) about their interactions and teaching behaviours with physical therapy students. A phenomenological approach using semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Six novice physical therapy CIs (less than two years as a CI and supervised fewer than three students) were recruited purposefully from a large metropolitan area in the USA. All participants were credentialed by the American Physical Therapy Association as CIs. Transcripts of interview data and focus group data were analysed using interpretative analysis for themes and subthemes. Participants viewed the transition of students from the classroom to the clinic as their primary role, using strategies of 'providing a way in', 'fostering critical thinking', 'finding a balance', 'overcoming barriers' and 'letting go'. While novice CIs showed skill in fostering student reflection and providing orientation, they struggled with student autonomy and balancing the competing obligations of patient care and clinical instruction. They expressed issues related to anxiety and lack of confidence. In the future, novice CIs could benefit from training and support in these areas. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Constructing an Ethical Training for Advanced Nursing Practice: An Interactionist and Competency-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariseau-Legault, Pierre; Lallier, Melisa

    2016-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses are working in a highly interdisciplinary and political context. Such situations can influence the deliberative and ethical decision-making processes in which they are also involved. This can subsequently compromise their abilities to protect their moral integrity, to find innovative and nondualistic solutions to complex ethical problems, and to collaborate with other health professionals. The authors constructed a training program inspired by discourse and narrative ethics. The objective pursued was to develop advanced practice nurses' moral integrity, highlight the ethical component of their clinical judgement, and foster the development of their deliberative competencies. The pedagogical process proposed exposes how an ethical curriculum adapted to the context in which advanced practice nurses evolve can address power relationships inherent in ethical decision making. The authors suggest that this pedagogical approach has the potential to optimize the consolidation of ethical, reflective, and deliberative competencies among advanced practice nurses. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(7):399-402.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Process waste assessment approach, training and technical assistance for DOE contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pemberton, S.

    1994-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors are faced with a large waste management problem as are other industries. One of the tools used in a successful waste minimization pollution prevention (WMin/P2) program is a process waste assessment (PWA). The purpose of this project was to share the Kansas City Plant's (KCP's) PWA expertise with other DOE personnel and DOE contractors. This consisted of two major activities: (1) The KCP's PWA graded approach methodology was modified with the assistance of DOE/Defense Program's laboratories, and (2) PWA training and technical assistance were provided to interested DOE personnel and DOE contractors. This report documents the FY93 efforts, lesson learned, and future plans for both PWA-related activities

  18. An Integrated Approach to Change the Outcome Part II: Targeted Neuromuscular Training Techniques to Reduce Identified ACL Injury Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Brent, Jensen L.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Prior reports indicate that female athletes who demonstrate high knee abduction moments (KAMs) during landing are more responsive to neuromuscular training designed to reduce KAM. Identification of female athletes who demonstrate high KAM, which accurately identifies those at risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, may be ideal for targeted neuromuscular training. Specific neuromuscular training targeted to the underlying biomechanical components that increase KAM may provide the most efficient and effective training strategy to reduce noncontact ACL injury risk. The purpose of the current commentary is to provide an integrative approach to identify and target mechanistic underpinnings to increased ACL injury in female athletes. Specific neuromuscular training techniques will be presented that address individual algorithm components related to high knee load landing patterns. If these integrated techniques are employed on a widespread basis, prevention strategies for noncontact ACL injury among young female athletes may prove both more effective and efficient. PMID:22580980

  19. Comparative Assessment of Three Approaches of Teaching Nonmedically Trained Persons in the Handling of Supraglottic Airways: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Mario; Schmidbauer, Willi; Benker, Michael; Schmieder, Paula; Kerner, Thoralf

    2017-03-01

    The use of supraglottic airways has been recommended in combat trauma airway management. To ensure an adequate airway management on the battlefield, suitable training concepts are sought to efficiently teach as many soldiers as possible. Our aim was to compare three approaches of teaching laypersons in the handling of supraglottic airways in a mannequin model. In this prospective randomized blinded study, 285 military service men without any medical background were divided into three groups and trained in the use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme (LMA) and the Laryngeal Tube Disposable (LT-D). The first group received a theoretical lecture, the second group was shown an instruction video, and the third group underwent a practical training. Immediately after instruction participants were asked to place the supraglottic airway and ventilate the mannequin within 60 seconds. The entire test was repeated 3 months later. Test results were evaluated with regard to success rate, insertion time, ability to judge the correct placement, and degree of difficulty. Practical training showed the highest success rate when placing supraglottic airways immediately after the instruction (lecture: 68%, video: 74%, training: 94%); (training vs. lecture and training vs. video, p training: 78%); (training vs. lecture, p = 0.019 and training vs. video, p = 0.025). Immediately after the instruction practical training was also superior in terms of insertion time, ability to judge the correct placement, and the self-rated degree of difficulty (p place a supraglottic airway immediately following minimal instruction and after 3 months as well. Study participants achieved the best results after practical training followed by video presentation and finally lecture regardless of the airway device used. There are two possible reasons why practical training is the superior method. Firstly, the success is tied to more time spent with the learners. Secondly, practical training seems to be the best

  20. Improvement of the First Training for Baccalaureate Nursing Students –A Mutual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadizaker, Marziyeh; Abedsaeedi, Zhila; Abedi, Heidarali; Alijanirenani, Hooshang; Moradi, Mehrnaz; Jahani, Simin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Examination of problems and application of strategies appropriate for clinical education and learning, especially nursing clinical principles and skills internship can improve educational process and satisfaction of nursing students. The aim of the current study was to revise the current status of the fundamentals of nursing course and implement an improvement plan (2012-2014). Participants & Methods: The present study reports the three rounds of a participatory action-research study with a mutual cooperation approach and focus group discussion, with participation of 104 stakeholders. Content analysis approach was used to analyze the data obtained in focus discussion interviews. In addition, evaluation and reflection were done during the operating rounds, with the participation of all members, including students, were involved. This research program was approved by Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran-capital of Iran, at the Research Deputy of Nursing and Midwifery School and ethics committee of the university. Results: The findings of qualitative study detected Lack of consistency in planning and implementation of curriculum, inadequate intra/extra-organizational communication management, inadequate student understanding of situation, improper control of restrictors and improper use of facilitators in teaching and in clinical setting, were among major challenges in clinical skills and principles internship process in the context of this study. Educational decision-making authorities of the School developed an operational program within national curriculum framework through cooperation and reflection in clinical skills and principles training program. Conclusion: Planning Fundamentals of Nursing training in partnership with all those involved in practice and education, together with students involved can be effective in reducing educational failures, gap between theory and practice, and in students’ accountability and satisfaction